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Sample records for plankton increase particle

  1. The cross-shore distribution of plankton and particles southwest of Iceland observed with a Video Plankton Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, Astthor; Logemann, Kai; Marteinsdottir, Gudrun

    2016-07-01

    The high resolution distribution of plankton and particles along a transect extending from the coast and across the shelf southwest of Iceland was studied in relation to hydrographic features and chlorophyll a fluorescence in late May 2010-2013 with a Video Plankton Recorder. The different groups of plankton and particles showed distinctive distributional pattern. Decaying organic matter (marine snow) was a very significant component of the system. Calanus finmarchicus stayed generally shallower than egg carrying Pseudocalanus spp. Diel variability in depth distribution of C. finmarchicus was not evident. Ctenophores, jellies and fish larvae were most abundant above ~50 m depth. Ctenophores were relatively abundant across the whole transect, while jellies and fish larvae were mainly seen on the landward half of the transect. The data on distribution of copepods (mainly C. finmarchicus) were combined with the results of a numerical circulation model (CODE), thus obtaining an estimate of fluxes of copepods in the area. The results show that C. finmarchicus may be transported by currents both eastwards and westwards along the south coast, while retention on the bank is also possible. Based on the results of the synthesis of the distributional data and the CODE model, it is hypothesized that the populations off the south coast are at least partly self-sustained in the region.

  2. Assessing Plankton and Particles with an Autonomous Imaging LOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Artemia , provided by the Hubbs Research Institute, were introduced. Images of these zooplankton, acquired in April 2008 in the SIO pier flume, are shown...long), and an Artemia (~ 0.8 mm long).] 3 Laser Optical Plankton Counter The final operational software was

  3. CO2 increases 14C primary production in an Arctic plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Engel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Responses to ocean acidification in plankton communities were studied during a CO2-enrichment experiment in the Arctic Ocean, accomplished from June to July 2010 in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (78°56′ 2′′ N, 11°53′ 6′′ E. Enclosed in 9 mesocosms (volume: 43.9–47.6 m3, plankton was exposed to CO2 concentrations, ranging from glacial to projected mid-next-century levels. Fertilization with inorganic nutrients at day 13 of the experiment supported the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass, as indicated by two periods of high chl a concentration. This study tested for CO2 sensitivities in primary production (PP of particulate organic carbon (PPPOC and of dissolved organic carbon (PPDOC. Therefore, 14C-bottle incubations (24 h of mesocosm samples were performed at 1 m depth receiving about 60% of incoming radiation. PP for all mesocosms averaged 8.06 ± 3.64 μmol C L−1 d−1 and was slightly higher than in the outside fjord system. Comparison between mesocosms revealed significantly higher PPPOC at elevated compared to low pCO2 after nutrient addition. PPDOC was significantly higher in CO2-enriched mesocosms before as well as after nutrient addition, suggesting that CO2 had a direct influence on DOC production. DOC concentrations inside the mesocosms increased before nutrient addition and more in high CO2 mesocosms. After addition of nutrients, however, further DOC accumulation was negligible and not significantly different between treatments, indicating rapid utilization of freshly produced DOC. Bacterial biomass production (BP was coupled to PP in all treatments, indicating that 3.5 ± 1.9% of PP or 21.6 ± 12.5% of PPDOC provided on average sufficient carbon for synthesis of bacterial biomass. During the later course of the bloom, the response of 14C-based PP rates to CO2 enrichment differed from net community production (NCP rates that were also determined during this mesocosm campaign. We conclude that the enhanced release of

  4. CO2 increases 14C-primary production in an Arctic plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bellerby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Responses to ocean acidification in plankton communities were studied during a CO2-enrichment experiment in the Arctic Ocean, accomplished from June to July 2010 in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (78°56, 2' N, 11°53, 6' E. Enclosed in 9 mesocosms (volume: 43.9–47.6 m3, plankton was exposed to CO2 concentrations, ranging from glacial to projected mid-next-century levels. Fertilization with inorganic nutrients at day 13 of the experiment supported the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass, as indicated by two periods of high Chl a concentration. This study tested for CO2 sensitivities in primary production (PP of particulate organic carbon (PPPOC and of dissolved organic carbon (PPDOC. Therefore, 14C-bottle incubations (24 h of mesocosm samples were performed at 1 m depth receiving about 60% of incoming radiation. PP for all mesocosms averaged 8.06 ± 3.64 μmol C l−1 d−1 and was slightly higher than in the outside fjord system. Comparison between mesocosms revealed significantly higher PPPOC at elevated compared to low pCO2 after nutrient addition. PPDOC was significantly higher in CO2 enriched mesocosms before as well as after nutrient addition, suggesting that CO2 had a direct influence on DOC production. DOC concentrations inside the mesocosms increased before nutrient addition and more in high CO2 mesocosms. After addition of nutrients, however, further DOC accumulation was negligible and not significantly different between treatments, indicating rapid utilization of freshly produced DOC. Bacterial biomass production (BP was coupled to PP in all treatments, indicating that 3.5 ± 1.9% of PP, or 21.6 ± 12.5% of PPDOC provided sufficient carbon for synthesis of bacterial biomass. The response of 14C-based PP rates to CO2 enrichment was at odds with O2-based net community production (NCP rates that were also determined during this study, albeit at lower light level. We conclude that the enhanced release of labile DOC during autotrophic

  5. Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Inputs from Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents Increase Responses of Planktonic Metabolic Rates to Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Conley, Daniel J; Muthusamy, Saraladevi; Lindh, Markus V; Pinhassi, Jarone; Kritzberg, Emma S

    2015-10-06

    Increased anthropogenic pressures on coastal marine ecosystems in the last century are threatening their biodiversity and functioning. Global warming and increases in nutrient loadings are two major stressors affecting these systems. Global warming is expected to increase both atmospheric and water temperatures and increase precipitation and terrestrial runoff, further increasing organic matter and nutrient inputs to coastal areas. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations frequently exceed those of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in aquatic systems. Many components of the DON pool have been shown to supply nitrogen nutrition to phytoplankton and bacteria. Predictions of how global warming and eutrophication will affect metabolic rates and dissolved oxygen dynamics in the future are needed to elucidate their impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Here, we experimentally determine the effects of simultaneous DON additions and warming on planktonic community metabolism in the Baltic Sea, the largest coastal area suffering from eutrophication-driven hypoxia. Both bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic rates changed in relation to temperature. DON additions from wastewater treatment plant effluents significantly increased the activation energies for community respiration and gross primary production. Activation energies for community respiration were higher than those for gross primary production. Results support the prediction that warming of the Baltic Sea will enhance planktonic respiration rates faster than it will for planktonic primary production. Higher increases in respiration rates than in production may lead to the depletion of the oxygen pool, further aggravating hypoxia in the Baltic Sea.

  6. Long-term trends in ocean plankton production and particle export between 1960–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Laufkötter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyse long-term trends in marine primary and particle export production and their link to marine phytoplankton community composition over the period 1950–2006 using a hindcast simulation of the ocean component of the Community Climate System Model to which the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling Model had been coupled. In our simulation, global primary and export production decreased by 6% and 7%, respectively over the last 50 yr. These changes go along with a 8% decrease in small phytoplankton biomass and 5% decrease in zooplankton biomass. Diatom biomass decreases by 3% with strong temporal and spatial variability. Strongest decreases in primary and export production occured in the Western Pacific, where increased stratification leads to a decrease in total phytoplankton and a decrease in diatom fraction. This causes decreases in zooplankton biomass and a lower export efficiency. Strong phytoplankton composition changes occur in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic, where increased wind stress leads to stronger mixing, which reduces the biomass of small phytoplankton, while diatoms profit from higher nutrient inputs and lower grazing pressure. The relative fraction of diatoms correlates positively with the export efficiency (r = 0.8 in most areas except the Northern Pacific and Antarctic Circumpolar Current, where the correlation is negative (r = −0.5. However, long-term trends in global export efficiency are ultimately driven by decreases in small phytoplankton and consequent decreases in coccolithophore biomass.

  7. Effect of increased pCO2 on the planktonic metabolic balance during a mesocosm experiment in an Arctic fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Gattuso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the balance between gross community production (GCP and community respiration (CR (i.e., net community production, NCP of plankton communities was investigated in summer 2010 in Kongsfjorden, west of Svalbard. Surface water, which was characterized by low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and chlorophyll a (a proxy of phytoplankton biomass, was enclosed in nine mesocosms and subjected to eight pCO2 levels (two replicated controls and seven enhanced pCO2 treatments for one month. Nutrients were added to all mesocosms on day 13 of the experiment, and thereafter increase of chlorophyll a was provoked in all mesocosms. No clear trend in response to increasing pCO2 was found in the daily values of NCP, CR, and GCP. For further analysis, these parameters were cumulated for the following three periods: phase 1 – end of CO2 manipulation until nutrient addition (t4 to t13; phase 2 – nutrient addition until the second chlorophyll a minimum (t14 to t21; phase 3 – the second chlorophyll a minimum until the end of this study (t22 to t28. A significant response was detected as a decrease of NCP with increasing pCO2 during phase 3. CR was relatively stable throughout the experiment in all mesocosms. As a result, the cumulative GCP significantly decreased with increasing pCO2 during phase 3. After the nutrient addition, the ratios of cumulative NCP to cumulative consumption of NO3 and PO4 showed a significant decrease during phase 3 with increasing pCO2. The results suggest that elevated pCO2 influenced cumulative NCP and stoichiometric C and nutrient coupling of the plankton community in a high-latitude fjord only for a limited period. However provided that there were some differences or weak correlations between NCP data based on different methods in the same experiment, this conclusion should be taken with caution.

  8. Metabolic balance of a plankton community in a pelagic water of a northern high latitude fjord in response to increased pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Gattuso

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the balance between gross community production (GCP and community respiration (CR (i.e. net community production, NCP of plankton communities was investigated in summer 2010 in Kongsfjorden, West of Svalbard. Surface water, which was characterized by low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and chlorophyll, was enclosed in 9 mesocosms and subjected to 8 pCO2 levels (2 replicated controls and 7 enhanced pCO2 treatments for one month. Nutrients were added to all mesocosms on day 13 of the experiment, and thereafter increase of chlorophyll (index of phytoplankton biomass was provoked in all mesocosms. No clear trend in response to increasing pCO2 was found in the daily values of NCP, CR, and GCP. For further analysis, these parameters were cumulated for the following three periods: phase 1: end of CO2 manipulation until nutrient addition (t4 to t13; phase 2: nutrient addition until the second chlorophyll minimum (t14 to t21; phase 3: the second chlorophyll minimum until the end of this study (t22 to t28. Significant response was detected as a decrease of NCP with increasing pCO2 during phase 3. CR was relatively stable throughout the experiment in all mesocosms. As a result, the cumulative GCP significantly decreased with increasing pCO2 during phase 3. After the nutrient addition, the ratios of cumulative NCP to cumulative consumption of NO3 and PO4 showed significant decrease during phase 3 with increasing pCO2. The results suggest that elevated pCO2 influenced cumulative NCP and stoichiometric C and nutrient coupling of the plankton community in a high latitude fjord only for a limited period. However provided that there were some differences or weak correlations between NCP data based on different methods in the same experiment, this conclusion should be taken with caution.

  9. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate chemistry speciation at a large scale, namely the under-saturation of surface waters with respect to aragonite, a calcium carbonate polymorph produced by several organisms in this region. During a CO2 perturbation study in Kongsfjorden on the west coast of Spitsbergen (Norway, in the framework of the EU-funded project EPOCA, the temporal dynamics of a plankton bloom was followed in nine mesocosms, manipulated for CO2 levels ranging initially from about 185 to 1420 μatm. Dissolved inorganic nutrients were added halfway through the experiment. Autotrophic biomass, as identified by chlorophyll a standing stocks (Chl a, peaked three times in all mesocosms. However, while absolute Chl a concentrations were similar in all mesocosms during the first phase of the experiment, higher autotrophic biomass was measured as high in comparison to low CO2 during the second phase, right after dissolved inorganic nutrient addition. This trend then reversed in the third phase. There were several statistically significant CO2 effects on a variety of parameters measured in certain phases, such as nutrient utilization, standing stocks of particulate organic matter, and phytoplankton species composition. Interestingly, CO2 effects developed slowly but steadily, becoming more and more statistically significant with time. The observed CO2-related shifts in nutrient flow into different phytoplankton groups (mainly dinoflagellates, prasinophytes and haptophytes could have consequences for future organic matter flow to higher trophic levels and export production, with consequences

  10. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, K. G.; Bellerby, R. G. J.; Brussaard, C. P. D.; Büdenbender, J.; Czerny, J.; Engel, A.; Fischer, M.; Koch-Klavsen, S.; Krug, S. A.; Lischka, S.; Ludwig, A.; Meyerhöfer, M.; Nondal, G.; Silyakova, A.; Stuhr, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate chemistry speciation at a large scale, namely the under-saturation of surface waters with respect to aragonite, a calcium carbonate polymorph produced by several organisms in this region. During a CO2 perturbation study in Kongsfjorden on the west coast of Spitsbergen (Norway), in the framework of the EU-funded project EPOCA, the temporal dynamics of a plankton bloom was followed in nine mesocosms, manipulated for CO2 levels ranging initially from about 185 to 1420 μatm. Dissolved inorganic nutrients were added halfway through the experiment. Autotrophic biomass, as identified by chlorophyll a standing stocks (Chl a), peaked three times in all mesocosms. However, while absolute Chl a concentrations were similar in all mesocosms during the first phase of the experiment, higher autotrophic biomass was measured as high in comparison to low CO2 during the second phase, right after dissolved inorganic nutrient addition. This trend then reversed in the third phase. There were several statistically significant CO2 effects on a variety of parameters measured in certain phases, such as nutrient utilization, standing stocks of particulate organic matter, and phytoplankton species composition. Interestingly, CO2 effects developed slowly but steadily, becoming more and more statistically significant with time. The observed CO2-related shifts in nutrient flow into different phytoplankton groups (mainly dinoflagellates, prasinophytes and haptophytes) could have consequences for future organic matter flow to higher trophic levels and export production, with consequences for ecosystem productivity and atmospheric CO2.

  11. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate chemistry speciation at a large scale, namely the under-saturation of surface waters with respect to aragonite, a calcium carbonate polymorph produced by several organisms in this region. During a CO2 perturbation study in 2010, in the framework of the EU-funded project EPOCA, the temporal dynamics of a plankton bloom was followed in nine mesocosms, manipulated for CO2 levels ranging initially from about 185 to 1420 μatm. Dissolved inorganic nutrients were added halfway through the experiment. Autotrophic biomass, as identified by chlorophyll a standing stocks (Chl a, peaked three times in all mesocosms. However, while absolute Chl a concentrations were similar in all mesocosms during the first phase of the experiment, higher autotrophic biomass was measured at high in comparison to low CO2 during the second phase, right after dissolved inorganic nutrient addition. This trend then reversed in the third phase. There were several statistically significant CO2 effects on a variety of parameters measured in certain phases, such as nutrient utilization, standing stocks of particulate organic matter, and phytoplankton species composition. Interestingly, CO2 effects developed slowly but steadily, becoming more and more statistically significant with time. The observed CO2 related shifts in nutrient flow into different phytoplankton groups (mainly diatoms, dinoflagellates, prasinophytes and haptophytes could have consequences for future organic matter flow to higher trophic levels and export production, with consequences for ecosystem productivity and atmospheric

  12. Increased-diversity systematic resampling in particle filtering for BLAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jianping; Bai Baoming; Wang Xinmei

    2009-01-01

    Two variants of systematic resampling (S-RS) are proposed to increase the diversity of particles and thereby improve the performance of particle filtering when it is utilized for detection in Bell Laboratories Layered Space-Time (BLAST) systems. In the first variant, Markov chain Monte Carlo transition is integrated in the S-RS procedure to increase the diversity of particles with large importance weights. In the second one, all particles are first partitioned into two sets according to their importance weights, and then a double S-RS is introduced to increase the diversity of particles with small importance weights. Simulation results show that both variants can improve the bit error performance efficiently compared with the standard S-RS with little increased complexity.

  13. Increasing of horizontal velocity of particles leaving a belt conveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares Abraão

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the transport of granular materials by a conveyor belt via numerical simulations. We report an unusual increasing of particles horizontal velocity when they leave the belt and initiate free-fall. Using Discrete Elements Method, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon were investigated, and a study on how particle and system properties influences this effect were conducted.

  14. Particle In-Flight Velocity and Dispersion Measurements at Increasing Particle Feed Rates in Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M.; Yin, S.; Lupoi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Cold spray (CS) is attracting interest of research and industry due to its rapid, solid-state particle deposition process and respective advantages over conventional deposition technologies. The acceleration of the particles is critical to the efficiency of CS, and previous investigations rarely consider the particle feed rate. However, because higher particle loadings are typically used in the process, the effect of this cannot be assumed negligible. This study therefore investigates the particle velocities in the supersonic jet of an advanced CS system at low- and high pressure levels and varying particle feed rates using particle image velocimetry. The particle dispersion and velocity evolution along the jet axis were investigated for several feedstock materials. It was found that the average particle velocity noticeably decreases with increasing particulate loading in all cases. The velocity distribution and particle dispersion were also observed to be influenced by the feed rate. Effects are driven by both mass loading and volume fraction, depending on the feedstock's particle velocity parameter. Increased particle feed rates hence affect the magnitude and distribution of impact velocity and consequently the efficiency of CS. In particular, numerical models neglecting this interconnection are required to be further improved, based on these experimental studies.

  15. Organic matter production response to CO2 increase in open subarctic plankton communities: Comparison of six microcosm experiments under iron-limited and -enriched bloom conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Takeshi; Sugie, Koji; Endo, Hisashi; Suzuki, Koji; Nishioka, Jun; Ono, Tsuneo

    2014-12-01

    Increase in seawater pCO2 and the corresponding decrease in pH caused by the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration (i.e., ocean acidification) may affect organic matter production by phytoplankton communities. Organic matter production forms the basis of marine food webs and plays a crucial role in oceanic CO2 uptake through the biological carbon pump, and hence will potentially affect future marine ecosystem dynamics. However, responses of organic matter production in open ocean plankton ecosystems to CO2 increase have not been fully examined. We conducted on-deck microcosm experiments using high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters in the western subarctic Pacific and oceanic Bering Sea basin in summer 2008 and 2009, respectively, to examine the impacts of elevated CO2 on particulate and dissolved organic matter (i.e., POM and DOM, respectively) production. Iron deficient natural plankton communities were incubated for 7-14 days under multiple CO2 levels with and without iron enrichments (hereafter +Fe and -Fe treatments, respectively). By combining with our previous experiments at two sites, we created a comprehensive dataset on responses of organic matter production to CO2 increase during macronutrient replete conditions in HNLC waters. Significant differences in net particulate organic carbon production among CO2 treatments were observed only in the -Fe treatments, whereas that in net dissolved organic carbon production were mainly observed in the +Fe treatments, suggesting that CO2 may affect different processes depending on the Fe nutritional status. However, impacts of CO2 were not consistent among experiments and were much smaller than the consistent positive effects of Fe enrichment. In contrast, no significant differences among the CO2 treatments were observed for organic carbon partitioning into POM and DOM, and carbon to nitrogen ratio of net produced POM. We conclude that CO2 does not play a primary role, but could have secondary effects on

  16. What you see is not what you catch: a comparison of concurrently collected net, Optical Plankton Counter, and Shadowed Image Particle Profiling Evaluation Recorder data from the northeast Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsen, Andrew; Hopkins, Thomas L.; Samson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Zooplankton and suspended particles were sampled in the upper 100 m of the Gulf of Mexico with the High Resolution Sampler. This towed-platform can concurrently sample zooplankton with plankton nets, an Optical Plankton Counter (OPC) and the Shadowed Image Particle Profiling and Evaluation Recorder (SIPPER), a zooplankton imaging system. This allowed for direct comparison of mesozooplankton abundance, biomass, taxonomic composition and size distributions between simultaneously collected net samples, OPC data, and digital imagery. While the net data were numerically and taxonomically similar to that of previous studies in the region, analysis of the SIPPER imagery revealed that nets significantly underestimated larvacean, doliolid, protoctist and cnidarian/ctenophore abundance by 300%, 379%, 522% and 1200%, respectively. The inefficiency of the nets in sampling the fragile and gelatinous zooplankton groups led to a dry-weight biomass estimate less than half that of the SIPPER total and suggests that this component of the zooplankton assemblage is more important than previously determined for this region. Additionally, using the SIPPER data we determined that more than 29% of all mesozooplankton-sized particles occurred within 4 mm of another particle and therefore would not be separately counted by the OPC. This suggests that coincident counting is a major problem for the OPC even at the low zooplankton abundances encountered in low latitude oligotrophic systems like the Gulf. Furthermore, we found that the colonial cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was the most abundant recognizable organism in the SIPPER dataset, while it was difficult to quantify with the nets. For these reasons, the traditional method of using net samples to ground truth OPC data would not be adequate in describing the particle assemblage described here. Consequently we suggest that in situ imaging sensors be included in any comprehensive study of mesozooplankton.

  17. Mixotrophy in the Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David A.; Mitra, Aditee

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhizaria, are mixotrophic owing to their retention of functional algal organelles or maintenance of algal endosymbionts. Phototrophy among the microzooplankton may increase gross growth efficiency and carbon transfer through the microzooplankton to higher trophic levels. Characteristic assemblages of mixotrophs are associated with warm, temperate, and cold seas and with stratification, fronts, and upwelling zones. Modeling has indicated that mixotrophy has a profound impact on marine planktonic ecosystems and may enhance primary production, biomass transfer to higher trophic levels, and the functioning of the biological carbon pump.

  18. Gelatinous plankton: irregularities rule the world (sometimes)

    OpenAIRE

    Boero, F.; Bouillon, J; GRAVILI C.; Miglietta, M. P.; Parsons, T. R.; Piraino, S.

    2008-01-01

    In spite of being one of the most relevant components of the biosphere, the plankton-benthos network is still poorly studied as such. This is partly due to the irregular occurrence of driving phenomena such as gelatinous plankton pulses in this realm. Gelatinous plankters rely on their life cycles and histories to exploit temporarily abundant resources with an undeniable, but often overlooked, impact on marine food webs. Dramatic increases of gelatinous filter-feeders and/or carnivores (both ...

  19. Mixotrophy in the marine plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David;

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic...... waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhizaria, are mixotrophic owing to their retention of functional algal organelles or maintenance of algal...

  20. Test-particle simulations in increasingly strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    Quasi-linear theory supposes that the energy in resonant fluctuations is small compared to that in the mean magnetic field. This is evident in the fact that the zeroth-order particle trajectories are helices about a mean field B(sub o) that is spatially uniform over many correlation lengths. However, in the solar wind it is often the case that the fluctuating part of the field is comparable in magnitude to the mean part. It is generally expected that quasi-linear theory remains viable for particles that are in resonance with a region of the fluctuation spectrum having only small energy density, but even so, care must be taken when comparing simulations to theoretical predictions. We have performed a series of test-particle simulations to explore the evolution of ion distributions in turbulent situations with varying levels of magnetic fluctuations. As delta-B/B(sub o) is increased the distinctions among absolute pitch angle (defined relative to B(sub o)), local pitch angle (defined relative to B(x)), and magnetic moment become important, some of them exhibiting periodic sloshing unrelated to the nonadiabatic processes of interest. Comparing and contrasting the various runs illustrates the phenomena that must be considered when the premise underlying quasi-linear theory are relaxed.

  1. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-14

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  2. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bowler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  3. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  4. Increasing effective number of neutrinos by decaying particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, K.; Kawasaki, M.; Nakayama, K.; Senami, M. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    We present models of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos N{sub {nu}} after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario not only solves the discrepancy between the constraints on N{sub {nu}} from these two epochs, but also provides a possible answer to deeper inconsistency in the estimation of the matter power spectrum amplitude at small scales, represented by {sigma}{sub 8}, between the WMAP and some small scale matter power measurements such as the Lyman-{alpha} forest and weak lensing. We consider (a) saxion decay into two axions; (b) gravitino decay into axino and axion; (c) Dirac right-handed sneutrino decay into gravitino and right-handed neutrino. (orig.)

  5. Barium in planktonic foraminifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, D.W.; Boyle, E.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Reconstructions of Ba distributions in ancient oceanic surface waters could provide new insight into paleoceanographic change. Calcite shells of planktonic foraminifera potentially provide a means of reconstructing such paleo-Ba distributions if lattice-bound Ba can be determined on shells recovered from deep-sea cores. Planktonic foraminifera shells from a series of cores were purified of non-lattice-bound Ba associated with organic or sedimentary phases by a combination of physical agitation, oxidative-reductive steps, acid leaches, and a novel alkaline-DTPA step to dissolve barite. A sequential dissolution of a large sample of cleaned shells of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides conglobatus indicates homogeneous distribution of Ba in the shell material. Comparison of shells from sediments, sediment traps, and plankton tows indicates no significant differences in the Ba content of the purified shells. Variation in foraminiferal Ba contents between the Pacific, Atlantic, and Mediterranean Sea is consistent with the trend in surface seawater Ba. The calculated distribution coefficient for Ba incorporation in five species based on these data is 0.19 {plus minus} 0.05. Several species of the non-spinose planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia have Ba/Ca ratios ranging from 2 to 13 {mu}mol; these high Ba contents might be explained by differences in the way these foraminifera precipitate their shells. A temporal record of Ba/Ca in samples of Globigerinoides and Orbulina from a core in the northwest Atlantic suggests that the Ba concentration of surface waters at this site has not changed by more than 20% over the last 14 kyr.

  6. Plankton Production Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-30

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00... Crustacea ), the group that contributes the major part of the biomass of zooplankton collected with plankton nets in salt- and freshwater. The basis of...windows to the large Russian-language marine- biological literature by publishing this translation. The observations are not subject to becoming outdated

  7. Nutrient-enrichment effect on plankton composition:

    OpenAIRE

    Malej, Alenka; Mozetič, Patricija; Turk, Valentina

    1998-01-01

    Three enrichment experiments were conduced in order to analyze the development of plankton biomass and species composition as a response to different nutrient regimes. The additions of all nutrients had the most profound effect on phytoplankton biomass increase, whereas picoplankton abundance decreased continuously in all treatments. Initially dominating phytoplanktonic groups and species expanded significantly towards the end of experiments...

  8. Increased particle flux to the deep ocean related to monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Ittekkot, V.; Manganini, S.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Haake, B.; Degens, E.T.; Desai, B.N.; Honjo, S.

    . To assess the impact of monsoon-driven processes on the downward particle flux variations in the open ocean we deployed three moored arrays consisting of six time-series sediment traps at selected locations in the western, central and eastern parts...

  9. Intense photooxidative degradation of planktonic and bacterial lipids in sinking particles collected with sediment traps across the Canadian Beaufort Shelf (Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Rontani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The lipid content of seven samples of sinking particles collected with sediment traps moored at ~100 m depth in summer and fall across the Canadian Beaufort Shelf (Arctic Ocean was investigated. Our main goal was to quantify and characterize the biotic and abiotic degradation processes that acted on sinking material during these periods. Diatoms, which dominated the phytoplanktonic assemblage in every trap sample, appeared to be remarkably sensitive to Type II (i.e. involving singlet oxygen photodegradation processes in summer, but seemed to be relatively unaffected by biotic degradation at the same time. Hence, the relative recalcitrance of phytodetritus towards biodegradation processes during the Arctic midnight sun period was attributed to the strong photodegradation state of heterotrophic bacteria, which likely resulted from the efficient transfer of singlet oxygen from photodegraded phytoplanktonic cells to attached bacteria. In addition, the detection in trap samples of photoproducts specific to wax ester components found in herbivorous copepods demonstrated that zooplanktonic faecal material exported out of the euphotic zone in summer were as well affected by Type II photodegradation processes. By contrast, sinking particles collected during the autumn were not influenced by any light-driven stress. Further chemical analyses showed that photodegraded sinking particles contained an important amount of intact hydroperoxides, which could then induce a strong oxidative stress in underlying sediments.

  10. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  11. Evolution and field application of a plankton imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsen, Andrew Walker

    Understanding the processes controlling the distribution and abundance of zooplankton has been a primary concern of oceanographers and has driven the development of numerous technologies to more accurately quantify these parameters. This study investigates the potential of a new plankton imaging sensor, the shadowed image particle profiling and evaluation recorder (SIPPER), that I helped develop at the University of South Florida, to address that concern. In the first chapter, results from the SIPPER are compared against concurrently sampling plankton nets and the optical plankton counter (OPC), the most widely used optical zooplankton sampling sensor in the field. It was found that plankton nets and the SIPPER sampled robust and hard-bodied zooplankton taxa similarly while nets significantly underestimated the abundance of fragile and gelatinous taxa imaged by the SIPPER such that nets might underestimate zooplankton biomass by greater than 50%. Similarly, it was determined that the OPC misses greater than a quarter of resolvable particles due to coincident counting and that it can not distinguish between zooplankton and other abundant suspended particles such as marine snow and Trichodesmium that are difficult to quantify with traditional sampling methods. Therefore the standard method of using net samples to ground truth OPC data should be reevaluated. In the second chapter, a new automated plankton classification system was utilized to see if it was possible to use machine learning methods to classify SIPPER-imaged plankton from a diverse subtropical assemblage on the West Florida Shelf and describe their distribution during a 24 hour period. Classification accuracy for this study was similar to that of other studies in less diverse environments and similar to what could be expected by a human expert for a complex dataset. Fragile plankton taxa such as larvaceans, hydromedusae, sarcodine protoctists and Trichodesmium were found at significantly higher

  12. Biogeochemical and physical controls on concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and plankton of the Mediterranean and Black Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Dachs, Jordi; Ojeda, MaríA. José; Valle, MaríA. Carmen; Castro-JiméNez, Javier; Wollgast, Jan; Ghiani, Michela; Hanke, Georg; Zaldivar, José Manuel

    2011-12-01

    The Mediterranean and Black Seas are unique marine environments subject to important anthropogenic pressures due to atmospheric and riverine inputs of organic pollutants. They include regions of different physical and trophic characteristics, which allow the studying of the controls on pollutant occurrence and fate under different conditions in terms of particles, plankton biomass, interactions with the atmosphere, biodegradation, and their dependence on the pollutant physical chemical properties. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been measured in samples of seawater (dissolved and particulate phases) and plankton during two east-west sampling cruises in June 2006 and May 2007. The concentrations of dissolved PAHs were higher in the south-western Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean than in the Western Mediterranean, reflecting different pollutant loads, trophic conditions and cycling. Particle and plankton phase PAH concentrations were higher when lower concentrations of suspended particles and biomass occurred, with apparent differences due to the PAH physical chemical properties. The surface PAH particle phase concentrations decreased when the total suspended particles (TSP) increased for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds, consistent with controls due to particle settling depletion of water column compounds and dilution. Conversely, PAH concentrations in plankton decreased at higher biomass only for the low MW PAHs, suggesting that biodegradative processes in the water column are a major driver of their occurrence in the photic zone. The results presented here are the most extensive data set available for the Mediterranean Sea and provide clear evidence of the important physical and biological controls on PAH occurrence and cycling in oceanic regions.

  13. Increased particle fluxes at the INDEX site attributable to simulated benthic disturbance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parthiban, G.

    Indian Basin. The predisturbance particle fluxes varied between 22.3 to 55.1 mg m sup(-2) day sup(-1). Increased and variable particle fluxes were recorded by the sediment traps during the disturbance period. The increase observed was 0.5 to 4 times more...

  14. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600-2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500-542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600-1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000-542 Mya).

  15. Sediment traps as a new tool for estimation of longevity of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Sediment trap technique provides time series data of sinking particles (faunal and sediment) from surface to bottom of the sea. Besides many other applications, data can also be used to estimate life span of planktonic foraminifera. Based on rearing...

  16. Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

    In addition to the several extreme environments on Earth, Space can be considered as just another exceptional environment with a unique mixture of stress factors comprising UV radiation, vacuum, desiccation, temperature, ionizing radiation and microgravity. Life that processes in these environments can depend on the life forms and their state of living. The question is whether there are different strategies for individual microorganisms compared to communities of the same organisms to cope with the different factors of their surroundings. Comparative studies of the survi-val of these communities called biofilms and planktonic cell samples of Deinococcus geothermalis stand at the focal point of the presented investigations. A biofilm is a structured community of microorganisms that live encapsulated in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances on a surface. Microorganisms living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties to cooperate than individually living microorganisms of the same species. An advantage of the biofilm is increased resistance to various chemical and physical effects, while the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of the cells protect the interior of the microbial consortium. The space experiment BOSS (Biofilm organisms surfing Space) as part the ESA experimental unit EXPOSE R-2 with a planned launch date in July 2014 will be subsequently mounted on the Russian Svesda module outside the ISS. An international team of scientists coordinated by Dr. P. Rettberg will investigate the hypothesis whether microorganisms organized as biofilm outmatch the same microorganisms exposed individually in the long-term survival of the harsh environmental conditions as they occur in space and on Mars. Another protective function in the samples could be dust par-ticles for instance Mars regolith simulant contained inside the biofilms or mixed with the planktonic cells, as additional shelter especially against the extraterrestrial UV

  17. Standard filtration practices may significantly distort planktonic microbial diversity estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Cruz Padilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of biomass by filtration is a standard method for sampling planktonic microbes. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition of filtered biomass changes depending on sample volume. Using seawater from a marine oxygen minimum zone, we quantified the 16S rRNA gene composition of biomass on a prefilter (1.6 μm pore-size and a downstream 0.2 μm filter over sample volumes from 0.05 to 5 L. Significant community shifts occurred in both filter fractions, and were most dramatic in the prefilter community. Sequences matching Vibrionales decreased from ~40-60% of prefilter datasets at low volumes (0.05-0.5 L to less than 5% at higher volumes, while groups such at the Chromatiales and Thiohalorhabdales followed opposite trends, increasing from minor representation to become the dominant taxa at higher volumes. Groups often associated with marine particles, including members of the Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes, were among those showing the greatest increase with volume (4 to 27-fold. Taxon richness (97% similarity clusters also varied significantly with volume, and in opposing directions depending on filter fraction, highlighting potential biases in community complexity estimates. These data raise concerns for studies using filter fractionation for quantitative comparisons of aquatic microbial diversity, for example between free-living and particle-associated communities.

  18. Standard filtration practices may significantly distort planktonic microbial diversity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Cory C; Ganesh, Sangita; Gantt, Shelby; Huhman, Alex; Parris, Darren J; Sarode, Neha; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    Fractionation of biomass by filtration is a standard method for sampling planktonic microbes. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition of filtered biomass changes depending on sample volume. Using seawater from a marine oxygen minimum zone, we quantified the 16S rRNA gene composition of biomass on a prefilter (1.6 μm pore-size) and a downstream 0.2 μm filter over sample volumes from 0.05 to 5 L. Significant community shifts occurred in both filter fractions, and were most dramatic in the prefilter community. Sequences matching Vibrionales decreased from ~40 to 60% of prefilter datasets at low volumes (0.05-0.5 L) to less than 5% at higher volumes, while groups such at the Chromatiales and Thiohalorhabdales followed opposite trends, increasing from minor representation to become the dominant taxa at higher volumes. Groups often associated with marine particles, including members of the Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes, were among those showing the greatest increase with volume (4 to 27-fold). Taxon richness (97% similarity clusters) also varied significantly with volume, and in opposing directions depending on filter fraction, highlighting potential biases in community complexity estimates. These data raise concerns for studies using filter fractionation for quantitative comparisons of aquatic microbial diversity, for example between free-living and particle-associated communities.

  19. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-02-27

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  20. Ecological Stoichiometry of Ocean Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Allison R; Martiny, Adam C

    2017-08-30

    Marine plankton elemental stoichiometric ratios can deviate from the Redfield ratio (106C:16N:1P); here, we examine physiological and biogeochemical mechanisms that lead to the observed variation across lineages, regions, and seasons. Many models of ecological stoichiometry blend together acclimative and adaptive responses to environmental conditions. These two pathways can have unique molecular mechanisms and stoichiometric outcomes, and we attempt to disentangle the two processes. We find that interactions between environmental conditions and cellular growth are key to understanding stoichiometric regulation, but the growth rates of most marine plankton populations are poorly constrained. We propose that specific physiological mechanisms have a strong impact on plankton and community stoichiometry in nutrient-rich environments, whereas biogeochemical interactions are important for the stoichiometry of the oligotrophic gyres. Finally, we outline key areas with missing information that is needed to advance understanding of the present and future ecological stoichiometry of ocean plankton. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. DIMETHYLSULFIDE PRODUCTION BY PLANKTON COMMUNITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KWINT, RLJ; KRAMER, KJM

    1995-01-01

    The trends of dimethylsulphide (DMS) production by plankton communities in mesocosm systems were studied under various conditions. The results show that the DMS concentration in the water column can be highly variable over time, even within days, and under apparently identical conditions. DMS releas

  2. The Continuous Plankton Recorder: concepts and history, from Plankton Indicator to undulating recorders [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, P. C.; Colebrook, J. M.; Matthews, J. B. L.; Aiken, J.; Continuous Plankton Recorder Team

    2003-08-01

    Alister Hardy conceived the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey in the 1920s as a means of mapping near-surface plankton in space and time, interpreting the changing fortunes of the fisheries and relating plankton changes to hydrometeorology and climatic change. The seed he planted has grown to become the most extensive long-term survey of marine organisms in the world and the breadth of his vision becomes ever more apparent. The survey has now run for over 70 years and its value increases with every passing decade. Operating from ‘ships of opportunity’ the machines used are robust, reliable and easy to handle. Wherever possible, all the sampling and analytical methods have not been changed to maintain the consistency of the time series. Computerisation and the development of new statistical approaches have increased our ability to handle the large quantities of information generated and enhance the sensitivity of the data analyses. This overview, based on almost 900 papers, recounts the various phases in the history of the survey. It starts with the Indicator Survey (1921-1934), the deployment of the first CPR on the Discovery Expedition (1924-1927) and the early CPR survey in the North Sea (1931-1939). The survey reopened in 1946 after the Second World War and expanded across the North Atlantic to North America from 1959. Taxonomic studies were initiated and an emphasis was placed on patterns of distribution, which were seen to reflect the varying oceanographic conditions. The years 1968-1976 saw further expansion with operations even in the American Great Lakes, publication of a Plankton Atlas and initial evidence for a downward trend in plankton biomass. At about this time electronic instrumentation was attached to CPRs to make additional measurements and work was started on the development of a new generation of undulating Continuous Plankton and Environmental Recorders (CPERs). In 1976 the survey moved to Plymouth. Scientific priorities in the UK

  3. Effects of sea surface warming on marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Boyce, Daniel G; Hofmann, Matthias; Matthiessen, Birte; Sommer, Ulrich; Worm, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Ocean warming has been implicated in the observed decline of oceanic phytoplankton biomass. Some studies suggest a physical pathway of warming via stratification and nutrient flux, and others a biological effect on plankton metabolic rates; yet the relative strength and possible interaction of these mechanisms remains unknown. Here, we implement projections from a global circulation model in a mesocosm experiment to examine both mechanisms in a multi-trophic plankton community. Warming treatments had positive direct effects on phytoplankton biomass, but these were overcompensated by the negative effects of decreased nutrient flux. Zooplankton switched from phytoplankton to grazing on ciliates. These results contrast with previous experiments under nutrient-replete conditions, where warming indirectly reduced phytoplankton biomass via increased zooplankton grazing. We conclude that the effect of ocean warming on marine plankton depends on the nutrient regime, and provide a mechanistic basis for understanding global change in marine ecosystems.

  4. Strong seasonal effect of moderate experimental warming on plankton respiration in a temperate estuarine plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Satya; Nydahl, Anna; Anton, Peter; Wikner, Johan

    2013-12-01

    Climate change projections forecast a 1.1-6.4 °C global increase in surface water temperature and a 3 °C increase for the Baltic Sea. This study examined the short-term interactive effects of a realistic future temperature increase (3 °C) on pelagic respiration and bacterioplankton growth and phytoplankton photosynthesis in situ. This study was undertaken throughout a full seasonal cycle in the northern Baltic Sea. We found marked positive short-term effects of temperature on plankton respiration but no significant effect on bacterioplankton growth or phytoplankton photosynthesis. Absolute respiration rates remained similar to other comparable environments at the in situ temperature. With the 3 °C temperature increase, respiration rates in situ increased up to 5-fold during the winter and 2-fold during the summer. A maximum seasonal Q10 value of 332 was observed for respiration during the cold winter months (twater ≈ 0 °C), and summer Q10 values were comparatively high (9.1). Q10 values exhibited a significant inverse relationship to water temperature during winter. Our results thereby suggest that plankton respiration in this coastal zone is more temperature sensitive than previously reported. In addition, field data indicated that plankton respiration switched from being temperature limited to being limited by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) after the simulated temperature increase. Assuming that our observations are relevant over longer time scales, climate change may worsen hypoxia, increase CO2 emissions and create a more heterotrophic food web in coastal zones with a high load of riverine DOC.

  5. Pulmonary exposure to particles during pregnancy causes increased neonatal asthma susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedulov, Alexey V; Leme, Adriana; Yang, Zhiping;

    2008-01-01

    Maternal immune responses can promote allergy development in offspring, as shown in a model of increased susceptibility to asthma in babies of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged mother mice. We investigated whether inflammatory responses to air pollution particles (diesel exhaust particles...... inflammatory responses were evaluated 48 hours after exposure. Offspring of particle- or buffer-treated mothers were sensitized and aerosolized with OVA, followed by assays of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergic inflammation (AI). Nonpregnant females had the expected minimal response to "inert" TiO(2......). In contrast, pregnant mice showed robust and persistent acute inflammation after both TiO(2) and DEP. Genomic profiling identified genes differentially expressed in pregnant lungs exposed to TiO(2). Neonates of mothers exposed to TiO(2) (and DEP, but not PBS) developed AHR and AI, indicating that pregnancy...

  6. Dispersed cells represent a distinct stage in the transition from bacterial biofilm to planktonic lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria assume distinct lifestyles during the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Increased levels of the intracellular messenger c-di-GMP determine the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth, while a reduction causes biofilm dispersal. It is generally assumed that cells dispersed from...... biofilms immediately go into the planktonic growth phase. Here we use single-nucleotide resolution transcriptomic analysis to show that the physiology of dispersed cells from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is highly different from those of planktonic and biofilm cells. In dispersed cells, the expression...... of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY and RsmZ is downregulated, whereas secretion genes are induced. Dispersed cells are highly virulent against macrophages and Caenorhabditis elegans compared with planktonic cells. In addition, they are highly sensitive towards iron stress, and the combination of a biofilm...

  7. The effect of carbon subsidies on marine planktonic niche partitioning and recruitment during biofilm assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed eHall

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of resource availability on planktonic and biofilm microbial community membership is poorly understood. Heterotrophic bacteria derive some to all of their organic carbon (C from photoautotrophs while simultaneously competing with photoautotrophs for inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus (P or nitrogen (N. Therefore, C inputs have the potential to shift the competitive balance of aquatic microbial communities by increasing the resource space available to heterotrophs (more C while decreasing the resource space available to photoautotrophs (less mineral nutrients due to increased competition from heterotrophs. To test how resource dynamics affect membership of planktonic communities and assembly of biofilm communities we amended a series of flow-through mesocosms with C to alter the availability of C among treatments. Each mesocosm was fed with unfiltered seawater and incubated with sterilized microscope slides as surfaces for biofilm formation. The highest C treatment had the highest planktonic heterotroph abundance, lowest planktonic photoautotroph abundance, and highest biofilm biomass. We surveyed bacterial 16S rRNA genes and plastid 23S rRNA genes to characterize biofilm and planktonic community membership andstructure. Regardless of resource additions, biofilm communities had higher alpha diversity than planktonic communities in all mesocosms. Heterotrophic plankton communities were distinct from heterotrophic biofilm communities in all but the highest C treatment where heterotrophic plankton and biofilm communities resembled each other after 17 days. Unlike the heterotrophs, photoautotrophic plankton communities were different than photoautotrophic biofilm communities in composition in all treatments including the highest C treatment. Our results suggest that although resource amendments affect community membership and structure, microbial lifestyle (biofilm versus planktonic has a stronger influence on community composition.

  8. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Lionel; Chaffron, Samuel; Bittner, Lucie; Eveillard, Damien; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2016-04-28

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions.

  9. Chemical ecology of marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Emily R; Poulin, Remington X; Mojib, Nazia; Kubanek, Julia

    2016-07-28

    Covering: January 2013 to online publication December 2014This review summarizes recent research in the chemical ecology of marine pelagic ecosystems, and aims to provide a comprehensive overview of advances in the field in the time period covered. In order to highlight the role of chemical cues and toxins in plankton ecology this review has been organized by ecological interaction types starting with intraspecific interactions, then interspecific interactions (including facilitation and mutualism, host-parasite, allelopathy, and predator-prey), and finally community and ecosystem-wide interactions.

  10. Hydromechanical signals in the plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre

    2001-01-01

    The distance at which plankters can detect and thus interact with each other depends on their sensitivity, size, and motion, as well as the hydrodynamic characteristics of their behaviour. Through a simple consideration of the distribution of forces exerted on the ambient fluid by different...... plankton behaviours, it is possible to deduce the spatial scale over-which the associated hydromechanical disturbance propagates. At low Reynolds numbers, for passive sinking or for a feeding current, the associated hydromechanical velocity, u, attenuates with distance, r, as u proportional to a Ur(-1...

  11. Comparing the chlorine disinfection of detached biofilm clusters with those of sessile biofilms and planktonic cells in single- and dual-species cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Parker, Albert E; Woodall, Dawn; Camper, Anne K

    2011-10-01

    Although the detachment of cells from biofilms is of fundamental importance to the dissemination of organisms in both public health and clinical settings, the disinfection efficacies of commonly used biocides on detached biofilm particles have not been investigated. Therefore, the question arises whether cells in detached aggregates can be killed with disinfectant concentrations sufficient to inactivate planktonic cells. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in standardized laboratory reactors as single species and in coculture. Cluster size distributions in chemostats and biofilm reactor effluent were measured. Chlorine susceptibility was assessed for planktonic cultures, attached biofilm, and particles and cells detached from the biofilm. Disinfection tolerance generally increased with a higher percentage of larger cell clusters in the chemostat and detached biofilm. Samples with a lower percentage of large clusters were more easily disinfected. Thus, disinfection tolerance depended on the cluster size distribution rather than sample type for chemostat and detached biofilm. Intact biofilms were more tolerant to chlorine independent of species. Homogenization of samples led to significantly increased susceptibility in all biofilm samples as well as detached clusters for single-species B. cepacia, B. cepacia in coculture, and P. aeruginosa in coculture. The disinfection efficacy was also dependent on species composition; coculture was advantageous to the survival of both species when grown as a biofilm or as clusters detached from biofilm but, surprisingly, resulted in a lower disinfection tolerance when they were grown as a mixed planktonic culture.

  12. Ocean acidification decreases plankton respiration: evidence from a mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilling, Kristian; Paul, Allanah J.; Virkkala, Niklas; Hastings, Tom; Lischka, Silke; Stuhr, Annegret; Bermúdez, Rafael; Czerny, Jan; Boxhammer, Tim; Schulz, Kai G.; Ludwig, Andrea; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are reducing the pH in the world's oceans. The plankton community is a key component driving biogeochemical fluxes, and the effect of increased CO2 on plankton is critical for understanding the ramifications of ocean acidification on global carbon fluxes. We determined the plankton community composition and measured primary production, respiration rates and carbon export (defined here as carbon sinking out of a shallow, coastal area) during an ocean acidification experiment. Mesocosms ( ˜ 55 m3) were set up in the Baltic Sea with a gradient of CO2 levels initially ranging from ambient ( ˜ 240 µatm), used as control, to high CO2 (up to ˜ 1330 µatm). The phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates, diatoms, cyanobacteria and chlorophytes, and the zooplankton community by protozoans, heterotrophic dinoflagellates and cladocerans. The plankton community composition was relatively homogenous between treatments. Community respiration rates were lower at high CO2 levels. The carbon-normalized respiration was approximately 40 % lower in the high-CO2 environment compared with the controls during the latter phase of the experiment. We did not, however, detect any effect of increased CO2 on primary production. This could be due to measurement uncertainty, as the measured total particular carbon (TPC) and combined results presented in this special issue suggest that the reduced respiration rate translated into higher net carbon fixation. The percent carbon derived from microscopy counts (both phyto- and zooplankton), of the measured total particular carbon (TPC), decreased from ˜ 26 % at t0 to ˜ 8 % at t31, probably driven by a shift towards smaller plankton (export, and consequently did not work as a negative feedback mechanism for increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  13. Biophysical Modeling of Cross-Shore Plankton Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ecosystems are influenced by cross-shore flows. Processes that create coastal plankton distributions are not well understood, even though possible mechanisms of plankton transport in the surf zone have been investigated. Our data from a rip-channeled beach show that concentrations of zooplankton and phytoplankton are higher in the surf zone than offshore. To examine how plankton are transported toward the shore, we used a coupled biophysical model, comprised of Delft3D wave/flow simulations and an individual-based model for tracking plankton. Model results indicate that onshore delivery of zooplankton is enhanced by Stokes drift, wave-driven bottom boundary streaming, alongshore topographic variability, and turbulence-dependent sinking behavior of zooplankton. Phytoplankton sinking may also be accelerated by turbulence, but the mechanism differs from that which affects zooplankton. Turbulence has the potential to increase phytoplankton growth rates. Therefore, the phytoplankton transport model includes turbulence-induced sinking velocity and growth rate, although the latter appears to have little influence on phytoplankton distributions. Modeled phytoplankton concentrations in the surf zone are much lower than expected, although the zooplankton transport model qualitatively reproduced our observations. Thus, there must be other possible factors influencing phytoplankton transport, some of which will be discussed.

  14. Dissipation Intermittency Increases Long-Distance Dispersal of Heavy Particles in the Canopy Sublayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Tomer; Trakhtenbrot, Ana; Poggi, Davide; Cassiani, Massimo; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion of heavy particles such as seeds within canopies is evaluated using Lagrangian stochastic trajectory models, laboratory, and field experiments. Inclusion of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate intermittency is shown to increase long-distance dispersal (LDD) by contributing to the intermittent ejection of particles to regions of high mean velocity outside the canopy volume. Model evaluation against controlled flume experiments, featuring a dense rod canopy, detailed flow measurements, and imaged trajectories of spherical particles, demonstrates that superimposing a terminal velocity on the fluid velocity is insufficient to determine the particle dispersal kernel. Modifying the trajectory model by adding dissipation intermittency is found to be significant for dispersal predictions along with the addition of inertial and crossing trajectories' effects. Comparison with manual seed-release experiments in a forest using wind-dispersed seeds shows that the model captures most of the measured kernels when accepted uncertainties in plant area index and friction velocity are considered. Unlike the flume experiments, the model modifications for several wind-dispersed seeds have minor effects on short-distance dispersal. A large increase was predicted in LDD when including dissipation intermittency for the forest experiment. The main results suggest that fitting or calibrating models to the `main body' of measured kernels may not offer extrapolating foresight to LDD predictions. As inertial effects were found mostly negligible in the field conditions here, the extended trajectory model requires specifying only the seed's terminal velocity and a constant variance of the normalized dissipation rate. Therefore, the proposed modifications can be readily applied to classical trajectory models so as to improve LDD predictions.

  15. The predictive skill of species distribution models for plankton in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, Philipp Georg; Kiørboe, Thomas; Licandro, Priscilla;

    2016-01-01

    Statistical species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to project spatial relocations of marine taxa under future climate change scenarios. However, tests of their predictive skill in the real-world are rare. Here, we use data from the Continuous Plankton Recorder program, one...... null models, is essential to assess the robustness of projections of marine planktonic species under climate change....... Plankton may be particularly challenging to model, due to its short life span and the dispersive effects of constant water movements on all spatial scales, however there are few other studies against which to compare these results. We conclude that rigorous model validation, including comparison against...

  16. Scalar transport by planktonic swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2012-11-01

    Nutrient and energy transport in the ocean is primarily governed by the action of physical phenomena. In previous studies it has been suggested that aquatic fauna may significantly contribute to this process through the action of the induced drift mechanism. In this investigation, the role of planktonic swarms as ecosystem engineers is assessed through the analysis of scalar transport within a stratified water column. The vertical migration of Artemia salina is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. The scalar transport of fluorescent dye is visualized and quantified through planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms enhances scalar transport relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present. Funded by the BSF program (2011553).

  17. Particles matter: Transformation of suspended particles in constructed wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulling, B.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that constructed wetlands transform suspended particles in (treated) municipal wastewater through selective precipitation in ponds, biological filtering by plankton communities and physical and biological retention in reed beds. These processes effectively remove faecal indicator

  18. Effect of Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events on the evolutionary trend of planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, A.; Ozaki, K.; Kawahata, H.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely thought that oceanic redox state is essential for the evolutionary history of life on the earth, and "anoxic events" have been proposed as one of the causal mechanisms for mass extinctions. During mid-Cretaceous, widely known as the extremely warm period, oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) occurred several times and they would have caused a substantial impact on the biosphere. Planktonic foraminifera are marine planktons with calcite tests and their productions constitute ~30-80% of the modern deep-marine calcite budget, thus they play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Previous study reported that planktonic foraminifera displayed the high turnover (extinction and speciation) rate at or near the major OAEs. However, the impact of Cretaceous OAEs on the evolutionary trend of planktonic foraminifera remains obscure. In this study, we investigated the role of spatiotemporal extent of anoxia on the evolutionary trend of planktonic foraminifera by assessing the extinction/speciation rate of planktonic foraminifera around Cretaceous OAEs. The number of foraminiferal species increased across the OAE1a and then showed a peak after this episode. Around OAE2, several planktonic foraminifera species became extinct and several speciated, however, long-term trends in foraminiferal evolution showed no drastic changes near the event. Therefore these results suggest that the ocean surface environment at OAEs would not have a direct effect on foraminiferal extinction/speciation. This interpretation is reinforced when considering the recent culturing results, which demonstrate that modern planktonic foraminifera have a high tolerance to extremely low dissolved oxygen levels than expected. Accumulating geochemical data also suggest a spatial heterogeneity of oceanic anoxia/euxinia during OAE2. These results lead us to conclude that Cretaceous OAEs would not directly related to planktonic foraminiferal extinction due to regional distribution of anoxia/euxinia.

  19. Experimentally determined temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Arrieta, J. M.; Vaquer-Suyner, R.; Coello-Camba, A.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half of its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase the rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested, experimentally, the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest an experimental temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. This threshold is also validated by field measurements across a range of temperatures which suggested a temperature 5.4 °C beyond which Arctic plankton communities switch to heterotrophy. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  20. Experimentally determined temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half of its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase the rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested, experimentally, the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest an experimental temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. This threshold is also validated by field measurements across a range of temperatures which suggested a temperature 5.4 °C beyond which Arctic plankton communities switch to heterotrophy. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  1. The influence of global warming on freshwater plankton communities in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    George, D. Glen

    1991-01-01

    The likely response of freshwater plankton to the direct and indirect effects of sustained global warming are summarized. The increase in CO2 posited by climatologists will have a direct effect on many biological processes, and an even more important indirect effect on the global climate. Lake plankton populations are relatively well buffered against sudden fluctuations in temperature but can react in unexpected ways to seasonal changes in the wind speed, with effects on seasonal growth and s...

  2. The plankton multiplier—positive feedback in the greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, John; Barkmann, Wolfgang

    1993-01-01

    The plankton multiplier is a positive feedback mechanism linking the greenhouse effect and biological pump (Woods.J.D., Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, 1990). As pollution increases the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, the enhanced greenhouse effect induces radiative forcing of the ocean, which diminishes the depth of winter convection, reducing the annual resupply of nutrients to the euphotic zone and therefore the annual primary production. That weakens the biologic...

  3. GLOBEC NEP Vertical Plankton Tow (VPT) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) California Current Program Vertical Plankton Tow (VPT) Data For more information, see...

  4. GLOBEC NEP MOCNESS Plankton (MOC1) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) California Current Program MOCNESS Plankton (MOC1) Data The MOCNESS is based on the Tucker Trawl...

  5. the vertical migration behaviour of estuarine plankton

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of investigations on the vertical migration behaviour of estuarine zooplankton have been ... This behaviour is particularly well-marked in the plankton of estuaries. Some of the .... time during the night and descended before dawn.

  6. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, JK; Muehlmatt, A; Savage, A; Lin, L; Kennedy, AR

    2014-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in OP occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure. PMID:25242832

  7. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Legendre, Louis; Guidi, Lionel; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Jamet, Dominique; Mousseau, Laure; Pedrotti, Maria-Luiza; Picheral, Marc; Gorsky, Gabriel; Sardet, Christian; Stemmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available). Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche) weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model) characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  8. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Romagnan

    Full Text Available Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes and larger (i.e. macroplankton organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available. Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  9. Raman spectroscopic differentiation of planktonic bacteria and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusić, Dragana; Kampe, Bernd; Ramoji, Anuradha; Neugebauer, Ute; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Both biofilm formations as well as planktonic cells of water bacteria such as diverse species of the Legionella genus as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were examined in detail by Raman microspectroscopy. Production of various molecules involved in biofilm formation of tested species in nutrient-deficient media such as tap water was observed and was particularly evident in the biofilms formed by six Legionella species. Biofilms of selected species of the Legionella genus differ significantly from the planktonic cells of the same organisms in their lipid amount. Also, all Legionella species have formed biofilms that differ significantly from the biofilms of the other tested genera in the amount of lipids they produced. We believe that the significant increase in the synthesis of this molecular species may be associated with the ability of Legionella species to form biofilms. In addition, a combination of Raman microspectroscopy with chemometric approaches can distinguish between both planktonic form and biofilms of diverse bacteria and could be used to identify samples which were unknown to the identification model. Our results provide valuable data for the development of fast and reliable analytic methods based on Raman microspectroscopy, which can be applied to the analysis of tap water-adapted microorganisms without any cultivation step.

