WorldWideScience

Sample records for planar organic molecules

  1. Empirical LCAO parameters for \\pi molecular orbitals in planar organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hawke, Laurence; Simserides, Constantinos

    2008-01-01

    We present a simplified LCAO model for the description of \\pi molecular orbitals in organic molecules containing \\pi-bonds between carbon, nitrogen, or oxygen atoms with sp2 hybridization, which we show to be quite accurate in predicting the energy of the highest occupied \\pi orbital and the first \\pi-\\pi* transition energy of a large set of organic compounds. We provide four empirical parameter values for the diagonal matrix elements of the LCAO description, corresponding to atoms of carbon, nitrogen with one pz electron, nitrogen with two pz electrons, and oxygen. The bond-distance dependent formula (proportional to 1/d^2) of Harrison is used for the non-diagonal matrix elements between neighboring atoms. The predictions of our calculations have been tested against available experimental results in more than sixty organic molecules, including benzene and its derivatives, polyacenes, aromatic hydrocarbons of various geometries, polyenes, ketones, aldehydes, azabenzenes, nucleic acids bases and others. The co...

  2. Organic Small Molecule as the Underlayer Toward High Performance Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Shan; Yang, Hao; Lou, Yanhui; Han, Liang; Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Haibo; Sun, Yinghui; Zou, Guifu

    2017-01-25

    The underlayer plays an important role for organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite formation and charge transport in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Here, we employ a classical organic small molecule, 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyltetracene (rubrene), as the underlayer of perovskite films to achieve 15.83% of power conversion efficiency with remarkable moisture tolerance exposed to the atmosphere. Experiments demonstrate rubrene hydrophobic underlayer not only drives the crystalline grain growth of high quality perovskite, but also contributes to the moisture tolerance of PSCs. Moreover, the matching energy level of the desirable underlayer is conductive to extracting holes and blocking electrons at anode in PSCs. This introduction of organic small molecule into PSCs provides alternative materials for interface optimization, as well as platform for flexible and wearable solar cells.

  3. Electronic structure of planar-quasicycled organic molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXEI N. PANKRATOV

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the HF/6-311G(d,p method, the electronic structure of the series of organic molecules, among which are malonaldehyde, acetylacetone, thiomalonaldehyde,’the derivatives of aniline 2-XC6H4NH2, phenol 2-XC6H4OH, benzenethiol 2-XC6H4SH (X = CHO, COOH, COO-, NO, NO2, OH, OCH3, SH, SCH3, F, Cl, Br, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-mercaptoquinoline, tropolone, has been studied. The intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB has been established to lead to a local electron redistribution in quasicycle, and primarily to the electron density transfer between the direct IHB participants – from the hydrogen atom toward the proton-aceptor atom. On forming the IHB of the S–H···O type, the electron density in general decreases on the sulphohydryl hydrogen atom and increases on the sulphur atom.

  4. Work-Function and Surface Energy Tunable Cyanoacrylic Acid Small-Molecule Derivative Interlayer on Planar ZnO Nanorods for Improved Organic Photovoltaic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Swapnil B; Ambade, Rohan B; Bagde, Sushil S; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2016-12-28

    The issue of work-function and surface energy is fundamental to "decode" the critical inorganic/organic interface in hybrid organic photovoltaics, which influences important photovoltaic events like exciton dissociation, charge transfer, photocurrent (Jsc), open-circuit voltage (Voc), etc. We demonstrate that by incorporating an interlayer of cyanoacrylic acid small molecular layer (SML) on solution-processed, spin-coated, planar ZnO nanorods (P-ZnO NRs), higher photovoltaic (PV) performances were achieved in both inverted organic photovoltaic (iOPV) and hybrid organic photovoltaic (HOPV) devices, where ZnO acts as an "electron-transporting layer" and as an "electron acceptor", respectively. For the tuned range of surface energy from 52.5 to 33 mN/m, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) iOPVs based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM) increases from 3.16% to 3.68%, and that based on poly[4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b;4,5b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-(4-(2-ethylhexyl)-3-fluorothieno[3,4-b]thiophene)-2-carboxylate-2-6-diyl)] (PTB7:Th):[6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) photoactive BHJ increases from 6.55% to 8.0%, respectively. The improved PV performance in iOPV devices is majorly attributed to enhanced photocurrents achieved as a result of reduced surface energy and greater electron affinity from the covalent attachment of the strong electron-withdrawing cyano moiety, while that in HOPV devices, where PCE increases from 0.21% to 0.79% for SML-modified devices, is ascribed to a large increase in Voc benefitted due to reduced work function effected from the presence of strong dipole moment in SML that points away from P-ZnO NRs.

  5. Rational design and characterization of high-efficiency planar A–π–D–π–A type electron donors in small molecule organic solar cells: A quantum chemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongmei [Gansu Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Eco-environment-related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070, Gansu (China); Department of Chemistry, Baoji College of Arts. and Sci., Baoji 721013, Shaanxi (China); Ding, Weilu [Gansu Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Eco-environment-related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070, Gansu (China); Geng, Zhiyuan, E-mail: zhiyuangeng@126.com [Gansu Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Eco-environment-related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070, Gansu (China); Wang, Li; Geng, Yun; Su, Zhongmin [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China); Yu, Hailing [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Jinlin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Taking the reported donor DR3TBDT as reference, a series of A–π–D–π–A type donor molecules involving different planar donor cores were designed and investigated by using density functional theory (DFT)/time-dependent DFT methods. Preliminary calculations on geometries, energy levels and spectrum properties show that four of the designed molecules (4, 5, 12 and 13) could become potential donor replacements of DR3TBDT due to their good planarity, larger light harvesting efficiencies and similar exciton migration capability. Additionally, several factors influencing on short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) were analyzed by in-depth quantum chemical investigations on the transition density matrix, charge transfer indexes, exciton binding energy and Gibbs free energy loss in charge dissociation process. Comparative analyses demonstrate that 4 with indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b′]dithiophene donor core has more significant electron transfer character and favorable exciton dissociation capability for enhancing the J{sub sc}, and would be potentially promising donor material in organic solar cells. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A series of A–π–D–π–A type donors with different donor core for OSC were designed. • The relationship between donor properties and device performance is explored by DFT. • An In-depth quantum chemical investigation on the affecting factors on J{sub sc}. • The efficiency of new donor 4 may surpass the reported donor DR3TBDT.

  6. Developing high-performance small molecule organic solar cells via a large planar structure and an electron-withdrawing central unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Liu, Yongtao; Sun, Yanna; Li, Miaomiao; Kan, Bin; Ke, Xin; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Xiangjian; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-12-22

    We designed and synthesized a new small molecule donor material named DR3TBDD using an electron-withdrawing unit BDD as the central building block. A PCE of 9.53% with a high Voc of around 1 V was achieved.

  7. Theoretical observation of hexaatomic molecules containing pentacoordinate planar carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The smallest molecules up to date containing a D5h pentacoordinate planar carbon (PPC) atom, CBe5 and CBe54-, are presented by means of ab initio calculations. To gain a better understanding about which electronic factors contribute to their stabilization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) were calculated. The data reported here suggest that D5h CBe5 is σ aromaticity in nature, while in D5h CBe54- π aromaticity is dominating. The classical octet rule is well satisfied in both molecules, and is one of the fundamental reasons to understand the stability of the pentagon structures. The Be5 ring serves as σ donor in D5h CBe5, and π-acceptor in D5h CBe54-. The D5h CBe54- possessing 18 valence electrons with a closed-shell electron configuration is the most plau-sible candidate for experimental detection.

  8. Organising cells into tissues: new roles for cell adhesion molecules in planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburi, Sakura; McNeill, Helen

    2005-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the coordinated organization of cells within the plane of the epithelium, first described in Drosophila. A Frizzled signalling pathway dedicated to PCP (the non-canonical Frizzled pathway) acts through Dishevelled and small G proteins, as does the classical Wnt pathway, but then diverges downstream of Dishevelled. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role for several atypical cadherin molecules (Fat, Dachsous and Flamingo) in controlling PCP signalling. Recent work has also indicated that the first sign of PCP during development is the polarized localization of PCP proteins (Frizzled, Flamingo, Dishevelled, etc). Exciting new data reveal that this PCP pathway is conserved to man.

  9. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

    2011-03-01

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  10. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  11. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  12. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençaǧa, Deniz; Carbon, Duane F.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  13. Energy level alignment at planar organic heterojunctions: influence of contact doping and molecular orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Andreas

    2017-02-14

    Planar organic heterojunctions are widely used in photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes, and bilayer field-effect transistors. The energy level alignment in the devices plays an important role in obtaining the aspired gap arrangement. Additionally, the π-orbital overlap between the involved molecules defines e.g. the charge-separation efficiency in solar cells due to charge-transfer effects. To account for both aspects, direct/inverse photoemission spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy were used to determine the energy level landscape and the molecular orientation at prototypical planar organic heterojunctions. The combined experimental approach results in a comprehensive model for the electronic and morphological characteristics of the interface between the two investigated molecular semiconductors. Following an introduction on heterojunctions used in devices and on energy levels of organic materials, the energy level alignment of planar organic heterojunctions will be discussed. The observed energy landscape is always determined by the individual arrangement between the energy levels of the molecules and the work function of the electrode. This might result in contact doping due to Fermi level pinning at the electrode for donor/acceptor heterojunctions, which also improves the solar cell efficiency. This pinning behaviour can be observed across an unpinned interlayer and results in charge accumulation at the donor/acceptor interface, depending on the transport levels of the respective organic semiconductors. Moreover, molecular orientation will affect the energy levels because of the anisotropy in ionisation energy and electron affinity and is influenced by the structural compatibility of the involved molecules at the heterojunction. High structural compatibility leads to π-orbital stacking between different molecules at a heterojunction, which is of additional interest for photovoltaic active interfaces and for ground

  14. Energy level alignment at planar organic heterojunctions: influence of contact doping and molecular orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Planar organic heterojunctions are widely used in photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes, and bilayer field-effect transistors. The energy level alignment in the devices plays an important role in obtaining the aspired gap arrangement. Additionally, the π-orbital overlap between the involved molecules defines e.g. the charge-separation efficiency in solar cells due to charge-transfer effects. To account for both aspects, direct/inverse photoemission spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy were used to determine the energy level landscape and the molecular orientation at prototypical planar organic heterojunctions. The combined experimental approach results in a comprehensive model for the electronic and morphological characteristics of the interface between the two investigated molecular semiconductors. Following an introduction on heterojunctions used in devices and on energy levels of organic materials, the energy level alignment of planar organic heterojunctions will be discussed. The observed energy landscape is always determined by the individual arrangement between the energy levels of the molecules and the work function of the electrode. This might result in contact doping due to Fermi level pinning at the electrode for donor/acceptor heterojunctions, which also improves the solar cell efficiency. This pinning behaviour can be observed across an unpinned interlayer and results in charge accumulation at the donor/acceptor interface, depending on the transport levels of the respective organic semiconductors. Moreover, molecular orientation will affect the energy levels because of the anisotropy in ionisation energy and electron affinity and is influenced by the structural compatibility of the involved molecules at the heterojunction. High structural compatibility leads to π-orbital stacking between different molecules at a heterojunction, which is of additional interest for photovoltaic active interfaces and for ground

  15. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  16. Length-dependent thermal transport in one-dimensional self-assembly of planar π-conjugated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Xiong, Yucheng; Zu, Fengshuo; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Qiang; Jie, Jiansheng; Yang, Juekuan; Xu, Dongyan

    2016-06-01

    This work reports a thermal transport study in quasi-one-dimensional organic nanostructures self-assembled from conjugated planar molecules via π-π interactions. Thermal resistances of single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanoribbons are measured via a suspended thermal bridge method. We experimentally observed the deviation from the linear length dependence for the thermal resistance of single crystalline β-phase CuPc nanoribbons, indicating possible subdiffusion thermal transport. Interestingly, a gradual transition to the linear length dependence is observed with the increase of the lateral dimensions of CuPc nanoribbons. The measured thermal resistance of single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons shows an increasing trend with temperature. However, the trend of temperature dependence of thermal resistance is reversed after electron irradiation, i.e., decreasing with temperature, indicating that the single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons become `amorphous'. Similar behavior is also observed for PTCDI nanoribbons after electron irradiation, proving that the electron beam can induce amorphization of single crystalline self-assembled nanostructures of planar π-conjugated molecules. The measured thermal resistance of the `amorphous' CuPc nanoribbon demonstrates a roughly linear dependence on the nanoribbon length, suggesting that normal diffusion dominates thermal transport.This work reports a thermal transport study in quasi-one-dimensional organic nanostructures self-assembled from conjugated planar molecules via π-π interactions. Thermal resistances of single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanoribbons are measured via a suspended thermal bridge method. We experimentally observed the deviation from the linear length dependence for the thermal resistance of single crystalline β-phase CuPc nanoribbons, indicating possible subdiffusion thermal transport

  17. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  18. A study of small molecule ingress into planar and cylindrical materials using ion beam analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R W

    2001-01-01

    mechanisms that take place, and where relevant diffusion coefficients have been obtained using either a semi-infinite medium Fickian planar diffusion model or a cylindrical Fickian diffusion model. Ion beam analysis techniques have been developed to allow profiling of small molecules diffused into materials at depths ranging from 10 sup - sup 7 to 10 sup - sup 1 m. A model DPS/PS/DPS triple-layer film and D( sup 3 He,p) sup 4 He nuclear reaction analysis was used to test the applicability of a novel data processing program - the IBA DataFurnace - to nuclear reaction data. The same reaction and program were used to depth profile the diffusion of heavy water into cellophane. A scanning sup 3 He micro-beam technique was developed to profile the diffusion of small molecules into both planar and cylindrical materials. The materials were exposed to liquids containing deuterium labelled molecules. A cross-section was exposed by cutting the material perpendicular to the surface and this was bombarded by a scanning su...

  19. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic...

  20. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule’s magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  1. Organic- and molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joel S Miller

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of organic- and molecule-based magnets has led to design and synthesis of several families with magnetic ordering temperatures as high as ∼ 125° C. Examples of soft and hard magnets with coercivities as high as 27 kOe have also been reported. Examples from our laboratory of organic-based magnets using the tetracya- noethylene radical anion, [TCNE]$^{\\bullet -}$, are discussed. In addition, several molecule-based magnets based on Prussian Blue structured materials as well as dicyanamide are discussed.

  2. Organic chemistry: Precision pruning of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kin S.; Engle, Keary M.

    2016-05-01

    If organic molecules were trees, then the numerous carbon-hydrogen bonds within them would be leaves. A catalyst that targets one 'leaf' out of many similar other ones looks set to be a huge leap for synthetic chemistry. See Letter p.230

  3. Origin of organic molecules and biomolecular homochirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlech, J

    2001-01-01

    Theories about the origin of biomolecular homochirality, which seems to be a prerequisite for the creation of life, are discussed. First, possible terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources of organic molecules are outlined. Then, mechanisms for the formation of enantiomerically enriched compounds and for the amplification of their chirality are described.

  4. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J; Bryce, Martin R; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for -OH and -CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  5. Complex Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, H.; Herbst, E.; Widicus-Weaver, S.

    2013-06-01

    Protoplanetary disks are vital objects in star and planet formation. In addition to aiding mass accretion onto the central star and angular momentum dissipation, they also contain all material which may form an orbiting planetary system. Of great interest to the astrochemistry and astrobiology communities is the origin of prebiotic molecules, considered the "building blocks" of Life. Is it possible for complex molecules to form in protoplanetary disks and survive assimilation into planets and other planetary system objects, such as, comets? We explore the synthesis of large complex organic molecules (COMs) in protoplanetary disks which encompass young stars. We use a chemical network primarily developed for use in hot core models to calculate the abundance and distribution of gas-phase and grain-mantle (ice) COMs and discuss the potential of observing the gas-phase form of these species with new facilities, such as, ALMA.

  6. Organic- and molecule-based magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Miller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnets have been known for millennia and are strongly associated with metals (e.g. Fe, Co, Ni, Gd, intermetallics (e.g. Co17Sm2, Nd2Fe14B, or their oxides (e.g. CrO2, Fe3O4. The development of new magnetic materials has led to ubiquitous uses for electricity generation, memory storage media, and devices such as electric motors, microphones, telephones and computers. These magnets are fabricated via energy demanding metallurgical methods and are frequently brittle, chemically reactive, and possess elements in limited supply. The end of the last millennium has seen a surge in using organic, molecular, and polymeric materials as substitutes for metal and ceramic materials in many applications. Also, in the past few decades organic and molecule-based materials have been shown to magnetically order with examples having ordering temperatures exceeding room temperature, higher-than-iron saturation magnetizations, large coercive fields, etc. An overview of organic-based, and more generally molecule-based magnetic materials that exhibit unusual magnetic properties ranging from ferromagnets to synthetic antiferromagnets with emphasis on magnetic ordering using examples possessing organic nitriles (—CN or inorganic cyanide (CN− is described.

  7. Nanoscale contacts to organic molecules based on layered semiconductor substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Sebastian

    2009-06-15

    This work reports on the integration of organic molecules as nanoelectronic device units on semiconductor substrates. Two novel preparation methods for sub-10-nm separated metal electrodes are presented using current microelectronics process technology. The first method utilises AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as mold to create planar metal electrodes employing a newly developed, high resolution nanotransfer printing (nTP) process. The second method uses commercially available Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrates as base material for the fabrication of nanogap electrode devices. This sandwich-like material stack consists of a silicon substrate, a thin silicon oxide layer, and a capping silicon layer on top. Electronic transport measurements verified their excellent electrical properties at liquid helium temperatures. Specifically tailored nanogap devices featured an electrode insulation in the GW range even up to room temperature as well as within aqueous electrolyte solution. Finally, the well defined layer architecture facilitated the fabrication of electrodes with gap separations below-10-nm to be directly bridged by molecules. Approximately 12-nm-long conjugated molecules with extended -electron system were assembled onto the devices from solution. A large conductance gap was observed with a steep increase in current at a bias voltage of V{sub T}{approx}{+-}1.5 V. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism confirmed the measured non-linear IV-characteristics qualitatively and lead to the conclusion that the conductance gap mainly originates from the oxygen containing linker. Temperature dependent investigations of the conductance indicated a hopping charge transport mechanism through the central part of the molecule for bias voltages near but below V{sub T}. (orig.)

  8. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  9. Cyclopentadithiophene organic core in small molecule organic solar cells: morphological control of carrier recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Rocío; Montcada, Núria F; de la Cruz, Pilar; Palomares, Emilio; Langa, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Two new planar and symmetrical A-D-A (electron acceptor-electron donor-electron acceptor) small molecules based on a commercial cyclopentadithiophene derivative have been synthesized for solution processed small molecule organic solar cells. The aim was to synthesise the molecules to be energetically identical (similar HOMO-LUMO energy levels) in order to assign the differences observed to changes in the film morphology or to differences in the interfacial recombination kinetics or both. Devices were electrically characterized under one sun simulated (1.5 AM G) conditions by determining current-voltage curves, light harvesting efficiencies and external quantum efficiencies. Moreover, time-resolved photo-induced techniques such as photo-induced charge extraction and photo-induced transient photo-voltage were also performed. The results demonstrate that, despite having the same core, i.e. cyclopentadithiophene, the use of one hexyl chain instead of two in the organic molecule leads to a greater control of the molecular ordering using solvent vapour annealing techniques and also to better solar cell efficiency.

  10. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  11. Small Organic Molecules for Direct Aldol Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhuo; GONG Liu-Zhu; MI Ai-Qiao; JIANG Yao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Since the pioneering finding by List and Barbas Ⅲ and their coworkers that L-proline could work as a catalyst in the intermolecular direct aldol reaction, the concept of small organic molecules as catalysts has received great attention. However, new organic molecule which have better catalysis ability are reported scarcely.Our groups1 found L-Prolinamides 1 to be active catalysts for the direct aldol reaction of 4-nitrobenaldehyde with neat acetone at room temperature. The enantioselectivity increases as the amide N-H becomes more acidic and thus a better hydrogen bond donor. Introducing another proton donor, hydroxyl, in the catalyst lead to a further improvement in the catalytic enantioselectivity.The calculations reveal that the amide N-H and the terminal hydroxyl groups form hydrogen bonds with the benzaldehyde substrate. These hydrogen bonds reduce the activation energy and cause high enantioselectivity.Catalyst 2, prepared from L-proline and (1S, 2S)-diphenyl-2-aminoethanol, exhibits high enantioselectivities of up to 93% ee for aromatic aldehydes and up to >99% ee for aliphatic aldehydes. It is noteworthy that our results refuted the conventional wisdom that the carboxylic acid group of proline is a reqirement for high enatioselectivity and provide a powerful strategy in the molecular design of new organic catalyst because plentiful chiral resource containing multi-hydrogen bonding donor, for example, peptides.Very recently, we found that L-proline-based peptides 3-7 can catalyze the aldol reactions of hydroxyacetone with aldehydes 8 in aqueous media, to give 1,4-diols 9, the disfavored products with either aldolase or L-proline. Both peptides 5 and 6 give good results.The abilities of peptides 5 and 6 to catalyze the direct aldol reactions of hydroxyacetone with avariety of aldehydes were examined under optimal conditions. The results are shown in table. Highyields and entioselectivities of up to 96% ee were observed for aromatic aldehydes

  12. Oligomer Molecules for Efficient Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-02-16

    Solar cells, a renewable, clean energy technology that efficiently converts sunlight into electricity, are a promising long-term solution for energy and environmental problems caused by a mass of production and the use of fossil fuels. Solution-processed organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted much attention in the past few years because of several advantages, including easy fabrication, low cost, lightweight, and flexibility. Now, OSCs exhibit power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 10%. In the early stage of OSCs, vapor-deposited organic dye materials were first used in bilayer heterojunction devices in the 1980s, and then, solution-processed polymers were introduced in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices. Relative to polymers, vapor-deposited small molecules offer potential advantages, such as a defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, and good batch-to-batch reproducibility. However, the limited solubility and high crystallinity of vapor-deposited small molecules are unfavorable for use in solution-processed BHJ OSCs. Conversely, polymers have good solution-processing and film-forming properties and are easily processed into flexible devices, whereas their polydispersity of molecular weights and difficulty in purification results in batch to batch variation, which may hamper performance reproducibility and commercialization. Oligomer molecules (OMs) are monodisperse big molecules with intermediate molecular weights (generally in the thousands), and their sizes are between those of small molecules (generally with molecular weights 10000). OMs not only overcome shortcomings of both vapor-deposited small molecules and solution-processed polymers, but also combine their advantages, such as defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, good batch-to-batch reproducibility, good solution processability, and film-forming properties. Therefore, OMs are a

  13. Coupling Organic Molecules to Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Andrew Scott

    Macroscopic systems displaying quantum behavior can be investigated to gain insights into the fundamental nature of our universe. Topological insulators (TIs) are a recent example of such systems exhibiting exotic physical phenomenon in condensed matter. These topologically nontrivial materials are bulk insulating and have spin-momentum locked surface states as a result of its interface with a normal insulator. The topological surface states (TSS) are guaranteed by the materials topological invariant, and for materials studied in this thesis, protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS). The TSS exist in ambient conditions with no need for external applied fields allowing investigations of its nature relatively easy and obvious interest for spintronic devices. Organic molecules represent an electronic and magnetic knob by which one can tune the properties of the substrate of interest and are also of interest for spintronic applications. The organic-TI interface is a new unexplored playground to observe and probe novel physics. The surface is a unique environment for each solid and must be characterized by surface sensitive techniques. Prototypical TIs of study have been the van der Waals (vdW) layered binary chalcogenides. Characterization of the surface of cleaved Bi2Se3 samples by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) show that coexisting surface terminations are probable if performed in air, while in-situ cleaves are terminated as expected along a vdW layer. The electronic structure depends on the surface termination illustrating the important question of surface effects on the TSS. Breaking TRS in these systems is predicted to result in the quantum anomalous hall effect and topological magnetoelectric effects. Ferromagnetic TIs are expected to have a gapped TSS that can be measured by ARPES. We investigated bulk Cr-doping of the TI Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3 (BSTS) studied by XPS and ARPES. Low-doped samples have

  14. Complex organic molecules in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine; Nomura, Hideko; Herbst, Eric; Weaver, Susanna L Widicus; Aikawa, Yuri; Laas, Jake C; Vasyunin, Anton I

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Protoplanetary disks are vital objects in star and planet formation, possessing all the material which may form a planetary system orbiting the new star. We investigate the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) in disks to constrain the achievable chemical complexity and predict species and transitions which may be observable with ALMA. We have coupled a 2D model of a protoplanetary disk around a T Tauri star with a gas-grain chemical network including COMs. We compare compare synthesised line intensities and calculated column densities with observations and determine those COMs which may be observable in future. COMs are efficiently formed in the disk midplane via grain-surface chemical reactions, reaching peak grain-surface fractional abundances 1e-6 - 1e-4 that of the H nuclei number density. COMs formed on grain surfaces are returned to the gas phase via non-thermal desorption; however, gas-phase species reach lower fractional abundances than their grain-surface equivalents, 1e-12 - 1e-...

  15. Organization of 'nanocrystal molecules' using DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Johnsson, Kai P.; Peng, Xiaogang; Wilson, Troy E.; Loweth, Colin J.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Schultz, Peter G.

    1996-08-01

    PATTERNING matter on the nanometre scale is an important objective of current materials chemistry and physics. It is driven by both the need to further miniaturize electronic components and the fact that at the nanometre scale, materials properties are strongly size-dependent and thus can be tuned sensitively1. In nanoscale crystals, quantum size effects and the large number of surface atoms influence the, chemical, electronic, magnetic and optical behaviour2-4. 'Top-down' (for example, lithographic) methods for nanoscale manipulation reach only to the upper end of the nanometre regime5; but whereas 'bottom-up' wet chemical techniques allow for the preparation of mono-disperse, defect-free crystallites just 1-10 nm in size6-10, ways to control the structure of nanocrystal assemblies are scarce. Here we describe a strategy for the synthesis of'nanocrystal molecules', in which discrete numbers of gold nanocrystals are organized into spatially defined structures based on Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. We attach single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides of defined length and sequence to individual nanocrystals, and these assemble into dimers and trimers on addition of a complementary single-stranded DNA template. We anticipate that this approach should allow the construction of more complex two-and three-dimensional assemblies.

  16. Planar organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cell by electrospray

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the organic-inorganic perovskite solar cell has attracted great attention due to the easy processing and rapid developed power conversion efficiency. The tri-halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3-xClx possessing excellent optical and electronic properties, such as absorption hands span the visible region, long charge carrier diffusion lengths, and appropriate direct band gap, makes them ideal active layer material for photovoltaic devices. In this thesis, electrohydrodynamic spraying is used...

  17. MARTINI Model for Physisorption of Organic Molecules on Graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbo, Cristian; Beurroies, Isabelle; de Ridder, David; Eelkema, Rienk; Marrink, Siewert J.; De Feyter, Steven; van Esch, Jan H.; de Vries, Alex H.

    2013-01-01

    An extension to the MARTINI coarse-grained model is presented to describe the adsorption of organic molecules on graphite surfaces. The model allows the study of the dynamics of the preferential adsorption of long-chain organic molecules from solvent and the formation of ordered structures on the su

  18. Method of monitoring photoactive organic molecules in-situ during gas-phase deposition of the photoactive organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Vartanian, Garen; Rolin, Cedric

    2015-06-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring of gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in real time while depositing a film of the photoactive organic molecules on a substrate in a processing chamber for depositing the film includes irradiating the gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in the processing chamber with a radiation from a radiation source in-situ while depositing the film of the one or more organic materials and measuring the intensity of the resulting photoluminescence emission from the organic material. One or more processing parameters associated with the deposition process can be determined from the photoluminescence intensity data in real time providing useful feedback on the deposition process.

  19. Solution-Processable Organic Molecule for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells with Low Acceptor Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Guo, Bing; Xu, Zhuo; Guo, Xia; Zhang, Maojie; Li, Yongfang

    2015-11-11

    A new planar D2-A-D1-A-D2 structured organic molecule with bithienyl benzodithiophene (BDT) as central donor unit D1 and fluorine-substituted benzothiadiazole (BTF) as acceptor unit and alkyl-dithiophene as end group and donor unit D2, BDT-BTF, was designed and synthesized for the application as donor material in organic solar cells (OSCs). BDT-BTF shows a broad absorption in visible region, suitable highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of -5.20 eV, and high hole mobility of 1.07 × 10(-2) cm(2)/(V s), benefitted from its high coplanarity and strong crystallinity. The OSCs based on BDT-BTF as donor (D) and PC71BM as acceptor (A) at a D/A weight ratio of 3:1 without any extra treatment exhibit high photovoltaic performance with Voc of 0.85 V, Jsc of 10.48 mA/cm(2), FF of 0.66, and PCE of 5.88%. The morphological study by transmission electron microscopy reveals that the blend of BDT-BTF and PC71BM (3:1, w/w) possesses an appropriate interpenetrating D/A network for the exciton separation and charge carrier transport, which agrees well with the good device performance. The optimized D/A weight ratio of 3:1 is the lowest acceptor content in the active layer reported so far for the high-performance OSCs, and the organic molecules with the molecular structure like BDT-BTF could be promising high-performance donor materials in solution-processable OSCs.

  20. Metal oxide charge transport material doped with organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2016-08-30

    Doping metal oxide charge transport material with an organic molecule lowers electrical resistance while maintaining transparency and thus is optimal for use as charge transport materials in various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaic devices and organic light emitting devices.

  1. Comparative modeling of vertical and planar organic phototransistors with 2D drift-diffusion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzeccheri, E.; Colasanti, S.; Falco, A.; Liguori, R.; Rubino, A.; Lugli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Vertical Organic Transistors and Phototransistors have been proven to be promising technologies due to the advantages of reduced channel length and larger sensitive area with respect to planar devices. Nevertheless, a real improvement of their performance is subordinate to the quantitative description of their operation mechanisms. In this work, we present a comparative study on the modeling of vertical and planar Organic Phototransistor (OPT) structures. Computer-based simulations of the devices have been carried out with Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD in a 2D Drift-Diffusion framework. The photoactive semiconductor material has been modeled using the virtual semiconductor approach as the archetypal P3HT:PC61BM bulk heterojunction. It has been found that both simulated devices have comparable electrical and optical characteristics, accordingly to recent experimental reports on the subject.

  2. Self-assembly patterning of organic molecules on a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Minghu; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Maksymovych, Petro; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Li, Qing

    2017-04-04

    The embodiments disclosed herein include all-electron control over a chemical attachment and the subsequent self-assembly of an organic molecule into a well-ordered three-dimensional monolayer on a metal surface. The ordering or assembly of the organic molecule may be through electron excitation. Hot-electron and hot-hole excitation enables tethering of the organic molecule to a metal substrate, such as an alkyne group to a gold surface. All-electron reactions may allow a direct control over the size and shape of the self-assembly, defect structures and the reverse process of molecular disassembly from single molecular level to mesoscopic scale.

  3. Self-assembly patterning of organic molecules on a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Minghu; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Maksymovych, Petro; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Li, Qing

    2017-04-04

    The embodiments disclosed herein include all-electron control over a chemical attachment and the subsequent self-assembly of an organic molecule into a well-ordered three-dimensional monolayer on a metal surface. The ordering or assembly of the organic molecule may be through electron excitation. Hot-electron and hot-hole excitation enables tethering of the organic molecule to a metal substrate, such as an alkyne group to a gold surface. All-electron reactions may allow a direct control over the size and shape of the self-assembly, defect structures and the reverse process of molecular disassembly from single molecular level to mesoscopic scale.

  4. Endogenous Synthesis of Prebiotic Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stanley L.

    1996-01-01

    The necessary condition for the synthesis of organic compounds on the primitive earth is the presence of reducing conditions. This means an atmosphere of CH4, CO, or CO2 + H2. The atmospheric nitrogen can be N2 with a trace of NH3, but NH4(+) is needed in the ocean at least for amino acid synthesis. Many attempts have been made to use CO2 + H2O atmospheres for prebiotic synthesis, but these give at best extremely low yields of organic compounds, except in the presence of H2. Even strong reducing agents such as FeS + H2S or the mineral assemblages of the submarine vents fail to give significant yields of organic compounds with CO2. There appears to be a high kinetic barrier to the non-biological reduction of CO2 at low temperatures using geological reducing agents. The most abundant source of energy for prebiotic synthesis is ultraviolet light followed by electric discharges, with electric discharges being more efficient, although it is not clear which was the important energy source. Photochemical process would also make significant contributions. In an atmosphere Of CO2, N2, and H2O with no H2, the production rates of HCN and H2CO would be very low, 0.001 or less than that of a relatively reducing atmosphere. The concentration of organic compounds under these non-reducing conditions would be so low that there is doubt whether the concentration mechanism would be adequate for further steps toward the origin of life. A number of workers have calculated the influx of comets and meteorites on the primitive earth as a source of organic compounds. We conclude that while some organic material was added to the earth from comets and meteorites the amount available from these sources at a given time was at best only a few percent of that from earth bases syntheses under reducing conditions.

  5. High pressure photophysics of organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brey, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    High pressure spectroscopic studies on several classes of organic compounds were made both in fluid solution (to 10 kbar) and in polymeric media (to 40 kbar). The first three studies were conducted in fluid solution and concern the effect of solvent viscosity on the nonradiative deactivation rates from electronically excited states. Pressure was utilized to attain high viscosities in organic solvents at room temperature. The primary experimental technique used was fluorescence emission spectroscopy. In the fourth and last study observations were made both in fluid solution and in plastic films. The focus of this study was the effect of pressure on the solvent-chromophore dispersion interaction in several polyenes and the concomitant changes in both the radiative and non-radiative rates from the excited states. Extensive use was made of fluorescence lifetime measurements and excitation spectra. 105 references.

  6. The fabrication of sub-10 nm planar electrodes and their use for a molecule-based transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, P.; Della Torre, A.; Maruccio, G.; D'Amone, E.; Bramanti, A.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.

    2004-07-01

    The typical size of a single molecule is of the order of a few nanometres; for this reason metal electrodes separated by a nanometre-scale channel are required to make molecule-based electronic devices. In this work, we report on the fabrication of metallic (Cr/Au, Ti/Au or Ti/Pt) arrow-shaped electrodes on Si/SiO2 substrates, with tip separation between 100 and less than 10 nm. They can be used to implement two and three terminal molecular devices, just by connecting them by the chosen molecules and adding an Ag electrode on the back of the Si substrate. Electron beam lithography (EBL) allowed us to obtain electrodes with separation around 40 nm. In order to reduce the tip separation down to 20 nm, before the EBL process, we used a defocused e-beam to brush the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer for a short time (from 10 to 40 s). The smallest gap between the electrodes (less than 10 nm) was obtained with standard EBL and lift-off followed by Au electroplating deposition. The fabricated devices were inspected by plan-view scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrically tested by I/V measurements in the range ± 2 V. Open-circuit characteristics gave very low currents (in the range -10 to 10 pA) and a resistance {\\approx } 1~{\\mathrm {T}}\\Omega . As a typical example, we demonstrate a field effect transistor (FET) based on a deoxyguanosine derivative (a DNA base) placed between the fabricated planar electrodes by room temperature (RT) cast deposition. The FET device tested at RT and ambient pressure exhibited a maximum voltage gain as high as 0.76.

  7. Structure and Structure-activity Relationship of Functional Organic Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research theme The group is made up of junior scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Elemento-organic Chemistry, Nankai University.The scientists focus their studis on the structure and structure-activity relationship of functional organic molecules not only because it has been the basis of their research, but also because the functional study of organic compounds is now a major scientific issue for organic chemists around the world.

  8. Conductivity Modifications of Graphene by Electron Donative Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujima, Hiroaki; Mori, Takehiko; Hayamizu, Yuhei

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has been studied for the application of transparent electrodes in flexible electrical devices with semiconductor organics. Control of the charge carrier density in graphene is crucial to reduce the contact resistance between graphene and the active layer of organic semiconductor. Chemical doping of graphene is an approach to change the carrier density, where the adsorbed organic molecules donate or accept electrons form graphene. While various acceptor organic molecules have been demonstrated so far, investigation about donor molecules is still poor. In this work, we have investigated doping effect in graphene field-effect transistors functionalized by organic donor molecules such as dibenzotetrathiafulvalene (DBTTF), hexamethyltetrathiafulvalene (HMTTF), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN), and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). Based on conductivity measurements of graphene transistors, the former three molecules do not have any significant effect to graphene transistors. However, TMPD shows effective n-type doping. The doping effect has a correlation with the level of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of each molecule, where TMPD has the highest HOMO level.

  9. Photophysics of organic molecules at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean James

    1978-01-01

    The pressure dependence of emission intensities, energies, and lifetimes of several classes of organic compounds in plastic media were investigated over the range 0-140 kilobars. The fluorescence intensity of 9-anthraldehyde, 9-acetylanthracene, and 9-benzoylanthracene increases remarkably with increasing pressure, accompanied by a large red shift in the emission spectrum. For azulene and several derivatives, the efficiency of fluorescence from both the second and first excited singlet states was pressure dependent as was the relative energy of these states. The rate of internal conversion depended strongly on the energy separating the relevant states. The energy and quantum efficiency of fluorescence for fluorenone in crystalline form and in several polymeric matrices was measured as a function of pressure. The quantum yield, ranged from 0.001 at low pressure to a maximum of about 0.1 at high pressure in paraffinic plastics. Fluorescence quantum yields and phosphorescence quantum yields and lifetimes were measured for pyrazine (P) 2,6-dimethylpyrazine and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in PMMA over the pessure range 20-120 kbar. An additional emission, which is attributed to excimer fluorescence, was also observed for these samples and for crystalline pyrazine. The phosphorescence radiative lifetime for P and TMP was about 18 ms.

  10. Interfacial processes in small molecule organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the recent progress of small molecule organic solar cells mainly based on the previous worksof our group. We will mainly focus on the interfacial processes in the cells. The dissociation of excitons at electrode/organic andorganic/organic interfaces can be directly observed by transient photovoltage measurements. A simple model including dissociationof excitons at the interface and drift of free carriers in the built-in field is proposed to explain the observed signals of transientphotovoltage. Besides exciton-blocking and preventing damage due to cathode evaporation,blocking permeation of oxygen and/orwater molecules and modulating the built-in field are proposed as functions of the buffer layer between C60 and Al. By the use ofthe inverted structure,a shelf lifetime of over 1500 h is achieved for unencapsulated small-molecule organic solar cells.

  11. Fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films for planar solar cells via pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yangang; Yao, Yangyi; Zhang, Xiaohang; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Gong, Yunhui; Shin, Jongmoon; Wachsman, Eric D.; Dagenais, Mario; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films using a hybrid method consisting of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of lead iodide and spin-coating of methylammonium iodide. Smooth and highly crystalline CH3NH3PbI3 thin films have been fabricated on silicon and glass coated substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide using this PLD-based hybrid method. Planar perovskite solar cells with an inverted structure have been successfully fabricated using the perovskite films. Because of its versatility, the PLD-based hybrid fabrication method not only provides an easy and precise control of the thickness of the perovskite thin films, but also offers a straightforward platform for studying the potential feasibility in using other metal halides and organic salts for formation of the organic-inorganic perovskite structure.

  12. Fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films for planar solar cells via pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yangang; Zhang, Xiaohang; Gong, Yunhui; Shin, Jongmoon; Wachsman, Eric D.; Takeuchi, Ichiro, E-mail: takeuchi@umd.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Yao, Yangyi; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Dagenais, Mario [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We report on fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films using a hybrid method consisting of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of lead iodide and spin-coating of methylammonium iodide. Smooth and highly crystalline CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} thin films have been fabricated on silicon and glass coated substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide using this PLD-based hybrid method. Planar perovskite solar cells with an inverted structure have been successfully fabricated using the perovskite films. Because of its versatility, the PLD-based hybrid fabrication method not only provides an easy and precise control of the thickness of the perovskite thin films, but also offers a straightforward platform for studying the potential feasibility in using other metal halides and organic salts for formation of the organic-inorganic perovskite structure.

  13. Fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films for planar solar cells via pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangang Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on fabrication of organic-inorganic perovskite thin films using a hybrid method consisting of pulsed laser deposition (PLD of lead iodide and spin-coating of methylammonium iodide. Smooth and highly crystalline CH3NH3PbI3 thin films have been fabricated on silicon and glass coated substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide using this PLD-based hybrid method. Planar perovskite solar cells with an inverted structure have been successfully fabricated using the perovskite films. Because of its versatility, the PLD-based hybrid fabrication method not only provides an easy and precise control of the thickness of the perovskite thin films, but also offers a straightforward platform for studying the potential feasibility in using other metal halides and organic salts for formation of the organic-inorganic perovskite structure.

  14. Shaping the mammalian auditory sensory organ by the planar cell polarity pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael; Chen, Ping

    2007-01-01

    The human ear is capable of processing sound with a remarkable resolution over a wide range of intensity and frequency. This ability depends largely on the extraordinary feats of the hearing organ, the organ of Corti and its sensory hair cells. The organ of Corti consists of precisely patterned rows of sensory hair cells and supporting cells along the length of the snail-shaped cochlear duct. On the apical surface of each hair cell, several rows of actin-containing protrusions, known as stereocilia, form a "V"-shaped staircase. The vertices of all the "V"-shaped stereocilia point away from the center of the cochlea. The uniform orientation of stereocilia in the organ of Corti manifests a distinctive form of polarity known as planar cell polarity (PCP). Functionally, the direction of stereociliary bundle deflection controls the mechanical channels located in the stereocilia for auditory transduction. In addition, hair cells are tonotopically organized along the length of the cochlea. Thus, the uniform orientation of stereociliary bundles along the length of the cochlea is critical for effective mechanotransduction and for frequency selection. Here we summarize the morphological and molecular events that bestow the structural characteristics of the mammalian hearing organ, the growth of the snail-shaped cochlear duct and the establishment of PCP in the organ of Corti. The PCP of the sensory organs in the vestibule of the inner ear will also be described briefly.

  15. Small molecule organic semiconductors on the move: promises for future solar energy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amaresh; Bäuerle, Peter

    2012-02-27

    This article is written from an organic chemist's point of view and provides an up-to-date review about organic solar cells based on small molecules or oligomers as absorbers and in detail deals with devices that incorporate planar-heterojunctions (PHJ) and bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) between a donor (p-type semiconductor) and an acceptor (n-type semiconductor) material. The article pays particular attention to the design and development of molecular materials and their performance in corresponding devices. In recent years, a substantial amount of both, academic and industrial research, has been directed towards organic solar cells, in an effort to develop new materials and to improve their tunability, processability, power conversion efficiency, and stability. On the eve of commercialization of organic solar cells, this review provides an overview over efficiencies attained with small molecules/oligomers in OSCs and reflects materials and device concepts developed over the last decade. Approaches to enhancing the efficiency of organic solar cells are analyzed.

  16. Ag-Incorporated Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Films and Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Chen, Lei; Ye, Fengye; Zhao, Ting; Tang, Feng; Rajagopal, Adharsh; Jiang, Zheng; Jiang, Shenlong; Jen, Alex K-Y; Xie, Yi; Cai, Jinhua; Chen, Liwei

    2017-05-10

    Controlled doping for adjustable material polarity and charge carrier concentration is the basis of semiconductor materials and devices, and it is much more difficult to achieve in ionic semiconductors (e.g., ZnO and GaN) than in covalent semiconductors (e.g., Si and Ge), due to the high intrinsic defect density in ionic semiconductors. The organic-inorganic perovskite material, which is frenetically being researched for applications in solar cells and beyond, is also an ionic semiconductor. Here we present the Ag-incorporated organic-inorganic perovskite films and planar heterojunction solar cells. Partial substitution of Pb(2+) by Ag(+) leads to improved film morphology, crystallinity, and carrier dynamics as well as shifted Fermi level and reduced electron concentration. Consequently, in planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices with inverted stacking structure, Ag incorporation results in an enhancement of the power conversion efficiency from 16.0% to 18.4% in MAPbI3 based devices and from 11.2% to 15.4% in MAPbI3-xClx based devices. Our work implies that Ag incorporation is a feasible route to adjust carrier concentrations in solution-processed perovskite materials in spite of the high concentration of intrinsic defects.

  17. Electrospray deposition of organic molecules on bulk insulator surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinaut, Antoine; Pawlak, Rémy; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Large organic molecules are of important interest for organic-based devices such as hybrid photovoltaics or molecular electronics. Knowing their adsorption geometries and electronic structures allows to design and predict macroscopic device properties. Fundamental investigations in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) are thus mandatory to analyze and engineer processes in this prospects. With increasing size, complexity or chemical reactivity, depositing molecules by thermal evaporation becomes challenging. A recent way to deposit molecules in clean conditions is Electrospray Ionization (ESI). ESI keeps the possibility to work with large molecules, to introduce them in vacuum, and to deposit them on a large variety of surfaces. Here, ESI has been successfully applied to deposit triply fused porphyrin molecules on an insulating KBr(001) surface in UHV environment. Different deposition coverages have been obtained and characterization of the surface by in-situ atomic force microscopy working in the non-contact mode shows details of the molecular structures adsorbed on the surface. We show that UHV-ESI, can be performed on insulating surfaces in the sub-monolayer regime and to single molecules which opens the possibility to study a variety of complex molecules.

  18. Formation of partially ordered organic planar systems based on the in situ control of their structural organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakova, Yu. A.; Marchenkova, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The possibilities of significantly improving the quality of planar systems based on photoactive porphyrin-fullerene dyads, layers based on cytochrome c and cardiolipin, and lysozyme crystals and films using a complex of in situ X-ray methods and simulation are described. The potential of X-ray phase-sensitive and surface-sensitive methods developed by M.V. Koval'chuk and researchers from his school in monitoring all stages of synthesis of partially ordered organic structure is demonstrated. This approach shows its efficiency for in situ studies: starting from the formation of complexes in solutions up to the growth of protein films and crystals.

  19. Photochemistry and Astrochemistry: Photochemical Pathways to Interstellar Complex Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öberg, Karin I

    2016-09-14

    The interstellar medium is characterized by a rich and diverse chemistry. Many of its complex organic molecules are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Radicals form readily when interstellar ices (composed of water and other volatiles) are exposed to UV photons and other sources of dissociative radiation, and if sufficiently mobile the radicals can react to form larger, more complex molecules. The resulting complex organic molecules (COMs) accompany star and planet formation and may eventually seed the origins of life on nascent planets. Experiments of increasing sophistication have demonstrated that known interstellar COMs as well as the prebiotically interesting amino acids can form through ice photochemistry. We review these experiments and discuss the qualitative and quantitative kinetic and mechanistic constraints they have provided. We finally compare the effects of UV radiation with those of three other potential sources of radical production and chemistry in interstellar ices: electrons, ions, and X-rays.

  20. Photochemistry and astrochemistry: photochemical pathways to interstellar complex organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I

    2016-01-01

    The interstellar medium is characterized by a rich and diverse chemistry. Many of its complex organic molecules are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Radicals form readily when interstellar ices (composed of water and other volatiles) are exposed to UV photons and other sources of dissociative radiation, and, if sufficiently mobile, the radicals can react to form larger, more complex molecules. The resulting complex organic molecules (COMs) accompany star and planet formation, and may eventually seed the origins of life on nascent planets. Experiments of increasing sophistication have demonstrated that known interstellar COMs as well as the prebiotically interesting amino acids can form through ice photochemistry. We review these experiments and discuss the qualitative and quantitative kinetic and mechanistic constraints they have provided. We finally compare the effects of UV radiation with those of three other potential sources of radical production and chemistry in interstell...

  1. Optically Excited Entangled States in Organic Molecules Illuminate the Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, L; Harpham, M; Suzer, O; Richter, M; Mukamel, S; Goodson, T

    2013-06-20

    We utilize quantum entangled photons to carry out nonlinear optical spectroscopy in organic molecules with an extremely small number of photons. For the first time, fluorescence is reported as a result of entangled photon absorption in organic nonlinear optical molecules. Selectivity of the entangled photon absorption process is also observed and a theoretical model of this process is provided. Through these experiments and theoretical modeling it is found that while some molecules may not have strong classical nonlinear optical properties due to their excitation pathways; these same excitation pathways may enhance the entangled photon processes. It is found that the opposite is also true. Some materials with weak classical nonlinear optical effects may exhibit strong non-classical nonlinear optical effects. Our entangled photon fluorescence results provide the first steps in realizing and demonstrating the viability of entangled two-photon microscopy, remote sensing, and optical communications.

  2. Toward inkjet printing of small molecule organic light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, H.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Slaats, M.W.L.; Ren, M.; Lu, W.; Kuijpers, C.J.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal evaporation is the current standard for the manufacture of small molecule organic light emitting diodes (smOLEDs), but it requires vacuum process, complicated shadow masks and is inefficient in material utilization, resulting in high cost of ownership. As an alternative, wet solution deposit

  3. Toward inkjet printing of small molecule organic light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, H.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Slaats, M.W.L.; Ren, M.; Lu, W.; Kuijpers, C.J.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal evaporation is the current standard for the manufacture of small molecule organic light emitting diodes (smOLEDs), but it requires vacuum process, complicated shadow masks and is inefficient in material utilization, resulting in high cost of ownership. As an alternative, wet solution deposit

  4. Planarity and multiple components promote organic photovoltaic efficiency by improving electronic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldey, Matthew B; Reid, Daniel; de Pablo, Juan; Galli, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Establishing how the conformation of organic photovoltaic (OPV) polymers affects their electronic and transport properties is critical in order to determine design rules for new OPV materials and in particular to understand the performance enhancements recently reported for ternary blends. We report coupled classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showing that polymer linkage twisting significantly reduces optical absorption efficiency, as well as hole transport rates in donor polymers. We predict that blends with components favoring planar geometries contribute to the enhancement of the overall efficiency of ternary OPVs. Furthermore, our electronic structure calculations for the PTB7-PID2-PC71BM system show that hole transfer rates are enhanced in ternary blends with respect to their binary counterpart. Finally, our results point at thermal disorder in the blend as a key reason responsible for device voltage losses and at the need to carry out electronic structure calculations at finite temperature to reliably compare with experiments.

  5. Current concepts of hair cell differentiation and planar cell polarity in inner ear sensory organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienknecht, Ulrike J

    2015-07-01

    Phylogenetically and ontogenetically, vertebrate development led to the generation of several inner ear sensory organs. During embryogenesis, cell fate specification determines whether each progenitor cell differentiates into a sensory hair cell or a supporting cell within the common sensory primordium. Finally, all sensory epithelia of the inner ear consist of a hair cell/supporting cell mosaic, albeit with anatomical differences depending on the sensory organ type. Hair cells develop a polarized bundle of stereovilli that is of functional importance for mechanotransduction. After initiating stereovillar development, hair cells align their bundles in a coordinated fashion, generating a characteristic hair cell orientation pattern, a process referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP). The pathway that controls PCP in the inner ear needs both to establish the development of a polarized morphology of the stereovillar bundle of the hair cell and to organize a systematic hair cell alignment. Because the hair cell orientation patterns of the various inner ear organs and vertebrate species differ fundamentally, it becomes apparent that in vertebrates, different aspects of PCP need to be independently controlled. In spite of important progress recently gained in the field of PCP research, we still need to identify the mechanisms (1) that initiate molecular asymmetries in cells, (2) that guide the transmission of polarity information from cell to cell, and (3) that consistently translate such polarity information into morphological asymmetries of hair cells.

  6. Search for organic molecules in the outer solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T h

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments of millimeter astronomy have led to the discovery of more and more complex molecules in the interstellar medium. In a similar way, attempts have been made to detect complex molecules in the atmospheres of the most primitive bodies of the Solar System, i.e. outer planets and comets, as well as in Titan's atmosphere. An important progress has been achieved thanks to the continuous development of infrared astronomy, from the ground and from space vehicles. In particular, an important contribution has come from the IRIS-Voyager infrared spectrometer with the detection of prebiotic molecules on Titan, and some complex organic molecules on Jupiter and Saturn. Another important result has been the observation of carbonaceous material in the immediate surroundings of Comet Halley's nucleus. In the near future, the search for organic molecules in the outer Solar System should benefit from the developments of large millimeter antennae, and in the next decade, from the operation of infrared Earth-orbiting spacecrafts (ISO, SIRTF).

  7. Calculating free energies of organic molecules on insulating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaberle, Julian; Gao, David Z; Shluger, Alexander L

    2017-01-01

    The challenges and limitations in calculating free energies and entropies of adsorption and interaction of organic molecules on an insulating substrate are discussed. The adhesion of 1,3,5-tri(4'-cyano-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)benzene (TCB) and 1,4-bis(4-cyanophenyl)-2,5-bis(decyloxy)benzene (CDB) molecules to step edges on the KCl(001) surface and the formation of molecular dimers were studied using classical molecular dynamics. Both molecules contain the same anchoring groups and benzene ring structures, yet differ in their flexibility. Therefore, the entropic contributions to their free energy differ, which affects surface processes. Using potential of mean force and thermodynamic integration techniques, free energy profiles and entropy changes were calculated for step adhesion and dimer formation of these molecules. However, converging these calculations is nontrivial and comes at large computational cost. We illustrate the difficulties as well as the possibilities of applying these methods towards understanding dynamic processes of organic molecules on insulating substrates.

  8. Chiral switching by spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Sigrid; Busse, Carsten; Petersen, Lars; Rauls, Eva; Hammer, Bjørk; Gothelf, Kurt V; Besenbacher, Flemming; Linderoth, Trolle R

    2006-02-01

    Self-assembly of adsorbed organic molecules is a promising route towards functional surface nano-architectures, and our understanding of associated dynamic processes has been significantly advanced by several scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) investigations. Intramolecular degrees of freedom are widely accepted to influence ordering of complex adsorbates, but although molecular conformation has been identified and even manipulated by STM, the detailed dynamics of spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed molecules has hitherto not been addressed. Molecular surface structures often show important stereochemical effects as, aside from truly chiral molecules, a large class of so-called prochiral molecules become chiral once confined on a surface with an associated loss of symmetry. Here, we investigate a model system in which adsorbed molecules surprisingly switch between enantiomeric forms as they undergo thermally induced conformational changes. The associated kinetic parameters are quantified from time-resolved STM data whereas mechanistic insight is obtained from theoretical modelling. The chiral switching is demonstrated to enable an efficient channel towards formation of extended homochiral surface domains. Our results imply that appropriate prochiral molecules may be induced (for example, by seeding) to assume only one enantiomeric form in surface assemblies, which is of relevance for chiral amplification and asymmetric heterogenous catalysis.

  9. Nature and origin of organic molecules in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The organic molecules sublimating from the cometary nucleus either represent the 'frost' of interstellar molecules that condensed onto those interstellar grains that have later accreted into comets, or they represent the 'snows' that condensed onto silicate grains during the cooling phase of the presolar nebula. Even if one does not accept the speculations of Hoyle and Wickramashinghe (1977), the fact that prebiotic chemistry could have been brought from the interstellar space or from the solar nebula to the Earth by comets is an intriguing possibility that cannot be ruled out at this stage.

  10. In Situ Detection of Organic Molecules on the Martian Surface With the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) on Exomars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Arevalo, Ricardo D., Jr.; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars rover will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. The MOMA instrument is centered around a miniaturized linear ion trap (LIT) that facilitates two modes of operation: i) pyrolysisgas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrGC-MS); and, ii) laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) at ambient Mars pressures. The LIT also enables the structural characterization of complex molecules via complementary analytical capabilities, such as multi-frequency waveforms (i.e., SWIFT) and tandem mass spectrometry (MSMS). When combined with the complement of instruments in the rovers Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds.

  11. Planar Mn4O cluster homochiral metal-organic framework for HPLC separation of pharmaceutically important (±)-ibuprofen racemate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailili, Reshalaiti; Wang, Li; Qv, Junzhang; Yao, Ruxin; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Liu, Huwei

    2015-04-20

    A planar tetracoordinated oxygen containing a homochiral metal-organic framework (MOF) has been synthesized and characterized that can be used as a new chiral stationary phase in high-performance liquid chromatography to efficiently separate racemates such as pharmaceutically important (±)-ibuprofen and (±)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol.

  12. Fluorescent Organic Planar pn Heterojunction Light-Emitting Diodes with Simplified Structure, Extremely Low Driving Voltage, and High Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Xie, Gaozhan; Cai, Xinyi; Liu, Ming; Cao, Yong; Su, Shi-Jian

    2016-01-13

    Fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes capable of radiative utilization of both singlet and triplet excitons are achieved via a simple double-layer planar pn hetero-junction configuration without a conventional emission layer, leading to high external quantum efficiency above 10% and extremely low driving voltages close to the theoretical minima.