  10. Differential Adaptive Response and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Planktonic and Biofilm Cells Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Vidović, Sinisa; Korber, Darren R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the adaptive response and survival of planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis adapted to benzalkonium chloride (BC). Planktonic cells and biofilms were continuously exposed to 1 μg ml−1 of BC for 144 h. The proportion of BC-adapted biofilm cells able to survive a lethal BC treatment (30 μg ml−1) was significantly higher (4.6-fold) than that of BC-adapted planktonic cells. Similarly, there were 18.3-fold more survivors among the BC-adapted biofilm cells than among their nonadapted (i.e., without prior BC exposure) cell counterparts at the lethal BC concentration, and this value was significantly higher than the value for BC-adapted planktonic cells versus nonadapted cells (3.2-fold). A significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of surviving cells was noticed among BC-adapted biofilm cells relative to BC-adapted planktonic cells following a 10-min heat shock at 55°C. Fatty acid composition was significantly influenced by phenotype (planktonic cells or biofilm) and BC adaptation. Cell surface roughness of biofilm cells was also significantly greater (P < 0.05) than that of planktonic cells. Key proteins upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells included CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, STY0440. Nine and 17 unique proteins were upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells, respectively. These results suggest that enhanced biofilm-specific upregulation of 17 unique proteins, along with the increased expression of CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, phenotype-specific alterations in cell surface roughness, and a shift in fatty acid composition conferred enhanced survival to the BC-adapted biofilm cell population relative to their BC-adapted planktonic cell counterparts. PMID:18663028

  11. Responses of marine plankton to pollutant stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, M.

    The thesis analyses effects of pollutants on natural plankton communities on the basis of three independent mesocosm experiments and a series of laboratory experiments performed in Denmark and Greenland. The work focus on integrating functional and structural measures of community responses to re...... with examples of work done on natural communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Abiotic conditions such as UV light and nutrient concentrations are shown to influence pollutant effects.......The thesis analyses effects of pollutants on natural plankton communities on the basis of three independent mesocosm experiments and a series of laboratory experiments performed in Denmark and Greenland. The work focus on integrating functional and structural measures of community responses...

  12. International Airport Impacts to Air Quality: Size and Related Properties of Large Increases in Ultrafine Particle Number Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudda, N; Fruin, S A

    2016-04-05

    We measured particle size distributions and spatial patterns of particle number (PN) and particle surface area concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) where large increases (over local background) in PN concentrations routinely extended 18 km downwind. These elevations were mostly comprised of ultrafine particles smaller than 40 nm. For a given downwind distance, the greatest increases in PN concentrations, along with the smallest mean sizes, were detected at locations under the landing jet trajectories. The smaller size of particles in the impacted area, as compared to the ambient urban aerosol, increased calculated lung deposition fractions to 0.7-0.8 from 0.5-0.7. A diffusion charging instrument (DiSCMini), that simulates alveolar lung deposition, measured a fivefold increase in alveolar-lung deposited surface area concentrations 2-3 km downwind from the airport (over local background), decreasing steadily to a twofold increase 18 km downwind. These ratios (elevated lung-deposited surface area over background) were lower than the corresponding ratios for elevated PN concentrations, which decreased from tenfold to twofold over the same distance, but the spatial patterns of elevated concentrations were similar. It appears that PN concentration can serve as a nonlinear proxy for lung deposited surface area downwind of major airports.

  13. SEAMAP Spring 2016 Plankton Survey (R21601, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2016 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  14. SEAMAP Fall 2014 Plankton Survey (GU1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2014 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  15. SEAMAP Spring 2015 Plankton Survey (GU1501, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  16. SEAMAP 2015 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1504, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  17. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  18. Planktonic foraminifera from core tops of western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    A set of seven core tops from western equatorial Indian ocean were analysed for planktonic foraminifera, which has yielded 20 planktonic foraminiferal species. Among them Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinoides sacculifer and G. ruber constitute...

  19. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  20. Planktonic interactions and chaotic advection in Langmuir circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bees, Martin Alan; Mezic, I.; McGlade, J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of unsteady laminar flows for planktonic communities is investigated. Langmuir circulation is used, as a typical medium-scale structure, to illustrate mechanisms for the generation of plankton patches. Two behaviours are evident: chaotic regions that help to spread plankton and locally c...... coherent regions that do not mix with the chaotic regions and which persist for long periods of time. The interaction of populations of phytoplankton with zooplankton is discussed, taking into account the variations in plankton buoyancy....

  1. Studies on the hydrography and plankton of waters off Akarpati near Navapur, west coast of India during February-March

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Abidi, S.A; Desai, B.N; JiyalalRam

    Studies on selected physico-chemical parameters and plankton were carried out in waters off Akarpati during February-March 1978 In general, nutrient values increased towards offshore However, along the northern transect a reverse trend was observed...

  2. Understanding of increased diffuse scattering in regular arrays of fluctuating resonant particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Petrov, Mihail; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the analytical and numerical approaches to modeling electromagnetic properties of geometrically regular subwavelength 2D arrays of random resonant plasmonic particles. Amorphous metamaterials and metasurfaces attract interest of the scientific community due...... beam and photolithography fabrication. Despite the significant progress in large-scale fabrication, modeling and effective properties prediction of random/amorphous metamaterials and metasurfaces is still a challenge, which we address here. We present our results on analytical modelling of metasurfaces...... general cases of electric and magnetic resonant particles and oblique incidence....

  3. PFR²: a curated database of planktonic foraminifera 18S ribosomal DNA as a resource for studies of plankton ecology, biogeography and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Darling, Kate F; Mahé, Frédéric; Audic, Stéphane; Ujiié, Yurika; Weiner, Agnes K M; André, Aurore; Seears, Heidi A; Wade, Christopher M; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Douady, Christophe J; Escarguel, Gilles; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-11-01

    Planktonic foraminifera (Rhizaria) are ubiquitous marine pelagic protists producing calcareous shells with conspicuous morphology. They play an important role in the marine carbon cycle, and their exceptional fossil record serves as the basis for biochronostratigraphy and past climate reconstructions. A major worldwide sampling effort over the last two decades has resulted in the establishment of multiple large collections of cryopreserved individual planktonic foraminifera samples. Thousands of 18S rDNA partial sequences have been generated, representing all major known morphological taxa across their worldwide oceanic range. This comprehensive data coverage provides an opportunity to assess patterns of molecular ecology and evolution in a holistic way for an entire group of planktonic protists. We combined all available published and unpublished genetic data to build PFR(2), the Planktonic foraminifera Ribosomal Reference database. The first version of the database includes 3322 reference 18S rDNA sequences belonging to 32 of the 47 known morphospecies of extant planktonic foraminifera, collected from 460 oceanic stations. All sequences have been rigorously taxonomically curated using a six-rank annotation system fully resolved to the morphological species level and linked to a series of metadata. The PFR(2) website, available at http://pfr2.sb-roscoff.fr, allows downloading the entire database or specific sections, as well as the identification of new planktonic foraminiferal sequences. Its novel, fully documented curation process integrates advances in morphological and molecular taxonomy. It allows for an increase in its taxonomic resolution and assures that integrity is maintained by including a complete contingency tracking of annotations and assuring that the annotations remain internally consistent.

  4. Factors affecting egg ratios in planktonic rotifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Gulati, R.D.; Nandini, S.

    2005-01-01

    Edmondson’s egg ratio (number of amictic eggs per female) is an important life history variable, which has been in wide use to understand and predict patterns of population growth in planktonic rotifers under field conditions. It is also useful as an indicator of the health of rotifers under culture

  5. Seasonal dynamics of plankton communities coupled with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal dynamics of plankton communities coupled with environmental factors ... In this study, we studied the influence of the physical-chemical and biological ... which are well related to changes in algae diversity and abundance, noting that ... The “top-down” effect of planktivorous fish on the zooplankton is a significant ...

  6. Micro- and nanotechnologies in plankton research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Javeed Shaikh

    2015-05-01

    A better understanding of the vast range of plankton and their interactions with the marine environment would allow prediction of their large-scale impact on the marine ecosystem, and provide in-depth knowledge on pollution and climate change. Numerous technologies, especially lab-on-a-chip microsystems, are being used to this end. Marine biofouling is a global issue with significant economic consequences. Ecofriendly polymer nanotechnologies are being developed to combat marine biofouling. Furthermore, nanomaterials hold great potential for bioremediation and biofuel production. Excellent reviews covering focused topics in plankton research exist, with only a handful discussing both micro- and nanotechnologies. This work reviews both micro- and nanotechnologies applied to broad-ranging plankton research topics including flow cytometry, chemotaxis/toxicity assays, biofilm formation, marine antifouling/fouling-release surfaces and coatings, green energy, green nanomaterials, microalgae immobilization, and bioremediation. It is anticipated that developments in plankton research will see engineered exploitation of micro- and nanotechnologies. The current review is therefore intended to promote micro-/nanotechnology researchers to team up with limnologists/oceanographers, and develop novel strategies for understanding and green exploitation of the complex marine ecosystem.

  7. Letter to the EditorForbush precursory increase and shock-associated particles on 20 October 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Struminsky

    Full Text Available Strong interplanetary disturbances may affect cosmic ray protons tremendously with energies less than 1 GeV, increasing their intensity by hundreds of percents, but they are not so effective for protons of higher energies. This energy limit is crucial to understand processes of cosmic ray propagation and acceleration in the heliosphere. The Forbush pre-increase and the effect of shock-associated particles observed on 20 October 1989 illustrate the problem. This is a rare event, when the energies of shock-associated particles measured by the GOES-7 satellite spread continuously to the neutron monitor energies. The Forbush pre-increase could be attributed to a single reflection of galactic cosmic rays from the magnetic wall observed at 12:00 UT. It had a very hard spectrum with maximum energy of modulation more than 10 GeV. The spectrum of shock-associated particles was soft and their maximum energy was less than 1 GeV. The problem of shock acceleration versus trapping is discussed for the 20 October 1989 event. It is argued that the shock-associated particles were accelerated near the flare site and then propagated to the Earth inside the trap between two magnetic walls at 12:00 UT and 17:00 UT.Key words. Interplanetary physics (cosmic rays; energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  8. Changes in Microbial Plankton Assemblages Induced by Mesoscale Oceanographic Features in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alicia K.; McInnes, Allison S.; Rooker, Jay R.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale circulation generated by the Loop Current in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) delivers growth-limiting nutrients to the microbial plankton of the euphotic zone. Consequences of physicochemically driven community shifts on higher order consumers and subsequent impacts on the biological carbon pump remain poorly understood. This study evaluates microbial plankton <10 μm abundance and community structure across both cyclonic and anti-cyclonic circulation features in the NGOM using flow cytometry (SYBR Green I and autofluorescence parameters). Non-parametric multivariate hierarchical cluster analyses indicated that significant spatial variability in community structure exists such that stations that clustered together were defined as having a specific ‘microbial signature’ (i.e. statistically homogeneous community structure profiles based on relative abundance of microbial groups). Salinity and a combination of sea surface height anomaly and sea surface temperature were determined by distance based linear modeling to be abiotic predictor variables significantly correlated to changes in microbial signatures. Correlations between increased microbial abundance and availability of nitrogen suggest nitrogen-limitation of microbial plankton in this open ocean area. Regions of combined coastal water entrainment and mesoscale convergence corresponded to increased heterotrophic prokaryote abundance relative to autotrophic plankton. The results provide an initial assessment of how mesoscale circulation potentially influences microbial plankton abundance and community structure in the NGOM. PMID:26375709

  9. Temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism: an experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Arrieta, J. M.; Coello, A.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2011-11-01

    Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested experimentally the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest a temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  10. Temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism: an experimental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holding

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested experimentally the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest a temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  11. Carnivorous planktonic Difflugia (Protista, Amoebina Testacea) and their predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bo-Ping; Wang, Tian; Xu, Lei; Lin, Qiu Qi; Jinyu, Zhang; Dumont, Henri J

    2011-08-01

    Four planktonic species of Difflugia co-occurring in a south Chinese reservoir were found to be carnivorous, but the diet was widest in the largest species (D. tuberspinifera) and narrowest in the smallest (D. hydrostatica). It included rotifers, ciliates, dinoflagellates, floating eggs, and small particles associated with organic debris. Scavenging and cannibalism were also observed. Species with a collared test (D. biwae, D. mulanensis) showed a form of suction-feeding, while species with teeth on the pseudostome used these, together with their pseudopods, as "inverted crown corks", providing leverage for opening the lorica of their (rotifer) prey. Predators of Difflugia included cyclopoid copepods. In addition, the rotifers Asplanchna priodonta, Ploesoma hudsoni and, occasionally, big ciliates (Stentor sp.) all ingested their prey as a whole. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of stochastic perturbations on plankton transport by internal solitary waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stastna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Internal solitary and solitary-like waves are a commonly observed feature of density stratified natural waters, including lakes and the coastal ocean. Since such waves induce significant currents throughout the water column they can be responsible for significant transport of both passive and swimming biota. We consider simple models of moving zooplankton based on the Langevin equation. The small amplitude randomness significantly alters the nature of particle motion. In particular, passage through the wave leads to strongly non Gaussian particle distributions. When the plankton swims to return to its equilibrium photic level, a steady state that balances randomness, swimming and wave-induced motions is possible. We discuss possible implications of this steady state for organisms that feed on plankton.

  13. Employing an Internal Wavemaker to Simulate Sensory Cues in the Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, A. C.; Webster, D. R.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous feature in many coastal marine ecosystems and as such are important features to consider in the spatiotemporal dynamics of thin planktonic layers. Oscillations of the pycnocline in stratified waters due to internal wave propagation generate fluxes of quantities, such as fluid momentum, thermal energy, and chemical concentration. These fields compose a set of hydrodynamic and thermochemical sensory cues that are fundamental to many planktonic life processes, including prey and predator detection, mate-tracking, habitat partitioning, nutrient and waste transport processes, and chemical communications. Thus, we expect that internal waves generate sensory cues in the water column, influence many fundamental biological processes, and broadly affect spatiotemporal productivity dynamics through unique biophysical coupling over a wide range of relevant scales. We constructed an internal wave generator facility to mimic characteristics that plankton observe in situ. Simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are employed on internal waves generated in a two-layer stratification to quantify wave-induced scalar fluxes. Difficulties inherent in scaling down in situ conditions for laboratory-scale behavioral assays are discussed in the context of accurately matching spatiotemporal scales from a planktonic point of view. Finally, the results are interpreted in the context of zooplankton sensory ecology.

  14. Benthos and plankton community data for selected rivers and harbors along Wisconsin's Lake Michigan shoreline, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C.; Bell, Amanda H.; Burns, Daniel J.; Templar, Hayley A.

    2014-01-01

    Four river systems on the Wisconsin shoreline of Lake Michigan are designated Areas of Concern (AOCs) because of severe environmental degradation: the Lower Menominee River, Lower Green Bay and Fox River, Sheboygan River, and Milwaukee Estuary. Each AOC has one or more Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) that form the basis of the AOC designation and that must be remediated or otherwise addressed before the AOC designation can be removed. All four of these AOCs have BUIs for benthos (bottom-dwelling or benthic invertebrates), and all but the Menominee River have a BUI for plankton (free-floating algae and invertebrates, or phytoplankton and zooplankton, respectively). The U.S. Geological Survey collected samples in 2012 at these four AOCs and at six non-AOCs to support the evaluation of the status of aquatic communities in the benthos and plankton at the AOCs. Samples were collected during three periods representing spring, summer, and fall. Benthos samples were collected using a dredge grab sampler and artificial substrates; plankton samples were collected using a tow net for zooplankton and a vertical water sampler for phytoplankton. Benthos and plankton were identified to the lowest possible taxonomic category and counted; samples for documenting water temperature, pH, and specific conductance, as well as sediment particle size and organic carbon were also collected during biological sampling.

  15. Modelling emergent trophic strategies in plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Aksnes, Dag L.; Berge, Terje;

    2015-01-01

    Plankton are typically divided into phytoplankton and zooplankton in marine ecosystem models. Yet, most protists in the photic zone engage in some degree of phagotrophy, and it has been suggested that trophic strategy is really a continuum between pure phototrophs (phytoplankton) and pure...... phagotrophs (unicellular zooplankton). Such a continuum of trophic strategies is well represented by trait-based modelling techniques. A key model ingredient is the size of individual cells, as size constrains affinities for nutrient uptake, photosynthesis and active encounter with other cells. We outline...... a general trait-based model of a unicellular planktonic organism where size is a central trait and where nutrient uptake, photosynthesis and phagotrophy are determined by investments into these functions and by the physical constraints imposed by organism size. This framework provides simple predictions...

  16. Climate-mediated dance of the plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Climate change will unquestionably influence global ocean plankton because it directly impacts both the availability of growth-limiting resources and the ecological processes governing biomass distributions and annual cycles. Forecasting this change demands recognition of the vital, yet counterintuitive, attributes of the plankton world. The biomass of photosynthetic phytoplankton, for example, is not proportional to their division rate. Perhaps more surprising, physical processes (such as deep vertical mixing) can actually trigger an accumulation in phytoplankton while simultaneously decreasing their division rates. These behaviours emerge because changes in phytoplankton division rates are paralleled by proportional changes in grazing, viral attack and other loss rates. Here I discuss this trophic dance between predators and prey, how it dictates when phytoplankton biomass remains constant or achieves massive blooms, and how it can determine even the sign of change in ocean ecosystems under a warming climate.

  17. Climate change and plankton phenology in freshwater: current trends and future commitments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Vadadi-Fülöp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid body of empirical, experimental and theoretical evidence accumulated over recent years indicated that freshwater plankton experienced advance in phenology in response to climate change. Despite rapidly growing evidence for phenological changes, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of how climate change alters plankton phenology in freshwater. To overcome current limitations, we need to shed some light on trends and constraints in current research. The goal of this study is to identify current trends and gaps based on analysis of selected papers, by the help of which we can facilitate further advance in the field. We searched the literature for plankton phenology and confined our search to studies where climate change has been proposed to alter plankton phenology and rates of changes were quantified. We did not restrict our search for empirical contributions; experimental and theoretical studies were considered as well. In the following we discuss the spatio-temporal setting of selected studies, contributions of different taxonomic groups, emerging methodological constraints, measures of phenological trends; and finally give a list of recommendations on how to improve our understanding in the field. The majority of studies were confined to deep lakes with a skewed geographical distribution toward Central Europe, where scientists have long been engaged in limnology. Despite these findings, recent studies suggest that plankton in running waters may experience change in phenology with similar magnitude. Average rate of advancement in phenology of freshwater plankton exceeded those of the marine plankton and the global average. Increasing study duration was not coupled either with increasing contribution of discontinuous data or with increasing rates of phenological changes. Future studies may benefit from i delivering longterm data across scientific and political boundaries; ii extending study sites to broader geographical areas with

  18. 层流手术室空气中浮游菌超标原因与控制%The causes and control of excessive planktonic bacteria in the air of laminar flow operation room

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷凤琼; 唐葶婷; 卞红强; 罗万军; 徐润林; 范丽; 杨泳茹

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究层流手术室空气中浮游菌超标的原因与控制,以降低感染发生率。方法对2012年7月-2014年7月层流手术室连续100台手术进行检测,使用浮游菌采样器和尘埃粒子计数仪在手术室中不同的时间段进行多点采样,包括手术区和非手术区(周边区),对所测浮游菌及尘埃粒子进行计数统计,分析浮游菌、尘埃粒子超标的原因,提出处理对策。结果层流手术室在手术前浮游菌、尘埃粒子数量均符合标准,手术开始后浮游菌及尘埃粒子开始呈上升趋势,直到手术结束时达到最大值,在手术结束后浮游菌及尘埃粒子开始下降,30 min后恢复标准,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在手术室中,尘埃粒子及浮游菌超标的原因是由于手术的动态运行、人员的走动、操作等均导致其上升,而严格的消毒、防止感染是保证手术室洁净的关键。%OBJECTIVE To study the causes and control of excessive planktonic bacteria in the air of laminar flow operation room so as to reduce infection rates .METHODS A total of 100 consecutive operation of laminar flow op‐eration from Jul .2012 to Jul .2014 were detected .Multi‐point sampling in different time period in operation rooms was conducted by planktonic bacteria sampler and dust particle calculating instrument in different areas ,including the operation area and non operation area (peripheral regions) .The planktonic bacteria and dust particle were counted and the causes for excessive planktonic bacteria and dust particle were analyzed to come up with some measures .RESULTS Before surgeries ,numbers of planktonic bacteria and dust particles in laminar flow operation room met the standards .But w hen the operation began ,numbers of planktonic bacteria and dust particle increased rapidly and reached the maximum at the end of the surgery .After that ,the numbers started to reduce and 30 mi‐nutes later

  19. The structure and evolution of plankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Alan R.

    New understanding of the circulation of ancient oceans is not yet matched by progress in our understanding of their pelagic ecology, though it was the planktonic ecosystems that generated our offshore oil and gas reserves. Can we assume that present-day models of ecosystem function are also valid for ancient seas? This question is addressed by a study of over 4000 plankton samples to derive a comprehensive, global description of zooplankton community structure in modern oceans: this shows that copepods form only 50% of the biomass of all plankton, ranging from 70% in polar to 35% in tropical seas. Comparable figures are derived from 14 other taxonomic categories of zooplankton. For trophic groupings, the data indicate globally: geletinous predators - 14%; gelatinous herbivores - 4%; raptorial predators - 33%; macrofiltering herbivores - 20%; macrofiltering omnivores - 25%; and detritivores - 3%. A simple, idealized model for the modern pelagic ecosystem is derived from these percentages which indicates that metazooplankton are not the most important consumers of pico- and nano-plankton production which itself probably constitutes 90% of primary production in warm oceans. This model is then compared with candidate life-forms available in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic oceans to determine to what extent it is also valid for ancient ecosystems: it is concluded that it is probably unnecessary to postulate models fundamentally differing from it in order to accommodate the life-forms, both protozoic and metazoic, known to have populated ancient seas. Remarkably few life-forms have existed which cannot be paralleled in the modern ocean, which contains remarkably few life-forms which cannot be paralleled in the Palaeozoic ocean. As a first assumption, then, it is reasonable to assume that energy pathways were similar in ancient oceans to those we study today.

  20. Quasi-planktonic behavior of foraging top marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, Alice; De Monte, Silvia; Kestenare, Elodie; Guinet, Christophe; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    Monitoring marine top predators is fundamental for assessing the health and functioning of open ocean ecosystems. Although recently tracking observations have substantially increased, factors determining the horizontal exploration of the ocean by marine predators are still largely unknown, especially at the scale of behavioral switches (1-100 km, days-weeks). It is commonly assumed that the influence of water movement can be neglected for animals capable of swimming faster than the current. Here, we challenge this assumption by combining the use of biologging (GPS and accelerometry), satellite altimetry and in-situ oceanographic data (ADCP and drifting buoys) to investigate the effect of the mesoscale ocean dynamics on a marine predator, the southern elephant seal. A Lagrangian approach reveals that trajectories of elephant seals are characterized by quasi-planktonic bouts where the animals are horizontally drifting. These bouts correspond to periods of increased foraging effort, indicating that in the quasi-planktonic conditions energy is allocated to diving and chasing, rather than in horizontal search of favourable grounds. These results suggest that mesoscale features like eddies and fronts may act as a focal points for trophic interactions not only by bottom-up modulation of nutrient injection, but also by directly entraining horizontal displacements of the upper trophic levels.

  1. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J.; Szwargulski, P.; Sequeira, S.; Kaul, M. G.; Lange, C.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter.

  2. Serotonin increases cilia-driven particle transport via an acetylcholine-independent pathway in the mouse trachea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter König

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mucociliary clearance in the airways is driven by the coordinated beating of ciliated cells. Classical neuromediators such as noradrenalin and acetylcholine increase ciliary beat frequency and thus cilia-driven transport. Despite the fact that the neuromediator serotonin is ciliostimulatory in invertebrates and has been implied in releasing acetylcholine from the airway epithelium, its role in regulating cilia function in vertebrate airways is not established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the effects of serotonin on ciliary beat frequency and cilia-driven particle transport in the acutely excised submerged mouse trachea and determined the sources of serotonin in this tissue by immunohistochemistry. Serotonin (100 microM increased cilary beat frequency (8.9+/-1.2 Hz to 17.0+/-2.7 Hz and particle transport speed (38.9+/-4.6 microm/s to 83.4+/-8.3 microm/s to an extent that was comparable to a supramaximal dose of ATP. The increase in particle transport speed was totally prevented by methysergide (100 microM. Blockade of muscarinic receptors by atropine (1 microM did not reduce the effect of serotonin, although it was effective in preventing the increase in particle transport speed mediated by muscarine (100 microM. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated serotonin in mast cells pointing towards mast cells and platelets as possible endogenous sources of serotonin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that serotonin is a likely endogenous mediator that can increase cilia-driven transport independent from acetylcholine during activation of mast cells and platelets.

  3. Serotonin Increases Cilia-Driven Particle Transport via an Acetylcholine-Independent Pathway in the Mouse Trachea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Gabriela; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Mucociliary clearance in the airways is driven by the coordinated beating of ciliated cells. Classical neuromediators such as noradrenalin and acetylcholine increase ciliary beat frequency and thus cilia-driven transport. Despite the fact that the neuromediator serotonin is ciliostimulatory in invertebrates and has been implied in releasing acetylcholine from the airway epithelium, its role in regulating cilia function in vertebrate airways is not established. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of serotonin on ciliary beat frequency and cilia-driven particle transport in the acutely excised submerged mouse trachea and determined the sources of serotonin in this tissue by immunohistochemistry. Serotonin (100 µM) increased cilary beat frequency (8.9±1.2 Hz to 17.0±2.7 Hz) and particle transport speed (38.9±4.6 µm/s to 83.4±8.3 µm/s) to an extent that was comparable to a supramaximal dose of ATP. The increase in particle transport speed was totally prevented by methysergide (100 µM). Blockade of muscarinic receptors by atropine (1 µM) did not reduce the effect of serotonin, although it was effective in preventing the increase in particle transport speed mediated by muscarine (100 µM). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated serotonin in mast cells pointing towards mast cells and platelets as possible endogenous sources of serotonin. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that serotonin is a likely endogenous mediator that can increase cilia-driven transport independent from acetylcholine during activation of mast cells and platelets. PMID:19290057

  4. Progress Towards a Global Understanding of Plankton Dynamics: The Global Alliance of CPR Surveys (GACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, S.; Richardson, A.; Melrose, C.; Muxagata, E.; Hosie, G.; Verheye, H.; Hall, J.; Edwards, M.; Koubbi, P.; Abu-Alhaija, R.; Chiba, S.; Wilson, W.; Nagappa, R.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-02-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) was first used in 1931 to routinely sample plankton and its continued deployment now sustains the longest-running, and spatially most extensive marine biological sampling programme in the world. Towed behind, for the most part commercial, ships it collects plankton samples from the surface waters that are subsequently analysed to provide taxonomically-resolved abundance data on a broad range of planktonic organisms from the size of coccolithophores to euphausiids. Plankton appear to integrate changes in the physical environment and by underpinning most marine food-webs, pass on this variability to higher trophic levels which have societal value. CPRs are deployed increasingly around the globe in discrete regional surveys that until recently interacted in an informal way. In 2011 the Global Alliance of CPR Surveys (GACS) was launched to bring these surveys together to collaborate more productively and address issues such as: methodological standardization, data integration, capacity building, and data analysis. Early products include a combined global database and regularly-released global marine ecological status reports. There are, of course, limitations to the exploitation of CPR data as well as the current geographic coverage. A current focus of GACS is integration of the data with models to meaningfully extrapolate across time and space. In this way the output could be used to provide more robust synoptic representations of key plankton variables. Recent years have also seen the CPR used as a platform in itself with the inclusion of additional sensors and water samplers that can sample the microplankton. The archive of samples has already been used for some molecular investigations and curation of samples is maintained for future studies. Thus the CPR is a key element of any regional to global ocean observing system of biodiversity.

  5. Salinity controls on Na incorporation in Red Sea planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezger, E. M.; Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Brummer, G. J. A.; Reichart, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas several well-established proxies are available for reconstructing past temperatures, salinity remains challenging to assess. Reconstructions based on the combination of (in)organic temperature proxies and foraminiferal stable oxygen isotopes result in relatively large uncertainties, which may be reduced by application of a direct salinity proxy. Cultured benthic and planktonic foraminifera showed that Na incorporation in foraminiferal shell calcite provides a potential independent proxy for salinity. Here we present the first field calibration of such a potential proxy. Living planktonic foraminiferal specimens from the Red Sea surface waters were collected and analyzed for their Na/Ca content using laser ablation quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using the Red Sea as a natural laboratory, the calibration covers a broad range of salinities over a steep gradient within the same water mass. For both Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinoides sacculifer calcite Na/Ca increases with salinity, albeit with a relatively large intraspecimen and interspecimen variability. The field-based calibration is similar for both species from a salinity of 36.8 up to 39.6, while values for G. sacculifer deviate from this trend in the northernmost transect. It is hypothesized that the foraminifera in the northernmost part of the Red Sea are (partly) expatriated and hence should be excluded from the Na/Ca-salinity calibration. Incorporation of Na in foraminiferal calcite therefore provides a potential proxy for salinity, although species-specific calibrations are still required and more research on the effect of temperature is needed.

  6. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plankton assembly in an ultra-oligotrophic Antarctic lake over the summer transition from the ice-cover to ice-free period: A size spectra approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochera, Carlos; Quesada, Antonio; Toro, Manuel; Rico, Eugenio; Camacho, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Lakes from the Antarctic maritime region experience climate change as a main stressor capable of modifying their plankton community structure and function, essentially because summer temperatures are commonly over the freezing point and the lake's ice cap thaws. This study was conducted in such seasonally ice-covered lake (Lake Limnopolar, Byers Peninsula, Livingston Is., Antarctica), which exhibits a microbial dominated pelagic food web. An important feature is also the occurrence of benthic mosses (Drepanocladus longifolius) covering the lake bottom. Plankton dynamics were investigated during the ice-thawing transition to the summer maximum. Both bacterioplankton and viral-like particles were higher near the lake's bottom, suggesting a benthic support. When the lake was under dim conditions because of the snow-and-ice cover, autotrophic picoplankters dominated at deep layers. The taxa-specific photopigments indicated dominance of picocyanobacteria among them when the light availability was lower. By contrast, larger and less edible phytoplankton dominated at the onset of the ice melting. The plankton size spectra were fitted to the continuous model of Pareto distribution. Spectra evolved similarly at two sampled depths, in surface and near the bottom, with slopes increasing until mid-January. However, slopes were less steep (i.e., size classes more uniformly distributed) at the bottom, thus denoting a more efficient utilization of resources. These findings suggest that microbial loop pathways in the lake are efficiently channelized during some periods to the metazoan production (mainly the copepod Boeckella poppei). Our results point to that trophic interactions may still occur in these lakes despite environmental harshness. This results of interest in a framework of increasing temperatures that may reduce the climatic restrictions and therefore stimulate biotic interactions.

  8. A simple method to increase the current range of the TERA chip in charged particle therapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Fausti, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni del Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Fanola Guarachi, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giordanengo, S., E-mail: Simona.Giordanengo@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Talpacci, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Varasteh Anvar, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vignati, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria,1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2015-10-21

    The development of the next generation of accelerators for charged particle radiotherapy aims to reduce dimensions and operational complexity of the machines by engineering pulsed beams accelerators. The drawback is the increased difficulty to monitor the beam delivery. Within each pulse, instantaneous currents larger by two to three orders of magnitude than present applications are expected, which would saturate the readout of the monitor chambers. In this paper, we report of a simple method to increase by almost two orders of magnitude the current range of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit chip previously developed by our group to read out monitor ionization chambers.

  9. A simple method to increase the current range of the TERA chip in charged particle therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, R.; Fausti, F.; Fanola Guarachi, L.; Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Talpacci, E.; Varasteh Anvar, M.; Vignati, A.

    2015-10-01

    The development of the next generation of accelerators for charged particle radiotherapy aims to reduce dimensions and operational complexity of the machines by engineering pulsed beams accelerators. The drawback is the increased difficulty to monitor the beam delivery. Within each pulse, instantaneous currents larger by two to three orders of magnitude than present applications are expected, which would saturate the readout of the monitor chambers. In this paper, we report of a simple method to increase by almost two orders of magnitude the current range of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit chip previously developed by our group to read out monitor ionization chambers.

  10. COPEPOD: The Coastal & Oceanic Plankton Ecology, Production, & Observation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal & Oceanic Plankton Ecology, Production, & Observation Database (COPEPOD) provides NMFS scientists with quality-controlled, globally distributed...

  11. Low normal thyroid function as a determinant of increased large very low density lipoprotein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Low-normal thyroid function may relate to increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but effects on lipoprotein subfractions are largely unknown. Associations of alterations in lipoprotein metabolism and functionality with low-normal thyroid function could be more pronounced in T

  12. Low normal thyroid function as a determinant of increased large very low density lipoprotein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Objectives: Low-normal thyroid function may relate to increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but effects on lipoprotein subfractions are largely unknown. Associations of alterations in lipoprotein metabolism and functionality with low-normal thyroid function could be more pronounced in

  13. Sub-decadal increase of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in atmospheric total suspended particles in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, S.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P.; Lee, M.; Tachibana, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are good tracers to evaluate the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere and are important precursors for the production of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in aqueous phase. Here we report seasonal and interannual variations of aerosol-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal over sub-decadal scale (2001-2008) in ambient aerosols collected at Gosan, Jeju Island in the East China Sea. Glyoxal concentrations ranged from 0.06 to 106 ng m-3, with a peak in January. Concentrations of methylglyoxal ranged from 0.05 to 110 ng m-3 with a peak in April. The glyoxal peak is related with carbon monoxide and levoglucosan whereas methylglyoxal peak aligns with ozone. These results suggest an elevated combustion sources of glyoxal in January and secondary sources of methylglyoxal in April. A pronounced seasonal variation was observed for methylglyoxal to glyoxal ratios with maximum in summer followed by spring, autumn and winter, suggesting methyglyoxal to glyoxal ratio is an effective proxy to evaluate the strength of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources of organic aerosol in East Asia. Overall, concentrations of glyoxal from 2001 to 2008 increased by at least 29% per year in winter and 83% per year in spring, being consistent with the increase of ozone, carbon monoxide, and biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs in East Asia. We propose that the increased glyoxal and methylglyoxal could be related to an enhanced SOA production by their reactive uptake in aqueous phase over East Asia.

  14. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...... distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead...

  15. Impact of manufactured TiO2 nanoparticles on planktonic and sessile bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomini, Stéphane; Clivot, Hugues; Bauda, Pascale; Pagnout, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we conducted a 2 week microcosm experiment with a natural freshwater bacterial community to assess the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) at various concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) on planktonic and sessile bacteria under dark conditions. Results showed an increase of planktonic bacterial abundance at the highest TiO2-NP concentration, concomitant with a decrease from that of sessile bacteria. Bacterial assemblages were most affected by the 100 mg/L TiO2-NP exposure and overall diversity was found to be lower for planktonic bacteria and higher for sessile bacteria at this concentration. In both compartments, a 100 mg/L TiO2-NPs exposure induced a decrease in the ratio between the Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. For planktonic communities, a decrease of Comamonadaceae was observed concomitant with an increase of Oxalobacteraceae and Cytophagaceae (especially Emticicia). For sessile communities, results showed a strong decrease of Betaproteobacteria and particularly of Comamonadaceae.

  16. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lazarus

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18O (climate and carbon cycle records (∂(13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2. Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all p<.001, but only weakly over the earlier Cenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  17. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related

  18. Preservation potential of ancient plankton DNA in Pleistocene marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boere, A.C.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; de Lange, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Coolen, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that ancient plankton DNA can be recovered from Holocene lacustrine and marine sediments, including from species that do not leave diagnostic microscopic fossils in the sediment record. Therefore, the analysis of this so-called fossil plankton DNA is a promising approach fo

  19. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related t

  20. Communities structure of the planktonic halophiles in the solar saltern of Sfax, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2009-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the main planktonic halophilic micro-organisms (heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, phytoplankton, ciliates) and metazooplankton were investigated in six ponds of increasing salinity in the solar salt works of Sfax, Tunisia, from January to December 2003. Marked changes in the composition and biomass of the communities were found along the salinity gradient, especially at salinities of 150 and 350. Autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates characterized the less salted ponds. Planktonic biomass was the highest at intermediate salinity as a consequence of a bloom of Ochromonas. Species richness of phytoplankton, ciliates and zooplankton greatly decrease above a salinity of 150 and typical halophiles ( Dunaliella salina, cyanobacteria, Fabrea salina and Artemia salina) were found between 150 and 350 salinity. In this environment, F. salina appeared more adapted than the brine shrimp to survive during phytoplankton blooms. The halophilic plankton was however almost entirely composed of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the crystallizers. We thus observed a progressive disappearance of the autotrophic planktonic communities along the salinity gradient. Multivariate analysis of the communities provides evidence that ponds represent discrete aquatic ecosystems within this salt works.

  1. Scaling of fecundity, growth and development in marine planktonic copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Sabatini, M.

    1995-01-01

    We compiled information from the literature on female and egg sizes and maximum egg production, growth and developmental rates in marine planktonic copepods. While specific growth and developmental rates are invariant with body mass, weight- specific fecundity scales with female body mass(-0.......26) in both broadcast-spawning and egg-carrying copepods. Egg sizes increase with female size and, consequently, egg production rates (no. of eggs female(-1) d(-1)) are constant with size. Developmental rates were similar among egg-carrying and broadcast-spawning copepods, but the latter grow faster by 30...... to 50% and have weight-specific fecundities that are 2.5 times and egg production rates that are 7.5 times those of the former, Nauplii develop faster (by a factor of 2) but grow slower (by 20 to 40%) than copepodites in both spawning types. The main demographic implications of these findings are (1...

  2. Partitioning and bioaccumulation of PCBs and PBDEs in marine plankton from the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Heloise; Dangerfield, Neil; Macdonald, Robie W.; Galbraith, M.; Crewe, Norman; Shaw, Patrick; Mackas, David; Ross, Peter S.

    2013-08-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a large, deep, fjord-like estuary on the southern coast of British Columbia which is subject to local and atmospheric inputs of persistent environmental contaminants. We measured 204 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 61 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) seasonally in water (two depths; dissolved and particle-bound) and plankton (vertical tow) samples collected at two stations. Principal components analysis clearly distinguished the dissolved and particulate water fractions and plankton samples, with the latter two compartments associated more with heavier congeners. Bioaccumulation factors (log BAFs) for PCBs and PBDEs in plankton were best described by parabolic relationships against octanol-water partitioning coefficients (log Kow), peaking at a log Kow of 5-7, underscoring the important role of physico-chemical properties in driving the uptake of these persistent contaminants by plankton from water. The estimated total quantity of PCBs (annual average of 0.61 ± SEM 0.12 kg) and PBDEs (annual average of 0.64 ± 0.19 kg) in Strait of Georgia plankton biomass were remarkably similar, highlighting the emergence of currently-used PBDEs as a priority concern. The estimated total of 52.1 ± 8.41 kg of PCBs in water (dissolved + particle-bound) was higher than the estimated 26.8 ± 5.20 kg of PBDEs (dissolved + particle-bound), reflecting the dichotomous use histories for these two contaminant classes. Results provide insight into the biological availability of PCBs and PBDEs to the Strait of Georgia food web, and describe an important initial partitioning process by which the region's endangered killer whales have become highly contaminated.

  3. Climate variance influence on the non-stationary plankton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Juan Carlos; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Bonnet, Delphine

    2013-08-01

    We examined plankton responses to climate variance by using high temporal resolution data from 1988 to 2007 in the Western English Channel. Climate variability modified both the magnitude and length of the seasonal signal of sea surface temperature, as well as the timing and depth of the thermocline. These changes permeated the pelagic system yielding conspicuous modifications in the phenology of autotroph communities and zooplankton. The climate variance envelope, thus far little considered in climate-plankton studies, is closely coupled with the non-stationary dynamics of plankton, and sheds light on impending ecological shifts and plankton structural changes. Our study calls for the integration of the non-stationary relationship between climate and plankton in prognostic models on the productivity of marine ecosystems.

  4. The predictive skill of species distribution models for plankton in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Philipp; Kiørboe, Thomas; Licandro, Priscilla; Payne, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Statistical species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to project spatial relocations of marine taxa under future climate change scenarios. However, tests of their predictive skill in the real-world are rare. Here, we use data from the Continuous Plankton Recorder program, one of the longest running and most extensive marine biological monitoring programs, to investigate the reliability of predicted plankton distributions. We apply three commonly used SDMs to 20 representative plankton species, including copepods, diatoms, and dinoflagellates, all found in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas. We fit the models to decadal subsets of the full (1958-2012) dataset, and then use them to predict both forward and backward in time, comparing the model predictions against the corresponding observations. The probability of correctly predicting presence was low, peaking at 0.5 for copepods, and model skill typically did not outperform a null model assuming distributions to be constant in time. The predicted prevalence increasingly differed from the observed prevalence for predictions with more distance in time from their training dataset. More detailed investigations based on four focal species revealed that strong spatial variations in skill exist, with the least skill at the edges of the distributions, where prevalence is lowest. Furthermore, the scores of traditional single-value model performance metrics were contrasting and some implied overoptimistic conclusions about model skill. Plankton may be particularly challenging to model, due to its short life span and the dispersive effects of constant water movements on all spatial scales, however there are few other studies against which to compare these results. We conclude that rigorous model validation, including comparison against null models, is essential to assess the robustness of projections of marine planktonic species under climate change. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A fluid mechanical model for mixing in a plankton predator-prey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J.; Dabiri, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    A Lagrangian method is developed to study mixing of small particles in open flows. Particle Lagrangian Coherent Structures (pLCS) are identified as transport barriers in the dynamical systems of particles. We apply this method to a planktonic predator-prey system in which moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita uses its body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. With the flow generated by the jellyfish experimentally measured and the dynamics of prey particles in the flow described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation, we use pLCS to identify the capture region in which prey can be captured. The properties of the capture region enable analysis of the effects of several physiological and mechanical parameters on the predator-prey interaction, such as prey size, escape force, predator perception, etc. The method provides a new methodology to study dynamics and mixing of small organisms in general.

  6. Continuous daylight in the high-Arctic summer supports high plankton respiration rates compared to those supported in the dark

    KAUST Repository

    Mesa, Elena

    2017-04-21

    Plankton respiration rate is a major component of global CO2 production and is forecasted to increase rapidly in the Arctic with warming. Yet, existing assessments in the Arctic evaluated plankton respiration in the dark. Evidence that plankton respiration may be stimulated in the light is particularly relevant for the high Arctic where plankton communities experience continuous daylight in spring and summer. Here we demonstrate that plankton community respiration evaluated under the continuous daylight conditions present in situ, tends to be higher than that evaluated in the dark. The ratio between community respiration measured in the light (Rlight) and in the dark (Rdark) increased as the 2/3 power of Rlight so that the Rlight:Rdark ratio increased from an average value of 1.37 at the median Rlight measured here (3.62 µmol O2 L-1 d-1) to an average value of 17.56 at the highest Rlight measured here (15.8 µmol O2 L-1 d-1). The role of respiratory processes as a source of CO2 in the Arctic has, therefore, been underestimated and is far more important than previously believed, particularly in the late spring, with 24 h photoperiods, when community respiration rates are highest.

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Adilson; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Pinheiro, Luiza; Moraes Riboli, Danilo Flávio; Benini Martins, Katheryne; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    . Linezolid was the most effective drug in inhibiting staphylococci in the biofilm, without an increase in the MIC, when compared to planktonic cells. None of the isolates were resistant to this drug. PMID:27598130

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Adilson; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Pinheiro, Luiza; Moraes Riboli, Danilo Flávio; Benini Martins, Katheryne; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-09-01

    . Linezolid was the most effective drug in inhibiting staphylococci in the biofilm, without an increase in the MIC, when compared to planktonic cells. None of the isolates were resistant to this drug.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    NS species. Linezolid was the most effective drug in inhibiting staphylococci in the biofilm, without an increase in the MIC, when compared to planktonic cells. None of the isolates were resistant to this drug.

  10. Increased Back-Bonding Explains Step-Edge Reactivity and Particle Size Effect for CO Activation on Ru Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Lucas; Copéret, Christophe; Comas-Vives, Aleix

    2016-12-28

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule, a key feedstock and intermediate in chemical processes. Its adsorption and activation, typically carried out on metallic nanoparticles (NPs), are strongly dependent on the particle size. In particular, small NPs, which in principle contain more corner and step-edge atoms, are surprisingly less reactive than larger ones. Hereby, first-principles calculations on explicit Ru NP models (1-2 nm) show that both small and large NPs can present step-edge sites (e.g., B5 and B6 sites). However, such sites display strong particle-size-dependent reactivity because of very subtle differences in local chemical bonding. State-of-the-art crystal orbital Hamilton population analysis allows a detailed molecular orbital picture of adsorbed CO on step-edges, which can be classified as flat (η(1) coordination) and concave (η(2) coordination) sites. Our analysis shows that the CO π-metal dπ hybrid band responsible for the electron back-donation is better represented by an oxygen lone pair on flat sites, whereas it is delocalized on both C and O atoms on concave sites, increasing the back-bonding on these sites compared to flat step-edges or low-index surface sites. The bonding analysis also rationalizes why CO cleavage is easier on step-edge sites of large NPs compared to small ones irrespective of the site geometry. The lower reactivity of small NPs is due to the smaller extent of the Ru-O interaction in the η(2) adsorption mode, which destabilizes the η(2) transition-state structure for CO direct cleavage. Our findings provide a molecular understanding of the reactivity of CO on NPs, which is consistent with the observed particle size effect.

  11. Projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on the global biogeography of planktonic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Roy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic foraminifera are a major contributor to the deep carbonate-flux and the planktonic biomass of the global ocean. Their microfossil deposits form one of the richest databases for reconstructing paleoenvironments, particularly through changes in their taxonomic and shell composition. Using an empirically-based foraminifer model that incorporates three known major physiological drivers of foraminifer biogeography – temperature, food and light – we investigate (i the global redistribution of planktonic foraminifera under anthropogenic climate change, and (ii the alteration of the carbonate chemistry of foraminifer habitat with ocean acidification. The present-day and future (2090–2100 3-D distributions of foraminifera are simulated using temperature, plankton biomass, and light from an Earth system model forced with historical and a future (IPCC A2 high CO2 emission scenario. The broadscale patterns of present day foraminifer biogeography are well reproduced. Foraminifer abundance and diversity are projected to decrease in the tropics and subpolar regions and increase in the subtropics and around the poles. In the tropics, the geographical shifts are driven by temperature, while the vertical shifts are driven by both temperature and food availability. In the high-latitudes, vertical shifts are driven by food availability, while geographical shifts are driven by both food availability and temperature. Changes in the marine carbon cycle would be expected in response to (i the large-scale rearrangements in foraminifer abundance, and (ii the reduction of the carbonate concentration in the habitat range of planktonic foraminifers: from 10–30 μmol kg−1 in the polar/subpolar regions to 30–70 μmol kg−1 in the subtropical/tropical regions. High-latitude species are most vulnerable to anthropogenic change: their abundance and available habitat decrease and up to 10% of their habitat drops below the calcite saturation horizon.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide and particle matter levels associated with increased dispensing of anti-asthma drugs in Iceland's capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Hanne Krage; Zoëga, Helga; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Gíslason, Thórarinn; Hrafnkelsson, Birgir

    2012-02-01

    Air pollutants in Iceland's capital area include hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions from geothermal power plants, particle pollution (PM10) and traffic-related pollutants. Respiratory health effects of exposure to PM and traffic pollutants are well documented, yet this is one of the first studies to investigate short-term health effects of ambient H2S exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between daily ambient levels of H2S, PM10, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), and the use of drugs for obstructive pulmonary diseases in adults in Iceland's capital area. The study period was 8 March 2006 to 31 December 2009. We used log-linear Poisson generalized additive regression models with cubic splines to estimate relative risks of individually dispensed drugs by air pollution levels. A three-day moving average of the exposure variables gave the best fit to the data. Final models included significant covariates adjusting for climate and influenza epidemics, as well as time-dependent variables. The three-day moving average of H2S and PM10 levels were positively associated with the number of individuals who were dispensed drugs at lag 3-5, corresponding to a 2.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4, 3.6) and 0.9% (95% CI 0.1, 1.8) per 10 μg/m3 pollutant concentration increase, respectively. Our findings indicated that intermittent increases in levels of particle matter from traffic and natural sources and ambient H2S levels were weakly associated with increased dispensing of drugs for obstructive pulmonary disease in Iceland's capital area. These weak associations could be confounded by unevaluated variables hence further studies are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanical disruption of tumors by iron particles and magnetic field application results in increased anti-tumor immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam N Bouchlaka

    Full Text Available The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer.

  14. Comprehensive Model of Annual Plankton Succession Based on the Whole-Plankton Time Series Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Baptiste Romagnan; Louis Legendre; Lionel Guidi; Jean-Louis Jamet; Dominique Jamet; Laure Mousseau; Maria-Luiza Pedrotti; Marc Picheral; Gabriel Gorsky; Christian Sardet; Lars Stemmann

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phy-toplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankt...

  15. Dietary Resistant Starch Supplementation Increases High-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number in Pigs Fed a Western Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Todd C; Harding, Scott V; Raslawsky, Amy; Rempel, Curtis B

    2017-05-04

    Resistant starch (RS) has been well characterized for its glycemic control properties; however, there is little consensus regarding the influence of RS on blood lipid concentrations and lipoprotein distribution and size. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the effect of daily RS supplementation in a controlled capsule delivery on biomarkers of cardiovascular (blood lipids, lipoproteins) and diabetes (glucose, insulin) risk in a pig model. Twelve 8-week-old male Yorkshire pigs were placed on a synthetic Western diet and randomly divided into two groups (n = 6/group) for 30 days: (1) a placebo group supplemented with capsules containing unmodified pre-gelatinized potato starch (0 g/RS/day); and (2) an RS group supplemented with capsules containing resistant potato starch (10 g/RS/day). Serum lipids including total-cholesterol (C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides did not differ (p > 0.05) between the RS and placebo groups. Although the total numbers of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles were similar (p > 0.05) between the two groups, total high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles were higher (+28%, p < 0.05) in the RS group compared with placebo, resulting from an increase (p < 0.05) in the small HDL subclass particles (+32%). Compared with the placebo group, RS supplementation lowered (p < 0.05) fasting serum glucose (-20%) and improved (p < 0.05) insulin resistance as estimated by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) without a change in insulin. Additionally, total serum glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) was higher (+141%, p < 0.05) following RS supplementation compared with placebo. This data suggests that in addition to the more well-characterized effect of RS intake in lowering blood glucose and improving insulin sensitivity, the consumption of RS may be beneficial in lipid management strategies by enhancing total

  16. Bioaccumulation and differential partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls in freshwater, planktonic food webs

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Olof; Larsson, Per; Ewald, Göran; Okla, Lennart

    2000-01-01

    The planktonic food chain phytoplankton - zooplankton - young-of-the-year roach (Rutilus rutilus) was studied in 19 lakes in southern Sweden to investigate the bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The Sigma PCB concentrations did not steadily increase with increasing trophic level. The Sigma PCB concentrations in zooplankton (400 ng.g lipid(-1)) were lower than in both phytoplankton (660 ng.g lipid(-1)) and fish (890 ng.g lipid(-1)), which did not differ significantly. Lipid c...

  17. Experimental assessment of cumulative temperature and UV-B radiation effects on Mediterranean plankton metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.; Martinez-Ayala, Juan; Duarte, Carlos M.; Agusti, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a vulnerable region for climate change, warming at higher rates compare to the global ocean. Warming leads to increased stratification of the water column and enhanced the oligotrophic nature of the Mediterranean Sea. The oligotrophic waters are already highly transparent, however, exposure of Mediterranean plankton to ultraviolet radiation (UV-B and UV-A) may increase further if the waters become more oligotrophic, thereby, allowing a deeper UV radiation penetration ...

  18. Using flow cytometry for counting natural planktonic bacteria and understanding the structure of planktonic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Gasol

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is rapidly becoming a routine methodology in aquatic microbial ecology. The combination of simple to use bench-top flow cytometers and highly fluorescent nucleic acid stains allows fast and easy determination of microbe abundance in the plankton of lakes and oceans. The different dyes and protocols used to stain and count planktonic bacteria as well as the equipment in use are reviewed, with special attention to some of the problems encountered in daily routine practice such as fixation, staining and absolute counting. One of the main advantages of flow cytometry over epifluorescence microscopy is the ability to obtain cell-specific measurements in large numbers of cells with limited effort. We discuss how this characteristic has been used for differentiating photosynthetic from non-photosynthetic prokaryotes, for measuring bacterial cell size and nucleic acid content, and for estimating the relative activity and physiological state of each cell. We also describe how some of the flow cytometrically obtained data can be used to characterize the role of microbes on carbon cycling in the aquatic environment and we prospect the likely avenues of progress in the study of planktonic prokaryotes through the use of flow cytometry.

  19. Hurricane-driven alteration in plankton community size structure in the Gulf of Mexico: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierach, Michelle M.; Subrahmanyam, Bulusu; Samuelsen, Annette; Ueyoshi, Kyozo

    2009-04-01

    This was the first study to analyze phytoplankton and zooplankton community size structure during hurricane passage. A three-dimensional biophysical model was used to assess ecosystem dynamics, plankton biomass, and plankton distribution in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Katrina (2005). Model simulations revealed that large phytoplankton were most responsive to hurricane-induced turbulent mixing and nutrient injection, with increases in biomass along the hurricane track. Small phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and mesozooplankton biomass primarily shifted in location and increased in spatial extent as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Hurricane passage disrupted the distribution of plankton biomass associated with mesoscale eddies. Biomass minimums and maximums that resided in the center of warm- and cold-core eddies and along eddy peripheries prior to hurricane passage were displaced during Hurricane Katrina.

  20. Mercury and selenium in seston, marine plankton and fish (Sardinella brasiliensis) as a tool for understanding a tropical food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Tércia Guedes; Moreira, Isabel; Kehrig, Helena Amaral

    2015-12-15

    Mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) concentrations were evaluated in a planktivorous fish and four size classes of organisms (FSCO), collected at an oligotrophic bay in the Southeastern Brazilian coast. No significant spatial differences between Hg and Se were found in the FSCO within the five sampling points in the bay. Hg and Se concentrations increased with successive increases in the size class of the analyzed plankton, i.e. approximately 3-and 2-fold, respectively, from microplankton to macroplankton. Hg and Se biomagnified throughout the planktonic food web. The smallest size class of organism, seston, composed of both biotic and abiotic portions, and fish showed the highest Hg concentrations. This indicates that Hg is not biomagnifying in the base of the bay food web. Selenium concentrations in fish were approximately 5.9 times higher than those in seston. Hg and Se concentrations in fish were approximately 3.5 and 14.6 times higher than those found in the plankton, respectively.

  1. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (< 10 % of the metabarcodes can be unambiguously assigned to planktonic taxa. These organisms live exclusively in the surface ocean and the recovered barcodes thus represent an allochthonous component deposited with the rain of organic remains from the surface ocean. We take advantage of the planktonic foraminifera portion of the metabarcodes to establish to what extent the structure of the surface ocean biota is preserved in sedimentary eDNA. We show that planktonic foraminifera DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of

  2. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  3. Estimates of zooplankton abundance and size distribution with the Optical Plankton Counter (OPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Petersen, D.; Schnack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The capability of the Optical Plankton Count er (OPC) to examine the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton was tested in Storfjorden, Norway, in June 1993. Selected material obtained from net sampling was measured with a laboratory version of the OPC and compared with microscope analysis...... in order to identify main species in the in situ size frequency distributions obtained by the submersible version of the OPC. Differences in the particle concentration between shallow and deep water layers were clearly resolved by the submersible OPC, but the high diversity of the zooplankton community...... of zooplankton...

  4. Selection and optimization of transfection enhancer additives for increased virus-like particle production in HEK293 suspension cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Laura; Fuenmayor, Javier; González-Domínguez, Irene; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-12-01

    The manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals in mammalian cells typically relies on the use of stable producer cell lines. However, in recent years, transient gene expression has emerged as a suitable technology for rapid production of biopharmaceuticals. Transient gene expression is particularly well suited for early developmental phases, where several potential therapeutic targets need to be produced and tested in vivo. As a relatively new bioprocessing modality, a number of opportunities exist for improving cell culture productivity upon transient transfection. For instance, several compounds have shown positive effects on transient gene expression. These transfection enhancers either facilitate entry of PEI/DNA transfection complexes into the cell or nucleus or increase levels of gene expression. In this work, the potential of combining transfection enhancers to increase Gag-based virus-like particle production levels upon transfection of suspension-growing HEK 293 cells is evaluated. Using Plackett-Burman design of experiments, it is first tested the effect of eight transfection enhancers: trichostatin A, valproic acid, sodium butyrate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), lithium acetate, caffeine, hydroxyurea, and nocodazole. An optimal combination of compounds exhibiting the highest effect on gene expression levels was subsequently identified using a surface response experimental design. The optimal consisted on the addition of 20 mM lithium acetate, 3.36 mM valproic acid, and 5.04 mM caffeine which increased VLP production levels 3.8-fold, while maintaining cell culture viability at 94%.

  5. Interleukin-12 gene adjuvant increases the immunogenicity of virus-like particles of human papillomavirus type 16 regional variant strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanlan Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the immunogenicity of virus-like particles (VLP of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 isolated in East China and the adjuvant potential of interleukin-12 (IL-12. Methods: The variant HPV16 L1VLP expressed in sf9 insect cells were purified with cesium chloride gradient centrifugation. BALB/c mice were vaccinated with VLP (L1N, VLP with Freund's adjuvant (L1A or VLP with IL-12 recombinant plasmid (L1P. HPV16 VLP specific IgG and IFN-γ level in the serum were detected by ELISA, and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ in spleen cells was detected with flow cytometry. Results: The titers of serum IgG antibodies in vaccinated groups were higher than in negative control and the serum antibodies mainly recognized conformation-dependent HPV16 VLP epitopes. Splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets increased after vaccination in every experimental group, and CD8+ increased obviously in L1P group. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ decreased in L1P group and increased in the other two groups, compared to control group. Vaccination induced specific secretion of IFN-γ in the serum of vaccinated group (p < 0.05, especially in the L1P group. Conclusions: VLP of HPV16 variant strain isolated in East China could induce humoral immunity and cellular immunity in mice, and IL-12 recombinant plasmid can enhance cellular immunity.

  6. Hypoxia and exercise increase the transpulmonary passage of 99mTc-labeled albumin particles in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Bates

    Full Text Available Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVs are large diameter connections that allow blood to bypass the lung capillaries and may provide a route for right-to-left embolus transmission. These anastomoses are recruited by exercise and catecholamines and hypoxia. Yet, whether IPAVs are recruited via direct, oxygen sensitive regulatory mechanisms or indirect effects secondary to redistribution pulmonary blood flow is unknown. Here, we hypothesized that the addition of exercise to hypoxic gas breathing, which increases cardiac output, would augment IPAVs recruitment in healthy humans. To test this hypothesis, we measured the transpulmonary passage of 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin particles (99mTc-MAA in seven healthy volunteers, at rest and with exercise at 85% of volitional max, with normoxic (FIO2 = 0.21 and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.10 gas breathing. We found increased 99mTc-MAA passage in both exercise conditions and resting hypoxia. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we found the greatest 99mTc-MAA passage with resting hypoxia. As an additional, secondary endpoint, we also noted that the transpulmonary passage of 99mTc-MAA was well-correlated with the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO2 during exercise. While increased cardiac output has been proposed as an important modulator of IPAVs recruitment, we provide evidence that the modulation of blood flow through these pathways is more complex and that increasing cardiac output does not necessarily increase IPAVs recruitment. As we discuss, our data suggest that the resistance downstream of IPAVs is an important determinant of their perfusion.

  7. Particle-based simulations of powder coating in additive manufacturing suggest increase in powder bed roughness with coating speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parteli Eric J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the first particle-based numerical tool to simulate the coating of powder particles in additive manufacturing devices. Our Discrete Element Method considers realistic particle shapes and incorporates attractive interaction (van-der-Waals forces between the particles. From simulations of powder coating using a roller as coating device, we find that the surface roughness of the powder bed scales with the square of coating speed. Moreover, we find that using fine, highly polydisperse powders may lead to larger powder bed roughness, compared to process simulations using coarser powders, due to the formation of agglomerates resulting from cohesive forces.

  8. Particle-based simulations of powder coating in additive manufacturing suggest increase in powder bed roughness with coating speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    We have developed the first particle-based numerical tool to simulate the coating of powder particles in additive manufacturing devices. Our Discrete Element Method considers realistic particle shapes and incorporates attractive interaction (van-der-Waals) forces between the particles. From simulations of powder coating using a roller as coating device, we find that the surface roughness of the powder bed scales with the square of coating speed. Moreover, we find that using fine, highly polydisperse powders may lead to larger powder bed roughness, compared to process simulations using coarser powders, due to the formation of agglomerates resulting from cohesive forces.

  9. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin

    2015-01-01

    increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.......Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid...

  10. THE PARADOX OF THE PLANKTON: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE PROMOTES BLOOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: The 'paradox of the plankton' refers to commensalism as well as symbiosis, predation, and impacts of non equilibrium conditions between two planktoniccompetitors. In regards to commensalism, phytoplankton can release organic carbon that enhances growth of its ba...

  11. Life spans of planktonic foraminifers: New sight through sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Mazumder, A.

    Maastrichtian planktic foraminifera: LIFE SPANS OF PLANKTONIC FORAMINIFERS 133 methodological comparisons, intraspecific variability, and evidence for photosynthesis. Mar. Micropal. 36: 169-188. Kawahata, II., Nishimura, A. and Gagan, M.K. 2002. Seasonal...

  12. Hydrographic and Plankton Data, 1960-1965 (NODC Accession 7101194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1952/63 the Institute of Oceanography undertook an extensive seasonal survey of hydrography and plankton in the south-west Indian Ocean as part of the...

  13. Planktonic algae and cyanoprokaryotes as indicators of ecosystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-07

    Oct 7, 2013 ... 1Unit for Environmental Science and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa. 2South African ... this study a survey of planktonic autotrophs of the dams in the. Mooi River ..... Spirulina sp. ✓. ✓.

  14. THE PARADOX OF THE PLANKTON: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE PROMOTES BLOOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: The 'paradox of the plankton' refers to commensalism as well as symbiosis, predation, and impacts of non equilibrium conditions between two planktoniccompetitors. In regards to commensalism, phytoplankton can release organic carbon that enhances growth of its ba...

  15. Living planktonic foraminifera of the Wadge bank, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    Twenty three species of living planktonic Foraminifera belonging to 11 genera have been studied from the Wadge Bank area off southern tip of the Indian peninsula. The fauna is characterized by species such as Globigerinoides conglobatus, G...

  16. Recent planktonic foraminifera from the sediment off Karwar and Mangalore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    of planktonic foraminifera from the shore towards the slope, indicative of a regulated sediment discharge and rate of sedimentation in the area. All the species represented are typical warm-water fauna, with one exception. Undoubted, though rare, @i...

  17. PLANKTON OF UST-KURA REGION OF THE CASPIAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Dzhalilov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Plankton of Ust-Kura region of the Caspian Sea is studied in 2009–2011. Forty-eight species of planktonic ciliates, 17 species of Cladocera, 3 species of rotifers and 2 species of copepods are registered during the studies. Species diversity of all groups strongly influences the Kura River defining seawater desalination this site. The vast majority of species of plankton community refers to freshwater representatives or eurybiontic species able to exist in a wide range of salinity.Methods.Collected samples for evaluation were examined diatomaceous plankton partially invivo, and then fixed with 4% formalin with addition of dye "Benqalrose". Further processing of the samples was carried out under laboratory conditions.Results. During the study 43 species of ciliates, 3 species of rotifers, 17 species of Cladocera and 2 species of copepods and their larval stages was noted (Table 1 . As seen from Table 1, the distribution of planktonic ciliates to collection points was fairly even and ranged from a minimum number of species reported by Article 1 (22 species to a maximum at station 5 (31 species. It should also be noted that the vast majority mentioned in plankton ciliates are typical planktontam is distributed fairly evenly throughout the studied waters. Random plankton species, such as representatives of Condylostoma and Amphisiella were marked in shallow water stations 4 and 5. Apparently their presence in the samples is due to the temporary transfer of benthic plankton under the influence of the wave factor.

  18. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Jurgens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated ......(3), >50 mum s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing....

  19. Ocean plankton. Determinants of community structure in the global plankton interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Colin, Sébastien; Carcillo, Fabrizio; Chaffron, Samuel; Ignacio-Espinosa, J Cesar; Roux, Simon; Vincent, Flora; Bittner, Lucie; Darzi, Youssef; Wang, Jun; Audic, Stéphane; Berline, Léo; Bontempi, Gianluca; Cabello, Ana M; Coppola, Laurent; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; d'Ovidio, Francesco; De Meester, Luc; Ferrera, Isabel; Garet-Delmas, Marie-José; Guidi, Lionel; Lara, Elena; Pesant, Stéphane; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez, Pablo; Sebastian, Marta; Souffreau, Caroline; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Gorsky, Gabriel; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; Sullivan, Matthew B; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-05-22

    Species interaction networks are shaped by abiotic and biotic factors. Here, as part of the Tara Oceans project, we studied the photic zone interactome using environmental factors and organismal abundance profiles and found that environmental factors are incomplete predictors of community structure. We found associations across plankton functional types and phylogenetic groups to be nonrandomly distributed on the network and driven by both local and global patterns. We identified interactions among grazers, primary producers, viruses, and (mainly parasitic) symbionts and validated network-generated hypotheses using microscopy to confirm symbiotic relationships. We have thus provided a resource to support further research on ocean food webs and integrating biological components into ocean models.

  20. Contribution to the Themed Section: Scaling from individual plankton to marine ecosystems HORIZONS Small bugs with a big impact: linking plankton ecology with ecosystem processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of these microscopic organisms shape plankton population dynamics, distributions, and ecosystem functions. Key features of the marine environment place constraints on the ecology and evolution of plankton. Understanding these constraints is critical in developing a mechanistic understanding and predictive capacity......As an introduction to the following Themed Section on the significance of planktonic organisms to the functioning of marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles we discuss the ramifications size imparts on the biology of plankton. We provide examples of how the characteristics...

  1. Plankton respiration in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carol; Serret, Pablo; Tilstone, Gavin; Teira, Eva; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2002-05-01

    Concurrent measurements of dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), size fractionated primary production ( 14C PP), nitrogen uptake, nutrients, chlorophyll a concentration, and heterotrophic and autotrophic bacterial abundance were collected from the upper 200 m of a latitudinal (32°S-48°N) transect in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean during May/June 1998. The mean mixed layer respiration rate was 2.5±2.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=119) for the whole transect, 2.2±1.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=32) in areas where chlorophyll a was dissolved oxygen consumption, was 0.8 ( n=11). At the time of the study, plankton community respiration exceeded GP in the picoautotroph dominated oligotrophic regions (Eastern Tropical Atlantic [15.5°S-14.2°N] and North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre [21.5-42.5°N]), which amounted to 50% of the stations sampled along the 12,100 km transect. These regions also exhibited high heterotrophic: autotrophic biomass ratios, higher turnover rates of phytoplankton than of bacteria and low f ratios. However, the carbon supply mechanisms required to sustain the rates of respiration higher than GP could not be fully quantified. Future research should aim to determine the temporal balance of respiration and GP together with substrate supply mechanisms in these ocean regions.

  2. Local fluid transport by planktonic swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    Energy transport in the ocean occurs through an intricate set of pathways mainly powered by physical phenomena. The hypothesis that vertical migrations of aquatic fauna may contribute to this process through the action of the induced drift mechanism has been investigated in recent years. Microscale measurements by Kunze et al. (1), in Saanich Inlet have shown the presence of high kinetic energy dissipation rates in the vicinity of vertically migrating krill swarms. However, it remains uncertain if energy is being introduced at scales large enough to induce the transport of fluid across surfaces of equal density. Within this context, the present study aims to provide experimental insight of fluid transport by planktonic swarms. The vertical migration of Artemia salina is triggered and controlled by means of a system of stationary and translating luminescent signals. High speed flow visualizations elucidate the competing effects of upward drift by the passive sections of the organisms and downward flow induced by the appendages. The resulting fluid transport is assessed by using PIV at different stages of the migration. The kinetic energy spectrum is computed using velocity correlation functions to determine the length scales at which the animals introduce energy to the flow.

  3. Millennial-scale plankton regime shifts in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelton W; McCarthy, Matthew D; Sherwood, Owen A; Larsen, Thomas; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2015-12-18

    Climate change is predicted to alter marine phytoplankton communities and affect productivity, biogeochemistry, and the efficacy of the biological pump. We reconstructed high-resolution records of changing plankton community composition in the North Pacific Ocean over the past millennium. Amino acid-specific δ(13)C records preserved in long-lived deep-sea corals revealed three major plankton regimes corresponding to Northern Hemisphere climate periods. Non-dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria dominated during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (950-1250 Common Era) before giving way to a new regime in which eukaryotic microalgae contributed nearly half of all export production during the Little Ice Age (~1400-1850 Common Era). The third regime, unprecedented in the past millennium, began in the industrial era and is characterized by increasing production by dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. This picoplankton community shift may provide a negative feedback to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Viral particles drive rapid differentiation of memory B cells into secondary plasma cells producing increased levels of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Mohanan, Deepa; Bessa, Juliana; Link, Alexander; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Saudan, Philippe; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-06-15

    Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles (VLPs), which allows tracking of VLP-specific B cells by flow cytometry as well as histology. Using allotype markers, it is possible to adoptively transfer memory B cells into a naive mouse and track responses of naive and memory B cells in the same mouse under physiological conditions. We have observed that VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into plasma cells that drove the early onset of a strong humoral IgG response. However, neither IgM(+) nor IgG(+) memory B cells proliferated extensively or entered germinal centers. Remarkably, plasma cells derived from memory B cells preferentially homed to the bone marrow earlier and secreted increased levels of Abs when compared with primary plasma cells derived from naive B cells. Hence, memory B cells have the unique phenotype to differentiate into highly effective secondary plasma cells.

  5. Experimental assessment of cumulative temperature and UV-B radiation effects on Mediterranean plankton metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.

    2015-07-07

    The Mediterranean Sea is a vulnerable region for climate change, warming at higher rates compare to the global ocean. Warming leads to increased stratification of the water column and enhanced the oligotrophic nature of the Mediterranean Sea. The oligotrophic waters are already highly transparent, however, exposure of Mediterranean plankton to ultraviolet radiation (UV-B and UV-A) may increase further if the waters become more oligotrophic, thereby, allowing a deeper UV radiation penetration and likely enhancing impacts to biota. Here we experimentally elucidate the cumulative effects of warming and natural UV-B radiation on the net community production (NCP) of plankton communities. We conducted five experiments at monthly intervals, from June to October 2013, and evaluated the responses of NCP to ambient UV-B radiation and warming (+3°C), alone and in combination, in a coastal area of the northwest Mediterranean Sea. UV-B radiation and warming lead to reduced NCP and resulted in a heterotrophic (NCP < 0) metabolic balance. Both UV-B radiation and temperature, showed a significant individual effect in NCP across treatments and time. However, their joint effect showed to be synergistic as the interaction between them (UV × Temp) was statistically significant in most of the experiments performed. Our results showed that both drivers, would affect the gas exchange of CO2−O2 from and to the atmosphere and the role of plankton communities in the Mediterranean carbon cycle.

  6. Experimental assessment of cumulative temperature and UV-B radiation effects on Mediterranean plankton metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara S. eGarcia-Corral

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is a vulnerable region for climate change, warming at higher rates compare to the global ocean. Warming leads to increased stratification of the water column and enhanced the oligotrophic nature of the Mediterranean Sea. The oligotrophic waters are already highly transparent, however, exposure of Mediterranean plankton to ultraviolet radiation (UV-B and UV-A may increase further if the waters become more oligotrophic, thereby, allowing a deeper UV radiation penetration and likely enhancing impacts to biota.Here we experimentally elucidate the cumulative effects of warming and natural UV-B radiation on the net community production (NCP of plankton communities. We conducted five experiments at monthly intervals, from June to October 2013, and evaluated the responses of NCP to ambient UV-B radiation and warming (+3ºC, alone and in combination, in a coastal area of the northwest Mediterranean Sea. UV-B radiation and warming lead to reduced net community production and resulted in a heterotrophic (NCP<0 metabolic balance. Both UV-B radiation and temperature, showed a significant individual effect in NCP across treatments and time. However, their joint effect showed to be synergistic as the interaction between them (UV x Temp was statistically significant in most of the experiments performed. Our results showed that both drivers, would affect the gas exchange of CO2-O2 from and to the atmosphere and the role of plankton communities in the Mediterranean carbon cycle

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm and Planktonic cultures differentially impact gene expression, mapk phosphorylation, and cytokine production in human keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olerud John E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many chronic diseases, such as non-healing wounds are characterized by prolonged inflammation and respond poorly to conventional treatment. Bacterial biofilms are a major impediment to wound healing. Persistent infection of the skin allows the formation of complex bacterial communities termed biofilm. Bacteria living in biofilms are phenotypically distinct from their planktonic counterparts and are orders of magnitude more resistant to antibiotics, host immune response, and environmental stress. Staphylococcus aureus is prevalent in cutaneous infections such as chronic wounds and is an important human pathogen. Results The impact of S. aureus soluble products in biofilm-conditioned medium (BCM or in planktonic-conditioned medium (PCM on human keratinocytes was investigated. Proteomic analysis of BCM and PCM revealed differential protein compositions with PCM containing several enzymes involved in glycolysis. Global gene expression of keratinocytes exposed to biofilm and planktonic S. aureus was analyzed after four hours of exposure. Gene ontology terms associated with responses to bacteria, inflammation, apoptosis, chemotaxis, and signal transduction were enriched in BCM treated keratinocytes. Several transcripts encoding cytokines were also upregulated by BCM after four hours. ELISA analysis of cytokines confirmed microarray results at four hours and revealed that after 24 hours of exposure, S. aureus biofilm induced sustained low level cytokine production compared to near exponential increases of cytokines in planktonic treated keratinocytes. The reduction in cytokines produced by keratinocytes exposed to biofilm was accompanied by suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs. Chemical inhibition of MAPKs did not drastically reduce cytokine production in BCM-treated keratinocytes suggesting that the majority of cytokine production is mediated through MAPK-independent mechanisms. Conclusions Collectively the results indicate that S

  8. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18)O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂(13)C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all pplanktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  9. Low diversity of planktonic bacteria in the tropical ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milici, Mathias; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Wang, Hui; Jáuregui, Ruy; Camarinha-Silva, Amelia; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Plumeier, Iris; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Wurst, Mascha; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Simon, Meinhard; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of macro-organisms increases towards the equator, with almost no exceptions. It is the most conserved biogeographical pattern on earth and is thought to be related to the increase of temperature and productivity in the tropics. The extent and orientation of a latitudinal gradient of marine bacterioplankton diversity is controversial. Here we studied the euphotic zone of the Atlantic Ocean based on a transect covering ~12.000 km from 51°S to 47 °N. Water samples were collected at 26 stations at five depths between 20 and 200 m and sequentially filtered through 8 μm, 3 μm and 0,22 μm filters, resulting in a total of 359 samples. Illumina sequencing of the V5–V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a clear biogeographic pattern with a double inverted latitudinal gradient. Diversity was higher in mid-latitudinal regions of the Atlantic Ocean and decreased towards the equator. This pattern was conserved for bacteria from all three planktonic size fractions. Diversity showed a non-linear relationship with temperature and was negatively correlated with bacterial cell numbers in the upper depth layers (<100 m). The latitudinal gradients of marine bacterial diversity and the mechanisms that govern them are distinct from those found in macro-organisms.

  10. A larval dispersion study using lagrangian simulation of particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rodríguez Díaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuous displacement of water allows stabilize the temperature and also distributes nutrients and plankton in the ocean and seas permitting the development of organisms and the transfers of larvae from the spawning areas to the habitat where adult fishes can be found. The area of study covers The North Atlantic Ocean so the principal aim of the study is analyze if released particles at the Florida Strait could cross the North Atlantic Ocean and reach the European shelf. To test this, it has simulated Lagrangian trajectories for different numbers of particles or "larvae" with a passive behavior (fixing at a depth of dispersion. It has analyzed the dispersion of those particles by using the data of the components U, V and W from the speed of currents provided by the database SODA which uses an ocean model based on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory MOM2 and data profiles from World Ocean Atlas-94 and from Geosat, ERS-1 and TOPEX/Poseidon satellites. Considering the dispersive nature of the ocean, the simulations were performed by releasing many particles (typically of the order of several thousand and it was also necessary to perform an interpolation process in time and space so that the position of the particles could evolve. The simulations have been run with 5,000 particles and it has been considered a biological parameter (planktonic larval duration, PLD that represents the length of larval life. At this study it has been used PLD for a specific starfish larva (Sclerasterias tanneri larvae that can be found at the Gulf of Mexico at different locations. Particles were released in October at the most oceanward location of the Gulf of Mexico close to the Florida Strait where Sclerasterias tanneri larvae can be found. Those particles have been tracked for 660 days (660 days is the PLD of Sclerasterias tanneri larvae recording their position every 15 days. That it has done for a period of more than 100 years (1901-2010. The period (1901

  11. Ra-228, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Po-210 variations in the water columns and the surface water plankton in the Luzon Strait and northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y.; Lin, C.; Wang, P.; Su, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Profiles of Ra-228, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Po-210 were measured in the Luzon Strait (LS) and northern South China Sea (SCS) areas to delineate the exchanges between the western Philippine Sea (WPS) and the northern SCS waters across the LS. Plankton samples were also collected for Po-210 and Pb-210 measurements to assess the balance between the Po-210 excess over Pb-210 in the plankton and the deficit in the surface water. Profiles of Ra-228 and Ra-226 seem to indicate the out flow of the SCS water below the salinity minimum and above around 1500m depth, below which the WPS water flows into the SCS through the LS above a sill depth of about 2600m. This is consistent with previous studies conducted in the area. All the Pb-210 profiles show a strong subsurface maximum with higher activity in the LS area. This maximum is in large excess over its parent, Ra-226 due to atmospheric input. Po-210 profiles generally follow the associated Pb-210 profiles but with lower activities, showing Po-210 deficiency. Po-210 is strongly enriched over Pb-210 in the plankton samples with an activity ratio generally over 10 and up to 40. Both nuclides in the plankton are higher in the LS area, a trend similar to the surface water. The Po-210 excess in the plankton can account for at least 70 percent of the surface water deficit, part of which may be removed by sinking particles.

  12. Distinct responses of planktonic foraminiferal B/Ca to dissolution on seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yuhao; Yu, Jimin; Johnstone, Heather J. H.

    2016-04-01

    We have measured B/Ca in four core-top planktonic foraminiferal species (Globigerinoides ruber (white), Globigerinoides sacculifer (without final sac-like chamber), Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata) from three depth transects (the Caribbean Sea, the southwestern Indian Ocean, and the Ontong Java Plateau) to evaluate the effect of dissolution on planktonic foraminiferal B/Ca. At each transect, G. ruber (w) and G. sacculifer (w/o sac) show decreasing B/Ca with increasing water depth. This decrease in B/Ca is accompanied with decreases in shell weights, Mg/Ca, and bottom water calcite saturation state. This indicates a postdepositional dissolution effect on B/Ca in these two species. The strong correlation observed between changes in B/Ca and bottom water calcite saturation state offers an approach to correcting for the dissolution bias. By contrast, B/Ca in N. dutertrei and P. obliquiloculata remains unchanged along depth transects, although shell weights and Mg/Ca display significant declines. Overall, our core-top results suggest species-specific dissolution effects on B/Ca in different planktonic foraminiferal species.

  13. Biogeography of planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria in coastal waters of the Big Island, Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Samuel D; Kaplan, Katherine A; Modanu, Maria; Sirianni, Katherine M; Annandale, Senifa; Hewson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are biogeochemically significant constituents of coral reef ecosystems; however, little is known about biotic and abiotic factors influencing the abundance and composition of cyanobacterial communities in fringing coral reef waters. To understand the patterns of cyanobacterial biogeography in relation to coastal environmental factors, we examined the diversity of planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria at 12 sites along the west coast of Hawaii's Big Island. We found distinct cyanobacterial communities in sediments compared to the water column. In both sediments and water, community structure was strongly related to overall biomass (chlorophyll a concentration), although both these communities corresponded to different sets of biotic/abiotic variables. To examine the influence of freshwater input on planktonic cyanobacterial communities, we conducted a mesocosm experiment where seawater was amended with freshwater from two sources representing high- and low-human population influence. Planktonic cyanobacterial abundance decreased over time in mesocosms, although chlorophyll a concentration significantly increased with time, indicating cyanobacteria were likely outcompeted by other phytoplankton in incubations. Our results show that cyanobacterial community structure may be affected by runoff from terrestrial habitats, but that the composition of cyanobacterial communities inhabiting these locations is also structured by factors not measured in this study.

  14. Early detection monitoring for larval dreissenid mussels: How much plankton sampling is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Timothy D.; Bollens, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    The development of quagga and zebra mussel (dreissenids) monitoring programs in the Pacific Northwest provides a unique opportunity to evaluate a regional invasive species detection effort early in its development. Recent studies suggest that the ecological and economic costs of a dreissenid infestation in the Pacific Northwest of the USA would be significant. Consequently, efforts are underway to monitor for the presence of dreissenids. However, assessments of whether these efforts provide for early detection are lacking. We use information collected from 2012 to 2014 to characterize the development of larval dreissenid monitoring programs in the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington in the context of introduction and establishment risk. We also estimate the effort needed for high-probability detection of rare planktonic taxa in four Columbia and Snake River reservoirs and assess whether the current level of effort provides for early detection. We found that the effort expended to monitor for dreissenid mussels increased substantially from 2012 to 2014, that efforts were distributed across risk categories ranging from high to very low, and that substantial gaps in our knowledge of both introduction and establishment risk exist. The estimated volume of filtered water required to fully census planktonic taxa or to provide high-probability detection of rare taxa was high for the four reservoirs examined. We conclude that the current level of effort expended does not provide for high-probability detection of larval dreissenids or other planktonic taxa when they are rare in these reservoirs. We discuss options to improve early detection capabilities.

  15. Modeling physiological processes in plankton on enzyme kinetic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Packard

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Many ecologically important chemical transformations in the ocean are controlled by biochemical enzyme reactions in plankton. Nitrogenase regulates the transformation of N2 to ammonium in some cyanobacteria and serves as the entryway for N2 into the ocean biosphere. Nitrate reductase controls the reduction of NO3 to NO2 and hence new production in phytoplankton. The respiratory electron transfer system in all organisms links the carbon oxidation reactions of intermediary metabolism with the reduction of oxygen in respiration. Rubisco controls the fixation of CO2 into organic matter in phytoplankton and thus is the major entry point of carbon into the oceanic biosphere. In addition to these, there are the enzymes that control CO2 production, NH4 excretion and the fluxes of phosphate. Some of these enzymes have been recognized and researched by marine scientists in the last thirty years. However, until recently the kinetic principles of enzyme control have not been exploited to formulate accurate mathematical equations of the controlling physiological expressions. Were such expressions available they would increase our power to predict the rates of chemical transformations in the extracellular environment of microbial populations whether this extracellular environment is culture media or the ocean. Here we formulate from the principles of bisubstrate enzyme kinetics, mathematical expressions for the processes of NO3 reduction, O2 consumption, N2 fixation, total nitrogen uptake.

  16. Differential effects of planktonic and biofilm MRSA on human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Kelly R; James, Garth A; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E; Stewart, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria colonizing chronic wounds often exist as biofilms, yet their role in chronic wound pathogenesis remains unclear. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms induce apoptosis in dermal keratinocytes, and given that chronic wound biofilms also colonize dermal tissue, it is important to investigate the effects of bacterial biofilms on dermal fibroblasts. The effects of a predominant wound pathogen, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, on normal, human, dermal fibroblasts were examined in vitro. Cell-culture medium was conditioned with equivalent numbers of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus and then fed to fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast response was evaluated using scratch, viability, and apoptosis assays. The results suggested that fibroblasts experience the same fate when exposed to the soluble products of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus, namely limited migration followed by death. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that fibroblast production of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases were differentially affected by planktonic and biofilm-conditioned medium. Planktonic-conditioned medium induced more interleukin-6, interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, heparin-bound epidermal growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and metalloproteinase-3 production in fibroblasts than the biofilm-conditioned medium. Biofilm-conditioned medium induced more tumor necrosis factor-α production in fibroblasts compared with planktonic-conditioned medium, and suppressed metalloproteinase-3 production compared with controls.

  17. Spatial distribution of plankton in Riau islands province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu, I. P.; Pratiwi, N. T. M.; Iswantari, A.; Hariyadi, S.; Mulyawati, D.; Subhan, B.; Arafat, D.; Santoso, P.; Sastria, M.

    2017-01-01

    Riau Islands which is located at 4ºLU - 1ºLS and 104ºBT - 107ºBT, consist of around 3200 islands. It has high marine biodiversity, especially micro-plankton. Biodiversity of marine phytoplankton is usually dominated by diatom and zooplankton by micro-crustacean and early stage of marine biota. Nowadays, biodiversity of micro-plankton is an important study to identify their origin and potential as alien and invasive species. The aim of this research was to determine the biodiversity of marine micro-plankton in Riau Islands. This research was conducted in 14 small islands (Karanggerih, Pemping, Panjang, Melur, Palantuah, Dendun, Mantang, Bunut, Kelong, Mercusuar, Tokong Hiu Kecil, Tokong Hiu Besar, Karimun, Penyengat) in Riau Islands Province. Samples of micro-plankton were collected from surface water using plankton net. Samples were observed under light microscope and identified morphologically. Biodiversity index was calculated. There were found 20-34 taxa of phytoplankton and 10-17 taxa of zooplankton in all sites. Phytoplankton was dominated by Bacillariophyceae group and zooplankton by Crustacean and Protozoa groups. This result is expected for biodiversity bank information and further research.

  18. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R.; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia’s southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species. PMID:27687507

  19. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2016-09-30

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia's southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species.

  20. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016.

  1. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L(2,3) absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  2. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  3. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Darling, Kate F.; Lecroq-Bennet, Béatrice; Winther Pedersen, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Pawlowski, Jan; Mulitza, Stefan; de Vargas, Colomban; Kucera, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA) in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of the entire pelagic community, including non-fossilized taxa, thus opening new avenues for paleoceanographic and paleoecological studies.

  4. Coaggregation between freshwater bacteria within biofilm and planktonic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, A H; McBain, A J; Ledder, R G; Handley, P S; Gilbert, P

    2003-03-14

    The coaggregation ability of bacteria isolated from a freshwater biofilm was compared to those derived from the coexisting planktonic population. Twenty-nine morphologically distinct bacterial strains were isolated from a 6-month-old biofilm, established in a glass tank under high-shear conditions, and 15 distinct strains were isolated from the associated re-circulating water. All 44 strains were identified to genus or species level by 16S rDNA sequencing. The 29 biofilm strains belonged to 14 genera and 23.4% of all the possible pair-wise combinations coaggregated. The 15 planktonic strains belonged to seven genera and only 5.8% of all the possible pair-wise combinations coaggregated. Therefore, compared to the planktonic population, a greater proportion of the biofilm strains coaggregated. It is proposed that coaggregation influences biofilm formation and species diversity in freshwater under high shear.

  5. Effects of continuous chlorination on entrained estuarine plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, S.J.; Foulk, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Technical report: The effects of continuous chlorination in running sea water on entrained plankton were examined. The concentration of ATP was used as an indicator of biomass because: it is present in all living cells; the concentration is proportional to the living biomass; and dead cells lose ATP rapidly. Effects were measured by bioluminescence; luciferin-luciferase reagents from firefly lanterns were used to analyze ATP concentration. Results indicate that ATP measurement is an accurate, effective means of evaluating damage done to planktonic organisms by continuous chlorination. Further studies of the effects of low-concentration, continuous chlorination are recommended. (13 references, 1 table)

  6. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  7. Proceedings of the Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) Workshop in Mexico City (12–18 February 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Gulati, R.D.; Nandini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plankton is an important constituent of aquatic ecosystems, dominated in freshwater ecosystems by diverse groups of bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, and zooplankton. The Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) has made noteworthy headway in understanding ecosystem dynamics through a series of formal PEG meetin

  8. A universal carbonate ion effect on stable oxygen isotope ratios in unicellular planktonic calcifying organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ziveri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O of calcium carbonate of planktonic calcifying organisms is a key tool for reconstructing both past seawater temperature and salinity. The calibration of paloeceanographic proxies relies in general on empirical relationships derived from field experiments on extant species. Laboratory experiments have more often than not revealed that variables other than the target parameter influence the proxy signal, which makes proxy calibration a challenging task. Understanding these secondary or "vital" effects is crucial for increasing proxy accuracy. We present data from laboratory experiments showing that oxygen isotope fractionation during calcification in the coccolithophore Calcidiscus leptoporus and the calcareous dinoflagellate Thoracosphaera heimii is dependent on carbonate chemistry of seawater in addition to its dependence on temperature. A similar result has previously been reported for planktonic foraminifera, supporting the idea that the [CO32−] effect on δ18O is universal for unicellular calcifying planktonic organisms. The slopes of the δ18O/[CO32−] relationships range between –0.0243‰ (μmol kg−1−1 (calcareous dinoflagellate T. heimii and the previously published –0.0022‰ (μmol kg−1−1 (non-symbiotic planktonic foramifera Orbulina universa, while C. leptoporus has a slope of –0.0048 ‰ (μmol kg−1−1. We present a simple conceptual model, based on the contribution of δ18O-enriched HCO3 to the CO32− pool in the calcifying vesicle, which can explain the [CO32−] effect on δ18O for the different unicellular calcifiers. This approach provides a new insight into biological fractionation in calcifying organisms

  9. A universal carbonate ion effect on stable oxygen isotope ratios in unicellular planktonic calcifying organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ziveri

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O of calcium carbonate of planktonic calcifying organisms is a key tool for reconstructing both past seawater temperature and salinity. The calibration of paloeceanographic proxies relies in general on empirical relationships derived from experiments on extant species. Laboratory experiments have more often than not revealed that variables other than the target parameter influence the proxy signal, which makes proxy calibration a challenging task. Understanding these secondary or "vital" effects is crucial for increasing proxy accuracy and possibly for developing new biomarkers. We present data from laboratory experiments showing that oxygen isotope fractionation during calcification in the coccolithophore Calcidiscus leptoporus and the calcareous dinoflagellate Thoracosphaera heimii is dependent on carbonate chemistry of seawater in addition to its dependence on temperature. A similar result has previously been reported for planktonic foraminifera, suggesting that the [CO32−] effect on δ18O is universal for unicellular calcifying planktonic organisms. The slopes of the δ18O/[CO32−] relationships range between −0.0243 (μmol kg−1−1 (calcareous dinoflagellate T. heimii and the previously published 0.0022 (μmol kg−1−1 (non-symbiotic planktonic foramifera Orbulina universa, while C. leptoporus has a slope of 0.0048 (μmol kg−1−1. We present a simple conceptual model, based on the contribution of δ18O-enriched HCO3 to the CO32− pool in the calcifying vesicle, which can explain the [CO32−] effect on δ18O for the different unicellular calcifiers. This approach provides a new insight into biological fractionation in

  10. A comparative study of induction of pneumonia in mice with planktonic and biofilm cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonica; Mohan, Harsh; Sharma, Saroj; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, the course of acute pneumonia in normal BALB/c mice infected by intranasal inoculation of planktonic and preformed biofilm cells (3 days old) of Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 was studied and compared. With both cell forms the peak of infection was observed on the third post infection day, as assessed on the basis of lung bacterial load and corresponding pathology. There was an intense neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tissue damage was assessed on the basis of increased amounts of nitrite, malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase in lung homogenates. The phagocytic potential of alveolar macrophages was lower in biofilm cell-induced infection than in that induced by planktonic cells. Biofilm cell induced infection generated significantly greater production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β on the third and fifth days of infection, respectively. Production of interleukin-10 was, however, variable. There was no significant difference in the ability of planktonic and biofilm cell forms of K. pneumoniae to induce acute pneumonia in mice in terms of bacterial counts and histopathological changes. However, biofilm cell-induced infection showed delayed clearance as compared to infection induced with the planktonic form.

  11. Intraseasonal patterns in coastal plankton biomass off central Chile derived from satellite observations and a biochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Fabian A.; Spitz, Yvette H.; Batchelder, Harold P.; Correa-Ramirez, Marco A.

    2017-10-01

    Subseasonal (5-130 days) environmental variability can strongly affect plankton dynamics, but is often overlooked in marine ecology studies. We documented the main subseasonal patterns of plankton biomass in the coastal upwelling system off central Chile, the southern part of the Humboldt System. Subseasonal variability was extracted from temporal patterns in satellite data of wind stress, sea surface temperature, and chlorophyll from the period 2003-2011, and from a realistically forced eddy-resolving physical-biochemical model from 2003 to 2008. Although most of the wind variability occurs at submonthly frequencies (biomass is within the intraseasonal band (30-90 days). The strongest intraseasonal coupling between wind and plankton is in spring-summer, when increased solar radiation enhances the phytoplankton response to upwelling. Biochemical model outputs show intraseasonal shifts in plankton community structure, mainly associated with the large fluctuations in diatom biomass. Diatom biomass peaks near surface during strong upwelling, whereas small phytoplankton biomass peaks at subsurface depths during relaxation or downwelling periods. Strong intraseasonally forced changes in biomass and species composition could strongly impact trophodynamics connections in the ecosystem, including the recruitment of commercially important fish species such as common sardine and anchovy. The wind-driven variability of chlorophyll concentration was connected to mid- and high-latitude atmospheric anomalies, which resemble disturbances with frequencies similar to the tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation.

  12. Chlorine dioxide disinfection of single and dual species biofilms, detached biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Camper, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection efficacy testing is usually done with planktonic cells or more recently, biofilms. While disinfectants are much less effective against biofilms compared to planktonic cells, questions regarding the disinfection tolerance of detached biofilm clusters remain largely unanswered. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in chemostats and biofilm tubing reactors, with the tubing reactor serving as a source of detached biofilm clusters. Chlorine dioxide susceptibility was assessed for B. cepacia and P. aeruginosa in these three sample types as monocultures and binary cultures. Similar doses of chlorine dioxide inactivated samples of chemostat and tubing reactor effluent and no statistically significant difference between the log(10) reductions was found. This contrasts with chlorine, shown previously to be generally less effective against detached biofilm particles. Biofilms were more tolerant and required chlorine dioxide doses ten times higher than chemostat and tubing reactor effluent samples. A second species was advantageous in all sample types and resulted in lower log(10) reductions when compared to the single species cultures, suggesting a beneficial interaction of the species.

  13. [Community structure of planktonic rotifers in the Pearl River Delta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Li, Xin-Hui; Lai, Zi-Ni; Yu, Jing; Wang, Chao; Zeng, Yan-Yi; Liu, Qian-Fu; Yang, Wan-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Four ecological investigations were carried out on planktonic rotifers in Pearl River Delta in 2012. The community structure, including spatial and temporal patterns of species composition, dominant species, biomass and biodiversity, was investigated. The correlation between the community structure of rotifers and the environmental factors was discussed. Moreover, the aggregation structures of rotifers were analyzed. A total of 53 rotifer species were found. Dominant species changed markedly with season and space. Polyarthra trigla had higher dominance. In terms of seasonal changes, the density and biomass were higher in dry season than in wet season, while the biodiversity and evenness indices were vice versa. The biomass and biodiversity of rotifers showed highly significant differences among seasons. In terms of spatial distribution, the average density and the average biomass showed an increase from the southwest to the northeast. The highest density and biomass were recorded in Shiqiao. The biodiversity and evenness indices had an opposite spatial distribution, with the highest values being recorded in Qingqi. The rotifer density was significantly different among the investigated sites, while the biomass and biodiversity were not significantly different. Correlation analysis demonstrated a highly significant positive correlation between rotifer density and biomass, as well as between biodiversity and evenness indices, and a highly negative correlation between biodiversity and biomass. The biodiversity and evenness indices both decreased markedly with the increase of biomass. Principal component analysis indicated that the rotifer density was closely correlated with environment factors, such as water temperature, pH, dissolved oxy- gen, chlorophyll a content, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, in different seasons. Aggregation analysis based on rotifer density revealed five aggregation structures in the investigated sites, indicating significant differences

  14. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂18O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p2 were only moderately higher than today. Diversity is strongly correlated to both ∂13C and pCO2 over the last 15 my (for both: r>.9, detrended r>.6, all prisk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  15. Progressive changes in the Western English Channel foster a reorganization in the plankton food web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Molinero, J.C.; Coombs, S.

    2015-01-01

    . (2013) drive a profound restructuration of the plankton community modifying the phenology and the dominance of key planktonic groups including fish larvae. Consequently, the slow but deep modifications detected in the plankton community highlight a climate driven ecosystem shift in the Western English...

  16. Evolution of a Planktonic Foraminifer during Environmental Changes in the Tropical Oceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurika Ujiié

    Full Text Available Ecological adaptation to environmental changes is a strong driver of evolution, enabling speciation of pelagic plankton in the open ocean without the presence of effective physical barriers to gene flow. The tropical ocean environment, which plays an important role in shaping marine biodiversity, has drastically and frequently changed since the Pliocene. Nevertheless, the evolutionary history of tropical pelagic plankton has been poorly understood, as phylogeographic investigations are still in the developing state and paleontological approaches are insufficient to obtain a sequential record from the deep-sea sediments. The planktonic foraminifer Pulleniatina obliquiloculata is widely distributed in the tropical area throughout the world's oceans, and its phylogeography is well established. It is thus one of the best candidates to examine how past environmental changes may have shifted the spatial distribution and affected the diversification of tropical pelagic plankton. Such an examination requires the divergence history of the planktonic foraminifers, yet the gene marker (partial small subunit (SSU rDNA previously used for phylogeographic studies was not powerful enough to achieve a high accuracy in estimating the divergence times. The present study focuses on improving the precision of divergence time estimates for the splits between sibling species (genetic types of planktonic foraminifers by increasing the number of genes as well as the number of nucleotide bases used for molecular clock estimates. We have amplified the entire coding regions of two ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA and large subunit (LSU rDNA of three genetic types of P. obliquiloculata and two closely related species for the first time and applied them to the Bayesian relaxed clock method. The comparison of the credible intervals of the four datasets consisting either of sequences of the partial SSU rDNA, the complete SSU rDNA, LSU rDNA, or a combination of both genes (SSU

  17. Benthos and plankton community data for selected rivers and harbors along the western Lake Michigan shoreline, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C.; Burns, Daniel J.; Templar, Hayley A.; Bell, Amanda H.; Mapel, Kassidy T.

    2016-06-15

    Benthos (benthic invertebrates) and plankton (zooplankton and phytoplankton) communities were sampled in 2014 at 10 Wisconsin rivers and harbors, including 4 sites in Great Lakes Areas of Concern and 6 less degraded comparison sites with similar physical and chemical characteristics, including climate, latitude, geology, and land use. Previous U.S. Geological Survey sampling was completed in 2012, but because of ongoing sediment remediation at three of the Areas of Concern (AOCs) and unusually hot and dry conditions in many areas during 2012, additional sampling was added in 2014. Comparable sampling methods were used in 2012 and 2014. Benthos were collected by using Hester-Dendy artificial substrate samplers and composite Ponar grab samples of bottom sediment; zooplankton were collected by using tows from depth to the surface with a 63-micrometer mesh plankton net; phytoplankton were collected by using whole water samples composited from set depth intervals. This report describes the study areas and field sampling methods for 2014, and it presents data on taxonomic identification and abundance of benthos and plankton that can serve as a basis for evaluation of related Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) at the AOCs. Physical and chemical data were sampled concurrently (specific conductance, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, total and volatile suspended solids in water samples; particle size and volatile-on-ignition of sediment in benthic grab samples). The results of field quality assurance-quality control are also presented.

  18. Planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the late Neogene of Crete (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachariasse, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    A planktonic foraminiferal zonation is established for the Middle/Upper Miocene - Pliocene interval in Crete. It is based upon the investigation of samples from 29 sections. Eight zones are distinguished. A comparison with samples from other Neogene sections from Italy, Spain, Algeria, and the islan

  19. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, Peter R.; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; Van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia's southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying

  20. Holocene planktonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments off Kerala Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Twenty-two planktonic foraminifers were identified from a few samples collected aboard INS KISTNA at 9~'N and 76~'E, at 89 metres depth from the bottom sediment-water interface. A few of the more characteristic features of each are described. Some...

  1. Ether lipids of planktonic archae in the marine water column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; Schouten, S.; King, L.L.; Wakeham, S.G.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    Acyclic and cyclic biphytanes derived from the membrane ether lipids of archaea were found in water column particulate and sedimentary organic matter from several oxic and anoxic marine environments. Compound-specific isotope analyses of the carbon skeletons suggest that planktonic archaea utilize a

  2. Global marine plankton functional type biomass distributions : Phaeocystis spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, M.; O'Brien, C.; Peloquin, J.; Schoemann, V.; Breton, E.; Estrada, M.; Gibson, J.; Karentz, D.; Van Leeuwe, M. A.; Stefels, J.; Widdicombe, C.; Peperzak, L.

    2012-01-01

    The planktonic haptophyte Phaeocystis has been suggested to play a fundamental role in the global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulphur, but little is known about its global biomass distribution. We have collected global microscopy data of the genus Phaeocystis and converted abundance data to

  3. Biodiversity of plankton by species oscillations and chaos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Weissing, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Biodiversity has both fascinated and puzzled biologists(1). In aquatic ecosystems, the biodiversity puzzle is particularly troublesome, and known as the 'paradox of the plankton'(2). Competition theory predicts that, at equilibrium, the number of coexisting species cannot exceed the number of limiti

  4. The effect of fish on plankton dynamics : a theoretical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Rinaldi, S.; Kuznetsov, Y.A.

    2000-01-01

    We present an expansion of a classical minimal Daphnia–algae model to account for effects of fish as a top predator. Our analyses suggest that in most situations, the plankton should show hysteresis in response to predation pressure by fish. Thus, there exist two distinct regimes, one in which

  5. Plankton bioindicators of environmental conditions in coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj, Deevesh A.; Hossain, Md A.; Ye, Qifeng; Qin, Jian G.; Leterme, Sophie C.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are characterised by strong spatial gradient of environmental parameters, especially hypersalinity, and are prone to anthropogenic disturbance. The Coorong (South Australia) is an inverse estuarine coastal lagoon separated from the sea by sand dunes. It is exposed to extreme water quality changes that affect its aquatic communities. Here, we used plankton as indicators of extreme environmental fluctuations to monitor and manage the environmental health of such complex systems. We defined the relationship of different plankton communities with water quality fluctuations and determined plankton species suitable for monitoring the ecosystem health. Two distinct communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton were identified, with salinity and nutrients being the principal factors impacting species distribution. Thus, two sets of indicator species were selected based on the different communities observed. Polychaete and gastropod larvae were positive indicators, showing salinity range restriction of brackish to marine. The distribution Acartia cf. fancetti represented healthy hypersaline conditions (salinity 40-60), while Cyclophora sp. and Scrippsiella sp. were negative indicators, correlating with extreme salinity and ammonia levels. The implementation of planktonic organisms as environmental indicators provided a constructive tool for the management of ecosystem health of the Coorong and will be applicable to similar coastal lagoons.

  6. Plankton Respiration from the Cellular to the Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Hull, T.; Kitidis, V. A.; Ostle, C.; Serret, P.; Tilstone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of marine plankton respiration provide an important constraint on the magnitude of the biological carbon pump and global elemental nutrient cycles, yet respiration remains one of the least constrained terms in models of metabolism, gas exchange and carbon mass balance. This is due in part to the difficulty in measuring both total oceanic respiration and that attributable to specific plankton groups or size classes and the resulting lack of earth observation algorithms. Respiration in the surface layer of the ocean is usually estimated from either the consumption of dissolved oxygen in a contained sample volume or from enzymatic proxies such as INT, and is less frequently determined from mixed layer oxygen utilisation, allometric equations or biomass / abundance spectra.As part of a tracer release (SF6) experiment in the Mauritanian upwelling and a seasonal study of UK shelf sea biogeochemistry, we measured plankton respiration using a range of methods which span time and space scales from cells to the mixed layer and hours to years. This presentation will compare and contrast these concurrent measurements with a view to assessing the range of variability in respiration relative to that in primary production alongside measures of parameters such as plankton community structure and organic carbon availability which may lead to this variability. In addition, by comparing between systems and between seasons in the same system, and utilising the available global dataset, we aim to test predictive empirical models of respiration in an attempt to extrapolate to the basin scale.

  7. Relationship between petroleum hydrocarbon and plankton in a mesocosm experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was carried out from May 26 to June 1, 1998 at the location of bon to the ecosystem, furthermore, to estimate the environmental capacity. In the experiment, it is found that the petroleum hydrocarbon can, in some degree, enhance the growth of diatom, but inhibit the growth of dinoflagellate. In general, the petroleum hydrocarbon can inhibit the growth of both phytoplankton and zooplankton, and can also inhibit the growth of total plankton (including phytoplankton and zooplankton) as well. A kinetic model was presented to estimate the uptake/release rate constants of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton, and thereafter, the uptake and release rate constants ( k1, k2),bioconcentration factor (BCF) as well as the petroleum hydrocarbon influenced uptake and release rate constants of nutrients by phytoplankton (kup, krel) were obtained. The results imply that the bioconcentration of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton is fairly large and petroleum hydrocarbon caused no significant influence on the uptake of N- NO3, but significant influence on that of P- PO4. In addition,the application of kinetic model for the bioconcentration of volatile organic toxic compound by organism suggests that the uptake of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton was an important process for the environmental capacity of petroleum hydrocarbon.

  8. Particle filters for the magnetoencephalography inverse problem: increasing the efficiency through a semi-analytic approach (Rao-Blackwellization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); Pascarella, A; Campi, C [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova (Italy); Piana, M [Dipartimento di Informatica, Universita di Verona (Italy)], E-mail: sorrentino@fisica.unige.it

    2008-07-15

    We consider the problem of dynamically estimating the parameters of point-like neural sources from magnetoencephalography data. Since the problem is non-linear, we apply the sequential Monte Carlo algorithms known as particle filters for solving the Bayesian filtering problem. We suggest that the linear dependence of the data on a subset of the parameters allows the analytic computation of the posterior density for these parameters, i.e. Rao-Blackwellization; this considerably improves the accuracy of the method and its statistical efficiency.

  9. Impact of oxygen depletion on planktonic community with emphasis temperature dynamics at aquaculture scale in Blanakan, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarina, Noverita Dian; Wardhana, Wisnu; Soedjiarti, Titi

    2017-05-01

    It is hypothesized that rise in temperature under climate change regimes can cause oxygen depletion and can reduce the diversity and population of plankton and decrease the potential food source for fish in ponds. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the primary factors that can affect the planktonic community with emphasis on temperature rise and oxygen depletion. Sampling was conducted in Blanakan, West Java. Samples were assessed to determine levels of planktonic community and other water quality parameters. DO was monitored in situ along with pH and temperature. Based on the results, the temperature average in ponds was 31.88±1.93 °C and ranged from 29.0 to 35.0 °C. The DO average was 7.63±0.59 mg/l and ranged from 7.0 to 8.5 mg/l. The rise of pond temperature affected slighltyto the DO and had reduced the DO level to the lowest level (7.0-7.2 mg/l) when temperature reached its peak at 32.5-35.0 °C. The results showed that the oxygen depletion will significantly reduce the phytoplankton population (r2=0.54). However, the oxygen depletion did not affect the plankton diversity. The results revealedthe presence of 23 genera of phytoplankton and 18 genera for zooplankton in Blanakan ponds. Nitzchia and Pleurosigma were known as genera that can adapt both in the DOmin and DOmax environment (7.0-8.5 mg/l). At aquaculture scale, temperature has potential to influence oxygen level and affect planktonic community. It is recommended to provide natural shades and develop aeration systems to increase oxygen levels in ponds.

  10. Effects of climate change on bioaccumulation and biomagnification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the planktonic food web of a subtropical shallow eutrophic lake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuqiang; Xue, Bin; Lei, Guoliang; Liu, Fei; Wang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    To date effects of climate change on bioaccumulation and biomagnification of chemical pollutants in planktonic food webs have rarely been studied. Recruitments of plankton have shifted earlier due to global warming. Global warming and precipitation patterns are projected to shift seasonally. Whether and how the shifts in plankton phenology induced by climate change will impact bioaccumulation and biomagnification of chemical pollutants, and how they will respond to climate change are largely unknown. Here, we combine data analysis of the past seven decades, high temporal resolution monitoring and model development to test this hypothesis with nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the planktonic food web of a subtropical shallow eutrophic lake in China. We find biphasic correlations between both bioconcentration factors and bioaccumulation factors of the PAHs and the mean temperature, which depend on the recruitment temperatures of cyanobacteria, and copepods and cladocerans. The positive correlations between bioconcentration factors, bioaccumulation factors and the mean temperature will be observed less than approximately 13-18 days by 2050-2060 due to the shifts in plankton phenology. The PAHs and their bioaccumulation and biomagnification will respond seasonally and differently to climate change. Bioaccumulation of most of the PAHs will decrease with global warming, with higher decreasing rates appearing in winter and spring. Biomagnification of most of the PAHs from phytoplankton to zooplankton will increase with global warming, with higher increasing rates appearing in winter and spring. Our study provides novel insights into bioaccumulation and biomagnification of chemical pollutants in eutrophic waters under climate change scenarios.

  11. An integrated fish-plankton aquaculture system in brackish water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, S; Fargier, L; Lazzaro, X; Baras, E; De Wilde, N; Drakidès, C; Amiel, C; Rispal, B; Blancheton, J-P

    2013-02-01

    Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture takes advantage of the mutualism between some detritivorous fish and phytoplankton. The fish recycle nutrients by consuming live (and dead) algae and provide the inorganic carbon to fuel the growth of live algae. In the meanwhile, algae purify the water and generate the oxygen required by fishes. Such mechanism stabilizes the functioning of an artificially recycling ecosystem, as exemplified by combining the euryhaline tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii and the unicellular alga Chlorella sp. Feed addition in this ecosystem results in faster fish growth but also in an increase in phytoplankton biomass, which must be limited. In the prototype described here, the algal population control is exerted by herbivorous zooplankton growing in a separate pond connected in parallel to the fish-algae ecosystem. The zooplankton production is then consumed by tilapia, particularly by the fry and juveniles, when water is returned to the main circuit. Chlorella sp. and Brachionus plicatilis are two planktonic species that have spontaneously colonized the brackish water of the prototype, which was set-up in Senegal along the Atlantic Ocean shoreline. In our system, water was entirely recycled and only evaporation was compensated (1.5% volume/day). Sediment, which accumulated in the zooplankton pond, was the only trophic cul-de-sac. The system was temporarily destabilized following an accidental rotifer invasion in the main circuit. This caused Chlorella disappearance and replacement by opportunist algae, not consumed by Brachionus. Following the entire consumption of the Brachionus population by tilapias, Chlorella predominated again. Our artificial ecosystem combining S. m. heudelotii, Chlorella and B. plicatilis thus appeared to be resilient. This farming system was operated over one year with a fish productivity of 1.85 kg/m2 per year during the cold season (January to April).

  12. The dichotomous oxyregulatory behaviour of the planktonic crustacean Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirow, R; Buchen, I

    2004-02-01

    The dual function of appendage movement (food acquisition, ventilation) proved to be the key to explaining the peculiar oxyregulatory repertoire of the planktonic filter feeder Daphnia magna. Short-term hypoxic exposure experiments with normoxia-acclimated animals under varying food concentrations revealed a dichotomous response pattern with a compensatory tachycardia under food-free conditions and a ventilatory compensation prevailing under food-rich conditions. Food-free, normoxic conditions resulted in maximum appendage beating rates (fA) and half-maximum heart rates (fH), which restricted the scope for oxyregulation to the circulatory system. Food-rich conditions (10(5) algal cells ml(-1)), on the contrary, had a depressing effect on fA whereas fH increased to 83% of the maximum. In this physiological state, D. magna was able to respond to progressive hypoxia with a compensatory increase in ventilation. A conceptual and mathematical model was developed to analyse the efficiency of ventilatory and circulatory adjustments in improving oxygen transport to tissue. Model predictions showed that an increase in perfusion rate was most effective under both food-free and food-rich conditions in reducing the critical ambient oxygen tension (PO2crit) at which oxygen supply to the tissue started to become impeded. By contrast, a hypothetical increase in ventilation rate had almost no effect on PO2crit under food-free conditions, indicating that appendage movement is driven by nutritive rather than respiratory requirements. However, the model predicted a moderate reduction of PO2crit by hyperventilation under food-rich conditions. Since the regulatory scope for an adjustment in fH was found to be limited in D. magna under these conditions, the increase in ventilation rate is the means of choice for a fed animal to cope with short-term, moderate reductions in ambient oxygen availability. Under long-term and more severe hypoxic conditions, however, the increase in the

  13. TURBOGEN: Computer-controlled vertically oscillating grid system for small-scale turbulence studies on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Alberto; Fortini, Stefania; Watteaux, Romain; Diano, Marcello; Espa, Stefania; Esposito, Serena; Ferrante, Maria I; Peters, Francesc; Iudicone, Daniele; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the impact of turbulence on aquatic organisms. In response to this interest, a novel instrument has been constructed, TURBOGEN, that generates turbulence in water volumes up to 13 l. TURBOGEN is fully computer controlled, thus, allowing for a high level of reproducibility and for variations of the intensity and characteristics of turbulence during the experiment. The calibration tests, carried out by particle image velocimetry, showed TURBOGEN to be successful in generating isotropic turbulence at the typical relatively low levels of the marine environment. TURBOGEN and its sizing have been devised with the long-term scope of analyzing in detail the molecular responses of plankton to different mixing regimes, which is of great importance in both environmental and biotechnological processes.

  14. Intragenotypic JFH1 based recombinant hepatitis C virus produces high levels of infectious particles but causes increased cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateu, Guaniri; Donis, Ruben O; Wakita, Takaji

    2008-01-01

    into the JFH1 infectious clone. All genomes produced high levels of intracellular HCV RNA and NS3 protein in Huh-7.5 transfected cells. However, JFH1 genomes containing J6 sequences from C to E2 (CE2) or C to p7 (Cp7) secreted up to 100-fold more infectious HCV particles than the parental JFH1 clone....... Subsequent infection of naive Huh-7.5 cells with each of the J6/JFH1 recombinants at a multiplicity of infection of 0.0003 resulted in high viral titers only for CE2 and Cp7 viruses. Comparison of virion production by the Cp7 J6/JFH1 recombinant to previously described J6/JFH1 recombinants showed flexibility...

  15. Inorganic and stable isotope geochemistry of tropical Atlantic/Caribbean planktonic foraminifera : implications for the reconstruction of upper ocean temperatures and stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Regenberg, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    Planktonic foraminifera from tropical Atlantic and Caribbean sediment-surface samples (0-1 cm) show general westward-directed increasing calcification depths depending on the east-west increase in thermocline depth. Positively related planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and carbonate ion concentration in the Caribbean show well preserved Mg/Ca down to depths about 1.5 km above the lysocline, which equals a carbonate ion concentration of 26-18 µmol/kg. Species-specific calibrations of Mg/Ca with d1...