  13. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  14. Complex organic molecules in organic-poor massive young stellar objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Öberg, Karin I.; Garrod, Robin T.;

    2015-01-01

    aim to use complex molecule abundances toward a chemically less explored class of MYSOs with weak hot organic emission lines to constrain the impact of hot molecular cores and initial ice conditions on the chemical composition toward MYSOs. Methods. We use the IRAM 30 m and the Submillimeter Array......Context. Massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) with hot cores are classic sources of complex organic molecules. The origins of these molecules in such sources, as well as the small-and large-scale differentiation between nitrogen-and oxygen-bearing complex species, are poorly understood. Aims. We...... to search for complex organic molecules over 8-16 GHz in the 1 mm atmospheric window toward three MYSOs with known ice abundances, but without luminous molecular hot cores. Results. Complex molecules are detected toward all three sources at comparable abundances with respect to CH3OH to classical hot core...

  15. Scanning Tunneling Microscopic Characterization of an Engineered Organic Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    3 Figure 3. The grazing angle FTIR spectra of a reference sample of PMNBT...SAMs of PMNBT, hDT, and dDT were deposited. The Au substrate as obtained was first treated with UV/ Ozone to remove any assortment of organic...molecules on the Au substrates, Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy was performed. A Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR , with a grazing angle

  16. Crystallization of Organic Semiconductor Molecules in Nanosized Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milita, Silvia; Dionigi, Chiara; Borgatti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    evaporation. Thanks to these real time experiments, the phase content and the crystalline domain orientation of H4T6 have been determined, from the onset of the first crystalline molecular assembly to the stable system. The correlation between the bead size dependent crystallization mechanism in this complex......The crystallization of an organic semiconductor, viz., tetrahexil-sexithiophene (H4T6) molecules, confined into nanosized cavities of a self-organized polystyrene beads template, has been investigated by means of in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements, during the solvent...

  17. Formation of simple organic molecules in inner T Tauri disks

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, Marcelino; Goicoechea, Javier R

    2008-01-01

    We present time dependent chemical models for a dense and warm O-rich gas exposed to a strong far ultraviolet field aiming at exploring the formation of simple organic molecules in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars. An up-to-date chemical network is used to compute the evolution of molecular abundances. Reactions of H2 with small organic radicals such as C2 and C2H, which are not included in current astrochemical databases, overcome their moderate activation energies at warm temperatures and become very important for the gas phase synthesis of C-bearing molecules. The photodissociation of CO and release of C triggers the formation of simple organic species such as C2H2, HCN, and CH4. In timescales between 1 and 10,000 years, depending on the density and FUV field, a steady state is reached in the model in which molecules are continuously photodissociated but also formed, mainly through gas phase chemical reactions involving H2. The application of the model to the upper layers of i...

  18. A highly porous metal-organic framework for large organic molecule capture and chromatographic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Zhou; Su, Jie; Liang, Jie; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hongzhong; Zhao, Yanli

    2017-03-25

    A highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) with large pores was successfully obtained via solvothermal assembly of a "click"-extended tricarboxylate ligand and Zn(ii) ions. The inherent feature of large-molecule accessible pores endows the MOF with a unique property for utilization toward large guest molecules.

  19. Contacting organic molecules by soft methods: towards molecule-based electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haick, Hossam; Cahen, David

    2008-03-01

    Can we put organic molecules to use as electronic components? The answer to this question is to no small degree limited by the ability to contact them electrically without damaging the molecules. In this Account, we present some of the methods for contacting molecules that do not or minimally damage them and that allow formation of electronic junctions that can become compatible with electronics from the submicrometer to the macroscale. In "Linnaean" fashion, we have grouped contacting methods according to the following main criteria: (a) is a chemical bond is required between contact and molecule, and (b) is the contact "ready-made", that is, preformed, or prepared in situ? Contacting methods that, so far, seem to require a chemical bond include spin-coating a conductive polymer and transfer printing. In the latter, a metallic pattern on an elastomeric polymer is mechanically transferred to molecules with an exposed terminal group that can react chemically with the metal. These methods allow one to define structures from several tens of nanometers size upwards and to fabricate devices on flexible substrates, which is very difficult by conventional techniques. However, the requirement for bifunctionality severely restricts the type of molecules that can be used and can complicate their self-assembly into monolayers. Methods that rely on prior formation of the contact pad are represented by two approaches: (a) use of a liquid metal as electrode (e.g., Hg, Ga, various alloys), where molecules can be adsorbed on the liquid metal and the molecularly modified drop is brought into contact with the second electrode, the molecules can be adsorbed on the second electrode and then the liquid metal brought into contact with them, or bilayers are used, with a layer on both the metal and the second electrode and (b) use of preformed metal pads from a solid substrate and subsequent pad deposition on the molecules with the help of a liquid. These methods allow formation of

  20. Preservation of organic molecules at Mars' near-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, Caroline

    2016-07-01

    One of the biggest concerns for the in situ detection of organics on extraterrestrial environment is the preservation potential of the molecules at the surface and subsurface given the harsh radiation conditions and oxidants they are exposed to. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) search for hydrocarbons is designed to understand taphonomic windows of organic preservation in the Mars' near-surface. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the MSL Curiosity rover discovered chlorohydrocarbon indigenous to a mudstone drilled sample, Cumberland (CB). The discovery of chlorohydrocarbons in the martian surface means that reduced material with covalent bonds has survived despite the severe degrading conditions. However, the precursors of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by pyrolysis at CB remain unknown. Organic compounds in this ancient sedimentary rock on Mars could include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and refractory organic material, either formed on Mars from igneous, hydrothermal, atmospheric, or biological processes or, alternatively, delivered directly to Mars via meteorites, comets, or interplanetary dust particles. It has been postulated that organic compounds in near-surface rocks may undergo successive oxidation reactions that eventually form metastable benzenecarboxylates, including phthalic and mellitic acids. These benzenecarboxylates are good candidates as the precursors of the chlorohydrocarbons detected in SAM pyrolysis at CB. Indeed, recently, SAM performed a derivatization experiments on a CB sample, using the residual vapor of N-methyl-N-tertbutylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) leaking into the system. The preliminary interpretations are compatible with the presence of benzocarboxylates, coincidently with long chain carboxylic acids and alcohols. The analysis of this interesting data set to identify these derivatization products, as well as future SAM measurements on Mt Sharp, should shed additional light on the chemical nature and the

  1. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  2. Permeability of uncharged organic molecules in reverse osmosis desalination membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Svalina, Marin; Catalano, Jacopo

    2017-06-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are primarily designed for removal of salts i.e. for desalination of brackish and seawater, but they have also found applications in removal of organic molecules. While it is clear that steric exclusion is the dominant removal mechanism, the fundamental explanation for how and why the separation occurs remains elusive. Until recently there was no strong microscopic evidences elucidating the structure of the active polyamide layers of RO membranes, and thus they have been conceived as "black boxes"; or as an array of straight capillaries with a distribution of radii; or as polymers with a small amount of polymer free domains. The knowledge of diffusion and sorption coefficients is a prerequisite for understanding the intrinsic permeability of any organic solute in any polymer. At the same time, it is technically challenging to accurately measure these two fundamental parameters in very thin (20-300 nm) water-swollen active layers. In this work we have measured partition and diffusion coefficients and RO permeabilities of ten organic solutes in water-swollen active layers of two types of RO membranes, low (SWC4+) and high flux (XLE). We deduced from our results and recent microscopic studies that the solute flux of organic molecules in polyamide layer of RO membranes occurs in two domains, dense polymer (the key barrier layer) and the water filled domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comprehensive mass spectrometric analysis of novel organic semiconductor molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Svitlana

    This work presents a comprehensive mass spectrometry (MS) study of novel organic semiconductor molecules including ion mobility/reactivity measurements and trace elemental analysis. The organic molecules investigated here are important semiconductor materials for molecular electronic devices such as Organic Field-Effect Transistors (OFETs) and Light Emitted Diodes (LED). A high-performance orthogonal time-of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) in combination with a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source operating at elevated pressure was used to perform MALDI/TOF analyses of pentacene and some of its derivatives with and without an added matrix. The observation of ion-molecule reactions between "cold" analyte ions and neutral analyte molecules in the gas phase has provided some insight into the mechanism of pentacene cluster formation and its functionalized derivatives. Furthermore, some of the matrices employed to assist the desorption/ionization process of these compounds were observed to influence the outcome via ion-molecule reactions of analyte ions and matrix molecules in the gas phase. The stability and reactivity of the compounds and their clusters in the MALDI plume during gas-phase expansion were evaluated; possible structures of the resulting clusters are discussed. The MALDI/TOF technique was also helpful in distinguishing between two isomeric forms of bis-[(triisopropylsilyl)-ethynyl]-pentacene. Furthermore, we reported ion mobility measurements of functionalized pentacene ions with a modified triple quadrupole mass spectrometer fitted with an ion molecule reactor (IMR). The IMR is equipped with a variable axial electrostatic drift field (ADF) and is able to trap ions for a prolong period of time. These capabilities were successfully employed in the measurement of ion mobilities in different modes of the IMR operation. Theoretical modeling of the drift dynamics and the special localization of the large ion packet was successfully

  4. Organic synthesis toward small-molecule probes and drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Organic synthesis” is a compound-creating activity often focused on biologically active small molecules. This special issue of PNAS explores innovations and trends in the field that are enabling the synthesis of new types of small-molecule probes and drugs. This perspective article frames the research described in the special issue but also explores how these modern capabilities can both foster a new and more extensive view of basic research in the academy and promote the linkage of life-science research to the discovery of novel types of small-molecule therapeutics [Schreiber SL (2009) Chem Bio Chem 10:26–29]. This new view of basic research aims to bridge the chasm between basic scientific discoveries in life sciences and new drugs that treat the root cause of human disease—recently referred to as the “valley of death” for drug discovery. This perspective article describes new roles that modern organic chemistry will need to play in overcoming this challenge. PMID:21464328

  5. On the possibility that supernovae influence homochiral organic molecule formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, D.B. [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The origin of the homochirality of the organic molecules in living material remains a mystery. We propose here that the supernova(s) that initiated the solar system also produced the mechanism for the chiral symmetry breaking in the organic material in the interstellar medium. The major process would involve either {bar {ital v}}{sub {ital e}} from a supernova explosion or the {ital Al}{sup 26} produced in the debris in conjunction with the weak neutral current process. Both give rise to chiral positrons and interactions with the organic material in the prebiotic medium. We describe some possible tests of this concept. We note that in this picture, all life forms in the Universe based on hydrocarbons should have the same chiral structure. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Synergetic Solvent Engineering of Film Nanomorphology to Enhance Planar Perylene Diimide-Based Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialin; Liang, Ziqi

    2016-08-31

    Solvent additive has proven as a useful protocol for improving the film nanomorphology of polymer donor (D): fullerene acceptor (A) blends in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells. By contrast, the effect of such solvent additive on nonfullerene BHJ cells based on perylene diimide acceptor, for instance, is less effective because of their highly planar structure and strong π-aggregation in solid state. Here we choose N,N'-bis(1-ethylpropyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) and thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-alt-benzodithiophene (PTB7) as a model D:A blend system to investigate how solvent engineering strategy synergistically impacts the blend film nanomorphology. Based on the differences of solvent volatility and solubility, various host solvents-chloroform (CF) and chlorobenzene (CB) and solvent additives-chloronaphthalene (CN) and 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) are selected for comparative studies. It is found that the π-aggregation of PDIs can be largely suppressed by using low-boiling point (Tb) CF solvent, yet enlarged by using high-Tb CB. Moreover, CN additive provides good solubility of PDI molecules and hence reduces large PDI aggregates in CB system, while DIO exhibiting poor solubility works oppositely. By contrast, DIO that presents larger Tb difference with CF prolongs the film-forming, which assists in optimizing the PDI aggregation and increases the intermixed PTB7:PDI phases more significantly than CN in CF system, yielding the finest phase-separation morphology and balanced charge mobility. Consequently, the inverted BHJ cells based on CF-processed PTB7:PDI blend film with 0.4 vol % DIO exhibit the highest PCE of 3.55% with a fill factor of 56%, both of which are among the best performance for such a paradigm PTB7:PDI blend-based BHJ cells.

  7. Diffusion of Small Molecules in Metal Organic Framework Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Nijem, Nour; Chabal, Yves J.; Thonhauser, T.

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio simulations are combined with in situ infrared spectroscopy to unveil the molecular transport of H2, CO2, and H2O in the metal organic framework MOF-74-Mg. Our study uncovers—at the atomistic level—the major factors governing the transport mechanism of these small molecules. In particular, we identify four key diffusion mechanisms and calculate the corresponding diffusion barriers, which are nicely confirmed by time-resolved infrared experiments. We also answer a long-standing question about the existence of secondary adsorption sites for the guest molecules, and we show how those sites affect the macroscopic diffusion properties. Our findings are important to gain a fundamental understanding of the diffusion processes in these nanoporous materials, with direct implications for the usability of MOFs in gas sequestration and storage applications.

  8. Touch sensors based on planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jooyeok; Lee, Chulyeon; Han, Hyemi; Lee, Sooyong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Hwajeong; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2014-09-01

    We report a tactile touch sensor based on a planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistor (LC-g-OFET) structure. The LC-g-OFET touch sensors were fabricated by forming the 10 μm thick LC layer (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on top of the 50 nm thick channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) - P3HT) that is coated on the in-plane aligned drain/source/gate electrodes (indium-tin oxide - ITO). As an external physical stimulation to examine the tactile touch performance, a weak nitrogen flow (83.3 μl/s) was employed to stimulate the LC layer of the touch device. The LC-g-OFET device exhibited p-type transistor characteristics with a hole mobility of 1.5 cm2/Vs, but no sensing current by the nitrogen flow touch was measured at sufficiently high drain (VD) and gate (VG) voltages. However, a clear sensing current signal was detected at lower voltages, which was quite sensitive to the combination of VD and VG. The best voltage combination was VD = -0.2 V and VG = -1 V for the highest ratio of signal currents to base currents (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). The change in the LC alignment upon the nitrogen flow touch was assigned as the mechanism for the present LC-g-OFET touch sensors.

  9. Planar Cell Polarity Breaks the Symmetry of PAR Protein Distribution prior to Mitosis in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Charlotte; Bernard, Fred; Corson, Francis; Rouault, Hervé; Reynaud, Elodie; Keder, Alyona; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, François

    2015-04-20

    During development, cell-fate diversity can result from the unequal segregation of fate determinants at mitosis. Polarization of the mother cell is essential for asymmetric cell division (ACD). It often involves the formation of a cortical domain containing the PAR complex proteins Par3, Par6, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). In the fly notum, sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs) divide asymmetrically within the plane of the epithelium and along the body axis to generate two distinct cells. Fate asymmetry depends on the asymmetric localization of the PAR complex. In the absence of planar cell polarity (PCP), SOPs divide with a random planar orientation but still asymmetrically, showing that PCP is dispensable for PAR asymmetry at mitosis. To study when and how the PAR complex localizes asymmetrically, we have used a quantitative imaging approach to measure the planar polarization of the proteins Bazooka (Baz, fly Par3), Par6, and aPKC in living pupae. By using imaging of functional GFP-tagged proteins with image processing and computational modeling, we find that Baz, Par6, and aPKC become planar polarized prior to mitosis in a manner independent of the AuroraA kinase and that PCP is required for the planar polarization of Baz, Par6, and aPKC during interphase. This indicates that a "mitosis rescue" mechanism establishes asymmetry at mitosis in PCP mutants. This study therefore identifies PCP as the initial symmetry-breaking signal for the planar polarization of PAR proteins in asymmetrically dividing SOPs.

  10. A Search For Organic Molecules in Intermediate Redshift DLAs

    CERN Document Server

    Lawton, B; Ellison, S L; Churchill, C W; Johnson, R A; Snow, T P; Lawton, Brandon; York, Brian; Ellison, Sara L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Johnson, Rachel A.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in searching for diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) due to their probable connection to organic molecules and, thus, their possible link to life in the Universe. Our group is undertaking an extensive search for DIBs in DLAs via QSO absorption-line systems. Six of our DLA targets are presented here. Our equivalent width (EW) limits for the 5780 DIB line strongly suggests that DIB abundance is below the Milky Way expected value or that metallicity plays a large role in DIB strengths.

  11. Complex organic molecules in protostellar environments in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Codella, C; Fontani, F; Jiménez-Serra, I; Caselli, P; Ceccarelli, C; Palumbo, M E; López-Sepulcre, A; Beltrán, M T; Lefloch, B; Brucato, J R; Viti, S; Testi, L

    2014-01-01

    Molecular complexity builds up at each step of the Sun-like star formation process, starting from simple molecules and ending up in large polyatomic species. Complex organic molecules (COMs; such as methyl formate, HCOOCH$_3$, dymethyl ether, CH$_3$OCH$_3$, formamide, NH$_2$CHO, or glycoaldehyde, HCOCH$_2$OH) are formed in all the components of the star formation recipe (e.g. pre-stellar cores, hot-corinos, circumstellar disks, shocks induced by fast jets), due to ice grain mantle sublimation or sputtering as well as gas-phase reactions. Understanding in great detail the involved processes is likely the only way to predict the ultimate molecular complexity reached in the ISM, as the detection of large molecules is increasingly more difficult with the increase of the number of atoms constituting them. Thanks to the recent spectacular progress of astronomical observations, due to the Herschel (sub-mm and IR), IRAM and SMA (mm and sub-mm), and NRAO (cm) telescopes, an enormous activity is being developed in the ...

  12. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  13. Cometary delivery of organic molecules to the early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, C F; Thomas, P J; Brookshaw, L; Sagan, C

    1990-07-27

    It has long been speculated that Earth accreted prebiotic organic molecules important for the origins of life from impacts of carbonaceous asteroids and comets during the period of heavy bombardment 4.5 x 10(9) to 3.8 x 10(9) years ago. A comprehensive treatment of comet-asteroid interaction with the atmosphere, surface impact, and resulting organic pyrolysis demonstrates that organics will not survive impacts at velocities greater than about 10 kilometers per second and that even comets and asteroids as small as 100 meters in radius cannot be aerobraked to below this velocity in 1-bar atmospheres. However, for plausible dense (10-bar carbon dioxide) early atmospheres, we find that 4.5 x 10(9) years ago Earth was accreting intact cometary organics at a rate of at least approximately 10(6) to 10(7) kilograms per year, a flux that thereafter declined with a half-life of approximately 10(8) years. These results may be put in context by comparison with terrestrial oceanic and total biomasses, approximately 3 x 10(12) kilograms and approximately 6 x 10(14) kilograms, respectively.

  14. Two-photon Photoemission of Organic Semiconductor Molecules on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Aram [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Angle- and time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) was used to study systems of organic semiconductors on Ag(111). The 2PPE studies focused on electronic behavior specific to interfaces and ultrathin films. Electron time dynamics and band dispersions were characterized for ultrathin films of a prototypical n-type planar aromatic hydrocarbon, PTCDA, and representatives from a family of p-type oligothiophenes.In PTCDA, electronic behavior was correlated with film morphology and growth modes. Within a fewmonolayers of the interface, image potential states and a LUMO+1 state were detected. The degree to which the LUMO+1 state exhibited a band mass less than a free electron mass depended on the crystallinity of the layer. Similarly, image potential states were measured to have free electron-like effective masses on ordered surfaces, and the effective masses increased with disorder within the thin film. Electron lifetimes were correlated with film growth modes, such that the lifetimes of electrons excited into systems created by layer-by-layer, amorphous film growth increased by orders of magnitude by only a few monolayers from the surface. Conversely, the decay dynamics of electrons in Stranski-Krastanov systems were limited by interaction with the exposed wetting layer, which limited the barrier to decay back into the metal.Oligothiophenes including monothiophene, quaterthiophene, and sexithiophene were deposited on Ag(111), and their electronic energy levels and effective masses were studied as a function of oligothiophene length. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO decreased with increasing chain length, but effective mass was found to depend on domains from high- or low-temperature growth conditions rather than chain length. In addition, the geometry of the molecule on the surface, e.g., tilted or planar, substantially affected the electronic structure.

  15. Touch sensors based on planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jooyeok; Lee, Chulyeon; Han, Hyemi; Lee, Sooyong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Youngkyoo, E-mail: ykimm@knu.ac.kr [Organic Nanoelectronics Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwajeong [Organic Nanoelectronics Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Priority Research Center, Research Institute of Advanced Energy Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon-Hyung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We report a tactile touch sensor based on a planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistor (LC-g-OFET) structure. The LC-g-OFET touch sensors were fabricated by forming the 10 μm thick LC layer (4-cyano-4{sup ′}-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on top of the 50 nm thick channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) - P3HT) that is coated on the in-plane aligned drain/source/gate electrodes (indium-tin oxide - ITO). As an external physical stimulation to examine the tactile touch performance, a weak nitrogen flow (83.3 μl/s) was employed to stimulate the LC layer of the touch device. The LC-g-OFET device exhibited p-type transistor characteristics with a hole mobility of 1.5 cm{sup 2}/Vs, but no sensing current by the nitrogen flow touch was measured at sufficiently high drain (V{sub D}) and gate (V{sub G}) voltages. However, a clear sensing current signal was detected at lower voltages, which was quite sensitive to the combination of V{sub D} and V{sub G}. The best voltage combination was V{sub D} = −0.2 V and V{sub G} = −1 V for the highest ratio of signal currents to base currents (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). The change in the LC alignment upon the nitrogen flow touch was assigned as the mechanism for the present LC-g-OFET touch sensors.

  16. Complex organic molecules in organic-poor massive young stellar objects

    CERN Document Server

    Fayolle, Edith C; Garrod, Robin T; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bisschop, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    Massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) with hot cores are classic sources of complex organic molecules. The origins of these molecules in such sources, as well as the small- and large-scale differentiation between nitrogen- and oxygen-bearing complex species, are poorly understood. We aim to use complex molecule abundances toward a chemically less explored class of MYSOs with weak hot organic emission lines to constrain the impact of hot molecular cores and initial ice conditions on the chemical composition toward MYSOs. We use the IRAM 30m and the Submillimeter Array to search for complex organic molecules over 8-16 GHz in the 1~mm atmospheric window toward three MYSOs with known ice abundances, but without luminous molecular hot cores. Complex molecules are detected toward all three sources at comparable abundances with respect to CH$_3$OH to classical hot core sources. The relative importance of CH$_3$CHO, CH$_3$CCH, CH$_3$OCH$_3$, CH$_3$CN, and HNCO differ between the organic-poor MYSOs and hot cores, howe...

  17. Optical and Transport Properties of Organic Molecules: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubbe, David Alan

    Organic molecules are versatile and tunable building blocks for technology, in nanoscale and bulk devices. In this dissertation, I will consider some important applications for organic molecules involving optical and transport properties, and develop methods and software appropriate for theoretical calculations of these properties. Specifically, we will consider second-harmonic generation, a nonlinear optical process; photoisomerization, in which absorption of light leads to mechanical motion; charge transport in junctions formed of single molecules; and optical excitations in pentacene, an organic semiconductor with applications in photovoltaics, optoelectronics, and flexible electronics. In the Introduction (Chapter 1), I will give an overview of some phenomenology about organic molecules and these application areas, and discuss the basics of the theoretical methodology I will use: density-functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and many-body perturbation theory based on the GW approximation. In the subsequent chapters, I will further discuss, develop, and apply this methodology. 2. I will give a pedagogical derivation of the methods for calculating response properties in TDDFT, with particular focus on the Sternheimer equation, as will be used in subsequent chapters. I will review the many different response properties that can be calculated (dynamic and static) and the appropriate perturbations used to calculate them. 3. Standard techniques for calculating response use either integer occupations (as appropriate for a system with an energy gap) or fractional occupations due to a smearing function, used to improve convergence for metallic systems. I will present a generalization which can be used to compute response for a system with arbitrary fractional occupations. 4. Chloroform (CHCl3) is a small molecule commonly used as a solvent in measurements of nonlinear optics. I computed its hyperpolarizability for second

  18. Controlled Encapsulation of Functional Organic Molecules within Metal-Organic Frameworks: In Situ Crystalline Structure Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jinju; Hu, Yu; Wang, Yu; Li, Hongfeng; Xu, Zhiling; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Peng; Zhang, Suoying; Xiao, Gengwu; Ji, Wenlan; Li, Linjie; Zhang, Meixuan; Fan, Yun; Li, Lin; Zheng, Bing; Zhang, Weina; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei

    2017-03-01

    Functional organic molecules/metal-organic frameworks composites can be obtained by in situ crystalline structure transformation from ZIF-L to ZIF-8-L under double solvent conditions. Interestingly, the as-prepared molecules/ZIF-8-L composites with the leaf-like morphology exhibit good fluorescence properties and size selectivity in fluorescent quenchers due to the molecular sieving effect of the well-defined microporous ZIF-8-L. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Targeting organic molecules in hydrothermal environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.; Bowden, S. A.; Lindgren, P.; Wilson, R.; Cooper, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrothermal deposits on Mars Hydrothermal systems are proposed as environments that could support organic synthesis, the evolution of life or the maintenance of life [1,2,3]. They have therefore been suggested as primary targets for exploration on Mars [1,2,4,].There is now confidence that hydrothermal deposits occur at the martian surface. This is based on a range of criteria that could point towards hydrothermal activity, including volcanic activity, magmatic-driven tectonism, impact cratering in icy terrains, hydrous alteration of minerals and typical hydrothermal mineralogies [4]. The proposals to search for evidence of life at martian hydrothermal sites have been focussed on seeking morphological evidence of microbial activity [5]. Here we discuss the potential to seek a chemical signature of organic matter in hydrothermal systems. Organics in terrestrial hydrothermal systems Terrestrial hydrothermal systems can have large quantities of organic matter because they intersect organic-rich sedimentary rocks or oil reservoirs. Thus the signatures that they contain reflect some preexisting concentration of fossil organic compounds, rather than life which was active in the hydrothermal system. If any extant life was incorporated in these hydrothermal systems, it is swamped by the fossil molecules. Examples of environments where organic materials may become entrained include subsurface hydrothermal mineral deposits, generation of hydrothermal systems by igneous intrusions, and hot fluid venting at the seafloor. Nevertheless, there is value in studying the interactions of hydrothermal systems with fossil organic matter, for information about the survivability of organic compounds, phase relationships between carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous materials, and where in hydrothermal deposits to find evidence of organic matter. Microbial colonization of hot spring systems is feasible at depth within the systems and at the surface where the hydrothermal waters discharge

  20. First-Principles Calculations of Electron Transfer in Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Ranjit; Karna, Shashi P.

    2000-03-01

    Suitably tailored organic structures are considered potential candidates as components in molecular electronic devices. A common molecular architecture for electronics consists of an electron donor (D) and an electron acceptor (A) moiety bonded together by a chemically inert bridging moiety, called spacer (S). The D-S-A combination constitutes the basic component equivalent of a solid state capacitor. A useful physical property that determines the applicability of molecular structures in moletronics is the electron transfer (ET) rate, which is related, in a two-state approximation, to the coupling matrix between the two electronic states representing the localization of electrons. In an effort to model potential organic structures, we have calculated the ET coupling matrix elements in a number of D-, S-, and A-type organic molecules with the use of ab initio Hartree-Fock method and two different basis sets, namely an STO-3G and a double zeta plus polarization (DZP). A number of important findings have emerged from this study: (i) The ET coupling matrix strongly depends upon the geometrical arrangement of the molecular fragment(s) in the architecture. (ii) In an oligomeric chain, the ET matrix decreases exponentially with molecular length (number of monomer units). (iii) In cyclic alkanes, the magnitude of the ET coupling matrix decreases with increasing size of fused rings.

  1. Predicting Complex Organic Molecule Emission from TW Hya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissapragada, Shreyas; Walsh, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has significantly increased our ability to observe the rich chemical inventory of star and planet formation. ALMA has recently been used to detect CH3OH (methanol) and CH3CN (methyl cyanide) in protoplanetary disks; these molecules may be vital indicators of the complex organic ice reservoir in the comet-forming zone. We have constructed a physiochemical model of TW Hya, a well-studied protoplanetary disk, to explore the different formation mechanisms of complex ices. By running our model through a radiative transfer code and convolving with beam sizes appropriate for ALMA, we have obtained synthetic observations of methanol and methyl cyanide. Here, we compare and comment on these synthetic observations, and provide astrochemical justification for their spatial distributions.

  2. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  3. Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling controls the anterior-posterior organization of monoaminergic axons in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermaker, Ali G; Prasad, Asheeta A; Bechara, Ahmad; Adolfs, Youri; Tissir, Fadel; Goffinet, Andre; Zou, Yimin; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2010-11-24

    Monoaminergic neurons [serotonergic (5-HT) and dopaminergic (mdDA)] in the brainstem project axons along the anterior-posterior axis. Despite their important physiological functions and implication in disease, the molecular mechanisms that dictate the formation of these projections along the anterior-posterior axis remain unknown. Here we reveal a novel requirement for Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling in the anterior-posterior organization of the monoaminergic system. We find that 5-HT and mdDA axons express the core planar cell polarity components Frizzled3, Celsr3, and Vangl2. In addition, monoaminergic projections show anterior-posterior guidance defects in Frizzled3, Celsr3, and Vangl2 mutant mice. The only known ligands for planar cell polarity signaling are Wnt proteins. In culture, Wnt5a attracts 5-HT but repels mdDA axons, and Wnt7b attracts mdDA axons. However, mdDA axons from Frizzled3 mutant mice are unresponsive to Wnt5a and Wnt7b. Both Wnts are expressed in gradients along the anterior-posterior axis, consistent with their role as directional cues. Finally, Wnt5a mutants show transient anterior-posterior guidance defects in mdDA projections. Furthermore, we observe during development that the cell bodies of migrating descending 5-HT neurons eventually reorient along the direction of their axons. In Frizzled3 mutants, many 5-HT and mdDA neuron cell bodies are oriented abnormally along the direction of their aberrant axon projections. Overall, our data suggest that Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling may be a global anterior-posterior guidance mechanism that controls axonal and cellular organization beyond the spinal cord.

  4. Improved Reliability of Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Double Anode Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Hsun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimized hybrid planar heterojunction (PHJ of small molecule organic solar cells (SM-OSCs based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc as donor and fullerene (C60 as acceptor was fabricated, which obviously enhanced the performance of device by sequentially using both MoO3 and pentacene as double anode buffer layers (ABL, also known as hole extraction layer (HEL. A series of the vacuum-deposited ABL, acting as an electron and exciton blocking layer, were examined for their characteristics in SM-OSCs. The performance and reliability were compared between conventional ITO/ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells and the new ITO/double ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells. The effect on the electrical properties of these materials was also investigated to obtain the optimal thickness of ABL. The comparison shows that the modified cell has an enhanced reliability compared to traditional cells. The improvement of lifetime was attributed to the idea of double layers to prevent humidity and oxygen from diffusing into the active layer. We demonstrated that the interfacial extraction layers are necessary to avoid degradation of device. That is to say, in normal temperature and pressure, a new avenue for the device within double buffer layers has exhibited the highest values of open circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and lifetime in this work compared to monolayer of ABL.

  5. Embarras de richesses – It is not good to be too anomalous: Accurate structure of selenourea, a chiral crystal of planar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhipu

    2017-01-01

    Selenourea, SeC(NH2)2, recently found an application as a derivatization reagent providing a significant anomalous diffraction signal used for phasing macromolecular crystal structures. The crystal structure of selenourea itself was solved about 50 years ago, from data recorded on films and evaluated by eye and refined to R = 0.15 with errors of bond lengths and angles about 0.1 Å and 6°. In the current work this structure is re-evaluated on the basis of synchrotron data and refined to R1 = 0.021 with bond and angle errors about 0.007 Å and 0.5°. The nine planar molecules of selenourea pack either in the P31 or in the P32 unit cell. All unique molecules are connected by a complex network of Se•••H-N hydrogen bonds and Se•••Se contacts. The packing of selenourea molecules is highly pseudosymmetric, approximating either of the P31(2)12, R3, and R32 space groups. Because the overwhelming majority of diffracted X-ray intensity originates form the anomalously scattering selenium atoms, the measurable anomalous Bijvoet differences are diminished and it was not possible to solve this crystal structure based on the anomalous signal alone. PMID:28207770

  6. Small organic molecules modulating iodine uptake in thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambroise, Y. [CEA Saclay, DSV/DBJC/SMMCB, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The thyroid gland accumulates large quantities of iodine. This uptake is needed for the production of iodinated hormones (T3 and T4). The first step in the iodine accumulation is a basolateral transport of iodide ions by the cloned 'Natrium Iodide Sym-porter' also called NIS. Using high-throughput screening techniques, we have identified a series of inhibitors of the iodide uptake in thyrocytes. These compounds are of medical significance in case of thyroid deregulation and can also offer solutions for radio-iodine detoxification in case of emergency situations (nuclear industry...). In addition, these small organic molecules can be important tools for the understanding of NIS structure and functions In parallel, we have identified and characterized a single compound capable to strongly enhance the amount of intra-cellular iodide in rat thyrocytes (FRTL5) as well as in HEK293 cells transfected with hNIS (Natrium/Iodide Sym-porter). Preliminary studies show that this effect is NIS dependant, and is induced by alternative and unknown mechanisms. Future work will consist in unraveling the mode of action of this molecule. These informations will help us not only to better understand the iodide pathways in the thyroid, but also to design more active analogues. We will use photo-labelling techniques to identify new proteins involved in the iodide transfer and retention. In addition, preliminary experiments are underway to validate our compound as an anti-cancer agent. Targeted NIS gene delivery into tumors plus radio-iodide injection leads to tumor size regression. Unfortunately, doses of radioactivity are to high for safe treatment. Our compound may lead to enhanced radio-iodide entrapment, thus necessitating lower doses of radioactivity for tumor regression. (author)

  7. Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in organic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Shih-Huang

    2007-12-01

    Amphiphilic molecules are well-known for their ability to self-assemble in water to form structures such as micelles and vesicles. In comparison, much less is known about amphiphilic self-assembly in nonpolar organic liquids. Such "reverse" self assembly can produce many of the counterparts to structures found in water. In this dissertation, we focus on the formation and dynamics of such reverse structures. We seek to obtain fundamental insight into the driving forces for reverse self-assembly processes. Three specific types of reverse structures are studied: (a) reverse wormlike micelles, i.e., long, flexible micellar chains; (b) reverse vesicles, i.e., hollow containers enclosed by reverse bilayers; and (c) organogel networks. While our focus is on the fundamentals, we note that reverse structures can be useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery, controlled release, hosts for enzymatic reactions, and templates for nanomaterials synthesis. In the first part of this study, we describe a new route for forming reverse wormlike micelles in nonpolar organic liquids. This route involves the addition of trace amounts of a bile salt to solutions of the phospholipid, lecithin. We show that bile salts, due to their unique "facially amphiphilic" structure, can promote the aggregation of lecithin molecules into these reverse micellar chains. The resulting samples are viscoelastic and show interesting rheological properties. Unusual trends are seen in the temperature dependence of their rheology, which indicates the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the formation of these micelles. Another remarkable feature of their rheology is the presence of strain-stiffening, where the material becomes stiffer at high deformations. Strain-stiffening has been seen before for elastic gels of biopolymers; here, we demonstrate the same properties for viscoelastic micellar solutions. The second reverse aggregate we deal with is the reverse vesicle. We present a

  8. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-26

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  9. Small molecules as tracers in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ge

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed from in-air oxidation of volatile organic compounds, greatly affects human health and climate. Although substantial research has been devoted to SOA formation and evolution, the modeled and lab-generated SOA are still low in mass and degree of oxidation compared to ambient measurements. In order to compensate for these discrepancies, the aqueous processing pathway has been brought to attention. The atmospheric waters serve as aqueous reaction media for dissolved organics to undergo further oxidation, oligomerization, or other functionalization reactions, which decreases the vapor pressure while increasing the oxidation state of carbon atoms. Field evidence for aqueous processing requires the identification of tracer products such as organosulfates. We synthesized the standards for two organosulfates, glycolic acid sulfate and lactic acid sulfate, in order to measure their aerosol-state concentration from five distinct locations via filter samples. The water-extracted filter samples were analyzed by LC-MS. Lactic acid sulfate and glycolic acid sulfate were detected in urban locations in the United States, Mexico City, and Pakistan with varied concentrations, indicating their potential as tracers. We studied the aqueous processing reaction between glyoxal and nitrogen-containing species such as ammonium and amines exclusively by NMR spectrometry. The reaction products formic acid and several imidazoles along with the quantified kinetics were reported. The brown carbon generated from these reactions were quantified optically by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The organic-phase reaction between oxygen molecule and alkenes photosensitized by alpha-dicarbonyls were studied in the same manner. We observed the fast kinetics transferring alkenes to epoxides under simulated sunlight. Statistical estimations indicate a very effective conversion of aerosol-phase alkenes to epoxides, potentially forming organosulfates in a deliquescence event and

  10. Small molecule semiconductors for high-efficiency organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Li, Yongfang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2012-06-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) are a promising cost-effective alternative to silicon-based solar cells, and possess light-weight, low-cost, and flexibility advantages. Significant progress has been achieved in the development of novel photovoltaic materials and device structures in the last decade. Nowadays small molecular semiconductors for OPVs have attracted considerable attention, due to their advantages over their polymer counterparts, including well-defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, and high purity without batch to batch variations. The highest power conversion efficiencies of OPVs based on small molecular donor/fullerene acceptors or polymeric donor/fullerene acceptors are up to 6.7% and 8.3%, respectively, and meanwhile nonfullerene acceptors have also exhibited some promising results. In this review we summarize the developments in small molecular donors, acceptors (fullerene derivatives and nonfullerene molecules), and donor-acceptor dyad systems for high-performance multilayer, bulk heterojunction, and single-component OPVs. We focus on correlations of molecular chemical structures with properties, such as absorption, energy levels, charge mobilities, and photovoltaic performances. This structure-property relationship analysis may guide rational structural design and evaluation of photovoltaic materials (253 references).

  11. The origin of complex organic molecules in prestellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments, including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperature of these objects, these last detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations towards the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3mm band at the IRAM-30m telescope, as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide the full census of the oxygen bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5e-11 to 6e-9. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core, at a radius of ~8000 AU where T~10 K and nH2~2e4 cm-3. Previous works have shown that water vapour is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and CO...

  12. Electrocatalytic recycling of CO2 and small organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaeyoung; Kwon, Youngkook; Machunda, Revocatus L; Lee, Hye Jin

    2009-10-05

    As global warming directly affects the ecosystems and humankind in the 21st century, attention and efforts are continuously being made to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). In addition, there have been numerous efforts to electrochemically convert CO2 gas to small organic molecules (SOMs) and vice versa. Herein, we highlight recent advances made in the electrocatalytic recycling of CO2 and SOMs including (i) the overall trend of research activities made in this area, (ii) the relations between reduction conditions and products in the aqueous phase, (iii) the challenges in the use of gas diffusion electrodes for the continuous gas phase CO2 reduction, as well as (iv) the development of state of the art hybrid techniques for industrial applications. Perspectives geared to fully exploit the potential of zero-gap cells for CO2 reduction in the gaseous phase and the high applicability on a large scale are also presented. We envision that the hybrid system for CO2 reduction supported by sustainable solar, wind, and geothermal energies and waste heat will provide a long term reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and will allow for continued use of the abundant fossil fuels by industries and/or power plants but with zero emissions.

  13. Observing Organic Molecules in Interstellar Gases: Non Equilibrium Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Faure, Alexandre; Remijan, Anthony; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2014-06-01

    In order to observe quantitatively organic molecules in interstellar gas, it is necessary to understand the relative importance of photonic and collisional excitations. In order to do so, collisional excitation transfer rates have to be computed. We undertook several such studies, in particular for H_2CO and HCOOCH_3. Both species are observed in many astrochemical environments, including star-forming regions. We found that those two molecules behave in their low-lying rotational levels in an opposite way. For cis methyl-formate, a non-equilibrium radiative transfer treatment of rotational lines is performed, using a new set of theoretical collisional rate coefficients. These coefficients have been computed in the temperature range 5 to 30 K by combining coupled-channel scattering calculations with a high accuracy potential energy surface for HCOOCH_3 -- He. The results are compared to observations toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud. A total of 2080 low-lying transitions of methyl formate, with upper levels below 25 K, were treated. These lines are found to probe a cold (30 K), moderately dense (n ˜ 104 cm-3) interstellar gas. In addition, our calculations indicate that all detected emission lines with a frequency below 30 GHz are collisionally pumped weak masers amplifying the background of Sgr B2(N). This result demonstrates the generality of the inversion mechanism for the low-lying transitions of methyl formate. For formaldehyde, we performed a similar non-equilibrium treatment, with H_2 as the collisional partner, thanks to the accurate H_2CO - H_2 potential energy surface . We found very different energy transfer rates for collisions with para-H_2 (J=0) and ortho-H_2 (J=1). The well-known absorption against the cosmological background of the 111→ 101 line is shown to depend critically on the difference of behaviour between para and ortho-H_2, for a wide range of H_2 density. We thank the CNRS-PCMI French national program for continuous support

  14. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of organic molecules on conductive new catalytic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tountian, D. [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Physique du Corps Solide; Sherbrooke Univ., Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie, Centre de Recherche en Electrochimie et Electrocatalyse; Brisach-Wittmeyer, A.; Menard, H. [Sherbrooke Univ., Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie, Centre de Recherche en Electrochimie et Electrocatalyse; Nkeng, P.; Poillerat, G. [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Physique du Corps Solide

    2008-07-01

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) of organic molecules is a process where chemisorbed hydrogen is produced by electroreduction of water which reacts with the species in bulk. Greater emphasis is being placed on improving the nature of the building material of the electrodes in order to increase ECH efficiency. The effectiveness of the ECH is known to be linked to the nature of electrode materials used and their adsorption properties. This work presented the effect of conductive support material on ECH. The conductive catalysts were obtained from tin dioxide which is chemically stable. Palladium was the catalytic metal used in this study. The production of chemisorbed hydrogen was shown to depend on the quantity of metallic nanoaggregates in electrical contact with the reticulated vitreous carbon use as electrode. The conductive support, F-doped tin dioxide, was obtained by the sol-gel method. The electrocatalysts were characterized by different methods as resistivity measurements, linear sweep voltammetry, XRD, SEM, TGA/DSC, and FTIR analysis. The effects of temperature and time of calcination were also investigated. The study showed that the F-doped SnO2 electrocatalyst appeared to increase the rate of phenol electrohydrogenation. It was concluded that the improved electrocatalytic activity of Pd/F-doped SnO2 can be attributed to the simultaneous polarization of all the metallic Pd nanoaggregates present on the surface as well as in the pores of the matrix by contact with RVC. This results in a better production of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen with a large number of adlienation points. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. THE ORIGIN OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN PRESTELLAR CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vastel, C. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Bachiller, R., E-mail: cvastel@irap.omp.eu [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (OAN, IGN). Calle Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3 mm band at the IRAM 30 m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 × 10{sup –11} to 6 × 10{sup –9}. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ∼8000 AU, where T ∼ 10 K and n {sub H{sub 2}} ∼2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  16. Reproducing morphologies of disorderly self-assembling planar molecules with static and dynamic simulation methods by matching density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumstead, M.; Arnold, B.; Turak, A.

    2017-04-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations are the two main numerical approaches to modeling molecular self-assembly and ordering. Conceptually, however, each method explores different paths through the thermodynamic landscape. Molecular dynamics depends on the position and momentum terms. Monte Carlo is a static set, and thus the momentum term is replaced with an energy term that is dependent on the volume and entropy. Until now, it was unclear if a stochastic process of densifying particles would have the same internal structure as morphologies produced from classical mechanics. This paper provides a systematic (i.e., statistical) analysis of the outcomes of 4032 simulations for hard-core circular objects as a function of the number of molecules and the boundary conditions. Structural classification of the resultant ensembles (averaged pair correlation function, bond-order parameter, translational order parameter, and Voronoi diagrams) shows that stochastic and dynamic approaches do not alter the morphology of the steric molecules. We conclude that when the probability density of covering area fractions are matched, the ensembles produced from the two methods will show the same level of structural disorder and positional patterns. The resultant morphology from both models, therefore, is not a product of dynamic unrest, but that of the relaxation of entropic frustration from macromolecular crowding. Although statistically the two methods produce similar configurations, nuances arise from the static and dynamic nature of modeling. As a result, Monte Carlo is slightly better suited to modeling systems when the desired morphology is represented by a metastable state; molecular dynamics on the other hand is more suited to finding defects that can arise in morphologies. Regardless, a fixed density will result in similar morphologies from both techniques, driven by similar configurational entropy.

  17. The function of a TiO2 compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cells incorporating "planar" organic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Anthony; Ito, Seigo; Snaith, Henry; Bach, Udo; Kwiatkowski, Joe; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-04-01

    We present a device based study into the operation of liquid electrolyte dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC's) using organic dyes. We find that, for these systems, it is entirely necessary to employ a compact TiO2 layer between the transparent fluorine doped SnO2 (FTO) anode and the electrolyte in order to reduce charge recombination losses. By incorporation of a compact layer, the device efficiency can be increased by over 160% under simulated full sun illumination and more than doubled at lower light intensities. This is strong evidence that the more widely employed ruthenium based sensitizers act as to "insulate" the anode against recombination losses and that many planar organic dyes employed in DSSC's could greatly benefit from the use of a compact TiO2 blocking layer. This is in strong contrast to DSSC's sensitized with ruthenium based systems, where the introduction of compact TiO2 has only marginal effects on conversion efficiencies.

  18. Organic semiconductor/gold interface interactions: from physisorption on planar surfaces to chemical reactions with metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligorio, Giovanni; Nardi, Marco Vittorio; Christodoulou, Christos; Koch, Norbert

    2015-08-24

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with prototypical organic semiconductors used in optoelectronics, namely, tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3 ) and 4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]diphenyl (α-NPD), is investigated in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These AuNPs-on-molecule experiments are compared with the reversed molecule-on-Au cases. The molecules-on-Au systems show only weak interactions, and the evolution of the XP spectra is dominated by final-state effects. In contrast, in the AuNPs-on-molecules cases, both initial-state effects and final-state effects occur. Spectral features arising for both molecules and metal indicate charge transfer and the formation of organometallic complexes (initial-state effects). The energy shift in the metal emission underlines the size-induced nanometric nature of the molecule/Au interaction (final-state effects). Consequently, the chemical interaction between metals and organic semiconductors likely depends strongly on the deposition sequence in general.

  19. High efficiency organic photovoltaic cells employing hybridized mixed-planar heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen

    2015-08-18

    A device is provided, having a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode. The photoactive region includes a first photoactive organic layer that is a mixture of an organic acceptor material and an organic donor material, wherein the first photoactive organic layer has a thickness not greater than 0.8 characteristic charge transport lengths; a second photoactive organic layer in direct contact with the first organic layer, wherein the second photoactive organic layer is an unmixed layer of the organic acceptor material of the first photoactive organic layer, and the second photoactive organic layer has a thickness not less than about 0.1 optical absorption lengths; and a third photoactive organic layer disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode and in direct contact with the first photoactive organic layer. The third photoactive organic layer is an unmixed layer of the organic donor layer of the first photoactive organic layer and has a thickness not less than about 0.1 optical absorption lengths.

  20. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  1. Ion-molecule reactions of tritiated phenyl cations with organic amines and phosphines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, V.D.; Toropova, M.A.; Shchepina, N.E. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Ion-molecule reactions of free multiply tritiated phenyl cations produced by a nuclear chemical method with organic amines and phosphines are studied. The product yields of the ion-molecule reactions of phenyl cations with arylalkylamines and -phosphines are determined by both the nature of the heteroatom and the organic radicals bonded to it.

  2. Small Molecule Organic Nanostructures-Fabrication and Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.B.Djuri(s)i(c); A.M.C.Ng; Kai-Yin CHEUNG; Man-Kin FUNG; Wai-Kin CHAN

    2008-01-01

    Organic materials are of great interest for the development of low cost electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although majority of research on organic materials is concerned with synthesis of novel compounds and organic thin films, organic nanostructures are attracting increasing interest in recent years. We briefly review different growth methods of organic nanostructures, which can be roughly divided into vapor deposition methods and self-assembly techniques in solution. Then we highlight some interesting properties of organic nanostructures, as well as possible applications, including field emission, electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Prediction of nonlinear optical properties of large organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of materials with large nonlinear responses usually requires involved synthetic processes. Thus, it is very advantageous for materials scientists to have a means of predicting nonlinear optical properties. The prediction of nonlinear optical properties has to be addressed first at the molecular level and then as bulk material. For relatively large molecules, two types of calculations may be used, which are the sum-over-states and the finite-field approach. The finite-field method was selected for this research, because this approach is better suited for larger molecules.

  4. Synergetic effect of organic cores and inorganic shells for core/shell structured composite abrasives for chemical mechanical planarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang, E-mail: cy.jpu@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Li, Zhina [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Miao, Naiming [School of Mechanical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213016 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The damage-free polishing mechanism of core/shell composite abrasive was explored. • The organic core is help to decrease surface roughness and mechanical damages. • The inorganic shell is in favor of improving material removal rate. • The enhanced CMP behavior is due to the synergistic effect between core and shell. - Abstract: Core/shell structured organic/inorganic composite microspheres has an important potential application in efficient and damage-free chemical mechanical planarization/polishing (CMP) as a kind of novel abrasive due to its uniform non-rigid mechanical property. However, the synergistic effect of material removal between organic cores and inorganic shells of composite abrasives is ambiguous. In this work, oxide-CMP performances of various slurries, containing polystyrene (PS) spheres, solid abrasives (SiO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}), mixed abrasives ((PS + SiO{sub 2}) or (PS + CeO{sub 2})), core/shell composites (PS/SiO{sub 2} or PS/CeO{sub 2}), were investigated by atomic force microscopy. Experiment results indicated that the surfaces polished by composite abrasives exhibited lower surface roughness, fewer scratches as well as lower topographical variations than those by other type of abrasives. The core/shell structure of composite abrasives plays an important role in improving CMP behavior. Moreover, the organic cores are mainly beneficial to decrease surface roughness and mechanical damages, and the inorganic shells are in favor of improving material removal rate.

  5. Planar Microwave Sensor for Theranostic Therapy of Organic Tissue Based on Oval Split Ring Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Carolin; Puentes, Margarita; Maasch, Matthias; Hübner, Frank; Bazrafshan, Babak; Vogl, Thomas J; Damm, Christian; Jakoby, Rolf

    2016-09-08

    Microwave sensors in medical environments play a significant role due to the contact-less and non-invasive sensing mechanism to determine dielectric properties of tissue. In this work, a theranostic sensor based on Split Ring Resonators (SRRs) is presented that provides two operation modes to detect and treat tumor cells, exemplary in the liver. For the detection mode, resonance frequency changes due to abnormalities are evaluated, and in the treatment mode, microwave ablation is performed. The planar sensor structure can be integrated into a needle like a surgery tool that evokes challenges concerning size limitations and biocompatibility. To meet the size requirements and provide a reasonable operating frequency, properties of oval shaped SRRs are investigated. By elongating the radius of the SRR in one direction, the resonance frequency can be decreased significantly compared to circular SRR by a factor of two below 12 GHz. In order to validate the detection and treatment characteristics of the sensor, full wave simulations and measurements are examined. Clear resonance shifts are detected for loading the sensor structures with phantoms mimicking healthy and malignant tissue. For treatment mode evaluation, ex vivo beef liver tissue was ablated leading to a lesion zone 1.2 cm × 1 cm × 0.3 cm with a three minute exposure of maximum 2.1 W.

  6. Effect of annealing on photovoltaic performance of fabricated planar organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltakesmez, Ali; Biber, Mehmet; Tüzemen, Sebahattin

    2016-04-01

    We fabricated planar perovskite solar cells used CH3NH3PbI3-xClx for light harvesting to investigate effect of annealing on photovoltaic performance of fabricated device. The devices have an architecture of Glass/ITO/Pedot:PSS/Perovskite/PC61BM/Al. Layers of hole transport (Pedot:PSS), active and electron transport (PC61BM) were prepared from solution based one step deposition method by a spin coater and standard annealing procedure. The current-voltage curves of devices were measured inside the glovebox using a Keithley 2400 sourcemeter. The cells were illuminated by a solar simulator have optical intensity value of 300 mW/cm2. For the best cells, while PCE value of 5.78% before the annealing, photovoltaic efficiency was improved average 13% delivered a short-circuit current density of 3.20 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.82 V and fill factor of 0.74, leading to an efficiency of 6.54% with respect to prior to annealing.

  7. Planar Microwave Sensor for Theranostic Therapy of Organic Tissue Based on Oval Split Ring Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Reimann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microwave sensors in medical environments play a significant role due to the contact-less and non-invasive sensing mechanism to determine dielectric properties of tissue. In this work, a theranostic sensor based on Split Ring Resonators (SRRs is presented that provides two operation modes to detect and treat tumor cells, exemplary in the liver. For the detection mode, resonance frequency changes due to abnormalities are evaluated, and in the treatment mode, microwave ablation is performed. The planar sensor structure can be integrated into a needle like a surgery tool that evokes challenges concerning size limitations and biocompatibility. To meet the size requirements and provide a reasonable operating frequency, properties of oval shaped SRRs are investigated. By elongating the radius of the SRR in one direction, the resonance frequency can be decreased significantly compared to circular SRR by a factor of two below 12 GHz. In order to validate the detection and treatment characteristics of the sensor, full wave simulations and measurements are examined. Clear resonance shifts are detected for loading the sensor structures with phantoms mimicking healthy and malignant tissue. For treatment mode evaluation, ex vivo beef liver tissue was ablated leading to a lesion zone 1.2 cm × 1 cm × 0.3 cm with a three minute exposure of maximum 2.1 W.

  8. Electronic absorption spectra and geometry of organic molecules an application of molecular orbital theory

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Absorption Spectra and Geometry of Organic Molecules: An Application of Molecular Orbital Theory focuses on electronic absorption spectra of organic compounds and molecules. The book begins with the discussions on molecular spectra, electronic absorption spectra of organic compounds, and practical measures of absorption intensity. The text also focuses on molecular orbital theory and group theory. Molecular state functions; fundamental postulates of quantum theory; representation of symmetry groups; and symmetry operations and symmetry groups are described. The book also dis

  9. Dynamic mass spectrometer for studies of organic and inorganic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavilopulo, A.N. [Institute of Electron Physics, Ukr. Nat. Acad. Sci., Department of Ion Processes, Universytetska Str. 21, 88017 Uzhhorod (Ukraine)]. E-mail: an@zvl.iep.uzhgorod.ua; Shpenik, O.B. [Institute of Electron Physics, Ukr. Nat. Acad. Sci., Department of Ion Processes, Universytetska Str. 21, 88017 Uzhhorod (Ukraine); Surkov, V.A. [SELMI Inc., Sumy (Ukraine)

    2006-07-28

    Experimental technique is described and relative cross-sections of direct and dissociative ionization of CO{sub 2}, C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6} and C{sub 7}H{sub 8} molecules by electron impact in the near-threshold energy range are obtained. The experiment is performed on a setup with ion mass separation based on a monopole mass spectrometer which is proved to be successful for such a sort of experiments. For the incident electron energy range from 7 to 35 eV the energy dependences of cross-section of appearance of the main molecule ions and the fragment ions formed due to its dissociation are given.

  10. Single-Molecule Magnet Behavior of Individual Polyoxometalate Molecules Incorporated within Biopolymer or Metal-Organic Framework Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, William; Lan, Yanhua; Rivière, Eric; Yang, Shu; Roch-Marchal, Catherine; Dolbecq, Anne; Simonnet-Jégat, Corine; Steunou, Nathalie; Leclerc-Laronze, Nathalie; Ruhlmann, Laurent; Mallah, Talal; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Mialane, Pierre

    2016-05-04

    The chemically and structurally highly stable polyoxometalate (POM) single-molecule magnet (SMM) [(FeW9 O34 )2 Fe4 (H2 O)2 ](10-) (Fe6 W18 ) has been incorporated by direct or post-synthetic approaches into a biopolymer gelatin (Gel) matrix and two crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), including one diamagnetic (UiO-67) and one magnetic (MIL-101(Cr)). Integrity of the POM in the Fe6 W18 @Gel, Fe6 W18 @UiO-67 and Fe6 W18 @MIL-101(Cr) composites was confirmed by a set of complementary techniques. Magnetic studies indicate that the POMs are magnetically well isolated. Remarkably, in Fe6 W18 @Gel, the SMM properties of the embedded molecules are close to those of the crystals, with clear quantum tunneling steps in the hysteresis loops. For the Fe6 W18 @UiO-67 composite, the molecules retain their SMM properties, the energy barrier being slightly reduced in comparison to the crystalline material and the molecules exhibiting a tunneling rate of magnetization significantly faster than for Fe6 W18 @Gel. When Fe6 W18 is introduced into MIL-101(Cr), the width of the hysteresis loops is drastically reduced and the quantum tunneling steps are smeared out because of the magnetic interactions between the antiferromagnetic matrix and the SMM guest molecules.