  16. Influence of plankton community structure on the sinking velocity of marine aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, L. T.; Boxhammer, T.; Larsen, A.; Hildebrandt, N.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-08-01

    About 50 Gt of carbon is fixed photosynthetically by surface ocean phytoplankton communities every year. Part of this organic matter is reprocessed within the plankton community to form aggregates which eventually sink and export carbon into the deep ocean. The fraction of organic matter leaving the surface ocean is partly dependent on aggregate sinking velocity which accelerates with increasing aggregate size and density, where the latter is controlled by ballast load and aggregate porosity. In May 2011, we moored nine 25 m deep mesocosms in a Norwegian fjord to assess on a daily basis how plankton community structure affects material properties and sinking velocities of aggregates (Ø 80-400 µm) collected in the mesocosms' sediment traps. We noted that sinking velocity was not necessarily accelerated by opal ballast during diatom blooms, which could be due to relatively high porosity of these rather fresh aggregates. Furthermore, estimated aggregate porosity (Pestimated) decreased as the picoautotroph (0.2-2 µm) fraction of the phytoplankton biomass increased. Thus, picoautotroph-dominated communities may be indicative for food webs promoting a high degree of aggregate repackaging with potential for accelerated sinking. Blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi revealed that cell concentrations of 1500 cells/mL accelerate sinking by about 35-40%, which we estimate (by one-dimensional modeling) to elevate organic matter transfer efficiency through the mesopelagic from 14 to 24%. Our results indicate that sinking velocities are influenced by the complex interplay between the availability of ballast minerals and aggregate packaging; both of which are controlled by plankton community structure.

  17. Influence of catalyst dilution by inert particles on the effectivity of a catalytical process in a fluidized bed. [Increasing selectivity by decreasing local reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augenblick, A.A. (Karpov Physico-Chemical Inst., Moscow, USSR); Kernerman, V.A.; Abayev, G.N.; Slin' ko, M.G.; Sergeev, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    The method of the increasing a selectivity of catalytic processes in fluidized bed reactor by decreasing local chemical reaction rates together with increasing a reactive volume is discussed. Based on the two-phase model of a fluidized bed it is shown that the dilution of a catalyst by inert particles leads to an increasing of effective interphase exchange coefficients and a decreasing of effective axial mixing coefficients. Restrictions to applications of the method connected with local features of a bed structure are discussed. 3 figures.

  18. Potential for Local Fertilization: A Benthocosm Test of Long-Term and Short-Term Effects of Mussel Excretion on the Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Mehdi; Granados, Monica; Duffy, Sean; Robert, Pauline; Péquin, Bérangère; Mohit, Vani; McKindsey, Christopher W; Archambault, Philippe; Myrand, Bruno; Lovejoy, Connie; Tremblay, Réjean; Plourde, Stéphane; Fussmann, Gregor F

    2016-01-01

    Mussel aquaculture has expanded worldwide and it is important to assess its impact on the water column and the planktonic food web to determine the sustainability of farming practices. Mussel farming may affect the planktonic food web indirectly by excreting bioavailable nutrients in the water column (a short-term effect) or by increasing nutrient effluxes from biodeposit-enriched sediments (a long-term effect). We tested both of these indirect effects in a lagoon by using plankton-enclosing benthocosms that were placed on the bottom of a shallow lagoon either inside of a mussel farm or at reference sites with no history of aquaculture. At each site, half of the benthocosms were enriched with seawater that had held mussels (excretion treatment), the other half received non-enriched seawater as a control treatment. We monitored nutrients ([PO43-] and [NH4+]), dissolved oxygen and plankton components (bacteria, the phytoplankton and the zooplankton) over 5 days. We found a significant relationship between long-term accumulation of mussel biodeposits in sediments, water-column nutrient concentrations and plankton growth. Effects of mussel excretion were not detected, too weak to be significant given the spatial and temporal variability observed in the lagoon. Effects of mussels on the water column are thus likely to be coupled to benthic processes in such semi-enclosed water bodies.

  19. Potential for Local Fertilization: A Benthocosm Test of Long-Term and Short-Term Effects of Mussel Excretion on the Plankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Cherif

    Full Text Available Mussel aquaculture has expanded worldwide and it is important to assess its impact on the water column and the planktonic food web to determine the sustainability of farming practices. Mussel farming may affect the planktonic food web indirectly by excreting bioavailable nutrients in the water column (a short-term effect or by increasing nutrient effluxes from biodeposit-enriched sediments (a long-term effect. We tested both of these indirect effects in a lagoon by using plankton-enclosing benthocosms that were placed on the bottom of a shallow lagoon either inside of a mussel farm or at reference sites with no history of aquaculture. At each site, half of the benthocosms were enriched with seawater that had held mussels (excretion treatment, the other half received non-enriched seawater as a control treatment. We monitored nutrients ([PO43-] and [NH4+], dissolved oxygen and plankton components (bacteria, the phytoplankton and the zooplankton over 5 days. We found a significant relationship between long-term accumulation of mussel biodeposits in sediments, water-column nutrient concentrations and plankton growth. Effects of mussel excretion were not detected, too weak to be significant given the spatial and temporal variability observed in the lagoon. Effects of mussels on the water column are thus likely to be coupled to benthic processes in such semi-enclosed water bodies.

  20. Evaluation of antibiotic efficacy against infections caused by planktonic or biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthall, Gabriel; Touzel, Rebecca E; Hind, Charlotte K; Titball, Richard W; Sutton, J Mark; Thomas, Rachael J; Wand, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    The lack of novel antibiotics for more than a decade has placed increased pressure on existing therapies to combat the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. This study evaluated the Galleria mellonella insect model in determining the efficacy of available antibiotics against planktonic and biofilm infections of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in comparison with in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. In general, in vitro analysis agreed with the G. mellonella studies, and susceptibility in Galleria identified different drug resistance mechanisms. However, the carbapenems tested appeared to perform better in vivo than in vitro, with meropenem and imipenem able to clear K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa infections with strains that had bla(NDM-1) and bla(VIM) carbapenemases. This study also established an implant model in G. mellonella to allow testing of antibiotic efficacy against biofilm-derived infections. A reduction in antibiotic efficacy of amikacin against K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa biofilms was observed compared with a planktonic infection. Ciprofloxacin was found to be less effective at clearing a P. aeruginosa biofilm infection compared with a planktonic infection, but no statistical difference was seen between K. pneumoniae biofilm and planktonic infections treated with this antibiotic (P>0.05). This study provides important information regarding the suitability of Galleria as a model for antibiotic efficacy testing both against planktonic and biofilm-derived MDR infections.

  1. Plankton food-webs: to what extent can they be simplified?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico D'Alelio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is a hugely diverse community including both unicellular and multicellular organisms, whose individual dimensions span over seven orders of magnitude. Plankton is a fundamental part of biogeochemical cycles and food-webs in aquatic systems. While knowledge has progressively accumulated at the level of single species and single trophic processes, the overwhelming biological diversity of plankton interactions is insufficiently known and a coherent and unifying trophic framework is virtually lacking. We performed an extensive review of the plankton literature to provide a compilation of data suitable for implementing food-web models including plankton trophic processes at high taxonomic resolution. We identified the components of the plankton community at the Long Term Ecological Research Station MareChiara in the Gulf of Naples. These components represented the sixty-three nodes of a plankton food-web. To each node we attributed biomass and vital rates, i.e. production, consumption, assimilation rates and ratio between autotrophy and heterotrophy in mixotrophic protists. Biomasses and rates values were defined for two opposite system’s conditions; relatively eutrophic and oligotrophic states. We finally identified 817 possible trophic links within the web and provided each of them with a relative weight, in order to define a diet-matrix, valid for both trophic states, which included all consumers, fromn anoflagellates to carnivorous plankton. Vital rates for plankton resulted, as expected, very wide; this strongly contrasts with the narrow ranges considered in plankton system models implemented so far. Moreover, the amount and variety of trophic links highlighted by our review is largely excluded by state-of-the-art biogeochemical and food-web models for aquatic systems. Plankton models could potentially benefit from the integration of the trophic diversity outlined in this paper: first, by using more realistic rates; second, by better

  2. On the Possibility of Quantum-Mechanical Interpretation the Relativistic Effect of Energy Increase in a Particle Freely Moving in Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Gestrina, G N

    2005-01-01

    The relativistic effect of energy increase in a particle freely moving in vacuum is discussed on the basis of quantum field theory and probability theory using some ideas of super-symmetrical theories. The particle is assumed to consist of a "seed" whose energy is equal to the particle rest energy and whose pulse is equal to the product of the particle mass by its velocity and of a "fur coat" - the system of virtual quanta of the material field - vacuum. Each of these quanta possesses the same energy and pulse as the "seed" but have no mass. The system of the quanta is in a state being the superposition of quantum states with energies and pulses multiple of the "seed" energy and pulse. The virtual quanta is created (or destroyed) in of such states. The probability of creating a quanta in any state is the inverse of the relativistic factor, and the average number of the quanta making up the "fur coat" with a "seed" is equal to this particular factor. The kinetic energy and the relativistic addition to the part...

  3. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-04-08

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. RESULTS Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect.

  4. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm, yielding pH values (on the total scale from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1 prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2 first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3 second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.

  5. Plasticity of hatching and the duration of planktonic development in marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzun, Fernanda X; Strathmann, Richard R

    2011-07-01

    Plasticity in hatching potentially adjusts risks of benthic and planktonic development for benthic marine invertebrates. The proportionate effect of hatching plasticity on duration of larval swimming is greatest for animals that can potentially brood or encapsulate offspring until hatching near metamorphic competence. As an example, early hatching of the nudibranch mollusk Phestilla sibogae is stimulated by scattering of encapsulated offspring, as by a predator feeding on the gelatinous egg ribbon. When egg ribbons are undisturbed, hatching is at or near metamorphic competence. Disturbance of an unguarded benthic egg mass can insert 4 or more days of obligate larval dispersal into the life history. As another example, the spionid annelid Boccardia proboscidea broods capsules, each with both cannibalistic and developmentally arrested planktivorous siblings plus nurse eggs. Early hatching produces mainly planktivorous larvae with a planktonic duration of 15 days. Late hatching produces mainly adelphophages who have eaten their planktivorous siblings and metamorphose with little or no period of swimming. Mothers actively hatch their offspring by tearing the capsules, and appeared to time hatching in response to their environment and not to the stage of development of their offspring. Higher temperature increased the variance of brooding time. Females appeared to hatch capsules at an earlier developmental stage at lower temperatures. Species that release gametes or zygotes directly into the plankton have less scope for plasticity in stage at hatching. Their embryos develop singly with little protection and hatch at early stages, often as blastulae or gastrulae. Time of hatching cannot be greatly advanced, and sensory capabilities of blastulae may be limited.

  6. Identification, Discrimination, and Discovery of Species of Marine Planktonic Ostracods Using DNA Barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Lisa M; Angel, Martin V; Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Hopcroft, Russell R; Bucklin, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Ostracoda (Crustacea; Class Ostracoda) is a diverse, frequently abundant, and ecologically important component of the marine zooplankton assemblage. There are more than 200 described species of marine planktonic ostracods, many of which (especially conspecific species) can be identified only by microscopic examination and dissection of fragile morphological characters. Given the complexity of species identification and increasing lack of expert taxonomists, DNA barcodes (short DNA sequences for species discrimination and identification) are particularly useful and necessary. Results are reported from analysis of 210 specimens of 78 species of marine planktonic ostracods, including two novel species, and 51 species for which barcodes have not been previously published. Specimens were collected during 2006 to 2008 from the Atlantic, Indian, and Southern Oceans, Greenland Sea and Gulf of Alaska. Samples were collected from surface to 5,000 m using various collection devices. DNA sequence variation was analyzed for a 598 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Kimura-2-Parameter (K2P) genetic distances within described species (mean = 0.010 ± 0.017 SD) were significantly smaller than between species (0.260 + 0.080), excluding eight taxa hypothesized to comprise cryptic species due to morphological variation (especially different size forms) and/or collection from different geographic regions. These taxa showed similar K2P distance values within (0.014 + 0.026) and between (0.221 ± 0.068) species. All K2P distances > 0.1 resulted from comparisons between identified or cryptic species, with no overlap between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. A Neighbor Joining tree resolved nearly all described species analyzed, with multiple sequences forming monophyletic clusters with high bootstrap values (typically 99%). Based on taxonomically and geographically extensive sampling and analysis (albeit with small sample sizes

  7. Detection of anti-IgA antibodies using the particle gel immunoassay: a rapid test for increased patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Simona; Epure, Andreea; Lindström, Karin; Pardi, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a major issue in transfusion medicine and commands continuous efforts to develop valid control methods aiming to avoid serious transfusion-related complications. Anti-IgA antibodies can cause anaphylactic transfusion reactions in IgA-deficient individuals. Since standard quantitative methods for anti-IgA measurement require considerable time to be performed, in an emergency situation it can be a challenge to prevent or to quickly interpret and manage acute transfusion reactions suspected to be a consequence of anti-IgA. The purpose of this study was to test and validate at our transfusion centre a rapid assay for the identification of patients with anti-IgA antibodies. Materials and methods Forty-six samples (6 from healthy controls and 40 from IgA-deficient patients) were collected. Sera were analysed blindly by three different clinical laboratory technologists using two DiaMed particle gel immunoassays (ID-PaGIA) for IgA deficiency and for antibodies to IgA. The results were subsequently checked with the results of a fluorescence enzyme immunoassay conducted in the reference immunology laboratory. Results The ID-PaGIA had a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 97.1% for the IgA deficiency test. With regards to the detection of anti-IgA antibodies, the sensitivity was 89.3% and the specificity 100%. The reproducibility of the test was 100%. Discussion The ID-PaGIA screening assays are suitable for the investigation of transfusion-related anaphylactic reactions in a routine blood bank laboratory. Although the gel card technique does not quantify the level of anti-IgA antibodies, it is readily available, providing an effective and simple method for the diagnosis of anti-IgA related anaphylaxis and guidance for the appropriate transfusion practice in an emergency. PMID:24887222

  8. Morphological controls on cannibalism in a planktonic marine phagotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Claire M; Flynn, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    The ingestion preferences of planktonic protozoa influence the structure and succession of microbial communities and thus biogeochemical cycling within aquatic environments. Some predatory ciliates and flagellates are reported to switch to cannibalism when no suitable non-self prey items are available for consumption. However, the importance of cannibalism as a survival strategy, and its ubiquity within the planktonic protozoa is not known. We report the first attempt to quantify cannibalism in a phagotrophic marine dinoflagellate (Oxyrrhis marina). Cannibalistic Oxyrrhis cells seldom comprised >2% of any experimental population, including those in which all non-self prey items had been grazed to extinction. Such 'prey-deplete' cultures became dominated by homogeneous populations of highly motile Oxyrrhis that were morphologically unable (too similar in size) to cannibalise. That cannibalism can only occur when 'victim' and 'cannibal' cell size-classes of sufficient difference collide, suggests that cannibalism may be of limited use as a long-term survival strategy in phagotrophic protozoa.

  9. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J

    2006-01-01

    Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light......-driven proton translocation across the cell membrane. So far, proteorhodopsin genes have been well documented only in proteobacteria and a few other bacterial groups. Here we report the presence and distribution of proteorhodopsin genes in Archaea affiliated with the order Thermoplasmatales, in the ocean......'s upper water column. The genomic context and phylogenetic relationships of the archaeal and proteobacterial proteorhodopsins indicate its probable lateral transfer between planktonic Bacteria and Archaea. About 10% of the euryarchaeotes in the photic zone contained the proteorhodopsin gene adjacent...

  10. Control of plankton seasonal succession by adaptive grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Andersen, Ken Haste; Visser, Andre;

    2013-01-01

    on the effects of adaptive zooplankton grazing behavior on the seasonal succession of temperate plankton communities in an idealized community model consisting of a zooplankton grazer and two phytoplankton species, one motile and the other nonmotile. The grazer can switch between ambush feeding on motile cells...... or feeding-current feeding on nonmotile cells. The feeding-current behavior imposes an additional mortality risk on the grazer, whereas ambush feeding benefits from small-scale fluid turbulence. Grazer–phytoplankton feeding interactions are forced by light and turbulence and the grazer adopts the feeding...... behavior that optimizes its fitness. The adaptive grazing model predicts essential features of the seasonal plankton succession reported from temperate seas, including the vertical distribution and seasonal variation in the relative abundance of motile and nonmotile phytoplankton and the seasonal variation...

  11. Antagonism between Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in planktonic systems and in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Manuel; Simoes, Lúcia C; Pereira, Maria O; Vieira, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    In the environment, many microorganisms coexist in communities competing for resources, and they are often associated as biofilms. The investigation of bacterial ecology and interactions may help to improve understanding of the ability of biofilms to persist. In this study, the behaviour of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in the planktonic and sessile states was compared. Planktonic tests were performed with single and dual species cultures in growth medium with and without supplemental FeCl3. B. cereus and P. fluorescens single cultures had equivalent growth behaviours. Also, when in co-culture under Fe-supplemented conditions, the bacteria coexisted and showed similar growth profiles. Under Fe limitation, 8 h after co-culture and over time, the number of viable B. cereus cells decreased compared with P. fluorescens. Spores were detected during the course of the experiment, but were not correlated with the decrease in the number of viable cells. This growth inhibitory effect was correlated with the release of metabolite molecules by P. fluorescens through Fe-dependent mechanisms. Biofilm studies were carried out with single and dual species using a continuous flow bioreactor rotating system with stainless steel (SS) substrata. Steady-state biofilms were exposed to a series of increasing shear stress forces. Analysis of the removal of dual species biofilms revealed that the outer layer was colonised mainly by B. cereus. This bacterium was able to grow in the outermost layers of the biofilm due to the inhibitory effect of P. fluorescens being decreased by the exposure of the cells to fresh culture medium. B. cereus also constituted the surface primary coloniser due to its favourable adhesion to SS. P. fluorescens was the main coloniser of the middle layers of the biofilm. Single and dual species biofilm removal data also revealed that B. cereus biofilms had the highest physical stability, followed by P. fluorescens biofilms. This study highlights the

  12. Chronic exposure to air pollution particles increases the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome: findings from a natural experiment in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongjie; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Li, Zhigang; Gow, Andrew; Chung, Kian Fan; Hu, Min; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zeng, Limin; Zhu, Tong; Jia, Guang; Li, Xiaoqian; Duarte, Marlyn; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that air pollution is a risk factor for childhood obesity. Limited experimental data have shown that early-life exposure to ambient particles either increases susceptibility to diet-induced weight gain in adulthood or increases insulin resistance, adiposity, and inflammation. However, no data have directly supported a link between air pollution and non-diet-induced weight increases. In a rodent model, we found that breathing Beijing's highly polluted air resulted in weight gain and cardiorespiratory and metabolic dysfunction. Compared to those exposed to filtered air, pregnant rats exposed to unfiltered Beijing air were significantly heavier at the end of pregnancy. At 8 wk old, the offspring prenatally and postnatally exposed to unfiltered air were significantly heavier than those exposed to filtered air. In both rat dams and their offspring, after continuous exposure to unfiltered air we observed pronounced histologic evidence for both perivascular and peribronchial inflammation in the lungs, increased tissue and systemic oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, and an enhanced proinflammatory status of epididymal fat. Results suggest that TLR2/4-dependent inflammatory activation and lipid oxidation in the lung can spill over systemically, leading to metabolic dysfunction and weight gain.-Wei, Y., Zhang, J., Li, Z., Gow, A., Chung, K. F., Hu, M., Sun, Z., Zeng, L., Zhu, T., Jia, G., Li, X., Duarte, M., Tang, X. Chronic exposure to air pollution particles increases the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome: findings from a natural experiment in Beijing.

  13. Application of Statistical Learning Theory to Plankton Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Davis and S. M. Gallager A. R. Solow . Microaggregations of oceanic plankton observed by towed video microscopy. Science, 257:230-232, 1992. [33] C.S...correction. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 306, 2006. 162 [75] J. S. Jaffe, M. D. Ohman, and A. D. Roberts . OASIS in the sea: measurement of the acoustic...Engineering, pages 223-230, Wahington DC, 1991. [146] A. Solow , C. Davis, and Q. Hu. Estimating the txaonomic composition of a sample when individuals are

  14. Rearing and growth of the Octopus Robsonella fontaniana (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) from planktonic hatchlings to benthic juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Iker; Hernández, Jorge; Dörner, Jessica; Paschke, Kurt; Farías, Ana; Crovetto, Enzo; Rosas, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Globally, octopus larviculture is one of the challenges faced in the attempt to diversify aquaculture and achieve cephalopod farming. Currently, only juveniles of Octopus vulgaris, Octopus joubini, and Enteroctopus dofleini have been obtained at an experimental level. This is the first study to look at the characteristics of planktonic and benthic Robsonella fontaniana juveniles in an effort to analyze the morphometric changes occurring during their planktonic and benthic phases and to explore the feasibility of obtaining settlement under controlled conditions. The morphometric measurements varied exponentially over time and did not show different tendencies before and after settlement. Mantle growth in relation to total length fit a logarithmic regression, whereas arm length and eye diameter increased linearly with respect to total length throughout the entire paralarval and juvenile periods. This suggests that the size of the mantle decreases with age in proportion to the total octopus length, whereas the organs more directly involved in catching prey tend to increase in direct proportion to the total length. The present study shows that R. fontaniana can be reared from hatching through the final paralarval stage on a diet of Lithodes santolla (king crab) zoeae; after settlement, the juveniles can be reared on a diet of crab such as Petrolisthes.

  15. Lunar periodicity in the shell flux of some planktonic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, L.; Reynolds, C. E.; Richey, J.; Hall, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    Synchronised reproduction offers clear benefits to planktonic foraminifera - an important group of marine calcifiers - as it increases the chances of successful gamete fusion. Such synchrony requires tuning to an internal or external clock. Evidence exists for lunar reproductive cycles in some species, but its recognition in shell flux time series has proven difficult, raising questions about reproductive strategies. Using spectral analysis of a 6 year time series (mostly at weekly resolution) from the northern Gulf of Mexico we show that the shell flux of Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinella siphonifera, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and in Globigerinoides ruber (both pink and white varieties) is characterised by lunar periodicity. The fluxes of Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerinella calida, Globorotalia crassaformis and Globigerinita glutinata do not show significant spectral power at the lunar frequency. If present, lunar periodicity is superimposed on longer term/seasonal changes in the shell fluxes, but accounts for a significant part of the variance in the fluxes. The amplitude of the lunar cycle increases roughly proportional with the magnitude of the flux, demonstrating that most of the population is indeed affected by lunar-phased synchronisation. Phasing of peak fluxes appears species-specific, with G. menardii, O. universa and G. sacculifer showing most peaks around the full moon and G. ruber one week later. Contrastingly, peaks G. siphonifera occur dominantly around new moon. Very limited literature exists on lunar phasing of foraminiferal export fluxes, but spatial differences in its presence may exist, corroborating the exogenous nature of lunar synchrony in planktonic foraminifera.

  16. A long-term study on crustacean plankton of a shallow tropical lake: the role of invertebrate predation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene S. Arcifa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary factor that governs the size and species composition of zooplankton is still a controversial issue and temperature is considered the main factor responsible for latitudinal differences. In waters with a narrow temperature range, such as in the tropics, predation may be a more important factor. Nearly three decades of intermittent studies of the crustacean plankton in a shallow tropical lake revealed that the main event that led to their restructuring was the appearance of a second predator, the water mite Krendowskia sp. The new predator and larvae of the dipteran Chaoborus brasiliensis Theobald exerted a combined, although asymmetrical effect on microcrustaceans. The period when the mite was detected was followed by the restructuring of the crustacean plankton community. Predation by these two invertebrates emerged as the factor responsible for community changes, involving an increased contribution of copepods and decreases in the relative abundance of smaller cladoceran species. In the short term, the mite caused a decrease in species richness and the annual mean instantaneous composition of cladocerans, a predominance of large-sized species (Daphnia ambigua Scourfield and Daphnia gessneri Herbst and the virtual disappearance of small species (e.g., Bosmina tubicen Brehm. The long-term impact resulted in increased species richness and the dominance of large and medium-sized cladocerans, such as D. gessneri and Ceriodaphnia richardi Sars. The larger body size of three cladocerans, the two Daphnia species and B. tubicen, in the long term, may be a response to the dominant predator, Chaoborus. The seasonal variation in the predator abundance, mainly Chaoborus larvae, allowed the prey to recover during the cool season. The copepods Tropocyclops prasinus meridionalis (Fischer and Thermocyclops decipiens Kiefer were less affected by predation than the cladocerans; their contribution to the crustacean plankton increased 12-28% after the

  17. Oceanic nitrogen reservoir regulated by plankton diversity and ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-09-20

    The average nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio of marine phytoplankton (16N:1P) is closely matched to the nutrient content of mean ocean waters (14.3N:1P). This condition is thought to arise from biological control over the ocean's nitrogen budget, in which removal of bioavailable nitrogen by denitrifying bacteria ensures widespread selection for diazotrophic phytoplankton that replenish this essential nutrient when it limits the growth of other species. Here we show that in the context of a realistic ocean circulation model, and a uniform N:P ratio of plankton biomass, this feedback mechanism yields an oceanic nitrate deficit more than double its observed value. The critical missing phenomenon is diversity in the metabolic N:P requirement of phytoplankton, which has recently been shown to exhibit large-scale patterns associated with species composition. When we model these variations, such that diazotrophs compete with high N:P communities in subtropical regions, the ocean nitrogen inventory rises and may even exceed the average N:P ratio of plankton. The latter condition, previously considered impossible, is prevented in the modern ocean by shallow circulations that communicate stoichiometric signals from remote biomes dominated by diatoms with low N:P ratios. Large-scale patterns of plankton diversity and the circulation pathways connecting them are thus key factors determining the availability of fixed nitrogen in the ocean.

  18. Massive consumption of gelatinous plankton by Mediterranean apex predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Luis; Álvarez de Quevedo, Irene; Borrell, Assumpció; Aguilar, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus), spearfish (Tetrapturus belone) and swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola) also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), blue shark (Prionace glauca), leerfish (Lichia amia), bonito (Sarda sarda), striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba) and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga), amberjack (Seriola dumerili), blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus) were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage) and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish), most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing.

  19. Massive consumption of gelatinous plankton by Mediterranean apex predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cardona

    Full Text Available Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus, little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus, spearfish (Tetrapturus belone and swordfish (Xiphias gladius. Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix, blue shark (Prionace glauca, leerfish (Lichia amia, bonito (Sarda sarda, striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga, amberjack (Seriola dumerili, blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola, bullet tuna (Auxis rochei, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus, horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus, mackerel (Scomber scombrus and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish, most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing.

  20. Plankton community structure: evaluation of analytical methods using model communities. Final report. [Effects of effluents on plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, W. B.

    1976-07-01

    The general purpose of this project was to provide information that might be of use to biologists who are investigating the effects of effluents on plankton. Although most applicable to non-persistent pollutants, such as thermal effluents, the methodology may be applied in some degree to nondegradable pollutants as well. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to provide some information about the relative effectiveness of certain representative affinity tests, in circumstances that would be analogous to those encountered in an impact investigation on plankton. In such a study, real data cannot be used, if the purpose is to show the efficiency of a test at detecting groups with known characteristics; artificial data must be employed in which those characteristics are built in. For that reason, a distribution model was to generate the data for computer analysis.

  1. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, B C; Lind, O C; Bradshaw, C; Salbu, B

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as (137)Cs and (90)Sr/(90)Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gyh(-1)) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the "no-effect dose" are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment, for example potential

  2. Experimental Research on Atmospheric Electric Field and Extensive Air Shower Particle Increasing During Thunderstorms with ARGO-YBJ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bin; ZHANG Ying; JIA Huan-Yu

    2008-01-01

    From April lst to August 14th, 2006, thunderstorms had been recorded at Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory by ARGO-YBJ experiment. This paper analyzed the correlation between atmospheric electric field (AEF) and "scaler mode" counting rate during thunderstorm. Counting rates of multiplicities n = 1,2 were found to have a large increase ( from 1.02% to 9.03% ), while there was few or no changes in those of multiplicities n =3 and n≥4 during the thunderstorms. The counts of different multiplicities had different feedbacks on the violent change of AEF, which showed that their energy and most components were distinguishing.

  3. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

  4. Effect of ocean acidification on the structure and fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Rafael; Winder, Monika; Stuhr, Annegret; Almén, Anna-Karin; Engström-Öst, Jonna; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is changing seawater chemistry towards reduced pH, which affects various properties of marine organisms. Coastal and brackish water communities are expected to be less affected by ocean acidification (OA) as these communities are typically adapted to high fluctuations in CO2 and pH. Here we investigate the response of a coastal brackish water plankton community to increasing CO2 levels as projected for the coming decades and the end of this century in terms of community and biochemical fatty acid (FA) composition. A Baltic Sea plankton community was enclosed in a set of offshore mesocosms and subjected to a CO2 gradient ranging from natural concentrations ( ˜ 347 µatm fCO2) up to values projected for the year 2100 ( ˜ 1333 µatm fCO2). We show that the phytoplankton community composition was resilient to CO2 and did not diverge between the treatments. Seston FA composition was influenced by community composition, which in turn was driven by silicate and phosphate limitation in the mesocosms and showed no difference between the CO2 treatments. These results suggest that CO2 effects are dampened in coastal communities that already experience high natural fluctuations in pCO2. Although this coastal plankton community was tolerant of high pCO2 levels, hypoxia and CO2 uptake by the sea can aggravate acidification and may lead to pH changes outside the currently experienced range for coastal organisms.

  5. Ocean acidification reduces transfer of essential biomolecules in a natural plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, J. Rafael; Riebesell, Ulf; Larsen, Aud; Winder, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), a process of increasing seawater acidity caused by the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) by the ocean, is expected to change surface ocean pH to levels unprecedented for millions of years, affecting marine food web structures and trophic interactions. Using an in situ mesocosm approach we investigated effects of OA on community composition and trophic transfer of essential fatty acids (FA) in a natural plankton assemblage. Elevated pCO2 favored the smallest phytoplankton size class in terms of biomass, primarily picoeukaryotes, at the expense of chlorophyta and haptophyta in the nano-plankton size range. This shift in community composition and size structure was accompanied by a decline in the proportion of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) to total FA content in the nano- and picophytoplankton size fractions. This decline was mirrored in a continuing reduction in the relative PUFA content of the dominant copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, which primarily fed on the nano-size class. Our results demonstrate that a shift in phytoplankton community composition and biochemical composition in response to rising CO2 can affect the transfer of essential compounds to higher trophic levels, which rely on their prey as a source for essential macromolecules. PMID:27324057

  6. The response of calcifying plankton to climate change in the Pliocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. V. Davis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of anthropogenic pCO2 increases, future oceans are growing warmer and lower in pH and oxygen, conditions that are likely to impact planktic communities. Past intervals of elevated and changing pCO2 and temperatures can offer a glimpse into the response of marine calcifying plankton to changes in surface oceans under conditions similar to those projected for the future. Here we present new records of planktic foraminiferal and coccolith calcification (weight and size from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 (mid-North Atlantic and Ocean Drilling Program Site 999 (Caribbean Sea from the Pliocene, the last time that pCO2 was similar to today, and extending through a global cooling event into the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (3.3 to 2.6 million years ago. Test weights of both surface-dwelling Foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and thermocline-dwelling Foraminifera Globorotalia puncticulata vary with a potential link to regional temperature variation in the North Atlantic, whereas in the tropics Globigerinoides ruber test weight remains stable. In contrast, reticulofenestrid coccoliths show a narrowing size range and a decline in the largest lith diameters over this interval. Our results suggest no major changes in plankton calcite production during the high pCO2 Pliocene or during the transition into an icehouse world.

  7. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Silva-Dias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the CLSI protocol for yeast M27-A3 S4.Yeast cells of non-albicans species exhibit increased ability to adhere and form biofilm. However the correlation between adhesion and biofilm formation varied according to species and also with the methodology used for biofilm assessment. No association was found between strain´s site of isolation or planktonic antifungal susceptibility and adhesion or biofilm formation. Finally CSH seemed to be a good predictor for biofilm formation but not for adhesion.Despite the marked variability registered intra and inter species, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis were the species exhibiting high adhesion profile. C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii and C. krusei revealed higher biofilm formation values in terms of biomass. C. parapsilosis was the species with lower biofilm metabolic activity.

  8. Investigating Carbonate System Perturbations across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene Transition using Boron Isotopes in Planktonic Foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henehan, M. J.; Hull, P. M.; Planavsky, N. J.; Huber, B. T.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The interval spanning the latest Maastrichtian to the early Palaeocene has great potential in helping to elucidate the stabilising mechanisms on the Earth's carbonate system on both long and very short geological timescales, from the geologically-instantaneous production of sulphate-rich aerosols and nitrogen oxides from the K-Pg bolide impact to the relatively more gradual degassing from Deccan volcanism in the latest Maastrichtian. The extent to which ocean pH (and atmospheric CO2 concentrations) changed in response to these contrasting acidification pressures, and the timescales of their recovery, may provide unique insight into the efficiency of the Earth's oceans in buffering greenhouse gas increases (through carbonate dissolution, weathering-derived alkalinity flux, and biological carbon cycling). The boron isotope palaeo-pH proxy in planktic foraminifera is well suited to such investigations, but its application over this interval has been problematic, not least due to a scarcity of sample material and a near-complete turnover of planktonic foraminiferal species across the K-Pg boundary. To attempt to circumvent these issues, we investigate the biological influences on boron isotope signals in Maastrichtian and Danian planktonic foraminifera, with the goal of producing more accurate palaeo-pH reconstructions. With these findings in mind, we present preliminary constraints on ocean pH and carbonate system dynamics across this critical interval of geological time.

  9. Microbubble-Mediated Ultrasound Enhances the Lethal Effect of Gentamicin on Planktonic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Xiao Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has found that low-intensity ultrasound enhanced the lethal effect of gentamicin on planktonic E. coli. We aimed to further investigate whether microbubble-mediated low-intensity ultrasound could further enhance the antimicrobial efficacy of gentamicin. The planktonic E. coli (ATCC 25922 was distributed to four different interventions: control (GCON, microbubble only (GMB, ultrasound only (GUS, and microbubble-mediated ultrasound (GMUS. Ultrasound was applied with 100 mW/cm2 (average intensity and 46.5 KHz, which presented no bactericidal activity. After 12 h, plate counting was used to estimate the number of bacteria, and bacterial micromorphology was observed with transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the viable counts of E. coli in GMUS were decreased by 1.01 to 1.42 log10 CFU/mL compared with GUS (P<0.01. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of gentamicin against E. coli was 1 μg/mL in the GMUS and GUS groups, lower than that in the GCON and GMB groups (2 μg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images exhibited more destruction and higher thickness of bacterial cell membranes in the GMUS than those in other groups. The reason might be the increased permeability of cell membranes for gentamicin caused by acoustic cavitation.

  10. Antifungal Activity of 14-Helical β-Peptides against Planktonic Cells and Biofilms of Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Raman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungal infections and treatment is further complicated by the formation of drug resistant biofilms, often on the surfaces of implanted medical devices. In recent years, the incidence of fungal infections by other pathogenic Candida species such as C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis has increased. Amphiphilic, helical β-peptide structural mimetics of natural antimicrobial α-peptides have been shown to exhibit specific planktonic antifungal and anti-biofilm formation activity against C. albicans in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that β-peptides are also active against clinically isolated and drug resistant strains of C. albicans and against other opportunistic Candida spp. Different Candida species were susceptible to β-peptides to varying degrees, with C. tropicalis being the most and C. glabrata being the least susceptible. β-peptide hydrophobicity directly correlated with antifungal activity against all the Candida clinical strains and species tested. While β-peptides were largely ineffective at disrupting existing Candida biofilms, hydrophobic β-peptides were able to prevent the formation of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis biofilms. The broad-spectrum antifungal activity of β-peptides against planktonic cells and in preventing biofilm formation suggests the promise of this class of molecules as therapeutics.

  11. Metabolomics and proteomics reveal impacts of chemically mediated competition on marine plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulson-Ellestad, Kelsey L.; Jones, Christina M.; Roy, Jessie; Viant, Mark R.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Kubanek, Julia; Nunn, Brook L.

    2014-01-01

    Competition is a major force structuring marine planktonic communities. The release of compounds that inhibit competitors, a process known as allelopathy, may play a role in the maintenance of large blooms of the red-tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces potent neurotoxins that negatively impact coastal marine ecosystems. K. brevis is variably allelopathic to multiple competitors, typically causing sublethal suppression of growth. We used metabolomic and proteomic analyses to investigate the role of chemically mediated ecological interactions between K. brevis and two diatom competitors, Asterionellopsis glacialis and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The impact of K. brevis allelopathy on competitor physiology was reflected in the metabolomes and expressed proteomes of both diatoms, although the diatom that co-occurs with K. brevis blooms (A. glacialis) exhibited more robust metabolism in response to K. brevis. The observed partial resistance of A. glacialis to allelopathy may be a result of its frequent exposure to K. brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. For the more sensitive diatom, T. pseudonana, which may not have had opportunity to evolve resistance to K. brevis, allelopathy disrupted energy metabolism and impeded cellular protection mechanisms including altered cell membrane components, inhibited osmoregulation, and increased oxidative stress. Allelopathic compounds appear to target multiple physiological pathways in sensitive competitors, demonstrating that chemical cues in the plankton have the potential to alter large-scale ecosystem processes including primary production and nutrient cycling. PMID:24889616

  12. Increasing the Collision Rate of Particle Impact Electroanalysis with Magnetically Guided Pt-Decorated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Donald A; Yoo, Jason J; Castañeda, Alma D; Gu, Brett; Dasari, Radhika; Crooks, Richard M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2015-07-28

    An integrated microfluidic/magnetophoretic methodology was developed for improving signal response time and detection limits for the chronoamperometric observation of discrete nanoparticle/electrode interactions by electrocatalytic amplification. The strategy relied on Pt-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles which exhibit both superparamagnetism and electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine. A wet chemical synthetic approach succeeded in the controlled growth of Pt on the surface of FeO/Fe3O4 core/shell nanocubes, resulting in highly uniform Pt-decorated iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles with good dispersibility in water. The unique mechanism of hybrid nanoparticle formation was investigated by electron microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of isolated nanoparticle intermediates and final products. Discrete hybrid nanoparticle collision events were detected in the presence of hydrazine, an electrochemical indicator probe, using a gold microband electrode integrated into a microfluidic channel. In contrast with related systems, the experimental nanoparticle/electrode collision rate correlates more closely with simple theoretical approximations, primarily due to the accuracy of the nanoparticle tracking analysis method used to quantify nanoparticle concentrations and diffusion coefficients. Further modification of the microfluidic device was made by applying a tightly focused magnetic field to the detection volume to attract the magnetic nanoprobes to the microband working electrode, thereby resulting in a 6-fold increase to the relative frequency of chronoamperometric signals corresponding to discrete nanoparticle impact events.

  13. Missouri River Environmental Inventory. Measurements of the Species Diversity of Planktonic and Microbenthic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    is distinctly unfavorable to plankton development. In fas; flowing streams only those forits which can attach themselves by a gelatinous mass or stalks...abundant diatom genera in the plankton samples collected during November, 1972. .. ................ 67 31. The two most abundant species of ciliates...flagellates in the plankton samples collected during November, 1972 .. .............. 69 33. The five most abundant diatom genera in the benthos samples

  14. Efficiency of phenol biodegradation by planktonic Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes (a constructed wetland isolate) vs. root and gravel biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzbaum, Eyal; Kirzhner, Felix; Sela, Shlomo; Zimmels, Yoram; Armon, Robert

    2010-09-01

    In the last two decades, constructed wetland systems gained increasing interest in wastewater treatment and as such have been intensively studied around the world. While most of the studies showed excellent removal of various pollutants, the exact contribution, in kinetic terms, of its particular components (such as: root, gravel and water) combined with bacteria is almost nonexistent. In the present study, a phenol degrader bacterium identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes was isolated from a constructed wetland, and used in an experimental set-up containing: plants and gravel. Phenol removal rate by planktonic and biofilm bacteria (on sterile Zea mays roots and gravel surfaces) was studied. Specific phenol removal rates revealed significant advantage of planktonic cells (1.04 × 10(-9) mg phenol/CFU/h) compared to root and gravel biofilms: 4.59 × 10(-11)-2.04 × 10(-10) and 8.04 × 10(-11)-4.39 × 10(-10) (mg phenol/CFU/h), respectively. In batch cultures, phenol biodegradation kinetic parameters were determined by biomass growth rates and phenol removal as a function of time. Based on Haldane equation, kinetic constants such as μ(max) = 1.15/h, K(s) = 35.4 mg/L and K(i) = 198.6 mg/L fit well phenol removal by P. pseudoalcaligenes. Although P. pseudoalcaligenes planktonic cells showed the highest phenol removal rate, in constructed wetland systems and especially in those with sub-surface flow, it is expected that surface associated microorganisms (biofilms) will provide a much higher contribution in phenol and other organics removal, due to greater bacterial biomass. Factors affecting the performance of planktonic vs. biofilm bacteria in sub-surface flow constructed wetlands are further discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrafine particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Wierzbicka, Aneta;

    2013-01-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations (10-300 nm in size) were continuously measured over a period of ∼45 h in 56 residences of nonsmokers in Copenhagen, Denmark. The highest concentrations were measured when occupants were present and awake (geometric mean, GM: 22.3 × 103 cm-3), the lowest when...... the homes were vacant (GM: 6.1 × 103 cm-3) or the occupants were asleep (GM: 5.1 × 103 cm-3). Diary entries regarding occupancy and particle related activities were used to identify source events and apportion the daily integrated exposure among sources. Source events clearly resulted in increased PN...... concentrations and decreased average particle diameter. For a given event, elevated particle concentrations persisted for several hours after the emission of fresh particles ceased. The residential daily integrated PN exposure in the 56 homes ranged between 37 × 103 and 6.0 × 106 particles per cm3·h/day (GM: 3...

  16. A common mechanism involving the TORC1 pathway can lead to amphotericin B-persistence in biofilm and planktonic Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojsen, Rasmus; Regenberg, Birgitte; Gresham, David; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-02-23

    Fungal infections are an increasing clinical problem. Decreased treatment effectiveness is associated with biofilm formation and drug recalcitrance is thought to be biofilm specific. However, no systematic investigations have tested whether resistance mechanisms are shared between biofilm and planktonic populations. We performed multiplexed barcode sequencing (Bar-seq) screening of a pooled collection of gene-deletion mutants cultivated as biofilm and planktonic cells. Screening for resistance to the ergosterol-targeting fungicide amphotericin B (AmB) revealed that the two growth modes had significant overlap in AmB-persistent mutants. Mutants defective in sterol metabolism, ribosome biosynthesis, and the TORC1 and Ras pathways showed increased persistence when treated with AmB. The ras1, ras2 and tor1 mutants had a high-persister phenotype similar to wild-type biofilm and planktonic cells exposed to the TORC1 pathway inhibitor rapamycin. Inhibition of TORC1 with rapamycin also increased the proportion of persisters in Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. We propose that decreased TORC1-mediated induction of ribosome biosynthesis via Ras can lead to formation of AmB-persister cells regardless of whether the cells are in planktonic or biofilm growth mode. Identification of common pathways leading to growth mode-independent persister formation is important for developing novel strategies for treating fungal infections.

  17. Environmental bacteriophages active on biofilms and planktonic forms of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae: Potential relevance in cholera epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Iftekhar Bin; Hoque, M Mozammel; Abdullah, Ahmed; Bari, S M Nayeemul; Ghosh, Amar N; Faruque, Shah M

    2017-01-01

    Phages isolated from environmental waters in Bangladesh were tested for their host specificity towards V. cholerae O1 and O139, and the ability to disperse V. cholerae biofilms formed in the laboratory. Representative phages were further characterized by electron microscopy and whole genome sequencing. Selected phages were then introduced in various combinations to biofilms of toxigenic V. cholerae added to samples of river water, and the dispersion of biofilms as well as the growth kinetics of V. cholerae and the phages were monitored. A phage cocktail composed of three different phages isolated from surface waters in Bangladesh and designated as JSF7, JSF4, and JSF3 could significantly influence the distribution and concentration of the active planktonic form and biofilm associated form of toxigenic V. cholerae in water. While JSF7 showed a biofilm degrading activity and dispersed cells from both V. cholerae O1 and O139 derived biofilms thus increasing the concentration of planktonic V. cholerae in water, JSF4 and JSF3 showed strong bactericidal activity against V. cholerae O1 and O139 respectively. A mixture of all three phages could effectively reduce both biofilm-associated and planktonic V. cholerae in river water microcosms. Besides potential applicability in phage-mediated control of cholera, our results have relevance in appreciating possible intricate role of diverse environmental phages in the epidemiology of the disease, since both biofilms and phages influence the prevalence and infectivity of V. cholerae in a variety of ways.

  18. Plankton in the open Mediterranean Sea: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Siokou-Frangou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the plankton studies conducted during the last 25 years in the epipelagic offshore waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This quasi-enclosed sea is characterized by a rich and complex physical dynamics with distinctive traits, especially in regard to the thermohaline circulation. Recent investigations have basically confirmed the long-recognised oligotrophic nature of this sea, which increases along both the west-east and the north-south directions. Nutrient availability is low, especially for phosphorous (N:P up to 60, though this limitation may be buffered by inputs from highly populated coasts and from the atmosphere. Phytoplankton biomass, as chl a, generally displays low values (less than 0.2 μg chl a l−1 over large areas, with a modest late winter increase. A large bloom (up to 3 μg l−1 is observed throughout the late winter and spring exclusively in the NW area. Relatively high biomass values are recorded in fronts and cyclonic gyres. A deep chlorophyll maximum is a permanent feature for the whole basin, except during the late winter mixing. It is found at increasingly greater depths ranging from 30 m in the Alboran Sea to 120 m in the easternmost Levantine basin. Primary production reveals a west-east decreasing trend and ranges between 59 and 150 g C m−2 y−1 (in situ measurements. Overall, the basin is largely dominated by small autotrophs, microheterotrophs and egg-carrying copepod species. The microorganisms (phytoplankton, viruses, bacteria, flagellates and ciliates and zooplankton components reveal a considerable diversity and variability over spatial and temporal scales, although the latter is poorly studied. Examples are the wide diversity of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, the multifarious role of diatoms or picoeukaryotes, and the distinct seasonal or spatial patterns of the species-rich copepod genera or families which dominate the

  19. A Model of the Dynamics of Plankton Patchiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Ebenhöh

    1980-04-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the dynamics of plankton patchiness in the intermediate scale (1 km-10 km was developed. Mechanisms that may be important in the creation and destruction of patches were selected and modelled. Such mechanisms are: horizontal turbulent diffusion, noise in the vertical turbulence, vertical migration of the zooplankton combined with a velocity profile and consumption of zooplankton by fish in schools. Patchiness is described by thc usc of the moments of density distributions, coherence lengths and correlations of phytoplankton and zooplankton. These parameters are investigated as functions of time and, also, for their dependence on the parameters of the patch creation mechanisms.

  20. Bioavailability of autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Helle; Markager, Svend Stiig; Søndergaard, Morten

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) produced during a phytoplankton bloom. The experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities as batch growth experiments over approximately 30 days with nitrogen limitation. Five to six...... times during the exponential and stationary phases of each experimental bloom the bioavailability of DON was measured over 60 days together with DOC and oxygen consumption. The overall aim was to quantify remineralization of the added nitrate. The results showed that maximum 33 % of the added nitrate...

  1. Decreased seasonality and high variability of coastal plankton dynamics in an urban location of the NW Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Estela; Peters, Francesc; Arin, Laura; Guillén, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Contrary to what happens in open waters, where chlorophyll values and plankton dynamics can be predicted with a reasonable accuracy on an annual basis, biological parameters analyzed for coastal waters often show slight seasonality, and are exposed to numerous and convergent forcing factors that make it difficult to draw clear patterns. On top of this large natural variability, coastal locations subjected to urban sprawl suffer further human impact that may increase the unpredictability of plankton dynamics. Here we present the results of a multi-year time series of monthly samplings carried out in a coastal location by the city of Barcelona (NW Mediterranean) that is highly exposed to anthropogenic disturbances. Our data confirm the existence of complex patterns throughout the year. Freshwater inputs proved to be an important source of nutrients, yet the response of the planktonic organisms was vague and not systematic, contrary to the results of a previous study at a nearby coastal site less affected by human activities. The severity of anthropogenic disruptions was partially masked by the co-occurrence of natural physical phenomena, e.g., waste spills often come with downpours and large river discharge. In the NW Mediterranean, there seems to be a gradient of decreasing predictability on plankton dynamics from offshore to coastal waters with little human influence, where seasonality can be largely modified by local processes but the biological response is systematic and fairly predictable, and finally to urban coastal locations, where the seasonal background is diluted by numerous perturbations and there exists a variable pattern of biological responses. Our study underlines the importance of specific coastal processes in determining the structure and dynamics of the planktonic community, and the need to characterize coastal areas setting aside some of the assumptions valid for open ocean regions (e.g., (1) in the open ocean seasonality dominates annual nutrient

  2. Increased mutagenic joining of enzymatically-induced DNA double-strand breaks in high-charge and energy particle irradiated human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhentian; Hudson, Farlyn Z; Wang, Huichen; Wang, Ya; Bian, Zhuan; Murnane, John P; Dynan, William S

    2013-07-01

    The carcinogenic risk of high-charge and energy (HZE) particle exposure arises from its ability to both induce complex DNA damage and from its ability to evoke deleterious, non-DNA targeted effects. We investigate here whether these nontargeted effects involve dysregulation of double-strand break repair, such that a history of HZE exposure heightens the risks from future injury. We used a new human cell reporter line, in which expression of the I-SceI meganuclease stimulates both translocations on different chromosomes, and deletions on the same chromosome. Exposure to 1.0 Gy of 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions led to a doubling in the frequency of I-SceI-mediated translocations and a smaller, but nevertheless significant, increase in the frequency of I-SceI-mediated deletions. This mutagenic repair phenotype persisted for up to two weeks and eight population doublings. The phenotype was not induced by low-linear energy transfer radiation or by a lower dose of HZE-particle radiation (0.3 Gy) indicating that the effect is radiation quality and dose dependent. The mutagenic repair phenotype was associated with the presence of micronuclei and persistent DSB repair foci, consistent with a hypothesis that genomic stress is a causative factor.

  3. Endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan in Concentrated Ambient Particles Induce Rapid Increase in Blood Pressure in Controlled Human Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Thorne, Peter S; Scott, James; Liu, Ling; Brook, Robert D; Behbod, Behrooz; Gibson, Heike; Silverman, Frances; Mittleman, Murray A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Gold, Diane R

    2015-09-01

    Short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased blood pressure (BP) in epidemiological studies. Understanding the impact of specific PM components on BP is essential in developing effective risk-reduction strategies. We investigated the association between endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan-two major biological PM components-and BP. We also examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor, a vasodilatory inflammatory marker, modified these associations. We conducted a single-blind, randomized, crossover trial of controlled human exposure to concentrated ambient particles with 50 healthy adults. Particle-associated-endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan were sampled using polycarbonate-membrane-filters. Supine resting systolic BP and diastolic BP were measured pre-, 0.5-hour post-, and 20-hour postexposure. Urine vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and creatinine-corrected. Exposures to endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan for 130 minutes were associated with increases in BPs: at 0.5-hour postexposure, every doubling in endotoxin concentration was associated with 1.73 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.28, 3.18; P=0.02) and 2.07 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.74, 3.39; P=0.003); every doubling in β-1,3-d-Glucan concentration was associated with 0.80 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, -0.07, 1.67; P=0.07) and 0.88 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.09, 1.66; P=0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor rose after concentrated ambient particle endotoxin exposure and attenuated the association between endotoxin and 0.5-hour postexposure diastolic BP (Pinteraction=0.02). In healthy adults, short-term endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan exposures were associated with increased BP. Our findings suggest that the biological PM components contribute to PM-related cardiovascular outcomes, and postexposure vascular endothelial

  4. Exposure to O-16 particle irradiation causes age-like decrements in rats through increased oxidative stress, inflammation and loss of autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation, disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication, and alters cognitive behaviors. Even though exposure to these highly charged particles occurs at low fluence rates, p...

  5. Sheldon Spectrum and the Plankton Paradox: Two Sides of the Same Coin. A trait-based plankton size-spectrum model

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A; Law, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Sheldon spectrum describes a remarkable regularity in aquatic ecosystems: the biomass density as a function of logarithmic body mass is approximately constant over many orders of magnitude. While size-spectrum models have explained this phenomenon for assemblages of multicellular organisms, this paper introduces a species-resolved size-spectrum model to explain the phenomenon in unicellular plankton. A Sheldon spectrum spanning the cell-size range of unicellular plankton necessarily consists of a large number of coexisting species covering a wide range of characteristic sizes. The coexistence of many phytoplankton species feeding on a small number of resources is known as the Paradox of the Plankton. Our model resolves the paradox by showing that coexistence is facilitated by the allometric scaling of four physiological rates. Two of the allometries have empirical support, the remaining two emerge from predator-prey interactions exactly when the abundances follow a Sheldon spectrum. Our plankton model is ...

  6. Lunar periodicity in the shell flux of planktonic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, L.; Reynolds, C. E.; Richey, J.; Hall, I. R.

    2015-05-01

    Synchronised reproduction offers clear benefits to planktonic foraminifera - an important group of marine calcifiers - as it increases the chances of successful gamete fusion. Such synchrony requires tuning to an internal or external clock. Evidence exists for lunar reproductive cycles in some species, but its recognition in shell flux time series has proven difficult, raising questions about reproductive strategies. Using spectral analysis of a 4-year time series (mostly at weekly resolution) from the northern Gulf of Mexico, we show that the shell flux of Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinella siphonifera, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinoides ruber (both pink and white varieties), Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerinella calida and Globigerinita glutinata is characterised by lunar periodicity. However, the lunar rhythm is not present in all size fractions of each species and tends to be more dominant in the flux of larger shells, consistent with reproduction being more prevalent in larger specimens. Lunar periodicity is superimposed on longer term/seasonal changes in the shell fluxes, but accounts for a significant part of the variance in the fluxes. The amplitude of the lunar cycle increases roughly proportional with the magnitude of the flux, demonstrating that most of the population is indeed affected by lunar-phased synchronisation. In most species peak fluxes occur predominantly around, or just after, full moon. Only G. siphonifera and G. calida show a contrasting pattern with peaks concentrated around new moon. Although the exact cause of the synchronisation remains elusive, our data considerably increase the number of species for which lunar synchronised reproduction is reported and suggest that such reproductive behaviour is common in many species of planktonic foraminifera.

  7. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  8. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×1028 cells—approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  9. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2017-01-03

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×10(28) cells-approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  10. Environmental selection of planktonic methanogens in permafrost thaw ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevecoeur, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-08-01

    The warming and thermal erosion of ice-containing permafrost results in thaw ponds that are strong emitters of methane to the atmosphere. Here we examined methanogens and other Archaea, in two types of thaw ponds that are formed by the collapse of either permafrost peat mounds (palsas) or mineral soil mounds (lithalsas) in subarctic Quebec, Canada. Using high-throughput sequencing of a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA, we determined the taxonomic structure and diversity of archaeal communities in near-bottom water samples, and analyzed the mcrA gene transcripts from two sites. The ponds at all sites were well stratified, with hypoxic or anoxic bottom waters. Their archaeal communities were dominated by Euryarchaeota, specifically taxa in the methanogenic orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales, indicating a potentially active community of planktonic methanogens. The order Methanomicrobiales accounted for most of the mcrA transcripts in the two ponds. The Archaeal communities differed significantly between the lithalsa and palsa ponds, with higher alpha diversity in the organic-rich palsa ponds, and pronounced differences in community structure. These results indicate the widespread occurrence of planktonic, methane-producing Archaea in thaw ponds, with environmental selection of taxa according to permafrost landscape type.

  11. Analysis and modeling of scale-invariance in plankton abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, J D

    1996-01-01

    The power spectrum, $S$, of horizontal transects of plankton abundance are often observed to have a power-law dependence on wavenumber, $k$, with exponent close to $-2$: $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ over a wide range of scales. I present power spectral analyses of aircraft lidar measurements of phytoplankton abundance from scales of 1 to 100 km. A power spectrum $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ is obtained. As a model for this observation, I consider a stochastic growth equation where the rate of change of plankton abundance is determined by turbulent mixing, modeled as a diffusion process in two dimensions, and exponential growth with a stochastically variable net growth rate representing a fluctuating environment. The model predicts a lognormal distribution of abundance and a power spectrum of horizontal transects $S(k)\\propto k^{-1.8}$, close to the observed spectrum. The model equation predicts that the power spectrum of variations in abundance in time at a point in space is $S(f)\\propto f^{-1.5}$ (where $f$ is the frequency...

  12. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissel J Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival dental plaque, as part of a mature biofilm, has been strongly implicated in the onset and progression of chronic periodontitis. In this study using DNA microarray we compared the global gene expression of a P. gingivalis biofilm with that of its planktonic counterpart grown in the same continuous culture. Results Approximately 18% (377 genes, at 1.5 fold or more, P-value P. gingivalis genome was differentially expressed when the bacterium was grown as a biofilm. Genes that were down-regulated in biofilm cells, relative to planktonic cells, included those involved in cell envelope biogenesis, DNA replication, energy production and biosynthesis of cofactors, prosthetic groups and carriers. A number of genes encoding transport and binding proteins were up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilm cells. Several genes predicted to encode proteins involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation were differentially regulated and may be important in the regulation of biofilm growth. Conclusion This study analyzing global gene expression provides insight into the adaptive response of P. gingivalis to biofilm growth, in particular showing a down regulation of genes involved in growth and metabolic activity.

  13. A 50% increase in the amount of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean over the last 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Doxaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming has a significant impact at the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia. The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitations along the drainage basins of Arctic Rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting the permafrost and sea-ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which was sequestered as frozen since the last glacial maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean-colour satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the amount of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean. Our results show that during the summer period the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  14. A 50 % increase in the mass of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxaran, D.; Devred, E.; Babin, M.

    2015-06-01

    Global warming has a significant impact on the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitation along the drainage basins of Arctic rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting permafrost and sea ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which has been sequestered in a frozen state since the Last Glacial Maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean color satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the mass of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). Our results show that during the summer period, the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon) export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  15. A 50% increase in the amount of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxaran, D.; Devred, E.; Babin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has a significant impact at the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitations along the drainage basins of Arctic Rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting the permafrost and sea-ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which was sequestered as frozen since the last glacial maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean-colour satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the amount of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). Our results show that during the summer period the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon) export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  16. First planktonic foraminifera from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) of the Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, J.; Vergara, L.; Stock, H. W.

    1992-10-01

    Albian planktonic foraminifera have been found in the Caballos and "Villeta" formations at two localities in the Upper Magdalena Valley. This is the first documented record of Early Cretaceous planktonic foraminifera in Colombia. Hedbergellids and heterohelicids predominate; keeled forms are absent. The sedimentologic features and the associated microfauna indicate the onset of restricted environments from the middle Albian on.

  17. Distribution of planktonic foraminifera in waters of the submarine coral banks in southeast Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Balasubramanian, T.

    Twentyfive species of planktonic foraminifera are recorded from 36 plankton tows collected from waters of the submerged coral banks- Bassas de Pedro, Sesostris and Cora Divh-located at northern end of the Laccadive group of islands in southeastern...

  18. Plankton in the open Mediterranean Sea: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siokou-Frangou, I.; Christaki, U.; Mazzocchi, M. G.; Montresor, M.; Ribera D'Alcalá, M.; Vaqué, D.; Zingone, A.

    2009-11-01

    We present an overview of the plankton studies conducted during the last 25 years in the epipelagic offshore waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This quasi-enclosed sea is characterized by a rich and complex physical dynamics that includes unique thermohaline features, particular multilayer circulation, topographic gyres, and meso- and sub-mesoscale activity. Recent investigations have basically confirmed the long-recognised oligotrophic character of this sea, which enhances along both the west-east, and the north-south directions. Nutrient availability is low, especially for phosphorous (N:P up to 60), although limitation may be relaxed by inputs from highly populated coasts and from the atmosphere. Phytoplankton biomass as chl-a, generally displays low values (less than 0.2 μg chl-a l-1) over large areas, with a modest late winter increase. A large bloom (up to 3 μg l-1) throughout the late winter and early spring is only observed in the NW area. Relatively high biomass peaks are also recorded in fronts and cyclonic gyres. A deep chlorophyll maximum is a~permanent feature for the whole basin (except during the late winter mixing). It progressively deepens from the Alboran Sea (30 m) to the easternmost Levantine basin (120 m). Primary production reveals a similar west-east decreasing trend and ranges from 59 to 150 g C m-2 y-1 (in situ measurements). Overall the basin is largely dominated by small-sized autotrophs, microheterotrophs and egg-carrying copepod species. The phytoplankton, the microbial (both autotrophic and heterotrophic) and the zooplankton components reveal a considerable diversity and variability over spatial and temporal scales, the latter less explored though. Examples are the wide diversity of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, the multifarious role of diatoms or picoeukaryotes, and the distinct seasonal or spatial patterns of the species-reach copepod genera or families which dominate in the basin. Major dissimilarities between western and

  19. In vitro photodynamic inactivation effects of cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers on clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans planktonic cells and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaona; Fang, Yanyan; Ye, Zulin; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Yuxia; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: An increasing prevalence of Candida infections has emerged with the wide use of immune-suppressants and antibiotics. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) as a new approach to treat localized Candida infections is an emerging and promising field nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy using two new Cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers(P1 and P2) against strains of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. Methods: Suspensions and biofilms of Candida species were incubated with P1 and P2 concentrations (0.25 50 μM) for 30 min followed by 532nm laser irradiation. For planktonic suspensions, viability of cells was assayed by CFU counting. For biofilms, the metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT. Results: In PDI of a planktonic culture of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, P2 showed the higher efficacy. After incubation with 25 μM of P2 for 30 min and irradiation with 532nm laser (36 J cm-2), the viability of C. albicans planktonic cells decreased by 3.84 log10. For biofilm cells, a higher light dose of 75 mW cm-2 was necessary to achieve 97.71% metabolic activity reduction. Conclusions: The results of this investigation demonstrated that benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizer, P2, is an efficient photosensitizer to kill C. albicans. Moreover, single-species biofilms were less susceptible to PDT than their planktonic counterparts.

  20. Modelling the attack success of planktonic predators: patterns and mechanisms of prey size selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caparroy, P.; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Visser, Andre

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of the attack success of planktonic predators (fish larvae and carnivorous copepods) is proposed. Based on a geometric representation of attack events, the model considers how the escape reaction characteristics (speed and direction) of copepod prey affect their probability...... of being captured. By combining the attack success model with previously published hydrodynamic models of predator and prey perception, we examine how predator foraging behaviour and prey perceptive ability affect the size spectra of encountered and captured copepod prey. We examine food size spectra of (i...... also acts in modifying the prey escape direction. The model demonstrates that the reorientation of the prey escape path towards the centre of the feeding current's flow field results in increased attack success of the predator. Finally, the model examines how variability in the kinetics of approach...

  1. Ocean net heat flux influences seasonal to interannual patterns of plankton abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim J Smyth

    Full Text Available Changes in the net heat flux (NHF into the ocean have profound impacts on global climate. We analyse a long-term plankton time-series and show that the NHF is a critical indicator of ecosystem dynamics. We show that phytoplankton abundance and diversity patterns are tightly bounded by the switches between negative and positive NHF over an annual cycle. Zooplankton increase before the transition to positive NHF in the spring but are constrained by the negative NHF switch in autumn. By contrast bacterial diversity is decoupled from either NHF switch, but is inversely correlated (r = -0.920 with the magnitude of the NHF. We show that the NHF is a robust mechanistic tool for predicting climate change indicators such as spring phytoplankton bloom timing and length of the growing season.

  2. [Biodiversity in plankton, benthos, and fish communities, and ecosystems of fresh water bodies with various productivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, A F

    2001-01-01

    The species diversity of phyto- and zooplankton, benthic animals, and ichthyofauna was studied in continental water bodies that differ in type, geographic location, size, and productivity. The results showed that the number of species in the communities of aquatic organisms and in ecosystems depends on the area and volume of the water body and the level of plankton primary production. Corresponding relationships can be approximated by the equations of exponential and polymodal functions. The species number and biomass per unit area or volume proved to decrease the area or volume of the water body increased. The greatest number of heterotrophic species was observed in water bodies whose primary production approached 1400 kcal/m2 per year. It is proposed that the number of aquatic species in a body of water depends on the total area of the latter and the area of individual territories occupied by the representatives of certain species.

  3. Mixed-layer deepening during Heinrich events: a multi-planktonic foraminiferal delta18O approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Harunur; Boyle, Edward A

    2007-10-19

    Proxies from Greenland ice cores and North Atlantic marine sediment cores document repeated extreme climate swings of a few decades to millennia during the last glacial cycle, including periods of intense ice rafting called Heinrich events (HEs). We have found similar oxygen isotope variations recorded in mixed-layer-and thermocline-dwelling planktonic foraminifera during HEs 0, 1, and 4, suggesting that three foraminiferal taxa calcified their shells at similar temperatures in a homogenized upperwater column. This implies that the surface mixed layer was deeper during HEs. Similar deepening occurred on the northern margin of the ice-rafted-debris belt, implying that these deep mixed layers during HEs were widespread in the region. We suggest that an increase in storminess during HEs intensified the vertical mixing of meltwater from ice rafting in the upper ocean.

  4. Influence of ocean acidification on plankton community structure during a winter-to-summer succession: An imaging approach indicates that copepods can benefit from elevated CO2 via indirect food web effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucher, Jan; Haunost, Mathias; Boxhammer, Tim; Bach, Lennart T.; Algueró-Muñiz, María; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Plankton communities play a key role in the marine food web and are expected to be highly sensitive to ongoing environmental change. Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) causes pronounced shifts in marine carbonate chemistry and a decrease in seawater pH. These changes–summarized by the term ocean acidification (OA)–can significantly affect the physiology of planktonic organisms. However, studies on the response of entire plankton communities to OA, which also include indirect effects via food-web interactions, are still relatively rare. Thus, it is presently unclear how OA could affect the functioning of entire ecosystems and biogeochemical element cycles. In this study, we report from a long-term in situ mesocosm experiment, where we investigated the response of natural plankton communities in temperate waters (Gullmarfjord, Sweden) to elevated CO2 concentrations and OA as expected for the end of the century (~760 μatm pCO2). Based on a plankton-imaging approach, we examined size structure, community composition and food web characteristics of the whole plankton assemblage, ranging from picoplankton to mesozooplankton, during an entire winter-to-summer succession. The plankton imaging system revealed pronounced temporal changes in the size structure of the copepod community over the course of the plankton bloom. The observed shift towards smaller individuals resulted in an overall decrease of copepod biomass by 25%, despite increasing numerical abundances. Furthermore, we observed distinct effects of elevated CO2 on biomass and size structure of the entire plankton community. Notably, the biomass of copepods, dominated by Pseudocalanus acuspes, displayed a tendency towards elevated biomass by up to 30–40% under simulated ocean acidification. This effect was significant for certain copepod size classes and was most likely driven by CO2-stimulated responses of primary producers and a complex interplay of trophic interactions that allowed this

  5. Validation of Spectral IOP and Particle Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-30

    they can be largely constrained and represent numerous particle types due to fluvial input, plankton diversity, and varying concentrations of organic...change rapidly due to zebra mussel presence with high scattering b (b(650)>7 m-1). In contrast Skaneateles is a low production lake dominated by...been previously suggested in this instrument but such effects are likely in the other in-situ instrumentation as well. RESULTS A large

  6. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 cbm each were exposed to different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm, yielding pH values (on the total scale from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30 days experiment passed three distinct phases: (1 prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2 first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3 second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, an important diatom marker. There are strong indications for these correlations being mediated indirectly through taxonomic changes and the natural development of the communities in the mesocosms exposed to different pCO2 levels. While diatoms increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids. The significant positive correlations between most PUFAs and pCO2 reflected treatment-dependent differences in the community composition between the mesocosms rather than a direct positive effect of pCO2 on specific fatty acids.

  7. Impacts of UV radiation on plankton community metabolism along the Humboldt Current System

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    N. Godoy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Humbolt Current System along the Chilean coast is one of the most productive regions in the world, where UV levels are particularly high due to stratospheric ozone depletion. Research has shown that phytoplankton photosynthesis can be severely inhibited by surface radiation and there are concerns that this will reduce not only algal carbon fixation, but also the carbon supply for higher trophic level. Experimental estimates of community metabolism (NCP, GPP and R and the impacts of UV on community metabolism were assessed at 8 stations along the meridional track by the Humbold-2009 cruise (54.80° S–23.85° S on board RV Hespérides from 5 to 15 March 2009. The results showed an increase UVB penetration towards the Equator, along the Humboldt Current System, suggesting a more important impact of UVB radiation towards the north. The metabolic rates observed were within average values reported for the Ocean Pacific and did not show the water mass investigated to be exceptionally productive at the time of the study. Experimental evaluation of the effect of UVB radiation on surface waters, those most strongly affected by UVB, showed that UVB radiation suppressed net community production, resulting in a dominance of heterotrophic communities in surface waters, compared to the prevalence of autotrophic communities inferred when materials, excluding UVB radiation, are used for incubation. These results show that UVB radiation, which has increased greatly in the study area, may have suppressed net community production of the plankton communities, possibly driving plankton communities in the Southwest Pacific towards CO2 sources.

  8. The seasonal succession of modern planktonic foraminifera: Sediment traps observations from southwest Taiwan waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Ling

    2014-08-01

    The seasonal succession and stable isotope compositions of living planktonic foraminifera collected in sediment traps from the continental shelf/slope off southwest Taiwan were investigated. Sediment trap moorings were deployed at water depths of ~816 m and ~233/250 m during October-November 2009, March-April 2010 and July-August 2010. The sampling duration was 3 days for each collecting cup, yielding 36 days/12 cups per individual mooring over the three sampling periods. All planktonic foraminiferal tests greater than 150 μm were picked, identified and counted for the faunal census. The variations in shell abundance (#/g; number of specimens per gram of original bulk sample) and size frequency show a pattern which seems to be related to the lunar cycle: shell abundances increase from low concentration at the new moon and reach their maxima before the full moon. Occurrences of larger foraminiferal shells also gradually increase as the collection approaching to full moon. The faunal assemblages were dominated by Globigerinella aequilateralis, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinoides ruber, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata; these six species constituting 30-80% of all foraminiferal tests found in the sediment traps. The seasonal contrast within the faunal assemblage between these three deployment periods, however, is not very evident except for the relative abundance of G. sacculifer and G. ruber. G. ruber is more abundant in summer than in spring whereas G. sacculifer shows an inverse pattern. Seasonal differences in the δ18O of P. obliquiloculata, G. sacculifer and G. ruber can be well explained by temperature profiles in the water column, while variations of δ13C are not related to the chlorophyll concentration hence to productivity. In addition, the calcifying depths reflected by three species are estimated to be ~40 m for G. ruber; ~60 m for G. sacculifer; and >80 m for P. obliquiloculata.

  9. Lunar periodicity in the shell flux of some planktonic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jonkers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchronised reproduction offers clear benefits to planktonic foraminifera – an important group of marine calcifiers – as it increases the chances of successful gamete fusion. Such synchrony requires tuning to an internal or external clock. Evidence exists for lunar reproductive cycles in some species, but its recognition in shell flux time series has proven difficult, raising questions about reproductive strategies. Using spectral analysis of a 6 year time series (mostly at weekly resolution from the northern Gulf of Mexico we show that the shell flux of Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinella siphonifera, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and in Globigerinoides ruber (both pink and white varieties is characterised by lunar periodicity. The fluxes of Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerinella calida, Globorotalia crassaformis and Globigerinita glutinata do not show significant spectral power at the lunar frequency. If present, lunar periodicity is superimposed on longer term/seasonal changes in the shell fluxes, but accounts for a significant part of the variance in the fluxes. The amplitude of the lunar cycle increases roughly proportional with the magnitude of the flux, demonstrating that most of the population is indeed affected by lunar-phased synchronisation. Phasing of peak fluxes appears species-specific, with G. menardii, O. universa and G. sacculifer showing most peaks around the full moon and G. ruber one week later. Contrastingly, peaks G. siphonifera occur dominantly around new moon. Very limited literature exists on lunar phasing of foraminiferal export fluxes, but spatial differences in its presence may exist, corroborating the exogenous nature of lunar synchrony in planktonic foraminifera.

  10. Comparative metagenomics of bathypelagic plankton and bottom sediment from the Sea of Marmara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaiser, Achim; Zivanovic, Yvan; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2011-02-01

    To extend comparative metagenomic analyses of the deep-sea, we produced metagenomic data by direct 454 pyrosequencing from bathypelagic plankton (1000  m depth) and bottom sediment of the Sea of Marmara, the gateway between the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Seas. Data from small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene libraries and direct pyrosequencing of the same samples indicated that Gamma- and Alpha-proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, dominated the bacterial fraction in Marmara deep-sea plankton, whereas Planctomycetes, Delta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the most abundant groups in high bacterial-diversity sediment. Group I Crenarchaeota/Thaumarchaeota dominated the archaeal plankton fraction, although group II and III Euryarchaeota were also present. Eukaryotes were highly diverse in SSU rRNA gene libraries, with group I (Duboscquellida) and II (Syndiniales) alveolates and Radiozoa dominating plankton, and Opisthokonta and Alveolates, sediment. However, eukaryotic sequences were scarce in pyrosequence data. Archaeal amo genes were abundant in plankton, suggesting that Marmara planktonic Thaumarchaeota are ammonia oxidizers. Genes involved in sulfate reduction, carbon monoxide oxidation, anammox and sulfatases were over-represented in sediment. Genome recruitment analyses showed that Alteromonas macleodii 'surface ecotype', Pelagibacter ubique and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were highly represented in 1000  m-deep plankton. A comparative analysis of Marmara metagenomes with ALOHA deep-sea and surface plankton, whale carcasses, Peru subsurface sediment and soil metagenomes clustered deep-sea Marmara plankton with deep-ALOHA plankton and whale carcasses, likely because of the suboxic conditions in the deep Marmara water column. The Marmara sediment clustered with the soil metagenome, highlighting the common ecological role of both types of microbial communities in the degradation of organic matter and the completion of biogeochemical cycles.

  11. Plankton in Monterey Bay: Optimization of optical sensor data from autonomous underwater vehicles with applications in plankton community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Diane E.

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with oceanographic sensors demonstrate the capability to describe plankton communities in the marine environment. The vehicles collect data from the surface through the mixed layer for a variety of oceanographic parameters. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute operates the Dorado upper-water-column AUV. The Dorado AUV collects data for 32 size-classes, from 1.25 to 250 mum, using a laser in-situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST-100X) instrument. The objective of this study is to analyze data from AUVs and laboratory work to inform sampling methods with applications in targeting specific classes of plankton, particularly harmful algal bloom species. The results of this study show that specific combinations of LISST-100X size class channels can be combined to reconstruct fluorescence data. This project includes laboratory tests with monocultures of phytoplankton on both a backscattering sensor that detects chlorophyll at 695 nm and on the forward scattering LISST-100X sensor. The results show a linear relationship between backscattered chlorophyll concentration and cell density for four monocultures of phytoplankton. The forward scattering lab experiments show distinct organism signatures for three genera of phytoplankton tested as monocultures.

  12. Diesel exhaust particles increase IL-1β-induced human β-defensin expression via NF-κB-mediated pathway in human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chun

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-defensin (hBD-2, antimicrobial peptide primarily induced in epithelial cells, is a key factor in the innate immune response of the respiratory tract. Several studies showed increased defensin levels in both inflammatory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and infectious diseases. Recently, epidemiologic studies have demonstrated acute and serious adverse effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory health, especially in people with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease. To elucidate the effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on pulmonary innate immune response, we investigated the hBD-2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 expression to DEP exposure in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β-stimulated A549 cells. Results IL-1β markedly up-regulated the hBD-2 promoter activity, and the subsequent DEP exposure increased dose-dependently the expression of hBD-2 and inflammatory cytokine IL-8 at the transcriptional level. In addition, DEP further induced the NF-κB activation in IL-1β-stimulated A549 cells more rapidly than in unstimulated control cells, which was showed by nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB and degradation of IκB-α. The experiment using two NF-κB inhibitors, PDTC and MG132, confirmed that this increase of hBD-2 expression following DEP exposure was regulated through NF-κB-mediated pathway. Conclusion These results demonstrated that DEP exposure increases the expression of antimicrobial peptide and inflammatory cytokine at the transcriptional level in IL-1β-primed A549 epithelial cells and suggested that the increase is mediated at least partially through NF-κB activation. Therefore, DEP exposure may contribute to enhance the airway-responsiveness especially on the patients suffering from chronic respiratory disease.

  13. The trophic role and impact of plankton ciliates in the microbial web structure of a tropical polymictic lake dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Esquivel

    2016-03-01

    abundant component of the plankton, and their abundance was assessed through epifluorescence microscopy counts. The autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton abundance was measured through epifluorescence, and their abundance and biomass were higher at the study site relative to other shallow freshwater ecosystems. The total ciliate biomass distribution patterns were similar to those of filamentous cyanobacteria and autotrophic or heterotrophic picoplankton, although the nanociliate biomasses peaked when the picoplankton and filamentous cyanobacteria were least abundant. The consequences of this increased importance of ciliates on the structure of the plankton at Lake Catemaco will be discussed along with the probable causes.

  14. Alkyl polyglucoside compound influences freshwater plankton community structure in floating field mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Steven F; Cohen, Risa A

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic surfactants in cleaners and detergents commonly contaminate freshwater systems, therefore use of low-toxicity alternatives is becoming increasingly important. Alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) derived from natural products are less toxic than synthetic surfactants, and degrade rapidly reducing chemical exposure time. However, single species toxicity tests showed APGs have toxic effects on aquatic primary producers and zooplankton, and that species demonstrate different sensitivities to APGs. Furthermore, species unaffected by APGs directly may be indirectly affected by removal of a food source or changes in predator densities, thereby changing plankton community structure. To determine the effects of APGs on plankton communities under environmental conditions, floating mesocosms were deployed in a shallow pond in southeast Georgia, USA and dosed with 0, 0.01, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg L(-1) APG. Zooplankton community composition and abundance, phytoplankton abundance (as chlorophyll a), and water column dissolved oxygen concentration were determined weekly for 1 month. Zooplankton abundance decreased primarily due to loss of copepods, and community composition shifted toward small-bodied cladocerans (Bosmina sp.), and chlorophyll a concentrations declined by up to 81 % following exposure to APG concentrations of 2.5 mg L(-1) or greater. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen never dropped below 5.70 mg L(-1), but the observed declines of ~2 mg L(-1) could become stressful during periods of high water temperatures. Nevertheless, the APG-induced shift from copepod to cladoceran dominated communities and decrease in autochthonous carbon availability has important implications for food availability and quality to higher trophic levels such as planktivorous fishes.

  15. Investigating the Effectiveness of Centaureacyanus Extracts on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Structures of Six Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Mohsenipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, the treatments of infectious disease are regarded difficult due to increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria, which the reason may be placing of microorganisms in a structure named biofilm. Biofilms are complex structures consisting of surface-attached bacteria. Therefore, it is essential to find new compounds in order to remove and inhibit biofilms. This study aimed to examine the antibacterial activities of alcoholic extracts of Centaurea cyanus on the biofilm structures and planktonic form of six pathogen bacteria(Staphylococcusaureus, Bacilluscereus, Streptococcuspneumoniae, Pseudomonasaeruginosa, Escherichiacoli and Klebsiellapneumonia. Methods: Antimicrobial activities of the alcoholic plant extracts against the planktonic form of bacteria were assessed via using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were determined by a macrobroth dilution technique and anti-biofilm effects were scrutinized by microtiter plate method. Results: The results of this study confirmed high ability of C.cyanus extracts against the biofilm of the tested bacteria as well as their free-living forms. To inhibit bacterial growth, ethanolic extracts proved to be more effective than methanolic extracts. Anti-biofilm effects of plant extracts were associated with the solvent type and extract concentration. C.cyanus extracts were reported to be most efficient to inhibit biofilm formation of E. coli (84/26% and S. pneumoniae(83/14%. The greatest eradication of biofilm structures were observed on S. pneumonia biofilm (75.66%, and the highest decrease in metabolic activity was reported in S.aureus biofilms (71/85%. Conclusion: In this study the high capacity of C. cyanus extracts to encounter with whit biofilm was emphasized. Moreover, it was demonstrated that these extracts possess an appropriate potential to become active principles of new drugs.

  16. Historical changes in the ecosystem condition of a small mountain lake over the past 60 years as revealed by plankton remains and Daphnia ephippial carapaces stored in lake sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Ohtsuki

    Full Text Available To examine if changes in species composition of a plankton community in the past due to anthropogenic activities can be clarified in lakes without any monitoring data, we analyzed genetically ephippial carapaces of Daphnia with plankton remains stored in the bottom sediments of Lake Hataya Ohunma in Japan. In the lake, abundance of most plankton remains in the sediments was limited and TP flux was at low levels (2-4 mg/m2/y before 1970. However TP flux increased two-fold during the period from 1980s to 1990 s. In parallel with this increase, abundance of most plankton remains increased although abundance of benthic testate amoebae's remains decreased, indicating that the lake trophic condition had changed from oligo- to mesotrophic for the past 60 years. According to cluster analysis, the stratigraphic sediments were divided into two periods with different features of the phytoplankton composition. Chronological comparison with events in the watershed suggested that eutrophication occurred because of an increase in visitors to the watershed and deposition of atmospheric dust. In this lake more than 50% of resting eggs produced by Daphnia over the past 60 years hatched. However, genetic analysis of the ephippial carapaces (remains showed that the Daphnia population was originally composed of D. dentifera but that D. galeata, or its hybrid with D. dentifera, invaded and increased the population density when the lake was eutrophied. Subsequently, large D. pulex established populations in the 1980s when largemouth bass were anonymously introduced. These results indicated that the Lake Hataya Ohunma plankton community underwent significant changes despite the fact that there were no notable changes in land cover or land use in the watershed. Since increases in atmospheric deposition and release of fish have occurred in many Japanese lakes, the changes in the plankton community described here may be widespread in these lakes.

  17. Historical Changes in the Ecosystem Condition of a Small Mountain Lake over the Past 60 Years as Revealed by Plankton Remains and Daphnia Ephippial Carapaces Stored in Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Awano, Tamotsu; Tsugeki, Narumi K.; Ishida, Seiji; Oda, Hirotaka; Makino, Wataru; Urabe, Jotaro

    2015-01-01

    To examine if changes in species composition of a plankton community in the past due to anthropogenic activities can be clarified in lakes without any monitoring data, we analyzed genetically ephippial carapaces of Daphnia with plankton remains stored in the bottom sediments of Lake Hataya Ohunma in Japan. In the lake, abundance of most plankton remains in the sediments was limited and TP flux was at low levels (2–4 mg/m2/y) before 1970. However TP flux increased two-fold during the period from 1980s to 1990s. In parallel with this increase, abundance of most plankton remains increased although abundance of benthic testate amoebae’s remains decreased, indicating that the lake trophic condition had changed from oligo- to mesotrophic for the past 60 years. According to cluster analysis, the stratigraphic sediments were divided into two periods with different features of the phytoplankton composition. Chronological comparison with events in the watershed suggested that eutrophication occurred because of an increase in visitors to the watershed and deposition of atmospheric dust. In this lake more than 50% of resting eggs produced by Daphnia over the past 60 years hatched. However, genetic analysis of the ephippial carapaces (remains) showed that the Daphnia population was originally composed of D. dentifera but that D. galeata, or its hybrid with D. dentifera, invaded and increased the population density when the lake was eutrophied. Subsequently, large D. pulex established populations in the 1980s when largemouth bass were anonymously introduced. These results indicated that the Lake Hataya Ohunma plankton community underwent significant changes despite the fact that there were no notable changes in land cover or land use in the watershed. Since increases in atmospheric deposition and release of fish have occurred in many Japanese lakes, the changes in the plankton community described here may be widespread in these lakes. PMID:25757090

  18. Ingestion and transfer of microplastics in the planktonic food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setälä, Outi; Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi; Lehtiniemi, Maiju

    2014-02-01

    Experiments were carried out with different Baltic Sea zooplankton taxa to scan their potential to ingest plastics. Mysid shrimps, copepods, cladocerans, rotifers, polychaete larvae and ciliates were exposed to 10 μm fluorescent polystyrene microspheres. These experiments showed ingestion of microspheres in all taxa studied. The highest percentage of individuals with ingested spheres was found in pelagic polychaete larvae, Marenzelleria spp. Experiments with the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the mysid shrimp Neomysis integer showed egestion of microspheres within 12 h. Food web transfer experiments were done by offering zooplankton labelled with ingested microspheres to mysid shrimps. Microscopy observations of mysid intestine showed the presence of zooplankton prey and microspheres after 3 h incubation. This study shows for the first time the potential of plastic microparticle transfer via planktonic organisms from one trophic level (mesozooplankton) to a higher level (macrozooplankton). The impacts of plastic transfer and possible accumulation in the food web need further investigations.

  19. Photosynthetic planulae and planktonic hydroids: contrasting strategies of propagule survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Pagliara

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Settlement delays can be important to prevent propagule waste when proper settling substrates are not immediately available. Under laboratory conditions, the planulae of Clytia viridicans underwent two alternative developmental patterns. Some settled on the bottom, forming a hydranth-gonotheca complex that produced up to four medusae and later either degenerated or gave rise to a hydroid colony. Other planulae settled right below the air-water interface, forming floating colonies that eventually fell to the bottom and settled. Halecium nanum released planulae with a rich population of symbiotic zooxanthellae that survived into a rearing jar for three months. After a long period of apparent quiescence (possibly fuelled by photosynthetic activities of zooxanthellae the planulae produced new colonies. Both photosynthetic planulae and settlement at the interface air-water allow a delay in the passage from a planktonic to a fully functional benthic life.

  20. Mathematical analysis of a nutrient-plankton system with delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehim, Mehbuba; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Muhammadhaji, Ahmadjan

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the interaction of nutrient-plankton is investigated in this paper. In order to account for the time needed by the phytoplankton to mature after which they can release toxins, a discrete time delay is incorporated into the system. Moreover, it is also taken into account discrete time delays which indicates the partially recycled nutrient decomposed by bacteria after the death of biomass. In the first part of our analysis the sufficient conditions ensuring local and global asymptotic stability of the model are obtained. Next, the existence of the Hopf bifurcation as time delay crosses a threshold value is established and, meanwhile, the phenomenon of stability switches is found under certain conditions. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  1. Metabolic profiles of planktonic and biofilm cells of Candida orthopsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Regina Helena; Cataldi, Thaís Regiani; Franceschini, Livia Maria; Labate, Mônica Veneziano; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Palma, Mario Sérgio; Soares Mendes-Giannini, Maria José

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to understand which Candida orthopsilosis protein aids fungus adaptation upon its switching from planktonic growth to biofilm. Ion mobility separation within mass spectrometry analysis combination were used. Proteins mapped for different biosynthetic pathways showed that selective ribosome autophagy might occur in biofilms. Glucose, used as a carbon source in the glycolytic flux, changed to glycogen and trehalose. Candida orthopsilosis expresses proteins that combine a variety of mechanisms to provide yeasts with the means to adjust the catalytic properties of enzymes. Adjustment of the enzymes helps modulate the biosynthesis/degradation rates of the available nutrients, in order to control and coordinate the metabolic pathways that enable cells to express an adequate response to nutrient availability.

  2. Partitioning of organic production in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conan, P.; Søndergaard, Morten; Kragh, T.

    2007-01-01

    and a constant low net production of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) across the nutrient gradient. The production of DOP was low in the P-limited (-Si) bags; however, with a surplus of inorganic P, most of the assimilated P (74% to 85%) was recovered as new DOP. The consequence was a huge range...... limitation as the initial conditions. The experiment lasted 21 days in August. Addition of silicate (+Si) resulted in diatom dominance, while a more diverse community was present in treatments with no added Si (-Si). Addition of inorganic nutrients in a N:P gradient from 64 to 4 either conserved the initial...... N limitation or forced the plankton communities to P limitation. Per added limiting nutrient, the diatom-dominated bags produced more particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the other bags. However, the relative partitioning of net production to POC and DOC did not differ...

  3. Magnetic light cloaking control in the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Ohtsuka, S.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the light cloaking behavior of the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina under a magnetic field. Optical interferences in the multi-laminated guanine crystal layer beneath the dorsal body surface create a brilliant structural color, which can be almost entirely removed by changing the light reflection. In the investigation, we immersed segments of Sapphirina in seawater contained in an optical chamber. When the derived Sapphirina segments were attached to the container surface, they were inert to magnetic fields up to 300 mT. However, when the back plate segments were attached to the substrate at a point, with most of the plate floating in the seawater, the plate rotated oppositely to the applied magnetic field. In addition, the brilliant parts of the Sapphirina back plate rotated backward and forward by changing the magnetic field directions. Our experiment suggests a new model of an optical micro-electro-mechanical system that is controllable by magnetic fields.

  4. Partitioning of organic production in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conan, P.; Søndergaard, Morten; Kragh, T.;

    2007-01-01

    N limitation or forced the plankton communities to P limitation. Per added limiting nutrient, the diatom-dominated bags produced more particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the other bags. However, the relative partitioning of net production to POC and DOC did not differ...... and a constant low net production of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) across the nutrient gradient. The production of DOP was low in the P-limited (-Si) bags; however, with a surplus of inorganic P, most of the assimilated P (74% to 85%) was recovered as new DOP. The consequence was a huge range...... diagenetic "maturation" process but can be produced almost immediately. Both the nutrient regime and phytoplankton community composition affected the production and composition of new DOM in this experiment...

  5. The Lagrangian Ensemble metamodel for simulating plankton ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. D.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a detailed account of the Lagrangian Ensemble (LE) metamodel for simulating plankton ecosystems. It uses agent-based modelling to describe the life histories of many thousands of individual plankters. The demography of each plankton population is computed from those life histories. So too is bio-optical and biochemical feedback to the environment. The resulting “virtual ecosystem” is a comprehensive simulation of the plankton ecosystem. It is based on phenotypic equations for individual micro-organisms. LE modelling differs significantly from population-based modelling. The latter uses prognostic equations to compute demography and biofeedback directly. LE modelling diagnoses them from the properties of individual micro-organisms, whose behaviour is computed from prognostic equations. That indirect approach permits the ecosystem to adjust gracefully to changes in exogenous forcing. The paper starts with theory: it defines the Lagrangian Ensemble metamodel and explains how LE code performs a number of computations “behind the curtain”. They include budgeting chemicals, and deriving biofeedback and demography from individuals. The next section describes the practice of LE modelling. It starts with designing a model that complies with the LE metamodel. Then it describes the scenario for exogenous properties that provide the computation with initial and boundary conditions. These procedures differ significantly from those used in population-based modelling. The next section shows how LE modelling is used in research, teaching and planning. The practice depends largely on hindcasting to overcome the limits to predictability of weather forecasting. The scientific method explains observable ecosystem phenomena in terms of finer-grained processes that cannot be observed, but which are controlled by the basic laws of physics, chemistry and biology. What-If? Prediction ( WIP), used for planning, extends hindcasting by adding events that describe

  6. Patterns in planktonic metabolism in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Regaudie-de-Gioux

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic gross community production (GPP, net community production (NCP and community respiration (CR across the Mediterranean Sea was examined in two cruises, Thresholds 2006 and 2007, each crossing the Mediterranean from West to East to test for consistent variation along this longitudinal gradient in late spring to early summer. GPP averaged 2.4±0.4 mmol O2 m−3 d−1, CR averaged 3.8±0.5 mmol O2 m−3 d−1, and NCP averaged – 0.8±0.6 mmol O2 m−3 d−1 across the studied sections, indicative of a tendency for a net heterotrophic metabolism in late spring to early summer, prevalent across studied sections of the Mediterranean Sea as reflected in 70% of negative NCP estimates. The median P/R ratio was 0.6, also indicating a strong prevalence of heterotrophic communities (P/R<1 along the studied sections of the Mediterranean Sea. The communities tended to be net heterotrophic (i.e. P/R<1 at GPP less than 2.8 mmol O2 m−3 d−1. The Western Mediterranean tended to support a higher gross primary production and community respiration than the Eastern basin did, but these differences were not statistically significant (t-test, p>0.05. The net heterotrophy of the studied sections of the Mediterranean Sea indicates that allochthonous carbon should be important to subsidise planktonic metabolism during the late spring.

  7. Influence of UVB radiation on the lethal and sublethal toxicity of dispersed crude oil to planktonic copepod nauplii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Harvey, Tracy E.; Connelly, Tara L

    2016-01-01

    Toxic effects of petroleum to marine zooplankton have been generally investigated using dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons and in the absence of sunlight. In this study, we determined the influence of natural ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the lethal and sublethal toxicity of dispersed crude oil...... in the sea after oil spills are highly toxic to copepod nauplii and that natural levels of UVB radiation substantially increase the toxicity of crude oil to these planktonic organisms. Overall, this study emphasizes the importance of considering sunlight in petroleum toxicological studies and models...

  8. Connecting export fluxes to plankton food web efficiency in the Black Sea waters inflowing into the Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The short-time scale evolution of plankton carbon partitioning and downward flux of the modified Black Sea Water (BSW) mass entering the northeast Aegean Sea was studied using a Lagrangian approach (6-10/04/2008). The free-drifting sediment trap positioned at the bottom of the BSW layer and the control drifter, followed the same path within the anticyclone that circulates the BSW in the area. ?ooplankton biomass increased (from 159 to 292 mg C m-2), as did faecal pellet pr...

  9. Biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating Halomonas venusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Domènech, Òscar; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm development is characterized by distinct stages of initial attachment, microcolony formation and maturation (sessile cells), and final detachment (dispersal of new, planktonic cells). In this work we examined the influence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation on bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of an environmental strain isolated from microbial mats, Halomonas venusta MAT28. This strain was cultured either in an artificial biofilm in which the cells were immobilized on alginate beads (sessile) or as free-swimming (planktonic) cells. For the two modes of growth, conditions allowing or preventing PHA accumulation were established. Cells detached from alginate beads and their planktonic counterparts were used to study cell surface properties and cellular adhesion on polystyrene. Detached cells showed a slightly higher affinity than planktonic cells for chloroform (Lewis-acid) and a greater hydrophobicity (affinity for hexadecane and hexane). Those surface characteristics of the detached cells may explain their better adhesion on polystyrene compared to planktonic cells. Adhesion to polystyrene was not significantly different between H. venusta cells that had accumulated PHA vs. those that did not. These observations suggest that the surface properties of detached cells clearly differ from those of planktonic cells and that for at least the first 48 h after detachment from alginate beads H. venusta retained the capacity of sessile cells to adhere to polystyrene and to form a biofilm.

  10. Why Do the Relativistic Masses and Momenta of Faster-than-Light Particles Decrease as their Speeds Increase? 5M Madarász, Judit X.; Stannett, Mike; Székely, Gergely

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been shown within a formal axiomatic framework using a definition of four-momentum based on the Stückelberg-Feynman-Sudarshan-Recami ''switching principle'' that Einstein's relativistic dynamics is logically consistent with the existence of interacting faster-than-light inertial particles. Our results here show, using only basic natural assumptions on dynamics, that this definition is the only possible way to get a consistent theory of such particles moving within the geometry of Minkowskian spacetime. We present a strictly formal proof from a streamlined axiom system that given any slow or fast inertial particle, all inertial observers agree on the value of {m}\\cdot √{|1-v^2|}, where {m} is the particle's relativistic mass and vits speed. This confirms formally the widely held belief that the relativistic mass and momentum of a positive-mass faster-than-light particle must decrease as its speed increases.

  11. Concentration and size distribution of particulate oxalate in marine and coastal atmospheres - Implication for the increased importance of oxalate in nanometer atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianfeng; Li, Kai; Zhu, Yujiao; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    In literature, particulate oxalate has been widely studied in the total suspended particles (TSP), particles 100 nm. In this article, we measured oxalate's concentrations in size-segregated atmospheric particles down to 10 nm or 56 nm during eight campaigns performed at a semi-urban coastal site, over the marginal seas of China and from the marginal seas to the northwest Pacific Ocean (NWPO) in 2012-2015. When the sum of the oxalate's concentration in particles pollution event. Mode analysis results of particulate oxalate and the correlation between oxalate and sulfate suggested that the elevated concentrations of oxalate in PM10 were mainly related to enhanced in-cloud formation of oxalate via anthropogenic precursors. Size distribution data in the total of 136 sets of samples also showed approximately 80% of particulate oxalate's mass existing in atmospheric particles >100 nm. Consistent with previous studies, particulate oxalate in particles >100 nm was a negligible ionic component when comparing to particulate SO42- in the same size range. However, the mole ratios of oxalate/sulfate in particles 100 nm atmospheric particles such as PM2.5, PM10, TSP, etc.

  12. Climate Variability Drives Plankton Community Composition Changes: the 2010-2011 El Nino to La Nina Transition Around Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Peter A.; Bonham, Pru; Thomson, Paul; Rochester, Wayne; Doblin, Martina A.; Waite, Anya M.; Richardson, Anthony; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    The strong La Nina of 2010-2011 provided an opportunity to investigate the ecological impacts of El Nino-Southern Oscillation on coastal plankton communities using the nine national reference stations around Australia. Based on remote sensing and across the entire Australian region 2011 (La Nina) was only modestly different from 2010 (El Nino) with the average temperature declining 0.2 percent surface chlorophyll a up 3 percent and modelled primary production down 14 percent. Other changes included a poleward shift in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Along the east coast, there was a reduction in salinity, increase in nutrients, Chlorophytes and Prasinophytes (taxa with chlorophyll b, neoxanthin and prasinoxanthin). The southwest region had a rise in the proportion of 19-hexoyloxyfucoxanthin; possibly coccolithophorids in eddies of the Leeuwin Current and along the sub-tropical front. Pennate diatoms increased, Ceratium spp. decreased and Scrippsiella spp. increased in 2011. Zooplankton biomass declined significantly in 2011. There was a reduction in the abundance of Calocalanus pavo and Temora turbinata and increases in Clausocalanus farrani, Oncaea scottodicarloi and Macrosetella gracilis in 2011. The changes in the plankton community during the strong La Nina of 2011 suggest that this climatic oscillation exacerbates the tropicalization of Australia.

  13. Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, pressure, plankton, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and primary productivity data collected using CTD, bottle, and plankton net from the R/V Italica in the Ross Sea and Magellan Strait during 10th Italian Antarctic Expedition from 1994-11-13 to 1995-04-02 (NODC Accession 0068289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, pressure, plankton, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and primary productivity data collected using CTD, bottle, and plankton...

  14. Direct effects of CO{sub 2} concentration on growth and isotopic composition of marine plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf-Gladrow, D.A.; Riebesell, Ulf; Burkhardt, Steffen; Bijma, Jelle [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The assessment of direct effects of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} increase on the marine biota has received relatively little attention compared to the intense research on CO{sub 2}-related responses of the terrestrial biosphere. Yet, due to the rapid air-sea gas exchange, the observed past and predicted future rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2} causes a corresponding increase in seawater CO{sub 2} concentrations, [CO{sub 2}], in upper ocean waters. Increasing [CO{sub 2}] leads to considerable changes in the surface ocean carbonate system, resulting in decreases in pH and the carbonate concentration, [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]. These changes can be shown to have strong impacts on the marine biota. Here we will distinguish between CO{sub 2}-related responses of the marine biota which (a) potentially affect the ocean`s biological carbon pumps and (b) are relevant to the interpretation of diagnostic tools (proxies) used to assess climate change on geological times scales. With regard to the former, three direct effects of increasing [CO{sub 2}] on marine plankton have been recognized: enhanced phytoplankton growth rate, changing elemental composition of primary produced organic matter, and reduced biogenic calcification. Although quantitative estimates of their impacts on the oceanic carbon cycle are not yet feasible, all three effects increase the ocean`s capacity to take up and store atmospheric CO{sub 2} and hence, can serve as negative feedbacks to anthropogenic CO{sub 2} increase. With respect to proxies used in paleo-reconstructions, CO{sub 2}-sensitivity is found in carbon isotope fractionation by phytoplankton and foraminifera. While CO{sub 2}-dependent isotope fractionation by phytoplankton may be of potential use in reconstructing surface ocean pCO{sub 2} at ancient times, CO{sub 2}-related effects on the isotopic composition of foraminiferal shells confounds the use of the difference in isotopic signals between planktonic and benthic shells as a measure for the strength of

  15. No detectable effect of ocean acidification on plankton metabolism in the NW oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea: Results from two mesocosm studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugendre, L.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Poulton, A. J.; Dellisanti, W.; Gaubert, M.; Guieu, C.; Gazeau, F.

    2017-02-01

    Oligotrophic areas account for about 30% of oceanic primary production and are projected to expand in a warm, high-CO2 world. Changes in primary production in these areas could have important impacts on future global carbon cycling. To assess the response of primary production and respiration of plankton communities to increasing partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) levels in Low Nutrient Low Chorophyll areas, two mesocosm experiments were conducted in the Bay of Calvi (Corsica, France) and in the Bay of Villefranche (France) in June-July 2012 and February-March 2013 under different trophic state, temperature and irradiance conditions. Nine mesocosms of 50 m3 were deployed for 20 and 12 days, respectively, and were subjected to seven pCO2 levels (3 control and 6 elevated levels). The metabolism of the community was studied using several methods based on in situ incubations (oxygen light-dark, 18O and 14C uptake). Increasing pCO2 had no significant effect on gross primary production, net community production, particulate and dissolved carbon production, as well as on community respiration. These two mesocosm experiments, the first performed under maintained low nutrient and low chlorophyll, suggest that in large areas of the ocean, increasing pCO2 levels may not lead to a significant change in plankton metabolic rates and sea surface biological carbon fixation.

  16. Seasonal plankton variability in Chilean Patagonia fjords: Carbon flow through the pelagic food web of Aysen Fjord and plankton dynamics in the Moraleda Channel basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, H. E.; Castro, L.; Daneri, G.; Iriarte, J. L.; Silva, N.; Vargas, C. A.; Giesecke, R.; Sánchez, N.

    2011-03-01

    recognizable particles contributing to the particulate organic carbon flux. The topographic constriction sills partially modulated the exchange of oceanic waters (Subantarctic Surface Water) with freshwater river discharges along the Moraleda Channel. This exchange affects salinity and nutrient availability and, thus, the plankton structure. The north microbasin was dominated by a seasonal alternation of the classical (spring) and microbial (winter) food webs. However, in the south microbasin, productivity was low and the system was dominated year-round by large inputs of glacier-derived, silt-rich freshwater carrying predominantly small-sized diatoms ( Skeletonema spp) and bacteria. When superimposed upon this scenario, highly variable (seasonal) solar radiation and photoperiods could exacerbate north-south differences along Moraleda Channel.

  17. Plio-Pleistocene planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, paleo-oceanography, and sediment accumulation rates, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.E.; Johnson, G.W.; Spotz, B.

    1987-05-01

    The planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy has been analyzed for Ocean Drilling Program's hole 625B (Leg 100), drilled to a total subbottom depth of 235 m south of De Soto Canyon in the northeast Gulf of Mexico. The hole penetrated to at least early Pliocene (zone N19), as indicated by the Globigerina nepenthes LAD (approx. 3.7 Ma) at 182 m. Preliminary seismic section of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments of the continental slope in the northeast Gulf suggested a relatively continuous depositional record. However, sediment accumulation rates have fluctuated in parallel with paleo-oceanographic changes. Percent coarse (approx. 63 ..mu..m) carbonate fraction (mainly planktonic foraminiferal tests) in hole 625 B shows high-frequency, low-amplitude fluctuations from the Pliocene to the Jaramillo paleomagnetic event (approx. 900,000 y.B.P.), whereupon low-frequency, high-amplitude fluctuations occur to the Holocene. Low-frequency, high-amplitude fluctuations correspond primarily to increased amplitude of sea level fluctuations and terrigenous dilution during low sea level stands. Percent abundance of Globorotalia menardii and percent coarse carbonate fraction in the uppermost 18 m reflects oxygen isotope stages 1-5 and therefore, primarily, ice volume and, secondarily, water temperature. However, the lack of a strict correspondence between G. menardii abundance, percent coarse carbonate fraction, and planktonic-benthic ratios (presumed dissolution indicator) lower in the hole indicates that G. menardii abundance peaks reflect not only eustatic sea level changes and water temperature but possibly also productivity (upwelling) and/or differential dissolution. Preliminary results of factor analysis of foraminiferal assemblages are also presented.

  18. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  19. Effects of Photoactivated Titanium Dioxide Nanopowders and Coating on Planktonic and Biofilm Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polo, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    . A running protocol for the photoactivation of TiO(2) was set up using the dye rhodamine B. The microorganisms studied were Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a Bacillus cereus-group as planktonic cells. P. aeruginosa biofilms were also studied at both the solid-liquid and the solid......-air interface. The TiO(2) nanopowder produced 1-log reduction of Bacillus sp. planktonic cells in 24 h, 2-log reduction of P. stutzeri planktonic cells in 30 min and 1-log reduction of P. aeruginosa planktonic cells in 2 h compared to non-photoactivated TiO(2) . TiO(2) thin film produced almost a complete...

  20. Distribution patterns of Recent planktonic foraminifera in surface sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and to map the distribution of 11 abundant and/or ecologically important planktonic foramini- feral species; (2) to evaluate the extent to which patterns of foraminiferal abundance and diversity in Recent bottom sediments reflect the details of surface...

  1. Pre-monsoon living planktonic foraminifera from the Southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Muralinath, A.S.

    . References BE, A. W. H. and HUTSON, W. H. (l977) Ecologic and biogeographic patterns of planktonic foraminiferal life and fossil assemblages. Micropaleontology, v. 23, pp. 369-414. COLBORN, J. G. (1975) Thermal structure of Indian Ocean. International Indian...

  2. Planktonic foraminifera from a quaternary deep sea core from the southern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Rao, P.S.; Pattan, J.N.

    An investigation on planktonic foraminifera and calcium carbonate content of a box core collected at a depth of 2556 m from the southern part of the Arabian sea indicates faunal changes depicting Quaternary climatic fluctuations. Based on the study...

  3. Plankton composition in two estuaries of the Konkan coast during premonsoon season

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.; Devassy, V.P.; Nair, V.R.

    Plankton composition of the Shastri and the Kajvi estuaries of the Konkan Coast were studied during the premonsoon season. Phytoplankton constituents were more abundant at the mid and upper reaches in the former whereas in the latter they were...

  4. Feedback control in a general almost periodic discrete system of plankton allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenshuang

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of almost periodic solutions for a general discrete system of plankton allelopathy with feedback controls and establish a theorem on the uniformly asymptotic stability of almost periodic solutions.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton metabolism and PCO2 in a subarctic Greenland fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejr, Mikael K.; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2014-01-01

    We measured net planktonic community production (NCP), community respiration (CR), and gross primary production (GPP) in September, February, and May in a subarctic Greenland fjord influenced by glacial meltwater and terrestrial runoff. Potential controls of pelagic carbon cycling, including...

  6. Clustering of floating particles in stratified turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, Guido; de Lillo, Filippo; Musacchio, Stefano; Sozza, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of small floating particles transported by stratified turbulence in presence of a mean linear density profile as a simple model for the confinement and the accumulation of plankton in the ocean. By means of extensive direct numerical simulations we investigate the statistical distribution of floaters as a function of the two dimensionless parameters of the problem. We find that vertical confinement of particles is mainly ruled by the degree of stratification, with a weak dependency on the particle properties. Conversely, small scale fractal clustering, typical of non-neutral particles in turbulence, depends on the particle relaxation time and is only weakly dependent on the flow stratification. The implications of our findings for the formation of thin phytoplankton layers are discussed.

  7. Growth and functioning of the microbial plankton community: effects of temperature, nutrients and light

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial plankton form the basis of the food web in aquatic habitats. Due to their vast abundances they influence the cycling of elements and the Earth’s climate at a global scale. This thesis aims at a better understanding of how environmental factors such as temperature and the availability of nutrients and light affect the growth and functioning of microbial plankton communities. The thesis combines experimental studies and mathematical modelling to address open questions in community eco...

  8. Across-shore variability in plankton layering and abundance associated with physical forcing in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevadjian, J. C.; McManus, M. A.; Ryan, J.; Greer, A. T.; Cowen, R. K.; Woodson, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    -fold increase in gelatinous zooplankton was observed. These findings reveal a strong coupling between physical processes and the abundance and vertical distribution of plankton. It is necessary to understand the underlying physical environment in order to understand the complex distribution of organisms in the sea.

  9. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin;

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  10. Seasonal variation of plankton communities influenced by environmental factors in an artificial lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuemei; YU Yuhe; ZHANG Tanglin; FENG Weisong; AO Hongyi; YAN Qingyun

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the seasonal variation in plankton community composition in an artificial lake.We conducted microscopic analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes to characterize the plankton community.The clustering of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) was then used to investigate the similarity of these plankton communities.DGGE fingerprinting revealed that samples collected at the different sites within a season shared high similarity and were generally grouped together.In contrast,we did not observe any seasonal variation based on microscopic analysis.Redundancy analysis (RDA) of the plankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in relation to environmental factors revealed that transparency was negatively correlated with the first axis (R=-0.931),and temperature and total phosphorus (TP) were positively correlated with the first axis (R=0.736 and R=0.660,respectively).In conclusion,plankton communities in the artificial lake exhibited significant seasonal variation.Transparency,phosphorus and temperature appear to be the major factors driving the differences in plankton composition.

  11. Seasonal variation of plankton communities influenced by environmental factors in an artificial lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemei; Yu, Yuhe; Zhang, Tanglin; Feng, Weisong; Ao, Hongyi; Yan, Qingyun

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the seasonal variation in plankton community composition in an artificial lake. We conducted microscopic analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes to characterize the plankton community. The clustering of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) was then used to investigate the similarity of these plankton communities. DGGE fingerprinting revealed that samples collected at the different sites within a season shared high similarity and were generally grouped together. In contrast, we did not observe any seasonal variation based on microscopic analysis. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of the plankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in relation to environmental factors revealed that transparency was negatively correlated with the first axis ( R=-0.931), and temperature and total phosphorus (TP) were positively correlated with the first axis ( R=0.736 and R=0.660, respectively). In conclusion, plankton communities in the artificial lake exhibited significant seasonal variation. Transparency, phosphorus and temperature appear to be the major factors driving the differences in plankton composition.

  12. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  13. Water Quality and Planktonic Communities in Al-Khadoud Spring, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Fathi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Al-Khadoud spring is one of the most important water resources in Al- Hassa Governorate, Saudi Arabia. However, much of its biotic information is still unknown. This study presented preliminary ecological information of this aquatic body. The aim of this research was to study the water characteristics and the planktonic organisms inhibiting Al-Khadoud spring and its irrigational channels for a period of 1 year. Approach: A regular visit was monitoring the spring over a period of 1 year (June 2007 to may 2008. Physico-chemical characteristics of spring water were determined. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of Plankton (Phytoplankton or zooplankton were also investigated. Results: All the water quality variables measured showed considerable seasonal variation. The data of this study showed that there were marked seasonal differences in the quantitative and qualitative composition of the phytoplankton communities in Al-Khadoud spring and its irrigation canal. The changes in total algal counts throughout the investigation coincided closely with in Chlorophyceae abundance. Thirty six species were identified allover the period of the investigation. Out of these, 9 species belong to Chlorophyceae, 17 belong to Bacillariophyceae, 7 to Cyanophyceae and 3 to Euglenophyceae. Cyclotella meneghiniana Kützing, Nitzschia closterium Ehernberg, Fragilaria capucina Desmazieres, Surirella ovalis Breb, Actinastrum sp., Chlorella vulgaris Beyerinck, Scenedesmus quadriquda Breb, Oscillatoria sp. and Oscillatoria subbrevis Schmidle were observed in a high rank of occurrence. The phytoplankton crop showed a remarkable increase as compared with the previous records. The data showed that the zooplanktonic fauna identified in this aquatic body is a typical of the permanent freshwater and brackish water. Eleven species were recorded, 5 belonged to Cladoceran, 4 belonged to Rotifera and 2 belonged to Chironomid. Zooplankton

  14. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  15. Seasonal Variation in Abundance and Species Composition of a Planktonic Diatom Assemblage Including Viable Cells on the Bottom in Matsushima Bay, Northeastern Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ICHINOMIYA Mutsuo; TANIGUCHI Akira

    2003-01-01

    Seasonal variation in abundance and species composition of a planktonic diatom assemblage distributed in the water column and also settled on the bottom was investigated for the shallow coastal water in Matsushima Bay on the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan during the period from October 1999 to September 2000. A spring bloom of diatoms began in April when nutrient concentrations started to increase, indicating the importance of nutrients. Viable cells of Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira spp., which were the dominant species in the water column throughout the year, were also always abundant in the bottom sediment. Both populations in the water column and on the bottom fluctuated essentially in parallel.For the planktonic diatoms in shallow coastal waters to maintain their vegetative populations in the water column, it would be advantageous for them to have a seeding population of viable cells on the bottom that are easily resuspended into the upper photic layer.

  16. In vitro antifungal activity of extracts obtained from Hypericum perforatum adventitious roots cultured in a mist bioreactor against planktonic cells and biofilm of Malassezia furfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Giovanna; Tocci, Noemi; Valletta, Alessio; Brasili, Elisa; D'Auria, Felicia Diodata; Idoux, Alicia; Pasqua, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Xanthone-rich extracts from Hypericum perforatum root cultures grown in a Mist Bioreactor as antifungal agents against Malassezia furfur. Extracts of Hypericum perforatum roots grown in a bioreactor showed activity against planktonic cells and biofilm of Malassezia furfur. Dried biomass, obtained from roots grown under controlled conditions in a ROOTec mist bioreactor, has been extracted with solvents of increasing polarity (i.e. chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol). The methanolic fraction was the richest in xanthones (2.86 ± 0.43 mg g(-1) DW) as revealed by HPLC. The minimal inhibitory concentration of the methanol extract against M. furfur planktonic cells was 16 μg mL(-1). The inhibition percentage of biofilm formation, at a concentration of 16 μg mL(-1), ranged from 14% to 39%. The results show that H. perforatum root extracts could be used as new antifungal agents in the treatment of Malassezia infections.

  17. Mineral-vegetal co-milling: An effective process to improve lignocellulosic biomass fine milling and to increase interweaving between mixed particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, J-C; Delenne, J-Y; Rouau, X; Mayer-Laigle, C

    2015-09-01

    Fine-milling is a crucial objective for lignocellulosic biomass valorization. Co-milling appears to be a promising technique to improve its efficiency. However, the mechanisms occurring while co-milling remain poorly understood. In this study, an experimental work was performed to produce co-milled powders from both lignocellulosic (wheat, straw or pine sawdust) and mineral materials (limestone, quartzite or tile) with very contrasted physicochemical properties. The main consequences of co-milling were studied for both materials. A two-component mixing law for the prediction of the blend properties was proposed (particle sizes and true densities) to highlight the gain of this single processing step compared to separate milling and mixing. The predicted values were compared with experimental data for co-milled powders at 7 biomass contents from 0% to 100%. In all cases, co-milling leads to a reduction in particle size of lignocellulosic materials and create strong interweaving with mineral particles.