  11. Small organic molecules on surfaces fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Draxl, Claudia; Ramsey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with basic aspects of polymer electronics and optoelectronics. There is an enormous world-wide effort both in basic scientific research as well as in industrial development in the area of organic electronics. It is becoming increasingly clear that, if devices based on organic materials are ever going to have a significant relevance beyond being a cheap replacement for inorganic semiconductors, there will be a need to understand interface formation, film growth and functionality. A control of these aspects will allow the realisation of totally new device concepts exploiting the enormous flexibility inherent in organic chemistry. In this book we focus on oligomeric/molecular films as we believe that the control of molecular structures and interfaces provides highly defined systems which allow, on the one hand the study of the basic physics and on the other hand to find the important parameters necessary to improve organic devices.

  12. Vacuum deposition of organic molecules for photovoltaic applications

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics have attracted considerable research and commercial interest due to their lightness, mechanical flexibility and low production costs. There are two main approaches for the fabrication of organic solar cells – solution and vacuum processing. The former relies on morphology control in polymer-fullerene blends resulting from natural phase separation in these systems. The latter takes advantage of solvent-free processing allowing highly complex multi-junction architectures s...

  13. Efficient and Stable Ternary Organic Solar Cells Based on Two Planar Nonfullerene Acceptors with Tunable Crystallinity and Phase Miscibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialin; Peng, Jiajun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liang, Ziqi

    2017-06-21

    Planar perylene diimides (PDIs), when used as nonfullerene acceptors for organic photovoltaics, are constrained by their large π-aggregation in solid state. To tackle this issue, another planar nonfullerene acceptor 3,9-bis(2-methylene-(3-(1,1-dicyanomethylene)-indanone)-5,5,11,11-tetrakis(4-hexylphenyl)-dithieno[2,3-d:2',3'-d']-s-indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b']dithiophene (ITIC) with weak crystallinity and near-infrared light absorption is introduced into the PTB7-Th:PDI binary blend to fabricate efficient and stable ternary solar cells. We have finely tuned the PDI/ITIC weight ratio to investigate the influences of individual ITIC and PDI on the optical, electronic, and morphological properties of the PTB7-Th:ITIC:PDI ternary blend. Compared to the binary blend, complementary optical absorption is achieved in all ternary blends. More importantly, it is found that ITIC plays a critical role on largely suppressing the PDI aggregates in the PTB7-Th:PDI blend, while PDI aids to form an interpenetrating network morphology to facilitate charge transport in the PTB7-Th:ITIC blend. Consequently, when the PDI/ITIC ratio is 3:7 (w/w), the PTB7-Th:ITIC:PDI based inverted solar cells exhibit the highest power conversion efficiency of 8.64% due to their favorable out-of-plane π-π stacking, finest phase-separation morphology, and highest charge mobility. Remarkably, the optimal cells that are solution-processed in air show the promising efficiency of 7.09%, suggesting good ambient stability of such ternary solar cells.

  14. Resonant propagation of femtosecond laser pulse in DBASVP molecule:one-dimensional asymmetric organic molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Ke; Liu Ji-Cai; Wang Chuan-Kui; Luo Yi

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the resonant propagation of femtosecond laser pulse in 4-trans-[p-(N, N-Di-n-butylamino)-p-stilbenyl vinyl] pyridine medium with permanent dipole moments. The electronic structures and parameters for the compound have been calculated by using density functional theory. In the optical regime, there is one charge-transfer state, and the molecule can thus be simplified as a two-level system. Both the one- and two-photon transitions occur between the ground and charge-transfer states. The numerical results show that the permanent dipole moments have an obvious effect on the propagation of the ultrashort pulse laser. The ideal self-induced transparency disappears for 2π pulse, and second harmonic spectral components occur significantly due to the two-photon absorption process. For the 6π pulse, continuum frequency generation is produced and a shorter duration pulse in time domain with 465 as is obtained.

  15. Modulation of Exciton Generation in Organic Active Planar pn Heterojunction: Toward Low Driving Voltage and High-Efficiency OLEDs Employing Conventional and Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Liu, Kunkun; Gan, Lin; Liu, Ming; Gao, Kuo; Xie, Gaozhan; Ma, Yuguang; Cao, Yong; Su, Shi-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) combining low driving voltage and high efficiency are designed by employing conventional and thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters through modulation of excitons generated at the planar p-n heterojunction region. To date, this approach enables the highest power efficiency for yellow-green emitting fluorescent OLEDs with a simplified structure.

  16. Theoretical Thermochemistry for Organic Molecules: Development of the Generalized Connectivity-Based Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2011-07-12

    A generalized, unique thermochemical hierarchy applicable for all closed shell organic molecules is developed in this paper. In this chemically intuitive, structure-based approach, the connectivity of the atoms in an organic molecule is used to construct our hierarchy called "connectivity-based hierarchy" (CBH). The hierarchy has several rungs and ascending up the hierarchy increasingly balances the reaction energy. It requires no prior knowledge of the types of molecules and hybridizations for the appropriate balancing of the bond types and the bonding environments of the atoms. The rungs can be generated by an automated computer program for any closed shell organic molecule, and the first three rungs generate the simplest reactions for the widely used isodesmic, hypohomodesmotic, and hyperhomodesmotic schemes. The generated reaction schemes are unique for each rung and are derived in a simpler manner than previous approaches, avoiding potential errors. This work also suggests that for closed shell organic molecules, the previously well-studied homodesmotic scheme does not have a fundamental structure-based origin. In a preliminary application of CBH, density functional theory has been used to calculate accurate enthalpies of formation for a test set of 20 organic molecules. The performance of the hierarchy suggests that it will be useful to predict accurate thermodynamic properties of larger organic molecules.

  17. Series of isostructural planar lanthanide complexes [Ln(III)4(mu3-OH)2(mdeaH)2(piv)8] with single molecule magnet behavior for the Dy4 analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghulam; Lan, Yanhua; Kostakis, George E; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2010-09-06

    A series of five isostructural tetranuclear lanthanide complexes of formula [Ln(4)(mu(3)-OH)(2)(mdeaH)(2)(piv)(8)], (mdeaH(2) = N-methyldiethanolamine; piv = pivalate; Ln = Tb (1), Dy (2), Ho (3), Er (4), and Tm (5)) have been synthesized and characterized. These clusters have a planar "butterfly" Ln(4) core. Magnetically, the Ln(III) ions are weakly coupled in all cases; the Dy(4) compound 2 shows Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) behavior.

  18. Tunneling spectroscopy of organic monolayers and single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipps, K W

    2012-01-01

    Basic concepts in tunneling spectroscopy applied to molecular systems are presented. Junctions of the form M-A-M, M-I-A-M, and M-I-A-I'-M, where A is an active molecular layer, are considered. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is found to be readily applied to all the above device types. It can provide both vibrational and electron spectroscopic data about the molecules comprising the A layer. In IETS there are no strong selection rules (although there are preferences) so that transitions that are normally IR, Raman, or even photon-forbidden can be observed. In the electronic transition domain, spin and Laporte forbidden transitions may be observed. Both vibrational and electronic IETS can be acquired from single molecules. The negative aspect of this seemingly ideal spectroscopic method is the thermal line width of about 5 k(B)T. This limits the useful measurement of vibrational IETS to temperatures below about 10 K. In the case of most electronic transitions where the intrinsic linewidth is much broader, useful experiments above 100 K are possible. One further limitation of electronic IETS is that it is generally limited to transitions with energy less than about 20,000 cm(-1). IETS can be identified by peaks in d(2) I/dV (2) vs bias voltage plots that occur at the same position (but not necessarily same intensity) in either bias polarity.Elastic tunneling spectroscopy is discussed in the context of processes involving molecular ionization and electron affinity states, a technique we call orbital mediated tunneling spectroscopy, or OMTS. OMTS can be applied readily to M-I-A-M and M-I-A-I'-M systems, but application to M-A-M junctions is problematic. Spectra can be obtained from single molecules. Ionization state results correlate well with UPS spectra obtained from the same systems in the same environment. Both ionization and affinity levels measured by OMTS can usually be correlated with one electron oxidation and reduction potentials for the

  19. Current approaches in evolution: from molecules to cells and organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thattai, Mukund; Peisajovich, Sergio G

    2014-11-01

    This is an exciting time to be an evolutionary biologist. Indeed, it is difficult to keep up with all the studies that fall under the broad category of "Evolution" since they span species, traits, and scales of organization. This special issue gives a flavor of exciting new approaches in evolutionary biology, but also emphasizes universal themes. The reviews contained here discuss important aspects of molecular evolution at multiple scales, from individual proteins to complex regulatory networks, as well as from unicellular organisms to macroscopic traits in animals. Though the model systems are diverse, the issues addressed are fundamental: the origin of evolutionary novelties, and the forces that drive them to fixation.

  20. Spin thermoelectric effects in organic single-molecule devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Wang, M.X.; Qian, C.; Hong, X.K.; Zhang, D.B.; Liu, Y.S.; Yang, X.F., E-mail: xfyang@cslg.edu.cn

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • A stronger spin thermoelectric performance in a polyacetylene device is observed. • For the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, a transport gap is opened. Thus the thermoelectric effects are largely enhanced. - Abstract: The spin thermoelectric performance of a polyacetylene chain bridging two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) is investigated based on first principles method. Two different edge spin arrangements in ZGNRs are considered. For ferromagnetic (FM) ordering, transmission eigenstates with different spin indices distributed below and above Fermi level are observed, leading directly to a strong spin thermoelectric effect in a wide temperature range. With the edge spins arranged in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, an obvious transport gap appears in the system, which greatly enhances the thermoelectric effects. The presence of a small spin splitting also induces a spin thermoelectric effect greater than the charge thermoelectric effect in certain temperature range. In general, the single-molecule junction exhibits the potential to be used for the design of perfect thermospin devices.

  1. Branched terthiophenes in organic electronics: from small molecules to polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuble, Martin; Goll, Miriam; Ludwigs, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    A zoo of chemical structures is accessible when the branched unit 2,2':3',2″-terthiophene (3T) is included both in structurally well-defined small molecules and polymer-like architectures. The first part of this review article highlights literature on all-thiophene based branched oligomers including dendrimers as well as combinations of 3T-units with functional moieties for light-harvesting systems. Motivated by the perfectly branched macromolecular dendrimers both electropolymerization as well as chemical approaches are presented as methods for the preparation of branched polythiophenes with different branching densities. Structure-function relationships between the molecular architecture and optical and electronic properties are discussed throughout the article.

  2. Novel High-Activity Organic Piezoelectric Materials - From Single-Molecule Response to Energy Harvesting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Mirman, B.; Karapetian, E. “Relationship between Direct and Converse Piezoelectric Effect in a Nanoscale Electromechanical Contact,” Physical Review B...response of organic hydrogen-bonded crystals and single-molecule electromechanical response. Using the known piezoelectric response of crystalline 2...Using computational exploration of the electromechanical response other molecular scaffolds, we explored single-molecule ferroelectrics based on

  3. Inorganic-Organic Molecules and Solids with Nanometer-Sized Pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maverick, Andrew W

    2011-12-17

    We are constructing porous inorganic-organic hybrid molecules and solids, many of which contain coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. In this work, we use multifunctional ²-diketone ligands as building blocks to prepare extended-solid and molecular porous materials that are capable of reacting with a variety of guest molecules.

  4. Anchoring of organic molecules to a metal surface: HtBDC on Cu(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunack, M.; Petersen, L.; Kuhnle, A.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of largish molecules with metal surfaces has been studied by combining the imaging and manipulation capabilities of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). At the atomic scale, the STM results directly reveal that the adsorption of a largish organic molecule can induce a restruct...

  5. Adsorption of two gas molecules at a single metal site in a metal–organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runčevski, Tomče; Kapelewski, Matthew T.; Torres-Gavosto, Rodolfo M.; Tarver, Jacob D.; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy to markedly increase the gas storage capacity of metal-organic frameworks is to introduce coordinatively-unsaturated metal centers capable of binding multiple gas molecules. Herein, we provide an initial demonstration that a single metal site within a framework can support the terminal coordination of two gas molecules--specifically hydrogen, methane, or carbon dioxide.

  6. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-17

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm(2). Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  7. Organic molecules in the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Miller, K. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Archer, P. D.; Franz, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P. G.; Des Marais, D. J.; Dworkin, J. P.; Fairén, A. G.; François, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Kashyap, S.; ten Kate, I. L.; Leshin, L. A.; Malespin, C. A.; Martin, M. G.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Mcadam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-González, R.; Pavlov, A. A.; Prats, B. D.; Squyres, S. W.; Steele, A.; Stern, J. C.; Sumner, D. Y.; Sutter, B.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover is designed to conduct inorganic and organic chemical analyses of the atmosphere and the surface regolith and rocks to help evaluate the past and present habitability potential of Mars at Gale Crater. C

  8. Organizing mechanically interlocked molecules to function inside metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kelong; Loeb, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The idea that the workings of molecular switches, motors, and machines based on mechanically interlocked molecules can be transferred into the solid state by using them as the building blocks of metal-organic framework materials is addressed. This involves an in-depth review and analysis of the chemistry of coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks in which the linkers are rotaxanes and catenanes. To date, two types of materials have been prepared: (1) coordination polymers in which the interlocked components are part of a complex architecture but do not display large amplitude molecular motion or function and (2) those that clearly demonstrate some type of supramolecular quality (molecular recognition) or relative motion between interlocked components (dynamics) reminiscent of their solution counterparts. The latter can be thought of as prototypes of solid-state molecular machines. The possibility of creating more sophisticated, solid-state materials that have the full characteristics of molecular switches, motors, and machines and the way forward for this chemistry is also discussed.

  9. A-D-A small molecules for solution-processed organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wang; Wan, Xiangjian; Li, Miaomiao; Wang, Yunchuang; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-03-25

    A-D-A small molecules have drawn more and more attention in solution-processed organic solar cells due to the advantages of a diversity of structures, easy control of energy levels, etc. Recently, a power conversion efficiency of nearly 10% has been achieved through careful material design and device optimization. This feature article reviews recent representative progress in the design and application of A-D-A small molecules in organic photovoltaic cells.

  10. The Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the Orion KL Molecular Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Hsu, Yu-Sen; Charnley, Steven B.; Wang, Kuo-Song

    2011-01-01

    We conducted high angular-resolution observations toward the massive star-forming region Orion KL at 1.3 mm using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Spectral emission from twelve complex organic molecules was simultaneously imaged. We discuss the distinct chemical characteristics among four sub- regions in Orion KL by comparing the spatial distributions and fractional abundances of these complex molecules. These observations will allow us to test and constrain chemical models of interstellar organic synthesis.

  11. Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells Incorporating Metal-Organic Framework Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Chung-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Huang, Tzu-Yen; Kao, Sheng-Yuan; Lu, Hsin-Che; Lee, Min-Han; Boopathi, Karunakara Moorthy; Chu, Chih-Wei; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2015-11-25

    Zr-based porphyrin metal-organic framework (MOF-525) nanocrystals with a crystal size of about 140 nm are synthesized and incorporated into perovskite solar cells. The morphology and crystallinity of the perovskite thin film are enhanced since the micropores of MOF-525 allow the crystallization of perovskite to occur inside; this observation results in a higher cell efficiency of the obtained MOF/perovskite solar cell.

  12. Organic Molecules in the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Miller, K. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Archer, P. D.; Franz, H. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover is designed to determine the inventory of organic and inorganic volatiles thermally released from solid samples using a combination of evolved gas analysis (EGA), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS), and tunable laser spectroscopy. Here we report on various chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloromethanes, chlorobenzene and dichloroalkanes) detected at elevated levels above instrument background at the Cumberland (CB) drill site, and discuss their possible sources.

  13. Environmental sustainability of bioactive molecules from marine organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez López, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Marine and freshwater ecosystems have been widely exploited throughout history as vast sources of food and valuable natural products. The diversity of aquatic organisms has led to the isolation of more than 24000 bioactive compounds with applications in strategic industries such as pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic sectors. Moreover, the biochemical composition and growth characteristics of microalgae and seaweeds suggest their capability to overcome some bottleneck...

  14. Molecular spectral line surveys and the organic molecules in the interstellar molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2008-10-01

    It is known that more than 140 interstellar and circumstellar molecules have so far been detected, mainly by means of the radio astronomy observations. Many organic molecules are also detected, including alcohols, ketons, ethers, aldehydes, and others, that are distributed from dark clouds and hot cores in the giant molecular clouds. It is believed that most of the organic molecules in space are synthesized through the grain surface reactions, and are evaporated from the grain surface when they are heated up by the UV radiation from adjacent stars. On the other hand the recent claim on the detection of glycine have raised an important issue how difficult it is to confirm secure detection of weak spectra from less abundant organic molecules in the interstellar molecular cloud. I will review recent survey observations of organic molecules in the interstellar molecular clouds, including independent observations of glycine by the 45 m radio telescope in Japan, and will discuss the procedure to securely identify weak spectral lines from organic molecules and the importance of laboratory measurement of organic species.

  15. High resolution SPM imaging of organic molecules with functionalized tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Pavel

    2017-08-01

    One of the most remarkable and exciting achievements in the field of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the last years is the unprecedented sub-molecular resolution of both atomic and electronic structures of single molecules deposited on solid state surfaces. Despite its youth, the technique has already brought many new possibilities to perform different kinds of measurements, which cannot be accomplished by other techniques. This opens new perspectives in advanced characterization of physical and chemical processes and properties of molecular structures on surfaces. Here, we discuss the history and recent progress of the high resolution imaging with a functionalized probe by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We describe the mechanisms responsible for the high-resolution AFM, STM and IETS-STM contrast. The complexity of this technique requires new theoretical approaches, where a relaxation of the functionalized probe is considered. We emphasise the similarities of the mechanism driving high-resolution SPM with other imaging methods. We also summarise briefly significant achievements and progress in different branches. Finally we provide brief perspectives and remaining challenges of the further refinement of these high-resolution methods.

  16. PLACENTAL STEREOLOGY: SPANNING THE LEVELS FROM MOLECULE TO WHOLE ORGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry M Mayhew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Stereology can provide hard (functionally-relevant quantitative information at different levels of 3D structural organization. My researches have applied established methods to study organ function and developed novel methods to study subcellular localization of marker probes. We have studied whole-organ function (passive diffusion in the human placenta and quantified various processes at tissue and subcellular levels and in normal and complicated pregnancies. Fetoplacental angiogenesis and villous growth and maturation involve phased changes particularly around mid-gestation. Growth is associated with increased numbers of cells or nuclei and counts have shown that villous trophoblast continuously renews itself via cytotrophoblast (CT proliferation and recruitment and syncytiotrophoblast (ST differentiation and extrusion. Integration of these processes results in changes in total oxygen (O2 diffusive conductance which match the growing fetal mass. Similar processes occur during development of the mouse placenta and at least some are compromised in human pregnancies. For example: [a] in pure pre-eclampsia (PE, villous and fetoplacental vascular volumes and surfaces are similar to those seen in uncomplicated pregnancies but reduced in pure intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR and in PE+IUGR; [b] trophoblast extrusion is accelerated in PE and IUGR but the latter exhibits reduced CT proliferation and this perturbed steady state leads to smaller trophoblast volumes and surfaces; [c] O2 diffusive conductances alter in various pregnancy complications, including IUGR and PE+IUGR; [d] fetal weight is diminished, but diffusive transport increases, in placentas from mice exposed to urban air pollution. Finally, innovations in quantitative immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM have produced a portfolio of methods for revealing non-random distributions of marker gold particles in different cellular compartments and for testing whether patterns shift following

  17. Organic Molecules in the Galactic Center. Hot Core Chemistry without Hot Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Requena-Torres, M A; Martín, S; Martín-Pintado, J; Rodr'iguez-Fern'andez, N J; Rodríguez-Franco, A

    2006-01-01

    To study the origin of the large abundances of complex organic molecules in the Galactic center (GC), we have carried out a systematic study of the complex organic molecules CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O, HCOOCH3, HCOOH, CH3COOH, H2CO and CS toward 40 GC molecular clouds. Using the LTE approximation, we have derived the physical properties of GC molecular clouds and the abundances of the complex molecules.The CH3OH abundance between clouds varies by nearly two orders of magnitude from 2.4x10^{-8} to 1.1x10^{-6}. The abundance of the other complex organic molecules relative to that of CH3OH is basically independent of the CH3OH abundance, with variations of only a factor of 4-8. The abundances of complex organic molecules in the GC are compared with those measured in hot cores and hot corinos, in which these complex molecules are also abundant. We find that both the abundance and the abundance ratios of the complex molecules relative to CH3OH in hot cores are similar to that found in the GC clouds. However, hot corin...

  18. Power losses in bilayer inverted small molecule organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Trinh, Cong

    2012-01-01

    Inverted bilayer organic solar cells using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as a donor and C60 as an acceptor with the structure: glass/indium tin oxide (ITO)/ZnO/C60/CuPc/MoO3/Al, in which the zinc oxide (ZnO) was deposited by atomic layer deposition, are compared with a conventional device: glass/ITO/CuPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al. These inverted and conventional devices give short circuit currents of 3.7 and 4.8 mA/cm 2, respectively. However, the inverted device gives a reduced photoresponse from the CuPc donor compared to that of the conventional device. Optical field models show that the arrangement of organic layers in the inverted devices leads to lower absorption of long wavelengths by the CuPc donor; the low energy portion of the spectrum is concentrated near the metal oxide electrode in both devices. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  19. UV and VUV ionization of organic molecules, clusters and complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Marksteiner, M; Sclafani, M; Ulbricht, H; Arndt, M

    2014-01-01

    The generation of organic particle beams is studied in combination with photoionization using uv radiation at 266 nm and vuv light at 157 nm. Single-photon ionization with pulsed vuv light turns out to be sensitive enough to detect various large neutral biomolecular complexes ranging from metal-amino acid complexes to nucleotide clusters and aggregates of polypeptides. Different biomolecular clusters are shown to exhibit rather specific binding characteristics with regard to the various metals that are co-desorbed in the source. We also find that the ion signal of gramicidin can be increased by a factor of fifteen when the photon energy is increased from 4.66 eV to 7.9 eV.

  20. UV and VUV ionization of organic molecules, clusters, and complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Haslinger, Philipp; Sclafani, Michele; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2009-09-17

    The generation of organic particle beams is studied in combination with photoionization using UV radiation at 266 nm and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at 157 nm. Single-photon ionization with pulsed VUV light turns out to be sensitive enough to detect various large neutral biomolecular complexes ranging from metal-amino acid complexes to nucleotide clusters and aggregates of polypeptides. Different biomolecular clusters are shown to exhibit rather specific binding characteristics with regard to the various metals that are codesorbed in the source. We also find that the ion signal of gramicidin can be increased by a factor of 15 when the photon energy is increased from 4.66 to 7.9 eV.

  1. The PDZ Protein Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) Regulates Planar Cell Polarity and Motile Cilia Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Anny Caceres; Wheeler, David S; Stolz, Donna B; Tsang, Michael; Friedman, Peter A; Romero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Directional flow of the cerebrospinal fluid requires coordinated movement of the motile cilia of the ependymal epithelium that lines the cerebral ventricles. Here we report that mice lacking the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1/Slc9a3r1, also known as EBP50) develop profound communicating hydrocephalus associated with fewer and disorganized ependymal cilia. Knockdown of NHERF1/slc9a3r1 in zebrafish embryos also causes severe hydrocephalus of the hindbrain and impaired ciliogenesis in the otic vesicle. Ultrastructural analysis did not reveal defects in the shape or organization of individual cilia. Similar phenotypes have been described in animals with deficiencies in Wnt signaling and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. We show that NHERF1 binds the PCP core genes Frizzled (Fzd) and Vangl. We further show that NHERF1 assembles a ternary complex with Fzd4 and Vangl2 and promotes translocation of Vangl2 to the plasma membrane, in particular to the apical surface of ependymal cells. Taken together, these results strongly support an important role for NHERF1 in the regulation of PCP signaling and the development of functional motile cilia.

  2. The planar cell polarity protein Strabismus promotes Pins anterior localization during asymmetric division of sensory organ precursor cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns; Beaudoin-Massiani, Olivia; Stuttem, Isabella; Schweisguth, François

    2004-01-01

    Cell fate diversity is generated in part by the unequal segregation of cell-fate determinants during asymmetric cell division. In the Drosophila bristle lineage, the sensory organ precursor (pI) cell is polarized along the anteroposterior (AP) axis by Frizzled (Fz) receptor signaling. We show here that Fz localizes at the posterior apical cortex of the pI cell prior to mitosis, whereas Strabismus (Stbm) and Prickle (Pk), which are also required for AP polarization of the pI cell, co-localize at the anterior apical cortex. Thus, asymmetric localization of Fz, Stbm and Pk define two opposite cortical domains prior to mitosis of the pI cell. At mitosis, Stbm forms an anterior crescent that overlaps with the distribution of Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) and Discs-large (Dlg), two components of the anterior Dlg-Pins-Galphai complex that regulates the localization of cell-fate determinants. At prophase, Stbm promotes the anterior localization of Pins. By contrast, Dishevelled (Dsh) acts antagonistically to Stbm by excluding Pins from the posterior cortex. We propose that the Stbm-dependent recruitment of Pins at the anterior cortex of the pI cell is a novel read-out of planar cell polarity.

  3. Response Characterization of a Fiber Optic Sensor Array with Dye-Coated Planar Waveguide for Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a multi-array side-polished optical-fiber gas sensor for the detection of volatile organic compound (VOC gases. The side-polished optical-fiber coupled with a polymer planar waveguide (PWG provides high sensitivity to alterations in refractive index. The PWG was fabricated by coating a solvatochromic dye with poly(vinylpyrrolidone. To confirm the effectiveness of the sensor, five different sensing membranes were fabricated by coating the side-polished optical-fiber using the solvatochromic dyes Reinhardt’s dye, Nile red, 4-aminophthalimide, 4-amino-N-methylphthalimide, and 4-(dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde, which have different polarities that cause changes in the effective refractive index of the sensing membrane owing to evanescent field coupling. The fabricated gas detection system was tested with five types of VOC gases, namely acetic acid, benzene, dimethylamine, ethanol, and toluene at concentrations of 1, 2,…,10 ppb. Second-regression and principal component analyses showed that the response properties of the proposed VOC gas sensor were linearly shifted bathochromically, and each gas showed different response characteristics.

  4. Single-step metal-organic vapor-phase diffusion for low-dark-current planar-type avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Dong-Hwan; Jeong, Hae Yong; Kim, Youngjo; Shin, Chan-Soo; Park, Kyung Ho; Park, Won-Kyu; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Sangin; Han, Sang Wook; Moon, Sung

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a p-type diffusion process based literally on single-step metal-organic vapor-phase diffusion (MOVPD) employing diethyl zinc as the diffusion source in combination with the recessetching technique is developed to improve the dark-current characteristics of planar-type avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The developed single-step MOVPD process exhibits on excellent linear relationship between the diffusion depth and the square root of the diffusion time, which mainly results from maintaining constant source diffusion. The single-step MOVPD process without any additional thermal activation process achieves a surface doping concentration of 1.9 × 1018 cm -3, which is sufficient to form ohmic contact. The measured diffusion profiles of the APDs clearly reveal the presence of a two-dimensional diffusion front formed by the recess-etched and guard-ring regions. The impact of this p-type diffusion process on the performance of the APD devices has also been demonstrated by exhibiting improved dark-current characteristics for the fabricated APDs.

  5. A luminescent mixed-lanthanide-organic framework sensor for decoding different volatile organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chao; Ou, Sha; Zou, Chao; Zhao, Min; Wu, Chuan-De

    2014-07-01

    A flexible tripodal polyaromatic acid (4,4',4″-(((2,4,6-trimethylbenzene-1,3,5-triyl)-tris(methylene))-tris(oxy))tribenzoic acid, H3TCM) was used to adapt the coordination sites of lanthanide ions for the construction of microporous lanthanide-organic frameworks (LOFs) [LnTCM(H2O)2]·3DMF·H2O (Ln-TCM; Ln = La, Eu, and/or Tb). In these LOFs, the emission band of TCM matches well with the excitation energy of lanthanide ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) which results in high-efficient resonance energy transfer from TCM to lanthanide ions. Moreover, the mixed EuxTb1-x-TCM has tunable pores to adapt different induced-fit-type host-guest interactions which can modulate both the energy transfer efficiency from TCM to Ln(3+) ions and the energy allocation between Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions in the luminescence spectra. We demonstrate that the Eu(x)Tb(1-x)-TCM sensor has the capability of decoding different volatile organic molecules (VOMs) with a clearly differentiable and unique emission intensity ratio of (5)D0 → (7)F2 (Eu(3+), 614 nm) to (5)D4 → (7)F5 (Tb(3+), 545 nm) transitions for every different VOM. Compared with the traditional absolute emission intensity method, such a self-referencing emission intensity strategy has generated self-calibrating, highly differentiable, and very stable luminescent signals for decoding different VOMs from the unique Eu(x)Tb(1-x)-TCM platform, which has great potential for practical applications.

  6. Organic Molecules from Biochar Leacheates Have a Positive Effect on Rice Seedling Cold Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Meng, Jun; Liang, Xiao; E, Yang; Yang, Xu; Chen, Wenfu

    2017-01-01

    Biochar is known to have a number of positive effects on plant ecophysiology. However, limited research has been carried out to date on the effects and mechanisms of biochar on plant ecophysiology under abiotic stresses, especially responses to cold. In this study, we report on a series of experiments on rice seedlings treated with different concentrations of biochar leacheates (between 0 and 10% by weight) under cold stress (10°C). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and cold-resistant physiological indicator analysis at low temperatures revealed that the cold tolerance of rice seedlings increased after treatment with high concentrations of biochar leacheates (between 3 and 10% by weight). Results also show that the organic molecules in biochar leacheates enhance the cold resistance of plants when other interference factors are excluded. We suggest that the positive influence of biochar on plant cold tolerance is because of surface organic molecules which likely function by entering a plant and interacting with stress-related proteins. Thus, to verify these mechanisms, this study used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques, identifying 20 organic molecules in biochar extracts using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) library. Further, to illustrate how these organic molecules work, we utilized the molecular docking software Autodock to show that the organic molecule 6-(Methylthio)hexa-1,5-dien-3-ol from biochar extracts can dock with the stress-related protein zinc-dependent activator protein (ZAP1). 6-(Methylthio)hexa-1,5-dien-3-ol has a similar binding mode with the ligand succinic acid of ZAP1. It can be inferred that the organic molecule identified in this study performs the same function as the ZAP1 ligand, stimulating ZAP1 driving cold-resistant functions, and enhancing plant cold tolerance. We conclude that biochar treatment enhances cold tolerance in rice seedlings via interactions between organic molecules and

  7. Stability of organic molecules against shocks in the young Solar nebula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, Inga; Milosavljevic, Milica; Stempels, E

    2009-01-01

    One of the fundamental astrobiology questions is how life has formed in our Solar System. In this context the formation and stability of abiotic organic molecules such as CH(4), formic acid and amino acids, is important for understanding how organic material has formed and survived shocks and energe

  8. Interface properties of organic molecules on metal surfaces; Grenzflaecheneigenschaften organischer Molekuele auf Metalloberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacuban, Hatice

    2010-01-28

    In this work, the growth of the archetype molecules CuPc and PTCDA was investigated on Cu(111). PTCDA was also studied on NaCl/Cu(111). The main experiments were carried out with a scanning tunneling microscope. Structural analysis of CuPc on Cu (111) is only possible at low temperatures, since at room temperature the molecules exhibit a high surface mobility. For the investigation of these structures and especially to enable scanning tunneling spectroscopy, a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was developed. Using this home built STM the experiments could be carried out at about 10 K. After the adsorption of CuPc on Cu (111) a substrate-induced symmetry reduction of the molecules can be observed in scanning tunneling microscopy. When the occupied states of the molecules are imaged, a switching between two distinct levels is found. These modifications are determined by the adsorption geometry of the molecules. Based on high resolution STM data, an on-top adsorption geometry of the CuPc-molecules on Cu (111)-substrate can be deducted. At low temperatures, two new superstructures of PTCDA on Cu(111) are observed. The molecules within these superstructures are tilted with respect to the substrate. Intermolecular interactions may be the crucial factor for the realignment of the molecules. If PTCDA molecules are adsorbed on a NaCl/Cu (111) substrate, at room temperature, also two new superstructures on the copper substrate were found. They indicate the formation of a metall-organic-complex. On top of the NaCl layer the molecules exclusively grow at polar NaCl step edges. This is an indication for electrostatic interaction between the PTCDA molecules and the NaCl layer. When the molecule density is further increased, a Vollmer-Weber growth sets in. If both molecules PTCDA and CuPc are present on the sample at the same time, local spectroscopy provides information on the metal-organic interface in direct comparison. The STS-results of CuPc/PTCDA on Cu (111

  9. Self-organizing ontology of biochemically relevant small molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepelev Leonid L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high-throughput experimentation in biochemistry has led to the generation of vast amounts of chemical data, necessitating the development of novel analysis, characterization, and cataloguing techniques and tools. Recently, a movement to publically release such data has advanced biochemical structure-activity relationship research, while providing new challenges, the biggest being the curation, annotation, and classification of this information to facilitate useful biochemical pattern analysis. Unfortunately, the human resources currently employed by the organizations supporting these efforts (e.g. ChEBI are expanding linearly, while new useful scientific information is being released in a seemingly exponential fashion. Compounding this, currently existing chemical classification and annotation systems are not amenable to automated classification, formal and transparent chemical class definition axiomatization, facile class redefinition, or novel class integration, thus further limiting chemical ontology growth by necessitating human involvement in curation. Clearly, there is a need for the automation of this process, especially for novel chemical entities of biological interest. Results To address this, we present a formal framework based on Semantic Web technologies for the automatic design of chemical ontology which can be used for automated classification of novel entities. We demonstrate the automatic self-assembly of a structure-based chemical ontology based on 60 MeSH and 40 ChEBI chemical classes. This ontology is then used to classify 200 compounds with an accuracy of 92.7%. We extend these structure-based classes with molecular feature information and demonstrate the utility of our framework for classification of functionally relevant chemicals. Finally, we discuss an iterative approach that we envision for future biochemical ontology development. Conclusions We conclude that the proposed methodology

  10. Analysis of the Molecules Structure and Vertical Electron Affinity of Organic Gas Impact on Electric Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Juntao; Xiao, Dengming; Zhao, Xiaoling; Deng, Yunkun

    2016-05-01

    It is necessary to find an efficient selection method to pre-analyze the gas electric strength from the perspective of molecule structure and the properties for finding the alternative gases to sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). As the properties of gas are determined by the gas molecule structure, the research on the relationship between the gas molecule structure and the electric strength can contribute to the gas pre-screening and new gas development. In this paper, we calculated the vertical electron affinity, molecule orbits distribution and orbits energy of gas molecules by the means of density functional theory (DFT) for the typical structures of organic gases and compared their electric strengths. By this method, we find part of the key properties of the molecule which are related to the electric strength, including the vertical electron affinity, the lowest unoccupied molecule orbit (LUMO) energy, molecule orbits distribution and negative-ion system energy. We also listed some molecule groups such as unsaturated carbons double bonds (C=C) and carbonitrile bonds (C≡N) which have high electric strength theoretically by this method. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51177101 and 51337006)

  11. Analysis of the Molecules Structure and Vertical Electron Affinity of Organic Gas Impact on Electric Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Juntao; XIAO Dengming; ZHAO Xiaoling; DENG Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    It is necessary to find an efficient selection method to pre-analyze the gas electric strength from the perspective of molecule structure and the properties for finding the alternative gases to sulphur hexafluoride (SF6).As the properties of gas are determined by the gas molecule structure,the research on the relationship between the gas molecule structure and the electric strength can contribute to the gas pre-screening and new gas development.In this paper,we calculated the vertical electron affinity,molecule orbits distribution and orbits energy of gas molecules by the means of density functional theory (DFT) for the typical structures of organic gases and compared their electric strengths.By this method,we find part of the key properties of the molecule which are related to the electric strength,including the vertical electron affinity,the lowest unoccupied molecule orbit (LUMO) energy,molecule orbits distribution and negativeion system energy.We also listed some molecule groups such as unsaturated carbons double bonds (C=C) and carbonitrile bonds (C≡N) which have high electric strength theoretically by this method.

  12. A Self-Perpetuating Catalyst for the Production of Complex Organic Molecules in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. Many mechanisms may contribute to the total organic content in protostellar nebulae, ranging from organics formed via ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the cold dark clouds from which such nebulae collapse, to similar ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the dark regions of the nebula far from the proto star, to gas phase reactions in sub-nebulae around growing giant planets and in the nebulae themselves. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. The Haber-Bosch catalytic reduction of N2 by hydrogen was thought to produce the reduced nitrogen found in meteorites. However, the clean iron metal surfaces that catalyze these reactions are easily poisoned via reaction with any number of molecules, including the very same complex organics that they produce and both reactions work more efficiently in the hot regions of the nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Although none work as well as pure iron grains, and all produce a wide range of organic products rather than just pure methane, these materials are not truly catalysts.

  13. Theoretical characterization of charge transport in one-dimensional collinear arrays of organic conjugated molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Lucas; Olivier, Yoann; Athanasopoulos, Stavros; da Silva Filho, Demetrio A; Hulliger, Jürg; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Gierschner, Johannes; Cornil, Jérôme

    2010-04-06

    A great deal of interest has recently focused on host-guest systems consisting of one-dimensional collinear arrays of conjugated molecules encapsulated in the channels of organic or inorganic matrices. Such architectures allow for controlled charge and energy migration processes between the interacting guest molecules and are thus attractive in the field of organic electronics. In this context, we characterize here at a quantum-chemical level the molecular parameters governing charge transport in the hopping regime in 1D arrays built with different types of molecules. We investigate the influence of several parameters (such as the symmetry of the molecule, the presence of terminal substituents, and the molecular size) and define on that basis the molecular features required to maximize the charge carrier mobility within the channels. In particular, we demonstrate that a strong localization of the molecular orbitals in push-pull compounds is generally detrimental to the charge transport properties.

  14. Organic molecule fluorescence as an experimental test-bed for quantum jumps in thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Cormac; Farrow, Tristan; Dahlsten, Oscar C O; Taylor, Robert A; Vlatko, Vedral

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate with an experiment how molecules are a natural test bed for probing fundamental quantum thermodynamics. Single-molecule spectroscopy has undergone transformative change in the past decade with the advent of techniques permitting individual molecules to be distinguished and probed. We demonstrate that the quantum Jarzynski equality for heat is satisfied in this set-up by considering the time-resolved emission spectrum of organic molecules as arising from quantum jumps between states. This relates the heat dissipated into the environment to the free energy difference between the initial and final state. We demonstrate also how utilizing the quantum Jarzynski equality allows for the detection of energy shifts within a molecule, beyond the relative shift.

  15. An Optical Tweezers Platform for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jacob; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2017-10-03

    Observation at the single molecule level has been a revolutionary tool for molecular biophysics and materials science, but single molecule studies of solution-phase chemistry are less widespread. In this work we develop an experimental platform for solution-phase single molecule force spectroscopy in organic solvents. This optical-tweezer-based platform was designed for broad chemical applicability and utilizes optically trapped core-shell microspheres, synthetic polymer tethers, and click chemistry linkages formed in situ. We have observed stable optical trapping of the core-shell microspheres in ten different solvents, and single molecule link formation in four different solvents. These experiments demonstrate how to use optical tweezers for single molecule force application in the study of solution-phase chemistry.

  16. Adsorption of gases and large polycyclic organic molecules in metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siberio-Perez, Diana Yazmin

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous materials with unique properties, including size tunable pores and cavities that allow for high surface areas and high levels of porosity. These properties make MOFs appealing for a number of traditional processes such as separations and catalysis, and for areas of current interest such as gas storage. The implementation of these frameworks into these areas first requires an understanding of the adsorbene-adsorbent interactions. For this reason, the adsorption behavior of CH4, N2, and CO2 (298 K, 30 bar) in a series of isoreticular MOFs (IRMOFs) was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The data were marked by different shifts to the normal vibrational modes of the gases, depending on the IRMOF to which they were adsorbed. These shifts arise due to interactions within the framework pores, and not with the outer crystal surface. In all cases, Raman spectra at pressures up to 30 bar showed that saturation of the sorption sites does not occur. The observed shifts of the vibrational modes for each gas indicate different chemical environments within different IRMOFs, pointing to the important role the linkers play in the adsorption of gases. Despite the fact that MOFs possess surface areas that exceed those of other porous materials, no method of determining the upper limit in surface area for a material had yet been determined. Here, a general strategy is presented that has allowed for the realization of a structure that has one of the highest surface areas reported to date. The design and inclusion properties of crystalline Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2, a framework with a surface area measured to exceed 4,500 m2/g, is reported. This framework, named MOF-177, combines this exceptional level of surface area with an ordered structure that has extra-large pores capable of binding polycyclic organic guest molecules, that include C60 and several dyes. Size and isomer selectivity may also be achieved with MOF-177, as

  17. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoper...

  18. Phase-coherent electron transport through metallic atomic-sized contacts and organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, F.

    2007-02-02

    This work is concerned with the theoretical description of systems at the nanoscale, in particular the electric current through atomic-sized metallic contacts and organic molecules. In the first part, the characteristic peak structure in conductance histograms of different metals is analyzed within a tight-binding model. In the second part, an ab-initio method for quantum transport is developed and applied to single-atom and single-molecule contacts. (orig.)

  19. A scale-bridging modeling approach for anisotropic organic molecules at patterned semiconductor surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kleppmann, Nicola; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid systems consisting of organic molecules at inorganic semiconductor surfaces are gaining increasing importance as thin film devices for optoelectronics. The efficiency of such devices strongly depends on the collective behavior of the adsorbed molecules. In the present paper we propose a novel, coarse-grained model addressing the condensed phases of a representative hybrid system, that is, para-sexiphenyl (6P) at zinc-oxide (ZnO). Within our model, intermolecular interactions are repre-...

  20. Robust Manipulation of Magnetism in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As by Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Hailong; Pan, Dong; Keiper, Timothy; Li, Lixia; Yu, Xuezhe; Lu, Jun; Lochner, Eric; von Molnár, Stephan; Xiong, Peng; Zhao, Jianhua

    2015-12-22

    Surface adsorption of organic molecules provides a new method for the robust manipulation of ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As. Electron acceptor and donor molecules yield significant enhancement and suppression, respectively, of ferromagnetism with modulation of the Curie temperature spanning 36 K. Dip-pen nanolithography is employed to directly pattern monolayers on (Ga,Mn)As, which is presented as a novel pathway toward producing magnetic nanostructures.

  1. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Veland, Iben Rønn

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell-cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most...... role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border....

  2. Adsorption configuration effects on the surface diffusion of large organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, F.; Legoas, S.B.; Hummelink, F.

    2010-01-01

    Violet Lander (C108H104) is a large organic molecule that when deposited on Cu(110) surface exhibits lock-and-key like behavior [Otero et al., Nature Mater. 3, 779 (2004)]. In this work, we report a detailed fully atomistic molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics study of this phenomenon. Our...... results show that it has its physical basis on the interplay of the molecular hydrogens and the Cu(110) atomic spacing, which is a direct consequence of the matching between molecule and surface dimensions. This information could be used to find new molecules capable of displaying lock-and-key behavior...

  3. Isotope substitution extends the lifetime of organic molecules in transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Skowron, Stephen T; Bayliss, Peter A; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Kaiser, Ute; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2015-02-04

    Structural characterisation of individual molecules by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is fundamentally limited by the element and electron energy-specific interactions of the material with the high energy electron beam. Here, the key mechanisms controlling the interactions between the e-beam and C-H bonds, present in all organic molecules, are examined, and the low atomic weight of hydrogen-resulting in its facile atomic displacement by the e-beam-is identified as the principal cause of the instability of individual organic molecules. It is demonstrated theoretically and proven experimentally that exchanging all hydrogen atoms within molecules with the deuterium isotope, and therefore doubling the atomic weight of the lightest atoms in the structure, leads to a more than two-fold increase in the stability of organic molecules in the e-beam. Substitution of H for D significantly reduces the amount of kinetic energy transferred from the e-beam to the atom (main factor contributing to stability) and also increases the barrier for bond dissociation, primarily due to the changes in the zero-point energy of the C-D vibration (minor factor). The extended lifetime of coronene-d12 , used as a model molecule, enables more precise analysis of the inter-molecular spacing and more accurate measurement of the molecular orientations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Doping of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Functional Guest Molecules and Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Felicitas; Fischer, Roland A.

    Nanoparticle synthesis within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is performed by the adsorption of suitable precursor molecules for the metal component and subsequent decomposition to the composite materials nanoparticles@MOF. This chapter will review different approaches of loading MOFs with more complex organic molecules and metal-organic precursor molecules. The related reactions inside MOFs are discussed with a focus on stabilizing reactive intermediates in the corresponding cavities. The syntheses of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles inside MOFs are reviewed, and different synthetic routes compared. Emphasis is placed on the micro structural characterization of the materials nanoparticles@MOF with a particular focus on the location of embedded nanoparticles using TEM methods. Some first examples of applications of the doped MOFs in heterogeneous catalysis and hydrogen storage are described.

  5. Charge Carriers in Planar and Meso-Structured Organic-Inorganic Perovskites: Mobilities, Lifetimes, and Concentrations of Trap States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Eline M; Eperon, Giles E; Stranks, Samuel D; Savenije, Tom J

    2015-08-06

    Efficient solar cells have been obtained using thin films of solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskites. However, there remains limited knowledge about the relationship between preparation route and optoelectronic properties. We use complementary time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in thin planar films of CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), CH3NH3PbI3, and their meso-structured analogues. High mobilities close to 30 cm(2)/(V s) and microsecond-long lifetimes are found in thin films of CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), compared to lifetimes of only a few hundred nanoseconds in CH3NH3PbI3 and meso-structured perovskites. We describe our TRMC and PL experiments with a global kinetic model, using one set of kinetic parameters characteristic for each sample. We find that the trap density is less than 5 × 10(14) cm(-3) in CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), 6 × 10(16) cm(-3) in the CH3NH3PbI3 thin film and ca. 10(15) cm(-3) in both meso-structured perovskites. Furthermore, our results imply that band-to-band recombination is enhanced by the presence of dark carriers resulting from unintentional doping of the perovskites. Finally, our general approach to determine concentrations of trap states and dark carriers is also highly relevant to other semiconductor materials.

  6. Rational Design of Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Small Molecules as Donating Materials for Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ruifa; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A series of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based small molecules have been designed to explore their optical, electronic, and charge transport properties as organic solar cell (OSCs) materials. The calculation results showed that the designed molecules can lower the band gap and extend the absorption spectrum towards longer wavelengths. The designed molecules own the large longest wavelength of absorption spectra, the oscillator strength, and absorption region values. The optical, electronic, and charge transport properties of the designed molecules are affected by the introduction of different π-bridges and end groups. We have also predicted the mobility of the designed molecule with the lowest total energies. Our results reveal that the designed molecules are expected to be promising candidates for OSC materials. Additionally, the designed molecules are expected to be promising candidates for electron and/or hole transport materials. On the basis of our results, we suggest that molecules under investigation are suitable donors for [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and its derivatives as acceptors of OSCs. PMID:26343640

  7. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-01-01

    inadequate when the molecule has near-degeneracies and/or low-lying double-excited states. To address these issues we have recently proposed multiconfiguration short-range density-functional theory-MC-srDFT-as a new tool in the toolbox. While initial applications for systems with multireference character......-srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2...

  8. A NOVEL SECOND-ORDER TRANSITION IN ORGANIC HYBRIDS CONSISTING OF POLYMERS AND SMALL MOLECULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-fei Wu

    2001-01-01

    A novel transition appeared above the glass transition temperature of chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) for binary blends of CPE and additives such as organic small molecules or oligomers. This transition was assigned to the dissociation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the polymer and additive within the additive rich phase. Of particular interest is that a novel pyramid crystal was observed in the annealed CPE/hindered phenol blends. Another intriguing observation is that these polymer/small molecule blends organized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding have several potential properties, such as shape-memorization, self-restoration, self-adhesiveness and super damping.``

  9. Meteors do not break exogenous organic molecules into high yields of diatomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Schaller, Emily L; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schmidt, Greg; Rairden, Rick L

    2004-01-01

    Meteoroids that dominate the Earth's extraterrestrial mass influx (50-300 microm size range) may have contributed a unique blend of exogenous organic molecules at the time of the origin of life. Such meteoroids are so large that most of their mass is ablated in the Earth's atmosphere. In the process, organic molecules are decomposed and chemically altered to molecules differently from those delivered to the Earth's surface by smaller (10 cm) meteorites. The question addressed here is whether the organic matter in these meteoroids is fully decomposed into atoms or diatomic compounds during ablation. If not, then the ablation products made available for prebiotic organic chemistry, and perhaps early biology, might have retained some memory of their astrophysical nature. To test this hypothesis we searched for CN emission in meteor spectra in an airborne experiment during the 2001 Leonid meteor storm. We found that the meteor's light-emitting air plasma, which included products of meteor ablation, contained less than 1 CN molecule for every 30 meteoric iron atoms. This contrasts sharply with the nitrogen/iron ratio of 1:1.2 in the solid matter of comet 1P/Halley. Unless the nitrogen content or the abundance of complex organic matter in the Leonid parent body, comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, differs from that in comet 1P/Halley, it appears that very little of that organic nitrogen decomposes into CN molecules during meteor ablation in the rarefied flow conditions that characterize the atmospheric entry of meteoroids approximately 50 microm-10 cm in size. We propose that the organics of such meteoroids survive instead as larger compounds.

  10. Organic molecules in ices and their release into the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Edith; Oberg, Karin I.; Garrod, Robin; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Michaut, Xavier; Fillion, Jean-Hugues

    2015-08-01

    Organic molecules in the early stages of star formation are mainly produced in icy mantles surrounding interstellar dust grains. Identifying these complex organics and quantifying their abundance during the evolution of young stellar objects is of importance to understand the emergence of life. Simple molecules in ices, up to methanol in size, have been identified in the interstellar medium through their mid-IR vibrations, but band confusion prevents detections of more complex and less abundant organic molecules in interstellar ices. The presence of complex organics on grains can instead be indirectly inferred from observations of their rotational lines in the gas phase following ice sublimation.Thermal sublimation of protostellar ices occurs when icy grains flow toward a central protostar, resulting in the formation of a hot-core or a hot-corinos. The high degree of chemical complexity observed in these dense and warm regions can be the results of i) direct synthesis on the grains followed by desorption, but also to ii) the desorption of precursors from the ice followed by gas-phase chemistry. I will show how spatially resolved millimetric observations of hot cores and cooler protostellar environments, coupled to ice observations can help us pinpoint the ice or gas-phase origin of these organic species.Organic molecules have also recently been observed in cold environments where thermal desorption can be neglected. The presence of these cold molecules in the gas phase is most likely due to non-thermal desorption processes induced by, for e.g., photon-, electron-, cosmic-ray-irradiation, shock, exothermic reactions... I will present laboratory and observational efforts that push our current understanding of these non-thermal desorption processes and how they could be use to quantify the amount of organics in ices.

  11. Development of new methods in modern selective organic synthesis: preparation of functionalized molecules with atomic precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananikov, V. P.; Khemchyan, L. L.; Ivanova, Yu V.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.; Sorokin, A. M.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Vatsadze, S. Z.; Medved'ko, A. V.; Nuriev, V. N.; Dilman, A. D.; Levin, V. V.; Koptyug, I. V.; Kovtunov, K. V.; Zhivonitko, V. V.; Likholobov, V. A.; Romanenko, A. V.; Simonov, P. A.; Nenajdenko, V. G.; Shmatova, O. I.; Muzalevskiy, V. M.; Nechaev, M. S.; Asachenko, A. F.; Morozov, O. S.; Dzhevakov, P. B.; Osipov, S. N.; Vorobyeva, D. V.; Topchiy, M. A.; Zotova, M. A.; Ponomarenko, S. A.; Borshchev, O. V.; Luponosov, Yu N.; Rempel, A. A.; Valeeva, A. A.; Stakheev, A. Yu; Turova, O. V.; Mashkovsky, I. S.; Sysolyatin, S. V.; Malykhin, V. V.; Bukhtiyarova, G. A.; Terent'ev, A. O.; Krylov, I. B.

    2014-10-01

    The challenges of the modern society and the growing demand of high-technology sectors of industrial production bring about a new phase in the development of organic synthesis. A cutting edge of modern synthetic methods is introduction of functional groups and more complex structural units into organic molecules with unprecedented control over the course of chemical transformation. Analysis of the state-of-the-art achievements in selective organic synthesis indicates the appearance of a new trend — the synthesis of organic molecules, biologically active compounds, pharmaceutical substances and smart materials with absolute selectivity. Most advanced approaches to organic synthesis anticipated in the near future can be defined as 'atomic precision' in chemical reactions. The present review considers selective methods of organic synthesis suitable for transformation of complex functionalized molecules under mild conditions. Selected key trends in the modern organic synthesis are considered including the preparation of organofluorine compounds, catalytic cross-coupling and oxidative cross-coupling reactions, atom-economic addition reactions, methathesis processes, oxidation and reduction reactions, synthesis of heterocyclic compounds, design of new homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems, application of photocatalysis, scaling up synthetic procedures to industrial level and development of new approaches to investigation of mechanisms of catalytic reactions. The bibliography includes 840 references.

  12. Drosophila tensin plays an essential role in cell migration and planar polarity formation during oogenesis by mediating integrin-dependent extracellular signals to actin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, In Jun; Lee, Jang Ho; Cho, Kyoung Sang; Lee, Sung Bae

    2017-03-11

    Oogenesis in Drosophila involves very dynamic cellular changes such as cell migration and polarity formation inside an ovary during short period. Previous studies identified a number of membrane-bound receptors directly receiving certain types of extracellular inputs as well as intracellular signalings to be involved in the regulation of these dynamic cellular changes. However, yet our understanding on exactly how these receptor-mediated extracellular inputs lead to dynamic cellular changes remains largely unclear. Here, we identified Drosophila tensin encoded by blistery (by) as a novel regulator of cell migration and planar polarity formation and characterized the genetic interaction between tensin and integrin during oogenesis. Eggs from by mutant showed decreased hatching rate and morphological abnormality, a round-shape, compared to the wild-type eggs. Further analyses revealed that obvious cellular defects such as defective border cell migration and planar polarity formation might be primarily associated with the decreased hatching rate and the round-shape phenotype of by mutant eggs, respectively. Moreover, by mutation also induced marked defects in F-actin organization closely associated with both cell migration and planar polarity formation during oogenesis of Drosophila. Notably, all these defective phenotypes observed in by mutant eggs became much severer by reduced level of integrin, indicative of a close functional association between integrin and tensin during oogenesis. Collectively, our findings suggest that tensin acts as a crucial regulator of dynamic cellular changes during oogenesis by bridging integrin-dependent extracellular signals to intracellular cytoskeletal organization.

  13. Encapsulation of organic molecules in carbon nanotubes: role of the van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dappe, Y. J.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are fascinating nano-objects not only from a fundamental point of view but also with respect to their remarkable properties, holding great potential in new materials design. When combined with organic molecules, these properties can be enhanced or modulated in order to fulfil the demand in domains as diverse as molecular electronics, biomaterials or even construction engineering, to name a few. To adequately conceive these hybrid materials it is essential to fully appreciate the nature of molecule-carbon nanotube interactions. In this review, we will discuss some relevant fundamental and applied research done on encapsulated molecules in carbon nanotubes. We will particularly focus on the weak and van der Waals interactions which rule the molecule-tube coupling. Therefore a small state of the art on the theoretical methods used to describe these interactions is presented here. Then, we will discuss various applications of molecular encapsulation, where we will consider structural, magnetic, charge transfer and transport, and optical properties.

  14. Influence of thermocleavable functionality on organic field-effect transistor performance of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Rajashree Y.; Dharmapurikar, Satej S.; Chini, Mrinmoy Kumar; Venugopalan, Vijay

    2017-06-01

    Diketopyrrolopyrrole based donor-acceptor-donor conjugated small molecules using ethylene dioxythiophene as a donor was synthesized. Electron deficient diketopyrrolopyrrole unit was substituted with thermocleavable (tert-butyl acetate) side chains. The thermal treatment of the molecules at 160 °C eliminated the tert-butyl ester group results in the formation of corresponding acid. Optical and theoretical studies revealed that the molecules adopted a change in molecular arrangement after thermolysis. The conjugated small molecules possessed p-channel charge transport characteristics in organic field effect transistors. The charge carrier mobility was increased after thermolysis of tert-butyl ester group to 5.07 × 10-5 cm2/V s.

  15. Dipole-driven self-organization of zwitterionic molecules on alkali halide surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Nony

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the adsorption of 4-methoxy-4′-(3-sulfonatopropylstilbazolium (MSPS on different ionic (001 crystal surfaces by means of noncontact atomic force microscopy. MSPS is a zwitterionic molecule with a strong electric dipole moment. When deposited onto the substrates at room temperature, MSPS diffuses to step edges and defect sites and forms disordered assemblies of molecules. Subsequent annealing induces two different processes: First, at high coverage, the molecules assemble into a well-organized quadratic lattice, which is perfectly aligned with the directions of the substrate surface (i.e., rows of equal charges and which produces a Moiré pattern due to coincidences with the substrate lattice constant. Second, at low coverage, we observe step edges decorated with MSPS molecules that run along the direction. These polar steps most probably minimize the surface energy as they counterbalance the molecular dipole by presenting oppositely charged ions on the rearranged step edge.

  16. Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

  17. Formation and recondensation of complex organic molecules during protostellar luminosity outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of the surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts, followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas phase formation and the recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas phase chemical network forming complex organic molecules in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores, without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas phase reaction bra...

  18. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Jaber, Ali A; Kahane, C; Caux, E

    2014-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) are considered crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of the terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules in principle difficult to synthetize in the harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesised on the lukewarm grain surfaces ($\\gtrsim$30-40 K), and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures $\\gtrsim$100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in $\\lesssim$20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of the COMs formation. We present here a complete census of the oxygen and nitrogen bearing COMs, previously detected in different ISM regions, towards the solar type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Six COMs, out of the 29 searched for, were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ...

  19. Adsorption of two gas molecules at a single metal site in a metal–organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Run; #269; evski, Tom; #269; e; Kapelewski, Matthew T.; Torres-Gavosto, Rodolfo M.; Tarver, Jacob D.; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R. (LBNL); (Delaware); (UCB); (NIST)

    2016-11-21

    One strategy to markedly increase the gas storage capacity of metal–organic frameworks is to introduce coordinatively-unsaturated metal centers capable of binding multiple gas molecules. Herein, we provide an initial demonstration that a single metal site within a framework can support the terminal coordination of two gas molecules—specifically hydrogen, methane, or carbon dioxide.

  20. Covalent organic frameworks with spatially confined guest molecules in nanochannels and their impacts on crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2016-01-25

    We demonstrate the profound effects of spatially confined guest molecules in one-dimensional nanochannels on X-ray diffraction behaviors of covalent organic frameworks. Our results give insights into the abnormal X-ray diffraction patterns and suggest a novel molecular dynamic strategy for resolving crystalline structures.

  1. Rhodanine dye-based small molecule acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yujeong; Song, Chang Eun; Moon, Sang-Jin; Lim, Eunhee

    2014-08-01

    The solution-processable small molecules based on carbazole or fluorene containing rhodanine dyes at both ends were synthesized and introduced as acceptors in organic photovoltaic cells. The high energy levels of their lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals resulted in a power conversion efficiency of 3.08% and an open circuit voltage of up to 1.03 V.

  2. EPOXIDATION OF SMALL ORGANIC MOLECULES USING A SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The commodity-scale epoxidation of several organic molecules has been carried out using a Spinning Tube-in-Tube (STTr) reactor (manufactured by Kreido Laboratories). This reactor, which embodies and facilitates the use of Green Chemistry principles and Process Intensification, a...

  3. EPOXIDATION OF SMALL ORGANIC MOLECULES USING A SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The commodity-scale epoxidation of several organic molecules has been carried out using a Spinning Tube-in-Tube (STTr) reactor (manufactured by Kreido Laboratories). This reactor, which embodies and facilitates the use of Green Chemistry principles and Process Intensification, a...

  4. Modeling the Self-Assembly of Organic Molecules in 2D Molecular Layers with Different Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lit, J.; Marsman, J.L.; Koster, R.S.; Jacobse, Peter; den Hartog, Stephan; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Klein Gebbink, Bert; Filion, Laura; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    If organic molecules are to be used as the active component in devices, self-assembly represents the most attractive route to control the geometric structure and therefore part of the device performance. High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurement combined with density functional theor

  5. Application of variational reduced-density-matrix theory to organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2005-03-01

    Variational calculation of the two-electron reduced-density matrix (2-RDM), using a new first-order algorithm [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 213001 (2004)], is applied to medium-sized organic molecules. The calculations reveal systematic trends in the accuracy of the energy with well-known chemical concepts such as hybridization, electronegativity, and atomic size. Furthermore, correlation energies from hydrocarbon chains indicate that the calculation of the 2-RDM subject to two-positivity conditions is size extensive, that is, the energy grows linearly with the number of electrons. Because organic molecules have a well-defined set of functional groups, we employ the trends in energy accuracy of the functional groups to design a correction to the 2-RDM energy for an arbitrary organic molecule. We apply the 2-RDM calculations with the functional-group correction to a large set of organic molecules with different functional groups. Energies with millihartree accuracy are obtained both at equilibrium and nonequilibrium geometries.

  6. Partition Coefficients of Organic Molecules in Squalane and Water/Ethanol Mixtures by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Rasmus; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2011-01-01

    coefficient can be estimated for both a small hydrophilic and a hydrophobic organic molecules between squalane (used here to mimic low density poly ethylene) and water/ethanol solutes using thermodynamic integration to calculate the free energy of solvation. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed, using...

  7. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-01-01

    and roughness. This influences cell behaviour on the surface such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells as well as the mineralization of the extracellular matrix at the implant surfaces. The aim of the present systematic review was to describe organic molecules used for surface nanocoating...

  8. Organization of extracting molecules in organic phase: consequences on the extracting properties; Organisation des molecules extractantes en phase organique: consequences sur les proprietes extractantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meridiano, Y. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)]|[CEA Valrho, Lab de Chimie des Systemes Extractants (LCSE), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to establish a correlation between the organization of extracting molecules in organic phase and the implemented chemical equilibria. The first experimental data will be carried out on the chemical system of the DIAMEX process: DMDOHEMA/n-dodecane/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/rare earth or actinide nitrate. Extraction isotherms will established in making the diamide concentration, the solute concentration, the acidity of the aqueous phase and the temperature vary. The different constituents will be titrated in organic and aqueous phases after extraction allowing thus to write an extraction equilibrium for each of the systems and to determine the bound constants. Then, a structural characterization of the organic phases will be considered in order to correlate the different organizations to the extraction constants, through several techniques as the surface tension measurements, the vapor pressure osmometry and the neutrons and X-rays small angle scattering which allow to characterize the size and geometry of the extractant aggregates as well as the interactions between them. (O.M.)

  9. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, B.

    2016-05-11

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Adsorption of polar organic molecules on sediments: Case-study on Callovian-Oxfordian claystone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamimanana, S; Lefèvre, G; Dagnelie, R V H

    2017-08-01

    The release and transport of anthropogenic organic matter through the geosphere is often an environmental criterion of safety. Sedimentary rocks are widely studied in this context as geological barriers for waste management. It is the case of Callovian-Oxfordian claystone (COx), for which several studies report adsorption of anthropogenic organic molecules. In this study, we evaluated and reviewed adsorption data of polar organic molecules on COx claystone. Experiments were performed on raw claystone, decarbonated and clay fractions. Adsorption isotherms were measured with adsorbates of various polarities: adipate, benzoate, ortho-phthalate, succinate, gluconate, oxalate, EDTA, citrate. A significant adsorption was observed for multidentate polycarboxylic acids as evidenced with phthalate, succinate, oxalate, gluconate, EDTA and citrate (Rd = 1.53, 3.52, 8.4, 8.8, 12.4, 54.7 L kg(-1) respectively). Multiple linear regression were performed as a statistical analysis to determine the predictors from these adsorption data. A linear correlation between adsorption data (Rd) and dipole moment (μ) of adsorbates was evidenced (R(2) = 0.91). Molecules with a high dipole moment, μ(D) > 2.5, displayed a significant adsorption, Rd≫1 L kg(-1). A qualitative correlation can be easily estimated using the water/octanol partition coefficient, Pow, of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.77). In this case, two opposite trends were distinguished for polar and apolar molecules. The use of organic carbon content in sediments is relevant for predicting adsorption of apolar compounds, log (Pow)>+1. The oxides/clays contents may be relevant regarding polar molecules, log ((apparent)Pow)<-1. The proposed scheme offers a general methodology for investigation of geo-barriers towards heterogeneous organic plumes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Organic Semiconductor-Containing Supramolecules: Effect of Small Molecule Crystallization and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-21

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Small molecules (SMs) with unique optical or electronic properties provide an opportunity to incorporate functionality into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules. However, the assembly of supramolecules based on these highly crystalline molecules differs from their less crystalline counterparts. Here, two families of organic semiconductor SMs are investigated, where the composition of the crystalline core, the location (side- vs end-functionalization) of the alkyl solubilizing groups, and the constitution (branched vs linear) of the alkyl groups are varied. With these SMs, we present a systematic study of how the phase behavior of the SMs affects the overall assembly of these organic semiconductor-based supramolecules. The incorporation of SMs has a large effect on the interfacial curvature, the supramolecular periodicity, and the overall supramolecular morphology. The crystal packing of the SM within the supramolecule does not necessarily lead to the assembly of the comb block within the BCP microdomains, as is normally observed for alkyl-containing supramolecules. An unusual lamellar morphology with a wavy interface between the microdomains is observed due to changes in the packing structure of the small molecule within BCP microdomains. Since the supramolecular approach is modular and small molecules can be readily switched out, present studies provide useful guidance toward access supramolecular assemblies over several length scales using optically active and semiconducting small molecules.

  12. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced...... during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) and Fullerenes (C70), as electron donor and acceptor respectively, with cell area...... ranging on a scale from a few mm2 to cm2, are produced by organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). All the layers in the device are fabricated from a highly sophisticated vacuum cluster deposition system that includes electrode, interfacial layer and organic layer deposition in one high-vacuum deposition...

  13. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport.

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of organic molecules and self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hayn

    In this dissertation I present my findings on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on Au(111), as well as investigations of the self-assembly and electron transport properties of a custom-synthesized organic molecule (bis-phenyloxazole: BPO) chosen for its interesting physical and electronic structure. Utilizing scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques, we observed unique molecular structures at the boundaries of single-species alkanethiol SAM domains, and propose packing arrangements for the observed structures. We also found evidence for island formation in alkanethiol SAMs; these islands were dynamic and exhibited ordered packing of the adsorbed molecules. For codeposited two-species (dodecanethiol, octanethiol) SAMs, we observed preferential insertion of the longer molecules at domain boundaries, edges, and defect sites, and found that they tended to segregate into separate domains. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of the inserted dodecanethiol molecules revealed evidence of conduction resonances within the HOMO-LUMO gap. We explored the charge transport and self-assembly properties of the BPO molecules on a Au(111) surface. The molecules self-assembled into a novel columnar structure after annealing in vacuum. We compare tunneling spectroscopy results to ab initio computations of the molecular orbitals.

  15. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects, a method to predict (subcooled liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA.

  16. Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside: Intermolecular interactions and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez, A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC-CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This contribution discusses the intercalation of imidazole and its 2-ethyl derivative, and pyridine in 2D copper nitroprusside. In the interlayer region, neighboring molecules remain interacting throu gh their dipole and quadrupole moments, which supports the solid 3D crystal structure. The crystal structure of this series of intercalation compounds was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction patterns complemented with spectroscopic information. The intermolecular interactions were studied from the refined crystal structures and low temperature magnetic measurements. Due to strong attractive forces between neighboring molecules, the resulting π–π cloud overlapping enables the ferromagnetic coupling between metal centers on neighboring layers, which was actually observed for the solids containing imidazole and pyridine as intercalated molecules. For these two solids, the magnetic data were properly described with a model of six neighbors. For the solid containing 2-ethylimidazole and for 2D copper nitroprusside, a model of four neighbors in a plane is sufficient to obtain a reliable data fitting. - Highlights: • Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Molecular properties of intercalation compounds of 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Magnetic properties of hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Hybrid inorganic–organic 3D framework.

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  18. Effects of vibrational motion on core-level spectra of prototype organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2008-08-21

    A computational approach is presented for prediction and interpretation of core-level spectra of complex molecules. Applications are presented for several isolated organic molecules, sampling a range of chemical bonding and structural motifs. Comparison with gas phase measurements indicate that spectral lineshapes are accurately reproduced both above and below the ionization potential, without resort to ad hoc broadening. Agreement with experiment is significantly improved upon inclusion of vibrations via molecular dynamics sampling. We isolate and characterize spectral features due to particular electronic transitions enabled by vibrations, noting that even zero-point motion is sufficient in some cases.

  19. From Polymer to Small Organic Molecules: A Tight Relationship between Radical Chemistry and Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Mirizzi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since Gomberg’s discovery of radicals as chemical entities, the interest around them has increased through the years. Nowadays, radical chemistry is used in the synthesis of 75% of all polymers, inevitably establishing a close relationship with Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis. More recently, the interest of organic chemists has shifted towards the application of usual “in-solution” radical chemistry to the solid-phase, ranging from the use of supported reagents for radical reactions, to the development of methodologies for the synthesis of small molecules or potential libraries. The aim of this review is to put in perspective radical chemistry, moving it away from its origin as a synthetic means for solid supports, to becoming a useful tool for the synthesis of small molecules.

  20. From polymer to small organic molecules: a tight relationship between radical chemistry and solid-phase organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirizzi, Danilo; Pulici, Maurizio

    2011-04-18

    Since Gomberg's discovery of radicals as chemical entities, the interest around them has increased through the years. Nowadays, radical chemistry is used in the synthesis of 75% of all polymers, inevitably establishing a close relationship with Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis. More recently, the interest of organic chemists has shifted towards the application of usual "in-solution" radical chemistry to the solid-phase, ranging from the use of supported reagents for radical reactions, to the development of methodologies for the synthesis of small molecules or potential libraries. The aim of this review is to put in perspective radical chemistry, moving it away from its origin as a synthetic means for solid supports, to becoming a useful tool for the synthesis of small molecules.

  1. Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions II: Acetic acid

    CERN Document Server

    Pilling, S; Boechat-Roberty, H M

    2006-01-01

    Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH$_3$COOH), a glycine (NH$_2$CH$_2$COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100 - 310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH$_3$COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH$_3$CO$^+$, COOH$^+$ and CH$_3^+$ ions are the mai...

  2. Electrochemical assembly of organic molecules by the reduction of iodonium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Howell, Stephen W.; Wheeler, David R.

    2009-06-23

    Methods are described for the electrochemical assembly of organic molecules on silicon, or other conducting or semiconducting substrates, using iodonium salt precursors. Iodonium molecules do not assemble on conducting surfaces without a negative bias. Accordingly, the iodonium salts are preferred for patterning applications that rely on direct writing with negative bias. The stability of the iodonium molecule to acidic conditions allows them to be used with standard silicon processing. As a directed assembly process, the use of iodonium salts provides for small features while maintaining the ability to work on a surface and create structures on a wafer level. Therefore, the process is amenable for mass production. Furthermore, the assembled monolayer (or multilayer) is chemically robust, allowing for subsequent chemical manipulations and the introduction of various molecular functionalities for various chemical and biological applications.

  3. Multichromophoric organic molecules encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles for artificial light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Santanu; Jana, Bikash; Patra, Amitava

    2015-03-16

    We designed a self-assembled multichromophoric organic molecular arrangement inside polymer nanoparticles for light-harvesting antenna materials. The self-assembled molecular arrangement of quaterthiophene molecules was found to be an efficient light-absorbing antenna material, followed by energy transfer to Nile red (NR) dye molecules, which was confined in polymer nanoparticles. The efficiency of the antenna effect was found to be 3.2 and the effective molar extinction coefficient of acceptor dye molecules was found to be enhanced, which indicates an efficient light-harvesting system. Based on this energy-transfer process, tunable photo emission and white light emission has been generated with 14 % quantum yield. Such self-assembled oligothiophene-NR systems encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles may open up new possibilities for fabrication of artificial light harvesting system.

  4. Searching for Bio-Precursors and Complex Organic Molecules in Space using the GBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M.; Charnley, S.; Kisiel, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Using the latest microwave receiver technology, large organic molecules with abundances as low as approx. 10(exp -11) times that of molecular hydrogen are detectable in cold interstellar clouds via their rotational emission line spectra. We report new observations to search for complex molecules, including molecules of possible pre-biotic importance, using the newly-commissioned Kband focal plane array (KFPA) of the NRAO Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. Spectra are presented of the dense molecular cloud TMC-1, showing strict upper limits on the level of emission from nitrogen-bearing rings pyrimidine, quinoline and iso-quinoline, carbon-chain oxides C60, C70, HC60 and HC70, and the carbon-chain anion C4H-. The typical RMS brightness temperature noise levels we achieved are approx. 1 mK at around 20 GHz.

  5. Complex organic molecules toward low-mass and high-mass star forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bergin, E.; Carvajal, M.; Brouillet, N.; Despois, D.; Jørgensen, J.; Kleiner, I.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important questions in molecular astrophysics is how, when, and where complex organic molecules, COMs (≥ 6 atoms) are formed. In the Interstellar-Earth connection context, could this have a bearing on the origin of life on Earth? Formation mechanisms of COMs, which include potentially prebiotic molecules, are still debated and may include grain-mantle and/or gas-phase chemistry. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the interstellar molecular complexification, along with the involved physicochemical processes, is mandatory to answer the above questions. In that context, active researches are ongoing in theory, laboratory experiment, chemical modeling and observations. Thanks to recent progress in radioastronomy instrumentation for both single-dish and millimeter array (e.g. Herschel, NOEMA, ALMA), new results have been obtained. I will review some notable results on the detection of COMs, including prebiotic molecules, towards star forming regions.

  6. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M. McGreevy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock, to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs.

  7. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Erica M; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-16

    Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs.

  8. Giant increase in the metal-enhanced fluorescence of organic molecules in nanoporous alumina templates and large molecule-specific red/blue-shift of the fluorescence peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Kanchibotla, B; Nelson, J D; Edwards, J D; Anderson, J; Tepper, G C; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2014-10-08

    The fluorescence of organic fluorophore molecules is enhanced when they are placed in contact with certain metals (Al, Ag, Cu, Au, etc.) whose surface plasmon waves couple into the radiative modes of the molecules and increase the radiative efficiency. Here, we report a hitherto unknown size dependence of this metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect in the nanoscale. When the molecules are deposited in nanoporous anodic alumina films with exposed aluminum at the bottom of the pores, they form organic nanowires standing on aluminum nanoparticles whose plasmon waves have much larger amplitudes. This increases the MEF strongly, resulting in several orders of magnitude increase in the fluorescence intensity of the organic fluorophores. The increase in intensity shows an inverse superlinear dependence on nanowire diameter because the nanowires also act as plasmonic "waveguides" that concentrate the plasmons and increase the coupling of the plasmons with the radiative modes of the molecules. Furthermore, if the nanoporous template housing the nanowires has built-in electric fields due to space charges, a strong molecule-specific red- or blue-shift is induced in the fluorescence peak owing to a renormalization of the dipole moment of the molecule. This can be exploited to detect minute amounts of target molecules in a mixture using their optical signature (fluorescence) despite the presence of confounding background signals. It can result in a unique new technology for biosensing and chemical sensing.

  9. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglia, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.scaglia@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy); Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira [Laboratório de Química Ambiental, Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, São Carlos (Brazil); Tambone, Fulvia [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy); Adani, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.adani@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100–6000 mg carbon L{sup −1}. {sup 13}C CPMAS-NMR and GC–MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS {sup 13}CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R{sup 2} = − 0.85; p < 0.01, n = 6). - Highlights: • Vermicomposting converts waste into organic fertilizer. • Vermicomposts can have biostimulating effect for the presence of hormone-like molecules. • Auxine-like activity was associated to the vermicompost humic acid fraction (HA). • HA carboxylic acids and amino acids, were reported to act as auxin-like molecules. • A linear regression was found between molecules and auxin-like activity.

  10. UV photolysis, organic molecules in young disks, and the origin of meteoritic amino acids

    CERN Document Server

    Throop, Henry

    2011-01-01

    The origin of complex organic molecules such as amino acids and their precursors found in meteorites and comets is unknown. Previous studies have accounted for the complex organic inventory of the Solar System by aqueous chemistry on warm meteoritic parent bodies, or by accretion of organics formed in the interstellar medium. This paper proposes a third possibility: that complex organics were created in situ by ultraviolet light from nearby O/B stars irradiating ices already in the Sun's protoplanetary disk. If the Sun was born in a dense cluster near UV-bright stars, the flux hitting the disk from external stars could be many orders of magnitude higher than that from the Sun alone. Such photolysis of ices in the laboratory can rapidly produce amino acid precursors and other complex organic molecules. I present a simple model coupling grain growth and UV exposure in a young circumstellar disk. It is shown that the production may be sufficient to create the Solar System's entire complex organic inventory withi...

  11. Difficulties in Laboratory Studies and Astronomical Observations of Organic Molecules: Hydroxyacetone and Lactic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apponi, A. J.; Brewster, M. A.; Hoy, J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 35 years, radio astronomy has revealed a rich organic chemistry in the interstellar gas, which is exceptionally complex towards active star-forming regions. New solar systems condense out of this gas and may influence the evolution of life on newly formed planets. Much of the biologically important functionality is present among the some 130 gas-phase molecules found to date, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amines, amides and even the simplest sugar - glycolaldehyde. Still, many unidentified interstellar radio signals remain, and their identification relies on further laboratory study. The molecules hydroxyacetone and lactic acid are relatively small organic molecules, but possess rather complex rotational spectra owing to their high asymmetry. Hydroxyacetone is particularly problematic because it possess a very low barrier to internal rotation, and exhibits strong coupling of the free-rotor states with the overall rotation of the molecule. As in the case of acetamide, a full decomposition method was employed to order the resultant eigenstates onto normal asymmetric top eigenvectors.

  12. Ocean metabolism and dissolved organic matter: How do small dissolved molecules persist in the ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    The ocean reservoir of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest global reservoirs (~700 Pg C) of reactive organic carbon. Marine primary production (~50 Pg C/yr) by photosynthetic microalgae and cyanobacteria is the major source of organic matter to the ocean and the principal substrate supporting marine food webs. The direct release of DOM from phytoplankton and other organisms as well as a variety of other processes, such as predation and viral lysis, contribute to the ocean DOM reservoir. Continental runoff and atmospheric deposition are relatively minor sources of DOM to the ocean, but some components of this material appear to be resistant to decomposition and to have a long residence time in the ocean. Concentrations of DOM are highest in surface waters and decrease with depth, a pattern that reflects the sources and diagenesis of DOM in the upper ocean. Most (70-80%) marine DOM exists as small molecules of low molecular weight (1 kDalton) DOM is relatively enriched in major biochemicals, such as combined neutral sugars and amino acids, and is more bioavailable than low-molecular-weight DOM. The observed relationships among the size, composition, and reactivity of DOM have led to the size-reactivity continuum model, which postulates that diagenetic processes lead to the production of smaller molecules that are structurally altered and resistant to microbial degradation. The radiocarbon content of these small dissolved molecules also indicates these are the most highly aged components of DOM. Chemical signatures of bacteria are abundant in DOM and increase during diagenesis, indicating bacteria are an important source of slowly cycling biochemicals. Recent analyses of DOM isolates by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry have revealed an incredibly diverse mixture of molecules. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules are abundant in DOM, and they appear to be derived from diagenetically-altered terpenoids, such as sterols and hopanoids. Thermally

  13. Linker-Induced Anomalous Emission of Organic-Molecule Conjugated Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Babu, Suresh; Le, Duy; Kumar, Amit; Haldar, Manas K.; Wagh, Anil V.; Hu, Zhongjian; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Gesquiere, Andre J.; Law, Benedict; Mallik, Sanku; Rahman, Talat S.; Leuenberger, Michael N.; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-06-26

    Semiconductor nanoparticles conjugated with organic- and dye-molecules to yield high efficiency visible photoluminescence (PL) hold great potential for many future technological applications. We show that folic acid (FA)-conjugated to nanosize TiO2 and CeO2 particles demonstrates a dramatic increase of photoemission intensity at wavelengths between 500 and 700 nm when derivatized using aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) as spacer-linker molecules between the metal oxide and FA. Using density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations we demonstrate that the strong increase of the PL can be explained by electronic transitions between the titania surface oxygen vacancy (OV) states and the low-energy excited states of the FA/APTMS molecule anchored onto the surface oxygen bridge sites in close proximity to the OVs. We suggest this scenario to be a universal feature for a wide class of metal oxide nanoparticles, including nanoceria, possessing a similar band gap (3 eV) and with a large surface-vacancy-related density of electronic states. We demonstrate that the molecule-nanoparticle linker can play a crucial role in tuning the electronic and optical properties of nanosystems by bringing optically active parts of the molecule and of the surface close to each other.

  14. Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Monte Carlo Simulations of Complex Organic Molecule Chemistry in Cold Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in the gas phase of cold cores with temperatures as cold as 10 K challenges our previous astrochemical models concerning the formation of complex organic molecules. The strong correlation between the abundances and distributions of methyl formate and dimethyl ether further shows that current astrochemical models may be missing important chemical processes in cold astronomical sources. We investigate a scenario in which complex organic molecules and the methoxy radical can be formed on dust grains via a so-called "chain reaction" mechanism, in a similar manner to CO$_2$. A unified gas-grain microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach with both normal and interstitial sites for icy grain mantles is used to perform the chemical simulations. Reactive desorption with varying degrees of efficiency is included to enhance the non-thermal desorption of species formed on cold dust grains. In addition, varying degrees of efficiency for the surface formation of m...

  15. Chemical sensors based on n-conjugated organic molecules and gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN MingJian; LI YongJun; LIU HuiBiao; LI YuLiang

    2009-01-01

    Scientists have developed techniques for synthesizing and characterizing many new materials includ-ing conjugated small molecules, polymers and gold particles protected by conjugated organic chro-mophores for testing specific sensing properties in the past decade. Still, the design and synthesis or supermolecular systems fabrication of novel materials with controlled sensing properties is a signifi-cant and ongoing challenge within nanoscience and nanotechnology. Recently, our group has suc-cessfully constructed a series of chemosensors using small organic molecules, conjugated polymersand gold nanoparticles for real-time detection of specific analytes. The chemosensors show high se-lectivity and sensitivity in the detection of cations and biologic analytes and thus are potentially promising for applications in sensing assay system. In this review, recent sutdies on the design, syn-thesis and photo-physical properties of novel materials and construct of chemosensors are summa-rized with an emphasis on the development in our groups in recent years.

  16. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna Aleksandra; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye;

    2012-01-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the method used to improve osseointegration. Nanoscale modification of titanium implants affects surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, biochemical bonding capacity...... and roughness. This influences cell behaviour on the surface such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells as well as the mineralization of the extracellular matrix at the implant surfaces. The aim of the present systematic review was to describe organic molecules used for surface nanocoating...... nanocoatings. The included in vivo studies, showed improvement of bone interface reactions measured as increased Bone-to-Implant Contact length and Bone Mineral Density adjacent to the polysaccharide coated surfaces. Based on existing literature, surface modification with polysaccharide and glycosaminoglycans...

  17. Bifunctional Pt-Si Alloys for Small Organic Molecule Electro-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna; Suntivich, Jin; Han, Binghong

    Designing highly active catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules can help to reduce the anodic overpotential for more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon fuels. The challenge in developing more active electrocatalysts for electro-oxidation reactions is to satisfy the stringent...... bifunctional requirement, which demands both adsorption and water oxidation sites. In this contribution, we explore the possibility of using Pt-Si alloys to fulfill this bifunctional requirement. Silicon, a highly oxophillic element, is alloyed into Pt as a site for water oxidation, while Pt serves as a CO...... adsorption site. We will discuss the enhanced activity of Pt-Si alloys for small organic molecule oxidation, which can be attributed to the improved CO electro-oxidation kinetics on Pt-Si....

  18. Chemical sensors based on π-conjugated organic molecules and gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Scientists have developed techniques for synthesizing and characterizing many new materials including conjugated small molecules, polymers and gold particles protected by conjugated organic chromophores for testing specific sensing properties in the past decade. Still, the design and synthesis or supermolecular systems fabrication of novel materials with controlled sensing properties is a significant and ongoing challenge within nanoscience and nanotechnology. Recently, our group has successfully constructed a series of chemosensors using small organic molecules, conjugated polymers and gold nanoparticles for real-time detection of specific analytes. The chemosensors show high selectivity and sensitivity in the detection of cations and biologic analytes and thus are potentially promising for applications in sensing assay system. In this review, recent sutdies on the design, synthesis and photo-physical properties of novel materials and construct of chemosensors are summarized with an emphasis on the development in our groups in recent years.

  19. Application of terahertz spectroscopy for characterization of biologically active organic molecules in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaliūnas, Mindaugas; Jakštas, Vytautas; Nasser, Kinan E.; Venckevičius, Rimvydas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Valušis, Gintaras

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a comparative research of biologically active organic molecules in its natural environment using the terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy (TDS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) systems is carried out. Absorption coefficient and refractive index of Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves containing nicotine, Cannabis sativa L. leaves containing tetrahydrocannabinol, and Humulu lupulus L. leaves containing α-acids, active organic molecules that obtain in natural environment, were measured in broad frequency range from 0.1 to 13 THz at room temperature. In the spectra of absorption coefficient the features were found to be unique for N. tabacum, C. sativa and H. lupulus. Moreover, those features can be exploited for identification of C. sativa sex and N. tabacum origin. The refractive index can be also used to characterize different species.

  20. Lifetimes of organic photovoltaics: Design and synthesis of single oligomer molecules in order to study chemical degradation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, J.; Norrman, K.; Jørgensen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms in organic and polymer photovoltaics are addressed through the study of an organic photovoltaic molecule based on a single phenylene-vinylene-type oligomer molecule. The synthesis of such a model compound with different end-groups is presented that allows for assignment...

  1. 2-Alkyl-5-thienyl-substituted benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-based donor molecules for solution-processed organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Dhananjaya; Huang, Tzu-Yen; Chiang, Chao-Cheng; Maturana, Ramon Orlando Valencia; Pao, Chun-Wei; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2013-10-09

    In this study, we have strategically designed and convergently synthesized two novel, symmetrical, and linear A-D-A-type π-conjugated donor molecules (TBDTCNR, TBDTCN), each containing a planar electron-rich 2-octylthiene-5-yl-substituted benzodithiophene (TBDT) unit as the core, flanked by octylthiophene units and end-capped with electron-deficient cyanoacetate (CNR) or dicyanovinyl (CN) units. We thoroughly characterized both of these materials and investigated the effects of the end groups (CNR, CN) on their optical, electrochemical, morphological, and photovoltaic properties. We then fabricated solution-processed bulk heterojunction organic solar cells incorporating TBDTCNR and TBDTCN. Among our tested devices, the one containing TBDTCNR and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester in a 1:0.40 ratio (w/w) exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency (5.42%) with a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 9.08 mA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.90 V, and an impressive fill factor (FF) of 0.66 under AM 1.5G irradiation (100 mW cm(-2)). The FFs of these solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells (SMOSCs) are outstanding when compared with those recently reported for benzodithiophene (BDT)-based SMOSCs, because of the high crystallinity and excellent stacking properties of the TBDT-based compounds.

  2. Density Functional Investigation of Graphene Doped with Amine-Based Organic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Yeun Hee Hwang; Hyang Sook Chun; Kang Min Ok; Kyung-Koo Lee; Kyungwon Kwak

    2015-01-01

    To improve the electronic properties of graphene, many doping techniques have been studied. Herein, we investigate the electronic and molecular structure of doped graphene using density functional theory, and we report the effects of amine-based benzene dopants adsorbed on graphene. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to determine the role of amine-based aromatic compounds in graphene doping. These organic molecules bind to graphene through long-range interactions such...

  3. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) ...

  4. Nonlinear Optical Absorption of Organic Molecules for Applications in Optical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Boni, Leonardo De; Daniel S. Correa; Mendonca, Cleber R.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter aimed to describe the resonant nonlinear optical properties of four important organic molecules: Chlorophyll A, Indocyanine Green, Ytterbium Bisphthalocyanine and Cytochrome C, which are materials that present interesting optical nonlinearities for applications in optical devices. It was shown that Chlorophyll A solution exhibits a RSA process for Q-switched and mode-locked laser pulses, with an intersystem-crossing time relatively fast and a triplet state cross section value twi...

  5. Nonlinear Transport in Organic Thin Film Transistors with Soluble Small Molecule Semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeok; Song, Dong-Seok; Kwon, Jin-Hyuk; Jung, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Do-Kyung; Kim, SeonMin; Kang, In Man; Park, Jonghoo; Tae, Heung-Sik; Battaglini, Nicolas; Lang, Philippe; Horowitz, Gilles; Bae, Jin-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear transport is intensively explained through Poole-Frenkel (PF) transport mechanism in organic thin film transistors with solution-processed small molecules, which is, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS) pentacene. We outline a detailed electrical study that identifies the source to drain field dependent mobility. Devices with diverse channel lengths enable the extensive exhibition of field dependent mobility due to thermal activation of carriers among traps.

  6. Interrelation between crystal packing and small-molecule organic solar cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzner, Roland; Reinold, Egon; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Baeuerle, Peter [Institut fuer Organische Chemie II und Neue Materialien, Universitaet Ulm (Germany); Elschner, Chris; Koerner, Christian; Riede, Moritz; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden (Germany); Weil, Matthias [Institut fuer Chemische Technologien und Analytik, Abteilung Strukturchemie, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria); Uhrich, Christian; Pfeiffer, Martin [Heliatek GmbH, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-02-02

    X-ray investigations on single crystals of a series of terminally dicyanovinyl-substituted quaterthiophenes and co-evaporated blend layers with C{sub 60} give insight into molecular packing behavior and morphology, which are crucial parameters in the field of organic electronics. Structural characteristics on various levels and length scales are correlated with the photovoltaic performance of bulk heterojunction small-molecule organic solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Laser operation in nondoped thin films made of a small-molecule organic red-emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Haghighi, Hadi; Forget, Sébastien; Chénais, Sébastien; Siove, Alain; Castex, Marie-Claude; Ishow, Elena

    2009-07-01

    Stimulated emission in small-molecule organic films at a high dye concentration is generally hindered by fluorescence quenching, especially in the red region of the spectrum. Here we demonstrate the achievement of high net gains (up to 50 cm-1) around 640 nm in thermally evaporated nondoped films of 4-di(4'-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)amino-4'-dicyanovinylbenzene, which makes this material suitable for green-light pumped single mode organic lasers with low threshold and superior stability. Lasing effect is demonstrated in a distributed Bragg resonator configuration, as well as under the form of random lasing at high pump intensities.

  8. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-05-10

    Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become inadequate when the molecule has near-degeneracies and/or low-lying double-excited states. To address these issues we have recently proposed multiconfiguration short-range density-functional theory-MC-srDFT-as a new tool in the toolbox. While initial applications for systems with multireference character and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC-srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2, NEVPT2, and the coupled cluster based CC2 and CC3.

  9. Surface plasmon engineering in graphene functionalized with organic molecules: a multiscale theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jierong; Wang, Wei Li; Mosallaei, Hossein; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-01-08

    Graphene was recently shown to support deep subwavelength surface plasmons at terahertz frequencies characterized by low energy loss and strong field localization, both highly desirable. The properties of graphene can be locally tuned by applying an external gate voltage or by the adsorption of organic molecules that lead to doping through charge transfer. Local tuning of the electronic features of graphene opens the possibility to realize any desired gradient index profile and thus brings large flexibility to control and manipulate the propagation of surface plasmons. Here, we explore this possibility created by functionalizing graphene with organic molecules. We employ a multiscale theoretical approach that combines first-principles electronic structure calculations and finite-difference time-domain simulations coupled by surface conductivity. We show that by patterning two types of organic molecules on graphene, a plasmonic metasurface can be realized with any gradient effective refractive index profile to manipulate surface plasmon beams as desired. The special properties of such devices based on functionalized graphene are compared to the similar metamaterials based on metallic films on top of a gradient index dielectric substrate. Using this idea, we design and analyze an ultrathin broadband THz plasmonic lens as proof-of-concept, while more sophisticated index profiles can also be realized and various plasmonic applications are readily accessible.

  10. Rectifications in organic single-molecule diodes alkanethiolate-terminated heterocyclics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yipeng, E-mail: ypan@htu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Zhang, Mengjun; Wang, Tianxing; Wang, Guangtao [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Fu, Zhaoming, E-mail: fuzhm1979@163.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-02-22

    Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with the ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the rectifying behaviors of the organic single-molecule S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with a variety of heterocyclics (i.e., BIPY, PHE, PHEPY, and PYR) coupled with two semi-infinite Au electrodes. Our quantum transport calculation results show that the BIPY and PHE nanojunctions show the high-efficiency rectifying effects. While, differently, the current–voltage (I–V) curves of PHEPY and PYR nanojunctions display the insulating and linear characters, respectively. The corresponding electronic transport mechanisms are analyzed in detail. Our calculation results demonstrate that these investigated organic single-molecule nanojunctions have the potential applications in rectifiers and molecular wires. - Highlights: • The organic single-molecule diodes S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with bipyridyl and phenanthroline groups present rectifying effects. • The S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with phenylpyridyl exhibit the insulating character. • The I–V curve of S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with pyrazinyl group presents well linear character.

  11. Near-unity mass accommodation coefficient of organic molecules of varying structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julin, Jan; Winkler, Paul M; Donahue, Neil M; Wagner, Paul E; Riipinen, Ilona

    2014-10-21

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a significant effect on global climate, air quality, and consequently human health. Condensation of organic vapors is a key process in the growth of nanometer-sized particles to climate relevant sizes. This growth is very sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient α, a quantity describing the vapor uptake ability of the particles, but knowledge on α of atmospheric organics is lacking. In this work, we have determined α for four organic molecules with diverse structural properties: adipic acid, succinic acid, naphthalene, and nonane. The coefficients are studied using molecular dynamics simulations, complemented with expansion chamber measurements. Our results are consistent with α = 1 (indicating nearly perfect accommodation), regardless of the molecular structural properties, the phase state of the bulk condensed phase, or surface curvature. The results highlight the need for experimental techniques capable of resolving the internal structure of nanoparticles to better constrain the accommodation of atmospheric organics.

  12. Metal-organic frameworks with functional pores for recognition of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Banglin; Xiang, Shengchang; Qian, Guodong

    2010-08-17

    Molecular recognition, an important process in biological and chemical systems, governs the diverse functions of a variety of enzymes and unique properties of some synthetic receptors. Because molecular recognition is based on weak interactions between receptors and substrates, the design and assembly of synthetic receptors to mimic biological systems and the development of novel materials to discriminate different substrates for selective recognition of specific molecules has proved challenging. The extensive research on synthetic receptors for molecular recognition, particularly on noncovalent complexes self-assembled by hydrogen bonding and metal-organic coordination, has revealed some underlying principles. In particular, these studies have demonstrated that the shapes of the supramolecular receptors play significant roles in their specific and selective recognition of substrates: receptors can offer concave surfaces that complement their convex targets. This Account describes our research to develop a synthetic molecular recognition platform using porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). These materials contain functional pores to direct their specific and unique recognition of small molecules through several types of interactions: van der Waals interactions of the framework surface with the substrate, metal-substrate interactions, and hydrogen bonding of the framework surface with the substrate. These materials have potential applications for gas storage, separation, and sensing. We demonstrate a simple strategy to construct a primitive cubic net of interpenetrated microporous MOFs from the self-assembly of the paddle-wheel clusters M(2)(CO(2))(4) (M = Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Co(2+)) with two types of organic dicarboxylic acid and pillar bidentate linkers. This efficient method allows us to rationally tune the micropores to size-exclusively sort different small gas molecules, leading to the highly selective separation and purification of gases. By optimizing the

  13. Laser-induced Native Fluorescence Detection of Organic Molecules in Hydrothermal Vent Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, E.; Kidd, R. D.; Bhartia, R.; Conrad, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a Multi-channel Deep Ultraviolet Excitation (McDuve) fluorescence detector that has been deployed at several Pacific hydrothermal vent sites [1]. The in situ McDuve detector was able to detect organic molecules at the vent site on rock surfaces and in the water, the signatures being distinguishable one from the other. The McDuve fluorescence detector uses a 224.3 nm helium-silver hollow cathode laser to induce native fluorescence from a sample. Spectral separation is achieved with optical band-pass filters which are coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for detection. Samples were recovered at the vent sites and returned from the expedition for bench-top analysis for correlation of the McDuve observations with standard analytical tools-GCMS and X-ray diffraction (for mineralogical ID), as well as with a bench-top version of the McDuve fluorescence detector. Here we report the corroborative results of the laboratory studies. Several preserved samples were subjected to 224.3 nm ultraviolet excitation under wet and dry conditions. Organic molecules were detected on the wet samples analyzed in the lab, corroborating the in situ McDuve data. The fluorescence emission wavelengths associated with the detected organic molecules suggest they are 3-5 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [2,3]. The samples were also pyrolized at 500 ºC to decompose any organic molecules present and subsequently reanalyzed. This McDuve analysis revealed a significant decrease in laser induced native fluorescence, a result consistent with the pyrolytic decomposition of the organic content of the rock samples. [1] Conrad, P.G., A.L. Lane, R. Bhartia, W. Hug, (March 2004) Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents 35th Lunar Plan. Sci. XXXV, 2055. [2] Karcher, W. (1985), Spectral Atlas of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds, vol. I, Kluwer Academic Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland. [3] Bhartia, R., McDonald, G.D., Salas, E.C., Hug, W., Reid, R

  14. A Quantitative Analysis of Extraction of Organic Molecules from Terrestrial Sedimentary Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, I.; Beegle, L. W.; Abbey, W. A.; Tsapin, A. T.

    2004-12-01

    There are several factors determining the ability to detect organic molecules as part of a robotic astrobiology mission to planets. These include the quantity of organics present in a sample, the efficiency of extracting those organics from the matrix that they reside in (i.e. sample processing) and finally the detection efficiencies of the analytical instrumentation aboard the robotic platform. Once the detection limits of the analytical instrumentation is established, the efficiency of extraction becomes the overriding factor in the detectability of these molecules, and needs to be factored in. We analyzed four different terrestrial field samples, which were initially created in aqueous environments, are sedimentary in nature. These particular samples were chosen because they possibly represent a terrestrial analog of Mars [1] and they represent a best case scenarios for finding organic molecules on the Martian surface. The extraction efficiencies of amino acids (smallest building blocks of life) from the samples using pyrolysis and solvent extraction techniques (with seven different solvents: water, hydrochloric acid, butane, ethanol, isoproponal, methanol, n=propanal) are reported. In order to remove any instrumental bias, we used a standard laboratory bench-top high pressure liquid chromatograph (HPLC). We determined both absolute quantity of organics as well as the D/L ratio to determine the preservation of that information in the processing step. Acknowledgment: The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and was sponsored by the NASA PIDDP and ASTID program offices. References: [1] Malin M.C. and Edgett K.S. (2003) Science 302 1931-1934.

  15. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  16. Solution-grown small-molecule organic semiconductor with enhanced crystal alignment and areal coverage for organic thin film transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Bi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drop casting of small-molecule organic semiconductors typically forms crystals with random orientation and poor areal coverage, which leads to significant performance variations of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs. In this study, we utilize the controlled evaporative self-assembly (CESA method combined with binary solvent system to control the crystal growth. A small-molecule organic semiconductor,2,5-Di-(2-ethylhexyl-3,6-bis(5″-n-hexyl-2,2′,5′,2″]terthiophen-5-yl-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (SMDPPEH, is used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. By optimizing the double solvent ratios, well-aligned SMDPPEH crystals with significantly improved areal coverage were achieved. As a result, the SMDPPEH based OTFTs exhibit a mobility of 1.6 × 10−2 cm2/V s, which is the highest mobility from SMDPPEH ever reported.

  17. Phase transfer of platinum nanoparticles from aqueous to organic solutions using fatty amine molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashavani Kumar; Hrushikesh M Joshi; Anandrao B Mandale; Rajendra Srivastava; Suguna D Adyanthaya; Renu Pasricha; Murali Sastry

    2004-08-01

    In this report we demonstrate a simple process based on amine chemistry for the phase transfer of platinum nanoparticles from an aqueous to an organic solution. The phase transfer was accomplished by vigorous shaking of a biphasic mixture of platinum nanoparticles synthesised in an aqueous medium and octadecylamine (ODA) in hexane. During shaking of the biphasic mixture, the aqueous platinum nanoparticles complex via either coordination bond formation or weak covalent interaction with the ODA molecules present in the organic phase. This process renders the nanoparticles sufficiently hydrophobic and dispersible in the organic phase. The ODA-stabilised platinum nanoparticles could be separated out from hexane in the form of a powder that is readily redispersible in weakly polar and nonpolar organic solvents. The ODA-capped platinum nanoparticles show high catalytic activity in hydrogenation reactions and this is demonstrated in the efficient conversion of styrene to ethyl benzene. The nature of binding of the ODA molecules to the platinum nanoparticles surface was characterised by thermogravimetry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  18. A scale-bridging modeling approach for anisotropic organic molecules at patterned semiconductor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppmann, Nicola; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-02-14

    Hybrid systems consisting of organic molecules at inorganic semiconductor surfaces are gaining increasing importance as thin film devices for optoelectronics. The efficiency of such devices strongly depends on the collective behavior of the adsorbed molecules. In the present paper, we propose a novel, coarse-grained model addressing the condensed phases of a representative hybrid system, that is, para-sexiphenyl (6P) at zinc-oxide (ZnO). Within our model, intermolecular interactions are represented via a Gay-Berne potential (describing steric and van-der-Waals interactions) combined with the electrostatic potential between two linear quadrupoles. Similarly, the molecule-substrate interactions include a coupling between a linear molecular quadrupole to the electric field generated by the line charges characterizing ZnO(10-10). To validate our approach, we perform equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations, where the lateral positions are fixed to a 2D lattice, while the rotational degrees of freedom are continuous. We use these simulations to investigate orientational ordering in the condensed state. We reproduce various experimentally observed features such as the alignment of individual molecules with the line charges on the surface, the formation of a standing uniaxial phase with a herringbone structure, as well as the formation of a lying nematic phase.

  19. Signatures of dynamics in charge transport through organic molecules; Dynamisches Verhalten beim Ladungstransport durch organische Molekuele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secker, Daniel

    2008-06-03

    The aim of the thesis at hand was to investigate dynamical behaviour in charge transport through organic molecules experimentally with the help of the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique. the thesis concentrates on the complex interaction between the molecular contact configuration and the electronic structure. it is shown that by variation of the electrode distance and so by a manipulation of the molecule and contact configuration the electronic structure as well as the coupling between the molecule and the electrodes is affected. The latter statement is an additional hint how closely I-V-characteristics depend on the molecular contact configuration. Depending on the applied voltage and so the electric field there are two different configurations preferred by the molecular contact. A potential barrier between these two states is the origin of the hysteresis. A central part of the thesis is dealing with measurements of the current noise. Finally it can be concluded that the detailed discussion reveals the strong effect of dynamical interactions between the atomic configuration of the molecular contact and the electronic structure on the charge transport in single molecule junctions. (orig.)

  20. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications.

  1. Using NMR to study small molecule adsorption in metal organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M. G.; Canepa, P.; Thonhauser, T.

    2013-03-01

    We calculate the carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift for the CO2 molecule and the hydrogen shift for both H2 and H2O inside the metal organic framework structure Mg-MOF74 using ab initio calculations at the density functional theory level[1,2] with the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF).[3] These shifts are obtained while placing the small molecules throughout the structure, including the calculated adsorption site for various loading scenarios. Our binding energy results agree well with previous experiments and calculation, and the NMR calculations show that it is reasonable to expect an experimentally observable change in the chemical shift depending on adsorbant, position, and loading. By providing this mapping of chemical shift to position and loading for these adsorbants, we argue that NMR probes could be used to provide information about the position at which these small molecules bind within the MOF and provide information about the loading of the adsorbed molecule.

  2. Supramolecular organization of pi-conjugated molecules monitored by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Laurent; Almadori, Yann; Belhboub, Anouar; Le Parc, Rozenn; Aznar, Raymond; Dieudonné-George, Philippe; Rahmani, Abdelali; Hermet, Patrick; Fossard, Frédéric; Loiseau, Annick; Jousselme, Bruno; Campidelli, Stéphane; Saito, Takeshi; Wang, Guillaume; Bantignies, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Photoactive pi-conjugated molecules (quaterthiophene and phthalocyanine) are either encapsulated into the hollow core of single-walled carbon nanotubes or noncovalently stacked at their outer surface in order to elaborate hybrid nanosystems with new physical properties, providing practical routes to fit different requirements for potential applications. We are interested in the relationship between the structure and the optoelectronic properties. The structural properties are investigated mainly by x-ray diffraction and/or transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We show that the supramolecular organizations of confined quaterthiophenes depend on the nanocontainer size, whereas phthalocyanine encapsulation leads to the formation of a one-dimensional phase for which the angle between the molecule ring and the nanotube axis is close to 32 deg. Confined phthalocyanine molecules display Raman spectra hardly altered with respect to the bulk phase, suggesting a rather weak interaction with the tubes. In contrast, the vibrational properties of the molecules stacked at the outer surface of tubes display important modifications. We assume a significant curvature of the phthalocyanine induced by the interaction with the tube walls and a change of the central atom position within the molecular ring, in good agreement with our density functional theory calculations.

  3. Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions. II. Acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, S.; Santos, A. C. F.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2006-04-01

    Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH3COOH), a glycine (NH2CH2COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100-310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH3COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH3CO^+, COOH+ and CH3+ ions are the main fragments, and the presence of the former may indicate that the production-destruction process of acetic acid in hot molecular cores (HMCs) could decrease the H2O abundance since the net result of this process converts H2O into OH + H^+. The COOH+ ion plays an important role in ion-molecule reactions to form large biomolecules like glycine.

  4. Reactions of metal cluster anions with inorganic and organic molecules in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-07-28

    The study of gas phase ion-molecule reactions by state-of-the-art mass spectrometric experiments in conjunction with quantum chemistry calculations offers an opportunity to clarify the elementary steps and mechanistic details of bond activation and conversion processes. In the past few decades, a considerable number of publications have been devoted to the ion-molecule reactions of metal clusters, the experimentally and theoretically tractable models for the active phase of condensed phase systems. The focus of this perspective concerns progress on activation and transformation of important inorganic and organic molecules by negatively charged metal clusters. The metal cluster anions cover bare metal clusters as well as ligated systems with oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, among others. The following important issues have been summarized and discussed: (i) dependence of chemical reactivity and selectivity on cluster structures and sizes, metals and metal oxidation states, odd-even electron numbers, etc. and (ii) effects of doping, ligation, and pre-adsorption on the reactivity of metal clusters toward rather inert molecules.

  5. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohmura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC-triethylene glycol (TEG–C60 molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D+ and A- in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  6. Photogenerated Intrinsic Free Carriers in Small-molecule Organic Semiconductors Visualized by Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Gangbei; Yang, Jianbing; Chang, Hao; Meng, Qingyu; Zhao, Hongwu; Zhou, Xin; Yue, Shuai; Wang, Zhuan; Shi, Jinan; Gu, Lin; Yan, Donghang; Weng, Yuxiang

    2015-11-01

    Confirmation of direct photogeneration of intrinsic delocalized free carriers in small-molecule organic semiconductors has been a long-sought but unsolved issue, which is of fundamental significance to its application in photo-electric devices. Although the excitonic description of photoexcitation in these materials has been widely accepted, this concept is challenged by recently reported phenomena. Here we report observation of direct delocalized free carrier generation upon interband photoexcitation in highly crystalline zinc phthalocyanine films prepared by the weak epitaxy growth method using ultrafast spectroscopy. Transient absorption spectra spanning the visible to mid-infrared region revealed the existence of short-lived free electrons and holes with a diffusion length estimated to cross at least 11 molecules along the π-π stacking direction that subsequently localize to form charge transfer excitons. The interband transition was evidenced by ultraviolet-visible absorption, photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectroscopy. Our results suggest that delocalized free carriers photogeneration can also be achieved in organic semiconductors when the molecules are packed properly.

  7. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmura, Satoshi, E-mail: s.ohmura.m4@cc.it-hiroshima.ac.jp [Research Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Civil Engineering and Urban Design, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Tsuruta, Kenji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Shimojo, Fuyuki [Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 Japan (Japan); Nakano, Aiichiro [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Computer Science, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, CA90089-024 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-triethylene glycol (TEG)–C{sub 60} molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D{sup +} and A{sup -}) in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  8. Spintronic and Electronic Phenomena in Organic Molecules Measured with μSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Schulz, Leander; Willis, Maureen; Zhang, Sijie; Misquitta, Alston J.; Drew, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    The use of implanted muons to probe the spin dynamics and electronic excitations in organic materials is reviewed. At first, a brief introduction to the historical context and background of the muon technique is given, followed by an outline of some of the underlying theoretical models needed to quantitatively interpret data taken on organic molecules. Caution is advised when using certain theoretical models for the interpretation of low-field spin relaxation data. The next section deals with spin dynamics in soft materials, and starts with discussing many of the key results in thin films, followed by a review of bulk measurements in three different materials classes — polymers, biologically active molecules, and small molecules. Finally, we present a detailed discussion of the density functional theory methodology when applied to μSR, and present the common issues encountered when trying to perform these calculations to support muon experiments. In particular, we discuss a method for benchmarking to manage the approximations inherent to the technique and common sources of errors that can sometimes fortuitously cancel.

  9. Organic proton-conducting molecules as solid-state separator materials for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Garcia, Lucia; Kaltbeitzel, Anke; Enkelmann, Volker; Gutmann, Jochen S.; Klapper, Markus; Muellen, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-06-21

    Organic proton-conducting molecules are presented as alternative materials to state-of-the-art polymers used as electrolytes in proton-exchanging membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Instead of influencing proton conductivity via the mobility offered by polymeric materials, the goal is to create organic molecules that control the proton-transport mechanism through supramolecular order. Therefore, a series of phosphonic acid-containing molecules possessing a carbon-rich hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic periphery was synthesized and characterized. Proton conductivity measurements as well as water uptake and crystallinity studies (powder and single-crystal X-ray analysis) were performed under various conditions. These experiments reveal that proton mobility is closely connected to crystallinity and strongly dependent on the supramolecular ordering of the compound. This study provides insights into the proton-conducting properties of this novel class of materials and the mechanisms responsible for proton transport. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. An investigation of the interrelationships between linear and nonlinear polarizabilities and bond-length alternation in conjugated organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, C B; Marder, S R

    1993-01-01

    A computational method was devised to explore the relationship of charge separation, geometry, molecular dipole moment (mu), polarizability (alpha), and hyperpolariz-abilities (beta, gamma) in conjugated organic molecules. We show that bond-length alternation (the average difference in length between single and double bonds in the molecule) is a key structurally observable parameter that can be correlated with hyperpolarizabilities and is thus relevant to the optimization of molecules and materials. By using this method, the relationship of bond-length alternation, mu, alpha, beta, and gamma for linear conjugated molecules is illustrated, and those molecules with maximized alpha, beta, and gamma are described. PMID:11607441

  11. An Investigation of the Interrelationships Between Linear and Nonlinear Polarizabilities and Bond-Length Alternation in Conjugated Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Christopher B.; Marder, Seth R.

    1993-12-01

    A computational method was devised to explore the relationship of charge separation, geometry, molecular dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α), and hyperpolariz-abilities (β, γ) in conjugated organic molecules. We show that bond-length alternation (the average difference in length between single and double bonds in the molecule) is a key structurally observable parameter that can be correlated with hyperpolarizabilities and is thus relevant to the optimization of molecules and materials. By using this method, the relationship of bond-length alternation, μ, α, β, and γ for linear conjugated molecules is illustrated, and those molecules with maximized α, β, and γ are described.

  12. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Michael C; Raker, Jeffrey R; Kobilka, Brandon; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2014-01-14

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world.