  18. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B.C., E-mail: Ben.Jaeschke@gmail.com [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Lind, O.C. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Bradshaw, C. [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Salbu, B. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway)

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gy h{sup −1}) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the “no-effect dose” are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment

  19. Tumbling in Turbulence: How much does particle shape effect particle motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, E. A.; Andersson, H. I.; Zhao, L.; Byron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural particles suspended in surface water are often non-spherical. We explore the ways in which particle shape effects particle motion, focusing specifically on how particle rotation is divided into spinning and tumbling components. This, in turn, will effect particle collision, clustering, and settling rates. We focus on idealized axisymmetric particles shaped as rods, discs, and spheroids. They are chosen so as to explain the physics of aspherical-particle motion that will be relevant for natural particles such as plankton, sediment, or aggregates (e.g. oil-mineral aggregates, clay flocs, or bio-sediment aggregates held together by TEP). Our work begins with laboratory measurements of particle motion in a turbulence tank built to mimic the flow found in rivers, estuaries, and the ocean surface mixed layer. We then proceed to direct numerical simulation of particle-flow interactions in sheared turbulence similar to that which is found in the surface water of creeks and rivers. We find that shape has only a very weak effect on particle angular velocity, which is a quantity calculated with respect the global reference frame (i.e. east/north/up). If we analyze rotation in a particle's local frame (i.e. the particle's principle axes of rotation), then particle shape has a strong effect on rotation. In the local frame, rotation is described by two components: tumbling and spinning. We find that rod-shaped particles spin more than they tumble, and we find that disc-shaped particles tumble more than they spin. Such behavior is indicative of how particles respond the the directional influence of vortex tubes in turbulence, and such response has implications for particle motion other than rotation. Understanding particle alignment is relevant for predicting particle-particle collision rates, particle-wall collision rates, and the shear-driven breakup of aggregates. We discuss these briefly in the context of what can be concluded from the rotation data discussed above.

  20. DECELERATION OF ELECTRON VE LOCITY BASED ON THE WAVE- PARTICLE DUALITY LEADS TO RE LATIVE TIME ACCELERATION: HYPOTHESIS OF INCREASED BIOPHYSICAL REACTION VELOCITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Koch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The high speed of biological processes such as photosynthesis, enzymatic reactions or neuronal activity cannot completely be explained on the basis of classic physical approaches. Different quantum biology effects such as tunnelling have been postulated. We hypothetically admit that deceleration of electron velocity based on light-particle duality of electrons leads to time acceleration. Deceleration from the status of light towards a status of a particle may therefore speed up biochemical or biophysical reactions in the atomic or molecular dimension. Electrophysiological and biological phenomena are discussed on the basis of the hypothesis

  1. Methodology for single-cell genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera for studies of protist diversity and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Katharina Maria Weiner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell genetic analysis is an essential method to investigate the biodiversity and evolutionary ecology of marine protists. In protist groups that do not reproduce under laboratory conditions, this approach provides the only means to directly associate molecular sequences with cell morphology. The resulting unambiguous taxonomic identification of the DNA sequences is a prerequisite for barcoding and analyses of environmental metagenomic data. Extensive single-cell genetic studies have been carried out on planktonic foraminifera over the past 20 years to elucidate their phylogeny, cryptic diversity, biogeography and the relationship between genetic and morphological variability. In the course of these investigations, it has become evident that genetic analysis at the individual specimen level is confronted by innumerable challenges ranging from the negligible amount of DNA present in the single cell to the substantial amount of DNA contamination introduced by endosymbionts or food particles. Consequently, a range of methods has been developed and applied throughout the years for the genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera in order to enhance DNA amplification success rates. Yet, the description of these methods in the literature rarely occurred with equivalent levels of detail and the different approaches have never been compared in terms of their efficiency and reproducibility. Here, aiming at a standardization of methods, we provide a comprehensive review of all methods that have been employed for the single-cell genetic analysis of planktonic foraminifera. We compile data on success rates of DNA amplification and use these to evaluate the effects of key parameters associated with the methods of sample collection, storage and extraction of single-cell DNA. We show that the chosen methods influence the success rates of single-cell genetic studies, but the differences between them are not sufficient to hinder comparisons between studies

  2. Comparison of transcriptional heterogeneity of eight genes between batch Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm and planktonic culture at a single-cell level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua eQi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB biofilm formed on metal surfaces can change the physicochemical properties of metals and cause metal corrosion. To enhance understanding of differential gene expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris under planktonic and biofilm growth modes, a single-cell based RT-qPCR approach was applied to determine gene expression levels of 8 selected target genes in four sets of the 31 individual cells isolated from each growth condition (i.e., biofilm formed on a stainless steel (SS) and planktonic cultures, exponential and stationary phases. The results showed obvious gene-expression heterogeneity for the target genes among D. vulgaris single cells of both biofilm and planktonic cultures. In addition, an increased gene-expression heterogeneity in the D. vulgaris biofilm when compared with the planktonic culture was also observed for seven out of eight selected genes, which may be contributing to the increased complexity in terms of structures and morphology in the biofilm. Moreover, the results showed up-regulation of DVU0281 gene encoding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein, and down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., DVU0434 and DVU0588, stress responses (i.e., DVU2410 and response regulator (i.e., DVU3062 in the D. vulgaris biofilm cells. Finally, the gene (DVU2571 involved in iron transportation was found down-regulated, and two genes (DVU1340 and DVU1397 involved in ferric uptake repressor and iron storage were up-regulated in D. vulgaris biofilm, suggesting their possible roles in maintaining normal metabolism of the D. vulgaris biofilm under environments of high concentration of iron. This study showed that the single-cell based analysis could be a useful approach in deciphering metabolism of microbial biofilms.

  3. Entry of Oil to the Coastal Planktonic Food Web During the Deepwater Horizon Spill (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, W. M.; Condon, R. H.; Carmichael, R. H.; D'Ambra, I.; Patterson, H. K.; Hernandez, F. J., Jr.

    2010-12-01

    After the explosion and subsequent sinking of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) on 22 April 2010, an estimated 780,000 m3 of Sweet Louisiana Crude (SLC) and 205,000 mT of methane were released into the northern Gulf of Mexico over an 85 d period. A great deal of controversy ensued regarding the application of unprecedented volumes of chemical dispersants both at the surface and at depth. One of the consequences of dispersing such large volumes of oil into the water column was the difficulty of tracking its fate over distance and through the food web. Most of the attention to date has been on large underwater plumes of oil, and scant evidence exists for subsea oil in warm (>25 °C), shallow shelf waters due to rapid weathering and utilization by prokaryotes. A large pool of isotopically depleted carbon from released oil and methane is presumably available to zooplankton and zooplankton-eating fish and invertebrates via prokaryotic consumers. Thus, carbon isotopic depletion extending into marine zooplankton grazers, a pathway mediated by the microbial food web, is a good proxy for food web modification by the spill. We employed δ13C as a tracer of oil-derived carbon incorporation into the lower marine food web across the middle and inner continental shelf. During June-August 2010, we followed two particle size classes: the nominally 1 μm - 0.2 mm “small suspended particulate” and the >0.2-2 mm “mesozooplankton” fractions, with the former considered likely food particle size for the latter. A clear pattern of δ13C depletion occurring in each fraction at middle and inner shelf stations was consistent with two sequential northward pulses of surface oil slicks from DWH. Relative to early June, an isotopic shift of -1 to -3 ‰ (toward weathered and fresh oil, -27.23 ± 0.03 ‰ and -27.34 ± 0.34 ‰, respectively) occurred during the peak of areal coverage of oil over the sites in late June 2010. Recovery of this depletion was 2-4 wks. A third pulse of residual oil

  4. CALCAREOUS PLANKTON BIOSTRATIGRAPHY AND AGE OF THE MIDDLE MIOCENE DEPOSITS OF LONGANO FORMATION (EASTERN MATESE MOUNTAINS, SOUTHERN APENNINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FABRIZIO LIRER

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The integrated calcareous plankton biostratigraphy (planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils and an accurate fieldwork, allowed us the reconstruction of the sedimentary evolution of the Longano Formation (Orbulina Marls. In particular the correlation between the bioevents recognised in the Orbulina Marls sequence and those recorded in astronomically calibrated Middle Miocene sections, offered the possibility to date the passage from the shallow-water Cusano Formation to the deep-water deposits of the Longano Formation at about 13.21 Ma and the successive onset of terrigenous deposits of the Pietraroia Formation at 10.54 Ma. In addition, an high resolution study of the terrigenous sequence, showed that this sedimentary event is not abrupt but it is characterised by a progressive increase, bed by bed, of the siliciclastic fraction up to the deposition of the sandstones. The recognition in all the studied sections of the base of the first Acme (AB1 of Paragloborotalia siakensis dated at 13.21 Ma, just above the phosphate-rich interval (this interval marks the transition between Cusano and Longano Formations, proved that the transgression which led to the deposition of the Orbulina Marls was synchronous in all the south-eastern Matese Mountains. 

  5. Negative effects of Microcystis blooms on the crustacean plankton in an enclosure experiment in the subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fei-zhou; XIE Ping; TANG Hui-juan; LIU Hong

    2005-01-01

    Effects of Microcystis blooms on the crustacean plankton were studied using enclosure experiments during July-September,2000. Eight enclosures were set in the hypereutrophic Donghu Lake. Different nutrient concentrations through additional nutrient and sediment in enclosures were expected to result in different abundance of Microcystis. From July to early August, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Chlorophyta, Cryptophyta, Bacillariophyta and Cyanophyta other than Microcystis aeruginosa. M. aeruginosa showed a rapid increase during early August in all enclosures and predominated. Crustacean plankton was dominated by the herbivorous Moina micrura, Diaphanosoma brachyurum and Ceriodaphnia cornuta, and the predaceous Mesocyclops sp. and Thermocyclops taihokuensis. During the pre-bloom period, the dynamics of M. micrura population appeared to be mainly affected by the predaceous cyclopoids. With the development of Microcystis blooms, such interaction between M. micrura and cyclopoids seemed weakened, especially when the Microcystis biomass was high. But there was no apparent influence on the interaction between Leptodora kindti and its zooplanktonic prey. The density of two cyclopoids decreased with the enhancement of Microcystis. The density decline of M. micrura was caused by both predation and inhibition by Microcystis. The low food availability of other edible phytoplankton during the blooms led to low densities of both C. comuta and D. brachyurum by late August. lt appears that dense Microcystis blooms exert strong negative effects on the herbivorous cladocerans and the predaceous cyclopoids.

  6. Ice-brine and planktonic microheterotrophs from Saroma-ko Lagoon, Hokkaido (Japan): quantitative importance and trophodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Juniper, S. Kim; Demers, Serge

    1997-02-01

    Biologists have rarely had the opportunity to investigate the community characteristics and dynamics of heterotrophic microorganisms in highly productive first-year sea ice. In this study, sterile seawater was used as a salinity buffer to extract the ice-brine microheterotroph communities (bacteria, flagellates and ciliates) from a coastal lagoon in Japan (Saroma-ko, Hokkaido; 44°N, 144°E) during the late winter (February—March) of 1992. This procedure reduced osmotic shock during the melting of ice cores and allowed the recovery of up to 323% more cells than the traditional melting method. Most of the organisms were concentrated in the bottom 3-4 cm of the ice, where abundances were up to 33 times higher than in the plankton. In ice and plankton samples, heterotrophic flagellates were dominated by small species (sampling period while protozoa increased or attained their maximum number in late winter, toward the end of the sampling period. These observations support previous suggestions of the existence of a functional microbial food web within the sea-ice community. Heterotrophic flagellate biomass greatly exceeded bacterial biomass in the sea ice (30-60 x). Coupled with similar potential growth rates, this suggests the utilization of additional (non-bacterial) food items by ice-brine flagellates. Finally, the effects of salinity variations (ranging between 15 and 120 psu) on potential microheterotroph growth rates are discussed.

  7. Sheldon spectrum and the plankton paradox: two sides of the same coin-a trait-based plankton size-spectrum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José A; Delius, Gustav W; Law, Richard

    2017-05-25

    The Sheldon spectrum describes a remarkable regularity in aquatic ecosystems: the biomass density as a function of logarithmic body mass is approximately constant over many orders of magnitude. While size-spectrum models have explained this phenomenon for assemblages of multicellular organisms, this paper introduces a species-resolved size-spectrum model to explain the phenomenon in unicellular plankton. A Sheldon spectrum spanning the cell-size range of unicellular plankton necessarily consists of a large number of coexisting species covering a wide range of characteristic sizes. The coexistence of many phytoplankton species feeding on a small number of resources is known as the Paradox of the Plankton. Our model resolves the paradox by showing that coexistence is facilitated by the allometric scaling of four physiological rates. Two of the allometries have empirical support, the remaining two emerge from predator-prey interactions exactly when the abundances follow a Sheldon spectrum. Our plankton model is a scale-invariant trait-based size-spectrum model: it describes the abundance of phyto- and zooplankton cells as a function of both size and species trait (the maximal size before cell division). It incorporates growth due to resource consumption and predation on smaller cells, death due to predation, and a flexible cell division process. We give analytic solutions at steady state for both the within-species size distributions and the relative abundances across species.

  8. Lake morphometry and wind exposure may shape the plankton community structure in acidic mining lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weithoff, Guntram; Moser, Michael; Kamjunke, Norbert; Gaedke, Ursula; Weisse, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Acidic mining lakes (pH web in such lakes. The plankton community structure of mining lakes of different morphometry and mixing type but similar chemical characteristics (Lake 130, Germany and Lake Langau, Austria) was investigated. The focus was laid on the species composition, the trophic relationship between the phago-mixotrophic flagellate Ochromonas sp. and bacteria and the formation of a deep chlorophyll maximum along a vertical pH-gradient. The shallow wind-exposed Lake 130 exhibited a higher species richness than Lake Langau. This increase in species richness was made up mainly by mero-planktic species, suggesting a strong benthic/littoral - pelagic coupling. Based on the field data from both lakes, a nonlinear, negative relation between bacteria and Ochromonas biomass was found, suggesting that at an Ochromonas biomass below 50 μg C L(-1), the grazing pressure on bacteria is low and with increasing Ochromonas biomass bacteria decline. Furthermore, in Lake Langau, a prominent deep chlorophyll maximum was found with chlorophyll concentrations ca. 50 times higher than in the epilimnion which was build up by the euglenophyte Lepocinclis sp. We conclude that lake morphometry, and specific abiotic characteristics such as mixing behaviour influence the community structure in these mining lakes.

  9. Biodiversity patterns of plankton assemblages at the extremes of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2016-01-07

    The diversity of microbial plankton has received limited attention in the main basin of the Red Sea. This study investigates changes in the community composition and structure of prokaryotes and eukaryotes at the extremes of the Red Sea along cross-shelf gradients and between the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum. Using molecular methods to target both the 16S and 18S rRNA genes, it was observed that the dominant prokaryotic classes were Acidimicrobiia, Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, regardless of the region and depth. The eukaryotes Syndiniophyceae and Dinophyceae between them dominated in the north, with Bacillariophyceae and Mamiellophyceae more prominent in the southern region. Significant differences were observed for prokaryotes and eukaryotes for region, depth and distance from shore. Similarly, it was noticed that communities became less similar with increasing distance from the shore. Canonical correspondence analysis at the class level showed that Mamiellophyceae and Bacillariophyceae correlated with increased nutrients and chlorophyll a found in the southern region, which is influenced by the input of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water.

  10. A micro-fluidic treadmill for observing suspended plankton in the lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, J. S.; Laxton, B.; Garwood, J. C.; Franks, P. J. S.; Roberts, P. L.

    2016-02-01

    A significant obstacle to laboratory studies of interactions between small organisms ( mm) and their fluid environment is our ability to obtain high-resolution images while allowing freedom of motion. This is because as the organisms sink, they will often move out of the field of view of the observation system. One solution to this problem is to impose a water circulation pattern that preserves their location relative to the camera system while imaging the organisms away from the glass walls. To accomplish this we have designed and created a plankton treadmill. Our computer-controlled system consists of a digital video camera attached to a macro or microscope and a micro-fluidic pump whose flow is regulated to maintain a suspended organism's position relative to the field of view. Organisms are detected and tracked in real time in the video frames, allowing a control algorithm to compensate for any vertical movement by adjusting the flow. The flow control can be manually adjusted using on-screen controls, semi-automatically adjusted to allow the user to select a particular organism to be tracked or fully automatic through the use of classification and tracking algorithms. Experiments with a simple cm-sized cuvette and a number of organisms that are both positively and negatively buoyant have demonstrated the success of the system in permitting longer observation times than would be possible in the absence of a controlled-flow environment. The subjects were observed using a new dual-view, holographic imaging system that provides 3-dimensional microscopic observations with relatively isotropic resolution. We will present the system design, construction, the control algorithm, and some images obtained with the holographic system, demonstrating its effectiveness. Small particles seeded into the flow clearly show the 3D flow fields around the subjects as they freely sink or swim.

  11. Response of heterotrophic and autotrophic microbial plankton to inorganic and organic inputs along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Martínez-García

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric nutrient deposition into the open ocean increased over the past decades as a result of human activity and water-soluble organic nitrogen accounts for up to 30% of the total nitrogen inputs. The effects of inorganic and/or organic nutrient inputs on phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria have never been concurrently assessed in open ocean oligotrophic communities over a wide spatial gradient. We studied the effects of potentially limiting inorganic (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silica and organic nutrient (glucose, aminoacids inputs on microbial plankton biomass, community structure and metabolism in five microcosm experiments conducted along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean (from 26° N to 29° S.

    Primary production rates increased up to 1.8-fold. Bacterial respiration and microbial community respiration increased up to 14.3 and 12.7-fold, respectively. Bacterial production and bacterial growth efficiency increased up to 58.8-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively. The largest increases were measured after mixed inorganic-organic nutrients additions. Changes in microbial plankton biomass were small as compared with those in metabolic rates. A north to south increase in the response of heterotrophic bacteria was observed, which could be related to a latitudinal gradient in phosphorus availability. Our results suggest that organic matter inputs associated with atmospheric deposition into the Atlantic Ocean will result in a predominantly heterotrophic versus autotrophic response and in increases in bacterial growth efficiency, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. Subtle differences in the initial environmental and biological conditions are likely to result in differential microbial responses to inorganic and organic matter inputs.

  12. One new route to optimize the oxidation resistance of TiC/hastelloy (Ni-based alloy) composites applied for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell interconnect by increasing graphite particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qian; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lujie; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Jian; Huang, Zhengren

    2017-09-01

    TiC/hastelloy composites with suitable thermal expansion and excellent electrical conductivity are promising candidates for IT-SOFC interconnect. In this paper, the TiC/hastelloy composites are fabricated by in-situ reactive infiltration, and the oxidation resistance of composites is optimized by increasing graphite particle size. Results show that the increase of graphite particles size from 1 μm to 40 μm reduces TiC particle size from 2.68 μm to 2.22 μm by affecting the formation process of TiC. Moreover, the decrease of TiC particles size accelerates the fast formation of dense and continuous TiO2/Cr2O3 oxide layer, which bring down the mass gain (800 °C/100 h) from 2.03 mg cm-2 to 1.18 mg cm-2. Meanwhile, the coefficient of thermal expansion decreases from 11.15 × 10-6 °C-1 to 10.80 × 10-6 °C-1, and electrical conductivity maintains about 5800 S cm-1 at 800 °C. Therefore, the decrease of graphite particle size is one simple and effective route to optimize the oxidation resistance of composites, and meantime keeps suitable thermal expansion and good electrical conductivity.

  13. CALCAREOUS PLANKTON HIGH RESOLUTION BIO-MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY FOR THE LANGHIAN OF THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA

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    AGATA DI STEFANO

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution quantitative and qualitative analyses of the planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil content have been carried out on three Middle Miocene sections, from the Mediterranean area. Such sections (Cretaccio section, Tremiti Islands, Southern Italy; Moria section, Marche Region, Central Italy; DSDP Site 372 succession, Balearic Basin, all well known in the literature, have been chosen because of their high-quality biostratigraphic potential.Remarkable magnetostratigraphic data were provided by the Site 372 succession where all chrons and subchrons of the interval C5Br-C5AAn have been recognised.The investigated interval falls between the First Occurrence (FO of Praeorbulina glomerosa sicana and the Last Occurrence (LO of Sphenolithus heteromorphus and Globorotalia peripheroronda. The LO of S. heteromorphus was detected in the uppermost part of the investigated sequence of Site 372 at the same stratigraphic level of the G. peripheroronda LO. A drastic decrease in abundance of S. heteromorphus (Last Common Occurrence -LCO was detected slightly below its last occurrence; this event is well correlatable with the same event astronomically calibrated at Ras-il Pellegrin section (Malta Island, which has been recently ratified as the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP for the base of the Serravallian by the International Union of Geological Sciences.The stratigraphic correlation of the studied sections is based on first and last occurrences, abundance fluctuations of selected taxa and additional biohorizons. In particular the peculiar distribution pattern of some taxa, e.g. Paragloborotalia siakensis and Helicosphaera waltrans, offered the opportunity to increase the biostratigraphic resolution of the Langhian interval. The resulting integrated calcareous plankton bio-magnetostratigraphic scheme represents the downward extension of that one previously established for the Serravallian-Tortonian interval.The biostratigraphic

  14. Determinants of Seasonality of Planktonic Foraminifera Shell Flux: Consequences for Paleoproxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, L.; Kucera, M.

    2014-12-01

    with a longer reproductive cycle, and show a tendency for increased peak prominence at higher temperatures. These observations shed new light on the factors explaining seasonal variability in the shell flux of planktonic foraminifera and will aid to improve paleoceanographic reconstructions by allowing prediction of temporal changes in seasonality.

  15. Gemmobacter megaterium sp. nov., isolated from coastal planktonic seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhang, Xin-Qi; Chi, Fang-Tao; Pan, Jie; Sun, Cong; Wu, Min

    2014-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile and aerobic bacterium, designated CF17(T), was isolated from coastal planktonic seaweeds, East China Sea. The isolate grew at 18-37 °C (optimum 25-28 °C), pH 6.5-9.0 (optimum 7.0-8.0) and with 0-5 % NaCl (optimum 1-2 %, w/v) and 0.5-10 % sea salts (optimum 2-3 %, w/v). Growth of strain CF17(T) could be stimulated prominently by supplementing the growth medium with the autoclaved supernatant of a culture of strain CF5, which was isolated from the same sample along with strain CF17(T). The cell morphology of strain CF17(T) was a bean-shaped rod consisting of a swollen end and a long prostheca. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CF17(T) clustered with Gemmobacter nectariphilus DSM 15620(T) within the genus Gemmobacter. The DNA G+C content of strain CF17(T) was 61.4 mol%. The respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10. The major fatty acids included C18 : 1ω7c and C18 : 0. The polar lipids of strain CF17(T) consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, two uncharacterized phospholipids, one uncharacterized aminolipid, three uncharacterized glycolipids and one uncharacterized lipid. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, strain CF17(T) ( = CGMCC 1.11024(T) = JCM 18498(T)) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Gemmobacter, for which the name Gemmobacter megaterium sp. nov. is proposed.

  16. The biochemical composition of plankton in a subsurface chlorophyll maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortch, Quay

    1987-06-01

    The biochemical composition of plankton at a station with a deep, subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) below a nitrogen-depleted surface layer off the Washington coast was determined in order to answer long-standing questions about the nature and causes of SCM. The chlorophyll maximum did not correspond to a protein-biomass maximum, and chlorophyll: protein ratios indicate that only in the SCM were phytoplankton a major constituent of the total biomass. Ratios of free amino acids: protein in the particulate matter were high at all depths in the euphotic zone. From this it can be concluded that phytoplankton in the SCM are N-sufficient, since they make up 80-90% of the biomass there. Above and below the SCM, where non-phytoplankton predominate, the state of N deficiency or sufficiency of the phytoplankton cannot be ascertained until more is known about how the chemical composition of phytoplankton, zooplankton and bacteria are related. However, if it is assumed that very N-sufficient zooplankton and bacteria would not coexist with very N-deficient phytoplankton, then it seems likely that the phytoplankton were also N-sufficient or nearly so. Thus, the biochemical indicators do not support the hypothesis that the SCM forms because it represents the only layer in the water column with adequate N and light for phytoplankton growth. Comparison of the chlorophyll: protein ratios with those from cultures and from other regions suggests that oligotrophic areas have a much higher proportion of non-phytoplankton biomass than do eutrophic areas.

  17. In Vitro Interactions between Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Antifungal Agents against Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Trichosporon asahii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suteng Yang

    Full Text Available Increasing drug resistance has brought enormous challenges to the management of Trichosporon spp. infections. The in vitro antifungal activities of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. were recently discovered. In the present study, the in vitro interactions between three NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium and commonly used antifungal agents (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and amphotericin B against planktonic and biofilm cells of T. asahii were evaluated using the checkerboard microdilution method. The spectrophotometric method and the XTT reduction assay were used to generate data on biofilm cells. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI and the ΔE model were compared to interpret drug interactions. Using the FICI, the highest percentages of synergistic effects against planktonic cells (86.67% and biofilm cells (73.33% were found for amphotericin B/ibuprofen, and caspofungin/ibuprofen showed appreciable percentages (73.33% for planktonic form and 60.00% for biofilm as well. We did not observe antagonism. The ΔE model gave consistent results with FICI (86.67%. Our findings suggest that amphotericin B/ibuprofen and caspofungin/ibuprofen combinations have potential effects against T. asahii. Further in vivo and animal studies to investigate associated mechanisms need to be conducted.

  18. Application of the Extrusion to Increase the Binding between the Ceramic Particles and the Metal Matrix: Enhancement of Mechanical and Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Mazahery; Mohsen Ostad Shabani

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum alloyed with magnesium and silicon has been used as the matrix material owing to its excellent mechanical properties coupled with good formability and its wide applications in industrial sector.An extrusion process was developed to consolidate Al 6061-SiCp composites from mixed powders.The results show that the composites were fully densified,with no sign of pores or oxide layers observable in the optical microscope.The SiC particles were distributed uniformly in the matrix.As compared with 6061 alloys,the composites demonstrated a smaller elongation,but exhibited a higher Young's modulus and a larger work hardening capacity.These composites possessed much higher elongation at the same strength level.The present study also addressed the dry wear behavior of the composites at different sliding speeds and applied loads.Values of the friction coefficient of the matrix alloy and composite materials were in expected range for light metals in dry sliding conditions.All of these improvements were attributed to the merits,including full densification of the bulk,uniform dispersion of the SiC particles in the matrix,and strong binding between the SiC particles and the matrix resulting from the extrusion.

  19. Feeding of the planktonic shrimp Lucifer faroni Borradaile, 1915 (Crustacea: Decapoda in the laboratory

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    Luz Amelia Vega-Pérez

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Feeding behavior of juveniles of the planktonic shrimp Lucifer faxoni Borradaile was studied in the laboratory under light and dark conditions. Newly-hatched nauplii and metanauplii of Artemio were used as prey organisms. The fecding raie of L. foxoni was dependent on prey size and prey density, but was not obviously affected by light or dark conditions. The capture of the prey tended to increase with longer exposure time to prey. The maximum ingestion rate was 17.28 and 13.40 nauplii.L. faxoni .d- , in the light and in the dark conditions, respectively.O comportamento alimentar de espécimens jovens de Lucifer faxoni Borradaile, em laboratório, sob condições de luz e escuro, foi estudado utilizando-se como alimento náuplios recém-eclodidos e metanáuplios de Artemio. Neste estudo a taxa de alimentação de L. faxoni foi influenciada pelo tamanho e concentração da presa, bem como pelo tempo de contato com a mesma. A atividade alimentar de L. faxoni foi maior em condições de luz, quando comparado com as condições de escuro. f- taxa máxima de ingestão calculada foi de 17,28 e 13,40 náuplios.L. faxoni .d- para as condições de luz e escuro, respectivamente.

  20. Molecular ecological analysis of planktonic bacterial communities in constructed wetlands invaded by Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popko, David A; Han, Suk-Kyun; Lanoil, Brian; Walton, William E

    2006-11-01

    The succession of the planktonic bacterial community during the colonization by Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes of 0.1-ha treatment wetlands was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) methodology. Relationships between apparent bacterial diversity and ecological factors (water quality, total bacterial counts, and immature mosquito abundance) were determined during a 1-mo flooding period. Analysis of DGGE banding patterns indicated that days postflooding and temporal changes in water quality were the primary and secondary determinants, respectively, of diversity in bacterial communities. Lower levels of diversity were associated with later postflood stages and increases in ammoniacal nitrogen concentration and total bacterial counts. Diversity was therefore most similar for bacteria present on the same sampling date at wetland locations with similar flooding regimes and water quality, suggesting that wastewater input was the driving force shaping bacterial communities. Comparatively small changes in bacterial diversity were connected to natural processes as water flowed through the wetlands. Greater immature mosquito abundance coincided with less diverse communities composed of greater total numbers of bacteria. Five individual DGGE bands were directly associated with fluctuations in mosquito production, and an additional 16 bands were associated with hydrological aspects of the environment during the rise and fall of mosquito populations. A marked decline in mosquito numbers 21 d after inundation may have masked associations of bacterial communities and mosquito recruitment into the sparsely vegetated wetlands. DGGE was an effective tool for the characterization of bacteria in mosquito habitat in our study, and its potential application in mosquito ecology is discussed.

  1. Trophic state and geographic gradients influence planktonic cyanobacterial diversity and distribution in New Zealand lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susanna A; Maier, Marcia Y; Puddick, Jonathan; Pochon, Xavier; Zaiko, Anastasija; Dietrich, Daniel R; Hamilton, David P

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are commonly associated with eutrophic lakes, where they often form blooms and produce toxins. However, they are a ubiquitous component of phytoplankton in lakes of widely varying trophic status. We hypothesised that cyanobacterial diversity would vary among lakes of differing trophic status, but that the relative importance of geographical and hydromorphological characteristics driving these patterns would differ across trophic groups. DNA from 143 New Zealand lakes that spanned a range of geographic, hydromorphological and trophic gradients was analysed using automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis and screened for genes involved in cyanotoxin production. Statistical analysis revealed significant delineation among cyanobacterial communities from different trophic classes. Multivariate regression indicated that geographical features (latitude, longitude and altitude) were significant in driving cyanobacterial community structure; however, partitioning of their effects varied among trophic categories. High-throughput sequencing was undertaken on selected samples to investigate their taxonomic composition. The most abundant and diverse (71 operational taxonomic units) taxon across all lake types was the picocyanobacteria genus Synechococcus Cyanotoxins (microcystins n = 23, anatoxins n = 1) were only detected in eutrophic lowland lakes. Collectively, these data infer that increasing eutrophication of lakes will have broad-scale impacts on planktonic cyanobacteria diversity and the prevalence of cyanotoxins. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Dynamics of the marine planktonic diatom family Chaetocerotaceae in a Mediterranean coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Sunčica; Godrijan, Jelena; Šilović, Tina

    2016-10-01

    The planktonic diatoms belonging to two genera Chaetoceros and Bacteriastrum, included within the family Chaetocerotaceae, are ecologically important as they represent an important component of the phytoplankton in the coastal regions and are often among bloom-forming taxa. We analysed the chaetocerotacean species composition and abundances in the coastal area of northeastern Adriatic in a biweekly study conducted from September 2008 to October 2009 with the aim of investigating seasonal dynamics and species succession on a fine temporal scale and determining the most important ecological factors influencing their distribution. The study identified seven Chaetoceros and three Bacteriastrum species as major phytoplankton components showing the clear annual succession and two types of blooms (one species/multi species) governed by differing ecological conditions. Autumn bloom was composed of 20 chaetocerotacean species with Chaetoceros contortus and Chaetoceros vixvisibilis alternating in dominance. The summer period was characterized by spreading of freshwater from the Po River up to the eastern coast increasing availability of phosphate which triggered the monospecific Chaetoceros vixvisibilis bloom. We explained the chaetocerotacean dominant species succession pattern by the environmental parameters, with the temperature, salinity and phosphate availability as most important factors driving the species seasonality.

  3. Estuarine trophic state assessment: New plankton index based on morphology of Keratella rotifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopko, Mikhail; Telesh, Irena V.

    2013-09-01

    A new estuarine trophic state index - Keratella-index (KIN), based on the relative abundance of two common rotifer species, Keratella cochlearis and Keratella tecta, was developed and tested for the Neva Estuary (Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea). The morphological trait variation of these plankton species and their responses to different trophic conditions were investigated at three nearshore stations. The morphological data confirm that K. cochlearis and K. tecta are likely to be two distinct species (not two morphs) at our study site. The mean lorica length of K. cochlearis and K. tecta differ significantly and there were no K. cochlearis individuals with extremely short spines (spine length significantly decreases with an increase in trophic state (R2 = 0.71; p spined K. cochlearis may be explained by the "rare-enemy effect". There was a significant correlation (R2 = 0.76; p < 0.001; R2 = 0.68; p < 0.01) between KIN and the common trophic state indices (TSI and QB/T, respectively). The KIN values indicated meso-eutrophic to strongly eutrophic conditions at different nearshore sampling sites and hence indicated that the Neva Estuary is eutrophic.

  4. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging `oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events.

  5. Seasonal patterns in Arctic planktonic metabolism (Fram Strait – Svalbard region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vaquer-Sunyer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of the Arctic Ocean is marked by extreme pronounced seasonality and spatial heterogeneity associated with light conditions, ice cover, water masses and nutrient availability. Here we report the marine planktonic metabolic rates (Net Community Production, Gross Primary Production and Community Respiration along three different seasons of the year for a total of eight cruises along the western sector of the European Arctic (Fram Strait – Svalbard region in the Arctic Ocean margin: one at the end of 2006 (fall/winter, two in 2007 (early spring and summer, two in 2008 (early spring and summer, one in 2009 (late spring–early summer and one in 2010 (spring. The results show that metabolisms of the western sector of the European Arctic varies throughout the year, depending mostly on the stage of bloom, which is mainly determined by availability of light and nutrients. Here we report metabolic rates for the different periods, including the spring bloom, summer and the dark period, increasing considerably the empirical basis on metabolic rates in the Artic Ocean, and especially in the European Arctic corridor. We also report a rough annual metabolic balance for this area of the Arctic Ocean, resulting in a Net Community Production of 108 g C m−2 yr−1.

  6. Fine-scale planktonic habitat partitioning at a shelf-slope front revealed by a high-resolution imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Adam T.; Cowen, Robert K.; Guigand, Cedric M.; Hare, Jonathan A.

    2015-02-01

    Ocean fronts represent productive regions of the ocean, but predator-prey interactions within these features are poorly understood partially due to the coarse-scale and biases of net-based sampling methods. We used the In Situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS) to sample across a front near the Georges Bank shelf edge on two separate sampling days in August 2010. Salinity characterized the transition from shelf to slope water, with isopycnals sloping vertically, seaward, and shoaling at the thermocline. A frontal feature defined by the convergence of isopycnals and a surface temperature gradient was sampled inshore of the shallowest zone of the shelf-slope front. Zooplankton and larval fishes were abundant on the shelf side of the front and displayed taxon-dependent depth distributions but were rare in the slope waters. Supervised automated particle counting showed small particles with high solidity, verified to be zooplankton (copepods and appendicularians), aggregating near surface above the front. Salps were most abundant in zones of intermediate chlorophyll-a fluorescence, distinctly separate from high abundances of other grazers and found almost exclusively in colonial form (97.5%). Distributions of gelatinous zooplankton differed among taxa but tended to follow isopycnals. Fine-scale sampling revealed distinct habitat partitioning of various planktonic taxa, resulting from a balance of physical and biological drivers in relation to the front.

  7. Linking planktonic biomass and metabolism to net gas fluxes in northern temperate lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgio, P.A. del [Univ. of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, MD (United States). Horn Point Lab.; Cole, J.J.; Caraco, N.F. [Inst. of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY (United States); Peters, R.H. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    1999-06-01

    Plankton communities in oligotrophic waters are characteristically dominated by the biomass of heterotrophs, including bacteria, micro-, and macrozooplankton. It has been generally assumed that these inverted biomass pyramids are the direct result of high specific production rates of phytoplankton and a tight coupling between producers and consumers. There are, however, at least two alternative hypotheses: (1) heterotrophic biomass turnover is much slower in oligotrophic than eutrophic systems; and (2) oligotrophic planktonic communities are significantly subsidized by allochthonous organic matter. In this study the authors assessed these hypotheses by establishing the relationship between plankton biomass structure, plankton function, and whole-lake gas (O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) fluxes in 20 temperate lakes that span a large range in primary production. The authors show that the balance of phytoplankton production and community respiration (P/R ratio) is always below unity in unproductive lakes where heterotrophic biomass (H) is high relative to autotrophic biomass (A), suggesting that these planktonic food webs function as heterotrophic systems and must be subsidized by allochthonous organic matter. Further, rates of phytoplankton specific production are not highest in communities characterized by dominance of heterotrophic biomass. All except the most productive lakes were supersaturated in CO{sub 2} and undersaturated in O{sub 2}.

  8. Planktonic foraminifera in the Arctic: potentials and issues regarding modern and quaternary populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eynaud, Frederique, E-mail: f.eynaud@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux I, Laboratoire EPOC (Environnements et Paleoenvironnements OCeaniques), UMR CNRS 5805, Avenue des facultes, 33405 Talence cedex - France (France)

    2011-05-15

    Calcareous microfossils are widely used by paleoceanographers to investigate past sea-surface hydrology. Among these microfossils, planktonic foraminifera are probably the most extensively used tool (e.g. [1] for a review), as they are easy to extract from the sediment and can also be used for coupled geochemical (e.g; {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13}C, Mg/Ca) and paleo-ecological investigations. Planktonic foraminifera are marine protists, which build a calcareous shell made of several chambers which reflect in their chemistry the properties of the ambient water-masses. Planktonic foraminifera are known to thrive in various habitats, distributed not only along a latitudinal gradient, but also along different water-depth intervals within surface waters (0-1000 m). Regarding their biogeographical distribution, planktonic foraminifera assemblages therefore mirror different water-masses properties, such as temperature, salinity and nutrient content of the surface water in which they live. The investigation of the specific composition of a fossil assemblage (relative abundances) is therefore a way to empirically obtain (paleo)information on past variations of sea-surface hydrological parameters. This paper focuses on the planktonic foraminifera record from the Arctic domain. This polar region records peculiar sea-surface conditions, with the influence of nearly perennial sea-ice cover development. This has strong impact on living foraminifera populations and on the preservation of their shells in the underlying sediments.

  9. Differences in metabolism between the biofilm and planktonic response to metal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean C; Workentine, Matthew L; Wen, Jing; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Vogel, Hans J; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J; Weljie, Aalim M

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial biofilms are known to withstand the effects of toxic metals better than planktonic cultures of the same species. This phenomenon has been attributed to many features of the sessile lifestyle not present in free-swimming populations, but the contribution of intracellular metabolism has not been previously examined. Here, we use a combined GC-MS and (1)H NMR metabolomic approach to quantify whole-cell metabolism in biofilm and planktonic cultures of the multimetal resistant bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens exposed to copper ions. Metabolic changes in response to metal exposure were found to be significantly different in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Planktonic metabolism indicated an oxidative stress response that was characterized by changes to the TCA cycle, glycolysis, pyruvate and nicotinate and niacotinamide metabolism. Similar metabolic changes were not observed in biofilms, which were instead dominated by shifts in exopolysaccharide related metabolism suggesting that metal stress in biofilms induces a protective response rather than the reactive changes observed for the planktonic cells. From these results, we conclude that differential metabolic shifts play a role in biofilm-specific multimetal resistance and tolerance. An altered metabolic response to metal toxicity represents a novel addition to a growing list of biofilm-specific mechanisms to resist environmental stress.

  10. Susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms and planktonic cultures to hydrogen peroxide in food processing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyun Sun; Kim, Younghoon; Oh, Sejong; Jeon, Woo Min; Frank, Joseph F; Kim, Sae Hun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that Listeria monocytogenes formed biofilms on the surface of food processing equipment, and may survive sanitization treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes grown in either a biofilm or planktonic culture when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Twelve strains of biofilm-forming L. monocytogenes and their planktonic counterparts were treated with various concentrations of H(2)O(2) (1, 6, and 10%), and the cell survival was then determined at 10-min exposure intervals. When grown as a biofilm, L. monocytogenes was significantly more resistant to H(2)O(2) than under planktonic culture conditions. Planktonic L. monocytogenes strains exhibited significantly different susceptibility to 1% H(2)O(2). Equally interestingly, biofilms of the 12 L. monocytogenes strains also inhibited different survival rates after being treated with 6 and 10% H(2)O(2). However, most of the biofilms recovered to a population of 2-9 log CFU/glass fiber filter (GFF) after a 24-h re-growth period. These results indicate that there was no significant correlation between the H(2)O(2) resistance of biofilm- and planktonic-cultured cells, and suggest that different mechanisms for the resistance to sanitation or disinfection underly the persistence of certain strains in food-processing environments.

  11. Norwegian deep-water coral reefs: cultivation and molecular analysis of planktonic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Lynch, Michael D J; Ray, Jessica L; Neufeld, Josh D; Hovland, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Deep-sea coral reefs do not receive sunlight and depend on plankton. Little is known about the plankton composition at such reefs, even though they constitute habitats for many invertebrates and fish. We investigated plankton communities from three reefs at 260-350 m depth at hydrocarbon fields off the mid-Norwegian coast using a combination of cultivation and small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and transcript sequencing. Eight months incubations of a reef water sample with minimal medium, supplemented with carbon dioxide and gaseous alkanes at in situ-like conditions, enabled isolation of mostly Alphaproteobacteria (Sulfitobacter, Loktanella), Gammaproteobacteria (Colwellia) and Flavobacteria (Polaribacter). The relative abundance of isolates in the original sample ranged from ∼ 0.01% to 0.80%. Comparisons of bacterial SSU sequences from filtered plankton of reef and non-reef control samples indicated high abundance and metabolic activity of primarily Alphaproteobacteria (SAR11 Ia), Gammaproteobacteria (ARCTIC96BD-19), but also of Deltaproteobacteria (Nitrospina, SAR324). Eukaryote SSU sequences indicated metabolically active microalgae and animals, including codfish, at the reef sites. The plankton community composition varied between reefs and differed between DNA and RNA assessments. Over 5000 operational taxonomic units were detected, some indicators of reef sites (e.g. Flavobacteria, Cercozoa, Demospongiae) and some more active at reef sites (e.g. Gammaproteobacteria, Ciliophora, Copepoda). © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory. Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  13. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how wave–current and wave–turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory. Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  14. Controls on magnesium and strontium uptake in planktonic foraminifera determined by live culturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, D.W.; Mashiotta, T.A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Spero, H.J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology

    1999-08-01

    Because strontium and magnesium occur in seawater with nearly constant ratios to calcium, variations in Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca in modern foraminifer shells are due to the influence of environmental parameters on calcification. The authors have cultured two species of planktonic foraminifera, Globigerina bulloides and Orbulina universa, to establish the influence of temperature, pH, and salinity. Experimental results indicate that temperature is the primary control on shell Mg/Ca and that shell Mg/Ca increases exponentially by about 8 to 10% per {degree}C. The exponential rise in shell Mg with temperature mirrors the results from inorganic precipitation experiments and suggests at least partial thermodynamic control on Mg incorporation. Both seawater pH and salinity are secondary influences on shell Mg/Ca: {minus}6% per 0.1 pH unit increase and +4% per salinity unit increase. Shell Sr/Ca responds far more weakly to environmental parameters, and the small range observed in shell Sr/Ca relative to measurement precision of the ICP-MS method used here limits how well controls on shell Sr can be determined. Higher temperature, salinity, and pH all appear to increase shell Sr/Ca, most likely through the kinetic influence of calcification. Culturing results demonstrate the potential of Mg/Ca in G. bulloides as a paleothermometer. The culturing results suggest that the standard error of Mg paleothermometry is {+-}1.1 C, but when the secondary effects of salinity and pH are considered the error increases to {+-}1.3 C.

  15. Effects of varied nitrate and phosphate supply on polysaccharidic and proteinaceous gel particles production during tropical phytoplankton bloom experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Engel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxygen minimum zones (OMZ will expand in the tropical oceans as a result of global change with potential consequences for marine element cycling, such as an increase in anaerobic nitrogen loss, resulting in a lower supply of nitrate relative to phosphate to the euphotic zone. So far, the effects of changes in nutrient ratios on organic matter recycling and export fluxes are not well understood. Here, were investigated how different phosphate (Varied P: 0.15–1.58 μmol L−1 or nitrate (Varied N: 1.9–21.9 μmol L−1 concentrations affect the abundance and size distribution of polysaccharidic transparent exopolymer particles (TEP, which are suggested to enhance particle aggregation and export fluxes, and on proteinaceous coomassie stainable particles (CSP, a supposedly good substrate for heterotrophic bacteria. Two series of mesocosm bloom experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities collected from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA close to Cape Verde in October 2012. Until bloom peak, a positive correlation between gel particle abundance and Chl a concentration was determined, linking the release of dissolved gel precursors and the subsequent formation of gel particles to autotrophic production. After bloom peak, gel particle abundance remained stable or even increased, implying a continued partitioning of dissolved into particulate organic matter after biomass production itself ceased. During both experiments, differences between TEP and CSP dynamics were observed; TEP were generally more abundant than CSP. Changes in size distribution indicated aggregation of TEP during the bloom, while newly formed CSP decomposed. Abundance of gel particles clearly increased with nitrate concentration during the second experiment, suggesting that changes in [DIN]:[DIP] ratios can affect gel particle formation with potential consequences for carbon and nitrogen cycling as well as food web dynamics in

  16. Activities of Fluconazole, Caspofungin, Anidulafungin, and Amphotericin B on Planktonic and Biofilm Candida Species Determined by Microcalorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolo, Elena Maryka; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Borens, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the activities of fluconazole, caspofungin, anidulafungin, and amphotericin B against Candida species in planktonic form and biofilms using a highly sensitive assay measuring growth-related heat production (microcalorimetry). C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis were tested, and MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method. The antifungal activities were determined by isothermal microcalorimetry at 37°C in RPMI 1640. For planktonic Candida, heat flow was measured in the presence of antifungal dilutions for 24 h. Candida biofilm was formed on porous glass beads for 24 h and exposed to serial dilutions of antifungals for 24 h, and heat flow was measured for 48 h. The minimum heat inhibitory concentration (MHIC) was defined as the lowest antifungal concentration reducing the heat flow peak by ≥50% (≥90% for amphotericin B) at 24 h for planktonic Candida and at 48 h for Candida biofilms (measured also at 24 h). Fluconazole (planktonic MHICs, 0.25 to >512 μg/ml) and amphotericin B (planktonic MHICs, 0.25 to 1 μg/ml) showed higher MHICs than anidulafungin (planktonic MHICs, 0.015 to 0.5 μg/ml) and caspofungin (planktonic MHICs, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml). Against Candida species in biofilms, fluconazole's activity was reduced by >1,000-fold compared to its activity against the planktonic counterparts, whereas echinocandins and amphotericin B mainly preserved their activities. Fluconazole induced growth of planktonic C. krusei at sub-MICs. At high concentrations of caspofungin (>4 μg/ml), paradoxical growth of planktonic C. albicans and C. glabrata was observed. Microcalorimetry enabled real-time evaluation of antifungal activities against planktonic and biofilm Candida organisms. It can be used in the future to evaluate new antifungals and antifungal combinations and to study resistant strains. PMID:24566186

  17. Biogenic carbon flows through the planktonic food web of the Amundsen Gulf (Arctic Ocean): A synthesis of field measurements and inverse modeling analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Alexandre; Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Gratton, Yves; Martin, Johannie; Gagnon, Jonathan; Darnis, Gérald; Sampei, Makoto; Fortier, Louis; Ardyna, Mathieu; Gosselin, Michel; Hattori, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Dan; Maranger, Roxane; Vaqué, Dolors; Marrasé, Cèlia; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Sallon, Amélie; Michel, Christine; Kellogg, Colleen; Deming, Jody; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Thomas, Helmuth; Link, Heike; Archambault, Philippe; Piepenburg, Dieter

    2011-12-01

    Major pathways of biogenic carbon (C) flow are resolved for the planktonic food web of the flaw lead polynya system of the Amundsen Gulf (southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean) in spring-summer 2008. This period was relevant to study the effect of climate change on Arctic marine ecosystems as it was characterized by unusually low ice cover and warm sea surface temperature. Our synthesis relied on a mass balance estimate of gross primary production (GPP) of 52.5 ± 12.5 g C m -2 calculated using the drawdown of nitrate and dissolved inorganic C, and a seasonal f-ratio of 0.64. Based on chlorophyll a biomass, we estimated that GPP was dominated by phytoplankton (93.6%) over ice algae (6.4%) and by large cells (>5 μm, 67.6%) over small cells (production, zooplankton biomass and respiration, herbivory, bacterivory, vertical particle fluxes, pools of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC, DOC), net community production (NCP), as well as selected variables from the literature were used to evaluate the fate of size-fractionated GPP in the ecosystem. The structure and functioning of the planktonic food web was elucidated through inverse analysis using the mean GPP and the 95% confidence limits of every other field measurement as lower and upper constraints. The model computed a net primary production of 49.2 g C m -2, which was directly channeled toward dominant calanoid copepods (i.e. Calanus hyperboreus 20%, Calanus glacialis 10%, and Metridia longa 10%), other mesozooplankton (12%), microzooplankton (14%), detrital POC (18%), and DOC (16%). Bacteria required 29.9 g C m -2, a demand met entirely by the DOC derived from local biological activities. The ultimate C outflow comprised respiration fluxes (82% of the initial GPP), a small sedimentation (3%), and a modest residual C flow (15%) resulting from NCP, dilution and accumulation. The sinking C flux at the model limit depth (395 m) supplied 60% of the estimated benthic C demand (2.8 g C m -2), suggesting that

  18. Stoichiometry, herbivory and competition for nutrients: simple models based on planktonic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, James P

    2002-02-21

    Models are examined in which two prey species compete for two nutrient resources, and are preyed upon by a predator that recycles both nutrients. Two factors determine the effective relative supply of the nutrients, hence competitive outcomes: the external nutrient supply ratio, and the relative recycling of the two nutrients within the system. This second factor is governed by predator stoichiometry--its relative requirements for nutrients in its own biomass. A model with nutrient resources that are essential for the competing prey is detailed. Criteria are given to identify the limiting nutrient for a food chain of one competitor with the predator. Increased supply of this limiting nutrient increases predator density and concentration of this nutrient at equilibrium, while decreasing the concentration of a non-limiting nutrient. Changes in supply or recycling of a non-limiting nutrient affect only the concentration of that nutrient. Criteria for the invasion of a second prey competitor are presented. When different nutrients limit growth of the resident prey and the invader, increased supply or recycling of the invader's limiting nutrient assists invasion, while increased supply or recycling of the resident's limiting nutrient hinders invasion. If the same nutrient limits both resident and invader, then changes in supply and recycling have complex effects on invasion, depending on species properties. In a parameterized model of a planktonic ecosystem, green algae and cyanobacteria coexist over a wide range of nitrogen:phosphorus supply ratios, without predators. When the herbivore Daphnia is added, coexistence is eliminated or greatly restricted, and green algae dominate over a wide range of supply conditions, because the effective supply of P is greatly reduced as Daphnia rapidly recycles N.

  19. Global marine plankton functional type biomass distributions: Phaeocystis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Widdicombe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The planktonic haptophyte Phaeocystis has been suggested to play a fundamental role in the global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulphur, but little is known about its global biomass distribution. We have collected global microscopy data of the genus Phaeocystis and converted abundance data to carbon biomass using species-specific carbon conversion factors. Microscopic counts of single-celled and colonial Phaeocystis were obtained both through the mining of online databases and by accepting direct submissions (both published and unpublished from Phaeocystis specialists. We recorded abundance data from a total of 1595 depth-resolved stations sampled between 1955–2009. The quality-controlled dataset includes 5057 counts of individual Phaeocystis cells resolved to species level and information regarding life-stages from 3526 samples. 83% of stations were located in the Northern Hemisphere while 17% were located in the Southern Hemisphere. Most data were located in the latitude range of 50–70° N. While the seasonal distribution of Northern Hemisphere data was well-balanced, Southern Hemisphere data was biased towards summer months. Mean species- and form-specific cell diameters were determined from previously published studies. Cell diameters were used to calculate the cellular biovolume of Phaeocystis cells, assuming spherical geometry. Cell biomass was calculated using a carbon conversion factor for Prymnesiophytes (Menden-Deuer and Lessard, 2000. For colonies, the number of cells per colony was derived from the colony volume. Cell numbers were then converted to carbon concentrations. An estimation of colonial mucus carbon was included a posteriori, assuming a mean colony size for each species. Carbon content per cell ranged from 9 pg (single-celled Phaeocystis antarctica to 29 pg (colonial Phaeocystis globosa. Non-zero Phaeocystis cell biomasses (without mucus carbon range from 2.9 × 10−5 μg l−1 to 5.4 × 103 μg l−1, with a

  20. Global marine plankton functional type biomass distributions: Phaeocystis spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Widdicombe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The planktonic haptophyte Phaeocystis has been suggested to play a fundamental role in the global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulphur, but little is known about its global biomass distribution. We have collected global microscopy data of the genus Phaeocystis and converted abundance data to carbon biomass using species-specific carbon conversion factors. Microscopic counts of single-celled and colonial Phaeocystis were obtained both through the mining of online databases and by accepting direct submissions (both published and unpublished from Phaeocystis specialists. We recorded abundance data from a total of 1595 depth-resolved stations sampled between 1955–2009. The quality-controlled dataset includes 5057 counts of individual Phaeocystis cells resolved to species level and information regarding life-stages from 3526 samples. 83% of stations were located in the Northern Hemisphere while 17% were located in the Southern Hemisphere. Most data were located in the latitude range of 50–70° N. While the seasonal distribution of Northern Hemisphere data was well-balanced, Southern Hemisphere data was biased towards summer months. Mean species- and form-specific cell diameters were determined from previously published studies. Cell diameters were used to calculate the cellular biovolume of Phaeocystis cells, assuming spherical geometry. Cell biomass was calculated using a carbon conversion factor for prymnesiophytes. For colonies, the number of cells per colony was derived from the colony volume. Cell numbers were then converted to carbon concentrations. An estimation of colonial mucus carbon was included a posteriori, assuming a mean colony size for each species. Carbon content per cell ranged from 9 pg C cell−1 (single-celled Phaeocystis antarctica to 29 pg C cell−1 (colonial Phaeocystis globosa. Non-zero Phaeocystis cell biomasses (without mucus carbon range from 2.9 × 10−5 to 5.4 × 103 μg C l−1, with a mean of 45.7 μg C

  1. Effect of Octenidine Hydrochloride on Planktonic Cells and Biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Norris, Carol E.; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen capable of forming biofilms and persisting in food processing environments for extended periods of time, thereby potentially contaminating foods. The efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH) for inactivating planktonic cells and preformed biofilms of L. monocytogenes was investigated at 37, 21, 8, and 4°C in the presence and absence of organic matter (rehydrated nonfat dry milk). OH rapidly killed planktonic cells and biofilms of L. monocytogenes at all four temperatures. Moreover, OH was equally effective in killing L. monocytogenes biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel matrices in the presence and absence of organic matter. The results underscore OH's ability to prevent establishment of L. monocytogenes biofilms by rapidly killing planktonic cells and to eliminate preformed biofilms, thus suggesting that it could be used as a disinfectant to prevent L. monocytogenes from persisting in food processing environments. PMID:19376913

  2. Effect of octenidine hydrochloride on planktonic cells and biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Norris, Carol E; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen capable of forming biofilms and persisting in food processing environments for extended periods of time, thereby potentially contaminating foods. The efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH) for inactivating planktonic cells and preformed biofilms of L. monocytogenes was investigated at 37, 21, 8, and 4 degrees C in the presence and absence of organic matter (rehydrated nonfat dry milk). OH rapidly killed planktonic cells and biofilms of L. monocytogenes at all four temperatures. Moreover, OH was equally effective in killing L. monocytogenes biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel matrices in the presence and absence of organic matter. The results underscore OH's ability to prevent establishment of L. monocytogenes biofilms by rapidly killing planktonic cells and to eliminate preformed biofilms, thus suggesting that it could be used as a disinfectant to prevent L. monocytogenes from persisting in food processing environments.

  3. HIGH RESOLUTION CALCAREOUS PLANKTON BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE SERRAVALLIAN SUCCESSION OF THE TREMITI ISLANDS (ADRIATIC SEA, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCA M. FORESI

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil content of two Middle Miocene sections of the Tremiti Islands (Southern Adriatic Sea have been studied. The two sections are composed of marly limestones rich in calcareous plankton which show cyclic alternations of indurated (higher carbonate content whitish and less indurated grey or reddish beds. The two sections represent a succession with a total thickness of 38 m. Samples have been collected at a mean spacing of 10-15 cm; qualitative analyses were performed on one sample per meter but quantitative analyses were made for each sample. The abundance fluctuations of several marker species proved to be a very useful tool to correlate the two sections. The astronomical calibration of the sedimentary cycles provided absolute ages for all the recognised calcareous plankton bioevents. 

  4. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J; Walne, Anthony W; Hays, Graeme C

    2017-02-10

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity.

  5. A resource-based game theoretical approach for the paradox of the plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weini; de Araujo Campos, Paulo Roberto; Moraes de Oliveira, Viviane; Fagundes Ferrreira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of species diversity is a central focus in ecology. It is not rare to observe more species than the number of limiting resources, especially in plankton communities. However, such high species diversity is hard to achieve in theory under the competitive exclusion principles, known as the plankton paradox. Previous studies often focus on the coexistence of predefined species and ignore the fact that species can evolve. We model multi-resource competitions using evolutionary games, where the number of species fluctuates under extinction and the appearance of new species. The interspecific and intraspecific competitions are captured by a dynamical payoff matrix, which has a size of the number of species. The competition strength (payoff entries) is obtained from comparing the capability of species in consuming resources, which can change over time. This allows for the robust coexistence of a large number of species, providing a possible solution to the plankton paradox.

  6. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J.; Walne, Anthony W.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2017-02-01

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity.