  13. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world. PMID:24501431

  14. Metal–Organic Frameworks as Platforms for the Controlled Nanostructuring of Single-Molecule Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulakh, Darpandeep; Pyser, Joshua B.; Zhang, Xuan; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Dunbar, Kim R.; Wriedt, Mario

    2015-07-29

    The prototypical SMM molecule [Mn12O12(O2CCH3)16(OH2)4] was incorporated under mild conditions into a highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) matrix as a proof of principle for controlled nanostructuring of SMMs. Four independent experiments revealed that the SMM clusters were successfully loaded in the MOF pores, namely synchrotron-based powder diffraction, physisorption analysis, and in-depth magnetic and thermal analyses. The results provide incontrovertible evidence that the magnetic composite, SMM@MOF, combines key SMM properties with the functional properties of MOFs. Most importantly, the incorporated SMMs exhibit a significant enhanced thermal stability with SMM loading advantageously occurring at the periphery of the bulk MOF crystals with only a single SMM molecule isolated in the transverse direction of the pores.

  15. Empirical Method for the Prediction of Heat of Formation of Organic High Energy Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushanta Das

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available An empirical method based on additive procedures is proposed for estimating the heats offormation of aliphatic, aromatic, and ring molecules containing nitro and other energetic groupsat standard state. The method uses only molecular structural information. Calculation of heatof formation is carried out in three stages, first the heat of formation for gaseous state is calculated,followed by incorporation of heat of vapourisation/sublimation, and finally, corrections are donefor interactions. Some interaction terms, based on hydrogen bonding strength for variouscompounds and experimental heat of formation of isomeric compounds, are also proposed. Theresults are in good agreement with the experimentally determined values. The method providesquick and sufficiently accurate values of heat of formation of organic high energy molecules.

  16. Viscoelastic Properties of Organic Hybrid of Chlorinated Polythylene and Small Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chifei Wu

    2000-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of an organic hybrid of chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) and N,Ndicyclohexyl-benzthiazyl-2-sulfenaamid (DZ) are investigated. All CPE/DZ hybrids show a single loss tangent (Fan δ ) peak. Its position shift linearly to higher temperature and its maximum value increases nonlinearly with increasing DZ content. The energy absorptinity (EA, a ratio of loss modulus to complex modulus) is used to characterize these hybrids. The DZ content dependence of EA changes at a critical value. The existence of a bending point in the DZ content dependence of glass transition temperature and energy absorptinity is due to the microseparation and the crystallization of DZ molecules in CPE/DZ hybrids with high DZ content. The molecular structural model can successfully explain the influence of dispersion state of DZ molecules in the matrix polymer CPE on the maximum value and the position of Tan δ of CPE/DZ hybrids.

  17. Electron Transfer as a Probe of the Interfacial Quantum Dot-Organic Molecule Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark D.

    This dissertation describes a set of experimental and theoretical studies of the interaction between small organic molecules and the surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles, also called quantum dots (QDs). Chapter 1 reviews the literature on the influence of ligands on exciton relaxation dynamics following photoexcitation of semiconductor QDs, and describes how ligands promote or inhibit processes such as emission, nonradiative relaxation, and charge transfer to redox active adsorbates. Chapter 2 investigates the specific interaction of alkylcarboxylated viologen derivatives with CdS QDs, and shows how a combination of steady-state photoluminescence (PL) and transient absorption (TA) experiments can be used to reveal the specific binding geometry of redox active organic molecules on QD surfaces. Chapter 3 expands on Chapter 2 by using PL and TA to provide information about the mechanisms through which methyl viologen (MV 2+) associates with CdS QDs to form a stable QD/MV2+ complex, suggesting two chemically distinct reactions. We use our understanding of the QD/molecule interaction to design a drug delivery system in Chapter 4, which employs PL and TA experiments to show that conformational changes in a redox active adsorbate may follow electron transfer, "activating" a biologically inert Schiff base to a protein inhibitor form. The protein inhibitor limits cell motility and may be used to prevent tumor metastasis in cancer patients. Chapter 5 discusses future applications of QD/molecule redox couples with an emphasis on efficient multiple charge-transfer reactions -- a process facilitated by the high degeneracy of band-edge states in QDs. These multiple charge-transfer reactions may potentially increase the thermodynamic efficiency of solar cells, and may also facilitate the splitting of water into fuel. Multiple exciton generation procedures, multi-electron transfer experiments, and future directions are discussed.

  18. Effect of organic small-molecule hole injection materials on the performance of inverted organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Yifan; Zheng, Ding; Yu, Junsheng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the influence of small-molecule organic hole injection materials on the performance of organic solar cells (OSCs) as the hole transport layer (HTL) with an architecture of ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PC71BM/HTL/Ag has been investigated. A significant enhancement on the performance of OSCs from 1.06% to 2.63% is obtained by using N, N‧-bis(1-naphthalenyl)-N, N‧-bis-phenyl-(1, 1‧-biphenyl)-4, 4‧-diamine (NPB) HTL. Through the resistance simulation and space-charge limited current analysis, we found that NPB HTL cannot merely improve the hole mobility of the device but also form the Ohmic contact between the active layer and anode. Besides, when we apply mix HTL by depositing the NPB on the surface of molybdenum oxide, the power conversion efficiency of OSC are able to be further improved to 2.96%.

  19. Role of spatial distortions on the quadratic nonlinear optical properties of octupolar organic and metallo-organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidault, Sébastien; Brasselet, Sophie; Zyss, Joseph; Maury, Olivier; Le Bozec, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    Following on the recent experimental demonstration of a discrepancy between the nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior of several π-conjugated chromophores and their assumed octupolar symmetry, the authors investigate how geometrical distortions influence the NLO response of multipolar push-pull molecules. Their analytical model is set on a basis of valence-bond and charge-transfer states to estimate the hyperpolarizability of organic and metallo-organic chromophores using the lowest possible number of variables. Since symmetry breakdown changes the definition of the molecular Cartesian framework, tensorial spherical coordinates are implemented. The evolution of the nonlinear molecular anisotropy with possible rotational deviations is then evaluated for two recently studied chromophores. Zero-frequency calculations show that, outside optical resonance, weak geometrical distortions lead to strong anisotropy variations in agreement with experimental data. Their goal is to underscore which molecular engineering strategies should be applied when designing a photoisomerizable nonlinear octupole.

  20. Designing small molecule polyaromatic p- and n-type semiconductor materials for organic electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Collis, Gavin E.

    2015-12-22

    By combining computational aided design with synthetic chemistry, we are able to identify core 2D polyaromatic small molecule templates with the necessary optoelectronic properties for p- and n-type materials. By judicious selection of the functional groups, we can tune the physical properties of the material making them amenable to solution and vacuum deposition. In addition to solubility, we observe that the functional group can influence the thin film molecular packing. By developing structure-property relationships (SPRs) for these families of compounds we observe that some compounds are better suited for use in organic solar cells, while others, varying only slightly in structure, are favoured in organic field effect transistor devices. We also find that the processing conditions can have a dramatic impact on molecular packing (i.e. 1D vs 2D polymorphism) and charge mobility; this has implications for material and device long term stability. We have developed small molecule p- and n-type materials for organic solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 2%. Subtle variations in the functional groups of these materials produces p- and ntype materials with mobilities higher than 0.3 cm2/Vs. We are also interested in using our SPR approach to develop materials for sensor and bioelectronic applications.

  1. Characterization of the Hole Transport and Electrical Properties in the Small-Molecule Organic Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. G.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, X. L.; Cheng, L. F.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the hole transport and electrical properties in a small-molecule organic material N, N'-bis(1-naphthyl)- N, N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB), which is frequently used in organic light-emitting diodes. It is shown that the thickness-dependent current density versus voltage ( J- V) characteristics of sandwich-type NPB-based hole-only devices cannot be described well using the conventional mobility model without carrier density or electric field dependence. However, a consistent and excellent description of the thickness-dependent and temperature-dependent J- V characteristics of NPB hole-only devices can be obtained with a single set of parameters by using our recently introduced improved model that take into account the temperature, carrier density, and electric field dependence of the mobility. For the small-molecule organic semiconductor studied, we find that the width of the Gaussian distribution of density of states σ and the lattice constant a are similar to the values reported for conjugated polymers. Furthermore, we show that the boundary carrier density has an important effect on the J- V characteristics. Both the maximum of carrier density and the minimum of electric field appear near the interface of NPB hole-only devices.

  2. Density Functional Investigation of Graphene Doped with Amine-Based Organic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeun Hee Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the electronic properties of graphene, many doping techniques have been studied. Herein, we investigate the electronic and molecular structure of doped graphene using density functional theory, and we report the effects of amine-based benzene dopants adsorbed on graphene. Density functional theory (DFT calculations were performed to determine the role of amine-based aromatic compounds in graphene doping. These organic molecules bind to graphene through long-range interactions such as π-π interactions and C-H⋯π hydrogen bonding. We compared the electronic structures of pristine graphene and doped graphene to understand the electronic structure of doped graphene at the molecular level. Also, work functions of doped graphene were obtained from electrostatic potential calculations. A decrease in the work function was observed when the amine-based organic compounds were adsorbed onto graphene. Because these systems are based on physisorption, there was no obvious band structure change at point K at the Fermi level after doping. However, the amine-based organic dopants did change the absolute Fermi energy levels. In this study, we showed that the Fermi levels of the doped graphene were affected by the HOMO energy level of the dopants and by the intermolecular charge transfer between the adsorbed molecules and graphene.

  3. The formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Cesaroni, R; Fontani, F; Codella, C; Zhang, Q

    2016-01-01

    We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of the simplest sugar alcohol, ethylene glycol (EG), the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (GA), and other chemically related complex organic species towards the massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. We have analyzed multiple single dish and interferometric data, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities using an LTE analysis. We have reported for the first time the presence of EG towards G31.41+0.31, and we have also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as GA, methyl formate (MF), dimethyl ether (DME) and ethanol (ET). The high angular resolution images show that the EG emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like EG or GA, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that EG is more abundant than GA in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar r...

  4. Designing small molecule polyaromatic p- and n-type semiconductor materials for organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Gavin E.

    2015-12-01

    By combining computational aided design with synthetic chemistry, we are able to identify core 2D polyaromatic small molecule templates with the necessary optoelectronic properties for p- and n-type materials. By judicious selection of the functional groups, we can tune the physical properties of the material making them amenable to solution and vacuum deposition. In addition to solubility, we observe that the functional group can influence the thin film molecular packing. By developing structure-property relationships (SPRs) for these families of compounds we observe that some compounds are better suited for use in organic solar cells, while others, varying only slightly in structure, are favoured in organic field effect transistor devices. We also find that the processing conditions can have a dramatic impact on molecular packing (i.e. 1D vs 2D polymorphism) and charge mobility; this has implications for material and device long term stability. We have developed small molecule p- and n-type materials for organic solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 2%. Subtle variations in the functional groups of these materials produces p- and ntype materials with mobilities higher than 0.3 cm2/Vs. We are also interested in using our SPR approach to develop materials for sensor and bioelectronic applications.

  5. Pre-biotic organic molecules in hydrothermal quartz veins from the Archaean Yilgarn province, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dyker, Gerald; Kirnbauer, Thomas; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinfried; Tubbesing, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    According to a model recently published by Schreiber et al. (OLEB 2012), pre-biotic organic molecules as earliest markers for a chemical evolution have been formed in tectonic faults of the first Archaean cratons. These faults are often documented by quartz- and other hydrothermal vein mineralization. During the growth of these quartzes, small portions of hydrothermal fluids are enclosed which conserve the chemical composition of the given fluid medium. According to our model, the preconditions for the geochemical formation of organic molecules are a suitable carbon source (e.g. carbon dioxide), varying P/T conditions, and catalysts. This given, rising hydrothermal fluids such as mineral-rich water and supercritical carbon dioxide in deep faults with contacts to the upper earth mantle offer conditions which allow for reactions similar to the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. So far, the inclusions which possibly have conserved the products of these reactions have not been analyzed for possible organic constituents. First analytical results of a Mesozoic hydrothermal quartz vein from central Germany (Taunus) reveal that several organic compounds are found in fluid inclusions. However, the true origin of these compounds is unclear due to possible contamination by adjacent Corg-rich metasediments. Therefore, we have extended the study to hydrothermal quartz veins from the Archaean Yilgarn craton, to impact-generated quartz veins of the Shoemaker-Crater as well as to hydrothermal quartz boulders from a 2.7 to 3 billion years old conglomerate near Murchison (Western Australia). In one of the samples from the conglomerate, a wide spectrum of organic compounds such as bromomethane, butane, isoprene, benzene, and toluene have been detected. The time interval between the quartz formation, its erosion and its sedimentation is unknown. Possibly, the analyzed quartz sample was formed in a hydrothermal vein long before any living cells have existed on earth. In this case, the given

  6. Selective adsorption and release of cationic organic dye molecules on mesoporous borosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Manidipa; Pal, Nabanita; Bhaumik, Asim, E-mail: msab@iacs.res.in

    2012-08-01

    Mesoporous materials can play a pivotal role as a host material for delivery application to a specific part of a system. In this work we explore the selective adsorption and release of cationic organic dye molecules such as safranine T (ST) and malachite green (MG) on mesoporous borosilicate materials. The mesoporous silica SBA-15 and borosilicate materials (MBS) were prepared using non-ionic surfactant Pluronic P123 as template via evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method. After template removal the materials show high surface areas and in some cases ordered mesopores of dimensions ca. 6-7 nm. High surface area, mesoporosity and the presence of heteroatom (boron) help this mesoporous borosilicate material to adsorb high amount of cationic dye molecules at its surface from the respective aqueous solutions. Furthermore, the mesoporous borosilicate samples containing higher percentage adsorbed dyes show excellent release of ST or MG dye in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at physiological pH = 7.4 and temperature 310 K. The adsorption and release efficiency of mesoporous borosilicate samples are compared with reference boron-free mesoporous pure silica material to understand the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent interaction at the surfaces. - Graphical abstract: Highly ordered 2D-hexagonal mesoporous borosilicate materials have been synthesized by using Pluronic P123 as template. The materials show very good adsorption and release of organic cationic dye molecules under physiological conditions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly ordered 2D-hexagonal mesoporous borosilicate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonionic Pluoronic P123 templated mesoporous material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of organic dyes at the mesopore surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlled release of dyes under physiological pH and temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Release of safranine T (ST) and malachite green (MG) dyes in simulated body fluids.

  7. Multiscale Molecular Simulation of Solution Processing of SMDPPEH: PCBM Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2016-08-17

    Solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells are a promising renewable energy source because of their low production cost, mechanical flexibility, and light weight relative to their pure inorganic counterparts. In this work, we developed a coarse-grained (CG) Gay-Berne ellipsoid molecular simulation model based on atomistic trajectories from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of smaller system sizes to systematically study the nanomorphology of the SMDPPEH/PCBM/solvent ternary blend during solution processing, including the blade-coating process by applying external shear to the solution. With the significantly reduced overall system degrees of freedom and computational acceleration from GPU, we were able to go well beyond the limitation of conventional all-atom molecular simulations with a system size on the order of hundreds of nanometers with mesoscale molecular detail. Our simulations indicate that, similar to polymer solar cells, the optimal blending ratio in small-molecule organic solar cells must provide the highest specific interfacial area for efficient exciton dissociation, while retaining balanced hole/electron transport pathway percolation. We also reveal that blade-coating processes have a significant impact on nanomorphology. For given donor/acceptor blending ratios, applying an external shear force can effectively promote donor/acceptor phase segregation and stacking in the SMDPPEH domains. The present study demonstrated the capability of an ellipsoid-based coarse-grained model for studying the nanomorphology evolution of small-molecule organic solar cells during solution processing/blade-coating and provided links between fabrication protocols and device nanomorphologies.

  8. Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer : The Search For Biosignatures And Biohints On Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Freissinet, C.; Brault, A.; Sternberg, R.; Rodier, C.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.; Pinnick, V.; MOMA Team

    2012-10-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission seeks the signs of past or present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) aboard the ExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. One of the instruments aboard MOMA is a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) which provides a unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds allowing chemical analyses on volatile and non-volatile species. The key challenge with the analysis of refractory organic compounds contained in soil is their extraction and subsequent analysis by GC-MS. Since the extraction of organic matter is not possible by liquid solvent extraction, thermodesoprtion followed by derivatization has been developed. The goal of the thermodesorption is to quickly extract the organic matter before degradation. One of the main focus is to determine the chirality of amino acids. Indeed, on earth homochirality (especially the L-form) is an indicator for the presence of life. However, other refractory compounds can be analyzed: nucleobases, carbox-ylic acids, PAHs, etc. Thermodesorption occurs within a range of temperatures from 150 °C to 300 °C over a period of 30 s to 10 min, depending on the chemical compound. Under these conditions, we have shown that amino acids are not degraded and that their chirality is preserved. Once extracted, refractory molecules with labile hydrogens (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, etc.) were derivatized. General and sensitive derivatization occurs with a sillylated compounds N,N-methyl-tert-butyl-dimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Derivative compounds were separated on an RTX-5 (Restek) column. If a chiral separation was targeted, then dimethylformamide dimethylacetale derivatization (DMF-DMA) was utilized. With DMF-DMA 11 of the 19 proteinic amino acids were separated on the Chirasil

  9. The Spatial Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the L1544 Pre-stellar Core

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T=30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average Av~7.5-8 mag located at 4000 au from the core's center and bright in CH3OH. Our observations show that CH3O, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO are more abundant (by factors ~2-10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH3OCHO, c-C3H2O, HCCCHO, CH2CHCN and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors

  10. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  11. Dynamic isotope effects on relaxation of quadrupolar nuclei in 12 simple organic molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛希安; andM.Holz

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic isotope effects on relaxation rate of quadrupolar nuclei are preliminarily reported. The relaxation rates of 17O and 14N in 12 simple organic molecules and their 18 corresponding deuterated species have been systematically measured. The principal components of the molecular inertia tensors have been calculated. The results show that there is an intrinsic correlation between the dynamic isotope effects of the relaxation rate and the static isotope effects of the molecular inertia. The concepts of molecular collision frequency and translation-rotation coupling have been introduced into the NMR relaxation theory. Therefore, a reasonable explanation of the experimental results has been given.

  12. Dual Function Additives: A Small Molecule Crosslinker for Enhanced Efficiency and Stability in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rumer, Joseph W.

    2015-02-01

    A bis-azide-based small molecule crosslinker is synthesized and evaluated as both a stabilizing and efficiency-boosting additive in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells. Activated by a noninvasive and scalable solution processing technique, polymer:fullerene blends exhibit improved thermal stability with suppressed polymer skin formation at the cathode and frustrated fullerene aggregation on ageing, with initial efficiency increased from 6% to 7%. © 2015 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Morphology versus Vertical Phase Segregation in Solvent Annealed Small Molecule Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep study of solvent annealed small molecules bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on DPP(TBFu2 : PC60BM blend is carried out. To reveal the reason of the solvent annealing advantage over the thermal one, capacitance-voltage measurements were applied. It was found that controlling the vertical phase segregation in the solar cells a high fullerene population in the vicinity of the cathode could be achieved. This results in increase of the shunt resistance of the cell, thus improving the light harvesting efficiency.

  14. Standoff detection of large organic molecules using Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy and microwave Rayleigh scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, Fedor M [ORNL; Zhang, Zhili [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for nonintrusive and standoff detection of large organic molecules using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering from plasma produced by structure sensitive photoionization through Rydberg states. We test the method on 1,4-diazobicyclooctane. Transitions between the 3s Rydberg state and higher lying Rydberg states are probed using two-color photoionization with 266?nm photons and photons in the range of 460-2400 nm. Photoionization is detected using microwave radiation, which is scattered by the unbounded electrons. Highly resolved Rydberg spectra are acquired in vacuum and in air.

  15. Water and oxygen induced degradation of small molecule organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermenau, Martin; Riede, Moritz; Leo, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule organic solar cells were studied with respect to water and oxygen induced degradation by mapping the spatial distribution of reaction products in order to elucidate the degradation patterns and failure mechanisms. The active layers consist of a 30 nm bulk heterojunction formed...... with isotopic labeling using H218O and 18O2 provided information on where and to what extent the atmosphere had reacted with the device. A comparison was made between the use of a humid (oxygen free) atmosphere, a dry oxygen atmosphere, and a dry (oxygen free) nitrogen atmosphere during testing of devices...

  16. Sugar-assisted kinetic resolution of amino acids and amplification of enantiomeric excess of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, Armando; Sundén, Henrik; Xu, Yongmei; Ibrahem, Ismail; Zou, Weibiao; Engqvist, Magnus

    2006-07-17

    The origins of biological homochirality have intrigued researchers since Pasteur's discovery of the optical activity of biomolecules. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a novel alternative for the evolution of homochirality that is not based on autocatalysis and forges a direct relationship between the chirality of sugars and amino acids. This process provides a mechanism in which a racemic mixture of an amino acid can catalyze the formation of an optically active organic molecule in the presence of a sugar product of low enantiomeric excess.

  17. Fluorination-enabled optimal morphology leads to over 11% efficiency for inverted small-molecule organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Zaiyu; Zhu, Lingyun; Fang, Jin; Xia, Benzheng; Wang, Zhen; Lu, Kun; Ma, Wei; Wei, Zhixiang

    2016-12-01

    Solution-processable small molecules for organic solar cells have attracted intense attention for their advantages of definite molecular structures compared with their polymer counterparts. However, the device efficiencies based on small molecules are still lower than those of polymers, especially for inverted devices, the highest efficiency of which is inverted device performance, and an average power conversion efficiency of 11.08% is achieved for a two-fluorine atom substituted molecule.

  18. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6).

  19. On the nucleation and initial film growth of rod-like organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Adolf

    2016-10-01

    In this article, some fundamental topics related to the initial steps of organic film growth are reviewed. General conclusions will be drawn based on experimental results obtained for the film formation of oligophenylene and pentacene molecules on gold and mica substrates. Thin films were prepared via physical vapor deposition under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions and characterized in-situ mainly by thermal desorption spectroscopy, and ex-situ by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. In this short review article the following topics will be discussed: What are the necessary conditions to form island-like films which are either composed of flat-lying or of standing molecules? Does a wetting layer exist below and in between the islands? What is the reason behind the occasionally observed bimodal island size distribution? Can one describe the nucleation process with the diffusion-limited aggregation model? Do the impinging molecules directly adsorb on the surface or rather via a hot-precursor state? Finally, it will be described how the critical island size can be determined by an independent measurement of the deposition rate dependence of the island density and the capture-zone distribution via a universal relationship.

  20. Electronegativity Equalization Method: Parameterization and Validation for Large Sets of Organic, Organohalogene and Organometal Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Koca

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Electronegativity Equalization Method (EEM is a fast approach for chargecalculation. A challenging part of the EEM is the parameterization, which is performedusing ab initio charges obtained for a set of molecules. The goal of our work was to performthe EEM parameterization for selected sets of organic, organohalogen and organometalmolecules. We have performed the most robust parameterization published so far. The EEMparameterization was based on 12 training sets selected from a database of predicted 3Dstructures (NCI DIS and from a database of crystallographic structures (CSD. Each setcontained from 2000 to 6000 molecules. We have shown that the number of molecules inthe training set is very important for quality of the parameters. We have improved EEMparameters (STO-3G MPA charges for elements that were already parameterized,specifically: C, O, N, H, S, F and Cl. The new parameters provide more accurate chargesthan those published previously. We have also developed new parameters for elements thatwere not parameterized yet, specifically for Br, I, Fe and Zn. We have also performedcrossover validation of all obtained parameters using all training sets that included relevantelements and confirmed that calculated parameters provide accurate charges.

  1. Van Der Waals Heterostructures between Small Organic Molecules and Layered Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional atomic crystals, like grapheme (G and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2, exhibit great interest in electronic and optoelectronic applications. The excellent physical properties, such as transparency, semiconductivity, and flexibility, make them compatible with current organic electronics. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of the interfaces of van der Waals (vdW heterostructures between small organic molecules (pentacene, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc, perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA, and dioctylbenzothienobenzothiophene (C8-BTBT and layered substrates (G, MoS2 and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN. The influences of the underlying layered substrates on the molecular arrangement, electronic and vibrational properties will be addressed.

  2. Transformations of Organic Molecules with F-TEDA-BF4 in Ionic Liquid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojan Stavber

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The transformations of organic molecules with F-TEDA-BF4 (1 were investigated in the hydrophilic ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4], 2 and the hydrophobic IL 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6], 3. The range of substrates included alkyl substituted phenols 4a-c, 9, 13, 1,1-diphenylethene (15, alkyl aryl ketones 19-22, aldehydes 23-25 and methoxy-substituted benzene derivatives 26-30. The evaluation of the outcome of reactions performed in IL media in comparison to those of the corresponding reactions in conventional organic solvents revealed that the transformations in IL are less efficient and selective. The effect of the presence of a nucleophile (MeOH, H2O, MeCN on the course of reaction was also studied.

  3. Effective Absorption Enhancement in Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Employing Trapezoid Gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Chun-Ping, Xiang; Yu, Jin; Bin-Zong, Xu; Wei-Min, Wang; Xin, Wei; Guo-Feng, Song; Yun, Xu

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the optical absorption has been enhanced in the small molecule organic solar cells by employing trapezoid grating structure. The enhanced absorption is mainly attributed to both waveguide modes and surface plasmon modes, which has been simulated by using finite-difference time-domain method. The simulated results show that the surface plasmon along the semitransparent metallic Ag anode is excited by introducing the periodical trapezoid gratings, which induce high intensity field increment in the donor layer. Meanwhile, the waveguide modes result a high intensity field in acceptor layer. The increment of field improves the absorption of organic solar cells, significantly, which has been demonstrated by simulating the electrical properties. The simulated results exhibiting 31 % increment of the short-circuit current has been achieved in the optimized device, which is supported by the experimental measurement. The power conversion efficiency of the grating sample obtained in experiment exhibits an...

  4. Rational molecular engineering towards efficient non-fullerene small molecule acceptors for inverted bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-Qing; Dai, Ya-Zhong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian

    2014-02-14

    Two non-fullerene small molecules based on fluoranthene-fused imide were developed as acceptors for solution-processed inverted organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, which showed good power conversion efficiency and high open-circuit voltage.

  5. Organization of extracting molecules of the diamide type: link with the extracting properties?; Organisation des molecules extractantes de type diamide: lien avec les proprietes extractantes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meridiano, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The aim of these studies is to establish a link between the different organizations of diamide extractants (used in the DIAMEX process) and their extracting properties. The effects of the key parameters leading the liquid-liquid extraction (concentration of extractant, nature of solute, activity of the aqueous phase, nature of the diluent and temperature) are studied: 1) at the supramolecular scale, with the characterization of the extractant organizations by vapor-pressure osmometry (VPO) and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS/SAXS) experiments; 2) at the molecular scale, with the quantification of the extracted solutes (water, nitric acid, metal nitrate) and the determination of extracted complexes stoichiometries by electro-spray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) experiments. The DMDOHEMA molecule acts as a classical surfactant and forms aggregates of the reverse micelle type. Taking into account the established supramolecular diagrams, a quantitative link between the extractants structures and their extracting properties has been brought to light. To model the europium nitrate extraction, two approaches have been developed: - an approach based on mass action laws. Extractions equilibria have been proposed taking into account the supramolecular speciation; - an innovative approach considering the extracted ions as adsorbed on a specific surface of the extractant molecule which depends on the extractant organization state. The ion extraction can be considered as a sum of isotherms corresponding to the different states of organization. This approach allows to compare the extraction efficiency of an extracting molecule as a function of its organization state. (author)

  6. Stability of metal organic frameworks and interaction of small gas molecules in these materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kui

    The work in this dissertation combines spectroscopy ( in-situ infrared absorption and Raman), powder X-ray diffraction and DFT calculations to study the stability of metal organic frameworks materials (MOFs) in the presence of water vapor and other corrosive gases (e.g., SO 2, NO2 NO), and the interaction and competitive co-adsorption of several gases within MOFs by considering two types of prototypical MOFs: 1) a MOF with saturated metal centers based on paddlewheel secondary building units: M(bdc)(ted)0.5 [M=Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, ted = triethylenediamine], and 2) a MOF with unsaturated metal centers: M2(dobdc) [M=Mg2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and dobdc = 2,5-dihydroxybenzenedicarboxylate]. We find that the stability of MOFs to water vapor critically depends on their structure and the specific metal cation in the building units. For M(bdc)(ted)0.5, the metal-bdc bond is the most vulnerable for Cu(bdc)(ted)0.5, while the metal-ted bond is first attacked for the Zn and Co analogs. In contrast, Ni(bdc)(ted)0.5 remains stable under the same conditions. For M2(dobdc), or MOF-74, the weak link is the dobdc-metal bond. The water molecule is dissociatively adsorbed at the metal-oxygen group with OH adsorption directly on the metal center and H adsorption on the bridging O of the phenolate group in the dobdc linker. Other technologically important molecules besides water, such as NO, NO2, SO2, tend to poison M2(dobdc) through dissociative or molecular adsorption onto the open metal sites. A high uptake SO2 capacity was measured in M(bdc)(ted)0.5, attributed to multipoint interactions between the guest SO2 molecule and the MOF host. In the case of competitive co-adsorption between CO2 and other small molecules, we find that binding energy alone is not a good indicator of molecular site occupation within the MOF (i.e., it cannot successfully predict and evaluate the displacement of CO2 by other molecules). Instead, we show that the kinetic barrier for the

  7. The gas phase origin of complex organic molecules precursors in prestellar cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2016-05-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have long been observed in the warm regions surrounding nascent protostars. The recent discovery of oxygen-bearing COMs like methyl formate or dimethyl ether in prestellar cores (Bacmann et al. [2]), where gas and dust temperatures rarely exceed 10-15 K, has challenged the previously accepted models according to which COM formation relied on the diffusion of heavy radicals on warm (˜30 K) grains. Following these detections, new questions have arisen: do non-thermal processes play a role in increasing radical mobility or should new gas-phase routes be explored? The radicals involved in the formation of the aforementioned COMs, HCO and CH3O represent intermediate species in the grain-surface synthesis of methanol which proceeds via successive hydrogenations of CO molecules in the ice. We present here observations of methanol and its grain-surface precursors HCO, H2CO, CH3O in a sample of prestellar cores and derive their relative abundances. We find that the relative abundances HCO:H2CO:CH3O:CH3OH are constant across the core sample, close to 10:100:1:100. Our results also show that the amounts of HCO and CH3O are consistent with a gas-phase synthesis of these species from H2CO and CH3OH via radical-neutral or ion-molecule reactions followed by dissociative recombinations. Thus, while grain chemistry is necessary to explain the abundances of the parent volatile CH3OH, and possibly H2CO, the reactive species HCO and CH3O might be daughter molecules directly produced in the gas-phase.

  8. Hierarchical Self-Organization of AB n Dendron-like Molecules into a Supramolecular Lattice Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xueyan; Zhang, Ruimeng; Li, Yiwen; Hong, You-Lee; Guo, Dong; Lang, Kening; Wu, Kuan-Yi; Huang, Mingjun; Mao, Jialin; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Li, Tao; Cheng, Stephen Z D

    2017-08-23

    To understand the hierarchical self-organization behaviors of soft materials as well as their dependence on molecular geometry, a series of AB n dendron-like molecules based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles were designed and synthesized. The apex of these molecules is a hydrophilic POSS cage with 14 hydroxyl groups (denoted DPOSS). At its periphery, there are different numbers (n = 1-8) of hydrophobic POSS cages with seven isobutyl groups (denoted BPOSS), connected to the apical DPOSS via flexible dendron type linker(s). By varying the BPOSS number from one to seven, a supramolecular lattice formation sequence ranging from lamella (DPOSS-BPOSS), double gyroid (space group of Ia3̅d, DPOSS-BPOSS2), hexagonal cylinder (plane group of P6mm, DPOSS-BPOSS3), Frank-Kasper A15 (space group of Pm3̅n, DPOSS-BPOSS4, DPOSS-BPOSS5, and DPOSS-BPOSS6), to Frank-Kasper sigma (space group of P42/mnm, DPOSS-BPOSS7) phases can be observed. The nanostructure formations in this series of AB n dendron-like molecules are mainly directed by the molecular geometric shapes. Furthermore, within each spherical motif, the spherical core consists hydrophilic DPOSS cages with flexible linkages, while the hydrophobic BPOSS cages form the relative rigid shell, and contact with neighbors to provide decreased interfaces among the spherical motifs for constructing final polyhedral motifs in these Frank-Kasper lattices. This study provides the design principle of molecules with specific geometric shapes and functional groups to achieve anticipated structures and macroscopic properties.

  9. Binding energies of hydrogen molecules to isoreticular metal-organic framework materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Tatsuhiko; Klassen, James; Ortony, Julia; Ganz, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Recently, several novel isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) structures have been fabricated and tested for hydrogen storage applications. To improve our understanding of these materials, and to promote quantitative calculations and simulations, the binding energies of hydrogen molecules to the MOF have been studied. High-quality second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) calculations using the resolution of the identity approximation and the quadruple zeta QZVPP basis set were used. These calculations use terminated molecular fragments from the MOF materials. For H2 on the zinc oxide corners, the MP2 binding energy using Zn4O(HCO2)6 molecule is 6.28kJ/mol. For H2 on the linkers, the binding energy is calculated using lithium-terminated molecular fragments. The MP2 results with coupled-cluster singles and doubles and noniterative triples method corrections and charge-transfer corrections are 4.16kJ/mol for IRMOF-1, 4.72kJ/mol for IRMOF-3, 4.86kJ/mol for IRMOF-6, 4.54kJ/mol for IRMOF-8, 5.50 and 4.90kJ/mol for IRMOF-12, 4.87 and 4.84kJ/mol for IRMOF-14, 5.42kJ/mol for IRMOF-18, and 4.97 and 4.66kJ/mol for IRMOF-993. The larger linkers are all able to bind multiple hydrogen molecules per side. The linkers of IRMOF-12, IRMOF-993, and IRMOF-14 can bind two to three, three, and four hydrogen molecules per side, respectively. In general, the larger linkers have the largest binding energies, and, together with the enhanced surface area available for binding, will provide increased hydrogen storage. We also find that adding up NH2 or CH3 groups to each linker can provide up to a 33% increase in the binding energy.

  10. Complex organic molecules in diffuse clouds along the line of sight to Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, V.; Belloche, A.; Menten, K. M.; Garrod, R. T.; Müller, H. S. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Up to now, mostly relatively simple molecules have been detected in interstellar diffuse molecular clouds in our galaxy, but more complex species have been reported in the diffuse/translucent medium of a z = 0.89 spiral galaxy. Aims: We aim at searching for complex organic molecules (COMs) in diffuse molecular clouds along the line of sight to Sgr B2(N), taking advantage of the high sensitivity and angular resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Methods: We use data acquired as part of the EMoCA survey performed with ALMA. To analyse the absorption features of the molecules detected towards the ultracompact H ii region K4 in Sgr B2(N), we calculate synthetic spectra for these molecules and fit their column densities, line widths, centroid velocities, and excitation temperatures. Results: We report the detection of CH3OH, CH3CN, CH3CHO, HC3N, and NH2CHO in Galactic center (GC) diffuse clouds and CH3OH and CH3CN in a diffuse cloud in the Scutum arm. The chemical composition of one of the diffuse GC clouds is found to be similar to the one of the diffuse/translucent medium of the z = 0.89 spiral galaxy. Conclusions: The chemical processes leading to chemical complexity in the diffuse molecular ISM appear to have remained similar since z = 0.89. As proposed in previous studies, the presence of COMs in diffuse molecular clouds may result from a cyclical interstellar process of cloud contraction and expansion between diffuse and dense states.

  11. Temperature and composition-dependent density of states in organic small-molecule/polymer blend transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Simon; Mottram, Alexander D.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2016-07-01

    The density of trap states (DOS) in organic p-type transistors based on the small-molecule 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl) anthradithiophene (diF-TES ADT), the polymer poly(triarylamine) and blends thereof are investigated. The DOS in these devices are measured as a function of semiconductor composition and operating temperature. We show that increasing operating temperature causes a broadening of the DOS below 250 K. Characteristic trap depths of ˜15 meV are measured at 100 K, increasing to between 20 and 50 meV at room-temperature, dependent on the semiconductor composition. Semiconductor films with high concentrations of diF-TES ADT exhibit both a greater density of trap states as well as broader DOS distributions when measured at room-temperature. These results shed light on the underlying charge transport mechanisms in organic blend semiconductors and the apparent freezing-out of hole conduction through the polymer and mixed polymer/small molecule phases at temperatures below 225 K.

  12. Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Monte Carlo Simulations of Complex Organic Molecule Chemistry in Cold Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qiang; Herbst, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The recent discovery of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in the gas phase of cold cores with temperatures as cold as 10 K challenges our previous astrochemical models concerning the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs). The strong correlation between the abundances and distributions of methyl formate and dimethyl ether further shows that current astrochemical models may be missing important chemical processes in cold astronomical sources. We investigate a scenario in which COMs and the methoxy radical can be formed on dust grains via a so-called chain reaction mechanism, in a similar manner to CO2. A unified gas-grain microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach with both normal and interstitial sites for icy grain mantles is used to perform the chemical simulations. Reactive desorption with varying degrees of efficiency is included to enhance the nonthermal desorption of species formed on cold dust grains. In addition, varying degrees of efficiency for the surface formation of methoxy are also included. The observed abundances of a variety of organic molecules in cold cores can be reproduced in our models. The strong correlation between the abundances of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in cold cores can also be explained. Nondiffusive chemical reactions on dust grain surfaces may play a key role in the formation of some COMs.

  13. Structure Prediction Based on Hydrophobic to Hydrophilic Volume Ratios in Small Molecule Amphiphilic Organic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structure type for the crystal of 4,4'-bis-(2-hydroxy-ethoxyl)-biphenyl 1 has been predicted by using the previously developed interfacial model for small organic molecules. Based on the calculated hydrophobic to hydrophilic volume of 1, this model predicts the crystal structure to be of lamellar or bicontinuous type, which has been confirmed by the X-ray single-crystal structure analysis (C20H26O6, monoclinic, P21/c, a = 16.084(1), b = 6.0103(4), c = 9.6410(7)(A), β = 103.014(2)°, V = 908.1(1)(A)3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.325 g/cm3, F(000)=388, μ = 0.097 mm-1, MoKα radiation, λ = 0.71073 (A), R = 0.0382 and wR = 0.0882 with I > 2σ(I) for 7121 reflections collected, 1852 unique reflections and 170 parameters). As predicted, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions of 1 form in the lamellae. The same interfacial model is applied to other amphilphilic small molecule organic systems for structural type prediction.

  14. Modulation of nanotube formation in apatite single crystal via organic molecule incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Takuya, E-mail: tmatsu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oromaxillofacial Regeneration, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Uddin, Mohammad Hafiz; An, Sang Hyun [Department of Oromaxillofacial Regeneration, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Arakawa, Kazuto; Taguchi, Eiji [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Nakahira, Atsushi [Department of Material Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Okazaki, Masayuki [Department of Biomaterials Science, Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Hydroxyapatite incorporating amino acid was fabricated. {yields} The synthesized crystals showed linearly aligned nano-pores in their structure after their EB irradiation or heating. {yields} Amino acid is considered as an effective porogen for the modulation of internal structure of apatite single crystal. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite materials are potentially useful for biomedical application, especially as vehicles for functional molecules. Structural control of bulk apatite materials, such as in the fabrication of hollow microspheres or porous structures, has been studied for this purpose. However, control of the internal structure of the source apatite crystal itself is still a challenge. Here, we show that small organic molecules incorporated in apatite crystals act as porogens which control the porous structure of apatite single crystal. The presence of amino acid under apatite synthesis conditions leads to firm bindings and encapsulation of the amino acid in apatite single crystals. Amino acid elimination by heating or electron beam irradiation enhances the pore formation in apatite single crystal. Moreover, incorporation of an acidic amino acid in apatite induces peapod like nanotubes in apatite single crystals. This study suggests the potential of using small organics for nano-structural control of apatite single crystals which would be valuable for enhancing drug loadings or modulating material digestion in vivo.

  15. Ambipolar Small-Molecule:Polymer Blend Semiconductors for Solution-Processable Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minji; Hwang, Hansu; Park, Won-Tae; Khim, Dongyoon; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Kim, Yunseul; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-01-25

    We report on the fabrication of an organic thin-film semiconductor formed using a blend solution of soluble ambipolar small molecules and an insulating polymer binder that exhibits vertical phase separation and uniform film formation. The semiconductor thin films are produced in a single step from a mixture containing a small molecular semiconductor, namely, quinoidal biselenophene (QBS), and a binder polymer, namely, poly(2-vinylnaphthalene) (PVN). Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on QBS/PVN blend semiconductor are then assembled using top-gate/bottom-contact device configuration, which achieve almost four times higher mobility than the neat QBS semiconductor. Depth profile via secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the QBS domains in the films made from the blend are evenly distributed with a smooth morphology at the bottom of the PVN layer. Bias stress test and variable-temperature measurements on QBS-based OFETs reveal that the QBS/PVN blend semiconductor remarkably reduces the number of trap sites at the gate dielectric/semiconductor interface and the activation energy in the transistor channel. This work provides a one-step solution processing technique, which makes use of soluble ambipolar small molecules to form a thin-film semiconductor for application in high-performance OFETs.

  16. High-spin organic molecules with dominant spin-orbit contribution and unprecedentedly large magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misochko, Eugenii Ya.; Akimov, Alexander V.; Masitov, Artem A.; Korchagin, Denis V.; Yakushchenko, Igor K.; Chapyshev, Sergei V.

    2012-08-01

    High-spin organic molecules with dominant spin-orbit contribution to magnetic anisotropy are reported. Quintet 4-azido-3,5-dibromopyridyl-2,6-dinitrene (Q-1), quintet 2-azido-3,5-dibromopyridyl-4,6-dinitrene (Q-2), and septet 3,5-dibromopyridyl-2,4,6-trinitrene (S-1) were generated in solid argon matrices by ultraviolet irradiation of 2,4,6-triazido-3,5-dibromopyridine. The zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters, derived from electron spin resonance spectra, show unprecedentedly large magnitudes of the parameters D: |DQ1| = 0.289, |DQ2| = 0.373, and |DS1| = 0.297 cm-1. The experimental ZFS parameters were successfully reproduced by density functional theory calculations, confirming that magnetic anisotropy of high-spin organic molecules can considerably be enhanced by the "heavy atom effect." In bromine-containing high-spin nitrenes, the spin-orbit term is dominant and governs both the magnitude and the sign of magnetic anisotropy. The largest negative value of D among septet trinitrenes is predicted for 1,3,5-trinitrenobenzene bearing three heavy atoms (Br) in positions 2, 4, and 6 of the benzene ring.

  17. Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED)

    2017-01-01

    Synapses play a critical role in establishing and maintaining neural circuits, permitting targeted information transfer throughout the brain. A large portfolio of synaptic adhesion/organizing molecules (SAMs) exists in the mammalian brain involved in synapse development and maintenance. SAMs bind protein partners, formingtrans-complexes spanning the synaptic cleft orcis-complexes attached to the same synaptic membrane. SAMs play key roles in cell adhesion and in organizing protein interaction networks; they can also provide mechanisms of recognition, generate scaffolds onto which partners can dock, and likely take part in signaling processes as well. SAMs are regulated through a portfolio of different mechanisms that affect their protein levels, precise localization, stability, and the availability of their partners at synapses. Interaction of SAMs with their partners can further be strengthened or weakened through alternative splicing, competing protein partners, ectodomain shedding, or astrocytically secreted factors. Given that numerous SAMs appear altered by synaptic activity, in vivo, these molecules may be used to dynamically scale up or scale down synaptic communication. Many SAMs, including neurexins, neuroligins, cadherins, and contactins, are now implicated in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and studying their molecular mechanisms holds promise for developing novel therapeutics.

  18. The Census of Complex Organic Molecules in the Solar-type Protostar IRAS16293-2422

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Caux, E.

    2014-08-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (gsim30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of gsim100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in lsim20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (lsim30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10-10. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  19. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Caux, E. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (≳30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of ≳100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in ≲20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (≲30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10{sup –10}. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  20. Structure and magnetism of a porous three-dimensional metal-organic framework based on planar tetranuclear copper(Ⅱ) cluster units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A porous three-dimensional copper(Ⅱ) metal-organic framework (MOF) {[Cu2(tci)(OH)(pip)0.5(H2O)]·6H2O}n (1) [tci = tris (2-carboxyethyl)isocyanurate, pip = piperazine] has been generated under hydrothermal conditions at 120 °C. Single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the polymer exhibits a novel three-dimensional framework based on planar tetranuclear copper(Ⅱ) cluster units. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibility data in the range 2-280 K show antiferromagnetic spin-spin coupling in the tetranuclear unit in complex 1. A theoretical fitting of the magnetic data gives J values of -31.3 cm-1, -30.8 cm-1, and 13.5 cm-1.

  1. Thermodynamically self-organized hole transport layers for high-efficiency inverted-planar perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Soyeon; Chai, Sung Uk; Jung, Myung Sun; Nam, Jae Keun; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2017-08-31

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is a popular and promising hole transport material for making efficient inverted-planar perovskite solar cells (IP-PSCs). However, the mismatch between the work function of conventional PEDOT:PSS and the valence band maximum of perovskite materials is still a challenge for efficient hole extraction. Here, we report systematic studies on the work-function modification and thermodynamic morphological evolution of PEDOT:PSS films by tuning the PSS/PEDOT ratio, along with its effects on the photovoltaic responses of IP-PSCs. We found that the open-circuit voltage (VOC) of an IP-PSC could be enhanced by controlling the work function of PEDOT:PSS. Furthermore, the optical transmittance of the PEDOT:PSS film could be maximized by controlling the morphological evolution, which will further increase the short-circuit current density (JSC) of the IP-PSC. The VOC and JSC of the IP-PSC with the optimized PEDOT:PSS composition increased from 0.88 to 0.93 V and from 17.11 to 20.77 mA cm(-2), respectively, compared with an IP-PSC containing commercial PEDOT:PSS, which results in a power conversion energy that is greatly improved from 12.39 to 15.24%.

  2. Theory on the molecular characteristic contour (II)--Molecular intrinsic characteristic contours of several typical organic molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG; Lidong; ZHAO; Dongxia; YANG; Zhongzhi

    2005-01-01

    The molecular intrinsic characteristic contour (MICC) is defined based on the classical turning point of electron movement in a molecule. Three typical organic molecules, I.e. Methane, methanol and formic acid, were employed as examples for detailed introduction of our method. Investigations on the cross-sections of MICC provide important information about atomic size changing in the process of forming molecules. The electron density distributions on the MICCs of these molecules were calculated and shown for the first time. Results showed that the electron density distribution on the MICC correlates closely with molecular chemical properties, and it provides a new insight into molecular boundary.

  3. Dicyanovinyl-substituted oligothiophenes: Structure-property relationships and application in vacuum-processed small molecule organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzner, Roland; Reinold, Egon; Mishra, Amaresh; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Baeuerle, Peter [Institute of Organic Chemistry II and Advanced Materials, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Ziehlke, Hannah; Koerner, Christian; Leo, Karl; Riede, Moritz [Institute of Applied Photophysics, TU Dresden, Mommsenstrasse 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Weil, Matthias [Institut fuer Chemische Technologien und Analytik, Abteilung Strukturchemie, Technische Universitaet Wien, Getreidemarkt 9/164-SC, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Tsaryova, Olga; Weiss, Andre; Uhrich, Christian; Pfeiffer, Martin [Heliatek GmbH, Treidlerstr. 3, 01139 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-08

    Efficient synthesis of a series of terminally dicyanovinyl (DCV)-substituted oligothiophenes, DCVnT 1-6, without solubilizing side chains synthesized via a novel convergent approach and their application as electron donors in vacuum-processed m-i-p-type planar and p-i-n-type bulk heterojunction organic solar cells is described. Purification of the products via gradient sublimation yields thermally highly stable organic semiconducting materials in single crystalline quality which allows for X-ray structure analysis. Important insights into the packing features and intermolecular interactions of these promising solar cell materials are provided. Optical absorption spectra and electrochemical properties of the oligomers are investigated and valuable structure-property relationships deduced. Photovoltaic devices incorporating DCVnTs 4-6 showed power conversion efficiencies up to 2.8% for planar and 5.2% for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells under full sun illumination (mismatch corrected simulated AM 1.5G sunlight). The 5.2% efficiency shown here represents one of the highest values ever reported for organic vacuum-deposited single heterojunction solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Influence of organic molecules on the aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles in acidic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Karin; Gallego-Urrea, Julián A.; Hassellov, Martin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Jonsson, Caroline M.

    2017-04-01

    Engineered nanoparticles released into the environment may interact with natural organic matter (NOM). Surface complexation affects the surface potential, which in turn may lead to aggregation of the particles. Aggregation of synthetic TiO2 (anatase) nanoparticles in aqueous suspension was investigated at pH 2.8 as a function of time in the presence of various organic molecules and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA), using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that the average hydrodynamic diameter and ζ-potential were dependent on both concentration and molecular structure of the organic molecule. Results were also compared with those of quantitative batch adsorption experiments. Further, a time study of the aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and SRFA, respectively, was performed in order to observe changes in ζ-potential and particle size over a time period of 9 months. In the 2,3-DHBA-TiO2 system, ζ-potentials decreased with time resulting in charge neutralization and/or inversion depending on ligand concentration. Aggregate sizes increased initially to the micrometer size range, followed by disaggregation after several months. No or very little interaction between SRFA and TiO2 occurred at the lowest concentrations tested. However, at the higher concentrations of SRFA, there was an increase in both aggregate size and the amount of SRFA adsorbed to the TiO2 surface. This was in correlation with the ζ-potential that decreased with increased SRFA concentration, leading to destabilization of the system. These results stress the importance of performing studies over both short and long time periods to better understand and predict the long-term effects of nanoparticles in the environment.

  5. Structural Design Principle of Small-Molecule Organic Semiconductors for Metal-Free, Visible-Light-Promoted Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Li, Run; Gehrig, Dominik; Blom, Paul W M; Landfester, Katharina; Zhang, Kai A I

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on the structural design principle of small-molecule organic semiconductors as metal-free, pure organic and visible light-active photocatalysts. Two series of electron-donor and acceptor-type organic semiconductor molecules were synthesized to meet crucial requirements, such as 1) absorption range in the visible region, 2) sufficient photoredox potential, and 3) long lifetime of photogenerated excitons. The photocatalytic activity was demonstrated in the intermolecular C-H functionalization of electron-rich heteroaromates with malonate derivatives. A mechanistic study of the light-induced electron transport between the organic photocatalyst, substrate, and the sacrificial agent are described. With their tunable absorption range and defined energy-band structure, the small-molecule organic semiconductors could offer a new class of metal-free and visible light-active photocatalysts for chemical reactions.

  6. Metal-organic and supramolecular architectures based on mechanically interlocked molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Isurika Rosini

    The focus of this work is on mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), which have unusual physicochemical and mechanical properties with potential applications in nano-scale/molecular devices and high strength materials. Rotaxanes, for example, consist of an axle-like molecule threaded through a wheel-like molecule, with bulky groups at the two ends of the axle preventing the wheel from dissociating. The position of the wheel along the axle can be switched in a controllable and reversible manner by applying external stimuli, a feature that might lead to the next generation of computers. Molecularly woven materials (MWMs), another example of molecules with mechanically interlocked features, are predicted to be unprecedentedly strong while being lightweight and flexible. With the ultimate goal of achieving control over the functioning of molecular devices in the solid state, a variety of pseudorotaxane building blocks were prepared and characterized, including a novel, rare blue-colored motif. The temperature-dependent assembly/disassembly of pseudorotaxanes was exploited for the construction of single-wavelength colorimetric temperature sensors over a 100 °C window. Pseudorotaxanes based on aromatic crown ether wheels and disubstituted 4,4'-bipyridinium axles were converted into rotaxanes upon binding to metal complexes (zinc, cadmium, mercury, copper, cobalt), and the formation of ordered crystalline arrays was studied in the solid state. The columnar organization of pseudorotaxanes by Hg2X6 2-- complexes (X = Cl, Br, I), leading to unprecedented dichroic (blue/red) rotaxane crystals, was demonstrated for the first time. From the crystal structures studied it became apparent that negatively charged metal complexes are needed for successful assembly with the positively charged pseudorotaxane units. To be able to use the more common, positively charged metal ions for rotaxane framework construction, neutral and negatively charged pseudorotaxanes were synthesized

  7. Perturbations of planar algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Paramita; Gupta, Ved Prakash

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of {\\em weight} of a planar algebra $P$ and construct a new planar algebra referred as the {\\em perturbation of $P$} by the weight. We establish a one-to-one correspondence between pivotal structures on 2-categories and perturbations of planar algebras by weights. To each bifinite bimodule over $II_1$-factors, we associate a {\\em bimodule planar algebra} bimodule corresponds naturally with sphericality of the bimodule planar algebra. As a consequence of this, we reproduce an extension of Jones' theorem (of associating 'subfactor planar algebras' to extremal subfactors). Conversely, given a bimodule planar algebra, we construct a bifinite bimodule whose associated bimodule planar algebra is the one which we start with using perturbations and Jones-Walker-Shlyakhtenko-Kodiyalam-Sunder method of reconstructing an extremal subfactor from a subfactor planar algebra. We show that the perturbation class of a bimodule planar algebra contains a unique spherical unimodular bimodule planar algeb...

  8. Vacuum-deposited small-molecule organic solar cells with high power conversion efficiencies by judicious molecular design and device optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hong; Lin, Li-Yen; Lu, Chih-Wei; Lin, Francis; Huang, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Hao-Wu; Wang, Po-Han; Liu, Yi-Hung; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J; Darling, Seth B

    2012-08-22

    Three new tailor-made molecules (DPDCTB, DPDCPB, and DTDCPB) were strategically designed and convergently synthesized as donor materials for small-molecule organic solar cells. These compounds possess a donor-acceptor-acceptor molecular architecture, in which various electron-donating moieties are connected to an electron-withdrawing dicyanovinylene moiety through another electron-accepting 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole block. The molecular structures and crystal packings of DTDCPB and the previously reported DTDCTB were characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Photophysical and electrochemical properties as well as energy levels of this series of donor molecules were thoroughly investigated, affording clear structure-property relationships. By delicate manipulation of the trade-off between the photovoltage and the photocurrent via molecular structure engineering together with device optimizations, which included fine-tuning the layer thicknesses and the donor:acceptor blended ratio in the bulk heterojunction layer, vacuum-deposited hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction devices utilizing DTDCPB as the donor and C(70) as the acceptor showed the best performance with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.6 ± 0.2% (the highest PCE of 6.8%), along with an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 0.93 ± 0.02 V, a short-circuit current density (J(sc)) of 13.48 ± 0.27 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) of 0.53 ± 0.02, under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) AM 1.5G simulated solar illumination.

  9. Two frizzled planar cell polarity signals in the Drosophila wing are differentially organized by the Fat/Dachsous pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hogan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The regular array of distally pointing hairs on the mature Drosophila wing is evidence for the fine control of Planar Cell Polarity (PCP during wing development. Normal wing PCP requires both the Frizzled (Fz PCP pathway and the Fat/Dachsous (Ft/Ds pathway, although the functional relationship between these pathways remains under debate. There is strong evidence that the Fz PCP pathway signals twice during wing development, and we have previously presented a Bidirectional-Biphasic Fz PCP signaling model which proposes that the Early and Late Fz PCP signals are in different directions and employ different isoforms of the Prickle protein. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of the Ft/Ds pathway in the context of our Fz PCP signaling model. Our results allow us to draw the following conclusions: (1 The Early Fz PCP signals are in opposing directions in the anterior and posterior wing and converge precisely at the site of the L3 wing vein. (2 Increased or decreased expression of Ft/Ds pathway genes can alter the direction of the Early Fz PCP signal without affecting the Late Fz PCP signal. (3 Lowfat, a Ft/Ds pathway regulator, is required for the normal orientation of the Early Fz PCP signal but not the Late Fz PCP signal. (4 At the time of the Early Fz PCP signal there are symmetric gradients of dachsous (ds expression centered on the L3 wing vein, suggesting Ds activity gradients may orient the Fz signal. (5 Localized knockdown or over-expression of Ft/Ds pathway genes shows that boundaries/gradients of Ft/Ds pathway gene expression can redirect the Early Fz PCP signal specifically. (6 Altering the timing of ds knockdown during wing development can separate the role of the Ft/Ds pathway in wing morphogenesis from its role in Early Fz PCP signaling.

  10. High-Performance CH3NH3PbI3-Inverted Planar Perovskite Solar Cells with Fill Factor Over 83% via Excess Organic/Inorganic Halide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandar, Muhammad; Khan, Nasir; Lee, Hang Ken; Lee, Sang Kyu; Shin, Won Suk; Lee, Jong-Cheol; Song, Chang Eun; Moon, Sang-Jin

    2017-10-04

    The reduction of charge carrier recombination and intrinsic defect density in organic-inorganic halide perovskite absorber materials is a prerequisite to achieving high-performance perovskite solar cells with good efficiency and stability. Here, we fabricated inverted planar perovskite solar cells by incorporation of a small amount of excess organic/inorganic halide (methylammonium iodide (CH3NH3I; MAI), formamidinium iodide (CH(NH2)2I; FAI), and cesium iodide (CsI)) in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite film. Larger crystalline grains and enhanced crystallinity in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films with excess organic/inorganic halide reduce the charge carrier recombination and defect density, leading to enhanced device efficiency (MAI+: 14.49 ± 0.30%, FAI+: 16.22 ± 0.38% and CsI+: 17.52 ± 0.56%) compared to the efficiency of a control MAPbI3 device (MAI: 12.63 ± 0.64%) and device stability. Especially, the incorporation of a small amount of excess CsI in MAPbI3 perovskite film leads to a highly reproducible fill factor of over 83%, increased open-circuit voltage (from 0.946 to 1.042 V), and short-circuit current density (from 18.43 to 20.89 mA/cm(2)).

  11. Organic molecules in the polar ice: from chemical analysis to environmental proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbante, Carlo; Zennaro, Piero; Giorio, Chiara; Kehrwald, Natalie; Benton, Alisa K.; Wolff, Eric W.; Kalberer, Markus; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Barbaro, Elena; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The molecular and isotopic compositions of organic matter buried in ice contains information that helps reconstruct past environmental conditions, evaluate histories of climate change, and assess impacts of humans on ecosystems. In recent years novel analytical techniques were developed to quantify molecular compounds in ice cores. As an example, biomass burning markers, including monosaccharide anhydrides, lightweight carboxylic acids, lignin and resin pyrolysis products, black carbon, and charcoal records help in reconstructing past fire activity across seasonal to millennial time scales. Terrestrial biomarkers, such as plant waxes (e.g. long-chain n-alkanes) are also a promising paleo vegetation proxy in ice core studies. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous pollutants recently detected in ice cores. These hydrocarbons primarily originate from incomplete combustion of organic matter and fossil fuels (e.g. diesel engines, domestic heating, industrial combustion) and therefore can be tracers of past combustion activities. In order to be suitable for paloeclimate purposes, organic molecular markers detected in ice cores should include the following important features. Markers have to be stable under oxidizing atmospheric conditions, and ideally should not react with hydroxyl radicals, during their transport to polar regions. Organic markers must be released in large amounts in order to be detected at remote distances from the sources. Proxies must be specific, in order to differentiate them from other markers with multiple sources. The extraction of glaciochemical information from ice cores is challenging due to the low concentrations of some impurities, thereby demanding rigorous control of external contamination sources and sensitive analytical techniques. Here, we review the analysis and use of organic molecules in ice as proxies of important environmental and climatic processes.

  12. Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Thiophene-Sulfur-Doped Planar ZnO Nanorods as Electron-Transporting Layers for Enhanced Performance of Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Swapnil B; Ambade, Rohan B; Bagde, Sushil S; Eom, Seung Hun; Mane, Rajaram S; Shin, Won Suk; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2017-02-01

    1-D ZnO represents a fascinating class of nanostructures that are significant to optoelectronics. In this work, we investigated the use of an eco-friendly, metal free in situ doping through a pure thiophene-sulfur (S) on low temperature processed (inverted organic solar cells (iOSCs). The TEM, HRTEM, XPS, FT-IR, EDS and Raman studies clearly reveal that the thiophene-S (Thi-S) atom is incorporated on planar ZnRs. The investigations in electrical properties suggest the enhancement in conductivity after Thi-S doping on 1-D ZnRs. The iOSCs of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT: PC60BM) photoactive layer containing thiophene-S doped planar ZnRs (Thi-S-PZnRs) as ETL exhibits power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.68% under simulated AM 1.5 G, 100 mW cm(-2) illumination. The ∼47% enhancement in PCE compared with pristine planar ZnRs (PCE = 2.38%) ETL is attributed to a combination of desirable energy level alignment, morphological modification, increased conductivity and doping effect. The universality of Thi-S-PZnRs ETL is demonstrated by the highest PCE of 8.15% in contrast to 6.50% exhibited by the iOSCs of ZnRs ETL for the photoactive layer comprising of poly[4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophene-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b]dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-(4-(2-ethylhexyl)-3-fluorothieno[3,4-b]thiophene-)-2-carboxylate-2-6-diyl)]: phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PTB7-Th: PCB71M). This enhancement in PCE is observed to be driven mainly through improved photovoltaic parameters like fill factor (ff) as well as photocurrent density (Jsc), which are assigned to increased conductivity, exciton dissociation, and effective charge extraction, while; better ohmic contact, reduced charge recombination, and low leakage current density resulted in increased Voc.

  13. Elucidating turnover pathways of bioactive small molecules by isotopomer analysis: the persistent organic pollutant DDT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Ehlers

    Full Text Available The persistent organic pollutant DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenylethane is still indispensable in the fight against malaria, although DDT and related compounds pose toxicological hazards. Technical DDT contains the dichloro congener DDD (1-chloro-4-[2,2-dichloro-1-(4-chlorophenylethyl]benzene as by-product, but DDD is also formed by reductive degradation of DDT in the environment. To differentiate between DDD formation pathways, we applied deuterium NMR spectroscopy to measure intramolecular deuterium distributions (2H isotopomer abundances of DDT and DDD. DDD formed in the technical DDT synthesis was strongly deuterium-enriched at one intramolecular position, which we traced back to 2H/1H fractionation of a chlorination step in the technical synthesis. In contrast, DDD formed by reductive degradation was strongly depleted at the same position, which was due to the incorporation of 2H-depleted hydride equivalents during reductive degradation. Thus, intramolecular isotope distributions give mechanistic information on reaction pathways, and explain a puzzling difference in the whole-molecule 2H/1H ratio between DDT and DDD. In general, our results highlight that intramolecular isotope distributions are essential to interpret whole-molecule isotope ratios. Intramolecular isotope information allows distinguishing pathways of DDD formation, which is important to identify polluters or to assess DDT turnover in the environment. Because intramolecular isotope data directly reflect isotope fractionation of individual chemical reactions, they are broadly applicable to elucidate transformation pathways of small bioactive molecules in chemistry, physiology and environmental science.

  14. Hierarchical Self-Organization of ABn Dendron-type Giant Molecules into Supramolecular Lattice Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xueyan; Zhang, Ruimeng; Li, Yiwen; Hong, You-lee; Guo, Dong; Lang, Kening; Wu, Kuan-Yi; Huang, Mingjun; Mao, Jialin; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Li, Tao; Chang, Stephen Z. D.

    2017-08-23

    To understand the hierarchical self-organization behaviors of soft materials as well as their dependence on molecular geometry, a series of ABn dendron-type giant molecules based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles were designed and synthesized. The apex of these molecules is a hydrophilic POSS cage with fourteen hydroxyl groups (denoted DPOSS). At its periphery, there are different numbers (n = 1–8) of hydrophobic POSS cages with seven isobutyl groups (denoted BPOSS), connected to the apical DPOSS via flexible dendron type linker(s). With varying the BPOSS number from one to seven, a supramolecular lattice formation sequence ranging from lamella (DPOSS-BPOSS), double gyroid (space group of Ia3 ̅d, DPOSS-BPOSS2), hexagonal cylinder (space group of P6mm, DPOSS-BPOSS3), Frank-Kasper A15 (space group of Pm3 ̅n, DPOSS-BPOSS4, DPOSS-BPOSS5, and DPOSS-BPOSS6), to Frank-Kasper sigma (space group of P42/mnm, DPOSS-BPOSS7) phases can be observed. The nanostructure formations in this series of ABn dendron-type giant molecules are mainly directed by the macromolecular geometric shapes. Furthermore, within each spherical motif, the soft spherical core is consisted of hydrophilic DPOSS cages with flexible linkages, while the hydrophobic BPOSS cages form the relative rigid shell and contact with neighbors to provide decreased interfaces among the spherical motifs for constructing final polyhedral motifs in these Frank-Kasper lattices. This study provides the design principle of macromolecules with specific geometric shapes and functional groups to achieve anticipated structures and macroscopic properties.

  15. Elucidating turnover pathways of bioactive small molecules by isotopomer analysis: the persistent organic pollutant DDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Ina; Betson, Tatiana R; Vetter, Walter; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The persistent organic pollutant DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane) is still indispensable in the fight against malaria, although DDT and related compounds pose toxicological hazards. Technical DDT contains the dichloro congener DDD (1-chloro-4-[2,2-dichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene) as by-product, but DDD is also formed by reductive degradation of DDT in the environment. To differentiate between DDD formation pathways, we applied deuterium NMR spectroscopy to measure intramolecular deuterium distributions (2H isotopomer abundances) of DDT and DDD. DDD formed in the technical DDT synthesis was strongly deuterium-enriched at one intramolecular position, which we traced back to 2H/1H fractionation of a chlorination step in the technical synthesis. In contrast, DDD formed by reductive degradation was strongly depleted at the same position, which was due to the incorporation of 2H-depleted hydride equivalents during reductive degradation. Thus, intramolecular isotope distributions give mechanistic information on reaction pathways, and explain a puzzling difference in the whole-molecule 2H/1H ratio between DDT and DDD. In general, our results highlight that intramolecular isotope distributions are essential to interpret whole-molecule isotope ratios. Intramolecular isotope information allows distinguishing pathways of DDD formation, which is important to identify polluters or to assess DDT turnover in the environment. Because intramolecular isotope data directly reflect isotope fractionation of individual chemical reactions, they are broadly applicable to elucidate transformation pathways of small bioactive molecules in chemistry, physiology and environmental science.

  16. Organic molecules as sorbing tracers for the assessment of surface areas in consolidated aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Mario; Warner, Wiebke; Kutzner, Susann; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard; Licha, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    Based on the assumption that the specific surface area to volume ratio Asurf/V of consolidated rock materials is proportional to the surface area available for sorption, several inorganic cations were recently proposed as sorbing (cation exchanging) tracers for estimating these ratios in aquifers (e.g., for deriving the efficient heat exchange area of geothermal reservoirs). The main disadvantages of inorganic ions, however, are the limited number of suitable ions, their potential geogenic background, and their challenging online detection at trace concentrations. In this work, the spectrum of chemical substances used as sorbing tracers expands by considering fluorescent organic compounds that are cationic. They have the advantage of being highly water soluble and easy to measure online at very low concentrations. Results from systematic lab column experiments with seven selected organic cations under various conditions (different salinities and temperatures) are presented, emphasizing the potential of organic molecules as alternative sorbing tracers especially in consolidated aquifer systems. This work is a first stepping stone in identifying suitable molecular structures that can be selected or even individually adapted to the requirements of the tracer tests and prevailing aquifer conditions.

  17. Theoretical study of anisotropic mobility in ladder-type molecule organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui-Ling; Liu, Yu-Fang

    2014-09-01

    The properties of two ladder-type semiconductors {M1: 2,2'-(2,7-dihexy1-4,9-dihydro- s-indaceno[1,2- b:5,6- b']dithiophene-4,9-diylidene) dimalononitrile and M2: 2,7-dihexy1-4,9-dihydro- s-indaceno[1,2- b:5,6- b']dithiophene-4,9-dione} as the n-type and ambipolar organic materials are systematically investigated using the first-principle density functional theory combined with the Marcus-Hush electron transfer theory. It is found that the substitution of M1 induces large changes in its electron-transfer mobility of 1.370 cm2 V-1 s-1. M2 has both large electron- and hole-transfer mobility of 0.420 and 0.288 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively, which indicates that M2 is potentially a high efficient ambipolar organic semiconducting material. Both the M1 and M2 crystals show remarkable anisotropic behavior. A proper design of the n-type and ambipolar organic electronic materials, which may have high mobility performance, is suggested based on the investigated two molecules.

  18. Modifying the thermal conductivity of small molecule organic semiconductor thin films with metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Parrish, Kevin D; Malen, Jonathan A; Chan, Paddy K L

    2015-11-04

    Thermal properties of organic semiconductors play a significant role in the performance and lifetime of organic electronic devices, especially for scaled-up large area applications. Here we employ silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to modify the thermal conductivity of the small molecule organic semiconductor, dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DNTT). The differential 3-ω method was used to measure the thermal conductivity of Ag-DNTT hybrid thin films. We find that the thermal conductivity of pure DNTT thin films do not vary with the deposition temperature over a range spanning 24 °C to 80 °C. The thermal conductivity of the Ag-DNTT hybrid thin film initially decreases and then increases when the Ag volume fraction increases from 0% to 32%. By applying the effective medium approximation to fit the experimental results of thermal conductivity, the extracted thermal boundary resistance of the Ag-DNTT interface is 1.14 ± 0.98 × 10(-7) m(2)-K/W. Finite element simulations of thermal conductivity for realistic film morphologies show good agreement with experimental results and effective medium approximations.

  19. Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) mass spectrometer for ExoMars 2018 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Pinnick, V. T.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R. D.; Atanassova, M. S.; Li, Xiang; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.; Goesmann, F.; Steininger, H.

    The 2018 joint ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars rover mission will seek the signs of past or present life in the near-surface environment of Mars. The rover will obtain samples from as deep as two meters beneath the surface and deliver them to an onboard analytical laboratory for detailed examination. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation forms a core part of the sample analysis capability of ExoMars. Its top objective is to address the main “ life signs” goal of the mission through detailed chemical analysis of the acquired samples. MOMA characterizes organic compounds in the samples with a novel dual ion source ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The ITMS supports both pyrolysis-gas chromatography (pyr-GC) and Mars ambient laser desorption/ionization (LDI) analyses in an extremely compact package. Combined with the unprecedented depth sampling capability of ExoMars, MOMA affords a broad and powerful search for organics over a range of preservational environments, volatility, and molecular weight.

  20. Coupling between diffusion and orientation of pentacene molecules on an organic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Paul; Lechner, Barbara A. J.; Morherr, Antonia; Chisnall, David M.; Ward, David J.; Jardine, Andrew P.; Ellis, John; Allison, William; Eckhardt, Bruno; Witte, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The realization of efficient organic electronic devices requires the controlled preparation of molecular thin films and heterostructures. As top-down structuring methods such as lithography cannot be applied to van der Waals bound materials, surface diffusion becomes a structure-determining factor that requires microscopic understanding. Scanning probe techniques provide atomic resolution, but are limited to observations of slow movements, and therefore constrained to low temperatures. In contrast, the helium-3 spin-echo (HeSE) technique achieves spatial and time resolution on the nm and ps scale, respectively, thus enabling measurements at elevated temperatures. Here we use HeSE to unveil the intricate motion of pentacene admolecules diffusing on a chemisorbed monolayer of pentacene on Cu(110) that serves as a stable, well-ordered organic model surface. We find that pentacene moves along rails parallel and perpendicular to the surface molecules. The experimental data are explained by admolecule rotation that enables a switching between diffusion directions, which extends our molecular level understanding of diffusion in complex organic systems.

  1. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, J A; Alexander, M; Zika, R G

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A(330). Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  2. Quantitative structure-property relationship for predicting chlorine demand by organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luilo, Gebhard B; Cabaniss, Stephen E

    2010-04-01

    Conventional methods for predicting chlorine demand (HOCl(dem)) due to dissolved organic matter (DOM) are based on bulk water quality parameters and ignore structural features of individual molecules that may better indicate reactivity toward the disinfectant. The Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) modeling approach can account for structural properties of individual molecules. Here we report a QSPR for HOCl(dem) based on eight constitutional descriptors. Model compounds with HOCl(dem) ranging from 0.1 to 13.4 mol chlorine per mole compound were divided into a calibration and cross-validation data set (N = 159) and an external validation set (N = 42). The QSPR was calibrated using multiple linear regression in a 5-way leave-many-out approach and has average R(2) = 0.86 and standard error of regression (StdE(reg)) = 1.24 mol HOCl per mole compound and p data set exceeded the critical value, suggesting that these compounds may be overextrapolated. However, root-mean-square error of prediction in the external validation was 1.17 mol HOCl per mole compound, and all compounds were predicted with +/-2.5 standardized residuals (Sresid). Application of the QSPR to model structures of NOM predicts HOCl(dem) comparable to reported measurements from natural water treatment.

  3. Solution-Processed Organic Solar Cells from Dye Molecules: An Investigation of Diketopyrrolopyrrole:Vinazene Heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Walker, Bright

    2012-01-25

    Although one of the most attractive aspects of organic solar cells is their low cost and ease of fabrication, the active materials incorporated into the vast majority of reported bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells include a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative, classes of materials which are both typically difficult and expensive to prepare. In this study, we demonstrate that effective BHJs can be fabricated from two easily synthesized dye molecules. Solar cells incorporating a diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based molecule as a donor and a dicyanoimidazole (Vinazene) acceptor function as an active layer in BHJ solar cells, producing relatively high open circuit voltages and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 1.1%. Atomic force microscope images of the films show that active layers are rough and apparently have large donor and acceptor domains on the surface, whereas photoluminescence of the blends is incompletely quenched, suggesting that higher PCEs might be obtained if the morphology could be improved to yield smaller domain sizes and a larger interfacial area between donor and acceptor phases. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Cooperative Chemisorption-Induced Physisorption of CO2 Molecules by Metal-Organic Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min; Petek, Hrvoje; Shi, Yongliang; Sun, Hao; Zhao, Jin; Calaza, Florencia; Sterrer, Martin; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-12-22

    Effective CO2 capture and reduction can be achieved through a molecular scale understanding of interaction of CO2 molecules with chemically active sites and the cooperative effects they induce in functional materials. Self-assembled arrays of parallel chains composed of Au adatoms connected by 1,4-phenylene diisocyanide (PDI) linkers decorating Au surfaces exhibit self-catalyzed CO2 capture leading to large scale surface restructuring at 77 K (ACS Nano 2014, 8, 8644-8652). We explore the cooperative interactions among CO2 molecules, Au-PDI chains and Au substrates that are responsible for the self-catalyzed capture by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT). Decorating Au surfaces with Au-PDI chains gives the interfacial metal-organic polymer characteristics of both a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst. Au-PDI chains activate the normally inert Au surfaces by promoting CO2 chemisorption at the Au adatom sites even at surface supported Au-PDI chains provide a platform for investigating the physical and chemical interactions involved in CO2 capture and reduction.

  5. Understanding Small-Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Coupling Experiment with Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jason S. [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Vlaisavljevich, Bess [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Britt, David K. [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Brown, Craig M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg MD 20899 USA; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark DE 19716 USA; Haranczyk, Maciej [Computational Research Division Lawrence, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Neaton, Jeffrey B. [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Smit, Berend [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Department Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 CH Lausanne Switzerland; Long, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Division of Materials Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Queen, Wendy L. [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Department Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 CH Lausanne Switzerland

    2015-05-28

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained much attention as next-generation porous media for various applications, especially gas separation/storage, and catalysis. New MOFs are regularly reported; however, to develop better materials in a timely manner for specific applications, the interactions between guest molecules and the internal surface of the framework must first be understood. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is presented, which proves essential for the elucidation of small-molecule interactions in a model MOF system known as M2(dobdc) (dobdc4- = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate; M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, or Zn), a material whose adsorption properties can be readily tuned via chemical substitution. It is additionally shown that the study of extensive families like this one can provide a platform to test the efficacy and accuracy of developing computational methodologies in slightly varying chemical environments, a task that is necessary for their evolution into viable, robust tools for screening large numbers of materials.

  6. Novel Flourescent Sensors for the Detection of Organic Molecules in Extraterrestrial Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkin, Roy C.; Bruce, James I.; Pearson, Victoria K.

    2015-04-01

    Organic compounds in extraterrestrial samples have mostly been elucidated by destructive analytical techniques therefore information regarding spatial relationships between minerals and organic species is lost. Minerals form under specific chemical and physical conditions so organic compounds associated with these minerals are likely to have formed under the same conditions. It is therefore possible to infer in which cosmological provinces their chemical evolution took place. We will describe progress towards developing fluorescent sensors that may resolve spatial discrimination. Lanthanide elements such as europium and terbium produce well defined line-like, high intensity and long lived fluorescent emissions. Interactions with organic molecules may alter the luminescent emission characteristics. The lanthanide atom needs to be rendered chemically inert but must remain susceptible to these organic molecule interactions. An organic ligand must be employed to attain this. DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecanetetracetic acid) was chosen as a plausible organic ligand because its structure, a tetra-substituted cyclen ring, and ability to chelate are well characterized. It is also commercially available. Fluorescent lanthanide-DOTA complexes are used in many biological and analytical imaging applications so it is logical to investigate their applicability to fluorimetric analysis of extraterrestrial organics. Lanthanide-DOTA complexes are very stable because the lanthanide metal atom is enveloped within the DOTA structure. Experimental procedures were designed to investigate lanthanide/analyte interactions and their effect upon fluorescent emissions. A range of compounds were chosen giving a good representation of the organics identified in extraterrestrial samples and whether they may to interact with the lanthanide metal ion. An Europium-DOTA baseline fluorescent spectrum was obtained and compared against Europium-DOTA/analyte mixtures of a range of concentrations

  7. Crystallites of α-Sexithiophene in Bilayer Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells Double Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Radziwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent efforts in research and development of small molecule based organic solar cells have led to power conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%. Understanding the incorporated interfaces in these devices is an utterly important parameter for their improvement. Here we investigate the influence of α-sexithiophene (α-6T nanostructures on the performance parameters of α-6T/C60 inverted bilayer solar cells. By in situ controlled growth, crystalline α-6T nanostructures are formed in the devices and a correlation between the morphology of the structures and the device performance is presented. Under certain, well-defined circumstances, we observe an efficiency increase of around 100% when implementing crystalline nanostructures.

  8. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  10. Stable metal-organic frameworks containing single-molecule traps for enzyme encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Tian-Fu; Su, Jie; Bosch, Mathieu; Wei, Zhangwen; Wan, Wei; Yuan, Daqiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Kecheng; Lian, Xizhen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Park, Jihye; Zou, Xiaodong; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic catalytic processes possess great potential in chemical manufacturing, including pharmaceuticals, fuel production and food processing. However, the engineering of enzymes is severely hampered due to their low operational stability and difficulty of reuse. Here, we develop a series of stable metal-organic frameworks with rationally designed ultra-large mesoporous cages as single-molecule traps (SMTs) for enzyme encapsulation. With a high concentration of mesoporous cages as SMTs, PCN-333(Al) encapsulates three enzymes with record-high loadings and recyclability. Immobilized enzymes that most likely undergo single-enzyme encapsulation (SEE) show smaller Km than free enzymes while maintaining comparable catalytic efficiency. Under harsh conditions, the enzyme in SEE exhibits better performance than free enzyme, showing the effectiveness of SEE in preventing enzyme aggregation or denaturation. With extraordinarily large pore size and excellent chemical stability, PCN-333 may be of interest not only for enzyme encapsulation, but also for entrapment of other nanoscaled functional moieties.

  11. Formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Cesaroni, R.; Fontani, F.; Codella, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The detection of complex organic molecules related with prebiotic chemistry in star-forming regions allows us to investigate how the basic building blocks of life are formed. Aims: Ethylene glycol (CH2OH)2 is the simplest sugar alcohol and the reduced alcohol of the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (CH2OHCHO). We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of (CH2OH)2, CH2OHCHO and other chemically related complex organic species (CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH) towards the chemically rich massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. Methods: We analyzed multiple single-dish (Green Bank Telescope and IRAM 30 m) and interferometric (Submillimeter Array) spectra towards G31.41+0.31, covering a range of frequencies from 45 to 258 GHz. We fitted the observed spectra with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectra, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities. We compared our findings in G31.41+0.31 with the results found in other environments, including low- and high-mass star-forming regions, quiescent clouds and comets. Results: We report for the first time the presence of the aGg' conformer of (CH2OH)2 towards G31.41+0.31, detecting more than 30 unblended lines. We also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as CH2OHCHO, CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH. The high angular resolution images show that the (CH2OH)2 emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the 1.3 mm continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like (CH2OH)2 or CH2OHCHO, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that (CH2OH)2 is more abundant than CH2OHCHO in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar regions. Comparing different star-forming regions we find evidence of an increase of the (CH2OH)2/CH2OHCHO abundance ratio with the luminosity of the source. The CH3OCH3/CH3OCHO and (CH2OH)2/C2H5OH ratios are nearly constant with

  12. Strategies For Immobilization Of Bioactive Organic Molecules On Titanium Implant Surfaces – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotov Ivan V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous approaches have been used to improve the tissue-implant interface of titanium (Ti and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V. They all aim at increasing cell migration and attachment to the metal, preventing unspecific protein adsorption and improving post-implantation healing process. Promising methods for titanium and titanium alloy surface modification are based on the immobilization of biologically active organic molecules. New and interesting biochemical approaches to such surface modification include layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte films, phage display-selected surface binding peptides and self-assembled DNA monolayer systems. The present review summarizes the scientific information about these methods, which are at in vitro or in vivo development stages, and hopes to promote their future application in dental implantology and in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  13. Complex organic molecules along the accretion flow in isolated and externally irradiated protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine; Nomura, Hideko; Millar, T J; Weaver, Susanna Widicus

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The birth environment of the Sun will have influenced the conditions in the pre-solar nebula, including the attainable chemical complexity, important for prebiotic chemistry. The formation and distribution of complex organic molecules (COMs) in a disk around a T Tauri star is investigated for two scenarios: (i) an isolated disk, and (ii) a disk irradiated externally by a nearby massive star. The chemistry is calculated along the accretion flow from the outer disk inwards using a comprehensive network. Two simulations are performed, one beginning with complex ices and one with simple ices only. For the isolated disk, COMs are transported without major alteration into the inner disk where they thermally desorb into the gas reaching an abundance representative of the initial assumed ice abundance. For simple ices, COMs efficiently form on grain surfaces under the conditions in the outer disk. Gas-phase COMs are released into the molecular layer via photodesorption. For the irradiated disk, complex ice...

  14. Study of Pt-alloys as organic molecules-tolerant cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varelal, F.J.R. [Cinestav Unidad Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico). Nanosciences and Nanotechnology Program; Fuente de la, D.K.L. [Univ. Antonoma de Coahuila (Mexico). Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas; Morales-Acosta, D; Arriaga, L.G. [CIDETEQ, Quereturo (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    This paper investigated the high electrocatalytic activity of platinum-cobalt (Pt-Co) multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in direct oxidation fuel cell applications. The system's tolerance to ethylene glycol, ethanol, and 2-propanol was also evaluated. Rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) and electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analyses were used to determine Pt-Co/MWCNT performance. Results of the analyses suggested that the ORR on the alloy proceeded principally by a 4-electron transfer mechanism. The shape of a Nyquist plot of the ORR on the alloy in a solution containing 0.5 EtOH at different polarization potentials indicated that the ORR on the alloy may not change under conditions of organic-molecule containing electrolytes. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Photophysical properties of luminescent silicon nanoparticles surface-modified with organic molecules via hydrosilylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Mari; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Wada, Satoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Ishioka, Junya; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent silicon nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention for their potential uses in various applications. Many approaches have been reported to protect the surface of silicon nanoparticles and prevent their easy oxidation. Various air-stable luminescent silicon nanoparticles have been successfully prepared. However, the effect of interactions of the π-electron system with the silicon surface on the excited state properties of silicon nanoparticles is unclear. In this study, we have successfully prepared silicon nanoparticles protected with three organic compounds (styrene, 1-decene, and 1-vinyl naphthalene) and have examined their photophysical properties. The ligand π-electron systems on the silicon surface promoted the light harvesting ability for the luminescence through a charge transfer transition between the protective molecules and silicon nanoparticles and also enhanced the radiative rate of the silicon nanoparticles.

  16. Conjugated donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) molecule for organic nonvolatile resistor memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Guangwu; Yu, An-Dih; Bo, Zhishan; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2014-12-01

    A new donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) type of conjugated molecule, N-(4-(N',N'-diphenyl)phenylamine)-4-(4'-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)phenyl) naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic monoimide (TPA-NI-DCN), consisting of triphenylamine (TPA) donors and naphthalimide (NI)/dicyanovinylene (DCN) acceptors was synthesized and characterized. In conjunction with previously reported D-A based materials, the additional DCN moiety attached as end group in the D-A-A configuration can result in a stable charge transfer (CT) and charge-separated state to maintain the ON state current. The vacuum-deposited TPA-NI-DCN device fabricated as an active memory layer was demonstrated to exhibit write-once-read-many (WORM) switching characteristics of organic nonvolatile memory due to the strong polarity of the TPA-NI-DCN moiety. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Warwick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT. The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  18. "Molecules-in-Medicine": Peer-Evaluated Presentations in a Fast-Paced Organic Chemistry Course for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadnikova, Ekaterina N.

    2013-01-01

    To accentuate the importance of organic chemistry in development of contemporary pharmaceuticals, a three-week unit entitled "Molecules-in-Medicine" was included in the curriculum of a comprehensive one-semester four-credit organic chemistry course. After a lecture on medicinal chemistry concepts and pharmaceutical practices, students…

  19. "Molecules-in-Medicine": Peer-Evaluated Presentations in a Fast-Paced Organic Chemistry Course for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadnikova, Ekaterina N.

    2013-01-01

    To accentuate the importance of organic chemistry in development of contemporary pharmaceuticals, a three-week unit entitled "Molecules-in-Medicine" was included in the curriculum of a comprehensive one-semester four-credit organic chemistry course. After a lecture on medicinal chemistry concepts and pharmaceutical practices, students…

  20. Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

    2004-01-01

    An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

  1. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Xylenols: Application in the Synthesis of Novel Organic Molecules and Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Bis(o-xylenol) equivalents are useful synthetic intermediates in the construction of polymers and hydroxyl substituted organic molecules which can organize by hydrogen bonded self-assembly into unique supramolecular structures. These polymers and supramolecular materials have potential use as coatings and thin films in aerospace, electronic and biomedical applications.

  2. Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS): Constraining the formation of complex organic molecules with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Jes K.; Coutens, Audrey; Bourke, Tyler L.; Favre, Cecile; Garrod, Robin; Lykke, Julie; Mueller, Holger; Oberg, Karin I.; Schmalzl, Markus; van der Wiel, Matthijs; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Wampfler, Susanne F.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding how, when and where complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules are formed is a fundamental goal of astrochemistry and an integral part of origins of life studies. Already now ALMA is showing its capabilities for studies of the chemistry of solar-type stars with its high sensitivity for faint lines, high spectral resolution which limits line confusion, and high angular resolution making it possible to study the structure of young protostars on solar-system scales. We here present the first results from a large unbiased survey “Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)” targeting one of the astrochemical template sources, the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. The survey is more than an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous surveys of the source and provide imaging down to 25 AU scales (radius) around each of the two components of the binary. An example of one of the early highlights from the survey is unambiguous detections of the (related) prebiotic species glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (two lowest energy conformers), methyl formate and acetic acid. The glycolaldehyde-ethylene glycol abundance ratio is high in comparison to comets and other protostars - but agrees with previous measurements, e.g., in the Galactic Centre clouds possibly reflecting different environments and/or evolutionary histories. Complete mapping of this and other chemical networks in comparison with detailed chemical models and laboratory experiments will reveal the origin of complex organic molecules in a young protostellar system and investigate the link between these protostellar stages and the early Solar System.

  3. FORMATION AND RECONDENSATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES DURING PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY OUTBURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taquet, Vianney [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wirström, Eva S. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Charnley, Steven B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Mailstop 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  4. Planar tetranuclear Dy(III) single-molecule magnet and its Sm(III), Gd(III), and Tb(III) analogues encapsulated by salen-type and β-diketonate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Lin, Po-Heng; Habib, Fatemah; Aharen, Tomoko; Murugesu, Muralee; Deng, Zhao-Peng; Li, Guang-Ming; Sun, Wen-Bin

    2011-08-01

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties are reported for four new lanthanide clusters [Sm(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)L(2)(acac)(6)]·4H(2)O (1), [Gd(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)L(2)(acac)(6)]·4CH(3)CN (2), and [Ln(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)L(2)(acac)(6)]·2H(2)L·2CH(3)CN (3, Ln = Tb; 4, Ln = Dy) supported by salen-type (H(2)L = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine) and β-diketonate (acac = acetylacetonate) ligands. The four clusters were confirmed to be essentially isomorphous by infrared spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Their crystal structures reveal that the salen-type ligand provides a suitable tetradentate coordination pocket (N(2)O(2)) to encapsulate lanthanide(III) ions. Moreover, the planar Ln(4) core is bridged by two μ(3)-hydroxide, four phenoxide, and two ketonate oxygen atoms. Magnetic properties of all four compounds have been investigated using dc and ac susceptibility measurements. For 4, the static and dynamic data indicate that the Dy(4) complex exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization below 5 K associated with single-molecule magnet behavior.

  5. Detection of planar polarity proteins in mammalian cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montcouquiol, Mireille; Jones, Jennifer M; Sans, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    The "core genes" were identified as a group of genes believed to function as a conserved signaling cassette for the specification of planar polarity in Drosophila Melanogaster, and includes frizzled (fz), van gogh (vang) or strabismus (stbm), prickle (Pk), dishevelled (dsh), flamingo (fmi), and diego. The mutation of each of these genes not only causes the disruption of planar polarity within the wing or the eye of the animal, but also affects the localization of all the other protein members of the core group. These properties emphasize the importance of the interrelations between the proteins of this group. All of these core genes have homologs in vertebrates. Studies in Danio Rerio (zebrafish) and Xenopus laevis (frog) have uncovered other roles for some of these molecules in gastrulation and neurulation, during which the shape of a given tissue will undergo major transformation through cell movements. A disruption in these processes can lead to severe neural tube defects in diverse organisms, including humans. In fact, a large body of evidence suggests that planar polarity proteins are not involved in one specific cascade but in many different ones and many different mechanisms such as, but not limited to, hair or cilia orientation, asymmetric division, cellular movements, or neuronal migration. In mice cochleae, mutations in planar polarity genes lead to defects in the orientation of the stereociliary bundles at the apex of each hair cell. This phenotype established the cochlea as one of the clearest examples of planar polarity in mammals. Although significant progress has been made toward understanding the molecular basis required for the development of planar polarity in invertebrates, similar advances in vertebrates are more recent and rely mainly on the identification of a group of mammalian mutants that affect hair cell stereociliary bundle orientation. These include mutation of vangl2, scrb1, celsr1, PTK-7, dvl1-2, and more recently fz3 and fz6. In this

  6. Electronic coupling effects and charge transfer between organic molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, Roman

    2010-07-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is grown on graphite. We even achieve an efficient electronic decoupling from the subjacent Au(111) by inserting an atomically thin organic spacer layer consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) with a noticeably dissimilar electronic behavior. These observations are further consolidated by a systematic variation of the metal substrate (Au, Ag, and Al), ranging from inert to rather reactive. For this purpose, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) is chosen to ensure comparability of the molecular film structures on the different metals, and also because its electronic alignment on various metal surfaces has previously been studied with great intensity. We present evidence for ionized PTCDA at several interfaces and propose the charge transfer to be related to the electronic level alignment governed by interface dipole formation on the respective metals. (orig.)

  7. Theory of coupled hybrid inorganic/organic systems: Excitation transfer at semiconductor/molecule interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Judith; Verdenhalven, Eike; Theuerholz, Sverre; Knorr, Andreas; Richter, Marten

    2016-03-01

    We derive a theoretical framework for describing hybrid organic-inorganic systems consisting of an ordered organic molecular layer coupled to a semiconductor quantum well (e.g., ZnO). A Heisenberg equation of motion technique based on a density matrix formalism is applied to derive dynamical equations for the composite system on a mesoscopic scale. Our theoretical approach focuses on the inuence of nonradiative Förster excitation transfer across the hybrid interface on linear optical absorption spectra. Therefore, the dielectric screening is discussed at the interface of two materials with different dielectric constants. Moreover, the Förster transfer matrix element is calculated in the point-dipole approximation. For a consistent theoretical description of both constituents (i.e., the molecular layer and the semiconductor substrate), the problem is treated in momentum space. Solving the equations of motion for the microscopic polarizations in frequency space directly leads to an equation for the frequency-dependent linear absorption coefficient. Our theoretical approach forms the basis for studying parameter regimes and geometries with optimized excitation transfer efficiency across the semiconductor/ molecule interface.

  8. Reducing dynamic disorder in small-molecule organic semiconductors by suppressing large-amplitude thermal motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, Steffen; Eggeman, Alexander S; Troisi, Alessandro; Jiang, Lang; Warwick, Chris; Nikolka, Mark; Schweicher, Guillaume; Yeates, Stephen G; Henri Geerts, Yves; Anthony, John E; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-02-22

    Thermal vibrations and the dynamic disorder they create can detrimentally affect the transport properties of van der Waals bonded molecular semiconductors. The low-energy nature of these vibrations makes it difficult to access them experimentally, which is why we still lack clear molecular design rules to control and reduce dynamic disorder. In this study we discuss the promising organic semiconductors rubrene, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothio-phene and 2,9-di-decyl-dinaphtho-[2,3-b:20,30-f]-thieno-[3,2-b]-thiophene in terms of an exceptionally low degree of dynamic disorder. In particular, we analyse diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy, to show that small molecules that have their side chains attached along the long axis of their conjugated core are better encapsulated in their crystal structure, which helps reduce large-amplitude thermal motions. Our work provides a general strategy for the design of new classes of very high mobility organic semiconductors with a low degree of dynamic disorder.

  9. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy as a speciation tool for natural organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, J.; Plaschke, M.; Denecke, M.A. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    A molecular-scale understanding of the basic processes affecting stability and transport behavior of actinide cations, complexes or hydroxide ('eigencolloid') species is prerequisite to performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in geological formations. Depending on their functional group chemistry and macromolecular structure, naturally occurring organic molecules (NOM) possess a high tendency towards actinide complexation reactions. However, the compositional and structural heterogeneity of NOM and mixed aggregates with inorganic phases makes speciation by spectromicroscopy techniques highly desirable. The applicability of Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) as a speciation tool for the characterization of NOM is demonstrated for a multifunctional natural organic acid (chlorogenic acid), Eu(III)-loaded humic acid (HA) aggregates and Eu(III)-oxo/hydroxide/HA hetero-aggregates. It is shown that in situ probing of HA functional group chemistry down to a spatial resolution < 100 nm (i.e., less than femto-liter sampled volumes) is feasible, at the same time revealing morphological details on NOM aggregates and NOM/mineral associations. (orig.)

  10. Results of the First Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) GC-MS Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Pinnick, Veronica; Szopa, Cyril; Danell, Ryan; Grand, Noel; Van Amerom, Friso; Glavin, Daniel; Freissinet, Caroline; Humeau, Olivier; Coll, Patrice; Arevalo, Ricardo; Stalport, Fabien; Brinckerhoff, William; Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred; Mahaffy, Paul; Raulin, Francois

    2014-11-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) aboard the ExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular) information from the solid samples collected by the rover, with a particular focus on the char-acterization of the organic content. The core of the MOMA instrument is a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) which provides the unique capability to characterize a broad range of compounds, including both of volatile and non-volatile species. Samples will be crushed and deposited into sample cups seated in a rotating carousel. Soil samples will be analyzed either by UV laser desorption / ionization (LDI) or pyrolysis gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometry (pyr-GC-ITMS).The French GC brassboard was coupled to the US ion trap mass spectrometer brassboard in a flight-like con-figuration for several coupling campains. The MOMA GC setup is based on the SAM heritage design with a He reservoir and 4 separate analytical modules including traps, columns and Thermal Conductivity Detectors. Solid samples are sealed and heated in this setup using a manual tapping station, designed and built at MPS in Germany, for GC-MS analysis. The gaseous species eluting from the GC are then ionized by an electron impact ionization source in the MS chamber and analyzed by the linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Volatile and non-volatile compounds were injected in the MOMA instrumental suite. Both of these compounds classes were detected by the TCD and by the MS. MS signal (total ion current) and single mass spectra by comparison with the NIST library, gave us an unambiguous confirmation of these identifications. The mass spectra arise from an average of 10 mass spectra averaged around a given time point in the total ion chromatogram.Based on commercial instrument, the MOMA requirement for sensitivity in the GC-MS mode for organic molecules is 1 pmol. In this test, sensitivity was determined for the GC TCD and MS response to a dilution

  11. Tracking of single molecules as a powerful method to characterize diffusivity of organic species in mesoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellriegel, Christian; Kirstein, Johanna; Braeuchle, Christoph [Dept. Chemie und Biochemie and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen Butenandtstr. 11, D-81377 Munich (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion of individual fluorescent molecules can be observed by single-molecule tracking techniques and characterized by the analysis of their diffusional trajectory. Heterogeneities in the diffusivity that would pass undetected by conventional ensemble methods or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy are resolved by this method. This is demonstrated using four different examples in which we analyse the diffusion of single organic dye molecules in mesoporous materials. We show that this method can be used to obtain structural information from the inner structure of nanoporous materials with a resolution better than the optical diffraction limit.

  12. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. I. Organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, T. J.; Lozovoi, A. Y.; Pashov, D. L.; Kohanoff, J. J.; Paxton, A. T.

    2014-07-01

    As is now well established, a first order expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn total energy density functional about a trial input density, namely, the Harris-Foulkes functional, can be used to rationalize a non self consistent tight binding model. If the expansion is taken to second order then the energy and electron density matrix need to be calculated self consistently and from this functional one can derive a charge self consistent tight binding theory. In this paper we have used this to describe a polarizable ion tight binding model which has the benefit of treating charge transfer in point multipoles. This admits a ready description of ionic polarizability and crystal field splitting. It is necessary in constructing such a model to find a number of parameters that mimic their more exact counterparts in the density functional theory. We describe in detail how this is done using a combination of intuition, exact analytical fitting, and a genetic optimization algorithm. Having obtained model parameters we show that this constitutes a transferable scheme that can be applied rather universally to small and medium sized organic molecules. We have shown that the model gives a good account of static structural and dynamic vibrational properties of a library of molecules, and finally we demonstrate the model's capability by showing a real time simulation of an enolization reaction in aqueous solution. In two subsequent papers, we show that the model is a great deal more general in that it will describe solvents and solid substrates and that therefore we have created a self consistent quantum mechanical scheme that may be applied to simulations in heterogeneous catalysis.

  13. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. I. Organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, T. J.; Lozovoi, A. Y.; Kohanoff, J. J. [Atomistic Simulation Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Pashov, D. L.; Paxton, A. T., E-mail: Tony.Paxton@KCL.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-28

    As is now well established, a first order expansion of the Hohenberg–Kohn total energy density functional about a trial input density, namely, the Harris–Foulkes functional, can be used to rationalize a non self consistent tight binding model. If the expansion is taken to second order then the energy and electron density matrix need to be calculated self consistently and from this functional one can derive a charge self consistent tight binding theory. In this paper we have used this to describe a polarizable ion tight binding model which has the benefit of treating charge transfer in point multipoles. This admits a ready description of ionic polarizability and crystal field splitting. It is necessary in constructing such a model to find a number of parameters that mimic their more exact counterparts in the density functional theory. We describe in detail how this is done using a combination of intuition, exact analytical fitting, and a genetic optimization algorithm. Having obtained model parameters we show that this constitutes a transferable scheme that can be applied rather universally to small and medium sized organic molecules. We have shown that the model gives a good account of static structural and dynamic vibrational properties of a library of molecules, and finally we demonstrate the model's capability by showing a real time simulation of an enolization reaction in aqueous solution. In two subsequent papers, we show that the model is a great deal more general in that it will describe solvents and solid substrates and that therefore we have created a self consistent quantum mechanical scheme that may be applied to simulations in heterogeneous catalysis.

  14. Multi-solution processes of small molecule for flexible white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: ystsai@nfu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chittawanij, Apisit; Hong, Lin-Ann; Guo, Siou-Wei [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Ching-Chiun [Department of Solid State Lighting Technology, Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Juang, Fuh-Shyang [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Shih-Hsiang [Department of Solid State Lighting Technology, Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Yang-Ching [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-04-01

    Most small molecule organic light emitting diode (SM-OLED) device structures are made in one layer using solution-based processing because the solution is usually a high dissolvent material that easily attacks the layer below it. We demonstrate a simple and reliable stamping technique for fabricating multi-solution process flexible white SM-OLEDs. The structure is anode/spin-hole injection layer/spin-emitting layer/stamping-electron transport layer/cathode. Poly(di-methyl silane) (PDMS) stamp is used for transferring electron transport layer. An intermediate ultraviolet-ozone surface treatment is introduced to temporarily modify the PDMS stamp surface. Then, the solution-based electron transport layer film can therefore be uniformly formed on top of the PDMS surface. After that the electron transport layer film on the PDMS stamp is transfer-printed onto the emitting layer with suitable heating and pressing. A solution-based processing is successfully established to efficiently fabricate flexible white SM-OLEDs. The SM-OLEDs were obtained at the current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, luminance of 1062 cd/m{sup 2}, current efficiency of 5.57 cd/A, and Commission internationale de l'éclairage coordinate of (0.32, 0.35). - Highlights: • All solution-processed small molecule materials (emitting layer, electron transport layer). • Poly(di-methylsilane) (PDMS) stamp is subsequently used for stamping transfer. • The flexible white SM-OLEDs are based on solution-processes with a low-cost method.

  15. Production of complex organic molecules:H-atom addition versus UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-01-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been identified in different environments in star-forming regions. Laboratory studies show that COMs form in the solid state, on icy grains, typically following a `non-energetic' (atom-addition) or `energetic' (UV photon absorption) trigger. So far, such studies have been largely performed for single processes. Here we present the first work that quantitatively investigates both the relative importance and the cumulative effect of `(non)energetic' processing. We focus on astronomically relevant CO:CH3OH = 4:1 ice analogues exposed to doses relevant for the collapse stage of dense clouds. Hydrogenation experiments result in the formation of methyl formate (MF; HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (GA; HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (EG; H2C(OH)CH2OH) at 14 K. The absolute abundances and the abundance fractions are found to be dependent on the H-atom/CO:CH3OH-molecule ratios and on the overall deposition rate. In the case that ices are exposed to UV photons only, several different COMs are found. Typically, the abundance fractions are 0.2 for MF, 0.3 for GA, and 0.5 for EG as opposed to the values found in pure hydrogenation experiments without UV in which MF is largely absent: 0.0, 0.2-0.6 and 0.8-0.4, respectively. In experiments where both are applied, overall COM abundances drop to about half of those found in the pure UV irradiation experiments, but the composition fractions are very similar. This implies COM ratios can be used as a diagnostic tool to derive the processing history of an ice. Solid-state branching ratios derived here for GA and EG compare well with observations, while the MF case cannot be explained by solid state conditions investigated here.

  16. Production of complex organic molecules: H-atom addition versus UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-05-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been identified in different environments in star-forming regions. Laboratory studies show that COMs form in the solid state, on icy grains, typically following a 'non-energetic' (atom-addition) or 'energetic' (UV-photon absorption) trigger. So far, such studies have been largely performed for single processes. Here, we present the first work that quantitatively investigates both the relative importance and the cumulative effect of '(non-)energetic' processing. We focus on astronomically relevant CO:CH3OH = 4:1 ice analogues exposed to doses relevant for the collapse stage of dense clouds. Hydrogenation experiments result in the formation of methyl formate (MF; HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (GA; HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (EG; H2C(OH)CH2OH) at 14 K. The absolute abundances and the abundance fractions are found to be dependent on the H-atom/CO:CH3OH-molecule ratios and on the overall deposition rate. In the case that ices are exposed to UV photons only, several different COMs are found. Typically, the abundance fractions are 0.2 for MF, 0.3 for GA and 0.5 for EG as opposed to the values found in pure hydrogenation experiments without UV in which MF is largely absent: 0.0, 0.2-0.6 and 0.8-0.4, respectively. In experiments where both are applied, overall COM abundances drop to about half of those found in the pure UV irradiation experiments, but the composition fractions are very similar. This implies COM ratios can be used as a diagnostic tool to derive the processing history of an ice. Solid-state branching ratios derived here for GA and EG compare well with observations, while the MF case cannot be explained by solid-state conditions investigated here.

  17. A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Gregory C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Perez, Louis A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials and Dept. of Materials; Hoven, Corey V. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Zhang, Yuan [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Dang, Xuan-Dung [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Sharenko, Alexander [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials and Dept. of Materials; Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL); Kramer, Edward J. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Dept. of Materials; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials, Center for Polymers and Organic Solids and Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry; Bazan, Guillermo C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials, Center for Polymers and Organic Solids, Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Dept. of Materials

    2011-07-22

    We report on the design, synthesis and characterization of light harvesting small molecules for use in solution-processed small molecule bulk heterojunction (SM-BHJ) solar cell devices. These molecular materials are based upon an acceptor/donor/acceptor (A/D/A) core with donor endcapping units. Utilization of a dithieno(3,2-b;2',3'-d)silole (DTS) donor and pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT) acceptor leads to strong charge transfer characteristics, resulting in broad optical absorption spectra extending well beyond 700 nm. SM-BHJ solar cell devices fabricated with the specific example 5,5'-bis{7-(4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine}-3,3'-di-2-ethylhexylsilylene-2,2'-bithiophene (6) as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor component showed short circuit currents above -10 mA cm-2 and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) over 3%. Thermal processing is a critical factor in obtaining favorable active layer morphologies and high PCE values. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, conductive and photo-conductive atomic force microscopies, dynamic secondary mass ion spectrometry (DSIMS), and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) experiments were carried out to characterize how thermal treatment influences the active layer structure and organization.

  18. Predicting MDCK cell permeation coefficients of organic molecules using membrane-interaction QSAR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li CHEN; Jia YAO; Jian-bo YANG; Jie YANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To use membrane-interaction quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis (MI-QSAR) to develop predictive models of partitioning of organic compounds in gastrointestinal cells. Methods: A training set of 22 structurally diverse compounds, whose apparent permeability accross cellular membranes of MadinDarby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were measured, were used to construct MIQSAR models. Molecular dynamic simulations were used to determine the explicit interaction of each test compound (solute) with a dimyristoyl-phosphatidyl-choline monolayer membrane model. An additional set of intramolecular solute descriptors were computed and considered in the trial pool of descriptors for building MI-QSAR models. The QSAR models were optimized using multidimensional linear regression fitting and the stepwise method. A test set of 8 compounds were evaluated using the MI-QSAR models as part of a validation process. Results:MI-QSAR models of the gastrointestinal absorption process were constructed.The descriptors found in the best MI-QSAR models are as follows: 1) ClogP (the logarithm of the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient); 2) EHOMO (the highest occupied molecular orbital energy); 3) Es (stretch energy); 4) PMY (the principal moment of inertia Y, the inertia along the y axis in the rectangular coordinates; 5) Ct(total connectivity); and 6) Enb (the energy of interactions between all of the nonbonded atoms). The most important descriptor in the models is ClogP. Conclusion:Permeability is not only determined by the properties of drug molecules, but is also very much influenced by the molecule-membrane interaction process.

  19. Modeling the Emission Spectra of Organic Molecules: A Competition between Franck-Condon and Nuclear Ensemble Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Leonardo Evaristo; Ribeiro, Luiz Antonio; Fonseca, Antonio Luciano de Almeida; da Silva Filho, Demétrio Antonio

    2016-07-14

    The emission spectra of flexible and rigid organic molecules are theoretically investigated in the framework of the Franck-Condon (FC) and nuclear ensemble (NE) approaches, both of which rely on results from density functional theory but differ in the way vibrational contributions are taken into account. Our findings show that the emission spectra obtained using the NE approach are in better agreement with experiment than the ones produced by FC calculations considering both rigid and flexible molecules. Surprisingly, the description of a suitable balance between the vibronic progression and the emission spectra envelope shows dependency on the initial sampling for the NE calculations which must be judiciously selected. Our results intend to provide guidance for a better theoretical description of light emission properties of organic molecules with applications in organic electronic devices.

  20. In situ patterning of organic molecules in aqueous solutions using an inverted electron-beam lithography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazako, Hiroki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    A method for in situ controlling the detachment and deposition of organic molecules such as sugars and biocompatible polymers in aqueous solutions by electron-beam (EB) scan is proposed and evaluated. It was demonstrated that EB irradiation could detach 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymers from a silicon nitride membrane. Moreover, organic molecules such as cationic polymers and sugars could be deposited on the membrane by EB irradiation. Spatial distributions of scattered electrons were numerically simulated, and acceleration voltage dependences of the detachment and deposition phenomena were experimentally measured. The simulations and experimental results suggest that the detachment of MPC polymers is mainly due to electrical effects of primary electrons, and that the deposition of organic molecules is mainly due to chemical reactions induced by primary electrons. In view of these findings, the proposed method can be applied to in situ and nanoscale patterning such as the fabrication of cell scaffolds.

  1. Proazaphosphatranes: Versatile molecules with applications in fuel cell technology, biodiesel production and important organic transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Kuldeep

    In recent years proazaphosphatranes of type P(RNCH2CH 2)3N have proven their synthetic utility as catalysts and as stoichiometric bases in a variety of organic transformations. Several reports from our group appeared in which the use of proazaphosphatranes for the activation of the silicon to synthesize useful organic intermediates. Herein we report the use of proazaphosphatranes to synthesize various useful small organic molecules by the activation of Si-O and Si-C bonds, along with efforts to gain evidence for silicon group activation. We previously demonstrated that a phosphatranium cation for which the counter anion is nitrate, is an excellent catalyst for aza- and thia-Michael reactions. Evidence was presented that such a nitrate salt in which the cation was bound to a solid support was superior to a commercially available nitrate anion exchange resin. These results prompted us to chemically bind phosphatranium salts to NafionRTM membrane supports to function as nitrate and hydroxide ion conducting membranes for fuel cell applications. Here we report the synthesis of a novel anion exchange fuel cell membrane by chemically attaching proazaphosphatranium and phosphatranium cations under microwave conditions to the sulfonic groups of Nafion-F RTM and the use of solid-state NMR techniques to determine the structure and composition of this anion exchange membrane. A thermally and air stable derivative of a proazaphosphatrane i.e., a benzyl azidoproazaphosphatrane, was discovered in our laboratory which was shown to be an excellent catalyst for biodiesel synthesis via the transesterification of soybean oil and for other Lewis base- catalyzed important organic transformations. However, the heterogeneous analog i.e., a Merrifield resin-bound azidoproazaphosphatrane, was found to be deactivated after 11 cycles for the transesterification of soybean oil. We report here an attempted synthesis of a TeflonRTM - and NafionRTM-bound azidoproazaphosphatrane. Such a solid

  2. Label-free detection of protein molecules secreted from an organ-on-a-chip model for drug toxicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Andres W.; Zhang, Yu S.; Aleman, Julio; Alerasool, Parissa; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical attrition is about 30% from failure of drug candidates due to toxic side effects, increasing the drug development costs significantly and slowing down the drug discovery process. This partly originates from the fact that the animal models do not accurately represent human physiology. Hence there is a clear unmet need for developing drug toxicity assays using human-based models that are complementary to traditional animal models before starting expensive clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip techniques developed in recent years have generated a variety of human organ models mimicking different human physiological conditions. However, it is extremely challenging to monitor the transient and long-term response of the organ models to drug treatments during drug toxicity tests. First, when an organ-on-a-chip model interacts with drugs, a certain amount of protein molecules may be released into the medium due to certain drug effects, but the amount of the protein molecules is limited, since the organ tissue grown inside microfluidic bioreactors have minimum volume. Second, traditional fluorescence techniques cannot be utilized for real-time monitoring of the concentration of the protein molecules, because the protein molecules are continuously secreted from the tissue and it is practically impossible to achieve fluorescence labeling in the dynamically changing environment. Therefore, direct measurements of the secreted protein molecules with a label-free approach is strongly desired for organs-on-a-chip applications. In this paper, we report the development of a photonic crystal-based biosensor for label-free assays of secreted protein molecules from a liver-on-a-chip model. Ultrahigh detection sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated.

  3. The research front on molecular functional switches——A special issue on organic photoswitchable multifunctional molecules and materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He TIAN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 4th International Workshop on Organic Photoswitchable Multifunctional Molecules and Materials was held between 25th and 27th October 2009 in East China University of Science & Technology (ECUST), Shanghai. It was a great event for academic circles, and at the same time provided an excellent chance for communication between international scholars from the field of organic photoswitchable functional materials. Along with a successful series of workshops on this topic, such as those held by Japan-France (Shonan, 2006), France-Russia (Saissac, 2007) and France-Japan (Arras, 2008), ECUST (China) and CNRS's GDRI (France) joined together to host this continued workshop on novel photoswitchable multifunctional molecules and materials.