  7. Annual plankton dynamics in a coupled physical-biological model of the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, M. Angelica; Masson, Diane; Callendar, Wendy

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional coupled biophysical model was developed to study the dynamics of the plankton ecosystem in the Strait of Georgia (SoG) estuary. The ocean circulation component is an implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and the lower trophic level ecosystem is a nine-compartment Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model that includes two types of phytoplankton and of zooplankton. A three year hindcast (2007-2009) is used to examine the mean annual seasonal cycle of the local plankton dynamics. For realistic values of irradiance, wind forcing and fresh water fluxes, the model predicts a seasonal cycle of salinity, nutrients and plankton in reasonable agreement with observations. In particular, the model reproduces the main features of the estuarine circulation, the marked increase in phytoplankton biomass during spring followed by intermittent less intense blooms during summer and fall, as well as the seasonal pattern of zooplankton biomass. Model results show that primary production fluctuates between low values in January and high values in April, with an annual production of 270 ± 33 (gC m-2) in the SoG. Most primary production is fueled by nitrate (f-ratio of about 0.7). Upwelling is the main source of nitrate into the upper layer, while most of the nitrate entering the Strait is exported out by horizontal advection. Physical processes, such as freshwater inflow, wind events, tidal mixing, and horizontal transports are important in maintaining the high spatio-temporal variability of the local phytoplankton biomass and production. Horizontal variability is high during the growing season (March to September). In summer, phytoplankton concentrates near the surface, in the shallow mixed layer, resulting in sporadic nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth. In the northern portion of the strait, weaker summer winds and tidal currents lead to increased near-surface stratification which restricts nutrient fluxes and limit

  8. Inhibition of bacterial surface colonization by immobilized silver nanoparticles depends critically on the planktonic bacterial concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stacy M; Bertuccio, Alex J; Cao, Feng; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

    2016-04-01

    Immobilization of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on surfaces has been proposed as a method to inhibit biofouling or as a possible route by which incidental releases of AgNPs may interfere with biofilms in the natural environment or in wastewater treatment. This study addresses the ability of planktonic Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria to colonize surfaces with pre-adsorbed AgNPs. The ability of the AgNP-coated surfaces to inhibit colonization was controlled by the dissolved silver in the system, with a strong dependence on the initial planktonic cell concentration in the suspension, i.e., a strong inoculum effect. This dependence was attributed to a decrease in dissolved silver ion bioavailability and toxicity caused by its binding to cells and/or cell byproducts. Therefore, when the initial cell concentration was high (∼1×10(7)CFU/mL), an excess of silver binding capacity removed most of the free silver and allowed both planktonic growth and surface colonization directly on the AgNP-coated surface. When the initial cell concentration was low (∼1×10(5)CFU/mL), 100% killing of the planktonic cell inoculum occurred and prevented colonization. When an intermediate initial inoculum concentration (∼1×10(6)CFU/mL) was sufficiently large to prevent 100% killing of planktonic cells, even with 99.97% initial killing, the planktonic population recovered and bacteria colonized the AgNP-coated surface. In some conditions, colonization of AgNP-coated surfaces was enhanced relative to silver-free controls, and the bacteria demonstrated a preferential attachment to AgNP-coated, rather than bare, surface regions. The degree to which the bacterial concentration dictates whether or not surface-immobilized AgNPs can inhibit colonization has significant implications both for the design of antimicrobial surfaces and for the potential environmental impacts of AgNPs.

  9. Diversity of planktonic and attached bacterial communities in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizoulis, Athanasios; Elliott, David R; Rolfe, Stephen A; Thornton, Steven F; Banwart, Steven A; Pickup, Roger W; Scholes, Julie D

    2013-07-01

    Polluted aquifers contain indigenous microbial communities with the potential for in situ bioremediation. However, the effect of hydrogeochemical gradients on in situ microbial communities (especially at the plume fringe, where natural attenuation is higher) is still not clear. In this study, we used culture-independent techniques to investigate the diversity of in situ planktonic and attached bacterial communities in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer. Within the upper and lower plume fringes, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles indicated that planktonic community structure was influenced by the steep hydrogeochemical gradient of the plume rather than the spatial location in the aquifer. Under the same hydrogeochemical conditions (in the lower plume fringe, 30 m below ground level), 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing showed that planktonic and attached bacterial communities differed markedly and that the attached community was more diverse. The 16S rRNA gene phylogeny also suggested that a phylogenetically diverse bacterial community operated at this depth (30 mbgl), with biodegradation of phenolic compounds by nitrate-reducing Azoarcus and Acidovorax strains potentially being an important process. The presence of acetogenic and sulphate-reducing bacteria only in the planktonic clone library indicates that some natural attenuation processes may occur preferentially in one of the two growth phases (attached or planktonic). Therefore, this study has provided a better understanding of the microbial ecology of this phenol-contaminated aquifer, and it highlights the need for investigating both planktonic and attached microbial communities when assessing the potential for natural attenuation in contaminated aquifers.

  10. Mercury methylation rates of biofilm and plankton microorganisms from a hydroelectric reservoir in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, L; Castelle, S; Schäfer, J; Blanc, G; Maury-Brachet, R; Reynouard, C; Jorand, F

    2010-02-15

    The Petit-Saut ecosystem is a hydroelectric reservoir covering 365km(2) of flooded tropical forest. This reservoir and the Sinnamary Estuary downstream of the dam are subject to significant mercury methylation. The mercury methylation potential of plankton and biofilm microorganisms/components from different depths in the anoxic reservoir water column and from two different sites along the estuary was assessed. For this, reservoir water and samples of epiphytic biofilms from the trunk of a submerged tree in the anoxic water column and from submerged branches in the estuary were batch-incubated from 1h to 3 months with a nominal 1000ng/L spike of Hg(II) chloride enriched in (199)Hg. Methylation rates were determined for different reservoir and estuarine communities under natural nutrient (reservoir water, estuary freshwater) and artificial nutrient (culture medium) conditions. Methylation rates in reservoir water incubations were the highest with plankton microorganisms sampled at -9.5m depth (0.5%/d) without addition of biofilm components. Mercury methylation rates of incubated biofilm components were strongly enhanced by nutrient addition. The results suggested that plankton microorganisms strongly contribute to the total Hg methylation in the Petit-Saut reservoir and in the Sinnamary Estuary. Moreover, specific methylation efficiencies (%Me(199)Hg(net)/cell) suggested that plankton microorganisms could be more efficient methylating actors than biofilm consortia and that their methylation efficiency may be reduced in the presence of biofilm components. Extrapolation to the reservoir scale of the experimentally determined preliminary methylation efficiencies suggested that plankton microorganisms in the anoxic water column could produce up to 27mol MeHg/year. Taking into account that (i) demethylation probably occurs in the reservoir and (ii) that the presence of biofilm components may limit the methylation efficiency of plankton microorganisms, this result is

  11. No observed effect of ocean acidification on nitrogen biogeochemistry in a summer Baltic Sea plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Allanah J.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Bach, Lennart T.; Boxhammer, Tim; Czerny, Jan; Haunost, Mathias; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen fixation by filamentous cyanobacteria supplies significant amounts of new nitrogen (N) to the Baltic Sea. This balances N loss processes such as denitrification and anammox, and forms an important N source supporting primary and secondary production in N-limited post-spring bloom plankton communities. Laboratory studies suggest that filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria growth and N2-fixation rates are sensitive to ocean acidification, with potential implications for new N supply to the Baltic Sea. In this study, our aim was to assess the effect of ocean acidification on diazotroph growth and activity as well as the contribution of diazotrophically fixed N to N supply in a natural plankton assemblage. We enclosed a natural plankton community in a summer season in the Baltic Sea near the entrance to the Gulf of Finland in six large-scale mesocosms (volume ˜ 55 m3) and manipulated fCO2 over a range relevant for projected ocean acidification by the end of this century (average treatment fCO2: 365-1231 µatm). The direct response of diazotroph growth and activity was followed in the mesocosms over a 47 day study period during N-limited growth in the summer plankton community. Diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria abundance throughout the study period and N2-fixation rates (determined only until day 21 due to subsequent use of contaminated commercial 15N-N2 gas stocks) remained low. Thus estimated new N inputs from diazotrophy were too low to relieve N limitation and stimulate a summer phytoplankton bloom. Instead, regeneration of organic N sources likely sustained growth in the plankton community. We could not detect significant CO2-related differences in neither inorganic nor organic N pool sizes, or particulate matter N : P stoichiometry. Additionally, no significant effect of elevated CO2 on diazotroph activity was observed. Therefore, ocean acidification had no observable impact on N cycling or biogeochemistry in this N-limited, post-spring bloom

  12. Hydroecology of river plankton: the role of variability in channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C. S.

    2000-10-01

    The mechanisms by which entrained planktonic organisms survive in river systems, despite an inexorable, unidirectional downstream transport, are revisited. The importance of channel retentivity to downstream population recruitment is emphasized. The aggregated dead-zone (ADZ) model is shown to be adequate to explain downstream recruitment of a growing population. The ADZ behaviour is more prevalent in sinuous, low-gradient reaches than in other parts of the river. Plankton selection and dynamics relate conspicuously to flow at higher discharges but other environmental features are important at low flows. Discharge variability is pivotal to the opportunities for potamoplankton to thrive.

  13. Oil carbon entered the coastal planktonic food web during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, William M.; Condon, Robert H.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; D'Ambra, Isabella; Patterson, Heather K.; Linn, Laura J.; Hernandez, Frank J., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecedented in total loading of petroleum hydrocarbons accidentally released to a marine ecosystem. Controversial application of chemical dispersants presumably accelerated microbial consumption of oil components, especially in warm Gulf of Mexico surface waters. We employed δ13C as a tracer of oil-derived carbon to resolve two periods of isotopic carbon depletion in two plankton size classes. Carbon depletion was coincident with the arrival of surface oil slicks in the far northern Gulf, and demonstrated that subsurface oil carbon was incorporated into the plankton food web.

  14. How Plankton Swim: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Using Mathematics & Physics to Understand the Biology of the Natural World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Tansy W.; Fox, Jennifer B.; Grunbaum, Daniel; Jumars, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have developed and field-tested high school-level curricular materials that guide students to use biology, mathematics, and physics to understand plankton and how these tiny organisms move in a world where their intuition does not apply. The authors chose plankton as the focus of their materials primarily because the challenges faced…

  15. Biomass changes and trophic amplification of plankton in a warmer ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chust, Guillem; Allen, J Icarus; Bopp, Laurent; Schrum, Corinna; Holt, Jason; Tsiaras, Kostas; Zavatarelli, Marco; Chifflet, Marina; Cannaby, Heather; Dadou, Isabelle; Daewel, Ute; Wakelin, Sarah L; Machu, Eric; Pushpadas, Dhanya; Butenschon, Momme; Artioli, Yuri; Petihakis, George; Smith, Chris; Garçon, Veronique; Goubanova, Katerina; Le Vu, Briac; Fach, Bettina A; Salihoglu, Baris; Clementi, Emanuela; Irigoien, Xabier

    2014-07-01

    Ocean warming can modify the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and relationships between species, with nonlinear interactions between ecosystem components potentially resulting in trophic amplification. Trophic amplification (or attenuation) describe the propagation of a hydroclimatic signal up the food web, causing magnification (or depression) of biomass values along one or more trophic pathways. We have employed 3-D coupled physical-biogeochemical models to explore ecosystem responses to climate change with a focus on trophic amplification. The response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to global climate-change projections, carried out with the IPSL Earth System Model by the end of the century, is analysed at global and regional basis, including European seas (NE Atlantic, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, Black Sea, Bay of Biscay, Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea) and the Eastern Boundary Upwelling System (Benguela). Results indicate that globally and in Atlantic Margin and North Sea, increased ocean stratification causes primary production and zooplankton biomass to decrease in response to a warming climate, whilst in the Barents, Baltic and Black Seas, primary production and zooplankton biomass increase. Projected warming characterized by an increase in sea surface temperature of 2.29 ± 0.05 °C leads to a reduction in zooplankton and phytoplankton biomasses of 11% and 6%, respectively. This suggests negative amplification of climate driven modifications of trophic level biomass through bottom-up control, leading to a reduced capacity of oceans to regulate climate through the biological carbon pump. Simulations suggest negative amplification is the dominant response across 47% of the ocean surface and prevails in the tropical oceans; whilst positive trophic amplification prevails in the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Trophic attenuation is projected in temperate seas. Uncertainties in ocean plankton projections, associated to the use of single global and

  16. Temperature dependence of plankton community metabolism in the subtropical and tropical oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.

    2017-06-22

    Here we assess the temperature dependence of the metabolic rates (gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and the ratio GPP/CR) of oceanic plankton communities. We compile data from 133 stations of the Malaspina 2010 Expedition, distributed among the subtropical and tropical Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. We used the in vitro technique to measured metabolic rates during 24 h incubations at three different sampled depths: surface, 20%, and 1% of the photosynthetically active radiation measured at surface. We also measured the % of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) penetrating at surface waters. GPP and CR rates increased with warming, albeit different responses were observed for each sampled depth. The overall GPP/CR ratio declined with warming. Higher activation energies (E-a) were derived for both processes (GPP(Chla) = 0.97; CRChla = 1.26; CRHPA = 0.95 eV) compared to those previously reported. The Indian Ocean showed the highest E-a (GPP(Chla) = 1.70; CRChla = 1.48; CRHPA = 0.57 eV), while the Atlantic Ocean showed the lowest (GPP(Chla) = 0.86; CRChla = 0.77; CRHPA = -0.13 eV). We believe that the difference between previous assessments and the ones presented here can be explained by the overrepresentation of Atlantic communities in the previous data sets. We found that UVB radiation also affects the temperature dependence of surface GPP, which decreased rather than increased under high levels of UVB. Ocean warming, which causes stratification and oligotrophication of the subtropical and tropical oceans, may lead to reduced surface GPP as a result of increased penetration of UVB radiation.

  17. Biomass changes and trophic amplification of plankton in a warmer ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Chust, Guillem

    2014-05-07

    Ocean warming can modify the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and relationships between species, with nonlinear interactions between ecosystem components potentially resulting in trophic amplification. Trophic amplification (or attenuation) describe the propagation of a hydroclimatic signal up the food web, causing magnification (or depression) of biomass values along one or more trophic pathways. We have employed 3-D coupled physical-biogeochemical models to explore ecosystem responses to climate change with a focus on trophic amplification. The response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to global climate-change projections, carried out with the IPSL Earth System Model by the end of the century, is analysed at global and regional basis, including European seas (NE Atlantic, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, Black Sea, Bay of Biscay, Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea) and the Eastern Boundary Upwelling System (Benguela). Results indicate that globally and in Atlantic Margin and North Sea, increased ocean stratification causes primary production and zooplankton biomass to decrease in response to a warming climate, whilst in the Barents, Baltic and Black Seas, primary production and zooplankton biomass increase. Projected warming characterized by an increase in sea surface temperature of 2.29 ± 0.05 °C leads to a reduction in zooplankton and phytoplankton biomasses of 11% and 6%, respectively. This suggests negative amplification of climate driven modifications of trophic level biomass through bottom-up control, leading to a reduced capacity of oceans to regulate climate through the biological carbon pump. Simulations suggest negative amplification is the dominant response across 47% of the ocean surface and prevails in the tropical oceans; whilst positive trophic amplification prevails in the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Trophic attenuation is projected in temperate seas. Uncertainties in ocean plankton projections, associated to the use of single global and

  18. Temperature dependence of plankton community metabolism in the subtropical and tropical oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.; Holding, Johnna M.; Carrillo-de-Albornoz, Paloma; Steckbauer, Alexandra; Pérez-Lorenzo, María.; Navarro, Nuria; Serret, Pablo; Gasol, Josep M.; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G.; Estrada, Marta; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Benítez-Barrios, Verónica; Agusti, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-07-01

    Here we assess the temperature dependence of the metabolic rates (gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and the ratio GPP/CR) of oceanic plankton communities. We compile data from 133 stations of the Malaspina 2010 Expedition, distributed among the subtropical and tropical Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. We used the in vitro technique to measured metabolic rates during 24 h incubations at three different sampled depths: surface, 20%, and 1% of the photosynthetically active radiation measured at surface. We also measured the % of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) penetrating at surface waters. GPP and CR rates increased with warming, albeit different responses were observed for each sampled depth. The overall GPP/CR ratio declined with warming. Higher activation energies (Ea) were derived for both processes (GPPChla = 0.97; CRChla = 1.26; CRHPA = 0.95 eV) compared to those previously reported. The Indian Ocean showed the highest Ea (GPPChla = 1.70; CRChla = 1.48; CRHPA = 0.57 eV), while the Atlantic Ocean showed the lowest (GPPChla = 0.86; CRChla = 0.77; CRHPA = -0.13 eV). We believe that the difference between previous assessments and the ones presented here can be explained by the overrepresentation of Atlantic communities in the previous data sets. We found that UVB radiation also affects the temperature dependence of surface GPP, which decreased rather than increased under high levels of UVB. Ocean warming, which causes stratification and oligotrophication of the subtropical and tropical oceans, may lead to reduced surface GPP as a result of increased penetration of UVB radiation.

  19. Evaluation of trophic state and plankton abundance from the environmental parameters of Visakhapatnam Harbour and near-shore waters, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripathy, S.C.; KusumaKumari, B.A.V.L.; Sarma, V.V.; Murty, T.V.R.

    of water quality on spatial basis towards the near-shore environment from the polluted harbour zone. Multiple regression equations have been utilized to evaluate the plankton abundance and the influencing parameters controlling plankton distribution...

  20. In vitro activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lifestyles under conditions relevant to pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis, and relationship with SmeDEF multidrug efflux pump expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; Verginelli, Fabio; Bonaventura, Giovanni Di

    2016-07-01

    The activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cells and the role played by the multidrug efflux pump SmeDEF were evaluated under conditions relevant to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. MIC, MBC and MBEC of levofloxacin were assessed, against five CF strains, under 'standard' (CLSI-recommended) and 'CF-like' (pH 6.8, 5% CO2, in a synthetic CF sputum) conditions. Levofloxacin was tested against biofilms at concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μg mL(-1)) corresponding to achievable serum levels and sputum levels by aerosolisation. smeD expression was evaluated, under both conditions, in planktonic and biofilm cells by RT-PCR. The bactericidal effect of levofloxacin was decreased, in three out of five strains tested, under 'CF-like' conditions (MBC: 2-4 vs 8-16 μg mL(-1), under 'standard' and 'CF-like' conditions, respectively). Biofilm was intrinsically resistant to levofloxacin, regardless of conditions tested (MBECs ≥ 100 μg mL(-1) for all strains). Only under 'CF-like' conditions, smeD expression increased during planktonic-to-biofilm transition, and in biofilm cells compared to stationary planktonic cells. Our findings confirmed that S. maltophilia biofilm is intrinsically resistant to therapeutic concentrations of levofloxacin. Under conditions relevant to CF, smeD overexpression could contribute to levofloxacin resistance. Further studies are warranted to define the clinical relevance of our findings.

  1. Significance of plankton community structure and nutrient availability for the control of dinoflagellate blooms by parasites: a modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-de-Souza, Catharina; Pecqueur, David; Le Floc'h, Emilie; Mas, Sébastien; Roques, Cécile; Mostajir, Behzad; Vidussi, Franscesca; Velo-Suárez, Lourdes; Sourisseau, Marc; Fouilland, Eric; Guillou, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellate blooms are frequently observed under temporary eutrophication of coastal waters after heavy rains. Growth of these opportunistic microalgae is believed to be promoted by sudden input of nutrients and the absence or inefficiency of their natural enemies, such as grazers and parasites. Here, numerical simulations indicate that increasing nutrient availability not only promotes the formation of dinoflagellate blooms but can also stimulate their control by protozoan parasites. Moreover, high abundance of phytoplankton other than dinoflagellate hosts might have a significant dilution effect on the control of dinoflagellate blooms by parasites, either by resource competition with dinoflagellates (thus limiting the number of hosts available for infection) or by affecting numerical-functional responses of grazers that consume free-living parasite stages. These outcomes indicate that although both dinoflagellates and their protozoan parasites are directly affected by nutrient availability, the efficacy of the parasitic control of dinoflagellate blooms under temporary eutrophication depends strongly on the structure of the plankton community as a whole.

  2. Distribution and production of plankton communities in the subtropical convergence zone of the Sargasso Sea. II. Protozooplankton and copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nikolaj G.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik

    2011-01-01

    larvae and ostracods. Most of the recorded metazoan groups responded numerically to the frontal features (i.e. the surfacing of the isotherms) with high abundance in the STCZ compared with areas north and south of this. Juvenile copepod growth and egg production peaked in the STCZ, with a weight......The oligotrophic Sargasso Sea in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean is influenced by a complex set of oceanographic features that might introduce nutrients and enhance productivity in certain areas. To increase our understanding of the variability in plankton communities and to determine...... the potential reasons why Atlantic eels Anguilla spp. use this area for spawning, we investigated the distribution and productivity of the zooplankton community across the Subtropical Convergence Zone (STCZ) in the Sargasso Sea in March and April 2007. The vertical and horizontal distributions of protozoans...

  3. Plankton composition and biomass development: a seasonal study of a semi-intensive outdoor system for rearing of turbot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans; Jepsen, Per Meyer; Blanda, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Plankton food web dynamics were studied during a complete production season in a semi-intensive land-based facility for rearing of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) larvae. The production season was divided into three production cycles of 3–5 weeks. Phytoplankton biomass (using chlorophyll a as biomass...... proxy) peaked in each production cycle. However, the maximum biomass decreased from spring (18 μg chlorophyll a L−1) to fall (ca. 7 μg chlorophyll a L−1), simultaneous with a decline in the concentration of dissolved nitrogen in the inoculating water. During the three production cycles, we observed...... decreasing copepod nauplii concentration from spring to fall in the rearing tanks. The decreasing nitrogen gave increasing carbon to chlorophyll a ratio in the seston (from 23 in spring to 73 in fall). The pool of free amino acids in seston was constant. We suggest that the decreasing nitrogen input...

  4. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Ahmad; D J Patil; P S Rao; B N Nath; B R Rao; G Rajagopalan

    2000-03-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of the planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene 180 amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent with previously published records from this marginal basin and suggest increased salinity and/or decreased temperature in the glacial surface waters of this region. A pulse of 18O enrichment during the last deglaciation can be attributed to a Younger Dryas cooling event and/or to a sudden decrease of fresh water influx from the Irrawady and Salween rivers into the Andaman Sea. High 13C values observed during the isotopic stages 2 and 4 are probably due to the enhanced productivity during glacial times in the Andaman Sea.

  5. Plankton diversity and water quality assessment of three freshwater lakes of Mandi (Himachal Pradesh, India) with special reference to planktonic indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, R K; Jindal, R; Singh, Uday Bhan; Ahluwalia, A S

    2013-10-01

    The present study deals with the limnobiotic status of three selected lakes of Himachal Pradesh using physicochemical and biological parameters (especially phytoplankton and zooplankton) over a period of 2 years. One hundred forty-eight species belonging to nine groups of phytoplankton and 79 species belonging to five groups of zooplankton were identified from the lakes. Trophic level and the pollution status of the lakes were assessed upon the basis of Shannon diversity index (H'), species richness index (S), and physicochemical parameters. Plankton population size was correlated with biotic and abiotic parameters (pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, transparency, phosphate, chloride, and nitrate). The present investigation revealed that the distribution of plankton species depended upon the physicochemical parameters of the environment. Based on water quality standards given by the Central Pollution Control Board, the water quality was between "A-B" at Prashar wetland, "C-D" at Kuntbhyog Lake, and "D-E" at Rewalsar Lake. The results from the present study indicated that the potential of planktons as bioindicators of trophic status is very high.

  6. Community structure and function of planktonic Crenarchaeota: changes with depth in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anyi; Jiao, Nianzhi; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2011-10-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota represent a widespread and abundant microbial group in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the abundance, diversity, and distribution of planktonic Crenarchaeota in the epi-, meso-, and bathypelagic zones at three stations in the South China Sea (SCS) by analysis of crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene, ammonia monooxygenase gene amoA involved in ammonia oxidation, and biotin carboxylase gene accA putatively involved in archaeal CO(2) fixation. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated that crenarchaeal amoA and accA gene abundances varied similarly with archaeal and crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene abundances at all stations, except that crenarchaeal accA genes were almost absent in the epipelagic zone. Ratios of the crenarchaeal amoA gene to 16S rRNA gene abundances decreased ~2.6 times from the epi- to bathypelagic zones, whereas the ratios of crenarchaeal accA gene to marine group I crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene or to crenarchaeal amoA gene abundances increased with depth, suggesting that the metabolism of Crenarchaeota may change from the epi- to meso- or bathypelagic zones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling of the 16S rRNA genes revealed depth partitioning in archaeal community structures. Clone libraries of crenarchaeal amoA and accA genes showed two clusters: the "shallow" cluster was exclusively derived from epipelagic water and the "deep" cluster was from meso- and/or bathypelagic waters, suggesting that niche partitioning may take place between the shallow and deep marine Crenarchaeota. Overall, our results show strong depth partitioning of crenarchaeal populations in the SCS and suggest a shift in their community structure and ecological function with increasing depth.

  7. Impact of ultraviolet-B radiation on planktonic fish larvae: Alteration of the osmoregulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucre, Elliott, E-mail: elliott.sucre@univ-montp2.fr [AEO Team (Adaptation Ecophysiologique et Ontogenese), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc092, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France); Vidussi, Francesca [RESEAUX Team (Reseaux Planctoniques et Changement Environnemental), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc093, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France); Mostajir, Behzad [RESEAUX Team (Reseaux Planctoniques et Changement Environnemental), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc093, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France); Centre d' ecologie marine experimentale MEDIMEER (Mediterranean centre for Marine Ecosystem Experimental Research), Universite Montpellier 2-CNRS (UMS 3301), Station Mediterraneenne de l' Environnement Littoral, MEDIMEER, 2 Rue des Chantiers, 34200 Sete (France); Charmantier, Guy; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine [AEO Team (Adaptation Ecophysiologique et Ontogenese), UMR 5119 Ecosym UM2, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer, UM1, Universite Montpellier 2, cc092, Pl. Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Cx 05 (France)

    2012-03-15

    Coastal marine ecosystems are submitted to variations of several abiotic and biotic parameters, some of them related to global change. Among them the ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm) may strongly impact planktonic fish larvae. The consequences of an increase of UVBR on the osmoregulatory function of Dicentrarchus labrax larvae have been investigated in this study. In young larvae of D. labrax, as in other teleosts, osmoregulation depends on tegumentary ion transporting cells, or ionocytes, mainly located on the skin of the trunk and of the yolk sac. As early D. labrax larvae passively drift in the top water column, ionocytes are exposed to solar radiation. The effect of UVBR on larval osmoregulation in seawater was evaluated through nanoosmometric measurements of the blood osmolality after exposure to different UV-B treatments. A loss of osmoregulatory capability occured in larvae after 2 days of low (50 {mu}W cm{sup -2}: 4 h L/20 h D) and medium (80 {mu}W cm{sup -2}: 4 h L/20 h D) UVBR exposure. Compared to control larvae kept in the darkness, a significant increase in blood osmolality, abnormal behavior and high mortalities were detected in larvae exposed to UVBR from 2 days on. At the cellular level, an important decrease in abundance of tegumentary ionocytes and mucous cells was observed after 2 days of exposure to UVBR. In the ionocytes, two major osmoeffectors were immunolocalized, the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporter. Compared to controls, the fluorescent immunostaining was lower in UVBR-exposed larvae. We hypothesize that the impaired osmoregulation in UVBR-exposed larvae originates from the lower number of tegumentary ionocytes and mucous cells. This alteration of the osmoregulatory function could negatively impact the survival of young larvae at the surface water exposed to UVBR.

  8. The Pliocene Indian Ocean: A Unique Planktonic Foraminifer Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. M.; Dowsett, H. J.; Stoll, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Indian Ocean is complex in its ocean-atmosphere interactions, most notably the Indian Monsoon, and in its circulation regime that is dictated by the surrounding continental configuration. Its relative isolation from other ocean basins and its dynamic tropical processes, ruled by variations in interannual variability, create an environment of rapid response to local climate forcings. The Indian Ocean should, therefore, be among the first regions to record geologic indicators of local responses to global climate change. Despite the wealth of global paleoclimate data available for the mid-Piacenzian, ~3.3 to 3.0 Ma, the Indian Ocean has remained a region of sparse geographic coverage in terms of microfossil analysis. This climatically relevant warm period is of particular importance due to the similarity of mid-Piacenzian climate to what is projected for the near future. In the Indian Ocean, the 3.3 to 3.0 Ma interval sits at the intersection of major regional tectonically-induced oceanic and atmospheric circulation changes and global climate reorganizations including uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet, closure of the Indonesian Seaway, intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, and the development of the modern east-west SST gradient in the equatorial Pacific. This was a period of intense summer monsoon activity in the Indian Ocean, leading to a reorganization of the Indian monsoon ~2.8 Ma. In an effort to characterize the surface Indian Ocean during this complex climate interval, we examined the planktonic foraminifera from ODP Sites 709, 716, 722, 747, 751, 754, 757, 758 and 763, encompassing a wide range of oceanographic conditions. Quantitative analysis of Pliocene faunas highlight the unique nature of some Indian Ocean assemblages, particularly in the Bay of Bengal where a high percentage of Sphaeroidenellopsis and Sphaeroidinella points to a thermally homogenous water column capped by a persistent shallow halocline

  9. Trophic efficiency of plankton food webs: Observations from the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay, Southeast Coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjusha, A.; Jyothibabu, R.; Jagadeesan, L.; Mohan, Arya P.; Sudheesh, K.; Krishna, Kiran; Ullas, N.; Deepak, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    the food web, the trophic efficiency was found to be low (~ 3%), which can be attributed to the wide dispersal of organic carbon in the microbial loop. Importantly, during the NEM, when the copepod Paracalanus parvus was predominant in the PB, the trophic efficiency of the microbial loop dominant food web increased by more than a fold (7.2%). The study provides evidences for the first time from the field that exceptionally high abundance of efficient microzooplankton-consuming zooplankton can significantly increase the trophic efficiency of the microbial loop dominant plankton food web.

  10. Effect of ocean warming and acidification on a plankton community in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maugendre, L.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Louis, J.; de Kluijver, A.; Marro, S.; Soetaert, K.; Gazeau, F.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ocean warming and acidification was investigated on a natural plankton assemblage from an oligotrophic area, the bay of Villefranche (NW Mediterranean Sea). The assemblage was sampled in March 2012 and exposed to the following four treatments for 12 days: control (~360 µatm, 14°C),

  11. Linking Planktonic Larval Abundance to Internal Bores at the Head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, J.; Walter, R. K.; Steinbeck, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Variability in the physical coastal environment can play an important role in determining the spatio-temporal variation in abundance of planktonic organisms. Combining planktonic larval abundance estimates over the course of a year with concurrent temperature and current data, this study provides empirical data linking a locally predominant internal tidal feature to patterns of biological abundance in the very nearshore environment at the head of Monterey Submarine Canyon. The physical observations indicate the presence of seasonally-variable semidiurnal internal bores that result in the pumping of cold (subthermocline) waters onto the adjacent shelf. Analysis of the larval abundance data indicates an assemblage shift from a relatively abundant shelf assemblage of larval fishes to a reduced abundance assemblage that is concurrent with the semidiurnal cold water intrusions driven by the tidal pumping. Results suggest that the tidal period pumping of subthermocline waters by internal bores dilutes or displaces shelf waters and their associated planktonic larval community. This could have important ecological implications at these scales and may also be of interest when siting industrial facilities that require seawater for cooling or desalination, as it would potentially reduce their impact on regional planktonic communities by diluting their rates of entrainment.

  12. Plankton as an indicator of heavy metal pollution in a freshwater reservoir of Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Neetu; Biswas, A K; Raju, C B

    2013-06-01

    Halali Reservoir is an important freshwater body of Madhya Pradesh. The water of the reservoir is used for drinking, irrigation and aquaculture practices. It receives untreated sewage, wastes from small scale industries and agricultural runoff from the catchment area. Various heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) levels were measured in plankton of Halali Reservoir during 2006-2007 by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Mean concentration ranges for Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were 0.0018-0.0037, 0.0038-0.2257, 0.0013-0.0228, 0.0011-0.0086, 0.0133-0.0494 and 0.0130-0.1168 μg g⁻¹, respectively. Overall, mean Cr concentrations in the plankton were generally the highest of the six metals at four of the five study sites. Metal concentrations at these four sites generally followed the order: Cr > Zn > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd. Mean concentrations of all metals at a fifth site were consistently lower than at the other sites. The high levels of Cr in the plankton are in agreement with high Cr levels that have been reported in fish from this reservoir, indicating that plankton may serve as a useful indicator of metal pollution in fish.

  13. Effects of toxic cyanobacteria on plankton assemblage : community development during decay of Nodularia spumigena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström-Öst, J.; Koski, Marja; Schmidt, K.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the development of the plankton community in an artificially created toxic Nodularia spumigena bloom during a 2 wk enclosure study at the SW coast of Finland in the Baltic Sea. We measured bacterial abundance, dominant phytoplankton groups and ciliates, as well as concentrations...... of phytoplankton pigments, fatty acids, nodularin, protein and nutrients. A high POC:chl a (...

  14. Ecology and distribution of recent planktonic foraminifera in eastern part of Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kutty, M.K.

    (0-200 m) than in the surface (0-10 m) tows. Further, latitudinal gradient of some species which have a definite bearing on hydrography of the sea, has been outlined. Relative production of planktonic foraminifera shows that it is high in the southern...

  15. Observations of large-scale fluid transport by laser-guided plankton aggregationsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, Monica M.; Dabiri, John O.

    2014-10-01

    Diel vertical migration of plankton has been proposed to affect global ocean circulation to a degree comparable to winds and tides. This biomixing process has never been directly observed, however, due to the inability to predict its occurrence in situ or to reproduce it in a laboratory setting. Furthermore, it has been argued that the energy imparted to the ocean by plankton migrations occurs at the scale of individual organisms, which is too small to impact ocean mixing. We describe the development of a multi-laser guidance system that leverages the phototactic abilities of plankton to achieve controllable vertical migrations concurrently with laser velocimetry of the surrounding flow. Measurements in unstratified fluid show that the hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring swimmers establish an alternate energy transfer route from the small scales of individually migrating plankton to significantly larger scales. Observations of laser-induced vertical migrations of Artemia salina reveal the appearance of a downward jet, which triggers a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that results in the generation of eddy-like structures with characteristic length scales much larger than the organisms. The measured energy spectrum is consistent with these findings and indicates energy input at large scales, despite the small individual size of the organisms. These results motivate the study of biomixing in the presence of stratification to assess the contribution of migrating zooplankton to local and global ocean dynamics. The laser control methodology developed here enables systematic study of the relevant processes.

  16. Interindividual variability and ontogenetic effects on Mg and Sr incorporation in the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duenas-Bohorquez, A.; Da Rocha, R.E.; Kuroyanagi, A.; Nooijer, L.J. de; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the interindividual and ontogenetic effects on Mg and Sr incorporation, magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) and strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratios of cultured planktonic foraminifera have been determined. Specimens of Globigerinoides sacculifer were grown under controlled physical and

  17. Chamber formation leads to Mg/Ca banding in the planktonic foraminifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, L.; Buse, B.; Brummer, G.-J. A.; Hall, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    Many species of planktonic foraminifera show distinct banding in the intratest distribution of Mg/Ca. This heterogeneity appears biologically controlled and thus poses a challenge to Mg/Ca paleothermometry. The cause of this banding and its relation with chamber formation are poorly constrained and

  18. Growth and functioning of the microbial plankton community: effects of temperature, nutrients and light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial plankton form the basis of the food web in aquatic habitats. Due to their vast abundances they influence the cycling of elements and the Earth’s climate at a global scale. This thesis aims at a better understanding of how environmental factors such as temperature and the availability of nu

  19. Effect of ocean warming and acidification on a plankton community in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maugendre, L.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Louis, J.; de Kluijver, A.; Marro, S.; Soetaert, K.; Gazeau, F.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ocean warming and acidification was investigated on a natural plankton assemblage from an oligotrophic area, the bay of Villefranche (NW Mediterranean Sea). The assemblage was sampled in March 2012 and exposed to the following four treatments for 12 days: control (~360 µatm, 14°C), ele

  20. Ammonite habitat revealed via isotopic composition and comparisons with co-occurring benthic and planktonic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Jocelyn Anne; Larina, Ekaterina; Knoll, Katja; Garb, Matthew; Cochran, J. Kirk; Huber, Brian T.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Landman, Neil H.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonites are among the best-known fossils of the Phanerozoic, yet their habitat is poorly understood. Three common ammonite families (Baculitidae, Scaphitidae, and Sphenodiscidae) co-occur with well-preserved planktonic and benthic organisms at the type locality of the upper Maastrichtian Owl Creek Formation, offering an excellent opportunity to constrain their depth habitats through isotopic comparisons among taxa. Based on sedimentary evidence and the micro- and macrofauna at this site, we infer that the 9-m-thick sequence was deposited at a paleodepth of 70-150 m. Taxa present throughout the sequence include a diverse assemblage of ammonites, bivalves, and gastropods, abundant benthic foraminifera, and rare planktonic foraminifera. No stratigraphic trends are observed in the isotopic data of any taxon, and thus all of the data from each taxon are considered as replicates. Oxygen isotope-based temperature estimates from the baculites and scaphites overlap with those of the benthos and are distinct from those of the plankton. In contrast, sphenodiscid temperature estimates span a range that includes estimates of the planktonic foraminifera and of the warmer half of the benthic values. These results suggest baculites and scaphites lived close to the seafloor, whereas sphenodiscids sometimes inhabited the upper water column and/or lived closer to shore. In fact, the rarity and poorer preservation of the sphenodiscids relative to the baculites and scaphites suggests that the sphenodiscid shells may have only reached the Owl Creek locality by drifting seaward after death.

  1. High genetic diversity and novelty in eukaryotic plankton assemblages inhabiting saline lakes in the Qaidam basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%), whereas Stramenopiles (26.65%) and Alveolates (10.84%) are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution.

  2. Bottom-up effects of climate on fish populations: data from the Continuous Plankton Recorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitois, S.G.; Lynam, C.P.; Jansen, Teunis

    2012-01-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) dataset on fish larvae has an extensive spatio-temporal coverage that allows the responses of fish populations to past changes in climate variability, including abrupt changes such as regime shifts, to be investigated. The newly available dataset offers...

  3. Heterogeneity in physical, chemical and plankton-community structures in Lake Tanganyika

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, V.T.; Tumba, J.M.; Tshibangu, K.; Lukwesa, C.; Chitamwebwa, D.; Bwebwa, D.; Makasa, L.; Roijackers, R.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    From 28 August to 6 September 1995, we monitored the lake-wide physical, chemical and biological properties of the pelagic waters in Lake Tanganyika. The aim of this study was to examine the spatial environmental variability and its relation to fluctuations in plankton abundance and community assemb

  4. Studies on planktonic decapoda and stomatopoda (Crustacea) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paulinose, V.T.; Goswami, S.C.; Nair, V.R.

    An account of a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the planktonic decapoda and stomatopoda collected during R.V Gaveshani Cruises 10, 12, 13 in the Arabian Sea is given. Area surveyed lies between latitudes 07 degrees 00' and 20 degrees 00'N...

  5. Arsenic in water, plankton and sediments off Goa coast and adjacent regions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fondekar, S.P.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Joseph, T.

    Arsenic content was estimated in water, plankton and sediments in the region between 14 degrees 40'N and 15 degrees 50'N surrounding Goa coast. Of the total arsenic content in water (1.65 - 4.78 mu g/litre; av. 3.09 mu g/litre) 61% was found...

  6. Towards a solution of the plankton paradox : The importance of physiology and life history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Johansson, A.M.; Folmer, E.O.; Weissing, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities reveal an astonishing biodiversity, whereas classical competition theory seems to suggest that only a few competing species can survive. Recently we suggested a new solution to this plankton paradox. In theory, at least, competition between multiple species can generate com

  7. Tracing shifts of oceanic fronts using the cryptic diversity of the planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia inflata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël.; Reinelt, Melanie; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Kucera, Michal

    2016-09-01

    The use of planktonic foraminifera in paleoceanographic studies relies on the assumption that morphospecies represent biological species with ecological preferences that are stable through time and space. However, genetic surveys unveiled a considerable level of diversity in most morphospecies of planktonic foraminifera. This diversity is significant for paleoceanographic applications because cryptic species were shown to display distinct ecological preferences that could potentially help refine paleoceanographic proxies. Subtle morphological differences between cryptic species of planktonic foraminifera have been reported, but so far, their applicability within paleoceanographic studies remains largely unexplored. Here we show how information on genetic diversity can be transferred to paleoceanography using Globorotalia inflata as a case study. The two cryptic species of G. inflata are separated by the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC), a major oceanographic feature in the South Atlantic. Based on this observation, we developed a morphological model of cryptic species detection in core top material. The application of the cryptic species detection model to Holocene samples implies latitudinal oscillations in the position of the confluence that are largely consistent with reconstructions obtained from stable isotope data. We show that the occurrence of cryptic species in G. inflata can be detected in the fossil record and used to trace the migration of the BMC. Since a similar degree of morphological separation as in G. inflata has been reported from other species of planktonic foraminifera, the approach presented in this study can potentially yield a wealth of new paleoceanographical proxies.

  8. Smoothing a Piecewise-Smooth: An Example from Plankton Population Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltz, Sofia Helena

    2016-01-01

    In this work we discuss a piecewise-smooth dynamical system inspired by plankton observations and constructed for one predator switching its diet between two different types of prey. We then discuss two smooth formulations of the piecewise-smooth model obtained by using a hyperbolic tangent...

  9. Morphometric and molecular identification of individual barnacle cyprids from wild plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hsi-Nien; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Chan, Benny K.K.

    2013-01-01

    The present study used DNA barcodes to identify individual cyprids to species. This enables accurate quantification of larvae of potential fouling species in the plankton. In addition, it explains the settlement patterns of barnacles and serves as an early warning system of unwanted immigrant spe...

  10. Ecological differentiation in planktonic and sediment-associated chemotrophic microbial populations in Yellowstone hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Daniel R; Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Robinson, Kirtland J; Fecteau, Kristopher M; Xu, Huifang; Shock, Everett L; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-09-01

    Chemosynthetic sediment and planktonic community composition and sizes, aqueous geochemistry and sediment mineralogy were determined in 15 non-photosynthetic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). These data were used to evaluate the hypothesis that differences in the availability of dissolved or mineral substrates in the bulk fluids or sediments within springs coincides with ecologically differentiated microbial communities and their populations. Planktonic and sediment-associated communities exhibited differing ecological characteristics including community sizes, evenness and richness. pH and temperature influenced microbial community composition among springs, but within-spring partitioning of taxa into sediment or planktonic communities was widespread, statistically supported (P < 0.05) and could be best explained by the inferred metabolic strategies of the partitioned taxa. Microaerophilic genera of the Aquificales predominated in many of the planktonic communities. In contrast, taxa capable of mineral-based metabolism such as S(o) oxidation/reduction or Fe-oxide reduction predominated in sediment communities. These results indicate that ecological differentiation within thermal spring habitats is common across a range of spring geochemistry and is influenced by the availability of dissolved nutrients and minerals that can be used in metabolism.

  11. The role of microorganisms in a planktonic food web of a floodplain lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Bianca Trevizan; Pereira, Danielle Goeldner; Bini, Luis Mauricio; de Meira, Bianca Ramos; Nishida, Verônica Sayuri; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio Amodêo; Velho, Luiz Felipe Machado

    2015-02-01

    Food webs include complex ecological interactions that define the flow of matter and energy, and are fundamental in understanding the functioning of an ecosystem. Temporal variations in the densities of communities belonging to the planktonic food web (i.e., microbial: bacteria, flagellate, and ciliate; and grazing: zooplankton and phytoplankton) were investigated, aiming to clarify the interactions between these organisms and the dynamics of the planktonic food web in a floodplain lake. We hypothesized that hydrological pulse determines the path of matter and energy flow through the planktonic food web of this floodplain lake. Data were collected monthly from March 2007 to February 2008 at three different sites in Guaraná Lake (Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil). The path analysis provided evidence that the dynamics of the planktonic food web was strongly influenced by the hydrological pulse. The high-water period favored interactions among the organisms of the microbial loop, rather than their relationships with zooplankton and phytoplankton. Therefore, in this period, the strong interaction among the organisms of the grazing food chain suggests that the microbial loop functions as a sink of matter and energy. In turn, in the low-water period, higher primary productivity appeared to favor different interactions between the components of the grazing food chain and microorganisms, which would function as a link to the higher trophic levels.

  12. Long-Term Trends in Calcifying Plankton and pH in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beare, D.J.; McQuatters-Gollop, A.; Hammen, van der T.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Teoh, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between six calcifying plankton groups and pH are explored in a highly biologically productive and data-rich area of the central North Sea using time-series datasets. The long-term trends show that abundances of foraminiferans, coccolithophores, and echinoderm larvae have risen over th

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of biofilm and planktonic cells of Lactobacillus plantarum DB200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Maria; Siragusa, Sonya; Campanella, Daniela; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the relative abundance of extracellular and cell wall associated proteins (exoproteome), cytoplasmic proteins (proteome), and related phenotypic traits of Lactobacillus plantarum grown under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Lactobacillus plantarum DB200 was preliminarily selected due to its ability to form biofilms and to adhere to Caco2 cells. As shown by fluorescence microscope analysis, biofilm cells became longer and autoaggregated at higher levels than planktonic cells. The molar ratio between glucose consumed and lactate synthesised was markedly decreased under biofilm compared to planktonic conditions. DIGE analysis showed a differential exoproteome (115 protein spots) and proteome (44) between planktonic and biofilm L. plantarum DB200 cells. Proteins up- or downregulated by at least twofold (p < 0.05) were found to belong mainly to the following functional categories: cell wall and catabolic process, cell cycle and adhesion, transport, glycolysis and carbohydrate metabolism, exopolysaccharide metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolisms, fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis, purine and nucleotide metabolism, stress response, oxidation/reduction process, and energy metabolism. Many of the above proteins showed moonlighting behavior. In accordance with the high expression levels of stress proteins (e.g., DnaK, GroEL, ClpP, GroES, and catalase), biofilm cells demonstrated enhanced survival under conditions of environmental stress.

  14. A broad deglacial δ13C minimum event in planktonic foraminiferal records in the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The equatorial Pacific upwelling zone has been suspected of playing an important role in the global atmospheric CO2 changes associated with glacial-interglacial cycles.In order to assess the influencing scope of the surface water deglacial δ13C minimum in the tropical Iow-latitude Pacific,the core DGKS9603, collected from the middle Okinawa Trough, was examined for δ13C records of planktonic foraminifera N. dutertrei and G. ruber. The planktonic foraminiferal δ13C records show a clear decreasing event from 20 to 6 cal. kaBP., which is characterized by long duration of about 14 ka and amplitude shift of 0.4 × 10-3. Its minimum value occurred at 15.7 cai kaBP. The event shows fairly synchrony with the surface water deglacial δ13C minimum identiffed in the tropical Pacific and its marginal seas. Because there is no evidence in planktonic foraminiferal fauna and δ18O records for upwelling and river runoff enhancement,the broad deglacial δ13C minimum event in planktonic foraminiferal records revealed in core DGKS9603 might have been the direct influencing result of the deglacial surface water of the tropical Pacific. The identification for the event in the Okinawa Trough provides new evidence that the water evolution in the tropical low-latitude Pacific plays a key role in large regional, even global carbon cycle.

  15. Pattern formation for a model of plankton allelopathy with cross-diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, C.R.; Zhang, Lai; Lin, Z.G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework for investigating spatial patterns on plankton allelopathy with cross-diffusion. We show that under some conditions the cross-diffusion is able to induce the Turing instability, which is further confirmed by the numerical simulations. Moreover...

  16. Periodic solutions for impulsive delay differential equations in the control model of plankton allelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Junguo [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China) and Department of Mathematics, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China)]. E-mail: jungjia2@zzu.edu.cn; Wang Miansen [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li Meili [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2007-05-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional non-autonomous system with impulse that arises in plankton allelopathy involving discrete time delays and periodic environmental factors is studied. By the theory of the coincidence degree we obtain the conditions for the existence of periodic solution of this system.

  17. Global analysis of seasonality in the shell flux of extant planktonic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, L.; Kučera, M.

    2015-04-01

    Shell fluxes of planktonic Foraminifera species vary intra-annually in a pattern that appears to follow the seasonal cycle. However, the variation in the timing and prominence of seasonal flux maxima in space and among species remains poorly constrained. Thus, although changing seasonality may result in a flux-weighted temperature offset of more than 5° C within a species, this effect is often ignored in the interpretation of Foraminifera-based paleoceanographic records. To address this issue we present an analysis of the intra-annual pattern of shell flux variability in 37 globally distributed time series. The existence of a seasonal component in flux variability was objectively characterised using periodic regression. This analysis yielded estimates of the number, timing and prominence of seasonal flux maxima. Over 80% of the flux series across all species showed a statistically significant periodic component, indicating that a considerable part of the intra-annual flux variability is predictable. Temperature appears to be a powerful predictor of flux seasonality, but its effect differs among species. Three different modes of seasonality are distinguishable. Tropical and subtropical species (Globigerinoides ruber (white and pink varieties), Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Orbulina universa, Globigerinella siphonifera, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Globorotalia menardii, Globoturborotalita rubescens, Globoturborotalita tenella and Globigerinoides conglobatus) appear to have a less predictable flux pattern, with random peak timing in warm waters. In colder waters, seasonality is more prevalent: peak fluxes occur shortly after summer temperature maxima and peak prominence increases. This tendency is stronger in species with a narrower temperature range, implying that warm-adapted species find it increasingly difficult to reproduce outside their optimum temperature range and that, with decreasing mean temperature, their flux is progressively

  18. The role of advection in the distribution of plankton populations at a moored 1-D coastal observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jaimie; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.; Hosegood, Philip J.; Torres, Ricardo

    2015-09-01

    The degree to which advection modulates the distribution of plankton populations at a 1-D coastal observatory was assessed at station L4 in the western English Channel (50°15‧N 4°13‧W, depth 50 m), part of the Western Channel Observatory (WCO). Five tidal-cycle surveys were conducted, three in spring and two in summer 2010. Observations of the physical characteristics of L4 were obtained by using a moored acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) and a free-falling microstructure sensor (MSS). The moored ADCP highlighted the presence of vertical shear, with typical values of U during spring tides of ∼0.5 m s-1 at the surface and ∼0.2 m s-1 at the bed. The distribution of phyto- and zooplankton populations above a size threshold of 200 μm were examined using an in-line holographic imaging system, the Holocam. Variability in time as well as depth is a common feature throughout each of the surveys, with examples of recorded numbers of phytoplankton that ranged between 1300 L-1 and 2300 L-1 at the same depth but at different points within the tidal cycle. Further, at the same points in the tidal cycle the number of recorded zooplankton was also seen to vary, specifically with the identification of gelatinous planula in spring that increased the observed number to maximums of between 140 L-1 and 220 L-1 in the upper layer, considerably higher that the corresponding WP-2 net counts for a similar period. Specific aspects of the movement and transfer of plankton relating to advection and interaction with the pycnocline are identified, both across tidal cycles and seasons.

  19. Questioning the role of phenology shifts and trophic mismatching in a planktonic food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Angus; Harmer, Rachel A.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; McEvoy, Andrea J.; Smyth, Tim J.; Cummings, Denise G.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Maud, Jacqueline L.; McConville, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    In a warming climate, differential shifts in the seasonal timing of predators and prey have been suggested to lead to trophic "mismatches" that decouple primary, secondary and tertiary production. We tested this hypothesis using a 25-year time-series of weekly sampling at the Plymouth L4 site, comparing 57 plankton taxa spanning 4 trophic levels. During warm years, there was a weak tendency for earlier timings of spring taxa and later timings of autumn taxa. While this is in line with many previous findings, numerous exceptions existed and only a few taxa (e.g. Gyrodinium spp., Pseudocalanus elongatus, and Acartia clausi) showed consistent, strong evidence for temperature-related timing shifts, revealed by all 4 of the timing indices that we used. Also, the calculated offsets in timing (i.e. "mismatches") between predator and prey were no greater in extreme warm or cold years than during more average years. Further, the magnitude of these offsets had no effect on the "success" of the predator, in terms of their annual mean abundance or egg production rates. Instead numerous other factors override, including: inter-annual variability in food quantity, high food baseline levels, turnover rates and prolonged seasonal availability, allowing extended periods of production. Furthermore many taxa, notably meroplankton, increased well before the spring bloom. While theoretically a chronic mismatch, this likely reflects trade-offs for example in predation avoidance. Various gelatinous taxa (Phaeocystis, Noctiluca, ctenophores, appendicularians, medusae) may have reduced these predation constraints, with variable, explosive population outbursts likely responding to improved conditions. The match-mismatch hypothesis may apply for highly seasonal, pulsed systems or specialist feeders, but we suggest that the concept is being over-extended to other marine systems where multiple factors compensate.

  20. Anticandidal efficacy of cinnamon oil against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Candida parapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Regina Helena; Montanari, Lilian Bueno; Martins, Carlos Henrique G; Zaia, José Eduardo; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Matsumoto, Marcelo T; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José S

    2011-12-01

    Candida parapsilosis is yeast capable of forming biofilms on medical devices. Novel approaches for the prevention and eradication of the biofilms are desired. This study investigated the anticandidal activity of sixteen essential oils on planktonic and biofilm cultures of C. parapsilosis complex. We used molecular tools, enumeration of colony-forming units, the colourimetric MTT assay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a chequerboard assay coupled with software analyses to evaluate the growth kinetics, architecture, inhibition and reduction in biofilms formed from environmental isolates of the Candida parapsilosis complex; further, we also evaluated whether essential oils would interact synergistically with amphotericin B to increase their anticandidal activities. Of the environmental C. parapsilosis isolates examined, C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis were identified. Biofilm growth on polystyrene substrates peaked within 48 h, after which growth remained relatively stable up to 72 h, when it began to decline. Details of the architectural analysis assessed by SEM showed that C. parapsilosis complex formed less complex biofilms compared with C. albicans biofilms. The most active essential oil was cinnamon oil (CO), which showed anticandidal activity against C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis in both suspension (minimum inhibitory concentration-MIC-250 and 500 μg/ml) and biofilm (minimum biofilm reduction concentration-MBRC-1,000 and 2,000 μg/ml) cultures. CO also inhibited biofilm formation (MBIC) at concentrations above 250 μg/ml for both species tested. However, synergism with amphotericin B was not observed. Thus, CO is a natural anticandidal agent that can be effectively utilised for the control of the yeasts tested.

  1. Are watershed and lacustrine controls on planktonic N2 fixation hierarchically structured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J Thad; Doyle, Robert D; Prochnow, Shane J; White, Joseph D

    2008-04-01

    N2 fixation can be an important source of N to limnetic ecosystems and can influence the structure of phytoplankton communities. However, watershed-scale conditions that favor N2 fixation in lakes and reservoirs have not been well studied. We measured N2 fixation and lacustrine variables monthly over a 19-month period in Waco Reservoir, Texas, USA, and linked these data with nutrient-loading estimates from a physically based watershed model. Readily available topographic, soil, land cover, effluent discharge, and climate data were used in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to derive watershed nutrient-loading estimates. Categorical and regression tree (CART) analysis revealed that lacustrine and watershed correlates of N2 fixation were hierarchically structured. Lacustrine conditions showed greater predictive capability temporally. For instance, low NO3(-) concentration (27 degrees C) in the reservoir were correlated with the initiation of N2 fixation seasonally. When lacustrine conditions were favorable for N2 fixation, watershed conditions appeared to influence spatial patterns of N2 fixation within the reservoir. For example, spatially explicit patterns of N2 fixation were correlated with the ratio of N:P in nutrient loadings and the N loading rate, which were driven by anthropogenic activity in the watershed and periods of low stream flow, respectively. Although N2 fixation contributed <5% of the annual N load to the reservoir, 37% of the N load was derived from atmospheric N2 fixation during summertime when stream flow in the watershed was low. This study provides evidence that watershed anthropogenic activity can exert control on planktonic N2 fixation, but that temporality is controlled by lacustrine conditions. Furthermore, this study also supports suggestions that reduced inflows may increase the propensity of N2-fixing cyanobacterial blooms in receiving waters of anthropogenically modified landscapes.

  2. Biofilm and planktonic pneumococci demonstrate disparate immunoreactivity to human convalescent sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivshankar Pooja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is the leading cause of otitis media, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, sepsis, and meningitis. It is now evident that S. pneumoniae forms biofilms during nasopharyngeal colonization; the former which facilitates persistence, the latter, a prerequisite for subsequent development of invasive disease. Proteomic evaluation of S. pneumoniae suggests the antigen profile available for host-recognition is altered as a consequence of biofilm growth. This has potentially meaningful implications in regards to adaptive immunity and protection from disseminated disease. We therefore examined the antigen profile of biofilm and planktonic pneumococcal cell lysates, tested their reactivity with human convalescent sera and that generated against biofilm pneumococci, and examined whether immunization with biofilm pneumococci protected mice against infectious challenge. Results Biofilm pneumococci have dramatically altered protein profiles versus their planktonic counterparts. During invasive disease the humoral immune response is skewed towards the planktonic protein profile. Immunization with biofilm bacteria does not elicit a strong-cross-reactive humoral response against planktonic bacteria nor confer resistance against challenge with a virulent isolate from another serotype. We identified numerous proteins, including Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP, which may serve as a protective antigens against both colonization and invasive disease. Conclusion Differential protein production by planktonic and biofilm pneumococci provides a potential explanation for why individuals remain susceptible to invasive disease despite previous colonization events. These findings also strongly suggest that differential protein production during colonization and disease be considered during the selection of antigens for any future protein vaccine.