  4. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks as multifunctional luminescent sensor for detecting cations, anions and organic solvent molecules in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Gao, Wei; Li, Peng; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Liu, Jie-Ping

    2017-09-01

    A series of water-stable isostructural mono/bimetallic lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs) {[Eu5xTb5(1-x)(OH)6(TZI)3(DMA)1.5(H2O)10.5]·DMA·0.5H2O}n (x = 1.0 (1), 0.5 (3), 0.4 (4), 0.3 (5), 0.2 (6), 0.1 (7), 0.05 (8), 0 (2), H3TZI = 5-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)isophthalic acid) were synthesized. These Ln-MOFs exhibit 3D frameworks in which 1D chains based on pentanuclear [Ln5(μ3-OH)6(COO)5]4+ clusters are linked by TZI backbones. The luminescent investigations revealed that compounds 1 and 2 not only exhibit characteristic Eu3+ and Tb3+ emissions in the red and green regions, respectively, but also can sensitively and selectively detect Fe3+ cations, CO32-, PO43-, AsO43- anions and acetone molecules in aqueous solution. In addition, the luminescent colors of the bimetallic (Tb5(1-x):Eu5x) compounds can easily be tuned by doping isostructural Ln- MOFs with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions. This work presents some good candidate materials for the potential multifunctional sensors. Eight water-stable isostructural 3D Ln-MOFs {[Eu5xTb5(1-x)(OH)6(TZI)3(DMA)1.5(H2O)10.5]·DMA·0.5H2O}n based on pentanuclear clusters were prepared. The Ln-MOFs represented the rapid and drastic emission quenching induced by Fe3+ cations, CO32-, PO43-, AsO43- anions and acetone molecules in aqueous solution. the luminescence colors of the bimetallic (Tb5(1-x):Eu5x) compounds can easily be tuned by doping isostructural Ln-MOFs with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions.

  5. Improvement in the Lifetime of Planar Organic Photovoltaic Cells through the Introduction of MoO3 into Their Cathode Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Cattin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, MoO3, which is typically used as an anode buffer layer in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVCs, has also been used as a cathode buffer layer (CBL. Here, we check its efficiency as a CBL using a planar heterojunction based on the CuPc/C60 couple. The CBL is a bi-layer tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3/MoO3. We show that the OPVC with MoO3 in its CBL almost immediately exhibits lower efficiency than those using Alq3 alone. Nevertheless, the OPVCs increase their efficiency during the first five to six days of air exposure. We explain this evolution of the efficiency of the OPVCs over time through the variation in the MoO3 work function due to air contamination. By comparison to a classical OPVC using a CBL containing only Alq3, if it is found that the initial efficiency of the latter is higher, this result is no longer the same after one week of exposure to ambient air. Indeed, this result is due to the fact that the lifetime of the cells is significantly increased by the presence of MoO3 in the CBL.

  6. An All-Organic Composite System for Resistive Change Memory via the Self-Assembly of Plastic-Crystalline Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, An-Na; Lee, Sang-A; Bae, Sukang; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dong Su; Wang, Gunuk; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2017-01-25

    An all-organic composite system was introduced as an active component for organic resistive memory applications. The active layer was prepared by mixing a highly polar plastic-crystalline organic molecule (succinonitrile, SN) into an insulating polymer (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). As increasing concentrations of SN from 0 to 3.0 wt % were added to solutions of different concentrations of PMMA, we observed distinguishable microscopic surface structures on blended films of SN and PMMA at certain concentrations after the spin-casting process. The structures were organic dormant volcanos composed of micron-scale PMMA craters and disk type SN lava. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) analysis showed that these structures were located in the middle of the film. Self-assembly of the plastic-crystalline molecules resulted in the phase separation of the SN:PMMA mixture during solvent evaporation. The organic craters remained at the surface after the spin-casting process, indicative of the formation of an all-organic composite film. Because one organic crater contains one SN disk, our system has a coplanar monolayer disk composite system, indicative of the simplest composite type of organic memory system. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the composite films with organic craters revealed that our all-organic composite system showed unipolar type resistive switching behavior. From logarithmic I-V characteristics, we found that the current flow was governed by space charge limited current (SCLC). From these results, we believe that a plastic-crystalline molecule-polymer composite system is one of the most reliable ways to develop organic composite systems as potential candidates for the active components of organic resistive memory applications.

  7. Efficient small-molecule organic solar cells incorporating a doped buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Dei-Wei [Department of aviation and Communication Electronics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Yao-Jen [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ray; Meen, Teen-Hang [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Hu-Wei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs) with an optimized structure of indium tin oxide/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) (10 nm)/CuPc: fullerene (C{sub 60}) mixed (20 nm)/C{sub 60} (20 nm)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) (5 nm)/Ag were fabricated. In this study, the cesium carbonate-doped BPhen (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen) was adopted as the buffer layer to enhance the efficiency of the OSCs. The photovoltaic parameters of the OSCs, such as the short-circuit current density and fill factor, depend on the doping concentration of Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the BPhen layer. The cell with a Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen (1:4) cathode buffer layer exhibits a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.51%, compared to 3.37% for the device with the pristine BPhen layer. The enhancement of PCE was attributed to the energy-level alignment between the C{sub 60} layer and the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layer. In addition, the characterization measured using atomic force microscopy shows that the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layers have smoother surfaces. - Highlight: • Cs2CO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) cathode buffer layer. • Cs2CO3:BPhen layer with different ratios affects organic solar cells performance. • Cell with 1:4 (Cs2CO3:BPhen) ratio shows 3.51% power conversion efficiency.

  8. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2017-01-03

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  9. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2014-07-15

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  10. Ro-vibrational excitation of an organic molecule (HCN) in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Organic molecules are important constituents of protoplanetary disks. Their ro-vibrational lines observed in the near- and mid-infrared are commonly detected toward T Tauri disks. These lines are the only way to probe the chemistry in the inner few au where terrestrial planets form. To understand this chemistry, accurate molecular abundances have to be determined. This is complicated by excitation effects. Most analyses so far have made the assumption of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Starting from estimates for the collisional rate coefficients of HCN, non-LTE slab models of the HCN emission were calculated to study the importance of different excitation mechanisms. Using a new radiative transfer model, the HCN emission from a full two-dimensional disk was then modeled to study the effect of the non-LTE excitation, together with the line formation. We ran models tailored to the T Tauri disk AS 205 (N) where HCN lines in both the 3 {\\mu}m and 14 {\\mu}m bands have been observed by VLT-CRIRES and t...

  11. The Synthesis of Organic Molecules of Intrinsic Microporosity Designed to Frustrate Efficient Molecular Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rupert G D; Bezzu, C Grazia; Carta, Mariolino; Msayib, Kadhum J; Walker, Jonathan; Short, Rhys; Kariuki, Benson M; McKeown, Neil B

    2016-02-12

    Efficient reactions between fluorine-functionalised biphenyl and terphenyl derivatives with catechol-functionalised terminal groups provide a route to large, discrete organic molecules of intrinsic microporosity (OMIMs) that provide porous solids solely by their inefficient packing. By altering the size and substituent bulk of the terminal groups, a number of soluble compounds with apparent BET surface areas in excess of 600 m(2)  g(-1) are produced. The efficiency of OMIM structural units for generating microporosity is in the order: propellane>triptycene>hexaphenylbenzene>spirobifluorene>naphthyl=phenyl. The introduction of bulky hydrocarbon substituents significantly enhances microporosity by further reducing packing efficiency. These results are consistent with findings from previously reported packing simulation studies. The introduction of methyl groups at the bridgehead position of triptycene units reduces intrinsic microporosity. This is presumably due to their internal position within the OMIM structure so that they occupy space, but unlike peripheral substituents they do not contribute to the generation of free volume by inefficient packing.

  12. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  13. Single Photon Initiated Decomposition Rearrangement Reactions (spidrr) of Organic Molecules Mediated by the Ni+ Cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellert, Darrin; Mansell, Adam; Theis, Zachary; Gutierrez, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The Bellert group at Baylor University has developed a novel method for performing single photon initiated decomposition rearrangement reactions (SPIDRR) of organic molecules mediated by a transition metal cation. The advantage that SPIDRR affords is the direct measurement of first order microcanonical rate constants, k(E), determined at resolved internal energies. Furthermore, the SPIDRR technique measures kinetic details of exothermic reactions where product production is limited only by submerged activation barriers (kinetic barriers that are at energies below the separated reactant limit). Thus, such reactions approach unit efficiency, are thermodynamically driven, and are of greater relevance to catalytic research. Direct measurements of k(E) values extend to isotopically labelled species that provide direct measurement of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE), furnishing unique insight into the mechanistic details of a reaction. This talk presents results from the visible photon initiated, Ni+ induced decarbonylation reaction of propionaldehyde. Here a rather unique energy dependent behavior of the measured rate constants was observed and attributed to a dynamic competition between parallel reaction coordinates available to the photo-excited precursor. RRKM calculations in concert with high level DFT is used to support and further experimental results.

  14. Study of Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells Performance Based on Boron Subphthalocyanine Chloride and C60

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhong-Ciao Ke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The small molecule organic solar cells based on boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc and C60 by varying the SubPc layer thickness from 3 nm to 21 nm were fabricated. The maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE of 1.47% was obtained at the 9 nm SubPc layer under 100 mW/cm2 AM1.5G illumination, which is attributed to reach the optimal balance between the light absorption efficiency and the carrier collection efficiency in the device. To increase the open-circuit voltage (Voc of device, the molybdenum oxide (MoO3 and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrene sulfonate were inserted between the indium tin oxide and the SubPc layer, respectively. Finally, the Voc of device increased from 0.46 V to 1 V by using MoO3 buffer layer, resulting in the fact that the PCE of device increased from 1.47% to 2.52%.

  15. The Spatial Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the L1544 Pre-stellar Core

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T=30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average Av~7.5-8 mag located at 4000 au from the core's center and bright in CH3OH. Our observations show that CH3O, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO are more abundant (by factors ~2-10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH3OCHO, c-C3H2O, HCCCHO, CH2CHCN and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors <=3) but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modelling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and iii) the density...

  16. The Synthesis of Organic Molecules of Intrinsic Microporosity Designed to Frustrate Efficient Molecular Packing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rupert G. D.; Bezzu, C. Grazia; Carta, Mariolino; Msayib, Kadhum J.; Walker, Jonathan; Short, Rhys; Kariuki, Benson M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efficient reactions between fluorine‐functionalised biphenyl and terphenyl derivatives with catechol‐functionalised terminal groups provide a route to large, discrete organic molecules of intrinsic microporosity (OMIMs) that provide porous solids solely by their inefficient packing. By altering the size and substituent bulk of the terminal groups, a number of soluble compounds with apparent BET surface areas in excess of 600 m2 g−1 are produced. The efficiency of OMIM structural units for generating microporosity is in the order: propellane>triptycene>hexaphenylbenzene>spirobifluorene>naphthyl=phenyl. The introduction of bulky hydrocarbon substituents significantly enhances microporosity by further reducing packing efficiency. These results are consistent with findings from previously reported packing simulation studies. The introduction of methyl groups at the bridgehead position of triptycene units reduces intrinsic microporosity. This is presumably due to their internal position within the OMIM structure so that they occupy space, but unlike peripheral substituents they do not contribute to the generation of free volume by inefficient packing. PMID:26751824

  17. NaTa03/MCM-48 composites for photocatalytic conversion of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathne, K.; Xia, C.-K.; Adhikari, S. P.; Zhang, L.; Williams, R. T.; Lachgar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of a series of NaTaO3/MCM-48 composite photocatalysts prepared by sol-gel method is reported. The composite catalysts were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorption-desorption porosimetry. Their photocatalytic activity for conversion of organic molecules was tested using p-nitroaniline as a model pollutant. The surface area was found to be in the order of 235-964 m2/g and 35-407 m2/g for photocatalysts calcined at 500 °C and 850 °C, respectively. The surface area was found to depend on the MCM silica content. The pore size for samples calcined at 500 °C ranges from 2.6-3.2 nm, and becomes significantly larger at 850 °C (12.6-30.0 nm) for most composites. All composites have been found to be photocatalytically active towardsp-nitroaniline conversion intop-phenylenediamine under uv- visible irradiation. The conversion of p-nitroaniline per weight of NaTaO3 in the composite photocatalysts is found to be higher than that of pristine NaTaO3. The composites lose 12% of their original activity after three consecutive catalytic cycles.

  18. Organic Molecules and Water in the Inner Disks of T Tauri Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, John S

    2011-01-01

    We report high signal-to-noise Spitzer IRS spectra of a sample of eleven classical T Tauri stars. Molecular emission from rotational transitions of H2O and OH and ro-vibrational bands of simple organic molecules (CO2, HCN, C2H2) is common among the sources in the sample. The gas temperatures (200-800 K) and emitting areas we derive are consistent with the emission originating in a warm disk atmosphere in the inner planet formation region at radii < 2 AU. The H2O emission appears to form under a limited range of excitation conditions, as shown by the similarity in relative strengths of H2O features from star to star and the narrow range in derived temperature and column density. Emission from highly excited rotational levels of OH is present in all stars; the OH emission flux increases with the stellar accretion rate, and the OH/H2O flux ratio shows a relatively small scatter. We interpret these results as evidence for OH production via FUV photo-dissociation of H2O in the disk surface layers. No obvious ex...

  19. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  20. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Balucani, Nadia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain surface and gas phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthetized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairy well the observations towards L1544. It also...

  1. Life in extreme environments: single molecule force spectroscopy as a tool to explore proteins from extremophilic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Hoffmann, Toni; Batchelor, Matthew; Hughes, Megan L; Kendrick, Katherine E; Walsh, Danielle L; Wilson, Michael; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2015-04-01

    Extremophiles are organisms which survive and thrive in extreme environments. The proteins from extremophilic single-celled organisms have received considerable attention as they are structurally stable and functionally active under extreme physical and chemical conditions. In this short article, we provide an introduction to extremophiles, the structural adaptations of proteins from extremophilic organisms and the exploitation of these proteins in industrial applications. We provide a review of recent developments which have utilized single molecule force spectroscopy to mechanically manipulate proteins from extremophilic organisms and the information which has been gained about their stability, flexibility and underlying energy landscapes.

  2. Ca/Alq3 hybrid cathode buffer layer for the optimization of organic solar cells based on a planar heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jouad, Z.; Barkat, L.; Stephant, N.; Cattin, L.; Hamzaoui, N.; Khelil, A.; Ghamnia, M.; Addou, M.; Morsli, M.; Béchu, S.; Cabanetos, C.; Richard-Plouet, M.; Blanchard, P.; Bernède, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Use of efficient anode cathode buffer layer (CBL) is crucial to improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells. Here we show that using a double CBL, Ca/Alq3, allows improving significantly cell performances. The insertion of Ca layer facilitates electron harvesting and blocks hole collection, leading to improved charge selectivity and reduced leakage current, whereas Alq3 blocks excitons. After optimisation of this Ca/Alq3 CBL using CuPc as electron donor, it is shown that it is also efficient when SubPc is substituted to CuPc in the cells. In that case we show that the morphology of the SubPc layer, and therefore the efficiency of the cells, strongly depends on the deposition rate of the SubPc film. It is necessary to deposit slowly (0.02 nm/s) the SubPc films because at higher deposition rate (0.06 nm/s) the films are porous, which induces leakage currents and deterioration of the cell performances. The SubPc layers whose formations are kinetically driven at low deposition rates are more uniform, whereas those deposited faster exhibit high densities of pinholes.

  3. Improvement of pentathiophene/fullerene planar heterojunction photovoltaic cells by improving the organic films morphology through the anode buffer bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jouad, Zouhair; Cattin, Linda; Martinez, Francisco; Neculqueo, Gloria; Louarn, Guy; Addou, Mohammed; Predeep, Padmanabhan; Manuvel, Jayan; Bernède, Jean-Christian

    2016-05-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVCs) are based on a heterojunction electron donor (ED)/electron acceptor (EA). In the present work, the electron donor which is also the absorber of light is pentathiophene. The typical cells were ITO/HTL/pentathiophene/fullerene/Alq3/Al with HTL (hole transport layer) = MoO3, CuI, MoO3/CuI. After optimisation of the pentathiophene thickness, 70 nm, the highest efficiency, 0.81%, is obtained with the bilayer MoO3/CuI as HTL. In order to understand these results the pentathiophene films deposited onto the different HTLs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-rays diffraction, optical absorption and electrical characterization. It is shown that CuI improves the conductivity of the pentathiophene layer through the modification of the film structure, while MoO3 decreases the leakage current. Using the bilayer MoO3/CuI allows cumulating the advantages of each layer. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  4. Reversible multi-electron redox chemistry of π-conjugated N-containing heteroaromatic molecule-based organic cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chengxin; Ning, Guo-Hong; Su, Jie; Zhong, Guiming; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Su, Chenliang; Yu, Dingyi; Zu, Lianhai; Yang, Jinhu; Ng, Man-Fai; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Yong; Armand, Michel; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-07-01

    Even though organic molecules with well-designed functional groups can be programmed to have high electron density per unit mass, their poor electrical conductivity and low cycle stability limit their applications in batteries. Here we report a facile synthesis of π-conjugated quinoxaline-based heteroaromatic molecules (3Q) by condensation of cyclic carbonyl molecules with o-phenylenediamine. 3Q features a number of electron-deficient pyrazine sites, where multiple redox reactions take place. When hybridized with graphene and coupled with an ether-based electrolyte, an organic cathode based on 3Q molecules displays a discharge capacity of 395 mAh g-1 at 400 mA g-1 (1C) in the voltage range of 1.2-3.9 V and a nearly 70% capacity retention after 10,000 cycles at 8 A g-1. It also exhibits a capacity of 222 mAh g-1 at 20C, which corresponds to 60% of the initial specific capacity. Our results offer evidence that heteroaromatic molecules with multiple redox sites are promising in developing high-energy-density, long-cycle-life organic rechargeable batteries.

  5. Superconducting transition of FeSe /SrTi O3 induced by adsorption of semiconducting organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiaqi; Liu, Jian; Liu, Bing; Huang, Xiaochun; Zhu, Qing; Zhu, Xuetao; Sun, Jiatao; Meng, Sheng; Wang, Weihua; Guo, Jiandong

    2017-05-01

    We prepared superconducting and nonsuperconducting FeSe films on SrTi O3(001 ) substrates (FeSe/STO) and investigated the superconducting transition induced by charge transfer between organic molecules and FeSe layers by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. At low coverage, donor- and acceptor-type molecules adsorbed preferentially on the nonsuperconducting and superconducting FeSe layers, respectively. Superconductivity was induced by donor molecules on nonsuperconducting FeSe layer, while the superconductivity was suppressed near acceptor molecules. The corresponding evolutions of electronic states and work function were also resolved by scanning tunneling microscopy. These results illustrate the important role played by local electron concentration in the superconducting transition of FeSe/STO.

  6. Comparative integromics on non-canonical WNT or planar cell polarity signaling molecules: transcriptional mechanism of PTK7 in colorectal cancer and that of SEMA6A in undifferentiated ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-09-01

    Non-canonical WNT and planar cell polarity (PCP) are overlapping but distinct signaling pathways, which control convergent extension, neural tube closure, orientation of cilia and sensory hair cells, axon guidance, and cell motility. Non-canonical WNT signals, regulated by the interaction of WNT, WNT antagonist, Frizzled and ROR2, are transduced to JNK, ROCK, PKC, MAP3K7, and NFAT signaling cascades. PCP signals, regulated by the interaction of VANGL-PRICKLE complex, CELSR and Frizzled-DVL complex, are transduced to JNK, ROCK, and other uncharacterized signaling cascades. PTK7 signaling, regulated by SEMA6 and Plexin-A family members, affects PCP pathway through VANGL. Here, integrative genomic analyses on WNT5A, WNT5B, WNT11, FZD3, FZD6, ROR1, ROR2, RYK, CELSR1, CELSR2, CELSR3, VANGL1, VANGL2, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, PTK7, SEMA6A, SEMA6B, SEMA6C and SEMA6D were carried out. PTK7 and SEMA6A were expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells, SEMA6A in endodermal progenitors, CELSR1, VANGL1 and PTK7 in gastrointestinal tumors. CELSR2, PRICKLE2 and SEMA6C were expressed in fetal brain, CELSR2, PRICKLE1 and SEMA6A in adult brain, WNT5A and CELSR3 in adult brain tumors. These facts indicate class switches of non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling molecules during embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. TCF/LEF-, SP1-, and 5 bHLH-binding sites within human PTK7 promoter were conserved in chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and rat PTK7 orthologs, which explained the mechanism of PTK7 upregulation in colorectal cancer. NANOG-, SOX2-, and POU5F1 (OCT3/OCT4)-binding sites within intron 1 of the human SEMA6A gene were conserved in chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and rat SEMA6A orthologs, which explained the mechanism of SEMA6A upregulation in undifferentiated ES cells. Most of non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling molecules, except PTK7 and SEMA6A, were not frequently expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling pathway, activated to orchestrate

  7. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related A (MICA) Molecules: Relevance in Solid Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Ajay Kumar; Mehra, Narinder K.

    2017-01-01

    An ever growing number of reports on graft rejection and/or failure even with good HLA matches have highlighted an important role of non-HLA antigens in influencing allograft immunity. The list of non-HLA antigens that have been implicated in graft rejection in different types of organ transplantation has already grown long. Of these, the Major Histocompatibility Complex class I chain-related molecule A (MICA) is one of the most polymorphic and extensively studied non-HLA antigenic targets especially in the kidney transplantation. Humoral response to MICA antigens has repeatedly been associated with lower graft survival and an increased risk of acute and chronic rejection following kidney and liver transplantation with few studies showing conflicting results. Although there are clear indications of MICA antibodies being associated with adverse graft outcome, a definitive consensus on this relationship has not been arrived yet. Furthermore, only a few studies have dealt with the impact of MICA donor-specific antibodies as compared to those that are not donor specific on graft outcome. In addition to the membrane bound form, a soluble isoform of MICA (sMICA), which has the potential to engage the natural killer cell-activating receptor NKG2D resulting in endocytosis and degradation of receptor–ligand interaction complex leading to suppression of NKG2D-mediated host innate immunity, has been a subject of intense discussion. Most studies on sMICA have been directed toward understanding their influence on tumor growth, with limited literature focusing its role in transplant biology. Furthermore, a unique dimorphism (methionine to valine) at position 129 in the α2 domain categorizes MICA alleles into strong (MICA-129 met) and weak (MICA-129 val) binders of NKG2D receptor depending on whether they have methionine or valine at this position. Although the implications of MICA 129 dimorphism have been highlighted in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, its role in

  8. Low-temperature spectroscopy of organic molecules in solid matrices: from the Shpol'skii effect to laser luminescent spectromicroscopy for all effectively emitting single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    Sixty years ago, in 1952, Prof. E V Shpol'skii and his colleagues were the first to see quasilinear spectra from complex organic compounds in specially selected solvents at low temperatures. Twenty years later, in 1972, a team headed by Prof. R I Personov discovered laser fluorescence line narrowing in the solid solutions of organic dyes. These two discoveries served as the basis for the field of laser selective spectroscopy of impurity centers in solids. The work in this field culminated in the techniques of spectroscopy and luminescence imaging (microscopy) of single molecules in condensed matter. Today, optical spectroscopy of impurity centers in solid solutions has become one of the most popular tools for solving a wide variety of interdisciplinary problems in physics, physical chemistry, optics and spectroscopy, biophysics, quantum optics, and nanotechnology. In this article, the development of this field is briefly reviewed, potentials of the developed methods are discussed, and some research results are highlighted.

  9. Adsorption of organic molecules on rutile TiO2 and anatase TiO2 single crystal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andrew G; Syres, Karen L

    2012-06-07

    The interaction of organic molecules with titanium dioxide surfaces has been the subject of many studies over the last few decades. Numerous surface science techniques have been utilised to understand the often complex nature of these systems. The reasons for studying these systems are hugely diverse given that titanium dioxide has many technological and medical applications. Although surface science experiments investigating the adsorption of organic molecules on titanium dioxide surfaces is not a new area of research, the field continues to change and evolve as new potential applications are discovered and new techniques to study the systems are developed. This tutorial review aims to update previous reviews on the subject. It describes experimental and theoretical work on the adsorption of carboxylic acids, dye molecules, amino acids, alcohols, catechols and nitrogen containing compounds on single crystal TiO(2) surfaces.

  10. Spin-polarization inversion at small organic molecule/Fe{sub 4}N interfaces: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian; Mi, Wenbo, E-mail: miwenbo@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparation Technology, Faculty of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-09-21

    We report the first-principles calculations on the electronic structure and simulation of the spin-polarized scan tunneling microscopy graphic of the small organic molecules (benzene, thiophene, and cyclopentadienyl)/Fe{sub 4}N interfaces. It is found that the plane of benzene and thiophene keeps parallel to Fe{sub 4}N surface, while that of cyclopentadienyl does not. For all the systems, the organic molecules bind strongly with Fe{sub 4}N. Due to the hybridization between molecule p{sub z} orbitals and d orbitals of Fe, i.e., Zener interaction, all the three systems realize the spin-polarization inversion, whereas the spatial spin-polarization inversion distribution shows different intensities influenced by the competition between the spin polarization of C p{sub z} and Fe d states.

  11. Fundamental structural characteristics of planar granular assemblies: Self-organization and scaling away friction and initial state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Takashi; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2017-03-01

    The microstructural organization of a granular system is the most important determinant of its macroscopic behavior. Here we identify the fundamental factors that determine the statistics of such microstructures, using numerical experiments to gain a general understanding. The experiments consist of preparing and compacting isotropically two-dimensional granular assemblies of polydisperse frictional disks and analyzing the emergent statistical properties of quadrons—the basic structural elements of granular solids. The focus on quadrons is because the statistics of their volumes have been found to display intriguing universal-like features [T. Matsushima and R. Blumenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098003]. The dependence of the structures and of the packing fraction on the intergranular friction and the initial state is analyzed, and a number of significant results are found. (i) An analytical formula is derived for the mean quadron volume in terms of three macroscopic quantities: the mean coordination number, the packing fraction, and the rattlers fraction. (ii) We derive a unique, initial-state-independent relation between the mean coordination number and the rattler-free packing fraction. The relation is supported numerically for a range of different systems. (iii) We collapse the quadron volume distributions from all systems onto one curve, and we verify that they all have an exponential tail. (iv) The nature of the quadron volume distribution is investigated by decomposition into conditional distributions of volumes given the cell order, and we find that each of these also collapses onto a single curve. (v) We find that the mean quadron volume decreases with increasing intergranular friction coefficients, an effect that is prominent in high-order cells. We argue that this phenomenon is due to an increased probability of stable irregularly shaped cells, and we test this using a herewith developed free cell analytical model

  12. Time resolved single molecule spectroscopy of semiconductor quantum dot/conjugated organic hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoi, Michael Yemoh

    Single molecule studies on CdSe quantum dots functionalized with oligo-phenylene vinylene ligands (CdSe-OPV) provide evidence of strong electronic communication that facilitate charge and energy transport between the OPV ligands and the CdSe quantum dot core. This electronic interaction greatly modify, the photoluminescence properties of both bulk and single CdSe-OPV nanostructure thin film samples. Size-correlated wide-field fluorescence imaging show that blinking suppression in single CdSe-OPV is linked to the degree of OPV coverage (inferred from AFM height scans) on the quantum dot surface. The effect of the complex electronic environment presented by photoexcited OPV ligands on the excited state property of CdSe-OPV is measured with single photon counting and photon-pair correlation spectroscopy techniques. Time-tagged-time-resolved (TTTR) single photon counting measurements from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures, show excited state lifetimes an order of magnitude shorter relative to conventional ZnS/CdSe quantum dots. Second-order intensity correlation measurements g(2)(tau) from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures point to a weak multi-excitonic character with a strong wavelength dependent modulation depth. By tuning in and out of the absorption of the OPV ligands we observe changes in modulation depth from g(2) (0) ≈ 0.2 to 0.05 under 405 and 514 nm excitation respectively. Defocused images and polarization anisotropy measurements also reveal a well-defined linear dipole emission pattern in single CdSe-OPV nanostructures. These results provide new insights into to the mechanism behind the electronic interactions in composite quantum dot/conjugated organic composite systems at the single molecule level. The observed intensity flickering , blinking suppression and associated lifetime/count rate and antibunching behaviour is well explained by a Stark interaction model. Charge transfer from photo-excitation of the OPV ligands to the surface of the Cd

  13. Aqueous solubility of a simple (single-carbon) organic molecule as a function of its size & dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Malah, Kamal I

    2011-05-01

    The aqueous solubility of a single-carbon organic molecule as a function of its size & dipole moment was investigated. The molecular dipole moment was chosen to represent the polar character of a poly-atomic molecule. It is hypothesized here that at a given pH, temperature, and pressure, the solubility of a single-carbon organic molecule in water will be a function of its polar character; namely, dipole moment and of its molecular size. Different forms of the solubility function were tested; it was found that the solubility model, given by Eq. 1, which is based on the polar character and the molecular volume, adequately described the aqueous solubility of single-carbon organic moieties. The aqueous solubility of single-carbon organic solutes exhibits maximum at the condition of high polar character (large dipole moment) and low molecular volume. The general trend of the solubility of single-carbon organic solutes, based on the proposed model (Eq. 1) could be explained in terms of the trade-off between the driving force (degree of polar character of the solute) for solubilization versus the resistance to be solubilized as a result of the entropic effects which increase with increasing molecular volume of the organic moiety.

  14. Introducing Bond-Line Organic Structures in High School Biology: An Activity that Incorporates Pleasant-Smelling Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Andro C.; French, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Chemical education occurs in settings other than just the chemistry classroom. High school biology courses are frequently where students are introduced to organic molecules and their importance to cellular chemistry. However, structural representations are often intimidating because students have not been introduced to the language. As part of a…

  15. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Dequaire, Tristan; Stalport, Fabien; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The search for organic carbon-containing molecules at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major scientific goal for Mars exploration. Several lines of evidence, including the detection of phyllosilicates, suggest that early Mars offered favorable conditions for long-term sustaining of water. As a consequence, we can assume that in those days, endogenous chemical processes, or even primitive life, may have produced organic matter on Mars. Moreover, exogenous delivery from small bodies or dust particles is likely to have brought fresh organic molecules to the surface of Mars up today. Organic matter is therefore expected to be present at the surface/subsurface of the planet. But the current environmental conditions at the surface - UV radiation, oxidants and energetic particles - generate physico-chemical processes that may affect organic molecules. On the other hand, on Earth, phyllosilicates are known to accumulate and preserve organic matter. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under the current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We have monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea and adenine interacting with the Fe3+-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated Martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We have tested organic-rich samples which may be representative of the evaporation of a warm little pond of liquid water having concentrated organics on Mars. For each molecule, we have observed how the nontronite influences the quantum efficiency of its photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine: their efficiencies of photodecomposition are reduced by a factor

  16. Comprehensive approach to intrinsic charge carrier mobility in conjugated organic molecules, macromolecules, and supramolecular architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Akinori; Koizumi, Yoshiko; Aida, Takuzo; Seki, Shu

    2012-08-21

    (-1) s(-1), based on a combination of flash-photolysis TRMC and transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) measurements. Single-crystal rubrene showed an ambipolarity with anisotropic charge carrier transport along each crystal axis on the nanometer scale. Finally, we describe the charge carrier mobility of a self-assembled nanotube consisting of a large π-plane of hexabenzocoronene (HBC) partially appended with an electron acceptor. The local (intratubular) charge carrier mobility reached 3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the nanotubes that possessed well-ordered π-stacking, but it dropped to 0.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in regions that contained greater amounts of the electron acceptor because those molecules reduced the structural integrity of π-stacked HBC arrays. Interestingly, the long-range (intertubular) charge carrier mobility was on the order of 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and monotonically decreased when the acceptor content was increased. These results suggest the importance of investigating charge carrier mobilities by frequency-dependent charge carrier motion for the development of more efficient organic electronic devices.

  17. Light-controlled mass formation of aggregates of molecules in organic compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tariel D.Ebralidze; Nadia A.Ebralidze; Giorgi A.Mumladze; Enriko S.Kitsmarishvili

    2009-01-01

    During the mass formation of aggregates of molecules in a gelatin film dyed with the mixture of chrysophenine and acridine yellow dyes,photo-reorientation,photo-disorientation,and photo-orientation of the molecules are observed.Based on these observations,the photo-induction of granular aniso tropy may be realized.

  18. Terminal moiety-driven electrical performance of asymmetric small-molecule-based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Jianhua; Zhang, Shanlin; jiang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    With respect to the successes from symmetric small molecules, asymmetric ones have recently emerged as an alternative choice. In this paper, we present the synthesis and photovoltaic properties of four asymmetric small molecule donors. The benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) end in the asymmetri...

  19. The Spatial Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the L1544 Pre-stellar Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T<10 K), has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modelling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly-extinguished continuum peak with AV ≥30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average AV ~7.5-8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH3OH. Our observations show that CH3O, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO are more abundant (by factors ~2-10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH3OCHO, c-C3H2O, HCCCHO, CH2CHCN and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3) but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modelling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains. PMID:27733899

  20. Rapid heating experiments demonstrate the usefulness of organic molecules as an earthquake thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, R. E.; Polissar, P. J.; Savage, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    Measuring temperature rise due to an earthquake would elucidate the frictional characteristics of a fault during rapid slip. We developed a new paleothermometer for fault zones using the thermal maturity of organic compounds as a temperature proxy. The kinetics of these reactions are highly nonlinear, and previous experiments to constrain the kinetic parameters have only been accomplished on long time scales. We ran a series of rapid heating experiments designed to determine these parameters specifically on short time scales. Here, we focus on the kinetics of methylphenanthrenes, aromatic molecules whose pattern of methylation changes with thermal maturity. The MPI-1 thermal maturity index is a ratio of methylphenanthrene's refractory 2- and 3-methylphenanthrene isomers relative to the less stable 9- and 1-methylphenanthrene isomers, and thus increases with increasing temperature. Methylphenanthrenes are relevant to the study of fault heating as they are consistently found in faults exhumed from depths shallower than 4km. To address whether methylphenanthrenes react at earthquake rates, we conducted rapid hydrous pyrolysis experiments in a small stainless steel reactor with a carburized inner surface. For each experiment, the reactor was partially filled with water and Woodford Shale, an organic-rich, thermally immature quartzose claystone sampled in central Oklahoma. The reactor was heated for a range of times and temperatures using resistive heating coils. Temperature was controlled using an external thermocouple and a PID controller, while the temperature of the sample was recorded with an internal thermocouple. Steam pressure was monitored using a pressure transducer throughout the experiment. The expelled oil was extracted from the water contained in the reactor using a separatory funnel, and the shale fragments were crushed and extracted via sonication. Both the oil and the shale extractions were then separated using column chromatography. GCMS analysis shows

  1. Exploring molecular complexity with ALMA (EMoCA): Deuterated complex organic molecules in Sagittarius B2(N2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Deuteration is a powerful tracer of the history of the cold prestellar phase in star-forming regions. Apart from methanol, little is known about deuterium fractionation of complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium, especially in regions forming high-mass stars. Aims: Our goal is to detect deuterated complex organic molecules toward the high mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2 (Sgr B2) and derive the level of deuteration for these molecules. Methods: We use a complete 3-mm spectral line survey performed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to search for deuterated complex organic molecules toward the hot molecular core Sgr B2(N2). We constructed population diagrams and integrated intensity maps to fit rotational temperatures and emission sizes for each molecule. Column densities are derived by modeling the full spectrum under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We compare the results to predictions of two astrochemical models that treat the deuteration process. Results: We report the detection of CH2DCN toward Sgr B2(N2) with a deuteration level of 0.4%, and tentative detections of CH2DOH, CH2DCH2CN, the chiral molecule CH3CHDCN, and DC3N with levels in the range 0.05%-0.12%. A stringent deuteration upper limit is obtained for CH3OD (B2(N2) are also lower than in Orion KL by a factor of a few up to a factor ten. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the deuteration levels of Sgr B2(N2) and the predictions of chemical models, and the difference between Sgr B2(N2) and Orion KL may both be due to the higher kinetic temperatures that characterize the Galactic center region compared to nearby clouds. Alternatively, they may result from a lower overall abundance of deuterium itself in the Galactic center region by up to a factor ten.

  2. Functional p-Type, Polymerized Organic Electrode Interlayer in CH₃NH₃PbI₃ Perovskite/Fullerene Planar Heterojunction Hybrid Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tsung-Yu; Fan, Gang-Lun; Jeng, Jun-Yuan; Chen, Kuo-Cheng; Chen, Peter; Wen, Ten-Chin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Wong, Ken-Tsung

    2015-11-11

    Thermal curing of the styrene-functionalized 9,9-diarylfluorene-based triaryldiamine monomer (VB-DAAF) forms an ideal p-type organic electrode interlayer capable of resisting solvation of the polar precursor solution in fabricating methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite/fullerene (C60) planar heterojunction hybrid solar cells. The polymerized VB-DAAF film exhibits a good energy level alignment with the valence-band-edge level of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite to facilitate the transport of holes. The large energy barrier to the conduction-band-edge level of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite effectively blocks electrons from reaching the positive electrode and reduces the photon energy loss due to recombination. The best-performing cell with the configuration of glass/indium-tin oxide/polymerized VB-DAAF/CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite/C60/bathocuproine/aluminum is free of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) layer to achieve an open-circuit voltage (VOC) = 1.02 V, a short-circuit current (JSC) = 18.92 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) = 0.78, corresponding to a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.17% under standard 1 sun AM 1.5G simulated solar irradiation. The performance is much superior to the device applying the PSS interlayer with photovoltaic parameters of VOC = 0.85 V, JSC = 16.37 mA/cm(2), and FF = 0.74, corresponding to a PCE of 10.27%. Additionally, we had applied a UV-assisted process to polymerize the VB-DAAF film at relatively lower temperature and fabricate decent perovskite-based solar cells on the flexible substrate for real applications.

  3. Searching for amino-acid homochirality on Mars with the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard ExoMars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Brault, A.; Szopa, C.; Claude-Geffroy, C.; Coll, P. J.; Grand, N.; Raulin, F.; Pinick, V.; Goesmann, F.

    2012-12-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission plans to seek the signs of a past or a present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment onboard theExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing molecular information from Mars solid samples, with a specific focus on the characterization of their organic content. In this purpose, one of MOMA's main instruments is a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), which provides a unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds and allow chemical analyses on volatile and refractory species. The challenge with the analysis of this refractory matter embedded in soil is their primary extraction before their analysis by GC-MS. Since the extraction of organic matter is not possible by liquid solvent extraction, we have developed a method based on the thermodesorption and subsequent derivatization of the organic molecules. The goal of the thermodesorption is to extract the organic matter by heating the sample quickly enough not to degrade its organic content. One of the main focuses is to determine the chirality of this organic matter, notably amino acids. Indeed, on Earth, homochirality of molecules is an indicator for the presence of life. Amino acids appear to bear only the left-handed form (L) in living system. However, other refractory compounds can raise interest: nucleobases, carboxylic acids and PAHs are among molecules supported by life as we know it, and all of them can display chirality. The intrinsic chirality of molecules being thermosensitive, the thermodesorption parameters have been adjusted to occur within a range of temperatures from 150 °C to 300 °C over a period of 30 s to 10 min, depending on the chemical compound. Under these conditions, we have shown that amino acids are not degraded and that their chirality is preserved. Once extracted, refractory molecules with labile hydrogens (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, etc.) are derivatized

  4. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  5. Functionalized Self-Assembled InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Structures Hybridized with Organic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Miaoxiang Max; Kobashi, K.; Chen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Low-dimensional III-V semiconductors have many advantages over other semiconductors; however, they are not particularly stable under physiological conditions. Hybridizing biocompatible organic molecules with advanced optical and electronic semiconductor devices based on quantum dots (QDs......) and quantum wires could provide an efficient solution to realize stress-free and nontoxic interfaces to attach larger functional biomolecules. Monitoring the modifications of the optical properties of the hybrid molecule-QD systems by grafting various types of air-stable diazonium salts onto the QD structures...

  6. Lab-on-a-Chip Instrumentation and Method for Detecting Trace Organic and Bioorganic Molecules in Planetary Exploration: The Enceladus Organic Analyzer (EOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, A.; Stockton, A. M.; Turin, P.; Ludlam, M.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Kim, J.; Mathies, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Lab-on-a-chip instrumentation is providing an ever more powerful in situ approach for detecting organic molecules relevant for chemical/biochemical evolution in our solar system obviating the cost, risk and long mission duration associated with sample return. Microfabricated analysis systems are particularly feasible when directly sampling from comet comae, or ejecta from icy moons, such as targeting organic molecules in plumes from Enceladus. Furthermore, the superb ppm to ppb sensitivity of chip analyzers, like the Enceladus Organic Analyzer (EOA), coupled with the ability to examine organics with a wide variety of functional groups enhance the probability of detecting organic molecules and determining whether they have a biological origin. The EOA is based on 20 years of research and development of microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) analyzers at Berkeley that provide ppb sensitivity for a wide variety of organic molecules including amino acids, carboxylic acids, amines, aldehydes, ketones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [1]. Organic molecules are labeled with a fluorescent reagent according to their functional group in a programmable microfluidic processor [2,3] and then separated in a CE system followed by laser-induced fluorescence detection to determine molecular size and concentration. The EOA will be flown through Enceladus plumes and uses a specially designed impact plate/door to capture ice-particles. After closing the door, the material in the capture chamber is dissolved, labeled and analyzed by the microfabricated CE system. Only a few thousand 2 μm diameter particles containing ppm organic concentrations will provide an EOA detectable signal. If amino acids are detected, their chirality is determined because chirality is the best indicator of a biologically produced molecule. We have developed a flight design of this instrument for planetary exploration that is compact (16x16x12 cm), has low mass (3 kg), and requires very low power

  7. Combustion of Organic Molecules by the Thermal Decomposition of Perchlorate Salts: Implications for Organics at the Mars Phoenix Scout Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D.W.; Morris, R.V.; Niles, B.; Lauer, H.V.; Archer, P.D.; Sutter, B.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout Mission successfully landed on May 25, 2008 and operated on the northern plains of Mars for 150 sols. The primary mission objective was to study the history of water and evaluate the potential for past and present habitability in Martian arctic ice-rich soil [1]. Phoenix landed near 68 N latitude on polygonal terrain created by ice layers that are a few centimeters under loose soil materials. The Phoenix Mission is assessing the potential for habitability by searching for organic molecules in the ice or icy soils at the landing site. Organic molecules are necessary building blocks for life, although their presence in the ice or soil does not indicate life itself. Phoenix searched for organic molecules by heating soil/ice samples in the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA, [2]). TEGA consists of 8 differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) ovens integrated with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer with a mass range of 2-140 daltons [2]. Endothermic and exothermic reactions are recorded by the TEGA DSC as samples are heated from ambient to 1000 C. Evolved gases, including any organic molecules and their fragments, are simultaneously measured by the mass spectrometer during heating. Phoenix TEGA data are still under analysis; however, no organic fragments have been identified to date in the evolved gas analysis (EGA). The MECA Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) discovered a perchlorate salt in the Phoenix soils and a mass 32 peak evolved between 325 and 625 C for one surface sample dubbed Baby Bear [3]. The mass 32 peak is attributed to evolved O2 generated during the thermal decomposition of the perchlorate salt. Perchlorates are very strong oxidizers when heated, so it is possible that organic fragments evolved in the temperature range of 300-600 C were combusted by the O2 released during the thermal decomposition of the perchlorate salt. The byproduct of the combustion of organic molecules is CO2. There is a prominent release of CO2 between 200

  8. Molecular and structural characterization of dissolved organic matter from the deep ocean by FTICR-MS, including hydrophilic nitrogenous organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemtsma, T.; These, A.; Linscheid, M.; Leenheer, J.; Spitzy, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter isolated from the deep Atlantic Ocean and fractionated into a so-called hydrophobic (HPO) fraction and a very hydrophilic (HPI) fraction was analyzed for the first time by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) to resolve the molecular species, to determine their exact masses, and to calculate their molecular formulas. The elemental composition of about 300 molecules was identified. Those in the HPO fraction (14C age of 5100 year) are very similar to much younger freshwater fulvic acids, but less aromatic and more oxygenated molecules are more frequent. This trend continues toward the HPI fraction and may indicate biotic and abiotic aging processes that this material experienced since its primary production thousands of years ago. In the HPI fraction series of nitrogenous molecules containing one, two, or three nitrogens were identified by FTICR-MS. Product ion spectra of the nitrogenous molecules suggest that the nitrogen atoms in these molecules are included in the (alicyclic) backbone of these molecules, possibly in reduced form. These mass spectrometric data suggest that a large set of stable fulvic acids is ubiquitous in all aquatic compartments. Although sources may differ, their actual composition and structure appears to be quite similar and largely independent from their source, because they are the remainder of intensive oxidative degradation processes. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  9. Fluorescent molecule incorporated metal-organic framework for fluoride sensing in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xudong; Wang, Yuanyang; Hao, Xiuli; Liu, Wen

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the fluorescent molecule (fluorescein sodium, FS) was successfully incorporated in the zirconium-based MOF (UiO-66) via in-situ synthesis method, which can be confirmed by FTIR spectra and fluorescence microscopic images. Based on this in-situ synthesis strategy, FS molecule can be immobilized tightly in the framework. Furthermore, the resulting FS@UiO-66 demonstrates to be a highly selective, real-time and naked-eye chemical sensor for fluoride in aqueous solution, which is mainly due to the release of FS molecule from FS@UiO-66 into the aqueous solution. Meanwhile, to the best of our knowledge, such Zr-MOF-based fluoride sensor is very rare so far. These results provide a promising approach to rationally design novel MOF-based fluorescent sensor for the target molecules.

  10. Synthesis of many different types of organic small molecules using one automated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junqi; Ballmer, Steven G; Gillis, Eric P; Fujii, Seiko; Schmidt, Michael J; Palazzolo, Andrea M E; Lehmann, Jonathan W; Morehouse, Greg F; Burke, Martin D

    2015-03-13

    Small-molecule synthesis usually relies on procedures that are highly customized for each target. A broadly applicable automated process could greatly increase the accessibility of this class of compounds to enable investigations of their practical potential. Here we report the synthesis of 14 distinct classes of small molecules using the same fully automated process. This was achieved by strategically expanding the scope of a building block-based synthesis platform to include even C(sp3)-rich polycyclic natural product frameworks and discovering a catch-and-release chromatographic purification protocol applicable to all of the corresponding intermediates. With thousands of compatible building blocks already commercially available, many small molecules are now accessible with this platform. More broadly, these findings illuminate an actionable roadmap to a more general and automated approach for small-molecule synthesis. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Deposition and STM characterization of luminescent organic molecules on metal substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xinli [Advanced Nanocharacterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: Guo.xinli@nims.go.jp; Dong Zhenchao [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Fujita, Daisuke [Advanced Nanocharacterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-03

    The porphyrin-based molecules including H{sub 2}TBPP, ZnTBPP and P{sub t}TBPP as well as the perinone derivatives (PD) molecules were deposited on Au(100), Au(111) and Cu(100) substrates in the form of single molecule, molecular line, submonolayer, monolayer and multilayer. The features of the performed molecular nanostructures were characterized by an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature. The observed molecular topographies matched very well with the molecule structures in spite of the fact that the molecular adsorption states were influenced by different metal surface. STM-induced photon emission was generated from the surface of H{sub 2}TBPP multilayer structures on Au(100) in tunneling junction when the applied bias exceeds the 'turn-on' voltages {approx}- 1.6 V or + 1.3 V at 0.5 nA.

  12. Graphical prediction of quantum interference-induced transmission nodes in functionalized organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Stadler, Robert; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    with tight-binding and density functional theory calculations to investigate QI in linear molecular chains and aromatic molecules with different side groups. For the molecular chains we find a linear relation between the position of the transmission nodes and the side group π orbital energy. In contrast......, the transmission functions of functionalized aromatic molecules generally display a rather complex nodal structure due to the interplay between molecular topology and the energy of the side group orbital....

  13. CAL3JHH: a Java program to calculate the vicinal coupling constants (3J H,H) of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Valderrama, Alonso; Dobado, José A

    2008-12-01

    Here, we present a free web-accessible application, developed in the JAVA programming language for the calculation of vicinal coupling constant (3J(H,H)) of organic molecules with the H-Csp3-Csp3-H fragment. This JAVA applet is oriented to assist chemists in structural and conformational analyses, allowing the user to calculate the averaged 3J(H,H) values among conformers, according to its Boltzmann populations. Thus, the CAL3JHH program uses the Haasnoot-Leeuw-Altona equation, and, by reading the molecule geometry from a protein data bank (PDB) file format or from multiple pdb files, automatically detects all the coupled hydrogens, evaluating the data needed for this equation. Moreover, a "Graphical viewer" menu allows the display of the results on the 3D molecule structure, as well as the plotting of the Newman projection for the couplings.

  14. CAL3JHH: a Java program to calculate the vicinal coupling constants (3 J H,H) of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Valderrama, Alonso; Dobado, José A.

    2008-12-01

    Here, we present a free web-accessible application, developed in the JAVA programming language for the calculation of vicinal coupling constant (3 J H,H) of organic molecules with the H-Csp3-Csp3-H fragment. This JAVA applet is oriented to assist chemists in structural and conformational analyses, allowing the user to calculate the averaged 3 J H,H values among conformers, according to its Boltzmann populations. Thus, the CAL3JHH program uses the Haasnoot-Leeuw-Altona equation, and, by reading the molecule geometry from a protein data bank (PDB) file format or from multiple pdb files, automatically detects all the coupled hydrogens, evaluating the data needed for this equation. Moreover, a "Graphical viewer" menu allows the display of the results on the 3D molecule structure, as well as the plotting of the Newman projection for the couplings.

  15. Tensor algebra-based geometric methodology to codify central chirality on organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jacas, C R; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Hernández-Ortega, T; Martinez-Mayorga, K; Cabrera-Leyva, L; Ledesma-Romero, J C; Aguilera-Fernández, I; Rodríguez-León, A R

    2017-06-01

    A novel mathematical procedure to codify chiral features of organic molecules in the QuBiLS-MIDAS framework is introduced. This procedure constitutes a generalization to that commonly used to date, where the values 1 and -1 (correction factor) are employed to weight the molecular vectors when each atom is labelled as R (rectus) or S (sinister) according to the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog rules. Therefore, values in the range [Formula: see text] with steps equal to 0.25 may be accounted for. The atoms labelled R or S can have negative and positive values assigned (e.g. -3 for an R atom and 1 for an S atom, or vice versa), opposed values (e.g. -3 for an R atom and 3 for an S atom, or vice versa), positive values (e.g. 3 for an R atom and 1 for an S atom) or negative values (e.g. -3 for an R atom and -1 for an S atom). These proposed Chiral QuBiLS-MIDAS 3D-MDs are real numbers, non-symmetric and reduced to 'classical' (non-chiral) QuBiLS-MIDAS 3D-MDs when symmetry is not codified (correction factor equal to zero). In this report, only the factors with opposed values were considered with the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of this proposal. From QSAR modelling carried out on four chemical datasets (Cramer's steroids, fenoterol stereoisomer derivatives, N-alkylated 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-piperidines, and perindoprilat stereoisomers), it was demonstrated that the use of several correction factors contributes to the building of models with greater robustness and predictive ability than those reported in the literature, as well as with respect to the models exclusively developed with QuBiLS-MIDAS 3D-MDs based on the factor 1 | -1. In conclusion, it can be stated that this novel strategy constitutes a suitable alternative to computed chirality-based descriptors, contributing to the development of good models to predict properties depending on symmetry.

  16. Cold preservation injury in organ transplantation : beneficial effects of dopamine and carbon monoxide releasing molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation, as a treatment modality for patients with end-stage organ disease, has become possible by adequate improvements in surgical techniques, organ preservation and immunosuppression. Static cold preservation is the most widely used modality for preserving cadaveric organs

  17. Array formatting of the heat-transfer method (HTM) for the detection of small organic molecules by molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackers, Gideon; Vandenryt, Thijs; Cornelis, Peter; Kellens, Evelien; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; van Grinsven, Bart; Peeters, Marloes; Wagner, Patrick

    2014-06-20

    In this work we present the first steps towards a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based biomimetic sensor array for the detection of small organic molecules via the heat-transfer method (HTM). HTM relies on the change in thermal resistance upon binding of the target molecule to the MIP-type receptor. A flow-through sensor cell was developed, which is segmented into four quadrants with a volume of 2.5 μL each, allowing four measurements to be done simultaneously on a single substrate. Verification measurements were conducted, in which all quadrants received a uniform treatment and all four channels exhibited a similar response. Subsequently, measurements were performed in quadrants, which were functionalized with different MIP particles. Each of these quadrants was exposed to the same buffer solution, spiked with different molecules, according to the MIP under analysis. With the flow cell design we could discriminate between similar small organic molecules and observed no significant cross-selectivity. Therefore, the MIP array sensor platform with HTM as a readout technique, has the potential to become a low-cost analysis tool for bioanalytical applications.

  18. Kinetics of organic molecules in pulsed plasmas of nitrogen or N2/O2 mixtures at near atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquiers, S.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Magne, L.

    2013-12-01

    In plasmas of atmospheric gases, the kinetics of some aliphatic organic molecules belonging to the hydrocarbons (propene, propane), aldehydes (acetaldehyde) and ketones (acetone) families were studied using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma). It was shown that quenchings of N2 metastable states, A\\,^{3}\\Sigma_{u}^{+} and the group of singlets a'\\,^{1}\\Sigma_{u}^{-} , a 1Πg and w 1Δu, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. It plays a fundamental role in the nitrogen plasma, but it is also present in air. At low temperature, the oxidation reactions by the oxygen atom or by the hydroxyl radical are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the nitrogen/organic mixture. For most cases, quenching processes appear purely dissociative. However, recent results obtained for propene lead to the conclusion that a non-dissociative exit route could exist. The quenching of the singlet states induces a break of the double bound C = O for the acetaldehyde and acetone molecules. Some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas, which could be very useful to get a comprehensive understanding of the physico-chemical processes in dielectric barriers or corona discharges used for various applications.

  19. Exploring Molecular Complexity with ALMA (EMoCA): Deuterated complex organic molecules in Sagittarius B2(N2)

    CERN Document Server

    Belloche, A; Garrod, R T; Menten, K M

    2015-01-01

    Deuteration is a powerful tracer of the history of the cold prestellar phase in star forming regions. Apart from methanol, little is known about deuterium fractionation of complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium, especially in high mass star forming regions. We use a spectral line survey performed with ALMA to search for deuterated complex organic molecules toward the hot molecular core Sgr B2(N2). Population diagrams and integrated intensity maps are constructed to fit rotational temperatures and emission sizes for each molecule. Column densities are derived by modelling the full spectrum under the LTE assumption. The results are compared to predictions of two astrochemical models that treat the deuteration process. We report the detection of CH2DCN toward Sgr B2(N2) with a deuteration level of 0.4%, and tentative detections of CH2DOH, CH2DCH2CN, the chiral molecule CH3CHDCN, and DC3N with levels in the range 0.05%-0.12%. A stringent deuteration upper limit is obtained for CH3OD (<0.07%). Upp...

  20. Mitigation of charged impurity effects in graphene field-effect transistors with polar organic molecules (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Barrett C.; Kim, Seohee; Akinwande, Deji; Rossky, Peter J.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in monolayer graphene production allow its use as the active layer in field-effect transistor technology. Favorable electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene include high mobility, operating frequency, and good stability. These characteristics are governed by such key transport physical phenomena as electron-hole transport symmetry, Dirac point voltage, and charged impurity effects. Doping of graphene occurs during device fabrication, and is largely due to charged impurities located at or near the graphene/substrate interface. These impurities cause scattering of charge carriers, which lowers mobility. Such scattering is detrimental to graphene transistor performance, but our group has shown that coating with fluoropolymer thin films or exposure to polar organic vapors can restore favorable electrical characteristics to monolayer graphene. By partially neutralizing charged impurities and defects, we can improve the mobility by approximately a factor of 2, change the Dirac voltage by fairly large amounts, and reduce the residual carrier density significantly. We hypothesize that this phenomena results from screening of charged impurities by the polar molecules. To better understand such screening interactions, we performed computational chemistry experiments to observe interactions between polar organic molecules and monolayer graphene. The molecules interacted more strongly with defective graphene than with pristine graphene, and the electronic environment of graphene was altered. These computational observations correlate well with our experimental results to support our hypothesis that polar molecules can act to screen charged impurities on or near monolayer graphene. Such screening favorably mitigates charge scattering, improving graphene transistor performance.

  1. Surface supramolecular organization of a terbium(III) double-decker complex on graphite and its single molecule magnet behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidec, Mathieu; Biagi, Roberto; Corradini, Valdis; Moro, Fabrizio; De Renzi, Valentina; del Pennino, Umberto; Summa, Domenico; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio; Amabilino, David B; Veciana, Jaume

    2011-05-01

    The two-dimensional self-assembly of a terbium(III) double-decker phthalocyanine on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and it was shown that it forms highly regular rectangular two-dimensional nanocrystals on the surface, that are aligned with the graphite symmetry axes, in which the molecules are organized in a rectangular lattice as shown by scanning tunneling microscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations were run in order to model the behavior of a collection of the double-decker complexes on HOPG. The results were in excellent agreement with the experiment, showing that-after diffusion on the graphite surface-the molecules self-assemble into nanoscopic islands which align preferentially along the three main graphite axes. These low dimension assemblies of independent magnetic centers are only one molecule thick (as shown by AFM) and are therefore very interesting nanoscopic magnetic objects, in which all of the molecules are in interaction with the graphite substrate and might therefore be affected by it. The magnetic properties of these self-assembled bar-shaped islands on HOPG were studied by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, confirming that the compounds maintain their properties as single-molecule magnets when they are in close interaction with the graphite surface.

  2. Photoabsorption cross sections of organic molecules in the VUV at low temperatures : application to Titan's atmosphere observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Jolly, A.; Schwell, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    To build photochemical models of planetary atmospheres and to interpret observations the photoabsorption cross sections of molecules are needed A critical review of the absorption coefficient available in the vacuum ultraviolet domain VUV 110-210 nm for organic molecules present or expected to be present in Titan s atmosphere showed a critical lack of data In particular many absorption cross sections have never been measured at low temperature The lack is even greater for molecules not commercially available since even at room temperature absolute absorption coefficients are not available or erroneous A new specific absorption cell has thus been designed to o measure the absorption cross sections in the VUV range at low temperature characteristic of Titan s atmosphere The first molecules that we have studied are HCN HC3N and C4H2 We used the Berlin synchrotron facility BESSY to obtained those new absorption coefficients including the first spectra in the 110 to 210 nm range at the low temperature representative of Titan s atmosphere The effect of the temperature on the spectra will be discussed A application to the determination of photodissociation rate of those molecules will be showed And an application to the interpretation of VUV observations of Titan s atmosphere obtained by the UV spectrometer UVIS on board the CASSINI spacecraft will be presented

  3. Energetics and structure of organic molecules embedded in single-wall carbon nanotubes from first principles: The example of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milko, Matus; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia

    2011-08-01

    Stability and structural properties of nanopeapods are investigated by means of density-functional theory (DFT) including van der Waals interactions. As a prototypical system of organic π-conjugated molecules embedded into single-wall carbon nanotubes, we study benzene inside zig-zag nanotubes (n,0), with n ranging from 10 to 18. We explore the position and orientation of the molecule inside the cavity and find the optimal tube diameter for encapsulation to be around 1 nm. We compute that, overall, the molecule tends to align its molecular plane parallel to the tube axis. The internal orientation and molecule-wall distance depend, however, quite strongly on the tube diameter. The overall energy minimum is found for a situation in which the benzene ring takes a tilted position inside the (13,0) nanotube. Chirality turns out not to play a role in terms of the energetics. When benzene arrays are confined in nanotubes, the intermolecular distances can differ from those in the gas phase. Intermolecular interactions are important and further stabilize the peapods. As these as well as the molecule-tube interactions are governed by dispersive forces, we critically assess the performance of different DFT-based methods in this respect. Comparing four different computational schemes including both ab initio and semi-empirical treatment of van der Waals interactions, we conclude that vdW-DF is most reliable in terms of energetics and structural properties of these hybrids.

  4. Using sum rules to guide experiential and theoretical studies of the intrinsic nonlinear-optical susceptibility of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juefei

    This dissertation combines theoretical and experimental studies of organic molecules to understand light-matter interactions with the goal of making more efficient nonlinear-optical molecules. We use a finite element method to numerically calculate and optimize the nonlinear-optical susceptibilities of 1-dimensional molecules, which resulted in a new paradigm for fabricating molecules with better nonlinear properties. This approach was used as a guide by researchers to identify and characterize a record-high intrinsic hyperpolarizability. Using the results of a sum rule analysis, we propose a new method for modeling the nonlinear-optical spectra of molecules. We apply our theory to the two-photon absorption cross section of the Air Force dye called AF455, and find that it is consistent with our measurements. The properties of the first two excited states of AF455 determined with a combination of linear absorption spectroscopy and hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements are sufficient to predict, within experimental uncertainty, the full two-photon absorption spectrum.

  5. Hybrids of organic molecules and flat, oxide-free silicon: high-density monolayers, electronic properties, and functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Calder, Steven; Yaffe, Omer; Cahen, David; Haick, Hossam; Kronik, Leeor; Zuilhof, Han

    2012-07-03

    Since the first report of Si-C bound organic monolayers on oxide-free Si almost two decades ago, a substantial amount of research has focused on studying the fundamental mechanical and electronic properties of these Si/molecule surfaces and interfaces. This feature article covers three closely related topics, including recent advances in achieving high-density organic monolayers (i.e., atomic coverage >55%) on oxide-free Si(111) substrates, an overview of progress in the fundamental understanding of the energetics and electronic properties of hybrid Si/molecule systems, and a brief summary of recent examples of subsequent functionalization on these high-density monolayers, which can significantly expand the range of applicability. Taken together, these topics provide an overview of the present status of this active area of research.

  6. Charge-specific size-dependent separation of water-soluble organic molecules by fluorinated nanoporous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jeehye; Patel, Hasmukh A.; Thirion, Damien; Yavuz, Cafer T.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular architecture in nanoscale spaces can lead to selective chemical interactions and separation of species with similar sizes and functionality. Substrate specific sorbent chemistry is well known through highly crystalline ordered structures such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks and widely available nanoporous carbons. Size and charge-dependent separation of aqueous molecular contaminants, on the contrary, have not been adequately developed. Here we report a charge-specific size-dependent separation of water-soluble molecules through an ultra-microporous polymeric network that features fluorines as the predominant surface functional groups. Treatment of similarly sized organic molecules with and without charges shows that fluorine interacts with charges favourably. Control experiments using similarly constructed frameworks with or without fluorines verify the fluorine-cation interactions. Lack of a σ-hole for fluorine atoms is suggested to be responsible for this distinct property, and future applications of this discovery, such as desalination and mixed matrix membranes, may be expected to follow.

  7. The molecular transport and intercalation of guest molecules into hydrogen-bonded metal-organic frameworks (HMOFs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Greg Anthony

    The process of molecular transport and intercalation has been widely studied for many years, resulting in the discovery of molecular frameworks that are capable of hosting guest molecules or ions. Layered and porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been found to have applications in the field of catalysis, storage, separations, and ion-exchange. More recently, molecular components with peripheral hydrogen-bonding moieties have been used to affect the synthesis of hydrogen-bonded metal-organic frameworks (HMOFs) as an alternative to MOFs, which are interconnected via coordinate-covalent bonds. While MOFs are perhaps stronger materials, HMOFs have the advantage of being easily modifiable and more flexible. Because HMOFs have not been extensively studied for their ability to host molecules, and because their ability to withstand guest loss and guest exchange is essentially unknown, here we report the synthesis and molecular transport properties of both close-packed and porous HMOFs. Layered materials can mimic the behavior of naturally occurring clays, where guest molecules are absorbed and the layer will expand to accommodate the entering guest molecule. We have created a clay mimic composed of a metal pyridine-dicarboxylates and ammonium counterions (a layered HMOF), which is suitable for studying the ability of such materials to absorb guest molecules. We can control the distance of the interlayer region, as well as the chemical nature (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) by varying the organic amine. The metal complex contains axial water ligands that are replaceable, and such ligand exchange has precedence in coordination polymer (MOF) systems, and has been termed "coordinative intercalation". Using the synthesized layered material we examined the process of intercalation, having chosen a variety of guest molecules ranging from alkyl to aryl molecules, each of which have substituents varying in size, shape and electronics. The first set of guest molecules are non

  8. Manifestations of non-planar adsorption geometries of lead pyrenocyanine at the liquid-solid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Kunal S; Zöphel, Lukas; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Müllen, Klaus; De Feyter, Steven

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we provide evidence for multiple non-planar adsorption geometries of a novel pyrenocyanine derivative at the liquid-solid interface under ambient conditions. When adsorbed at the organic liquid-solid interface, lead pyrenocyanine forms well-ordered monolayers that exhibit peculiar non-periodic contrast variation. The different contrast of the adsorbed molecules is attributed to dissimilar adsorption geometries which arise from the non-planar conformation of the molecules. The non-planarity of the molecular backbone in turn arises due to a combination of the angularly extended pyrene subunits and the presence of the large lead ion, which is too big to fit inside the central cavity and thus is located out of the aromatic plane. The two possible locations of the lead atom, namely below and above the aromatic plane, could be identified as depression and protrusion in the central cavity, respectively. The manifestation of such multiple adsorption geometries on the structure of the resultant monolayer is discussed in detail. The packing density of these 2D arrays of molecules could be tuned by heating of the sample wherein the molecular packing changes from a low-density, pseudo six-fold symmetric to a high-density, two-fold symmetric arrangement. Finally, a well-ordered two-component system could be constructed by incorporating C60 molecules in the adlayer of lead pyrenocyanine at the liquid-solid interface.

  9. Optimizing the second-order optical nonlinearities of organic molecules: asymmetric cyanines and highly polarized polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Seth R.; Gorman, Christopher B.; Cheng, Lap-Tak A.; Tiemann, Bruce G.

    1993-02-01

    We recently reported that there is an optimal combination of donor and acceptor strengths for a given molecular length and bridge structure that maximizes (beta) . For this combination, there is the correct degree of bond length alternation and asymmetry in the molecule. Our recent findings suggest that molecules that can be viewed as asymmetric cyanines with relatively small amounts of bond length alternation are nearly optimal. In this manner, we have identified molecules with nonlinearities many times that of conventional chromophores for a given length. In this paper, we will present a new computational analysis that allows the correlation of bond length alternation with hyperpolarizabilities and will present EFISH data on simple donor-acceptor polyene chromophores.

  10. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  11. DNA-based small molecules for hole charge injection and channel passivation in organic heptazole field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsuk; Lee, Junyeong; Lim, June Yeong; Yu, Sanghyuck; Yi, Yeonjin; Im, Seongil

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based small molecules of guanine, cytosine, thymine and adenine are adopted for the charge injection layer between the Au electrodes and organic semiconductor, heptazole (C26H16N2). The heptazole-channel organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with a DNA-based small molecule charge injection layer showed higher hole mobility (maximum 0.12 cm2 V-1 s-1) than that of a pristine device (0.09 cm2 V-1 s-1). We characterized the contact resistance of each device by a transfer length method (TLM) and found that the guanine layer among all DNA-based materials performs best as a hole injection layer leading to the lowest contact resistance. Since the guanine layer is also known to be a proper channel passivation layer coupled with a thin conformal Al2O3 layer protecting the channel from bias stress and ambient molecules, we could realize ultra-stable OFETs utilizing guanine/Au contact and guanine/Al2O3 bilayer on the organic channel.

  12. Evolution of Organic Molecules in Space: Characterization and Isotope Composition of Experimental Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piani, L.; Tachibana, S.; Hama, T.; Endo, Y.; Fujita, K.; Nakatsubo, S.; Fukushi, H.; Mori, S.; Chigai, T.; Yurimoto, H.; Kouchi, A.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the organic compound formation in molecular cloud conditions and its evolution through UV irradiation and heating. A particular attention is given to the isotope composition of the organic residue.

  13. Influence of Oxychlorine Phases During the Pyrolysis of Organic Molecules: Implications for the Quest of Organics on Mars with the SAM Experiment Onboard the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D., Jr,; Sutter, B.; Mahaffy, P.

    2017-01-01

    One among the main objectives of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment is the in situ molecular analysis of gases evolving from solid samples heated up to approximately 850 degrees Centigrade, and collected by Curiosity on Mars surface/sub-surface in Gale crater. With this aim, SAM uses a gas-chromatograph coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer (GC-QMS) devoted to separate, detect and identify both volatile inorganic and organic compounds. SAM detected chlorinated organic molecules produced in evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments. Several of these were also detected by the Viking experiments in 1976. SAM also detected oxychlorine compounds that were present at the Phoenix landing site. The oxychlorines may be prevelant over much of the martian surface. The C1 to C3 aliphatic chlorohydrocarbons (chloromethane and di- and trichloromethane) detected by SAM were attributed to reaction products occurring between the oxychlorines phases and the organic compounds coming from SAM instrument background. But SAM also showed the presence of a large excess of chlorobenzene and C2 to C4 dichloroalkanes among the volatile species released by the Cumberland sample of the Sheepbed mudstone. For the first time in the history of the Mars exploration, this proved the presence of Mars indigenous organic material at the Mars' surface. However, the identification of the precursor organic compounds of these chlorohydrocarbons is difficult due to the complexity of the reactions occurring during the sample pyrolysis. Laboratory pyrolysis experiments have demonstrated that oxychlorines phases such as perchlorates and chlorates, decomposed into dioxygen and volatile chlorine bearing molecules (HCl and/or Cl2) during the pyrolysis. These chemical species can then react with the organic molecules present in the martian solid samples through oxidation, chlorination and oxychlorination processes.

  14. A new organic nanoporous architecture: dumb-bell-shaped molecules with guests in parallel channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller; Hulliger; Seichter; Weber; Weber; Wubbenhorst

    2000-01-01

    A new type of dumb-bell-shaped host molecule (6-8) has been synthesised, of which 1,8-bis((1)-adamantyl)-1,3,5,7-octatetrayne (8 = BAOT) forms an open porous architecture when cocrystallised with a number of typical solvent molecules. Adamantyl substituents attached to a tetraalkyne spacer build up the walls of parallel channels wherein guest molecules are aligned. Surprisingly, the tetraalkyne unit is significantly bent. Desolvation experiments provide evidence for a reversible inclusion of guests. In the case of the inclusion of 2-butanone, a partial substitution by symmetrical and asymmetrical long-chain chromophores during crystallisation was possible. Stained crystals showed optical frequency doubling. The crystal structure analysis revealed a centric space group, although considerable translational and orientational disorder was present. Application of scanning pyroelectric microscopy revealed that the growth of inclusion compounds with 2-butanone produced polar ordering of guest molecules, which were aligned in two macro-domains of opposing polarity. The resulting orientation of the carbonyl dipoles is in agreement with the theoretical prediction of a Markov model of spontaneous polarity formation based on molecular recognition processes on growing crystal faces. The present case represents a new example of a property-driven supramolecular synthesis.

  15. Small-molecule azomethines: organic photovoltaics via Schiff base condensation chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus,M. L.; Bouwer, R. K. M.; Lafont, U.; Athanasopoulos, S.; Greenham, N. C.; Dingemans, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated small-molecule azomethines for photovoltaic applications were prepared via Schiff base condensation chemistry. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices exhibit efficiencies of 1.2% with MoOx as the hole-transporting layer. The versatility and simplicity of the chemistry is illustrated by prepari

  16. Small-molecule azomethines: organic photovoltaics via Schiff base condensation chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus,M. L.; Bouwer, R. K. M.; Lafont, U.; Athanasopoulos, S.; Greenham, N. C.; Dingemans, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated small-molecule azomethines for photovoltaic applications were prepared via Schiff base condensation chemistry. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices exhibit efficiencies of 1.2% with MoOx as the hole-transporting layer. The versatility and simplicity of the chemistry is illustrated by

  17. Edge promoted ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of organic bio-molecules on epitaxial graphene nanowalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Roy, Pradip; Ganguly, Abhijit; Yang, Wei-Hsun; Wu, Chien-Ting; Hwang, Jih-Shang; Tai, Yian; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2015-08-15

    We report the simultaneous electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) on three dimensional (3D) unmodified 'as-grown' epitaxial graphene nanowall arrays (EGNWs). The 3D few layer EGNWs, unlike the 2D planar graphene, offers an abundance of vertically oriented nano-graphitic-edges that exhibit fast electron-transfer kinetics and high electroactive surface area to geometrical area (EAA/GA≈134%), as evident from the Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) redox kinetic study. The hexagonal sp(2)-C domains, on the basal plane of the EGNWs, facilitate efficient adsorption via spontaneous π-π interaction with the aromatic rings in DA and UA. Such affinity together with the fast electron kinetics enables simultaneous and unambiguous identification of individual AA, DA and UA from their mixture. The unique edge dominant EGNWs result in an unprecedented low limit of detection (experimental) of 0.033 nM and highest sensitivity of 476.2 µA/µM/cm(2), for UA, which are orders of magnitude higher than comparable existing reports. A reaction kinetics based modeling of the edge-oriented 3D EGNW system is proposed to illustrate the superior electro-activity for bio-sensing applications.

  18. Mail-Order Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs): Designing Isoreticular MOF-5 Analogues Comprising Commercially Available Organic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Richard L.; Lin, Li-Chiang; Jariwala, Kuldeep; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous materials, are of particular interest in gas storage and separation applications due largely to their high internal surface areas and tunable structures. MOF-5 is perhaps the archetypal MOF; in particular, many isoreticular analogues of MOF-5 have been synthesized, comprising alternative dicarboxylic acid ligands. In this contribution we introduce a new set of hypothesized MOF-5 analogues, constructed from commercially available organic molec...

  19. The synthesis and properties of linear A-π-D-π-A type organic small molecule containing diketopyrrolopyrrole terminal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Niu, Qingfen; Sun, Tao; Li, Yang; Li, Tianduo; Liu, Haixia

    2017-08-05

    A novel linear A-π-D-π-A-type organic small molecule Ph2(PDPP)2 consisting diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) as acceptor unit, biphenylene as donor unit and acetylene unit as π-linkage has been successfully designed and synthesized. Its corresponding thermal, photophysical and electrochemical properties as well as the photoinduced charge-separation process were investigated. Ph2(PDPP)2 exhibits high thermal stability and it can be soluble in common organic solvents such as chloroform and tetrahydrofuran. The photophysical properties show that DPP2Ph2 harvests sunlight over the entire visible spectrum range in the thin-film state (300-800nm). DPP2Ph2 has lower band gaps and appropriate energy levels to satisfy the requirement of solution-processable organic solar cells. The efficient photoinduced charge separation process was clearly observed between DPP2Ph2 with PC61BM and the Ksv value was found to be as high as 2.13×10(4)M(-1). Therefore, these excellent properties demonstrate that the designed A-π-D-π-A-type small molecule Ph2(PDPP)2 is the prospective candidate as donor material for organic photovoltaic material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. From Molecules to Living Organisms : an Interplay between Biology and Physics : Lecture Notes of the Les Houches School of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nury, Hughes; Parcy, François; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Ziegler, Christine; Cugliandolo, Leticia F; Session CII

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide new ideas for studying living matter by a simultaneous understanding of behavior from molecules to the cell, to the whole organism in the light of physical concepts. Indeed, forces guide most biological phenomena. In some cases these forces can be well-described and thus used to model a particular biological phenomenon. This is exemplified here by the study of membranes, where their shapes and curvatures can be modeled using a limited number of parameters that are measured experimentally. The growth of plants is another example where the combination of physics, biology and mathematics leads to a predictive model. The laws of thermodynamics are essential, as they dictate the behavior of proteins, or more generally biological molecules, in an aqueous environment. Integrated studies from the molecule to a larger scale need a combination of cutting-edge approaches, such as the use of new X-ray sources, in-cell NMR, cryo-electron microscopy or single-molecule microscopy. Some are...

  1. Exploring Charge Transport in Guest Molecule Infiltrated Cu3(BTC)2 Metal Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Francois Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Stavila, Vitalie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this Exploratory Express project was to expand the understanding of the physical properties of our recently discovered class of materials consisting of metal-organic frameworks with electroactive ‘guest’ molecules that together form an electrically conducting charge-transfer complex (molecule@MOF). Thin films of Cu3(BTC)2 were grown on fused silica using solution step-by-step growth and were infiltrated with the molecule tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The infiltrated MOF films were extensively characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrical conductivity, and thermoelectric properties. Thermopower measurements on TCNQ@Cu3(BTC)2 revealed a positive Seebeck coefficient of ~400 μV/k, indicating that holes are the primary carriers in this material. The high value of the Seebeck coefficient and the expected low thermal conductivity suggest that molecule@MOF materials may be attractive for thermoelectric power conversion applications requiring low cost, solution-processable, and non-toxic active materials.

  2. Excitation of lasing on organic molecules by radiation from eximer lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopylova, T.N.; Gruzinski, V.V.; Danilova, V.I.; Tarasenko, V.F.; Fedorov, A.I.; Degtyarenko, K.M.; Vernigor, E.M.

    1979-05-01

    The pumping of multiatomic molecules by radiation of lasers on excimer molecules AX (A - atom of a noble gas, X - atom of halogen) is considered. Lasing parameters in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum of polyphenylenes, aryloxazols, mono- and diarylbenzoxazols (including new compounds) are compared. The method of obtaining and lasing parameters of an eximer electrodischarge XeCl laser with halogen carriers CHCl/sub 3/, CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ and CCl/sub 4/ is described. The use of lambda/sub p/ = 308 nm makes it possible to considerably decrease Stokes losses and to improve thermal properties of the active medium in obtaining laser action in the middle ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to expand the group of solvents used.

  3. Energy Storage in Strained Organic Molecules: (Spectro)Electrochemical Characterization of Norbornadiene and Quadricyclane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Olaf; Besold, Daniel; Döpper, Tibor; Wu, Yanlin; Bochmann, Sebastian; Lazzari, Federica; Waidhas, Fabian; Bauer, Udo; Bachmann, Philipp; Papp, Christian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Görling, Andreas; Libuda, Jörg; Bachmann, Julien

    2016-06-22

    We have investigated the electrochemically triggered cycloreversion of quadricyclane (QC) to norbornadiene (NBD), a system that holds the potential to combine both energy storage and conversion in a single molecule. Unambiguous voltammetric traces are obtained for pure NBD and pure QC, the latter a strained polycyclic isomer of the former. The difference in redox potentials is smaller than the energy difference between the neutral molecules. This is owing to a significant energy difference between the corresponding radical cations, as demonstrated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The vibrational modes of each pure compound are characterized experimentally in the fingerprint region and identified by DFT methods. Thermal and electrochemical transformations of NBD and QC are monitored in situ by IR spectroelectrochemical methods. The kinetics of the cycloreversion of QC to NBD, which is catalyzed by oxidizing equivalents, can be controlled by an applied electrode potential, which implies the ability to adjust in real time the release of thermal power stored in QC.

  4. Complex Organic Molecules at High Spatial Resolution Toward Orion-KL I: Spatial Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Susanna L Widicus

    2012-01-01

    Here we present high spatial resolution (<1 arcsecond) observations of molecular emission in Orion-KL conducted using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA). This work was motivated by recent millimeter continuum imaging studies of this region conducted at a similarly high spatial resolution, which revealed that the bulk of the emission arises from numerous compact sources, rather than the larger-scale extended structures typically associated with the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge. Given that the spatial extent of molecular emission greatly affects the determination of molecular abundances, it is important to determine the true spatial scale for complex molecules in this region. Additionally, it has recently been suggested that the relative spatial distributions of complex molecules in a source might give insight into the chemical mechanisms that drive complex chemistry in star-forming regions. In order to begin to address these issues, this study seeks to determine the spa...

  5. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux eMesle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich rocks, shales and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e. the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility of the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may limit the accessibility to asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  6. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix. PMID:26136731

  7. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy and Computational Studies of Reactive Organic Molecules of Relevance to Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Laura A.; Kreifels, Terese A.; Schaffer, Christopher J.; Haenni, Benjamin C.; Esselman, Brian J.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2011-10-01

    Matrix isolation, the process of trapping a molecule in an inert gas at low temperature, provides a means for studying highly reactive intermediates, such as carbenes or radicals. Reactive species can be characterized by IR, UV-vis and/or EPR spectroscopy. Comparison of experimental and computed spectral data, as well as chemical reactivity, is used for structural assignment. Highly-unsaturated carbon chains are well known compounds in the interstellar medium (ISM). Detection of these molecules relies mostly on radioastronomy, making the detection of the linear HC2nH series difficult. The electronic structure changes from even carbon chain lengths (HC2nH) to odd chain lengths (HC2n+1H), changing from closed shell to open shell species. The odd series further alternate from a diradical character (HC3H) to a localized carbene (HC5H). This poster will present the synthesis and spectroscopy of the HC3H and HC7H species and derivatives. The study of arylcarbenes is vital to understanding the chemistry of carbon-rich environments, such as discharges, interstellar clouds, and circumstellar envelopes. The identification of small, sulfur containing molecules, and the identification of aromatics in the ISM make future thiophene and benzothiophene detections a real possibility. Studies on 2- and 3- diazomethyl substituted benzothiophenes are underway to assess their photochemical reactivity and potential for forming benzothiophene carbenes. Macrocylic polyynes are proposed to be involved in carbon condensation via the ring coalescence and annealing model to produce graphitic sheets or fullerenes. To simplify a complex system we are computationally studying the series of ethynyl-substituted cyclobutadienes and their possible involvement in the build-up of larger carbon containing molecules in the ISM.

  9. Theoretical Design of High-spin Organic Molecules with Heterocycles as Ferromagnetic Coupling Units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-min; ZHANG Jing-ping; WANG Rong-shun

    2003-01-01

    Novel stable high spin molecules possessing three different arranged fashions are designed with -*N-N< as a spin-containing(SC) fragment, phenylene as an end group and various aromatic molecules, such as benzene(1), 2,6-pyridine(2), 3,5-pyridine(3), pyridazine(4), 4,6-pyrimidine(5), 2,6-pyrimidine(6), pyrazine(7) and triazine(8), as a ferromagnetic coupling(FC) unit. The effects of the different coupling units on the spin multiplicities of the ground states and their stabilities were investigated by means of AM1-CI approach. It has been found that the spin densities on the two atoms of the SC fragment are different from delocalization results in the specific stability of -*N-N<. In these molecules, the stabilities of the triplet states decrease when the distance between the atoms of central SC(-N-) increases. It is shown that the heterocycles as the coupling units have influence on the stabilities of the high-spin ground states. That the heteroatom lying in m-phenyl can improve ferromagnetic coupling, while the heteroatom lying in o-phenyl or p-phenyl is not in favor of the ferromagnetic coupling.

  10. Studying neuronal microtubule organization and microtubule-associated proteins using single molecule localization microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chazeau, Anaël; Katrukha, Eugene A; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of highly polarized neurons critically depends on the proper organization of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton. In axons, MTs are uniformly oriented with their plus-end pointing outward whereas in mature dendrites MTs have mixed orientations. MT organization and dynamic

  11. Use of a commercially available nucleating agent to control the morphological development of solution-processed small molecule bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sharenko, Alexander

    2014-08-12

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. The nucleating agent DMDBS is used to modulate the crystallization of solution-processed small molecule donor molecules in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (BHJ OPV) devices. This control over donor molecule crystallization leads to a reduction in optimized thermal annealing times as well as smaller donor molecule crystallites, and therefore more efficient devices, when using an excessive amount of solvent additive. We therefore demonstrate the use of nucleating agents as a powerful and versatile processing strategy for solution-processed, small molecule BHJ OPVs. This journal is

  12. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  13. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal & Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, Satish, C

    2008-11-30

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  14. Intermediate-Sized Conjugated Donor Molecules for Organic Solar Cells: Comparison of Benzodithiophene and Benzobisthiazole-Based Cores

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-09-05

    Two intermediate-sized donor molecules, BBTz-X and BDT-X, have been synthesized by the Stille coupling between 4-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-6-(trimethylstannyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophen-2-yl)-7-(5′-hexyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine and either 4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,6-diiodobenzo[1,2-d:4,5-d′]bis(thiazole) or 2,6-dibromo-4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene, respectively. Both oxidation and reduction potentials for BBTz-X are anodically shifted relative to those for BDT-X, but the oxidation potential is more sensitive to the identity of the core; this is consistent with what is seen for DFT-calculated HOMO and LUMO energies and with a slightly blue-shifted absorption maximum for BBTz-X. Although DFT calculations, along with crystal structures of related compounds, suggest more planar molecular structures for BBTz-X than for BDT-X, film structures and the effects of various annealing processes on these films, as revealed by GIWAXS, are similar. The performance of BDT-X:PC61BM bulk-heterojunction solar cells is more sensitive to annealing conditions than that of BBTz-X:PC61BM cells, but under appropriate conditions, both yield power conversion efficiencies of >7%.

  15. Thermodynamics of the adsorption of organic molecules on graphitized carbon black modified with a monolayer of 5-hydroxy-6-methyluracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kov, V. Yu.; Ivanov, S. P.; Shaikhitdinova, Yu. F.; Kudasheva, F. Kh.

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic characteristics of the adsorption of alkanes, alcohols, arenes, and esters on graphitized carbon black with a deposited monolayer (0.17%) of 5-hydroxy-6-methyluracil are studied by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. It is established that size effects (violation of the additivity of molar changes in internal energy and the entropy of adsorption for pairs of molecules of one homologous series that differ by one methyl group) are observed when organic molecules are adsorbed on the surface of the resulting adsorbent. The size effects are similar to those observed when 1% 5-hydroxy-6-methyluracil is deposited on graphitized carbon black. It is concluded that the observed violation of additivity is associated with cavities in the supramolecular structure.

  16. Perylene-Diimide Based Donor-Acceptor-Donor Type Small-Molecule Acceptors for Solution-Processable Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesamoorthy, Ramasamy; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan; Sakthivel, Pachagounder

    2017-08-01

    Development of nonfullerene acceptors plays an important role in the commercial availability of plastic solar cells. We report herein synthesis of bay-substituted donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D)-type perylene diimide (PDI)-based small molecules (SM-1 to SM-4) by Suzuki coupling method and their use as acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs) with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer donor. We varied the number of electron-rich thiophene units and the solubilizing side chains and also evaluated the optical and electrochemical properties of the small molecules. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (HR-MS). The small molecules showed extensive and strong absorption in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region up to 750 nm, with bandgap (E_{{g}}^{{opt}} ) reduced below polymer donor showed maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.19% with V oc of 0.30 V, J sc of 1.72 mA cm-2, and fill factor (FF) of 37%. The PCE decreased with the number of thiophene units. The PCE of SM-2 was lower than that of SM-1. This difference in PCE can be explained by the higher aggregation tendency of the bithiophene compared with the thiophene unit. Introduction of the solubilizing group in the bay position increased the aggregation property, leading to much lower PCE than for the small molecules without solubilizing group.

  17. Recent advances in small organic molecules as DNA intercalating agents: synthesis, activity, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescifina, Antonio; Zagni, Chiara; Varrica, Maria Giulia; Pistarà, Venerando; Corsaro, Antonino

    2014-03-03

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA plays an essential role in many biological processes. As DNA is often the target for majority of anticancer and antibiotic drugs, study about the interaction of drug and DNA has a key role in pharmacology. Moreover, understanding the interactions of small molecules with DNA is of prime significance in the rational design of more powerful and selective anticancer agents. Two of the most important and promising targets in cancer chemotherapy include DNA alkylating agents and DNA intercalators. For these last the DNA recognition is a critical step in their anti-tumor action and the intercalation is not only one kind of the interactions in DNA recognition but also a pivotal step of several clinically used anti-tumor drugs such as anthracyclines, acridines and anthraquinones. To push clinical cancer therapy, the discovery of new DNA intercalators has been considered a practical approach and a number of intercalators have been recently reported. The intercalative binding properties of such molecules can also be harnessed as diagnostic probes for DNA structure in addition to DNA-directed therapeutics. Moreover, the problem of intercalation site formation in the undistorted B-DNA of different length and sequence is matter of tremendous importance in molecular modeling studies and, nowadays, three models of DNA intercalation targets have been proposed that account for the binding features of intercalators. Finally, despite DNA being an important target for several drugs, most of the docking programs are validated only for proteins and their ligands. Therefore, a default protocol to identify DNA binding modes which uses a modified canonical DNA as receptor is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A three-dimensional tetrahedral-shaped conjugated small molecule for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIN Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of a novel three-dimensional tetrahedral-shaped small molecule,SO,containing a tetraphenylsilane core and cyanoester functionalized terthiophene arms.A deep lying HOMO energy level of -5.3 eV and a narrow bandgap of 1.9 eV were obtained from cyclic voltammetry measurements.Absorption,X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments all indicate high crystallinity of this compound.Solar cells employing SO were fabricated and evaluated.The relatively low performance was mainly ascribed to lack of appreciable phase separation,which is confirmed by optical microscopy.

  19. Resonance energy transfer in conjugates of semiconductor nanocrystals and organic dye molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    I analyze the efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in luminescent donor-acceptor complexes based on conjugates of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and nanorods and the luminescent dyes. Semiconductor nanocrystals serve either as FRET donors or acceptors. Experimentally observed reduced FRET efficiency in complexes of nanorods and dye molecules as compared to quantum dots are found to be attributable to a distance-limited energy transfer rate in case of point-like dye dipoles and extended nanorod dipole.

  20. Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy of Reactive Organic Molecules of Relevance to Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Laura A.; Nolan, Alex M.; Kreifels, Terese A.; Draxler, Thomas W.; Esselman, Brian J.; Burrmann, Nicola J.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2010-11-01

    Matrix isolation, the process of trapping a molecule in an inert gas at low temperature, provides a means for studying highly reactive intermediates, such as carbenes or radicals. Reactive species can be characterized by IR, UV-vis and/or EPR spectroscopy. Comparison of experimental and computed spectral data, as well as chemical reactivity, is used for structural assignment Triplet propynylidene is proposed to exist in the interstellar medium (ISM), due to the detection of a higher-energy isomers via rotational spectroscopy. Currently, we are exploring the structural and photochemical effects of varying substituents on the propynylidne system. A diazo precursor has been synthesized and photolyzed to produce dimethylpropynylidene in an argon matrix. A photochemical hydrogen shift to produce 1-penten-3-yne has been observed through infrared spectroscopy. Cyanocarbons are known to be abundant in the ISM and the atmosphere of Titan, however matrixisolation studies have not yet been carried out for a significant number of these compounds. Photolysis of 3-cyano-3-methyldiazirine should yield methylcyanocarbene, one of the simplest species in this family. Another molecule of interest is l-HC4N, which has been detected in the ISM, but has not yet been matrix-isolated and characterized. The study of arylcarbenes is vital to understanding the chemistry of carbon-rich environments, such as discharges, interstellar clouds, and circumstellar envelopes. The identification of small, sulfur containing molecules, and the identification of aromatics in the ISM make future thiophene and benzothiophene detections a real possibility. Studies on 2- and 3-diazomethyl substituted benzothiophenes are underway to assess their photochemical reactivity and potential for forming benzothiophene carbenes. Macrocylic polyynes are proposed to be involved in carbon condensation via the ring coalescence and annealing model to produce graphitic sheets or fullerenes. To simplify a complex system we

  1. Adsorption of Organic Molecules to van der Waals Materials: Comparison of Fluorographene and Fluorographite with Graphene and Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding strength and nature of noncovalent binding to surfaces imposes significant challenge both for computations and experiments. We explored the adsorption of five small nonpolar organic molecules (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, ethyl acetate) to fluorographene and fluorographite using inverse gas chromatography and theoretical calculations, providing new insights into the strength and nature of adsorption of small organic molecules on these surfaces. The measured adsorption enthalpies on fluorographite range from −7 to −13 kcal/mol and are by 1–2 kcal/mol lower than those measured on graphene/graphite, which indicates higher affinity of organic adsorbates to fluorographene than to graphene. The dispersion-corrected functionals performed well, and the nonlocal vdW DFT functionals (particularly optB86b-vdW) achieved the best agreement with the experimental data. Computations show that the adsorption enthalpies are controlled by the interaction energy, which is dominated by London dispersion forces (∼70%). The calculations also show that bonding to structural features, like edges and steps, as well as defects does not significantly increase the adsorption enthalpies, which explains a low sensitivity of measured adsorption enthalpies to coverage. The adopted Langmuir model for fitting experimental data enabled determination of adsorption entropies. The adsorption on the fluorographene/fluorographite surface resulted in an entropy loss equal to approximately 40% of the gas phase entropy. PMID:28145699

  2. Exploring the electronic structure of an organic semiconductor based on a compactly fused electron donor-acceptor molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, Pere; Canadell, Enric; Geng, Yan; Hauser, Jürg; Macchi, Piero; Krämer, Karl; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-05-18

    A Mott-type semiconductor based on a compactly fused and partially oxidized electron donor-acceptor (D-A) molecule was recently prepared and identified to exhibit a large room-temperature conductivity of 2 S cm(-1) . In a marked contrast to the organic conductors characterized by relatively well decoupled and segregated uniform stacks of D and A moieties, the formally half-oxidized tetrathiafulvalene donors of the actual compound are organized in columnar π stacks only, whereby the coplanar electron-acceptor units, namely benzothiadiazole, are closely annulated along their ridges. Herein, we present a theoretical study that explores the electronic structure of this novel type of organic semiconductor. The highly symmetric-solid state material behaves as a one-dimensional electronic system with strong antiferromagnetic interactions (coupling constant>200 cm(-1) ). The unique shape and local dipole of this redox-active fused electron D-A molecule lays the basis for further investigations of the collective electronic structure, mainly in the function of different counterions embedded in the crystalline lattice. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Effects of Organic Molecules with Different Structures and Absorption Bandwidth on Modulating Photoresponse of MoS2 Photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanmin; Zheng, Wei; Qiu, Yunfeng; Hu, PingAn

    2016-09-01

    Organic dye molecules possessing modulated optical absorption bandwidth and molecular structures can be utilized as sensitizing species for the enhancement of photodetector performance of semiconductor via photoinduced charge transfer mechanism. MoS2 photodetector were modified by drop-casting of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine 6G (R6G), and methylene blue (MB) with different molecular structures and extinction coefficients, and enhanced photodetector performance in terms of photocurrent, photoresponsity, photodetectivity, and external quantum efficiency were obtained after modification of MO, R6G, and MB, respectively. Furthermore, dyes showed different modulating abilities for photodetector performance after combination with MoS2, mainly due to the variation of molecular structures and optical absorption bandwidth. Among tested dyes, deposition of MB onto monolayer MoS2 grown by CVD resulted in photocurrent ∼20 times as high as pristine MoS2 due to favorable photoinduced charge transfer of photoexcited electrons from flat MB molecules to the MoS2 layer. Meanwhile, the corresponding photoresponsivity, photodetectivity, and an external quantum efficiency are 9.09 A W(1-), 2.2 × 10(11) Jones, 1729% at 610 nm, respectively. Photoinduced electron-transfer measurements of the pristine MoS2 and dye-modified MoS2 indicated the n-doping effect of dye molecules on the MoS2. Additionally, surface-enhanced Raman measurements also confirmed the direct correlation with charge transfer between organic dyes and MoS2 taking into account the chemically enhanced Raman scattering mechanism. Present work provides a new clue for the manipulation of high-performance of two-dimensional layered semiconductor-based photodetector via the combination of organic dyes.

  4. Gold nano-island arrays on silicon as SERS active substrate for organic molecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignat, Teodora, E-mail: teodora.ignat@imt.ro [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology, 126A, Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania); Husanu, Marius-Adrian, E-mail: adrianhusanu@gmail.com [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor Str. 105bis, PO Box MG 7, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Munoz, Roberto, E-mail: rmunoz@icmm.csic.es [Inasmet Fdn, Dept. Biomat and Nanotechnol, San Sebastian (Spain); Kusko, Mihaela, E-mail: mihaela.kusko@imt.ro [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology, 126A, Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania); Danila, Mihai, E-mail: mihai.danila@imt.ro [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology, 126A, Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania); Teodorescu, Cristian Mihail, E-mail: teodorescu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor Str. 105bis, PO Box MG 7, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    Gold islands forming highly controlled arrays have been fabricated by two potential step electrochemical deposition method using nanopatterned Si surface templates. In the present work, the Raman scattering studies realized using 11-mercaptoundecanoic probe molecule showed that such structures exhibit an enhanced Raman signal compared with nanostructured physical deposited thin gold film on flat silicon substrate and can be valued as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates. Besides the more appropriate management of nano-island arrays distribution, the high ratio of their Raman signals can be explain by the epitaxial-like growth mechanism of the metallic nano-islands, clearly showed by X-ray diffraction studies. Furthermore, the substrates enabled reproducibility and stability detection due to the chemically assembling of organothiol molecules, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirming formation of the thiolate species which corresponds to Au-S bonds, and also, the unwanted ‘hot-spots’ are missing, which make them suitable for high sensitivity biosensing applications. - Highlights: • Gold nano-islands are electrochemical deposited on nanopatterned silicon. • The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the epitaxial-like growth mechanism. • Enhanced Raman signal of Au nano-islands was observed compared with Au nano-film.

  5. Assessment of oscillator strengths with multiconfigurational short-range density functional theory for electronic excitations in organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan

    2017-01-01

    considered the large collection of organic molecules whose excited states were investigated with a range of electronic structure methods by Thiel et al. As a by-product of our calculations of oscillator strengths, we also obtain electronic excitation energies, which enable us to compare the performance......We have in a series of recent papers investigated electronic excited states with a hybrid between a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave function and density functional theory (DFT). This method has been dubbed the CAS short-range DFT method (CAS–srDFT). The previous papers...

  6. Correlation of the isosteric heat of adsorption of organic molecules over zeolites with equalized electronegativity and chemical hardness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N V K Dutt; S J Kulkarni; Y V L Ravikumar; B S N Murthy

    2006-07-01

    Considering the direct correlation between charge transfer and heat of adsorption, we have equated the isosteric heat of adsorption () with Nalewajski's charge transfer equation involving equalized electronegativities and chemical hardness given in the literature. The equation is then tested and compared with the experimental heat of adsorption values of organic molecules over zeolites given in the literature with the average percentage deviation of 15.9. Other similar types of equations of charge transfer affinity are also tested. Various semi-empirical equations based on Barrer's approach of the determination of and neural network method have been proposed, tested and compared for the first time.

  7. Thermal Reactivity of Organic Molecules in the Presence of Chlorates and Perchlorates and the Quest for Organics on Mars with the SAM Experiment Onboard the Curiostiy Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Cyril; Millan, Maeva; Buch, Arnaud; Belmahdi, Imene; Coll, Patrice; Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; archer, doug; sutter, brad; Summons, Roger; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Mahaffy, Paul; cabane, Michel

    2016-10-01

    One of the main objectives of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment is the in situ molecular analysis of gases evolving from solid samples collected by Curiosity when they are heated up to ~850°C. With this aim SAM uses a gas-chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) able to detect and identify both inorganic and organic molecules released by the samples.During the pyrolysis, chemical reactions occur between oxychlorines, probably homogeneously distributed at Mars's surface, and organic compounds SAM seeks for. This was confirmed by the first chlorohydrocarbons (chloromethane and di- and trichloromethane) detected by SAM that were entirely attributed to reaction products occurring between these oxychlorines and organics from instrument background. But SAM also detected in the Sheepbed mudstone of Gale crater, chloroalkanes produced by reaction between oxychlorines and Mars indigenous organics, proving for the first time the presence of organics in the soil of Mars. However, the identification of the molecules at the origin of these chloroalkanes is much more difficult due to the complexity of the reactivity occurring during the sample pyrolysis. If a first study has already been done recently with this aim, it was relatively limited in terms of parameters investigated.This is the reason why, we performed a systematic study in the laboratory to help understanding the influence of oxychlorines on organic matter during pyrolysis. With this aim, different organic compounds from various chemical families (e.g. amino and carboxylic acids) mixed with different perchlorates and chlorates, in concentrations compatible with the Mars soil from estimations done with SAM measurements, were pyrolyzed under SAM like conditions. The products of reaction were analyzed and identified by GC-MS in order to show a possible correlation between them and the parent molecule. Different parameters were tested for the pyrolysis to evaluate their potential influence on the

  8. Organic synthesis: the art and science of replicating the molecules of living nature and creating others like them in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, K C

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic organic chemists have the power to replicate some of the most intriguing molecules of living nature in the laboratory and apply their developed synthetic strategies and technologies to construct variations of them. Such molecules facilitate biology and medicine, as they often find uses as biological tools and drug candidates for clinical development. In addition, by employing sophisticated catalytic reactions and appropriately designed synthetic processes, they can synthesize not only the molecules of nature and their analogues, but also myriad other organic molecules for potential applications in many areas of science, technology and everyday life. After a short historical introduction, this article focuses on recent advances in the field of organic synthesis with demonstrative examples of total synthesis of complex bioactive molecules, natural or designed, from the author's laboratories, and their impact on chemistry, biology and medicine.

  9. Organic synthesis: the art and science of replicating the molecules of living nature and creating others like them in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic organic chemists have the power to replicate some of the most intriguing molecules of living nature in the laboratory and apply their developed synthetic strategies and technologies to construct variations of them. Such molecules facilitate biology and medicine, as they often find uses as biological tools and drug candidates for clinical development. In addition, by employing sophisticated catalytic reactions and appropriately designed synthetic processes, they can synthesize not only the molecules of nature and their analogues, but also myriad other organic molecules for potential applications in many areas of science, technology and everyday life. After a short historical introduction, this article focuses on recent advances in the field of organic synthesis with demonstrative examples of total synthesis of complex bioactive molecules, natural or designed, from the author’s laboratories, and their impact on chemistry, biology and medicine. PMID:24611027

  10. Study on detection of terrestrial and marine fractions in marine organic molecules by spectrophoto- and spectrofluorometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, Violetta; Wróbel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    The sea surface is a highly productive and active interface between the sea and the atmosphere. Sea surface films are created by organic matter from sea and land sources and they dissipate due to loss of material at the sea surface, including microbial degradation, chemical and photo chemical processes, and loss due to absorption and adsorption onto particulates. However the surface microlayer is almost ubiquitous and cover most of the surface of the ocean, even under conditions of high turbulence. Surface active molecules (surfactants) present in the surface microlayer (SML) may modify the number of physical processes taking place there: among others they affect the depth of penetration of solar radiation and gas exchange. Therefore, research on the influence of surfactants on the sea surface properties become an important task, especially in coastal waters and in vicinity of the river mouths. Surfactants comprises a mixture of organic molecules rich in lipids, polymeric and humus whose proportions determine the various properties of the SML. A unique structure of the energy levels of the organic molecules results in a unique spectral distribution of the light intensity absorbed and emitted by the molecules. Hence, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of organic compounds may allow the identification of the sources of organic matter. Additionally, several absorption (E2:E3, S, SR) and fluorescence (fluorescence intensities at peaks: A, C, M, T, the ratio (M+T)/(A+C), HIX) indices help in describing the changes in molecular size and weight as well as composition of organic matter during the humification processes and caused by photobleaching and biodegradation. Investigations included the region of Gulf of Gdańsk, along a transect from the Vistula River outlet to open sea. The fluorescence and absorption measurements of the samples collected from a surface films and a subsurface layer (SS, a depth of 1 m) during three research cruises in Gulf of Gdańsk, the

  11. Planar Difference Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Joanne L; Donovan, Diane

    2012-01-01

    In 1980 Alltop produced a family of cubic phase sequences that nearly meet the Welch bound for maximum non-peak correlation magnitude. This family of sequences were shown by Wooters and Fields to be useful for quantum state tomography. Alltop's construction used a function that is not planar, but whose difference function is planar. In this paper we show that Alltop type functions cannot exist in fields of characteristic 3 and that for a known class of planar functions, $x^3$ is the only Alltop type function.

  12. Organic molecules as tools to control the growth, surface structure, and redox activity of colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Emily A

    2013-11-19

    In order to achieve efficient and reliable technology that can harness solar energy, the behavior of electrons and energy at interfaces between different types or phases of materials must be understood. Conversion of light to chemical or electrical potential in condensed phase systems requires gradients in free energy that allow the movement of energy or charge carriers and facilitate redox reactions and dissociation of photoexcited states (excitons) into free charge carriers. Such free energy gradients are present at interfaces between solid and liquid phases or between inorganic and organic materials. Nanostructured materials have a higher density of these interfaces than bulk materials. Nanostructured materials, however, have a structural and chemical complexity that does not exist in bulk materials, which presents a difficult challenge: to lower or eliminate energy barriers to electron and energy flux that inevitably result from forcing different materials to meet in a spatial region of atomic dimensions. Chemical functionalization of nanostructured materials is perhaps the most versatile and powerful strategy for controlling the potential energy landscape of their interfaces and for minimizing losses in energy conversion efficiency due to interfacial structural and electronic defects. Colloidal quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized with wet-chemical methods and coated in organic molecules. Chemists can use these model systems to study the effects of chemical functionalization of nanoscale organic/inorganic interfaces on the optical and electronic properties of a nanostructured material, and the behavior of electrons and energy at interfaces. The optical and electronic properties of colloidal quantum dots have an intense sensitivity to their surface chemistry, and their organic adlayers make them dispersible in solvent. This allows researchers to use high signal-to-noise solution-phase spectroscopy to study processes at interfaces. In this

  13. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  14. Photoluminescence Intermittency from Single Quantum Dots to Organic Molecules: Emerging Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Erin A.; Hess, Chelsea M.; Reid, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of photoluminescence intermittency (PI) or “blinking” exhibited by single core/shell quantum dots and single organic luminophores are reviewed. For quantum dots, a discussion of early models describing the origin of PI in these materials and recent challenges to these models are presented. For organic luminophores the role of electron transfer, proton transfer and other photophysical processes in PI are discussed. Finally, new experimental and data analysis methods are outlined that promise to be instrumental in future discoveries regarding the origin(s) of PI exhibited by single emitters. PMID:23202909

  15. Complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium: IRAM 30 m line survey of Sagittarius B2(N) and (M)

    CERN Document Server

    Belloche, Arnaud; Menten, Karl M; Schilke, Peter; Comito, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of amino acids in meteorites and the detection of glycine in samples returned from a comet to Earth suggest that the interstellar chemistry is capable of producing such complex organic molecules. Our goal is to investigate the degree of chemical complexity that can be reached in the ISM. We performed an unbiased, spectral line survey toward Sgr B2(N) and (M) with the IRAM 30m telescope in the 3mm window. The spectra were analyzed with a simple radiative transfer model that assumes LTE but takes optical depth effects into account. About 3675 and 945 spectral lines with a peak signal-to-noise ratio higher than 4 are detected toward N and M, i.e. about 102 and 26 lines per GHz, respectively. This represents an increase by about a factor of 2 over previous surveys of Sgr B2. About 70% and 47% of the lines detected toward N and M are identified and assigned to 56 and 46 distinct molecules as well as to 66 and 54 less abundant isotopologues of these molecules, respectively. We also report the detectio...

  16. Catalytically Triggered Energy Release from Strained Organic Molecules: The Surface Chemistry of Quadricyclane and Norbornadiene on Pt(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Udo; Mohr, Susanne; Döpper, Tibor; Bachmann, Philipp; Späth, Florian; Düll, Fabian; Schwarz, Matthias; Brummel, Olaf; Fromm, Lukas; Pinkert, Ute; Görling, Andreas; Hirsch, Andreas; Bachmann, Julien; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Libuda, Jörg; Papp, Christian

    2017-01-31

    We have investigated the surface chemistry of the polycyclic valence-isomer pair norbornadiene (NBD) and quadricyclane (QC) on Pt(111). The NBD/QC system is considered to be a prototype for energy storage in strained organic compounds. By using a multimethod approach, including UV photoelectron, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron, and IR reflection-absorption spectroscopic analysis and DFT calculations, we could unambiguously identify and differentiate between the two molecules in the multilayer phase, which implies that the energy-loaded QC molecule is stable in this state. Upon adsorption in the (sub)monolayer regime, the different spectroscopies yielded identical spectra for NBD and QC at 125 and 160 K, when multilayer desorption takes place. This behavior is explained by a rapid cycloreversion of QC to NBD upon contact with the Pt surface. The NBD adsorbs in a η(2) :η(1) geometry with an agostic Pt-H interaction of the bridgehead CH2 subunit and the surface. Strong spectral changes are observed between 190 and 220 K because the hydrogen atom that forms the agostic bond is broke. This reaction yields a norbornadienyl intermediate species that is stable up to approximately 380 K. At higher temperatures, the molecule dehydrogenates and decomposes into smaller carbonaceous fragments.

  17. Structure investigation of organic molecules on Au(111) surfaces; Strukturuntersuchung organischer Molekuele auf Au(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazempoor, Michel

    2009-02-02

    The present work covers two topics namely the coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) and the structure of biphenylalkanthiole SAMs on Au(111) surfaces. The coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) surfaces has been investigated by means of vibrational and photoelectron spectroscopy (HREELS, XPS). Formic acid adsorbs at 90 K molecularly with vibrational modes characteristic for flat lying zig-zag chains in the mono- and multilayer regime, like in solid formic acid. The structure of the flat lying formic acid chains was determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as a (2r3 x r19) unit cell. Annealing results in a complete desorption at 190 K. Sequential adsorption of formic acid and water at 90 K shows no significant chemical interaction. Upon annealing the coadsorbed layer to 140 K a hydrogenbonded cyclic complex of formic acid with one water molecule could be identified using isotopically labelled adsorbates. Upon further annealing this complex decomposes leaving molecularly adsorbed formic acid on the surface at 160 K, accompanied by a proton exchange between formic acid and water. The influence of the alkane spacer chain length on the structure of biphenylalkanethiols on Au(111) surfaces was investigated as well. A systematic study was done on BPn-SAMs deposited from the gas phase. For every chain length a structure was found by LEED. Furthermore the influence of temperature on the structure was investigated in the range from room temperature up to about 400 K. To obviate influences from different preparation methods BP3 and BP4 was deposited from gas phase and from solution. No LEED spots were observed on BP4 SAMs deposited from solution. For BP3 an influence of the preparation could be excluded. For all BPn-SAMs a good agreement between LEED and STM data's was found. Nevertheless different unit cells were determined by LEED and STM consistent structures could be suggested considering the unit cell size given by LEED and the

  18. Interstellar ices as witnesses of star formation: selective deuteration of water and organic molecules unveiled

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S; Spaans, M

    2011-01-01

    The environments where stars are born contain gas and dust grains covered by icy mantles. As the star forms and heats up its surroundings, the ices evaporate which leads to a very complex chemistry with high abundances of deuterated molecules. While formaldehyde and water are both ice constituents, deuterated formaldehyde is very abundant in comets and star forming regions, while deuterated water rarely is. Here, we explain this selective deuteration by following the formation and evolution of the ices as a cloud collapses to form a star. We show that the deuteration of formaldehyde is sensitive to the gas D/H ratio as the cloud undergoes gravitational collapse, while the deuteration of water strongly depends on the dust temperature at the time of ice formation.

  19. Bayesian Source Separation Applied to Identifying Complex Organic Molecules in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Kevin H; Choinsky, Joshua; Maunu, Haley A; Carbon, Duane F

    2014-01-01

    Emission from a class of benzene-based molecules known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) dominates the infrared spectrum of star-forming regions. The observed emission appears to arise from the combined emission of numerous PAH species, each with its unique spectrum. Linear superposition of the PAH spectra identifies this problem as a source separation problem. It is, however, of a formidable class of source separation problems given that different PAH sources potentially number in the hundreds, even thousands, and there is only one measured spectral signal for a given astrophysical site. Fortunately, the source spectra of the PAHs are known, but the signal is also contaminated by other spectral sources. We describe our ongoing work in developing Bayesian source separation techniques relying on nested sampling in conjunction with an ON/OFF mechanism enabling simultaneous estimation of the probability that a particular PAH species is present and its contribution to the spectrum.

  20. Disodium cromoglycate: exploiting its properties as a NMR weak-aligning medium for small organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troche-Pesqueira, Eduardo; Cid, María-Magdalena; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando

    2014-03-28

    Chromonic phases are a family of lyotropic liquid crystals (LC) formed by ionic aromatic mesogens such as disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn), sunset yellow and others. It is well known that chromonic phases are oriented in the presence of external magnetic fields, leading to the observation of anisotropic NMR observables such as quadrupolar splittings or residual dipolar couplings. Despite the fact that the cromolyn nematic LC phase (N) presents important advantages like great homogeneity, small line broadening, and easy sample preparation, it has been scarcely used as a water-compatible NMR orienting medium, in part due to a too strong induced degree of alignment on the guest molecules. However, the use of cromolyn-brine mixtures led to the optimum degree of alignment allowing to record (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings with good accuracy.