  3. Arterial retention of remnant lipoproteins ex vivo is increased in insulin resistance because of increased arterial biglycan and production of cholesterol-rich atherogenic particles that can be improved by ezetimibe in the JCR:LA-cp rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Rabban; Warnakula, Samantha; Borthwick, Faye; Hassanali, Zahra; Uwiera, Richard R E; Russell, James C; Cheeseman, Christopher I; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D

    2012-10-01

    Literature supports the "response-to-retention" hypothesis-that during insulin resistance, impaired metabolism of remnant lipoproteins can contribute to accelerated cardiovascular disease progression. We used the JCR:LA-cp rat model of metabolic syndrome (MetS) to determine the extent of arterial accumulation of intestinal-derived remnants ex vivo and potential mechanisms that contribute to exacerbated cholesterol deposition in insulin resistance. Arteries from control and MetS (insulin-resistant) JCR:LA-cp rats were perfused ex vivo with Cy5-labeled remnant lipoproteins, and their arterial retention was quantified by confocal microscopy. Arterial proteoglycans were isolated from control and MetS rats at 6, 12, and 32 weeks of age. There was a significant increase in the arterial retention of remnants and in associated cholesterol accumulation in MetS rats as compared to control rats. Mechanistic studies reveal that increased cholesterol deposition is a result of greater arterial biglycan content; longer glycosaminoglycans and increased production of cholesterol-rich intestinal-derived remnants, as compared to controls. Additionally, perfusion of vessels treated with ezetimibe, alone or in combination with simvastatin, with remnants isolated from the respective treatment group reduced ex vivo arterial retention of remnant-derived cholesterol ex vivo as compared to untreated controls. Increased progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in MetS and type 2 diabetes mellitus might be explained in part by an increase in the arterial retention of cholesterol-rich remnants. Furthermore, ezetimibe alone or in combination treatment with simvastatin could be beneficial in ameliorating atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in insulin resistance and MetS.

  4. Plankton Communities of The Macroscale Anticyclonic Gyre of The South At Lantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontkovski, S. A.; Finenko, Z. Z.; Kovalev, A. V.; Williams, R.; Gallienne, C. P.; Mishonov, A.; Skryabin, V. N.; Tokarev, Yu. N.; Nikolsky, V. N.

    Data collected during the Former Soviet Union and UK cruises were used to analyze phyto- and zooplankton size structure, biomass, species diversity, chlorophyll a, and plankton bioluminescence, on the scale of the southern anticyclonic gyre of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in physical and biological characteristics were monitored from the peripheral currents to the centre of the gyre. A number of general qualitative trends were noted. The contribution of small-sized phytoplankton cells to the total phytoplankton biomass decreased from the eastern periphery of the gyre to the central oligotrophic region, where convergence took place. The larger cells (20 - 50 µm) were the major contributors to the biomass in this central area. The bioluminescence intensity decreased in the same direction and showed a 10 to 30 times difference. The spatial pattern of bioluminescence ntensity was in good i agreement with that of remotely sensed (CZCS) chlorophyll a distribution especially in terms of geographic inclinations of the isolines, both associated with the north- westward pattern off the South Equatorial Current. There was a general decrease of mesozooplankton biomass to the east, with local maxima associated with upwelling along the African coast. Minimal values (15-30 mg m3) were recorded in the central part of the gyre. Overall, when data from the eastern peripheral (the Benguela Current) and the central parts of the gyre are compared, biomass differs approximately by one order of magnitude for chlorophyll a, bacteria, and mesozooplankton. Differences were about 15-20 times for phytoplankton biomass and primary production. Mesozooplankton species diversity index tended to increase from the surface to 200m and from peripheral currents to the central (most oligotrophic) part of the gyre. Among the 416 copepod species recorded in samples, 51 species were noted throughout the whole gyre. On the other hand, there were a number of species found only in one of the currents. The

  5. Advancing Access to New Technology for Sustained High Resolution Observations of Plankton: From Bloom Dynamics to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosik, H. M.; Olson, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The combination of ocean observatory infrastructure and automated submersible flow cytometry can provide unprecedented capability for sustained high resolution time series of plankton, including taxa that are harmful or early indicators of ecosystem response to environmental change. Over the past decade, we have developed the FlowCytobot series of instruments that exemplify this capability. FlowCytobot and Imaging FlowCytobot use a combination of laser-based scattering and fluorescence measurements and video imaging of individual particles to enumerate and characterize cells ranging from picocyanobacteria to large chaining-forming diatoms. The process of developing these complex instruments was streamlined by access to the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO), a cabled facility on the New England Shelf, where real time two-way communications and access to shore power expedited cycles of instrument evaluation and design refinement. Repeated deployments at MVCO, typically 6 months in duration, have produced multi-year high resolution (hourly to daily) time series that are providing new insights into dynamics of community structure such as blooms, seasonality, and possibly even trends linked to regional climate change. The high temporal resolution observations of single cell properties make it possible not only to characterize taxonomic composition and size structure, but also to quantify taxon-specific growth rates. To meet the challenge of broadening access to this enabling technology, we have taken a two-step approach. First, we are partnering with a few scientific collaborators interested in using the instruments in different environments and to address different applications, notably the detection and characterization of harmful algal bloom events. Collaboration at this stage ensured that these first users outside the developers' lab had access to technical know-how required for successful outcomes; it also provided additional feedback that could be

  6. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight: lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseno-Avena, Christian

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Using two in situ microscopes I described the fine-scale vertical distribution of phytoplankton and several zooplankton taxa in a coastal location in the Southern California Bight. Highly resolved spatial observations revealed cryptic maxima of fluorescent particles not observed with traditional fluorometers. Furthermore, this high sampling resolution revealed that water density, and not depth, regulated the vertical position, and interactions between observed phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions. Underwater acoustic echosounders can be powerful tools to observe in situ plankton distributions. Interpreting the acoustic echoes, however, requires highly calibrated instruments and ground-truthing experiments to identify the source of acoustic signals. This work presents the description of a novel combination of a broadband, high-frequency (1.5-2.5 MHz) echosounder and a stereoscopic camera --combined, these systems can localize the echo produced by an individual target while simultaneously providing visual identification of the target. This work has provided one of the first comparisons of in situ measured broadband target strength (BTS) and the expected signal using a physical model. The results of this experiment revealed unexpected, important differences between measured and modeled BTS. This system was also used to make in situ observations of individual fragile gelatinous organisms, marine snow particles and phytoplankton, providing evidence of their significant acoustic

  7. Technical Note: A minimally invasive experimental system for pCO2 manipulation in plankton cultures using passive gas exchange (atmospheric carbon control simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brooke A.; Olson, M. Brady; Wuori, Tristen

    2017-05-01

    As research into the biotic effects of ocean acidification has increased, the methods for simulating these environmental changes in the laboratory have multiplied. Here we describe the atmospheric carbon control simulator (ACCS) for the maintenance of plankton under controlled pCO2 conditions, designed for species sensitive to the physical disturbance introduced by the bubbling of cultures and for studies involving trophic interaction. The system consists of gas mixing and equilibration components coupled with large-volume atmospheric simulation chambers. These chambers allow gas exchange to counteract the changes in carbonate chemistry induced by the metabolic activity of the organisms. The system is relatively low cost, very flexible, and when used in conjunction with semi-continuous culture methods, it increases the density of organisms kept under realistic conditions, increases the allowable time interval between dilutions, and/or decreases the metabolically driven change in carbonate chemistry during these intervals. It accommodates a large number of culture vessels, which facilitate multi-trophic level studies and allow the tracking of variable responses within and across plankton populations to ocean acidification. It also includes components that increase the reliability of gas mixing systems using mass flow controllers.

  8. High resilience of two coastal plankton communities to 21st century seawater acidification: Evidence from microcosm studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Hansen, Per Juul

    2010-01-01

    are reported, and measurements include microscopy counts of ~20 planktonic protist taxa, HPLC pigment analysis, FlowCAM analysis of cell-size spectra, photosynthetic activity and total POC and PON. Initial communities were flagellate (experiment 1) and dinoflagellate and ciliate (experiment 2) dominated...... to be affected significantly, and plankton group composition, cell sizes and photosynthetic activity all remained unaffected during the 14-day incubation periods. Thus, both of the investigated coastal plankton communities were unaffected by twenty-first century expected changes in pH and free CO2. This may...

  9. 'End to end' planktonic trophic web and its implications for the mussel farms in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, Ana; Caroppo, Carmela; Monti, Marina; Camatti, Elisa; Di Poi, Elena; Stabili, Loredana; Auriemma, Rocco; Pansera, Marco; Cibic, Tamara; Del Negro, Paola

    2016-07-01

    The Mar Piccolo is a semi-enclosed basin subject to different natural and anthropogenic stressors. In order to better understand plankton dynamics and preferential carbon pathways within the planktonic trophic web, an integrated approach was adopted for the first time by examining all trophic levels (virioplankton, the heterotrophic and phototrophic fractions of pico-, nano- and microplankton, as well as mesozooplankton). Plankton abundance and biomass were investigated during four surveys in the period 2013-2014. Beside unveiling the dynamics of different plankton groups in the Mar Piccolo, the study revealed that high portion of the plankton carbon (C) pool was constituted by small-sized (Mar Piccolo exerts a profound impact on plankton communities, not only due to the important sequestration of the plankton biomass but also by strongly influencing its structure.

  10. Preparation of DNA-adsorbed TiO2 particles--augmentation of performance for environmental purification by increasing DNA adsorption by external pH regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Takeharu; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    We have previously developed a novel photocatalyst, DNA-attached titanium dioxide (DNA-TiO(2)), useful for the recovery and decomposition of chemicals [Suzuki et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 8076, 2008]. Chemicals accumulated in DNA near the surface of TiO(2) and were degraded under UV light. The efficiency of their removal was dependent on the amount of DNA adsorbed on TiO(2), indicating the attachment of larger amounts of DNA to result in higher efficiency. In this study, we succeeded in improving the performance of DNA-TiO(2) by increasing the amount of DNA adsorbed by regulating the external pH. The adsorption of DNA by TiO(2) dramatically increased at pH2, to about fourfold that at other pH values (pH4-10). Repeating the process of DNA addition increased the adsorption further. The attached DNA was stable on the surface of TiO(2) at pH2-10 and 4-56 degrees C, the same as DNA-TiO(2) prepared at pH7. As the DNA-TiO(2) prepared at pH2 retained much DNA on its surface, chemicals (methylene blue, ethidium bromide, etc.) which could intercalate or react with DNA were effectively removed from solutions. The photocatalytic degradation was slow at first, but the final degradation rate was higher than for non-adsorbed TiO(2) and DNA-TiO(2) prepared at pH7. These results indicated that preparation of DNA-TiO(2) at pH2 has advantages in that much DNA can be attached and large amounts of chemicals can be concentrated in the DNA, resulting in extensive decomposition under UV light.

  11. PRELIMINARY PLANKTON INVESTIGATIONS IN THE GRAVEL PIT AND WINTERPONDS NEAR JAGODNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tomec

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of plankton populations have been performed in the gravel pit and two winterponds near the place Jagodno, Novo Čiće, in the vicinity of Velika Gorica. Our goal was to examine plankton composition of the gravel pit and winterponds, two ecosystems characterized by specific life–conditions which change with time and space. Investigations were conducted during June 2007. Plankton samples were collected from water surface layer at four locations (two locations in the gravel pit and one location in each of two winterponds. Along with plankton sample collecting, measurements were made of some physico–chemical parameters (water temperature, pH–values and dissolved oxygen content in water. Water temperature at two sampling locations in the gravel pit and one location at each of the winterponds depended on the surrounding air temperature, and ranged from 22.5ºC to 23.6ºC. pH–reaction was alkaline, ranging from 8. 23 to 9. 02. Dissolved oxygen content in the gravel pit was around 10 mg/O2; in winterponds it ranged from 7.6 to 9.7 mg/O2 (Table 1. At the gravel pit locations total number of 32 phytoplankton species were determined; in winterponds were determined 37 (microphytic species? while zooplankton was represented in the phytoplankton community composition at the four locations with 5 species. Phytoplankton species determined in the samples from two gravel pit locations belonged to the system groups Dinophyta, Chrysophyta and Chlorophyta while in the samples from winterpond locations, along with the mentioned system groups, were found as well the representatives from the groups Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria and Euglenophyta. Zooplankton species belonged to the groups Rotatoria, Cladocera and Copepoda (Table 2. In gravel pit locations dominated diatoms or Bacillarophyceae while in winterponds the majority of phytoplankton mass consisted of the representatives of the species Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria and Euglenophyta. Qualitative

  12. Standard biostratigraphic scheme of planktonic foraminifera for the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone, northwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H.; Nishi, H.; Ikehara, M.; Tanaka, T.; Matsuzaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) was planned for comprehensive understanding of repeated mega-earthquakes along the subduction boundary of the Philippine Sea Plate. One of fundamental purposes of this project is to reconstruct the tectonic history of the seismogenic zone. For this purpose, we need an integrated stratigraphic approach including biostratigraphic method. With respect to previous studies, sediments from the Kumano forarc basin and accretionary complex of the seismogenic zone contain calcareous microfossils such as planktonic foraminifera (Hayashi et al., 2011). In addition, Miocene to Pliocene ocean-floor sediments in the Shikoku basin also contain planktonic foraminifera with several barren interval (Expedition 322 Scientists, 2010). We present a composite planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy using five drilling sites of the NanTroSEIZE transect. These sites are placed in the Kumamo forarc basin (Site C0002), upper trench-slope basin (Site C0001), trench slope (Sites C0022), lower trench-slope basin(C0021) and the Shikoku basin (Site C0012). Total 43 biohorizons were recognized from middle Miocene to Pleistocene sequences with three grades of reliability. Among them, 36 biohorizons were reported with astronomically-tuned ages by Wade et al. (2011) and Tian et al. (2008). These astronomical-tuned ages of biohorizons are in good agreement with each other and consistent with magnetostratigraphy. In particular notice to the comparison between the two different timetables, Tian et al.'s (2008) biohorizons are more concordant with calcareous nannofossil data than those of Wade et al. (2011). It can be explained by the difference of biogeographic provinces of planktonic foraminifera: Tian et al. (2008) constructed their astronomically-tuned records by using sediments from ODP Site 1148 in the South China Sea, about 2,300 km southwest of Site C0012, whereas Wade et al. (2011) are mainly based on Atlantic sites (ODP Sites 925 and

  13. Increased photocatalytic activity of NiO and ZnO in photodegradation of a model drug aqueous solution: Effect of coupling, supporting, particles size and calcination temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derikvandi, Hadis [Department of Chemistry, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 311-86145, Shahreza, Isfahan, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahreza (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza, E-mail: arnezamzadeh@iaush.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 311-86145, Shahreza, Isfahan, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahreza (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razi Chemistry Research Center (RCRC), Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Increased photoactivity of hybridized/supported NiO-ZnO whit respect to monocomponent one. • Strong dependence of photocatalytic activity of NiO-ZnO to calcination temperature. • Calcination temperature varied the crystallite forms of the semiconductors. • Red shifts in band gaps of the supported coupled semiconductors whit respect to monocomponent one. - Abstract: Mechanically ball-mill prepared clinoptilolite nanoparticles (NC) were used for increasing photocatalytic activity of NiO and ZnO as alone and binary systems. The semiconductors were supported onto the zeolite during calcination of Ni(II)-Zn(II)-exchanged NC at different calcinations temperatures. XRD, FTIR, SEM-EDX, X-ray mapping, DRS, TEM and BET techniques were used for characterization of the samples. The calcined catalysts at 400 °C for 4 h showed the best photocatalytic activity for metronidazole (MNZ) in aqueous solution. The mole ratio of ZnO/NiO affected the photodegradation efficiency because activity of the coupled catalysts depends to the both e/h production and electron scavenging processes. In the used system, NiO acted as e/h production source and ZnO as an electron sink. Red shifts in band gaps of the supported coupled semiconductors was observed whit respect to monocomponent one, confirming formation of nanoparticles of the semiconductors onto the zeolitic bed. The best activities were obtained for the NiO{sub 1.3}–ZnO{sub 1.5}/NC (NZ-NC) and NiO{sub 0.7}–ZnO{sub 4.3}/NC (NZ{sub 3}-NC) catalysts at pH 3, 1.2 g L{sup −1} of the catalysts and 1 g L{sup −1} of MNZ.

  14. Transfer of diazotroph-derived nitrogen towards non-diazotrophic planktonic communities: a comparative study between Trichodesmium erythraeum, Crocosphaera watsonii and Cyanothece sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Hugo; Bonnet, Sophie; Grosso, Olivier; Cornet, Véronique; Barani, Aude

    2016-07-01

    transfer twice as efficient. This suggests that NH4+ was the main pathway of the DDN transfer from diazotrophs to non-diazotrophs. The three simulated diazotroph blooms led to significant increases in non-diazotrophic plankton biomass. This increase in biomass was first associated with heterotrophic bacteria followed by phytoplankton, indicating that heterotrophs took the most advantage of the DDN in this oligotrophic ecosystem.

  15. Effects of wastewater treatment plant effluent inputs on planktonic metabolic rates and microbial community composition in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Reader, Heather E.; Muthusamy, Saraladevi; Lindh, Markus V.; Pinhassi, Jarone; Conley, Daniel J.; Kritzberg, Emma S.

    2016-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is the world's largest area suffering from eutrophication-driven hypoxia. Low oxygen levels are threatening its biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The main causes for eutrophication-driven hypoxia are high nutrient loadings and global warming. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) contribute to eutrophication as they are important sources of nitrogen to coastal areas. Here, we evaluated the effects of wastewater treatment plant effluent inputs on Baltic Sea planktonic communities in four experiments. We tested for effects of effluent inputs on chlorophyll a content, bacterial community composition, and metabolic rates: gross primary production (GPP), net community production (NCP), community respiration (CR) and bacterial production (BP). Nitrogen-rich dissolved organic matter (DOM) inputs from effluents increased bacterial production and decreased primary production and community respiration. Nutrient amendments and seasonally variable environmental conditions lead to lower alpha-diversity and shifts in bacterial community composition (e.g. increased abundance of a few cyanobacterial populations in the summer experiment), concomitant with changes in metabolic rates. An increase in BP and decrease in CR could be caused by high lability of the DOM that can support secondary bacterial production, without an increase in respiration. Increases in bacterial production and simultaneous decreases of primary production lead to more carbon being consumed in the microbial loop, and may shift the ecosystem towards heterotrophy.

  16. Plankton communities and summertime declines in algal abundance associated with low dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kurt D.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    during much of the growing season. A general seasonal trend in the phytoplankton assemblages was observed, with dominance by filamentous centric diatoms Stephanodiscus and Melosira in spring and early summer, and flagellated cryptophytes and green algae, particularly Chlamydomonas sp., in late-summer; or, in 2008, dominance by blue-green algae Anabaena flos-aquae and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae during the Wapato Lake bloom event. There were 99 zooplankton taxa identified from the Tualatin River in 2006–08, composed primarily of cladocerans, copepods, and rotifers. A seasonal increase in zooplankton abundance was observed in early summer just as or shortly after the phytoplankton population began to increase, with populations growing to 15,000−120,000 organisms per cubic meter in the lower river. Zooplankton abundance showed a predictable and distinct longitudinal downstream increase, particularly downstream of Highway 99W (RM 11.6). Although grazing rates were not measured, the data suggest that, at times, zooplankton grazing may affect algal abundance and species composition in the Tualatin River, with diatoms becoming relatively less abundant and flagellated cryptophytes and green algae relatively more abundant during periods when zooplankton densities were highest. Multivariate statistical analyses identified soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), natural flow, flow augmentation, and WWTF effluent as important factors influencing Tualatin River phytoplankton populations, with zooplankton density (particularly rotifers and copepods), specific conductance, chloride, and water temperature also having an important influence. Although SRP was highly correlated with the plankton communities, that correlation was likely the result of high or low algal activity (uptake) as SRP concentrations were often reduced to low levels during blooms. While previous studies have already established that phosphorus, among other factors such as flow, places a theoretical cap on the size of the

  17. Environmental perturbations at the early Eocene ETM2, H2, and I1 events as inferred by Tethyan calcareous plankton (Terche section, northeastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Roberta; Luciani, Valeria; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Boscolo Galazzo, Flavia; Dallanave, Edoardo; Westerhold, Thomas; Sprovieri, Mario; Telch, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Several early Eocene hyperthermals have been recently investigated and characterized in terms of temperature anomalies and oceanographic changes. The effects of these climatic perturbations on biotic communities are much less constrained. Here we present new records from the Terche section (northeastern Italy) that, for the first time, integrates data on planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils across three post-Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). The biomagnetostratigraphic framework generated at Terche allows us to confidently relate such CIEs to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), H2, and I1 events. Each of these events coincides with lithological anomalies characterized by significantly lower calcium carbonate content (marly units, MUs). We interpret these MUs as mainly linked to an effect of increased terrigenous dilution, as dissolution proxies do not display significant variations. Calcareous plankton assemblages change significantly across these events and radiolarians increase. Observed changes suggest that transient warming and environmental perturbations, though more intense during ETM2, occurred during each of the three investigated perturbations. Variations among calcareous plankton suggest increase in surface-water eutrophication with respect to the pre-event conditions, coupled with a weakening of the upper water-column thermal stratification. Higher nutrient discharge was related to intensification of the hydrological cycle as a consequence of the warmer climate. These conditions persisted during the early CIE recovery, implying slower recovery rates for the environment and biota than for the carbon cycle.

  18. Ocean-lagoon water and plankton exchanges in a semi-closed pearl farming atoll lagoon (Ahe, Tuamotu archipelago, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, M.; Rodier, M.; Guillaumot, C.; Thomas, Y.; Henry, K.; Andréfouët, S.

    2017-05-01

    In atoll lagoons, plankton richness is highly dependent on water exchange with the ocean through the atoll rim. However, the dynamics of the physical and biological fluxes at the lagoon-ocean interface remain poorly characterized. Here, we studied the combined effects of lagoon-ocean water exchanges and local environmental conditions on the phyto- and zooplankton abundance and community structure across the atoll lagoon rim of Ahe (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia). Plankton and environmental variables were monitored in May 2013 (i) at several stations inside and outside the lagoon and (ii) during time-series corresponding to ebb-flood tidal cycles in the two types of channels connecting the lagoon to the ocean: at the passage (300 m long and about 11 m deep) and in hoa (i.e reef-flat less than 50 cm depth). Our results highlight tidally-driven selective plankton exchanges between the lagoon and external ocean. Phytoplankton (chlorophyll-a) and zooplankton biomass were respectively 4 times and 7 times higher in the lagoon than at stations outside the atoll lagoon. Copepoda was the dominant zooplankton group at the oceanic station (>75% abundance) whereas meroplankton (with bivalve larvae most common) was dominant at the lagoon stations (54%), in the passage (55-82%) and in hoa (>80%). These differences between sites suggest a loss of bivalve larvae through export to the ocean and retention and/or increased production of copepods in the lagoon. The daily export of bivalve larvae represents a low percentage of the lagoon stock, in agreement with previously published larval dispersal numerical models. The retention of copepods could constitute a significant input of nutrients and organic matter (through excretion, feces release, decomposition, and remineralization) into the lagoon.

  19. Overendocytosis of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles increases apoptosis and triggers autophagic cell death in human osteosarcoma cell under a spinning magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shaohua; Li, Jingxiong; Du, Chonghua; Huang, Zhongming; Chen, Guangnan; Yan, Weiqi

    2017-02-07

    The toxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) is still a vital topic of debate and the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, overdose SPIONs could induce osteosarcoma cell death and the effects were exaggerated when combined with spinning magnetic field (SMF). In the combination group, mitochondrial transmembrane potential decrease more obviously and reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to generate much higher in line with that of the apoptosis ratio. Meantime, amount of autophagy was induced. Inhibiting the autophagy generation by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) increase cell viability but decrease the caspase 3/7 and caspase 8 activities in combination groups, and inhibiting apoptosis took the same effect. In the end, the SPIONs effects on xenograft mice was examed by intratumoral injection. The result showed that the combination group could greatly decrease the tumor volume and prolong the lifespan of mice. In sum, the result indicated that overdose SPIONs induced ROS generation, and excessive ROS induced by combination of SPIONs and SMF contribute to autophagy formation, which play a apoptosis-promoting role that formed as a platform to recruits initiate the caspase activities.

  20. Particle segregation during explosive dispersal of binary particle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David L.; Loiseau, Jason; Marr, Bradley J.; Goroshin, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles surrounding a spherical high explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. The shock-compacted particle layer typically fractures into discrete fragments which move radially outwards on ballistic trajectories. The fragments shed particles in their wakes forming jet-like structures. The tendency to form jets depends on the mass-ratio of the particles to explosive and the type of particles. Brittle or soft, ductile particles are more susceptible to forming jets during compaction and dispersal, whereas particles that are comprised of material with moderate hardness, high compressive strength and high toughness are much less prone to forming jets. Experiments have been carried out to determine the degree of particle segregation that occurs during the explosive dispersal of a uniform, binary mixture containing both "jetting" (silicon carbide) and "non-jetting" (steel) particles with various mass fractions of each particle type. During the dispersal of mixtures that contain predominantly non-jetting (steel) particles, the steel particles form a stable layer whereas the jetting (silicon carbide) particles rapidly segregate and form jets which are confined within the shell of steel particles. As the fraction of silicon carbide particles increases, the jet structures dominate the particle motion and the steel particles are entrained into the jet structures.

  1. Trade-offs between competition and defense specialists among unicellular planktonic organisms: the "killing the winner" hypothesis revisited

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, Christian; Bouvier, Thierry; Weinbauer, Markus G; Thingstad, T Frede

    2010-01-01

    .... In the special case of unicellular planktonic organisms, the theoretical framework describing the trade-offs between competition and defense specialists is known as the "killing the winner" hypothesis (KtW...

  2. A multivariate statistical study with a factor analysis of recent planktonic foraminiferal distribution in the Coromandel Coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, K.K.

    A study of planktonic foraminiferal assemblages from 19 stations in the neritic and oceanic regions off the Coromandel Coast, Bay of Bengal has been made using a multivariate statistical method termed as factor analysis. On the basis of abundance...

  3. Differences in carbohydrate profiles in batch culture grown planktonic and biofilm cells of Amphora rostrata Wm. Sm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Bhosle, N.B.

    modes of growth, the concentration of total carbohydrates, carbohydrate fractions, neutral carbohydrates, uronic acids and amino sugars in planktonic and biofilm cells of Amphora rostrata were measured. The results showed that the distribution...

  4. FAKTOR-FAKTOR LINGKUNGAN ABIOTIK DAN KEANEKARAGAMAN PLANKTON SEBAGAI INDIKATOR KUALITAS PERAIRAN DANAU TOBA (Environmental Abiotic Factors and the Diversity of Plankton as Water Quality Indicators in Lake Toba, North Sumatera, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternala Alexander Barus

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui faktor-faktor lingkungan dan keanekaragaman plankton sebagai indikator kualitas perairan Danau Toba, Sumatera Utara. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan pada bulan April – Mei 2003 pada 3 stasiun pengambilan sampel (Parapat, Simanindo dan Balige. Dari hasil penelitian diidentifikasi sebanyak 93 genera plankton (7 kelompok fitoplankton dan 2 kelompok zooplankton. Dari hasil perhitungan nilai indeks keanekaragaman Shannon-Wiener memperlihatkan bahwa komunitas plankton di ketiga lokasi pengamatan adalah mirip. Nilai indeks keanekaragaman menunjukkan bahwa perairan mengalami pencemaran sedang.   ABSTRACT The aim of the study is to investigate the environmental abiotic factors and the diversity of plankton as water quality indicators in Lake Toba ecosystem, North of Sumatera. The study was done on April to May, 2003 in three sampling stations (Parapat, Simanindo and Balige. Ninety three genera of plankton (seven groups of phytoplankton and two groups of zooplankton were identified. The calculated values of diversity index (Shannon-Wiener showed that plankton community in three stations is quite similar. The scores of diversity index were categorized into moderately polluted by organic matters.

  5. Genetic fingerprinting of plankton community provides new insights into aquatic ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Qingyun; YU Yuhe; FENG Weisong

    2006-01-01

    Over the past two decades, molecular techniques have been widely used in ecological study and molecular ecology has been one of the most important branches of ecology. Meanwhile, genetic fingerprinting analyses have significantly enhanced our knowledge of the diversity and evolutionary relations of the planktonic organisms. Compared with conventional approaches in ecological study ( e. g.morphological classification), genetic fingerprinting techniques are simpler and much more effective. This review provides an overview of the principles, advantages and limitations of the commonly used DNA fingerprinting techniques in plankton research. The aim of this overview is to assess where we have been, where we are now and what the future holds for solving aquatic ecological problems with molecular-level information.

  6. New data on the trace metal composition of the planktonic foraminifera microfossils of the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, L. L.; Oskina, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports new data on the trace metal composition of planktonic foraminifer shells from surface sediments and cores (fraction >0.1 mm) in the central part of the Atlantic Ocean. This investigation has made it possible to identify a considerable accumulation of trace elements from water due to calcite entering into the crystal lattice under biomineralization and adsorption on the shell surface and pores, despite the fact that the shells are depleted in trace elements relative to pelagic clays. The trace element content in planktonic foraminifer microfossils is characterized by temporal variability, which is the most pronounced in long cores (Holocene-Upper Pleistocene) and reflects the sedimentation paleoenvironment in the ocean.

  7. Progress in Late Cretaceous planktonic foraminiferal stable isotope paleoecology and implications for paleoceanographic reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrizzo, Maria Rose; Falzoni, Francesca; Huber, Brian T.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.

    2015-04-01

    Paleoecological preferences proposed for Cretaceous planktonic foraminiferal taxa have traditionally been based on morphological analogies with depth-stratified modern species, on biofacies comparison in continental margin and deepwater settings, and limited oxygen and carbon stable isotope data. These studies concluded that large-sized, keeled and heavily calcified planktonic foraminifera generally lived at deeper levels in the surface waters than small-sized, thinner-walled non-keeled species. Stable isotope data have been used to infer information on paleotemperature, paleoceanography and paleoproductivity of ancient oceans and constrain biological paleo-activities (i.e. photosymbiosis and respiration) of fossil species. These studies have suggested that the depth-distribution model based on analogy with modern taxa might not be fully applicable for Cretaceous species, and found particularly 13C-enriched values in some Maastrichtian multiserial taxa that have been related to the activity of photosymbionts. We have collected about 1500 δ18O and δ13C species-specific analyses on glassy preserved planktonic foraminifera from Tanzania (Tanzania Drilling Project TDP sites 23, 28 and 32) and well-preserved planktonic foraminifera from other mid-low latitude localities (Shatsky Rise, northwestern Pacific Ocean, ODP Leg 198 Hole 1210B; Exmouth Plateau, eastern Indian Ocean, ODP Leg 122, Hole 762C; Eratosthenes Seamount, eastern Mediterranean, ODP Leg 160, Hole 967E; Blake Nose, central Atlantic Ocean, ODP Leg 171B, holes 1050C and 1052E) to investigate Late Cretaceous species paleoecological preferences, life strategies and depth distribution in the surface water column. Our results indicates that several large-sized (> 500 μm) double-keeled species belonging to the genera Dicarinella, Marginotruncana and Contusotruncana, generally interpreted as deep to thermocline dwellers, instead occupied shallow/warm layers of the water column, whilst not all biserial species

  8. Influence of glyphosate in planktonic and biofilm growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Schneider Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the impact of different concentrations of glyphosate (Rondup® on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442 inoculated in MHB + glyphosate (0.845 ppm, 1.690 ppm, 8.45 ppm, 16.90 ppm, 84.50 ppm, 169 ppm, 845 ppm, and 1690 ppm and cultured in normoxia and anoxia, following their OD560nm every hour for 24 h. Biofilms of adapted cells were formed in the presence of glyphosate (0.845 to 1690 ppm in normoxia and anoxia for 36 h. Glyphosate at concentrations higher than 84.5 ppm reduces the cell density of planktonic aerobic cultures (p 0.05, and more pronounced over 169 ppm. Anaerobic biofilms have their growth more readily favored (p < 0.05, regardless of concentration. In a concentration-dependent manner, glyphosate interferes with the growth ability of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442.

  9. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zinab Mohsenipour; Mehdi Hassanshahian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobrot...

  10. Development of a real-time PCR assay for detection of planktonic red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus (Tilesius 1815)) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Pamela C.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Morado, J. Frank; Eckert, Ginny L.

    2012-01-01

    The Alaskan red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) fishery was once one of the most economically important single-species fisheries in the world, but is currently depressed. This fishery would benefit from improved stock assessment capabilities. Larval crab distribution is patchy temporally and spatially, requiring extensive sampling efforts to locate and track larval dispersal. Large-scale plankton surveys are generally cost prohibitive because of the effort required for collection and the time and taxonomic expertise required to sort samples to identify plankton individually via light microscopy. Here, we report the development of primers and a dual-labeled probe for use in a DNA-based real-time polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the red king crab, mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I for the detection of red king crab larvae DNA in plankton samples. The assay allows identification of plankton samples containing crab larvae DNA and provides an estimate of DNA copy number present in a sample without sorting the plankton sample visually. The assay was tested on DNA extracted from whole red king crab larvae and plankton samples seeded with whole larvae, and it detected DNA copies equivalent to 1/10,000th of a larva and 1 crab larva/5mL sieved plankton, respectively. The real-time polymerase chain reaction assay can be used to screen plankton samples for larvae in a fraction of the time required for traditional microscopial methods, which offers advantages for stock assessment methodologies for red king crab as well as a rapid and reliable method to assess abundance of red king crab larvae as needed to improve the understanding of life history and population processes, including larval population dynamics.

  11. The continuity of living matter and the discontinuities of its constituents: do plankton and benthos really exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, F; Belmonte, G; Fanelli, G; Piraino, S; Rubino, F

    1996-04-01

    Plankton and benthos are popular concepts identifying two ways of life of aquatic organisms. Their spatial separation led to the development of different sampling techniques and to separate conceptualizations of the principles governing these subsets of the aquatic environment. Reciprocal connections between plankton and benthos, however, are very strong both from a functional (energy fluxes) and a structural (life cycle dynamics) point of view. A full appreciation of such links is forcing marine ecology towards a more integrated approach.

  12. Viruses, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates in Laptev Sea plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Zabotkina, E. A.; Romanenko, A. V.; Romanova, N. D.; Makarevich, P. R.; Wenger, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The paper considers the concentrations and functional characteristics of viruses, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates determined for the first time in the Laptev Sea in August-September, 2014. The abundance of bacteria, viruses, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates varied from 110.1 × 103 to 828.4 × 103 cells/mL, from 384.2 × 103 to 2932.8 × 103 particles/mL, and from 108 to 651 cells/mL, respectively. The daily bacterioplankton production varied from 4.2 × 103 to 381.7 × 103 cells/mL, with an average of 117.6 × 103 cells/mL. Electron transmission microscopy has for the first time shown that the frequency of visibly infected bacterial cells varied from 0.2 to 2.0% (0.8% on average) of NB. The average virus-induced mortality of bacteria was 6.3% of bacterioplankton production, with variations ranging from 1.4 to 16.9%. Grazing on bacteria by heterotrophic nanoflagellates contributed more to bacteria mortality than virus-induced bacterial lysis. By grazing on bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates consumed large quantities of viruses located on the surface and inside bacterial cells.

  13. Measurements of fluid transport by controllable vertical migrations of plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Isabel A.; Dabiri, John O.

    2016-11-01

    Diel vertical migration of zooplankton has been proposed to be a significant contributor to local and possibly large-scale fluid transport in the ocean. However, studies of this problem to date have been limited to order-of-magnitude estimates based on first principles and a small number of field observations. In this work, we leverage the phototactic behavior of zooplankton to stimulate controllable vertical migrations in the laboratory and to study the associated fluid transport and mixing. Building upon a previous prototype system, a laser guidance system induces vertical swimming of brine shrimp (Artemia salina) in a 2.1 meter tall, density-stratified water tank. The animal swimming speed and spacing during the controlled vertical migration is characterized with video analysis. A schlieren imaging system is utilized to visualize density perturbations to a stable stratification for quantification of fluid displacement length scales and restratification timescales. These experiments can add to our understanding of the dynamics of active particles in stratified flows. NSF and US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  14. Microbial eukaryote plankton communities of high-mountain lakes from three continents exhibit strong biogeographic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filker, Sabine; Sommaruga, Ruben; Vila, Irma; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    Microbial eukaryotes hold a key role in aquatic ecosystem functioning. Yet, their diversity in freshwater lakes, particularly in high-mountain lakes, is relatively unknown compared with the marine environment. Low nutrient availability, low water temperature and high ultraviolet radiation make most high-mountain lakes extremely challenging habitats for life and require specific molecular and physiological adaptations. We therefore expected that these ecosystems support a plankton diversity that differs notably from other freshwater lakes. In addition, we hypothesized that the communities under study exhibit geographic structuring. Our rationale was that geographic dispersal of small-sized eukaryotes in high-mountain lakes over continental distances seems difficult. We analysed hypervariable V4 fragments of the SSU rRNA gene to compare the genetic microbial eukaryote diversity in high-mountain lakes located in the European Alps, the Chilean Altiplano and the Ethiopian Bale Mountains. Microbial eukaryotes were not globally distributed corroborating patterns found for bacteria, multicellular animals and plants. Instead, the plankton community composition emerged as a highly specific fingerprint of a geographic region even on higher taxonomic levels. The intraregional heterogeneity of the investigated lakes was mirrored in shifts in microbial eukaryote community structure, which, however, was much less pronounced compared with interregional beta-diversity. Statistical analyses revealed that on a regional scale, environmental factors are strong predictors for plankton community structures in high-mountain lakes. While on long-distance scales (>10 000 km), isolation by distance is the most plausible scenario, on intermediate scales (up to 6000 km), both contemporary environmental factors and historical contingencies interact to shift plankton community structures.

  15. Spatial heterogeneity in the structure of the planktonic food web in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Kathrine; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Bo Pedersen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    production as well as the greatest percentage of total water column primary production being channelled into copepods were recorded. The regions where subsurface phytoplankton peaks were predicted to form were, thus, characterised by a 'classical' food web in which energy is efficiently transferred...... into larger zooplankters. We argue that heterogeneity in the nutrient status of phytoplankton in the subsurface peak can be important in controlling the type ('classical' or 'regenerated') of planktonic food web found in the water column as a whole...

  16. Bioaccumulation and Trophic Transfer of Long-Lived Radionuclides in Arctic Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    brown macroalga ( Fucus vesiculosus ), uptake from the dissolved phase was measured, and for the sea stars and clams uptake from contaminated food was...research is to examine the bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of important radionuclides in important planktonic components of Arctic waters This project...has been ZLing the extent to which select species of boreal copepod species bioconcentrate released raLnucliies from water and from phytoplankton

  17. Study of the nutrient and plankton dynamics in Lake Tanganyika using a reduced-gravity model

    OpenAIRE

    Naithani, Jaya; Darchambeau, François; Deleersnijder, Eric; Descy, Jean*-Pierre; Wolanski, Eric

    2007-01-01

    An eco-hydrodynamic (ECOH) model is proposed for Lake Tanganyika to study the plankton productivity. The hydrodynamic sub-model solves the non-linear, reduced-gravity equations in which wind is the dominant forcing. The ecological sub-model for the epilimnion comprises nutrients, primary production, phytoplankton biomass and zooplankton biomass. In the absence of significant terrestrial input of nutrients, the nutrient loss is compensated for by seasonal, wind-driven, turbulent entrainment of...

  18. High genetic diversity and novelty in eukaryotic plankton assemblages inhabiting saline lakes in the Qaidam basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Wang

    Full Text Available Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing <90% identity to any previously reported sequence in GenBank. At least 4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs in mesosaline lakes, while up to eighteen OTUs in hypersaline lakes show very low CCM and CEM scores, indicating that these sequences are highly distantly related to any existing sequence. Most of the 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%, whereas Stramenopiles (26.65% and Alveolates (10.84% are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%, whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50% and Xiaochaidan (1.15%. Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution.

  19. Prevalence of Colacium vesiculosum (Colaciales: Euglenophyceae on planktonic crustaceans in a subtropical shallow lake of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Zalocar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Colacium vesiculosum (Euglenophyceae is an epibiont common on planktonic microcrustaceans of continental waters. The interaction between epibionts and substrate organisms is not very well known, particularly in subtropical environments of South America. In the present work, we analyzed the prevalence, density, biomass and attachment sites of C. vesiculosum on planktonic microcrustaceans from Paiva Lake, a subtropical lake of Argentina. With the aim to evaluate whether epibionts affect the filtering rates of Notodiaptomus spiniger, the dominant planktonic crustacean, we carried out bioassays using phytoplankton <53µm. Crustaceans were sampled using a PVC tube (1.2m long and 10cm in diameter, filtering 50L of water through a 53µm-mesh. Microcrustaceans were counted in Bogorov chambers under a stereoscopic microscope. The infested organisms were separated and observed with a photonic microscope to determine density and biovolume of epibionts, by analyzing their distribution on the exoskeleton. The prevalence of C. vesiculosum was higher in adult crustaceans than in their larvae and juveniles. The most infested group was that of calanoid copepods, related to their high density. The attachment sites on the exoskeleton were found to be the portions of the body which have a higher probability of encounter with epibionts during locomotion and feeding, i.e., antennae and thoracic legs in copepods, and thoracic legs and postabdomen in cladocerans. The similar values found in the filtering rate of infested and uninfested individuals of N. spiniger and the constant prevalence (<40% of epibiont algae, suggest that C. vesiculosum does not condition the life of planktonic crustaceans of Paiva Lake. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1295-1306. Epub 2011 September 01.

  20. Morphological Studies on the Infraciliature of a Planktonic Ciliate, Tintinnopsis brasiliensis (Ciliophora: Tintinina)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A poorly-described marine planktonic ciliate, Tintinnopsis brasiliensis Kofoid & Campbell, 1929, collected from the Taiping Cape of Qingdao, China, was morphologically investigated based on permanent preparation after protargol impregnation and was compared with other related congeners. According to the infraciliature, three ciliary groups can be recognized, which reveals a very stable structure among specimens and denotes that the pattern of infraciliature is, apart from the features of the lorica, a highly reliable criterion for species identification.

  1. Observations and Measurements of Planktonic Bioluminescence in and Around a Milky Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    produced by plankton subjected to mechanical stimulation) can be observed from breaking wave crests and swimming shoals of fish . The Arabian Sea is...identification: growth at 4 ’C, growth at 35 ’C, ainylase, lipase , gelatinase. growth on maltose, cellobiose, gluconate, BIOLUMINESCENCE IN MILKY SEA 57...neofluar oil -immersion objective. BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS Surface-water bioluminescence Surface-water bioluminescence was measured continuously during

  2. Defining planktonic protist functional groups on mechanisms for energy and nutrient acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Aditee; Flynn, Kevin J.; Tillmann, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Arranging organisms into functional groups aids ecological research by grouping organisms (irrespective of phylogenetic origin) that interact with environmental factors in similar ways. Planktonic protists traditionally have been split between photoautotrophic “phytoplankton” and phagotrophic...... for phototrophy, and (iv) non-constitutive mixotrophs (NCMs) that acquire their phototrophic capacity by ingesting specific (SNCM) or general non-specific (GNCM) prey. For the first time, we incorporate these functional groups within a foodweb structure and show, using model outputs, that there is scope...

  3. Shifts between gelatinous and crustacean plankton in a coastal upwelling region

    OpenAIRE

    Bode, A.; Álvarez-Ossorio-Costa, M.T. (María Teresa); Miranda, A; Ruiz-villarreal, M

    2013-01-01

    proyectos RADIALES (IEO) y EURO-BASIN (Ref. 264933, 7FP) Variability in the dominance of copepods vs. gelatinous plankton was analysed using monthly time-series covering the last 55 years and related to changes in climatic, oceanographic, and fishery conditions in the upwelling region of Galicia (NW Spain). Seasonality was generally the main component of variability in all groups, both along the coast and in the nearby ocean, but no common long-term trend was found. Coastal copepo...

  4. Estimating planktonic diversity through spatial dominance patterns in a model ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soccodato, Alice; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Lévy, Marina; Jahn, Oliver; Follows, Michael J; De Monte, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    In the open ocean, the observation and quantification of biodiversity patterns is challenging. Marine ecosystems are indeed largely composed by microbial planktonic communities whose niches are affected by highly dynamical physico-chemical conditions, and whose observation requires advanced methods for morphological and molecular classification. Optical remote sensing offers an appealing complement to these in-situ techniques. Global-scale coverage at high spatiotemporal resolution is however achieved at the cost of restrained information on the local assemblage. Here, we use a coupled physical and ecological model ocean simulation to explore one possible metrics for comparing measures performed on such different scales. We show that a large part of the local diversity of the virtual plankton ecosystem - corresponding to what accessible by genomic methods - can be inferred from crude, but spatially extended, information - as conveyed by remote sensing. Shannon diversity of the local community is indeed highly correlated to a 'seascape' index, which quantifies the surrounding spatial heterogeneity of the most abundant functional group. The error implied in drastically reducing the resolution of the plankton community is shown to be smaller in frontal regions as well as in regions of intermediate turbulent energy. On the spatial scale of hundreds of kms, patterns of virtual plankton diversity are thus largely sustained by mixing communities that occupy adjacent niches. We provide a proof of principle that in the open ocean information on spatial variability of communities can compensate for limited local knowledge, suggesting the possibility of integrating in-situ and satellite observations to monitor biodiversity distribution at the global scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional Divergence of Hsp90 Genetic Interactions in Biofilm and Planktonic Cellular States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Diezmann

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is among the most prevalent opportunistic fungal pathogens. Its capacity to cause life-threatening bloodstream infections is associated with the ability to form biofilms, which are intrinsically drug resistant reservoirs for dispersal. A key regulator of biofilm drug resistance and dispersal is the molecular chaperone Hsp90, which stabilizes many signal transducers. We previously identified 226 C. albicans Hsp90 genetic interactors under planktonic conditions, of which 56 are involved in transcriptional regulation. Six of these transcriptional regulators have previously been implicated in biofilm formation, suggesting that Hsp90 genetic interactions identified in planktonic conditions may have functional significance in biofilms. Here, we explored the relationship between Hsp90 and five of these transcription factor genetic interactors: BCR1, MIG1, TEC1, TUP1, and UPC2. We deleted each transcription factor gene in an Hsp90 conditional expression strain, and assessed biofilm formation and morphogenesis. Strikingly, depletion of Hsp90 conferred no additional biofilm defect in the mutants. An interaction was observed in which deletion of BCR1 enhanced filamentation upon reduction of Hsp90 levels. Further, although Hsp90 modulates expression of TEC1, TUP1, and UPC2 in planktonic conditions, it has no impact in biofilms. Lastly, we probed for physical interactions between Hsp90 and Tup1, whose WD40 domain suggests that it might interact with Hsp90 directly. Hsp90 and Tup1 formed a stable complex, independent of temperature or developmental state. Our results illuminate a physical interaction between Hsp90 and a key transcriptional regulator of filamentation and biofilm formation, and suggest that Hsp90 has distinct genetic interactions in planktonic and biofilm cellular states.

  6. Experimentally determined temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    J. M. Holding; Duarte, C. M.; Arrieta, J. M.; R. Vaquer-Sunyer; Coello-Camba, A.; P. Wassmann; S. Agustí

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half of its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase the rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rat...

  7. Viral to metazoan marine plankton nucleotide sequences from the Tara Oceans expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Adriana; Poulain, Julie; Engelen, Stefan; Labadie, Karine; Romac, Sarah; Ferrera, Isabel; Albini, Guillaume; Aury, Jean-Marc; Belser, Caroline; Bertrand, Alexis; Cruaud, Corinne; Da Silva, Corinne; Dossat, Carole; Gavory, Frédérick; Gas, Shahinaz; Guy, Julie; Haquelle, Maud; Jacoby, E'krame; Jaillon, Olivier; Lemainque, Arnaud; Pelletier, Eric; Samson, Gaëlle; Wessner, Mark; Acinas, Silvia G; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Logares, Ramiro; Fernández-Gómez, Beatriz; Bowler, Chris; Cochrane, Guy; Amid, Clara; Hoopen, Petra Ten; De Vargas, Colomban; Grimsley, Nigel; Desgranges, Elodie; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Poulton, Nicole; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Sullivan, Matthew B; Brum, Jennifer R; Duhaime, Melissa B; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Pesant, Stéphane; Karsenti, Eric; Wincker, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    A unique collection of oceanic samples was gathered by the Tara Oceans expeditions (2009-2013), targeting plankton organisms ranging from viruses to metazoans, and providing rich environmental context measurements. Thanks to recent advances in the field of genomics, extensive sequencing has been performed for a deep genomic analysis of this huge collection of samples. A strategy based on different approaches, such as metabarcoding, metagenomics, single-cell genomics and metatranscriptomics, has been chosen for analysis of size-fractionated plankton communities. Here, we provide detailed procedures applied for genomic data generation, from nucleic acids extraction to sequence production, and we describe registries of genomics datasets available at the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA, www.ebi.ac.uk/ena). The association of these metadata to the experimental procedures applied for their generation will help the scientific community to access these data and facilitate their analysis. This paper complements other efforts to provide a full description of experiments and open science resources generated from the Tara Oceans project, further extending their value for the study of the world's planktonic ecosystems.

  8. Plankton community dynamics in a subtropical lagoonal system and related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETÍCIA DONADEL

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Changes of the plankton community in a shallow, subtropical lagoonal system and its relation to environmental conditions were investigated during an annual cycle to provide information on its spatial and seasonal variation pattern. The study carried out at four sites (three in the Peixe lagoon and one in the Ruivo lagoon, which are located in the Lagoa do Peixe National Park, southern Brazil. The system has a temporary connection to the Atlantic Ocean by a narrow channel. The phytoplankton density was higher in the Peixe lagoon whereas the specific richness was higher in the Ruivo lagoon which is also a site with the lower salinity. The phytoplankton biomass near the channel showed seasonal variation with the highest value in fall and lowest in winter. Zooplankton richness was inversely correlated with salinity, and had the highest values in the Ruivo lagoon. Ordination analysis indicated seasonal and spatial patterns in plankton community in this lagoonal system, related to variation in salinity. In addition, the wind action and precipitation were important factors on the spatial and seasonal salinity changes in the lagoon with direct influence on the plankton community dynamics.

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae Planktonic and Biofilm Reduction by Different Plant Extracts: In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Santos, Carlos Eduardo; Camargo Reis Mello, Daphne; Nishiama Theodoro, Lígia; De Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Back Brito, Graziella N.; Campos Junqueira, Juliana; Cardoso Jorge, Antonio Olavo; Dias de Oliveira, Luciane

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the action of Pfaffia paniculata K., Juglans regia L., and Rosmarius officinalis L. extracts against planktonic form and biofilm of Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 4352). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) values were determined for each extract by microdilution broth method, according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Next, antimicrobial activity of the extracts on biofilm was analyzed. For this, standardized suspension at 107 UFC/mL of K. pneumoniae was distributed into 96-well microplates (n = 10) and after 48 h at 37°C and biofilm was subjected to treatment for 5 min with the extracts at a concentration of 200 mg/mL. ANOVA and Tukey tests (5%) were used to verify statistical significant reduction (p < 0.05) of planktonic form and biofilm. P paniculata K., R. officinalis L., and J. regia L. showed reductions in biomass of 55.6, 58.1, and 18.65% and cell viability reduction of 72.4, 65.1, and 31.5%, respectively. The reduction obtained with P. paniculata and R. officinalis extracts was similar to the reduction obtained with chlorhexidine digluconate 2%. In conclusion, all extracts have microbicidal action on the planktonic form but only P. paniculata K. and R. officinalis L. were effective against biofilm. PMID:28004034

  10. Spatial heterogeneity in a deep artificial lake plankton community revealed by PCR-DGGE fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Xu; Wei, Yuquan; Qiu, Linlin; Wei, Zimin; Li, Fuheng

    2015-05-01

    To explore the spatial heterogeneity of plankton communities in a deep artificial lake (Songhua Lake, China), samples were collected at seven sites. Samples were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S and 18S rRNA genes and specific bands were sequenced. Cluster analysis of the DGGE profiles revealed that all of the samples grouped into two distinct clusters, in accordance with sampling site; while in each cluster, the divergence of sub-clusters correlated with sampling depth. Sequence analysis of selected dominant DGGE bands revealed that most sequenced phylotypes (84%) exhibited ≥97% similarity to the closest sequences in GenBank, and were affiliated with ten common freshwater plankton phyla ( Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Bacillariophyta, Pyrrophyta, Cryptophyta, Ciliophora, Stramenopiles, and Rotifera). Several of these groups are also found worldwide, indicating the cosmopolitan distribution of the phylotypes. The relationships between DGGE patterns and environmental factors were analyzed by redundancy analysis (RDA). The results suggested that, total nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and CODMn concentrations, and water temperature were strongly correlated with the variation in plankton composition.

  11. Planktonic foraminiferal rare earth elements as a potential new aeolian dust proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Liu, Y.; Lo, L.; Wei, K.; Shen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Characteristics of rare earth elements (REEs) have widely been used as important tracers in many fields of earth sciences, including lithosphere research, environmental change, ocean circulation and other natural carbonate materials. Foraminiferal test REE signatures have been suggested to reflect ambient seawater conditions and serve as valuable proxies in the fields of paleoceanography and paleoclimate. Here we present a 60-kyr planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white, 250-300 μm) REE record of a sediment core MD05-2925 (9°20.61'S, 151°27.61'E, water depth 1660 m) from the Solomon Sea. The REE diagram shows two dominant sources of local seawater and nearby terrestrial input. The variability of foraminiferal REE/Ca time series is different from Mg/Ca-inferred sea surface temperature and δ18O records during the past 60-kyr. This inconsistency suggests that planktonic foraminiferal REE content cannot result only from changes in ice volume and temperature. Synchroneity between high planktonic foraminiferal REE content and Antarctic ice core dust amount record implies the same dust sources, probably from Australia or mainland China. Our results suggest that foraminiferal REE can potentially be as a new dust proxy and record dry/humid conditions at the source area.

  12. Comparison of the cytotoxic effect of polystyrene latex nanoparticles on planktonic cells and bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Fujisawa, Eri; Itoh, Shikibu; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The cytotoxic effect of positively charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles (PSL NPs) was compared between planktonic bacterial cells and bacterial biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and a colony counting method. Pseudomonas fluorescens, which is commonly used in biofilm studies, was employed as the model bacteria. We found that the negatively charged bacterial surface of the planktonic cells was almost completely covered with positively charged PSL NPs, leading to cell death, as indicated by the NP concentration being greater than that required to achieve single layer coverage. In addition, the relationship between surface coverage and cell viability of P. fluorescens cells correlated well with the findings in other bacterial cells ( Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis). However, most of the bacterial cells that formed the biofilm were viable despite the positively charged PSL NPs being highly toxic to planktonic bacterial cells. This indicated that bacterial cells embedded in the biofilm were protected by self-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that provide resistance to antibacterial agents. In conclusion, mature biofilms covered with EPS exhibit resistance to NP toxicity as well as antibacterial agents.

  13. Continuous Plankton Recorder sampling off the east coast of North America: history and status [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossi, J. W.; John, A. W. G.; Sameoto, D.

    2003-08-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey has sampled plankton on 14 routes off the coasts of the northeast United States and Canada between 1959 and 2000. Six of these routes are still operating and are sampled on a monthly basis. Some 2047 CPR tows have been made to the end of 2000 and the resulting database represents the most extensive time series of marine plankton available anywhere in the northwest Atlantic. The location and time span of coverage of each route is presented. In addition selected information is presented on: zooplankton abundance as departures from baselines for the northeast US continental shelf; interannual variation in seasonality of Gulf of Maine phytoplankton; zooplankton relationships to local hydrography of the Gulf of Maine and to the North Atlantic Oscillation; time-space matrices of zooplankton abundance and anomalies southeast of New York City; time series of phyto- and zooplankton on the Scotian Shelf; seasonal cycles of Phytoplankton Colour and of zooplankton on the Scotian Shelf and Georges Bank, and in the Gulf of Maine; and monthly abundance of zooplankton in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

  14. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J.; Walne, Anthony W.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2017-01-01

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity. PMID:28186097

  15. The ecology of plankton in biological oceanography: a tribute to Marta Estrada’s task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Solé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plankton ecology has been the object of intense research and progress in the last few decades. This has been partly due to technological advances that have facilitated the multidisciplinary and high-resolution sampling of ecosystems and improved experimentation and analytical methodologies, and to sophisticated modelling. In addition, exceptional researchers have had the vision to integrate all these innovative tools to form a solid theoretical background in ecology. Here we provide an overview of the outstanding research work conducted by Professor Marta Estrada and her pioneering contribution to different areas of research in the last four decades. Her research in biological oceanography has mainly focussed on phytoplankton ecology, taxonomy and physiology, the functional structure of plankton communities, and physical and biological interactions in marine ecosystems. She has combined a variety of field and laboratory approaches and methodologies, from microscopy to satellite observations, including in-depth statistical data analysis and modelling. She has been a reference for scientists all over the world. Here, her contributions to plankton ecology are summarized by some of her students and closest collaborators, who had the privilege to share their science and everyday experiences with her.

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae Planktonic and Biofilm Reduction by Different Plant Extracts: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas De Paula Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the action of Pfaffia paniculata K., Juglans regia L., and Rosmarius officinalis L. extracts against planktonic form and biofilm of Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 4352. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC values were determined for each extract by microdilution broth method, according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Next, antimicrobial activity of the extracts on biofilm was analyzed. For this, standardized suspension at 107 UFC/mL of K. pneumoniae was distributed into 96-well microplates (n=10 and after 48 h at 37°C and biofilm was subjected to treatment for 5 min with the extracts at a concentration of 200 mg/mL. ANOVA and Tukey tests (5% were used to verify statistical significant reduction (p<0.05 of planktonic form and biofilm. P paniculata K., R. officinalis L., and J. regia L. showed reductions in biomass of 55.6, 58.1, and 18.65% and cell viability reduction of 72.4, 65.1, and 31.5%, respectively. The reduction obtained with P. paniculata and R. officinalis extracts was similar to the reduction obtained with chlorhexidine digluconate 2%. In conclusion, all extracts have microbicidal action on the planktonic form but only P. paniculata K. and R. officinalis L. were effective against biofilm.

  17. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2016-08-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics o