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Sample records for placental perfusion model

  1. Placental Perfusion In Uterine Ischemia Model as Evaluated by Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background To validate DCE MRI method of placental perfusion estimation and to demonstrate application of the method in a rabbit model of fetal antenatal hypoxia-ischemia. Methods Placental perfusion was estimated by dynamic contrast imaging with bolus injection of Gd-DTPA in 3 Tesla GE magnet in a rabbit model of placental ischemia–reperfusion in rabbit dams at embryonic day 25 gestation age. Placental perfusion was measured using steepest slope method on DCE MRI before and after intermittent 40 min uterine ischemia. Antioxidants (n = 2 dams, 9 placentas imaged) or vehicle (n = 5 dams, 23 placenta imaged) were given systemically in a separate group of dams during reperfusion–reoxygenation. Placental perfusion was also measured in two dams from the antioxidant group (10 placentas) and two dams from the control group (12 placentas) by fluorescent microspheres method. Results While placental perfusion estimates between fluorescent microspheres and DCE MRI were significantly correlated (R2 = 0.85; P perfusion in reperfusion–reoxygenation phase in the saline, 0.44 ± 0.06 mL/min/g (P = 0.012, t-test), but not in the antioxidant group, 0.62 ± 0.06 mL/min/g, relative to preocclusion values (0.77 ± 0.07 and 0.84 ± 0.12 mL/min/g, correspondingly). Conclusion Underestimation of true perfusion in placenta by steepest slope DCE MRI is significant and the error appears to be systematic. PMID:25854322

  2. Bidirectional Transfer Study of Polystyrene Nanoparticles across the Placental Barrier in an ex Vivo Human Placental Perfusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Diener, Pierre-André; Maeder-Althaus, Xenia; Maurizi, Lionel; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle exposure in utero might not be a major concern yet, but it could become more important with the increasing application of nanomaterials in consumer and medical products. Several epidemiologic and in vitro studies have shown that nanoparticles can have potential toxic effects. However, nanoparticles also offer the opportunity to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat specifically either the pregnant mother or the fetus. Previous studies mainly addressed whether nanoparticles are able to cross the placental barrier. However, the transport mechanisms underlying nanoparticle translocation across the placenta are still unknown. Objectives In this study we examined which transport mechanisms underlie the placental transfer of nanoparticles. Methods We used the ex vivo human placental perfusion model to analyze the bidirectional transfer of plain and carboxylate modified polystyrene particles in a size range between 50 and 300 nm. Results We observed that the transport of polystyrene particles in the fetal to maternal direction was significantly higher than for the maternal to fetal direction. Regardless of their ability to cross the placental barrier and the direction of perfusion, all polystyrene particles accumulated in the syncytiotrophoblast of the placental tissue. Conclusions Our results indicate that the syncytiotrophoblast is the key player in regulating nanoparticle transport across the human placenta. The main mechanism underlying this translocation is not based on passive diffusion, but is likely to involve an active, energy-dependent transport pathway. These findings will be important for reproductive toxicology as well as for pharmaceutical engineering of new drug carriers. Citation Grafmueller S, Manser P, Diener L, Diener PA, Maeder-Althaus X, Maurizi L, Jochum W, Krug HF, Buerki-Thurnherr T, von Mandach U, Wick P. 2015. Bidirectional transfer study of polystyrene nanoparticles across the placental barrier in an ex vivo human

  3. Placental perfusion - a human alternative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2006-01-01

    Foetal exposures to environmental and medicinal products have impact on the growth of the foetus (e.g. cigarette smoke) and development of organs (e.g. methylmercury and Thalidomide). Perfusion studies of the human term placenta enable investigation of placental transport of chemical substances...... between the mother and foetus. Dual perfusion of a single cotyledon in the human placenta can contribute to a better understanding of the placental barrier, transport rate and mechanisms of different substances and placental metabolism. The perfusion system has recently been established in Copenhagen...

  4. Quality assessment of a placental perfusion protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line; Mose, Tina; Mørck, Thit Juul;

    2010-01-01

    the placental perfusion model in Copenhagen including control substances. The positive control substance antipyrine shows no difference in transport regardless of perfusion media used or of terms of delivery (n=59, pmarked dextran correspond with leakage criteria (...mlh(-1) from the fetal reservoir) when adding 2 (n=7) and 20mg (n=9) FITC-dextran/100ml fetal perfusion media. Success rate of the Copenhagen placental perfusions is provided in this study, including considerations and quality control parameters. Three checkpoints suggested to determine success rate...

  5. A proposed study on the transplacental transport of parabens in the human placental perfusion model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line; Zuri, Giuseppina; Andersen, Maria H

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure to parabens as a preservative used in personal care products is of increasing concern, as there is evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies of hormone disruption in association with exposure to parabens. Transport across the placenta could be critical for risk assessment......, but the available data are sparse. The aim is to develop a method for estimating fetal exposure, via the placenta, to the most commonly-used parabens, by using a human placental perfusion model. The use of human tissue is vital for determining human fetal exposure, because animal studies are of little relevance......, since the placenta exhibits significant interspecies variation. An HPLC model is currently being established to simultaneously quantify four different parabens, namely, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben and butylparaben, and their main metabolite, p-hydroxybenzoic acid. With this model, we aim...

  6. A proposed study on the transplacental transport of parabens in the human placental perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Line; Zuri, Giuseppina; Andersen, Maria H; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2013-12-01

    Human exposure to parabens as a preservative used in personal care products is of increasing concern, as there is evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies of hormone disruption in association with exposure to parabens. Transport across the placenta could be critical for risk assessment, but the available data are sparse. The aim is to develop a method for estimating fetal exposure, via the placenta, to the most commonly-used parabens, by using a human placental perfusion model. The use of human tissue is vital for determining human fetal exposure, because animal studies are of little relevance, since the placenta exhibits significant interspecies variation. An HPLC model is currently being established to simultaneously quantify four different parabens, namely, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben and butylparaben, and their main metabolite, p-hydroxybenzoic acid. With this model, we aim to determine the transport kinetics of these parabens across the human placenta, and to investigate placental metabolism, including differences in transport due to molecular characteristics. This will facilitate assessment of the risks associated with the use of paraben-containing products during pregnancy. 2013 FRAME.

  7. Placental transfer of enfuvirtide in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccaldi, Pierre-Francois; Ferreira, Claudia; Gavard, Laurent; Gil, Sophie; Peytavin, Gilles; Mandelbrot, Laurent

    2008-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the placental transfer of the antiretroviral fusion inhibitor, enfuvirtide (Fuzeon). Human cotyledons were perfused for 90 minutes in an open dual circuit with enfuvirtide, and fetal venous samples were collected every 5 minutes. Three perfusion experiments were validated using antipyrine. Enfuvirtide was not detected in the fetal compartment in any of the 3 experiments. The mean concentration of the drug measured in the maternal compartment was 12,400 ng/mL (range, 6500-16,200 ng/mL), which is 2.5 times the maximum concentration recommended for patients treated with enfuvirtide. Even at maternal concentrations twice above therapeutic levels, no placental transfer of enfuvirtide was observed. The high molecular weight of the molecule (4492 kDa) and its ionized state may account for the lack of placental transfer. This result suggests that enfuvirtide could be used in HIV-infected pregnant women without causing fetal exposure.

  8. Determination of the Transport Rate of Xenobiotics and Nanomaterials Across the Placenta using the ex vivo Human Placental Perfusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmüller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Krug, Harald F.; Wick, Peter; von Mandach, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Decades ago the human placenta was thought to be an impenetrable barrier between mother and unborn child. However, the discovery of thalidomide-induced birth defects and many later studies afterwards proved the opposite. Today several harmful xenobiotics like nicotine, heroin, methadone or drugs as well as environmental pollutants were described to overcome this barrier. With the growing use of nanotechnology, the placenta is likely to come into contact with novel nanoparticles either accidentally through exposure or intentionally in the case of potential nanomedical applications. Data from animal experiments cannot be extrapolated to humans because the placenta is the most species-specific mammalian organ 1. Therefore, the ex vivo dual recirculating human placental perfusion, developed by Panigel et al. in 1967 2 and continuously modified by Schneider et al. in 1972 3, can serve as an excellent model to study the transfer of xenobiotics or particles. Here, we focus on the ex vivo dual recirculating human placental perfusion protocol and its further development to acquire reproducible results. The placentae were obtained after informed consent of the mothers from uncomplicated term pregnancies undergoing caesarean delivery. The fetal and maternal vessels of an intact cotyledon were cannulated and perfused at least for five hours. As a model particle fluorescently labelled polystyrene particles with sizes of 80 and 500 nm in diameter were added to the maternal circuit. The 80 nm particles were able to cross the placental barrier and provide a perfect example for a substance which is transferred across the placenta to the fetus while the 500 nm particles were retained in the placental tissue or maternal circuit. The ex vivo human placental perfusion model is one of few models providing reliable information about the transport behavior of xenobiotics at an important tissue barrier which delivers predictive and clinical relevant data. PMID:23851364

  9. Determination of the transport rate of xenobiotics and nanomaterials across the placenta using the ex vivo human placental perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmüller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Krug, Harald F; Wick, Peter; von Mandach, Ursula

    2013-06-18

    Decades ago the human placenta was thought to be an impenetrable barrier between mother and unborn child. However, the discovery of thalidomide-induced birth defects and many later studies afterwards proved the opposite. Today several harmful xenobiotics like nicotine, heroin, methadone or drugs as well as environmental pollutants were described to overcome this barrier. With the growing use of nanotechnology, the placenta is likely to come into contact with novel nanoparticles either accidentally through exposure or intentionally in the case of potential nanomedical applications. Data from animal experiments cannot be extrapolated to humans because the placenta is the most species-specific mammalian organ (1). Therefore, the ex vivo dual recirculating human placental perfusion, developed by Panigel et al. in 1967 (2) and continuously modified by Schneider et al. in 1972 (3), can serve as an excellent model to study the transfer of xenobiotics or particles. Here, we focus on the ex vivo dual recirculating human placental perfusion protocol and its further development to acquire reproducible results. The placentae were obtained after informed consent of the mothers from uncomplicated term pregnancies undergoing caesarean delivery. The fetal and maternal vessels of an intact cotyledon were cannulated and perfused at least for five hours. As a model particle fluorescently labelled polystyrene particles with sizes of 80 and 500 nm in diameter were added to the maternal circuit. The 80 nm particles were able to cross the placental barrier and provide a perfect example for a substance which is transferred across the placenta to the fetus while the 500 nm particles were retained in the placental tissue or maternal circuit. The ex vivo human placental perfusion model is one of few models providing reliable information about the transport behavior of xenobiotics at an important tissue barrier which delivers predictive and clinical relevant data.

  10. Placental transfer of rilpivirine in an ex vivo human cotyledon perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbrot, Laurent; Duro, Dominique; Belissa, Emilie; Peytavin, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Placental transfers of the HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor rilpivirine were investigated in 8 term human cotyledons perfused with rilpivirine (400 ng/ml) in the maternal-to-fetal direction. The mean fetal transfer rate (FTR) (fetal/maternal concentration at steady state from 15 to 90 min) was 26% ± 8% (mean ± standard deviation), and the clearance index (rilpivirine FTR/antipyrine FTR) was 61% ± 20%. This shows that rilpivirine crosses the placenta at a relatively high rate, suggesting that the fetus is exposed to the compound during treatment of the mother. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Placental transfer of darunavir in an ex vivo human cotyledon perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbrot, Laurent; Duro, Dominique; Belissa, Emilie; Peytavin, Gilles

    2014-09-01

    Placental transfer of the HIV protease inhibitor darunavir was investigated in 5 term human cotyledons perfused with darunavir (1,000 ng/ml) in the maternal to fetal direction. The mean (± the standard deviation [SD]) fetal transfer rate (FTR) (fetal/maternal concentration at steady state from 30 to 90 min) was 15.0%±2.1%, and the mean (±SD) clearance index (darunavir FTR/antipyrine FTR) was 40.3%±5.8%. This shows that darunavir crosses the placenta at a relatively low rate, resulting in fetal exposure. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Antibody-dependent transplacental transfer of malaria blood-stage antigen using a human ex vivo placental perfusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen May

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure to allergens or antigens released by infections during pregnancy can stimulate an immune response or induce immunoregulatory networks in the fetus affecting susceptibility to infection and disease later in life. How antigen crosses from the maternal to fetal environment is poorly understood. One hypothesis is that transplacental antigen transfer occurs as immune complexes, via receptor-mediated transport across the syncytiotrophoblastic membrane and endothelium of vessels in fetal villi. This hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here we studied Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 that is released upon erythrocyte invasion. We found MSP1 in cord blood from a third of newborns of malaria-infected women and in >90% following treatment with acid dissociation demonstrating MSP1 immune complexes. Using an ex vivo human placental model that dually perfuses a placental cotyledon with independent maternal and fetal circuits, immune-complexed MSP1 transferred from maternal to fetal circulation. MSP1 alone or with non-immune plasma did not transfer; pre-incubation with human plasma containing anti-MSP1 was required. MSP1 bound to IgG was detected in the fetal perfusate. Laser scanning confocal microscopy demonstrated MSP1 in the fetal villous stroma, predominantly in fetal endothelial cells. MSP1 co-localized with IgG in endothelial cells, but not with placental macrophages. Thus we show, for the first time, antibody-dependent transplacental transfer of an antigen in the form of immune complexes. These studies imply frequent exposure of the fetus to certain antigens with implications for management of maternal infections during pregnancy and novel approaches to deliver vaccines or drugs to the fetus.

  13. Effect of taurocholic acid on fetoplacental arterial pressures in a dual perfusion placental cotyledon model: a novel approach to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinsky, Brad M; Zelig, Craig M; Paonessa, Damian J; Hoeldtke, Nathan J; Napolitano, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    To determine if continuous infusion of taurocholic acid into the fetoplacental and intervillous circulation of a placental cotyledon affects the fetal arterial pressure response after injection of the thromboxane mimetic U44619. Taurine conjugated bile acid is one bile acid putatively mediating intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). We selected 5 placentas from normal, unlabored patients. Two cotyledons from each placenta were isolated and dually perfused. Taurocholic acid was continuously infused into the fetoplacental and intervillous circulation of the test cotyledon. After 30 minutes U44619 was injected into both the test and control cotyledon vascular circuits. Pressure excursions were measured and compared to baseline pressures using a paired Student's t test. There was significant attenuation of the pressure excursion in the cotyledons perfused with taurocholic acid as compared to controls after injection of U44619. The difference from baseline in the taurocholic cotyledon compared with controls was 44.2 mmHg vs. 71.8 mmHg (p = 0.009). The perfusion of taurocholic acid attenuated the pressure response to thromboxane mimetic U44619 in the fetoplacental arterial circulation of a placental cotyledon as compared to control. This finding in our ex-vivo model may represent changes that occur in the placental vasculature with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. These placentas may have dysregulated vascular tone, which could contribute to the adverse fetal effects observed in ICP.

  14. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Placental malaria occurs when Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta. Placental parasite isolates bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) by expression of VAR2CSA on the surface of infected erythrocytes, but may sequester by other VAR2CSA mediated mechanisms...... placental tissue. RESULTS: The ex vivo placental perfusion model was modified to study adhesion of infected erythrocytes binding to CSA, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or a transgenic parasite where P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 expression had been shut down. Infected erythrocytes...... expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  15. Pathologic evaluation of normal and perfused term placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroun, Lisa Leth; Mathiesen, Line; Hedegaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This study reports for the 1st time the incidence and interobserver variation of morphologic findings in a series of 34 term placentas from pregnancies with normal outcome used for perfusion studies. Histologic evaluation of placental tissue is challenging, especially when it comes to defining "n...

  16. First trimester alcohol exposure alters placental perfusion and fetal oxygen availability affecting fetal growth and development in a non-human primate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jamie O; Schabel, Matthias C; Roberts, Victoria H J; Wang, Xiaojie; Lewandowski, Katherine S; Grant, Kathleen A; Frias, Antonio E; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2017-03-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure leads to impaired fetal growth, brain development, and stillbirth. Placental impairment likely contributes to these adverse outcomes, but the mechanisms and specific vasoactive effects of alcohol that links altered placental function to impaired fetal development remain areas of active research. Recently, we developed magnetic resonance imaging techniques in nonhuman primates to characterize placental blood oxygenation through measurements of T2* and perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of first-trimester alcohol exposure on macaque placental function and to characterize fetal brain development in vivo. Timed-pregnant Rhesus macaques (n=12) were divided into 2 groups: control (n=6) and ethanol exposed (n=6). Animals were trained to self-administer orally either 1.5 g/kg/d of a 4% ethanol solution (equivalent to 6 drinks/d) or an isocaloric control fluid from preconception until gestational day 60 (term is G168). All animals underwent Doppler ultrasound scanning followed by magnetic resonance imaging that consisted of T2* and dynamic contrast-enhanced measurements. Doppler ultrasound scanning was used to measure uterine artery and umbilical vein velocimetry and diameter to calculate uterine artery volume blood flow and placental volume blood flow. After noninvasive imaging, animals underwent cesarean delivery for placenta collection and fetal necropsy at gestational day 110 (n=6) or 135 (n=6). Fetal weight and biparietal diameter were significantly smaller in ethanol-exposed animals compared with control animals at gestational day 110. By Doppler ultrasound scanning, placental volume blood flow was significantly lower (P=.04) at gestational day 110 in ethanol-exposed vs control animals. A significant reduction in placental blood flow was evident by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. As we demonstrated recently, T2* values vary

  17. Functional Role of P-Glycoprotein and Binding Protein Effect on the Placental Transfer of Lopinavir/Ritonavir in the Ex Vivo Human Perfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Francois Ceccaldi

    2009-01-01

    Methods. Cotyledons were perfused with lopinavir, ritonavir, and the internal control antipyrin, at various albumin concentrations (10, 30, 40 g/L. After the control phase of each experiment, the P-glycoprotein inhibitor ciclosporin A was added at middle perfusion (45 minutes. Fetal Transfer Rate (FTR and Clearance Index (CLI were compared between the 2 phases. Results. In the control phase, the clearance index of lopinavir decreased from 0.401 ± 0.058 to 0.007 ± 0.027, as albumin concentrations increased from 10 g/L to higher concentrations (30, 40 g/L. When adding ciclosporin A at physiological albumin concentrations, the clearance index of lopinavir increased significantly 10.3 fold (95% of CI difference [−0.156, −0.002], P=.046 and became positive for ritonavir. Conclusions. Even at high albumin concentrations, inhibition of placental P-glycoprotein increased placental transfer of lopinavir, suggesting that this efflux pump actively reduces placental transfer of the drug. This mechanism may play a role in fetal exposure to maternal antiretroviral therapy.

  18. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K;

    2016-01-01

    expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  19. Prediction of spontaneous preterm delivery from maternal factors, obstetric history and placental perfusion and function at 11-13 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta, Jarek; Akolekar, Ranjit; Ventura, Walter; Syngelaki, Argyro; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2011-01-01

    To develop a model for prediction of spontaneous delivery before 34 weeks based on maternal factors, placental perfusion and function at 11-13 weeks' gestation. Two groups of studies: first, screening study of maternal characteristics, serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), free β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-hCG) and uterine artery pulsatility index (PI). Second, case-control studies of maternal serum or plasma concentration of placental growth factor (PlGF), placental protein 13 (PP13), a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12), inhibin-A and activin-A. Regression analysis was used to develop a model for the prediction of spontaneous early delivery. Spontaneous early delivery occurred in 365 (1.1%) of the 34 025 pregnancies. A model based on maternal factors could detect 38.2% of the preterm deliveries in women with previous pregnancies at or beyond 16 weeks and 18.4% in those without, at a false positive rate (FPR) of 10%. In the preterm delivery group, compared with unaffected pregnancies there were no significant differences in the markers of placental perfusion or function, except for PAPP-A which was reduced. Patient-specific risk of preterm delivery is provided by maternal factors and obstetric history. Placental perfusion and function at 11-13 weeks are not altered in pregnancies resulting in spontaneous early delivery. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Placental transport of large molecules –a study using human ex vivo placental perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line

    2011-01-01

    To maintain a healthy pregnancy, the exchange of substances between mother and fetus is vital. All transport of these substances takes place through the placenta, which is a temporary organ that serves its purpose from the implantation of the blastula to the birth of the term fetus, supplying...... nutrients, gas and waste transport between the maternal blood and the developing fetus and maintaining pregnancy by producing hormones. The placenta consists of cells of both maternal and fetal origin and forms a complex barrier between the maternal and fetal blood that allows for passage of different...... within two hours of perfusion with a fetal flow rate of 3 mL/min. Negative controls are added to ensure that substance transfer is not due to leakage, e.g. high molecular weight substances that only pass the placental barrier with bulk flow through a leakage in the fetal system. Dextran (40kD) can...

  1. Preliminary interlaboratory comparison of the ex vivo dual human placental perfusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myllynen, Päivi; Mathiesen, Line; Weimer, Marc

    2010-01-01

    As a part of EU-project ReProTect, a comparison of the dual re-circulating human placental perfusion system was carried out, by two independent research groups. The detailed placental transfer data of model compounds [antipyrine, benzo(a)pyrene, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b......)pyridine) and IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline] has been/will be published separately. For this project, a comparative re-analysis was done, by curve fitting the data and calculating two endpoints: AUC(120), defined as the area under the curve between time 0 and time 120min and as t(0.5), defined...

  2. Animal Models of Human Placentation - A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael

    2007-01-01

    This review examines the strengths and weaknesses of animal models of human placentation and pays particular attention to the mouse and non-human primates. Analogies can be drawn between mouse and human in placental cell types and genes controlling placental development. There are, however...... and endometrium is similar in macaques and baboons, as is the subsequent lacunar stage. The absence of interstitial trophoblast cells in the monkey is an important difference from human placentation. However, there is a strong resemblance in the way spiral arteries are invaded and transformed in the macaque...

  3. Studying placental transfer of highly purified non-dioxin-like PCBs in two models of the placental barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correia Carreira, S; Cartwright, L; Mathiesen, L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, toxicology and toxicokinetics of purified non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL-PCBs) are poorly characterised. Transplacental kinetics of NDL-PCBs can be studied in a variety of models, but careful validation of each model is crucial. We aimed to develop a standard operating...... procedure for establishing an in vitro model of the human placental barrier. Using this model, we sought to investigate placental transport kinetics of two NDL-PCB congeners. Firstly, we compared the BeWo cell line of the American Type Culture Collection with the BeWo b30 clone and determined parameters...... for monolayer formation. Secondly, we performed placental perfusions to validate the in vitro model. To that end, the transport of radiolabelled PCB52 and 180 was investigated in both models. We were not able to grow the ATCC cell line to confluency, but determined monolayer formation using BeWo b30...

  4. A stochastic model for early placental development.

    KAUST Repository

    Cotter, Simon L

    2014-08-01

    In the human, placental structure is closely related to placental function and consequent pregnancy outcome. Studies have noted abnormal placental shape in small-for-gestational-age infants which extends to increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. The origins and determinants of placental shape are incompletely understood and are difficult to study in vivo. In this paper, we model the early development of the human placenta, based on the hypothesis that this is driven by a chemoattractant effect emanating from proximal spiral arteries in the decidua. We derive and explore a two-dimensional stochastic model, and investigate the effects of loss of spiral arteries in regions near to the cord insertion on the shape of the placenta. This model demonstrates that disruption of spiral arteries can exert profound effects on placental shape, particularly if this is close to the cord insertion. Thus, placental shape reflects the underlying maternal vascular bed. Abnormal placental shape may reflect an abnormal uterine environment, predisposing to pregnancy complications. Through statistical analysis of model placentas, we are able to characterize the probability that a given placenta grew in a disrupted environment, and even able to distinguish between different disruptions.

  5. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...

  6. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...

  7. Simultaneous determination of acrylamide, its metabolite glycidamide and antipyrine in human placental perfusion fluid and placental tissue by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annola, Kirsi; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Lehtonen, Marko

    2008-12-15

    A rapid and sensitive method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of acrylamide (AA) and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide (GA) with a test marker antipyrine (AP) in placental tissue and perfusion medium used in human placental perfusion studies. An internal standard ((13)C-acrylamide) was added to the samples which were then deproteinized with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed phase column with a gradient elution of acetonitrile and 0.01% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. Detection and quantification of the analytes were carried out with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using positive electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The method was validated and linear over a concentration range of 0.5-20 microg/mL for acrylamide and glycidamide and 5-200 microg/mL for antipyrine. The lower limit of quantification for acrylamide and glycidamide was 0.5 microg/mL and for antipyrine 5 microg/mL. The method was selective, and good accuracy, precision, recovery, and stability were obtained for concentrations within the standard curve. The method was successfully used to analyze the placental perfusion medium and tissue samples in a toxicokinetic study for transplacental transfer of acrylamide and glycidamide. This is the first time that acrylamide, glycidamide and antipyrine are measured simultaneously.

  8. A microphysiological model of the human placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Cassidy; Tess, Emily R; Schanzer, Ariana S R; Coutifaris, Christos; Su, Emily J; Parry, Samuel; Huh, Dongeun

    2016-08-02

    During human pregnancy, the fetal circulation is separated from maternal blood in the placenta by two cell layers - the fetal capillary endothelium and placental trophoblast. This placental barrier plays an essential role in fetal development and health by tightly regulating the exchange of endogenous and exogenous materials between the mother and the fetus. Here we present a microengineered device that provides a novel platform to mimic the structural and functional complexity of this specialized tissue in vitro. Our model is created in a multilayered microfluidic system that enables co-culture of human trophoblast cells and human fetal endothelial cells in a physiologically relevant spatial arrangement to replicate the characteristic architecture of the human placental barrier. We have engineered this co-culture model to induce progressive fusion of trophoblast cells and to form a syncytialized epithelium that resembles the syncytiotrophoblast in vivo. Our system also allows the cultured trophoblasts to form dense microvilli under dynamic flow conditions and to reconstitute expression and physiological localization of membrane transport proteins, such as glucose transporters (GLUTs), critical to the barrier function of the placenta. To provide a proof-of-principle for using this microdevice to recapitulate native function of the placental barrier, we demonstrated physiological transport of glucose across the microengineered maternal-fetal interface. Importantly, the rate of maternal-to-fetal glucose transfer in this system closely approximated that measured in ex vivo perfused human placentas. Our "placenta-on-a-chip" platform represents an important advance in the development of new technologies to model and study the physiological complexity of the human placenta for a wide variety of applications.

  9. Decreased Brain and Placental Perfusion in Omphalopagus Conjoined Twins on Fetal MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureyya Burcu Gorkem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate perfusional changes in brain and placenta of omphalopagus conjoined twins and to compare them with singleton fetuses by using diffusion weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient. Fetal MRIs of 28-week-old omphalopagus conjoined twins with a shared liver with two separate gallbladders and portal and hepatic venous systems and three singleton fetuses with unilateral borderline ventriculomegaly at the same gestational week as control group were enrolled retrospectively. There was a significant decrease in ADC values of brain regions (p=0.018 and placenta (p=0.005 of conjoined twins compared to the control group. The decreased ADC values in placenta and brain regions in conjoined twins might be due to decreased placental perfusion compared to singleton pregnancy. Our results would be a keystone for future studies which will compare larger group of monochorionic multiple pregnancies with singleton pregnancies.

  10. Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej; Mathiesen, Line

    2008-01-01

    group of compounds. Benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate were chosen as model compounds because they are small molecules with large differences in physiochemical properties. Caffeine crossed the placenta by passive diffusion. The initial transfer rate of benzoic acid was more limited in the first part...... of the perfusion compared to caffeine, but reached the same steady-state level by the end of perfusion. The transfer of glyphosate was restricted throughout perfusion, with a lower permeation rate, and only around 15% glyphosate in maternal circulation crossed to the fetal circulation during the study period....

  11. Bidirectional placental transfer of Bisphenol A and its main metabolite, Bisphenol A-Glucuronide, in the isolated perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, T; Gayrard, V; Puel, S; Lacroix, M Z; Berrebi, A; Gil, S; Viguié, C; Toutain, P-L; Picard-Hagen, N

    2014-08-01

    The widespread human exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor interfering with developmental processes, raises the question of the risk for human health of BPA fetal exposure. In humans, highly variable BPA concentrations have been reported in the feto-placental compartment. However the human fetal exposure to BPA still remains unclear. The aim of the study was to characterize placental exchanges of BPA and its main metabolite, Bisphenol A-Glucuronide (BPA-G) using the non-recirculating dual human placental perfusion. This high placental bidirectional permeability to the lipid soluble BPA strongly suggests a transport by passive diffusion in both materno-to-fetal and feto-to-maternal direction, leading to a calculated ratio between fetal and maternal free BPA concentrations of about 1. In contrast, BPA-G has limited placental permeability, particularly in the materno-to-fetal direction. Thus the fetal exposure to BPA conjugates could be explained mainly by its limited capacity to extrude BPA-G.

  12. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...... turbo-FLASH (fast low-angle shot) sequence and Gd-DTPA has been presented. Here, an extension of the model is presented taking into account fast and slow water exchange between the compartments, enabling the calculation of the unidirectional influx constant (Ki) for Gd-DTPA, the distribution volume...... of Gd-DTPA (lambda), the vascular blood volume (Vb), and the time delay through the coronary arteries (delta T). The model was evaluated by computer simulation and used on experimental results from seven healthy subjects. The results in the healthy volunteers for a region of interest placed...

  13. Toxicokinetics of the food-toxin IQ in human placental perfusion is not affected by ABCG2 or xenobiotic metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immonen, E; Kummu, M; Petsalo, A

    2010-01-01

    Metabolizing enzymes and transporters affect toxicokinetics of foreign compounds (e.g. drugs and carcinogens) in human placenta. The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) is a food-borne carcinogen being metabolically activated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, especially...... by CYP1A1/2. IQ is also a substrate for ABCG2 transporter. Placental transfer of (14)C-IQ was evaluated in 4-6 h ex vivo human placental perfusions in Finland and Denmark. In Finland placentas were perfused with (14)C-IQ alone (0.5 muM, n = 6) or in combination with GF120918 (inhibitor of ABCG2, 1 muM, n...... = 6) or Ko143 (specific inhibitor of ABCG2, 2 muM, n = 4) to study the role of ABCG2 inhibition in transfer while in Denmark perfusions were performed with (14)C-IQ alone. Critical parameters (leak from fetal to maternal circulation, pH values, blood gases, glucose consumption, the production of h...

  14. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederiksen Marie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs have been widely used as flame retardants in consumer products. PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis, which can result in irreversible damage of cognitive performance, motor skills and altered behaviour. Thus, in utero exposure is of very high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. Methods A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored in the maternal and fetal compartments. In addition, the perfused cotyledon, the surrounding placental tissue as well as pre-perfusion placental tissue and umbilical cord plasma were also analysed. The PBDE analysis included Soxhlet extraction, clean-up by adsorption chromatography and GC-MS analysis. Results and Discussion Placental transfer of BDE-47 was faster and more extensive than for BDE-99. The fetal-maternal ratios (FM-ratio after four hours of perfusion were 0.47 and 0.25 for BDE-47 and BDE-99, respectively, while the indicative permeability coefficient (IPC measured after 60 minutes of perfusion was 0.26 h-1 and 0.10 h-1, respectively. The transport of BDE-209 seemed to be limited. These differences between the congeners may be related to the degree of bromination. Significant accumulation was observed for all congeners in the perfused cotyledon as well as in the surrounding placental tissue. Conclusion The transport of BDE-47 and BDE-99 indicates in utero exposure to these congeners. Although the transport of BDE-209 was limited, however, possible metabolic debromination may lead to products which are both more toxic and transportable. Our study demonstrates fetal exposure to PBDEs, which should be included in risk assessment of PBDE exposure of women of child-bearing age.

  15. Prevention of Defective Placentation and Pregnancy Loss by Blocking Innate Immune Pathways in a Syngeneic Model of Placental Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, Shari E; Brent, Elyssa; Redecha, Patricia; Perino, Giorgio; Tomlinson, Stephen; Davisson, Robin L; Salmon, Jane E

    2015-08-01

    Defective placentation and subsequent placental insufficiency lead to maternal and fetal adverse pregnancy outcome, but their pathologic mechanisms are unclear, and treatment remains elusive. The mildly hypertensive BPH/5 mouse recapitulates many features of human adverse pregnancy outcome, with pregnancies characterized by fetal loss, growth restriction, abnormal placental development, and defects in maternal decidual arteries. Using this model, we show that recruitment of neutrophils triggered by complement activation at the maternal/fetal interface leads to elevation in local TNF-α levels, reduction of the essential angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, and, ultimately, abnormal placentation and fetal death. Blockade of complement with inhibitors specifically targeted to sites of complement activation, depletion of neutrophils, or blockade of TNF-α improves spiral artery remodeling and rescues pregnancies. These data underscore the importance of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of placental insufficiency and identify novel methods for treatment of pregnancy loss mediated by abnormal placentation.

  16. Multiscale modelling of the feto–placental vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A. R.; Lin, M.; Tawhai, M.; Saghian, R.; James, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta provides all the nutrients required for the fetus through pregnancy. It develops dynamically, and, to avoid rejection of the fetus, there is no mixing of fetal and maternal blood; rather, the branched placental villi ‘bathe’ in blood supplied from the uterine arteries. Within the villi, the feto–placental vasculature also develops a complex branching structure in order to maximize exchange between the placental and maternal circulations. To understand the development of the placenta, we must translate functional information across spatial scales including the interaction between macro- and micro-scale haemodynamics and account for the effects of a dynamically and rapidly changing structure through the time course of pregnancy. Here, we present steps towards an anatomically based and multiscale approach to modelling the feto–placental circulation. We assess the effect of the location of cord insertion on feto–placental blood flow resistance and flow heterogeneity and show that, although cord insertion does not appear to directly influence feto–placental resistance, the heterogeneity of flow in the placenta is predicted to increase from a 19.4% coefficient of variation with central cord insertion to 23.3% when the cord is inserted 2 cm from the edge of the placenta. Model geometries with spheroidal and ellipsoidal shapes, but the same volume, showed no significant differences in flow resistance or heterogeneity, implying that normal asymmetry in shape does not affect placental efficiency. However, the size and number of small capillary vessels is predicted to have a large effect on feto–placental resistance and flow heterogeneity. Using this new model as an example, we highlight the importance of taking an integrated multi-disciplinary and multiscale approach to understand development of the placenta. PMID:25844150

  17. Multiscale modelling of the feto-placental vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A R; Lin, M; Tawhai, M; Saghian, R; James, J L

    2015-04-06

    The placenta provides all the nutrients required for the fetus through pregnancy. It develops dynamically, and, to avoid rejection of the fetus, there is no mixing of fetal and maternal blood; rather, the branched placental villi 'bathe' in blood supplied from the uterine arteries. Within the villi, the feto-placental vasculature also develops a complex branching structure in order to maximize exchange between the placental and maternal circulations. To understand the development of the placenta, we must translate functional information across spatial scales including the interaction between macro- and micro-scale haemodynamics and account for the effects of a dynamically and rapidly changing structure through the time course of pregnancy. Here, we present steps towards an anatomically based and multiscale approach to modelling the feto-placental circulation. We assess the effect of the location of cord insertion on feto-placental blood flow resistance and flow heterogeneity and show that, although cord insertion does not appear to directly influence feto-placental resistance, the heterogeneity of flow in the placenta is predicted to increase from a 19.4% coefficient of variation with central cord insertion to 23.3% when the cord is inserted 2 cm from the edge of the placenta. Model geometries with spheroidal and ellipsoidal shapes, but the same volume, showed no significant differences in flow resistance or heterogeneity, implying that normal asymmetry in shape does not affect placental efficiency. However, the size and number of small capillary vessels is predicted to have a large effect on feto-placental resistance and flow heterogeneity. Using this new model as an example, we highlight the importance of taking an integrated multi-disciplinary and multiscale approach to understand development of the placenta.

  18. Heterogeneous models place the root of the placental mammal phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Claire C; Foster, Peter G; Webb, Andrew E; Pisani, Davide; McInerney, James O; O'Connell, Mary J

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneity among life traits in mammals has resulted in considerable phylogenetic conflict, particularly concerning the position of the placental root. Layered upon this are gene- and lineage-specific variation in amino acid substitution rates and compositional biases. Life trait variations that may impact upon mutational rates are longevity, metabolic rate, body size, and germ line generation time. Over the past 12 years, three main conflicting hypotheses have emerged for the placement of the placental root. These hypotheses place the Atlantogenata (common ancestor of Xenarthra plus Afrotheria), the Afrotheria, or the Xenarthra as the sister group to all other placental mammals. Model adequacy is critical for accurate tree reconstruction and by failing to account for these compositional and character exchange heterogeneities across the tree and data set, previous studies have not provided a strongly supported hypothesis for the placental root. For the first time, models that accommodate both tree and data set heterogeneity have been applied to mammal data. Here, we show the impact of accurate model assignment and the importance of data sets in accommodating model parameters while maintaining the power to reject competing hypotheses. Through these sophisticated methods, we demonstrate the importance of model adequacy, data set power and provide strong support for the Atlantogenata over other competing hypotheses for the position of the placental root.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging detects placental hypoxia and acidosis in mouse models of perturbed pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Gabriele; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Surmon, Laura; Makris, Angela; Lind, Joanne M; Price, William S; Hennessy, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction as a result of dysregulation of anti-angiogenic molecules secreted by the placenta leads to the maternal hypertensive response characteristic of the pregnancy complication of preeclampsia. Structural abnormalities in the placenta have been proposed to result in altered placental perfusion, placental oxidative stress, cellular damage and inflammation and the release of anti-angiogenic compounds into the maternal circulation. The exact link between these factors is unclear. Here we show, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a tool to examine placental changes in mouse models of perturbed pregnancies, that T 2 contrast between distinct regions of the placenta is abolished at complete loss of blood flow. Alterations in T 2 (spin-spin or transverse) relaxation times are explained as a consequence of hypoxia and acidosis within the tissue. Similar changes are observed in perturbed pregnancies, indicating that acidosis as well as hypoxia may be a feature of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and may play a prominent role in the signalling pathways that lead to the increased secretion of anti-angiogenic compounds.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging detects placental hypoxia and acidosis in mouse models of perturbed pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Bobek

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction as a result of dysregulation of anti-angiogenic molecules secreted by the placenta leads to the maternal hypertensive response characteristic of the pregnancy complication of preeclampsia. Structural abnormalities in the placenta have been proposed to result in altered placental perfusion, placental oxidative stress, cellular damage and inflammation and the release of anti-angiogenic compounds into the maternal circulation. The exact link between these factors is unclear. Here we show, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a tool to examine placental changes in mouse models of perturbed pregnancies, that T 2 contrast between distinct regions of the placenta is abolished at complete loss of blood flow. Alterations in T 2 (spin-spin or transverse relaxation times are explained as a consequence of hypoxia and acidosis within the tissue. Similar changes are observed in perturbed pregnancies, indicating that acidosis as well as hypoxia may be a feature of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and may play a prominent role in the signalling pathways that lead to the increased secretion of anti-angiogenic compounds.

  1. HIV-1 Nef breaches placental barrier in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Poonam; Agnihotri, Saurabh Kumar; Tewari, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Sadan; Sachdev, Monika; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2012-01-01

    The vertical transmission of HIV-1 from the mother to fetus is known, but the molecular mechanism regulating this transmission is not fully characterized. The fetus is highly protected by the placenta, which does not permit microbial pathogens to cross the placental barrier. In the present study, a rat model was established to observe the effect of HIV-1 protein Nef on placental barrier. Evans blue dye was used to assay permeability of placental barrier and fourteen day pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were injected intravenously with 2% Evans blue dye along with various concentrations of recombinant Nef. After an hour, animals were sacrificed and dye migration was observed through the assimilation of peripheral blood into fetus. Interestingly, traces of recombinant Nef protein were detected in the embryo as well as amniotic fluid and amniotic membrane along with placenta and uterus. Our study indicates that recombinant HIV-1-Nef protein breaches the placental barrier and allows the migration of Evans blue dye to the growing fetus. Further the concentration of Nef protein in blood is directly proportional to the intensity of dye migration and to the amount of Nef protein detected in uterus, placenta, amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid and embryo. Based on this study, it can be concluded that the HIV-1 Nef protein has a direct effect on breaching of the placental barrier in the model we have established in this study. Our observations will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanisms related to this breach of placental barrier by Nef in humans and may be helpful to identify specific Nef inhibitors.

  2. Doppler sonographic examination of uterine and placental perfusion in cows in the last month of gestation and effects of epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Egloff, C; Hässig, M; Bruckmaier, R; Bleul, U

    2016-03-15

    The massive increase in size of the fetus and uterus in the last trimester is accompanied by an increasing demand for nutrients and oxygen, and it is assumed that this demand is met by increasing uterine and fetal perfusion. The goals of this study were to measure the perfusion of the uterine arteries and the placentomes in the last month of gestation and to investigate the effect of epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine on perfusion. During the last month of gestation, eight Braunvieh cows underwent nine color Doppler sonographic examinations of the uterine arteries to determine diameter (DM), pulse rate (PR), resistance index, time-averaged maximum blood flow velocity (TAMV), and blood flow volume (BFV), and power-mode Doppler sonography was used to determine perfusion of placentomes. The PR increased (P perfusion and the color pixel grading (Cp) increased by 10.1% (P perfusion and the Cp of the placentomes by 18.1% and 18.3% in the gravid horn and by 10.2% and 24.2% in the nongravid horn. Blood flow variables changed little in the last month of gestation. However, epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine caused changes in uterine and placentome perfusion that suggest improvement of placental nutrient and oxygen supply to the fetus.

  3. Does malaria affect placental development? Evidence from in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Umbers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria in early pregnancy is difficult to study but has recently been associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying malarial FGR are poorly characterized, but may include impaired placental development. We used in vitro methods that model migration and invasion of placental trophoblast into the uterine wall to investigate whether soluble factors released into maternal blood in malaria infection might impair placental development. Because trophoblast invasion is enhanced by a number of hormones and chemokines, and is inhibited by pro-inflammatory cytokines, many of which are dysregulated in malaria in pregnancy, we further compared concentrations of these factors in blood between malaria-infected and uninfected pregnancies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured trophoblast invasion, migration and viability in response to treatment with serum or plasma from two independent cohorts of Papua New Guinean women infected with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax in early pregnancy. Compared to uninfected women, serum and plasma from women with P. falciparum reduced trophoblast invasion (P = .06 and migration (P = .004. P. vivax infection did not alter trophoblast migration (P = .64. The P. falciparum-specific negative effect on placental development was independent of trophoblast viability, but associated with high-density infections. Serum from P. falciparum infected women tended to have lower levels of trophoblast invasion promoting hormones and factors and higher levels of invasion-inhibitory inflammatory factors. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that in vitro models of placental development can be adapted to indirectly study the impact of malaria in early pregnancy. These infections could result in impaired trophoblast invasion with reduced transformation of maternal spiral arteries due to maternal hormonal and inflammatory disturbances, which may contribute to FGR by

  4. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Mathiesen, Line

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants in consumer products. PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis, which can result in irreversible damage of cognitive performance, motor skills and altered behaviour. Thus, in utero exposure is of very...... high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. METHODS: A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored....... CONCLUSION: The transport of BDE-47 and BDE-99 indicates in utero exposure to these congeners. Although the transport of BDE-209 was limited, however, possible metabolic debromination may lead to products which are both more toxic and transportable. Our study demonstrates fetal exposure to PBDEs, which...

  5. Placental Hypoxia During Early Pregnancy Causes Maternal Hypertension and Placental Insufficiency in the Hypoxic Guinea Pig Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Loren P; Pence, Laramie; Pinkas, Gerald; Song, Hong; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-12-01

    Chronic placental hypoxia is one of the root causes of placental insufficiencies that result in pre-eclampsia and maternal hypertension. Chronic hypoxia causes disruption of trophoblast (TB) development, invasion into maternal decidua, and remodeling of maternal spiral arteries. The pregnant guinea pig shares several characteristics with humans such as hemomonochorial placenta, villous subplacenta, deep TB invasion, and remodeling of maternal arteries, and is an ideal animal model to study placental development. We hypothesized that chronic placental hypoxia of the pregnant guinea pig inhibits TB invasion and alters spiral artery remodeling. Time-mated pregnant guinea pigs were exposed to either normoxia (NMX) or three levels of hypoxia (HPX: 16%, 12%, or 10.5% O2) from 20 day gestation until midterm (39-40 days) or term (60-65 days). At term, HPX (10.5% O2) increased maternal arterial blood pressure (HPX 57.9 ± 2.3 vs. NMX 40.4 ± 2.3, P < 0.001), decreased fetal weight by 16.1% (P < 0.05), and increased both absolute and relative placenta weights by 10.1% and 31.8%, respectively (P < 0.05). At midterm, there was a significant increase in TB proliferation in HPX placentas as confirmed by increased PCNA and KRT7 staining and elevated ESX1 (TB marker) gene expression (P < 0.05). Additionally, quantitative image analysis revealed decreased invasion of maternal blood vessels by TB cells. In summary, this animal model of placental HPX identifies several aspects of abnormal placental development, including increased TB proliferation and decreased migration and invasion of TBs into the spiral arteries, the consequences of which are associated with maternal hypertension and fetal growth restriction.

  6. A model system for perfusion quantification using FAIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke; Sidaros, Karam; Gesmar, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Flow-sensitive experiments (FAIR) have been performed on a tube-flow phantom in order to validate quantitative perfusion measurements on humans. A straight-forward correspondence between perfusion and bulk-flow is found. It is shown that the flow phantom model only holds when the slice profiles...... to perfusion values lower than the cortical perfusion in the brain. Thus, the experimental accuracy and the computational methods for quantitative perfusion measurements in vivo can be validated by a tube-flow phantom....

  7. A model system for perfusion quantification using FAIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, I.K.; Sidaros, Karam; Gesmar, H

    2000-01-01

    Flow-sensitive experiments (FAIR) have been performed on a tube-flow phantom in order to validate quantitative perfusion measurements on humans. A straight-forward correspondence between perfusion and bulk-flow is found. It is shown that the flow phantom model only holds when the slice profiles...... to perfusion values lower than the cortical perfusion in the brain. Thus, the experimental accuracy and the computational methods for quantitative perfusion measurements in vivo can be validated by a tube-flow phantom...

  8. Of mice and women: rodent models of placental malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Marinho, Claudio R F; Staalsoe, Trine

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant women are at increased malaria risk. The infections are characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) with adverse consequences for mother and baby. Placental IE sequestration in the intervillous space is mediated by variant surface antigens (VSAs) selectively ex...

  9. A model system for perfusion quantification using FAIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, I.K.; Sidaros, Karam; Gesmar, H

    2000-01-01

    Flow-sensitive experiments (FAIR) have been performed on a tube-flow phantom in order to validate quantitative perfusion measurements on humans. A straight-forward correspondence between perfusion and bulk-flow is found. It is shown that the flow phantom model only holds when the slice profiles...

  10. A model system for perfusion quantification using FAIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, I.K.; Sidaros, Karam; Gesmar, H

    2000-01-01

    of the involved RF pulses are taken into account. A small flow-independent off-set may be present in the data. The off-set is explained by the model. Based on the correspondence between the phantom and the in vivo models, it is shown that the lowest flow values that could be measured in the phantom correspond...... to perfusion values lower than the cortical perfusion in the brain. Thus, the experimental accuracy and the computational methods for quantitative perfusion measurements in vivo can be validated by a tube-flow phantom......Flow-sensitive experiments (FAIR) have been performed on a tube-flow phantom in order to validate quantitative perfusion measurements on humans. A straight-forward correspondence between perfusion and bulk-flow is found. It is shown that the flow phantom model only holds when the slice profiles...

  11. A model system for perfusion quantification using FAIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke; Sidaros, Karam; Gesmar, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    of the involved RF pulses are taken into account. A small flow-independent off-set may be present in the data. The off-set is explained by the model. Based on the correspondence between the phantom and the in vivo models, it is shown that the lowest flow values that could be measured in the phantom correspond...... to perfusion values lower than the cortical perfusion in the brain. Thus, the experimental accuracy and the computational methods for quantitative perfusion measurements in vivo can be validated by a tube-flow phantom.......Flow-sensitive experiments (FAIR) have been performed on a tube-flow phantom in order to validate quantitative perfusion measurements on humans. A straight-forward correspondence between perfusion and bulk-flow is found. It is shown that the flow phantom model only holds when the slice profiles...

  12. In vitro placental model optimization for nanoparticle transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartwright L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laura Cartwright1, Marie Sønnegaard Poulsen2, Hanne Mørck Nielsen3, Giulio Pojana4, Lisbeth E Knudsen2, Margaret Saunders1, Erik Rytting2,51Bristol Initiative for Research of Child Health (BIRCH, Biophysics Research Unit, St Michael's Hospital, UH Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK; 2University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Public Health, 3University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca' Foscari Venice, Venice, Italy; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USABackground: Advances in biomedical nanotechnology raise hopes in patient populations but may also raise questions regarding biodistribution and biocompatibility, especially during pregnancy. Special consideration must be given to the placenta as a biological barrier because a pregnant woman's exposure to nanoparticles could have significant effects on the fetus developing in the womb. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to optimize an in vitro model for characterizing the transport of nanoparticles across human placental trophoblast cells.Methods: The growth of BeWo (clone b30 human placental choriocarcinoma cells for nanoparticle transport studies was characterized in terms of optimized Transwell® insert type and pore size, the investigation of barrier properties by transmission electron microscopy, tight junction staining, transepithelial electrical resistance, and fluorescein sodium transport. Following the determination of nontoxic concentrations of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles, the cellular uptake and transport of 50 nm and 100 nm diameter particles was measured using the in vitro BeWo cell model.Results: Particle size measurements, fluorescence readings, and confocal microscopy indicated both cellular uptake of

  13. Hepatic perfusion changes in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis: Evaluation by perfusion CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutcu, Semra [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Serter, Selim, E-mail: serterselim@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Kaya, Yavuz; Kara, Eray [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Nese, Nalan [Department of Pathology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Coskun, Teoman [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: It is known that acute pancreatitis may cause secondary changes in several organs. Liver is one of these involved organs. In different experimental studies hepatic damages were shown histopathologically in acute pancreatitis but there are a few studies about perfusion disorders that accompany these histopathologic changes. Perfusion CT (pCT) provides the ability to detect regional and global alterations in organ blood flow. The purpose of the study was to describe hepatic perfusion changes in experimental acute pancreatitis model with pCT. Materials and methods: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats of both genders with average weights of 250 g were used. Rats were randomized into two groups. Twenty rats were in control group and 20 in acute pancreatitis group. pCT was performed. Perfusion maps were formed by processing the obtained images with perfusion CT software. Blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) values were obtained from these maps. All pancreatic and liver tissues were taken off with laparotomy and histopathologic investigation was performed. Student's t test was used for statistical analyses. Results: In pCT we found statistically significant increase in blood volume in both lobes of liver and in blood flow in right lobe of the liver (p < 0.01). Although blood flow in left lobe of the liver increased, it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The quantitative analysis of liver parenchyma with pCT showed that acute pancreatitis causes a significant perfusion changes in the hepatic tissue. Systemic mediators seem to be effective as well as local inflammatory changes in perfusion changes.

  14. Mammalian Placentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    This guide to animal models of human placentation assesses the strengths and weaknesses of species in common use. We argue that structural differences from human placenta, though important in some contexts, are less of a drawback than differences in reproductive strategy. Many laboratory rodents...... to consider animal models with longer gestations and well-developed neonates. Placentation in different orders of mammal is surveyed and their proximity to humans described in an evolutionary context. Animal models are then compared with the human in terms of the functional anatomy, physiology, and immunology...... have brief gestations resulting in the birth of poorly developed young. They can provide useful insights on placental development and function relevant to early human pregnancy. However, to model the events of a 9-month gestation, which imposes added requirements on the placenta, it is necessary...

  15. Metabolomic perfusate analysis during kidney machine perfusion: the pig provides an appropriate model for human studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Nath

    Full Text Available Hypothermic machine perfusion offers great promise in kidney transplantation and experimental studies are needed to establish the optimal conditions for this to occur. Pig kidneys are considered to be a good model for this purpose and share many properties with human organs. However it is not established whether the metabolism of pig kidneys in such hypothermic hypoxic conditions is comparable to human organs.Standard criteria human (n = 12 and porcine (n = 10 kidneys underwent HMP using the LifePort Kidney Transporter 1.0 (Organ Recovery Systems using KPS-1 solution. Perfusate was sampled at 45 minutes and 4 hours of perfusion and metabolomic analysis performed using 1-D 1H-NMR spectroscopy.There was no inter-species difference in the number of metabolites identified. Of the 30 metabolites analysed, 16 (53.3% were present in comparable concentrations in the pig and human kidney perfusates. The rate of change of concentration for 3-Hydroxybutyrate was greater for human kidneys (p<0.001. For the other 29 metabolites (96.7%, there was no difference in the rate of change of concentration between pig and human samples.Whilst there are some differences between pig and human kidneys during HMP they appear to be metabolically similar and the pig seems to be a valid model for human studies.

  16. Postpartum Vascular Dysfunction in the Reduced Uteroplacental Perfusion Model of Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Anita; Davidge, Sandra T.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disorder affecting 2–8% of all pregnancies, characterized by gestational hypertension (≥ 140/90 mmHg) and proteinuria (≥300 mg over 24 hours) diagnosed following the 20th week of pregnancy, and for which there is currently no available treatment. While the precise cause of preeclampsia is unknown, placental ischemia/hypoxia resulting from abnormal trophoblast invasion and maternal endothelial dysfunction are central characteristics. Preeclampsia is a major cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the perinatal period. In addition, women who have experienced preeclampsia are more likely to suffer cardiovascular disease later in life. The cause of this elevation in cardiovascular risk postpartum, however, is unknown. We hypothesize that there may be lasting vascular dysfunction following exposure to reduced uteroplacental perfusion during pregnancy that may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk postpartum. Using the rat reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of preeclampsia, blood pressure was assessed in dams at gestational day 20, one and three months postpartum. Mesenteric artery and aortic function were assessed using wire myography. We demonstrated hypertension and increased mesenteric artery responses to phenylephrine at gestational day 20, with the latter due to a decreased contribution of nitric oxide without any change in methylcholine-induced relaxation. At one month postpartum, we demonstrated a small but significant vasoconstrictive phenotype that was due to an underlying loss of basal nitric oxide contribution. At three months postpartum, endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta demonstrated sensitivity to oxLDL and mesenteric arteries demonstrated decreased nitric oxide bioavailability with impaired methylcholine-induced relaxation; indicative of an early development of endothelial dysfunction. In summary, we have demonstrated impaired vascular function following exposure to a RUPP

  17. Structure-based modelling in reproductive toxicology: (Q)SARs for the placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, M; Madden, J C; Rowe, P H; Cronin, M T D

    2007-01-01

    The replacement of animal testing for endpoints such as reproductive toxicity is a long-term goal. This study describes the possibilities of using simple (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ((Q)SARs) to predict whether a molecule may cross the placental membrane. The concept is straightforward, if a molecule is not able to cross the placental barrier, then it will not be a reproductive toxicant. Such a model could be placed at the start of any integrated testing strategy. To develop these models the literature was reviewed to obtain data relating to the transfer of molecules across the placenta. A reasonable number of data were obtained and are suitable for the modelling of the ability of a molecule to cross the placenta. Clearance or transfer indices data were sought due to their ability to eliminate inter-placental variation by standardising drug clearance to the reference compound antipyrine. Modelling of the permeability data indicates that (Q)SARs with reasonable statistical fit can be developed for the ability of molecules to cross the placental barrier membrane. Analysis of the models indicates that molecular size, hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bonding ability are molecular properties that may govern the ability of a molecule to cross the placental barrier.

  18. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory pa

  19. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, F E M; Leeuwen, G M J van; Steenhoven, A A van [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2005-09-07

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 deg. C to 18.3 deg. C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q{sub 10} and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 deg. C to 21.8 deg. C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  20. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, F. E. M.; Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 °C to 18.3 °C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 °C to 21.8 °C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  1. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.K.; Walczak, A.P.; Louisse, J.; Berg, H.H.J. van den; Bouwmeester, H.; Tromp, P.; Fokkink, R.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcino

  2. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  3. Mammalian Placentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    This guide to animal models of human placentation assesses the strengths and weaknesses of species in common use. We argue that structural differences from human placenta, though important in some contexts, are less of a drawback than differences in reproductive strategy. Many laboratory rodents...... to consider animal models with longer gestations and well-developed neonates. Placentation in different orders of mammal is surveyed and their proximity to humans described in an evolutionary context. Animal models are then compared with the human in terms of the functional anatomy, physiology, and immunology...... of the placenta. This information is collated both to assess common animal models such as mouse, sheep, and primates and to introduce some alternatives that we consider worthy of attention....

  4. A novel extracorporeal kidney perfusion system: a concept model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajer, Michael; Shah, Gaurang; Kittur, Dilip; Searles, Bruce; Li, Lu; Bruch, David; Darling, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The number of patients awaiting kidney transplantation has more than doubled in the past decade while the number of available donor organs has seen only a modest increase, leading to a critical shortage of organs. In response to this extreme shortage, the criteria for accepting organs have been modified to include marginal donors such as non-heart beating donors (NHBD). In these kidneys, determining viability is important for success of transplantation. Therefore, a study was undertaken to develop a system that would allow the extracorporeal assessment of function and compatibility of the donor organ before the patient is exposed to the risks associated with surgery. Following bilateral nephrectomy, the kidneys of 10 pigs (approximately 30 kg) were connected to a commercially available hypothermic pulsatile kidney perfusion apparatus. This system was modified to allow for normothermic pulsatile renal perfusion using the potential recipient's blood, via vascular access. These kidneys were perfused with the animal's blood for a minimum of two hours while various parameters were monitored. Perfusion pressures were kept between 60 and 90 mmHg, which correlated to flows between 70 and 150 mL/min. A decrease in perfusion pressure with a concomitant rise in flow over the two-hour period served as a good predictor of a viable and compatible graft. The modified kidney preservation system allows the normothermic, pulsatile extracorporeal perfusion of donor kidneys with the ability to monitor resistance to flow and urine production. This model also allows observation of the kidney for signs of hyperacute rejection. Further research needs to be conducted in order to determine if the system represents a methodology to increase the pool of available donor organs.

  5. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  6. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-05-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols for obtaining patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a fuzzy c-mean supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling the modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained therein. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the investigation of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models.

  7. Placental programming of anxiety in adulthood revealed by Igf2-null models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaelsson, Mikael Allan; Constância, Miguel; Dent, Claire L; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Humby, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Imprinted, maternally silenced insulin-like growth factor-2 is expressed in both the foetus and placenta and has been shown to have roles in foetal and placental development in animal models. Here we compared mice engineered to be null for the placenta-specific P0 transcript (insulin-like growth factor-2-P0 KO) to mice with disruptions of all four insulin-like growth factor-2 transcripts, and therefore null for insulin-like growth factor-2 in both placenta and foetus (insulin-like growth factor-2-total KO). Both models lead to intrauterine growth restriction but dissociate between a situation where there is an imbalance between foetal demand and placental supply of nutrients (the insulin-like growth factor-2-P0 KO) and one where demand and supply is more balanced (the insulin-like growth factor-2-total KO). Increased reactivity to anxiety-provoking stimuli is manifested later in life only in those animals where there is a mismatch between placental supply and foetal demand for nutrients during gestation. Our findings further distinguish placental dysfunction from intrauterine growth restriction and reveal a role for the placenta in long-term programming of emotional behaviour.

  8. Non-invasive evaluation of placental blood flow: lessons from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, E; Tarrade, A; Duan, J; Richard, C; Bertholdt, C; Beaumont, M; Morel, O; Chavatte-Palmer, P

    2017-03-01

    In human obstetrics, placental vascularisation impairment is frequent as well as linked to severe pathological events (preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction), and there is a need for reliable methods allowing non-invasive evaluation of placental blood flow. Uteroplacental vascularisation is complex, and animal models are essential for the technical development and safety assessment of these imaging tools for human clinical use; however, these techniques can also be applied in the veterinary context. This paper reviews how ultrasound-based imaging methods such as 2D and 3D Doppler can provide valuable insight for the exploration of placental blood flow both in humans and animals and how new approaches such as the use of ultrasound contrast agents or ultrafast Doppler may allow to discriminate between maternal (non-pulsatile) and foetal (pulsatile) blood flow in the placenta. Finally, functional magnetic resonance imaging could also be used to evaluate placental blood flow, as indicated by studies in animal models, but its safety in human pregnancy still requires to be confirmed. © 2017 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  9. A Unifying model of perfusion and motion applied to reconstruction of sparsely sampled free-breathing myocardial perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    The clinical potential of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is currently limited by respiratory induced motion of the heart. This paper presents a unifying model of perfusion and motion in which respiratory motion becomes an integral part of myocardial perfusion...... quantification. Hence, the need for tedious manual motion correction prior to perfusion quantification is avoided. In addition, we demonstrate that the proposed framework facilitates the process of reconstructing DCEMRI from sparsely sampled data in the presence of respiratory motion. The paper focuses primarily...

  10. Cell- and Tissue-Based Models for Study of Placental Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, W R

    2017-01-01

    Decades of research into the molecular mechanisms by which the placenta forms and functions have sought to improve prevention, diagnosis, and management of disorders of this vital tissue. This research has included development of experimental models intended to replicate behavior of the native placenta in both health and disease. Animal models devised in rodents, sheep, cattle, or other domestic animal species have the advantage of being biologically "complete," but all differ to some degree in developmental timing and anatomical details compared to the human, suggesting subtle differences in molecular mechanism. Consequently, investigators have resorted to simplified systems, characterizing the mechanisms of placental development by using explants of maternal and fetal tissue, primary cell cultures, and immortalized or choriocarcinoma-derived cell lines. Such studies have advanced our understanding of mechanisms by which trophoblasts and associated tissues invade the endometrium, produce chorionic gonadotropin, manage immune tolerance of the fetus, or elaborate proteins that may contribute to placental dysfunction. More recently, use of three-dimensional spheroid cultures, computational modeling of placental tissue dynamics and blood flow, and bioengineering of tissue constructs have been undertaken, aimed to recapitulate the types of interactions that occur among diverse uterine and placental cell types in utero. New technologies and biological paradigms, stemming in part from the ongoing Human Placenta Project, promise to expand the array of available tools, increasing the likelihood that the years ahead will see significant improvements in the ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat life-threatening disorders of placental formation and function. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling placental transport: correlation of in vitro BeWo cell permeability and ex vivo human placental perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina

    2009-01-01

    across the BeWo cells was observed in the rank order of caffeine>antipyrine>benzoic acid>glyphosate in terms of both the apparent permeability coefficient and the initial slope, defined as the linear rate of substance transferred to the fetal compartment as percent per time, a parameter used to compare...

  12. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on fetal and placental development in an experimental model of placental insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Camila S O; Gomes, Bruno B F; Oliveira, Rafael A; Yamamoto, Leandro R; Rocha, Laura P; Glória, Maria A; Machado, Juliana R; Câmara, Niels O S; Reis, Marlene A; Corrêa, Rosana R M

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in pregnancies with placental insufficiency. Pregnant rats were subjected to uterine artery ligation and to TENS according to the following groups: ligated stimulated (LS); ligated non-stimulated (LN), control stimulated (CS); and control non-stimulated (CN). Fetal external measurements, such as crown-rump length (CRL), fronto-occipital distance (FOD), thoracic ventral-dorsal (TVDD) and abdominal ventral-dorsal (AVDD) distances were analyzed together with the area occupied by fetal internal organs. Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in fetal organs. Thickness of junctional, labyrinth and intermediate placental zones was analyzed by morphometric evaluation in HE-stained slides, and placental hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alfa expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In LN and CS groups compared to the CN group, CRL was reduced (27.51/28.95 versus 30.16 mm), as well as FOD (6.63/6.63 versus 7.36 mm), AVDD (7.38/8.00 versus 8.61 mm) and TVDD (6.46/6.87 versus 7.23 mm). Brain GLUT-1 expression was higher in LS (1.3%) and CS (1.8%). The area occupied by placental vessels in the labyrinth zone (29.67 ± 3.51 versus 20.83 ± 7.63) and intermediate zone (26.46 ± 10.21 versus 10.86 ± 8.94) was larger in the LS group than in the LN group. Our results suggest a negative effect of TENS on placental development, thus compromising the maintenance of adequate blood flow to the fetus.

  13. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus.

  14. Image-Based Modeling of Blood Flow and Oxygen Transfer in Feto-Placental Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbill, Paul; Janáček, Jiří; Jirkovská, Marie; Kubínová, Lucie; Chernyavsky, Igor L.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy, oxygen diffuses from maternal to fetal blood through villous trees in the placenta. In this paper, we simulate blood flow and oxygen transfer in feto-placental capillaries by converting three-dimensional representations of villous and capillary surfaces, reconstructed from confocal laser scanning microscopy, to finite-element meshes, and calculating values of vascular flow resistance and total oxygen transfer. The relationship between the total oxygen transfer rate and the pressure drop through the capillary is shown to be captured across a wide range of pressure drops by physical scaling laws and an upper bound on the oxygen transfer rate. A regression equation is introduced that can be used to estimate the oxygen transfer in a capillary using the vascular resistance. Two techniques for quantifying the effects of statistical variability, experimental uncertainty and pathological placental structure on the calculated properties are then introduced. First, scaling arguments are used to quantify the sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the geometry and the parameters. Second, the effects of localized dilations in fetal capillaries are investigated using an idealized axisymmetric model, to quantify the possible effect of pathological placental structure on oxygen transfer. The model predicts how, for a fixed pressure drop through a capillary, oxygen transfer is maximized by an optimal width of the dilation. The results could explain the prevalence of fetal hypoxia in cases of delayed villous maturation, a pathology characterized by a lack of the vasculo-syncytial membranes often seen in conjunction with localized capillary dilations. PMID:27788214

  15. Fetal nutrition in lecithotrophic squamate reptiles: toward a comprehensive model for evolution of viviparity and placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R

    2013-07-01

    The primary pattern of embryonic nutrition for squamate reptiles is lecithotrophy; with few exceptions, all squamate embryos mobilize nutrients from yolk. The evolution of viviparity presents an opportunity for an additional source of embryonic nutrition through delivery of uterine secretions, or placentotrophy. This pattern of embryonic nutrition is thought to evolve through placental supplementation of lecithotrophy, followed by increasing dependence on placentotrophy. This review analyzes the relationship between reproductive mode and pattern of embryonic nutrition in three lecithotrophic viviparous species, and oviparous counterparts, for concordance with a current model for the evolution of viviparity and placentation. The assumptions of the model, that nutrients for oviparous embryos are mobilized from yolk, and that this source is not disrupted in the transition to viviparity, are supported for most nutrients. In contrast, calcium, an essential nutrient for embryonic development, is mobilized from both yolk and eggshell by oviparous embryos and reduction of eggshell calcium is correlated with viviparity. If embryonic fitness is compromised by disruption of a primary source of calcium, selection may not favor evolution of viviparity, yet viviparity has arisen independently in numerous squamate lineages. Studies of fetal nutrition in reproductively bimodal species suggest a resolution to this paradox. If uterine calcium secretion occurs during prolonged intrauterine egg retention, calcium placentotrophy evolves prior to viviparity as a replacement for eggshell calcium and embryonic nutrition will not be compromised. This hypothesis is integrated into the current model for evolution of viviparity and placentation to address the unique attributes of calcium nutrition. The sequence of events requires a shift in timing of uterine calcium secretion and the embryonic mechanism of calcium retrieval to be responsive to calcium availability. Regulation of uterine

  16. The isolated perfused human skin flap model: A missing link in skin penetration studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternullo, Selenia; de Weerd, Louis; Flaten, Gøril Eide; Holsæter, Ann Mari; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša

    2017-01-01

    Development of effective (trans)dermal drug delivery systems requires reliable skin models to evaluate skin drug penetration. The isolated perfused human skin flap remains metabolically active tissue for up to 6h during in vitro perfusion. We introduce the isolated perfused human skin flap as a close-to-in vivo skin penetration model. To validate the model's ability to evaluate skin drug penetration the solutions of a hydrophilic (calcein) and a lipophilic (rhodamine) fluorescence marker were applied. The skin flaps were perfused with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer (pH7.4). Infrared technology was used to monitor perfusion and to select a well-perfused skin area for administration of the markers. Flap perfusion and physiological parameters were maintained constant during the 6h experiments and the amount of markers in the perfusate was determined. Calcein was detected in the perfusate, whereas rhodamine was not detectable. Confocal images of skin cross-sections shoved that calcein was uniformly distributed through the skin, whereas rhodamine accumulated in the stratum corneum. For comparison, the penetration of both markers was evaluated on ex vivo human skin, pig skin and cellophane membrane. The proposed perfused flap model enabled us to distinguish between the penetrations of the two markers and could be a promising close-to-in vivo tool in skin penetration studies and optimization of formulations destined for skin administration.

  17. Waking the undead: Implications of a soft explosive model for the timing of placental mammal diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Emerling, Christopher A; Meredith, Robert W; Janečka, Jan E; Eizirik, Eduardo; Murphy, William J

    2017-01-01

    The explosive, long fuse, and short fuse models represent competing hypotheses for the timing of placental mammal diversification. Support for the explosive model, which posits both interordinal and intraordinal diversification after the KPg mass extinction, derives from morphological cladistic studies that place Cretaceous eutherians outside of crown Placentalia. By contrast, most molecular studies favor the long fuse model wherein interordinal cladogenesis occurred in the Cretaceous followed by intraordinal cladogenesis after the KPg boundary. Phillips (2016) proposed a soft explosive model that allows for the emergence of a few lineages (Xenarthra, Afrotheria, Euarchontoglires, Laurasiatheria) in the Cretaceous, but otherwise agrees with the explosive model in positing the majority of interordinal diversification after the KPg mass extinction. Phillips (2016) argues that rate transference errors associated with large body size and long lifespan have inflated previous estimates of interordinal divergence times, and further suggests that most interordinal divergences are positioned after the KPg boundary when rate transference errors are avoided through the elimination of calibrations in large-bodied and/or long lifespan clades. Here, we show that rate transference errors can also occur in the opposite direction and drag forward estimated divergence dates when calibrations in large-bodied/long lifespan clades are omitted. This dragging forward effect results in the occurrence of more than half a billion years of 'zombie lineages' on Phillips' preferred timetree. By contrast with ghost lineages, which are a logical byproduct of an incomplete fossil record, zombie lineages occur when estimated divergence dates are younger than the minimum age of the oldest crown fossils. We also present the results of new timetree analyses that address the rate transference problem highlighted by Phillips (2016) by deleting taxa that exceed thresholds for body size and lifespan

  18. The isolated perfused human skin flap model: A missing link in skin penetration studies?

    OpenAIRE

    Ternullo, Selenia; de Weerd, Louis; Flaten, Gøril Eide; Holsæter, Ann Mari; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Development of effective (trans)dermal drug delivery systems requires reliable skinmodels to evaluate skin drug penetration. The isolated perfused human skin flap remainsmetabolically active tissue for up to 6 h during in vitro perfusion. We introduce the isolated perfused human skin flap as a close-to-in vivo skin penetration model. To validate the model's ability to evaluate skin drug penetration the solutions of a hydrophilic (calcein) and a lipophilic (rhodamine) fluorescence ...

  19. Reference values and physiological characterization of a specific isolated pig kidney perfusion model

    OpenAIRE

    Meissler Michael; Fischer Axel; Fehrenberg Claudia; Grosse-Siestrup Christian; Unger Volker; Groneberg David A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Models of isolated and perfused kidneys are used to study the effects of drugs, hazardous or toxic substances on renal functions. Since physiological and morphological parameters of small laboratory animal kidneys are difficult to compare to human renal parameters, porcine kidney perfusion models have been developed to simulate closer conditions to the human situation, but exact values of renal parameters for different collection and perfusion conditions have not been repo...

  20. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  1. A proposed study on the transplacental transport of parabens in the human placental perfusion model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line; Zuri, Giuseppina; Andersen, Maria H

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure to parabens as a preservative used in personal care products is of increasing concern, as there is evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies of hormone disruption in association with exposure to parabens. Transport across the placenta could be critical for risk assessment, but the...

  2. Transport of benzo[alpha]pyrene in the dually perfused human placenta perfusion model: effect of albumin in the perfusion medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina

    2009-01-01

    P is lipophilic and studies using cell culture medium in 6-hr placenta perfusions showed minimal transport through the placenta. To increase the solubility of BaP in perfusion medium and to increase physiological relevance, perfusions were also performed with albumin added to the perfusion medium [2 and 30 mg...

  3. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiuru Aaro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT and nuclear medicine (NM studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  4. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

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    Gert Jan Pelgrim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

  5. Human placentation from nidation to 5 weeks of gestation. Part II: Tools to model the crucial first days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, J L; Carter, Anthony Michael; Chamley, L W

    2012-01-01

    stages of human implantation and placentation from nidation to 5 weeks of gestation. The field has expanded rapidly in recent years due to the generation of human embryonic stem cell lines and the ability of some scientists to culture human blastocysts. These models have enabled researchers to begin...... trophoblast stem cell, will significantly enhance our ability to define the molecular and structural events occurring during human implantation and early placental development.......Human pregnancy is unusual with respect to monthly spontaneous decidualisation as well as the degree of placental invasion and interaction with the decidualised endometrial stroma. This review covers in vivo animal models and in vitro cell culture models that have been used to study the earliest...

  6. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

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    Ha, Bon Chul; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316{+-}181 mm{sup 3}, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm{sup 3} and 195 mm{sup 3}, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40{+-}9.63, 16.8{+-}0.64, 15.24{+-}3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p{<=}0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91{+-}75.96 vs. 357.82{+-}12.82 vs. 323.19{+-}83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37{+-}0.19 vs. 3.02{+-}0.41 vs. 2.86{+-}0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23{+-}25.44 vs. 14.54{+-}1.60 vs. 6.81{+-}4.20 ml/100g/min)(p{<=}0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and

  7. Feto-maternal interaction: a mathematical model simulating placental response in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

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    Luria, Oded; Bar, Jacob; Kovo, Michal; Golan, Abraham; Barnea, Ofer

    2010-10-01

    Elevated maternal blood pressure (BP) is common in pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders. In response, increased production and accumulation of elastin occurs in the feto-placental blood vessels. This results in increased vascular wall stiffness that increases the resistance to flow. To study the interaction between the stiffness of the fetoplacental blood vessels, fetoplacental blood flow and BP, a mathematical model of the fetoplacental vascular tree was developed. The model describes an elastic structure exposed to external pressure. Model results indicate that increased vascular stiffness in the fetal blood vessels may contribute to optimizing fetoplacental blood flow in hypertensive pregnancies. According to model predictions, uncontrolled lowering of BP following vascular adaptation may adversely affect fetoplacental blood flow.

  8. The effects of sildenafil citrate on feto?placental development and haemodynamics in a rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Tello, Jorge; Arias-Álvarez, María; Jiménez-Martínez, Maria-Ángeles; Barbero-Fernández, Alicia; García-García, Rosa María; Rodríguez, María; Lorenzo, Pedro L; Torres-Rovira, Laura; Astiz, Susana; González-Bulnes, Antonio; Rebollar, Pilar G

    2016-05-23

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of sildenafil citrate (SC) to improve placental and fetal growth in a diet-induced rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Pregnant rabbits were fed either ad libitum (Group C) or restricted to 50% of dietary requirements (Group R) or restricted and treated with SC (Group SC). The treatment with SC improved placental development by increasing vascularity and vessel hypertrophy in the decidua. The assessment of feto-placental haemodynamics showed higher resistance and pulsatility indices at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in fetuses treated with SC when compared with Group R, which had increased systolic peak and time-averaged mean velocities at the MCA. Furthermore, fetuses in the SC group had significantly higher biparietal and thoracic diameters and longer crown-rump lengths than fetuses in Group R. Hence, the SC group had a reduced IUGR rate and a higher kit size at birth compared with Group R. In conclusion, SC may provide potential benefits in pregnancies with placental insufficiency and IUGR, partially counteracting the negative effects of food restriction on placental development and fetal growth. However, the present study also found evidence of a possible blood overflow in the brain that warrants further investigation.

  9. Chronic tempol prevents hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes in BPH/5 mouse model of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Darren S; Weydert, Christine J; Lazartigues, Eric; Kutschke, William J; Kienzle, Martha F; Leach, Jenny E; Sharma, Jennifer A; Sharma, Ram V; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-04-01

    Recently we described a mouse model, BPH/5, that spontaneously develops the hallmark clinical features of preeclampsia. BPH/5 exhibit impaired placentation before the onset of hypertension and proteinuria, supporting a causal role for the placenta in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Here we tested the hypothesis that an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) early in pregnancy results in placental abnormalities leading to the maternal symptoms of preeclampsia. We further hypothesized that chronic antioxidant therapy would ameliorate both feto-placental abnormalities and maternal symptoms. ROS levels measured by dihydroethidium revealed significant increases in oxidative stress in BPH/5 placentas at midgestation compared with C57 controls. This increase in ROS was correlated with reduced expression and activity of cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase in early and midgestation BPH/5 placentas. These abnormalities in placental oxidant factors occurred before the onset of maternal symptoms, suggesting a possible causal link between increased ROS and maternal and feto-placental pathology in this model. In support of this, chronic treatment of BPH/5 with the superoxide dismutase-mimetic Tempol throughout gestation significantly improved fetal growth and survival. Furthermore, Tempol ameliorated pregnancy-induced increases in blood pressure and proteinuria in BPH/5 mothers. We confirmed that Tempol radical was present in plasma, and it normalized ROS levels in all placental zones in BPH/5. These data for the first time demonstrate an important causative role for increased ROS in the placenta in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia in a model that spontaneously develops the disease. The results also strongly suggest the potential utility of antioxidant therapy in treating preeclampsia.

  10. Whole Ovine Ovaries as a Model for Human: Perfusion with Cryoprotectants In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Isachenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available These experiments were performed to test the perfusion of ovine as a model for human ovaries by cryoprotectants in vivo at high temperature when the permeability of capillaries is high and when blood is insensibly replaced by the solution of cryoprotectants. By our hypothetical supposition, ovaries could be saturated by cryoprotectants before their surgical removal. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of perfusion of ovine ovaries with vascular pedicle in vivo and in vitro. Arteria ovarica was cannuled and ovaries were perfused by Leibovitz L-15 medium + 100 IU/mL heparin + 5% bovine calf serum + 6% dimethyl sulfoxide + 6% ethylene glycol + 0.15 M sucrose + Indian ink in vivo and in vitro. In the first and second cycle of experiments, ovaries (n=13 and n=23 were perfused in vivo and in vitro, respectively, during 60 min with the rate of perfusion 50 mL/h (0.8 mL/min. It was established with in vivo perfusion that only about 10% of ovarian tissues were perfused due to an appearance of multiple anastomoses when the perfusion medium goes from arteria ovarica to arteria uterina without inflow into the ovaries. It was concluded that in vitro perfusion of ovine intact ovaries with vascular pedicle by freezing medium is more effective than this manipulation performed in vivo.

  11. Whole ovine ovaries as a model for human: perfusion with cryoprotectants in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isachenko, Vladimir; Rahimi, Gohar; Dattena, Maria; Mallmann, Peter; Baikoshkarova, Saltanat; Kellerwessel, Elisabeth; Otarbaev, Marat; Shalakhmetova, Tamara; Isachenko, Evgenia

    2014-01-01

    These experiments were performed to test the perfusion of ovine as a model for human ovaries by cryoprotectants in vivo at high temperature when the permeability of capillaries is high and when blood is insensibly replaced by the solution of cryoprotectants. By our hypothetical supposition, ovaries could be saturated by cryoprotectants before their surgical removal. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of perfusion of ovine ovaries with vascular pedicle in vivo and in vitro. Arteria ovarica was cannuled and ovaries were perfused by Leibovitz L-15 medium + 100 IU/mL heparin + 5% bovine calf serum + 6% dimethyl sulfoxide + 6% ethylene glycol + 0.15 M sucrose + Indian ink in vivo and in vitro. In the first and second cycle of experiments, ovaries (n = 13 and n = 23) were perfused in vivo and in vitro, respectively, during 60 min with the rate of perfusion 50 mL/h (0.8 mL/min). It was established with in vivo perfusion that only about 10% of ovarian tissues were perfused due to an appearance of multiple anastomoses when the perfusion medium goes from arteria ovarica to arteria uterina without inflow into the ovaries. It was concluded that in vitro perfusion of ovine intact ovaries with vascular pedicle by freezing medium is more effective than this manipulation performed in vivo.

  12. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

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    Kei Takahashi

    Full Text Available Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model.Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6 mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP.Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37. Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5 mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay.In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  13. Tracer kinetic modelling in MRI: estimating perfusion and capillary permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourbron, S. P.; Buckley, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The tracer-kinetic models developed in the early 1990s for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) have since become a standard in numerous applications. At the same time, the development of MRI hardware has led to increases in image quality and temporal resolution that reveal the limitations of the early models. This in turn has stimulated an interest in the development and application of a second generation of modelling approaches. They are designed to overcome these limitations and produce additional and more accurate information on tissue status. In particular, models of the second generation enable separate estimates of perfusion and capillary permeability rather than a single parameter Ktrans that represents a combination of the two. A variety of such models has been proposed in the literature, and development in the field has been constrained by a lack of transparency regarding terminology, notations and physiological assumptions. In this review, we provide an overview of these models in a manner that is both physically intuitive and mathematically rigourous. All are derived from common first principles, using concepts and notations from general tracer-kinetic theory. Explicit links to their historical origins are included to allow for a transfer of experience obtained in other fields (PET, SPECT, CT). A classification is presented that reveals the links between all models, and with the models of the first generation. Detailed formulae for all solutions are provided to facilitate implementation. Our aim is to encourage the application of these tools to DCE-MRI by offering researchers a clearer understanding of their assumptions and requirements.

  14. Angiogenesis inhibition causes hypertension and placental dysfunction in a rat model of preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlström, Mattias; Wentzel, Parri; Skøtt, Ole

    2009-01-01

    successively increased during pregnancy and differed by 17 mmHg at gestational day 20 compared with the pregnant control rats. In the pregnant Suramin-treated rats group, the renin levels increased (+122%) and the sFlt-1 levels decreased (-58%) during pregnancy. The pregnant Suramin-treated fetuses......BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia is a serious pregnancy complication, accompanied by increased maternal and fetal morbidity. Different models have been used to study preeclampsia, but none of these display all the key features of the disease. METHOD: We investigated the effects on maternal blood pressure...... and fetal outcome exerted by the angiogenesis inhibitor Suramin (100 mg/kg i.p.) during early placentation. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured continuously with telemetry in Sprague-Dawley rats of four experimental groups: nonpregnant controls, Suramin-treated nonpregnant rats, pregnant controls...

  15. The lognormal perfusion model for disruption replenishment measurements of blood flow: in vivo validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, John M; Leung, Kogee; Burns, Peter N

    2011-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) is evolving as a promising tool to noninvasively quantify relative tissue perfusion in organs and solid tumours. Quantification using the method of disruption replenishment is best performed using a model that accurately describes the replenishment of microbubble contrast agents through the ultrasound imaging plane. In this study, the lognormal perfusion model was validated using an exposed in vivo rabbit kidney model. Compared against an implanted transit time flow meter, longitudinal relative flow measurement was (×3) less variable and correlated better when quantification was performed with the lognormal perfusion model (Spearman r = 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.05) vs. the prevailing mono-exponential model (Spearman r = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.18). Disruption-replenishment measurements using the lognormal perfusion model were reproducible in vivo to within 12%.

  16. A recapitulative three-dimensional model of breast carcinoma requires perfusion for multi-week growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla F Goliwas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast carcinomas are complex, three-dimensional tissues composed of cancer epithelial cells and stromal components, including fibroblasts and extracellular matrix. In vitro models that more faithfully recapitulate this dimensionality and stromal microenvironment should more accurately elucidate the processes driving carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and therapeutic response. Herein, novel in vitro breast carcinoma surrogates, distinguished by a relevant dimensionality and stromal microenvironment, are described and characterized. A perfusion bioreactor system was used to deliver medium to surrogates containing engineered microchannels and the effects of perfusion, medium composition, and the method of cell incorporation and density of initial cell seeding on the growth and morphology of surrogates were assessed. Perfused surrogates demonstrated significantly greater cell density and proliferation and were more histologically recapitulative of human breast carcinoma than surrogates maintained without perfusion. Although other parameters of the surrogate system, such as medium composition and cell seeding density, affected cell growth, perfusion was the most influential parameter.

  17. Viscosity and haemodynamics in a late gestation rat feto-placental arterial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bappoo, Nikhilesh; Kelsey, Lachlan J; Parker, Louis; Crough, Tim; Moran, Carmel M; Thomson, Adrian; Holmes, Megan C; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Doyle, Barry J

    2017-08-01

    The placenta is a transient organ which develops during pregnancy to provide haemotrophic support for healthy fetal growth and development. Fundamental to its function is the healthy development of vascular trees in the feto-placental arterial network. Despite the strong association of haemodynamics with vascular remodelling mechanisms, there is a lack of computational haemodynamic data that may improve our understanding of feto-placental physiology. The aim of this work was to create a comprehensive 3D computational fluid dynamics model of a substructure of the rat feto-placental arterial network and investigate the influence of viscosity on wall shear stress (WSS). Late gestation rat feto-placental arteries were perfused with radiopaque Microfil and scanned via micro-computed tomography to capture the feto-placental arterial geometry in 3D. A detailed description of rat fetal blood viscosity parameters was developed, and three different approaches to feto-placental haemodynamics were simulated in 3D using the finite volume method: Newtonian model, non-Newtonian Carreau-Yasuda model and Fåhræus-Lindqvist effect model. Significant variability in WSS was observed between different viscosity models. The physiologically-realistic simulations using the Fåhræus-Lindqvist effect and rat fetal blood estimates of viscosity revealed detailed patterns of WSS throughout the arterial network. We found WSS gradients at bifurcation regions, which may contribute to vessel enlargement, and sprouting and pruning during angiogenesis. This simulation of feto-placental haemodynamics shows the heterogeneous WSS distribution throughout the network and demonstrates the ability to determine physiologically-relevant WSS magnitudes, patterns and gradients. This model will help advance our understanding of vascular physiology and remodelling in the feto-placental network.

  18. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-28

    To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. It is feasible to establish an animal model of hepatic cirrhosis and

  19. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass: the role of hemodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Nick J; de Lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B A; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Begieneman, Mark P V; Niessen, Hans W; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-03-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue injury in a rat model. Male Wistar rats (375-425 g) were anesthetized, prepared for cremaster muscle intravital microscopy, and subjected to CPB (n = 9), hemodilution alone (n = 9), or a sham procedure (n = 6). Microcirculatory recordings were performed at multiple time points and analyzed for perfusion characteristics. Kidney and lung tissue were investigated for mRNA expression for genes regulating inflammation and endothelial adhesion molecule expression. Renal injury was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit levels dropped to 0.24 ± 0.03 l/l and 0.22 ± 0.02 l/l after onset of hemodilution with or without CPB. Microcirculatory perfusion remained unaltered in sham rats. Hemodilution alone induced a 13% decrease in perfused capillaries, after which recovery was observed. Onset of CPB reduced the perfused capillaries by 40% (9.2 ± 0.9 to 5.5 ± 1.5 perfused capillaries per microscope field; P perfusion, which cannot fully explain impaired microcirculation following cardiopulmonary bypass. CPB led to increased renal injury and endothelial adhesion molecule expression in the kidney and lung compared with hemodilution. Our findings suggest that microcirculatory impairment during CPB may play a role in the development of kidney injury.

  20. Placental transport and in vitro effects of Bisphenol A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Thit J; Sorda, Giuseppina; Bechi, Nicoletta

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-like chemical, leaches from consumer products potentially causing human exposure. To examine the effects of BPA exposure during pregnancy, we performed studies using the BeWo trophoblast cell line, placental explant cultures, placental perfusions and skin diffusion...

  1. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia.

  2. Experimental model of isolated lung perfusion in rats: first Brazilian experience using the IL-2 isolated perfused rat or guinea pig lung system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêgo-Fernandes, P M; Werebe, E; Cardoso, P F G; Pazetti, R; de Oliveira, K A; Soares, P R O; Jatene, F B

    2010-03-01

    Lung transplantation has become the mainstay therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease refractory to medical management. However, the number of patients listed for lung transplantation largely exceeds available donors. The study of lung preservation requires accurate, cost-effective small animal models. We have described a model of ex vivo rat lung perfusion using a commercially available system. Male Wistar rats weighing 250 g-300 g were anesthetized with intraperitoneal sodium thiopental (50 mg/kg body weight). The surgical technique included heart-lung block extraction, assembly, and preparation for perfusion and data collection. We used an IL-2 Isolated Perfused Rat or Guinea Pig Lung System (Harvard Apparatus, Holliston, Mass, United States; Hugo Sachs Elektronik, Alemanha). Preliminary results included hemodynamic and pulmonary mechanics data gathered in the experiments. The isolated rat lung perfusion system is a reliable method to assess lung preservation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Image-based modeling of blood flow and oxygen transfer in feto-placental capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Philip; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    During pregnancy, oxygen diffuses from maternal to fetal blood through the placenta. At the smallest scale of the feto-placental vasculature are the "terminal villi", bulbous structures that are thought to be the main sites for oxygen transfer in the final trimester of pregnancy. The objective of this study is to investigate blood flow and oxygen transfer in the terminal villi of the placenta. Three-dimensional representations of villous and capillary surfaces, obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy, are converted to finite-element meshes. Simulations of blood flow and oxygen transfer are performed to calculate the vascular flow resistance of the capillaries and the total oxygen transfer rate from the maternal blood. Scaling arguments, which predict the oxygen transfer across a range of Peclet numbers, are shown to be an efficient tool for quantifying the effect of statistical variability and experimental uncertainty. The effect of commonly observed localised dilations in the fetal vasculature on oxygen transfer is quantified using an idealised model in a simplified geometry. The model predicts how, for a fixed pressure drop through a capillary, oxygen transfer is maximised by an optimal shape of the dilation, leading to an increase in oxygen transfer of up to 15%.

  4. Prediction of preeclampsia in primigravida in late first trimester using serum placental growth factor alone and by combination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rachna; Chaudhary, Shweta; Kar, Rajarshi; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Tandon, Anupama

    2017-10-01

    We investigated a placental growth factor alone and combined clinical (mean arterial pressure, MAP), biophysical (uterine artery pulsability index, PI) and biochemical (placental growth factor, PLGF) model for predicting preeclampsia in late first trimester. The inclusion criteria was primigravida (model with all three markers had better prediction of preeclampsia rather than PLGF alone. Impact statement In view of high morbidity and mortality due to hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, there has been extensive research for developing markers to detect/screen the condition in early pregnancy. Several such markers have been tested in their individual capacities and in combination during early pregnancy. Most of these studies have originated from high income countries and focussed mainly on the second trimester of pregnancy. We investigated a placental growth factor alone and combined clinical (mean arterial pressure, MAP), biophysical (uterine artery pulsability index, PI) and biochemical (placental growth factor, PLGF) model for predicting preeclampsia in the first trimester in primigravida (model was used for our study. For preeclampsia, PLGF alone had detection rate of 40% and 51% with 5% and 10% FPR, respectively. On addition of MAP, the AUC improved to 0.937 for PE. Further, addition of mean PI slightly improved AUC to 0.965. The present study has been done in an Indian subcontinent setting (where maternal mortality related to preeclampsia are even higher) where very limited studies are available for the role of either PLGF or in combinations for prediction of preeclampsia. Our research pointed shows better predictability for PE when a combination of markers is used especially in low-risk nulligravida. These are easy, cheap and non-invasive measurements that can be taken in all women at their first routine antenatal visit.

  5. Placental expression of myostatin and follistatin-like-3 protein in a model of developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Hassendrini N; Ponnampalam, Anna P; Osepchook, Claire C; Mitchell, Murray D; Green, Mark P

    2010-04-01

    Maternal undernutrition during gestation is known to be detrimental to fetal development, leading to a propensity for metabolic disorders later in the adult lives of the offspring. Identifying possible mediators and physiological processes involved in modulating nutrient transport within the placenta is essential to prevent and/or develop treatments for the effects of aberrant nutrition, nutrient transfer, and detrimental changes to fetal development. A potential role for myostatin as a mediator of nutrient uptake and transport from the mother to the fetus was shown through the recent finding that myostatin acts within the human placenta to modulate glucose uptake and therefore homeostasis. The mRNA and protein expression of myostatin and its inhibitor, follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3), was studied in the placenta and skeletal muscle of a transgenerational Wistar rat model of gestational maternal undernutrition in which the F2 offspring postweaning consumed a high-fat (HF) diet. Alterations in placental characteristics and offspring phenotype, specifically glucose homeostasis, were evident in the transgenerationally undernourished (UNAD) group. Myostatin and FSTL3 protein expression were also higher (P UNAD compared with the control group. At maturity, UNAD HF-fed animals had higher (P < 0.05) skeletal muscle expression of FSTL3 than control animals. In summary, maternal undernutrition during gestation results in the aberrant regulation of myostatin and FSTL3 in the placenta and skeletal muscle of subsequent generations. Myostatin, through the disruption of maternal nutrient supply to the fetus, may thus be a potential mediator of offspring phenotype.

  6. Placental Aromatase Is Deficient in Placental Ischemia and Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Perez-Sepulveda

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a maternal hypertensive disorder with uncertain etiology and a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality worldwide, causing nearly 40% of premature births delivered before 35 weeks of gestation. The first stage of preeclampsia is characterized by reduction of utero-placental blood flow which is reflected in high blood pressure and proteinuria during the second half of pregnancy. In human placenta androgens derived from the maternal and fetal adrenal glands are converted into estrogens by the enzymatic action of placental aromatase. This implies that alterations in placental steroidogenesis and, subsequently, in the functionality or bioavailability of placental aromatase may be mechanistically involved in the pathophysiology of PE.Serum samples were collected at 32-36 weeks of gestation and placenta biopsies were collected at time of delivery from PE patients (n = 16 and pregnant controls (n = 32. The effect of oxygen tension on placental cells was assessed by incubation JEG-3 cells under 1% and 8% O2 for different time periods, Timed-mated, pregnant New Zealand white rabbits (n = 6 were used to establish an in vivo model of placental ischemia (achieved by ligature of uteroplacental vessels. Aromatase content and estrogens and androgens concentrations were measured.The protein and mRNA content of placental aromatase significantly diminished in placentae obtained from preeclamptic patients compared to controls. Similarly, the circulating concentrations of 17-β-estradiol/testosterone and estrone/androstenedione were reduced in preeclamptic patients vs. controls. These data are consistent with a concomitant decrease in aromatase activity. Aromatase content was reduced in response to low oxygen tension in the choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell line and in rabbit placentae in response to partial ligation of uterine spiral arteries, suggesting that reduced placental aromatase activity in preeclamptic patients may be associated with chronic

  7. Effects of preeclampsia-like symptoms at early gestational stage on feto-placental outcomes in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Rui-qiong; SUN Min-na; YANG Zi

    2010-01-01

    Background Early and late-onset preeclampsia is thought to be different disease entities. This study aimed to determine the effects of early-onset preeclampsia-like symptoms on feto-placental outcomes and the adverse impacts of various factors on placental and fetal growth and development at different gestational stages in a mouse model. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were divided into control and preeclampsia (PE) groups, and injected subcutaneously with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) 50 mg·kg~(-1)·d~(-1). The PE group was divided into early-, mid- and late-PE groups with L-NAME injections starting on days 7, 11 and 16 of pregnancy, respectively. Corresponding control groups were injected with saline at the same time points. Blood pressure was measured until days 14 and 18, when the fetuses and placentas were removed under anesthesia. Blood pressure, urinary protein, and fetal and placental conditions were analyzed. Results Blood pressure and urinary protein increased following L-NAME injection. The fetal survival rate and fetal weight were reduced and the fetal absorption rate was increased in the early-PE group on days 14 and 18 of pregnancy, compared with the control group. There were no significant differences in these parameters between the late-PE group and the respective control group. Placental weights in the early- and mid-PE groups were significantly reduced at days 14 and 18 of pregnancy compared with the control groups, but there was no significant difference in placental weight between the late-PE group and the respective control group. Morphologic examination of placentas from the early- and mid-PE groups showed varying degrees of fibrinoid necrosis and villous interstitial edema, but no significant pathologic changes were found in the placentas from the late-PE or control groups. Conclusion Preeclampsia-like symptoms occurring during the early stage of pregnancy are more likely to affect placental and fetal

  8. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation.

  9. Placental Underperfusion in a Rat Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction Induced by a Reduced Plasma Volume Expansion.

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    Karine Bibeau

    Full Text Available Lower maternal plasma volume expansion was found in idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR but the link remains to be elucidated. An animal model of IUGR was developed by giving a low-sodium diet to rats over the last week of gestation. This treatment prevents full expansion of maternal circulating volume and the increase in uterine artery diameter, leading to reduced placental weight compared to normal gestation. We aimed to verify whether this is associated with reduced remodeling of uteroplacental circulation and placental hypoxia. Dams were divided into two groups: IUGR group and normal-fed controls. Blood velocity waveforms in the main uterine artery were obtained by Doppler sonography on days 14, 18 and 21 of pregnancy. On day 22 (term = 23 days, rats were sacrificed and placentas and uterine radial arteries were collected. Diameter and myogenic response of uterine arteries supplying placentas were determined while expression of hypoxia-modulated genes (HIF-1α, VEGFA and VEGFR2, apoptotic enzyme (Caspase -3 and -9 and glycogen cells clusters were measured in control and IUGR term-placentas. In the IUGR group, impaired blood velocity in the main uterine artery along with increased resistance index was observed without alteration in umbilical artery blood velocity. Radial uterine artery diameter was reduced while myogenic response was increased. IUGR placentas displayed increased expression of hypoxia markers without change in the caspases and increased glycogen cells in the junctional zone. The present data suggest that reduced placental and fetal growth in our IUGR model may be mediated, in part, through reduced maternal uteroplacental blood flow and increased placental hypoxia.

  10. Placental economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jieun

    2016-01-01

    and sustained through the relations and practices of care that animate the placenta in different forms. On the basis of an ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Korea, this article focuses on two different forms of care (lab workers’ care of cells, and pregnant women’s care of fetuses) that enable the (re......Thinking with the vital materiality of placentas as it is evinced in a placental stem cell research lab in Korea, this article explores the relations and practices of care that are essential to the circulation of biological matters as infrastructure of tissue economies. I attend to the flows...... of care that sustain tissue economies with the notion of ‘placental economies’. Shifting attention from donor subjects and tissue objects to practices and relations of care as an infrastructure for the circulation of tissues, I explore how the vitality of biological matters is an achievement made...

  11. Renal versus splenic maximum slope based perfusion CT modelling in patients with portal-hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Brehmer, Katharina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Anders; Aspelin, Peter; Brismar, Torkel B. [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    To assess liver perfusion-CT (P-CT) parameters derived from peak-splenic (PSE) versus peak-renal enhancement (PRE) maximum slope-based modelling in different levels of portal-venous hypertension (PVH). Twenty-four patients (16 men; mean age 68 ± 10 years) who underwent dynamic P-CT for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were retrospectively divided into three groups: (1) without PVH (n = 8), (2) with PVH (n = 8), (3) with PVH and thrombosis (n = 8). Time to PSE and PRE and arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal-venous liver perfusion (PLP) and hepatic perfusion-index (HPI) of the liver and HCC derived from PSE- versus PRE-based modelling were compared between the groups. Time to PSE was significantly longer in PVH groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.02), whereas PRE was similar in groups 1, 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). In group 1, liver and HCC perfusion parameters were similar for PSE- and PRE-based modelling (all P > 0.05), whereas significant differences were seen for PLP and HPI (liver only) in group 2 and ALP in group 3 (all P < 0.05). PSE is delayed in patients with PVH, resulting in a miscalculation of PSE-based P-CT parameters. Maximum slope-based P-CT might be improved by replacing PSE with PRE-modelling, whereas the difference between PSE and PRE might serve as a non-invasive biomarker of PVH. (orig.)

  12. Placental Volumetry by 2-D Sonography with a New Mathematical Formula: Prospective Study on the Shell of a Spherical Sector Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinszky, Zoltan; Surányi, Andrea; Péics, Hajnalka; Molnár, András; Pál, Attila

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the utility of a new mathematical model in volumetric assessment of the placenta using 2-D ultrasound. Placental volumetry was performed in a prospective cross-sectional survey by virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) with the help of a shell-off method in 346 uncomplicated pregnancies according to STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines. Furthermore, placental thickness, length and height were measured with the 2-D technique to estimate placental volume based on the mathematical formula for the volume of "the shell of the spherical sector." Fetal size was also assessed by 2-D sonography. The placental volumes measured by 2-D and 3-D techniques had a correlation of 0.86. In the first trimester, the correlation was 0.82, and later during pregnancy, it was 0.86. Placental volumetry using "the circle-shaped shell of the spherical sector" mathematical model with 2-D ultrasound technique may be introduced into everyday practice to screen for placental volume deviations associated with adverse pregnancy outcome.

  13. Reference values and physiological characterization of a specific isolated pig kidney perfusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meissler Michael

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Models of isolated and perfused kidneys are used to study the effects of drugs, hazardous or toxic substances on renal functions. Since physiological and morphological parameters of small laboratory animal kidneys are difficult to compare to human renal parameters, porcine kidney perfusion models have been developed to simulate closer conditions to the human situation, but exact values of renal parameters for different collection and perfusion conditions have not been reported so far. If the organs could be used out of regular slaughtering processes animal experiments may be avoided. Methods To assess renal perfusion quality, we analyzed different perfusion settings in a standardized model of porcine kidney hemoperfusion with organs collected in the operating theatre (OP: groups A-D or in a public abattoir (SLA: group E and compared the data to in vivo measurements in living animals (CON. Experimental groups had defined preservation periods (0, 2 and 24 hrs, one with additional albumin in the perfusate (C for edema reduction. Results Varying perfusion settings resulted in different functional values (mean ± SD: blood flow (RBF [ml/min*100 g]: (A 339.9 ± 61.1; (C 244.5 ± 53.5; (D 92.8 ± 25.8; (E 153.8 ± 41.5; glomerular fitration (GFR [ml/min*100 g]: (CON 76.1 ± 6.2; (A 59.2 ± 13.9; (C 25.0 ± 10.6; (D 1.6 ± 1.3; (E 16.3 ± 8.2; fractional sodium reabsorption (RFNa [%] (CON 99.8 ± 0.1; (A 82.3 ± 8.1; (C 86.8 ± 10.3; (D 38.4 ± 24.5; (E 88.7 ± 5.8. Additionally the tubular coupling-ratio of Na-reabsorption/O2-consumption was determined (TNa/O2-cons [mmol-Na/mmol- O2] (CON 30.1; (A 42.0, (C 80.6; (D 17.4; (E 23.8, exhibiting OP and SLA organs with comparable results. Conclusion In the present study functional values for isolated kidneys with different perfusion settings were determined to assess organ perfusion quality. It can be summarized that the hemoperfused porcine kidney can serve as a biological model with

  14. The isolated perfused rat liver : standardization of a time-honoured model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, M.; t'Hart, N. A.; Tolba, R.; Doorschodt, B. M.; D Leuvenink, H. G.; Ploeg, R. J.; Minor, T.; van Gulik, T. M.

    For many years, the isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) model has been used to investigate the physiology and pathophysiology of the rat liver. This in vitro model provides the opportunity to assess cellular injury and liver function in an isolated setting. This review offers an update of recent

  15. Pravastatin ameliorates placental vascular defects, fetal growth, and cardiac function in a model of glucocorticoid excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Noble, June; Thomson, Adrian; Tesic, Dijana; Miller, Mark R; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Moran, Carmel M; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2016-05-31

    Fetoplacental glucocorticoid overexposure is a significant mechanism underlying fetal growth restriction and the programming of adverse health outcomes in the adult. Placental glucocorticoid inactivation by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) plays a key role. We previously discovered that Hsd11b2(-/-) mice, lacking 11β-HSD2, show marked underdevelopment of the placental vasculature. We now explore the consequences for fetal cardiovascular development and whether this is reversible. We studied Hsd11b2(+/+), Hsd11b2(+/-), and Hsd11b2(-/-) littermates from heterozygous (Hsd11b(+/-)) matings at embryonic day (E)14.5 and E17.5, where all three genotypes were present to control for maternal effects. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we found that umbilical vein blood velocity in Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses did not undergo the normal gestational increase seen in Hsd11b2(+/+) littermates. Similarly, the resistance index in the umbilical artery did not show the normal gestational decline. Surprisingly, given that 11β-HSD2 absence is predicted to initiate early maturation, the E/A wave ratio was reduced at E17.5 in Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses, suggesting impaired cardiac function. Pravastatin administration from E6.5, which increases placental vascular endothelial growth factor A and, thus, vascularization, increased placental fetal capillary volume, ameliorated the aberrant umbilical cord velocity, normalized fetal weight, and improved the cardiac function of Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses. This improved cardiac function occurred despite persisting indications of increased glucocorticoid exposure in the Hsd11b2(-/-) fetal heart. Thus, the pravastatin-induced enhancement of fetal capillaries within the placenta and the resultant hemodynamic changes correspond with restored fetal cardiac function. Statins may represent a useful therapeutic approach to intrauterine growth retardation due to placental vascular hypofunction.

  16. Fluoxetine and its active metabolite norfluoxetine disrupt estrogen synthesis in a co-culture model of the feto-placental unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Laurent, Laetitia; Vo Duy, Sung; Sauvé, Sébastien; Caron, Patrick; Guillemette, Chantal; Sanderson, J Thomas; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2017-02-15

    The effects of fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy, and its active metabolite norfluoxetine were studied on placental aromatase (CYP19) and feto-placental steroidogenesis. Fluoxetine did not alter estrogen secretion in co-culture of fetal-like adrenocortical (H295R) and trophoblast-like (BeWo) cells used as a model of the feto-placental unit, although it induced CYP19 activity, apparently mediated by the serotonin (5-HT)2A receptor/PKC signaling pathway. Norfluoxetine decreased estrogen secretion in the feto-placental co-culture and competitively inhibited catalytic CYP19 activity in BeWo cells. Decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity in the co-culture was comparable to 17β-estradiol treatment of BeWo cells. This work shows that the complex interaction of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine with placental estrogen production, involves 5-HT-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Considering the crucial role of estrogens during pregnancy, our results raise concern about the impact of SSRI treatment on placental function and fetal health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma-mediated vascular dysfunction in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure model of preeclampsia: a microvascular characterization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Sarah K

    2012-01-31

    Preeclampsia is associated with widespread maternal vascular dysfunction, which is thought to be mediated by circulating factor(s). The aim of the study was to characterize vascular function in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model of preeclampsia and to investigate the role of plasma factors in mediating any observed changes in vascular reactivity. Mean arterial blood pressure and vascular function were measured in RUPP and control rats. Mesenteric vessels from both virgin and pregnant rats were exposed for 1 hour or overnight to plasma from both RUPP and control rats and their vascular function assessed. RUPP rats were characterized by severe hypertension, restricted fetal growth, and reduced placental weight (P<0.001). Vasorelaxation was impaired in resistance vessels from RUPP compared with control rats (acetylcholine: R(max) 70+\\/-3 versus 92+\\/-1 [NP] and 93+\\/-3% [sham], P<0.01; bradykinin: 40+\\/-2 versus 62+\\/-2 [NP] and 59+\\/-4% [sham], P<0.001). Incubation of vessels from pregnant (but not virgin) animals with RUPP plasma overnight resulted in an attenuation of vasorelaxant responses (acetylcholine: 63+\\/-7 versus 86+\\/-2%, P<0.05; bradykinin: 35+\\/-5 versus 55+\\/-6%, P<0.001). The residual relaxant response in RUPP plasma-treated vessels was not further attenuated after treatment with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (acetylcholine: 57+\\/-7 versus 63+\\/-7%, ns; bradykinin: 37+\\/-5 versus 35+\\/-5%, ns). The RUPP rat model is characterized by an impaired response to vasodilators which may be attributable to one or more circulating factors. This plasma-mediated endothelial dysfunction appears to be a pregnancy-dependent effect. Furthermore, nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation appears to be absent in RUPP plasma-treated vessels.

  18. Iloprost donor treatment reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury in an isolated extracorporeal pig liver perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoening, Wenzel N; Feige, Ines; Schubert, Thomas; Olschewski, Peter; Buescher, Niklas; Helbig, Michael; Schmitz, Volker; Neuhaus, Peter; Pratschke, Johann; Puhl, Gero

    2015-02-01

    Iloprost has the potential to protect the liver transplant graft before and during cold ischemia. We studied iloprost administration during organ procurement and reperfusion in an extracorporeal pig liver perfusion model. German Landrace pigs (n = 7/group; 22-26 kg each) were used as donors. Preservation was performed by aortic perfusion with 2 L Bretschneiders' Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate solution HTK and cold ischemia time (4°C) 20 hours followed by normothermic extracorporeal perfusion for 8 hours. Untreated controls (1) were compared to iloprost (2) donor bolus-treatment (1 μg/kg body weight), (3) addition of iloprost to Bretschneiders' Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate solution HTK (0.0125 μg/mL), (4) continuous infusion during reperfusion (2 ng/kg/min), and (5) combined treatment (2) and (4). Iloprost donor treatment led to significantly higher bile production. Addition of iloprost to the preservation solution significantly improved hepatic artery perfusion and was accompanied by improvements of microcirculation and bile production. Iloprost reperfusion treatment alone significantly improved bile production. Enzyme levels were positively affected by all treatment regimens. Combined use of iloprost before and after ischemia improved hepatic artery flow and microcirculation and showed significantly lower hypoxia staining versus controls. Iloprost donor treatment and use of iloprost in the preservation solution significantly improved graft perfusion and function. The effects of graft treatment seemed greater before than after reperfusion. Combined treatment did not reveal a synergistic advantage.

  19. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Attenuates Placental-Ischemia Induced Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Eric M.; Cockrell, Kathy; Aranay, Marietta; Csongradi, Eva; Stec, David E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies have reported that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) downregulates the angiostatic protein sFlt-1 from placental villous explants and that the HO-1 metabolites CO and bilirubin negatively regulates endothelin-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although sFlt-1, ET-1, and ROS have been implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension during preeclampsia and in response to placental ischemia in pregnant rats, it is unknown whether chronic induction of HO-1 alters the hypertensive response to placental ischemia. The present study examined the hypothesis that HO-1 induction in a rat model of placental ischemia would beneficially affect blood pressure, angiogenic balance, superoxide, and ET-1 production in the ischemic placenta. To achieve this goal we examined the effects of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) placental ischemia model and in normal pregnant rats. In response to RUPP treatment, MAP increases 29mmHg (136 ± 7 vs. 106 ± 5 mmHg) which is significantly attenuated by CoPP (118 ± 5 mmHg). While RUPP treatment causes placental sFlt-1/VEGF ratios to alter significantly to an angiostatic balance (1 ± 0.1 vs 1.27 ± 0.2,), treatment with CoPP causes a significant shift in the ratio to an angiogenic balance (0.68 ± 0.1). Placental superoxide increased in RUPP (952.5 ± 278.8 vs 243.9 ± 70.5 RLU/min/mg), but was significantly attenuated by HO-1 induction (482.7 ± 117.4 RLU/min/mg). Also, preproendothelin message was significantly increased in RUPP, which was prevented by CoPP. These data indicate that HO-1, or its metabolites, are potential therapeutics for the treatment of preeclampsia. PMID:21383306

  20. Rescue of placental phenotype in a mechanistic model of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several imprinted genes have been implicated in the process of placentation. The distal region of mouse chromosome 7 (Chr 7 contains at least ten imprinted genes, several of which are expressed from the maternal homologue in the placenta. The corresponding paternal alleles of these genes are silenced in cis by an incompletely understood mechanism involving the formation of a repressive nuclear compartment mediated by the long non-coding RNA Kcnq1ot1 initiated from imprinting centre 2 (IC2. However, it is unknown whether some maternally expressed genes are silenced on the paternal homologue via a Kcnq1ot1-independent mechanism. We have previously reported that maternal inheritance of a large truncation of Chr7 encompassing the entire IC2-regulated domain (DelTel7 allele leads to embryonic lethality at mid-gestation accompanied by severe placental abnormalities. Kcnq1ot1 expression can be abolished on the paternal chromosome by deleting IC2 (IC2KO allele. When the IC2KO mutation is paternally inherited, epigenetic silencing is lost in the region and the DelTel7 lethality is rescued in compound heterozygotes, leading to viable DelTel7/IC2KO mice. Results Considering the important functions of several IC2-regulated genes in placentation, we set out to determine whether these DelTel7/IC2KO rescued conceptuses develop normal placentae. We report no abnormalities with respect to the architecture and vasculature of the DelTel7/IC2KO rescued placentae. Imprinted expression of several of the IC2-regulated genes critical to placentation is also faithfully recapitulated in DelTel7/IC2KO placentae. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that all the distal chromosome 7 imprinted genes implicated in placental function are silenced by IC2 and Kcnq1ot1 on the paternal allele. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the methylated maternal IC2 is not required for the regulation of nearby genes. The results show the potential for

  1. A murine model for the assessment of placental and fetal development in teratogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, J; Basse, A; Wolstrup, C

    1987-01-01

    During normal pregnancy in the mouse, maternal serum levels of the analogues to human schwangerschaftsprotein-1 and alpha-fetoprotein correlate significantly with the growth of the placenta and fetus respectively. This relationship has been utilized in the analysis of the effect of sodium selenite on placental and fetal growth in mice. Moderate doses of sodium selenite did not affect the growth of the placenta and fetus significantly, whereas high doses of selenite resulted in a large percentage of abortions. The protein markers were found to be useful in the prediction of placental and fetal growth, and they are suggested to be of general use in the study of the impact of teratogenic substances, since they reflect the status of the fetoplacental mass during gestation.

  2. LASER-DOPPLER VELOCIMETRY AND MONTE-CARLO SIMULATIONS ON MODELS FOR BLOOD PERFUSION IN TISSUE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMUL, FFM; KOELINK, MH; KOK, ML; HARMSMA, PJ; GREVE, J; GRAAFF, R; AARNOUDSE, JG

    1995-01-01

    Laser Doppler flow measurements and Monte Carlo simulations on small blood perfusion flow models at 780 nm are presented and compared. The dimensions of the optical sample volume are investigated as functions of the distance of the laser to the detector and as functions of the angle of penetration o

  3. In vitro fertilization and embryo culture strongly impact the placental transcriptome in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fauque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART are increasingly used in humans; however, their impact is now questioned. At blastocyst stage, the trophectoderm is directly in contact with an artificial medium environment, which can impact placental development. This study was designed to carry out an in-depth analysis of the placental transcriptome after ART in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blastocysts were transferred either (1 after in vivo fertilization and development (control group or (2 after in vitro fertilization and embryo culture. Placentas were then analyzed at E10.5. Six percent of transcripts were altered at the two-fold threshold in placentas of manipulated embryos, 2/3 of transcripts being down-regulated. Strikingly, the X-chromosome harbors 11% of altered genes, 2/3 being induced. Imprinted genes were modified similarly to the X. Promoter composition analysis indicates that FOXA transcription factors may be involved in the transcriptional deregulations. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, our study shows that in vitro fertilization associated with embryo culture strongly modify the placental expression profile, long after embryo manipulations, meaning that the stress of artificial environment is memorized after implantation. Expression of X and imprinted genes is also greatly modulated probably to adapt to adverse conditions. Our results highlight the importance of studying human placentas from ART.

  4. Polydimethylsiloxane embedded mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model: proof-of-concept study focusing on atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc P; Keel, Rahel Bänziger; Lehner, Roman; Hunziker, Patrick R

    2012-07-01

    Existing mouse artery ex vivo perfusion models have utilized arteries such as carotid, uterine, and mesenteric arteries, but not the aorta. However, the aorta is the principal vessel analyzed for atherosclerosis studies in vivo. We have devised a mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model that can bridge this gap. Aortas from apoE((-/-)) mice are embedded in a transparent, gas-permeable, and elastic polymer matrix [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)] and artificially perfused with cell culture medium under cell culture conditions. After 24 h of artificial ex vivo perfusion, no evidence of cellular apoptosis is detected. Utilizing a standard confocal microscope, it is possible to image specific receptor targeting of cells in atherosclerotic plaques during 24 h. Imaging motion artifacts are minimal due to the polymer matrix embedding. Re-embedding of the aorta enables tissue sectioning and immuno-histochemical analysis. The ex vivo data are validated by comparison with in vivo experiments. This model can save animal lives via production of multiple endpoints in a single experiment, is easy to apply, and enables straightforward comparability with pre-existing atherosclerosis in vivo data. It is suited to investigate atherosclerotic disease in particular and vascular biology in general.

  5. Quantitative myocardial perfusion measurement using CT perfusion: a validation study in a porcine model of reperfused acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Aaron; Hsieh, Jiang; Li, Jian-Ying; Hadway, Jennifer; Kong, Hua-Fu; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2012-06-01

    We validated a CT perfusion technique with beam hardening (BH) correction for quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was created in four pigs by occluding the distal LAD for 1 h followed by reperfusion. MBF was measured from dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning of the heart, with correction of cardiac motion and BH, before ischemic insult and on day 7, 10 and 14 post. On day 14 post, radiolabeled microspheres were injected to measure MBF and the results were compared with those measured by CT perfusion. Excised hearts were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) to determine the relationship between MBF measured by CT Perfusion and myocardial viability. MBF measured by CT perfusion was strongly correlated with that by microspheres over a wide range of MBF values (R = 0.81, from 25 to 225 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1)). While MBF in the LAD territory decreased significantly from 98.4 ± 2.5 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1) at baseline to 32.2 ± 9.1 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1), P 0.05). TTC staining confirmed incomplete infarction in the LAD territory and no infarction in the LCx territory. Microvascular obstruction in infarcted tissue resulted in no-reflow and hence persistently low MBF in the reperfused LAD territory which contained a mixture of viable and non-viable tissue. CT perfusion measurement of MBF was accurate and correlated well with histology and microspheres measurements.

  6. Protective effect of active perfusion in porcine models of acute myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zanxiang; Mao, Zhifu; Dong, Shengjun; Liu, Baohui

    2016-10-01

    Mortality rates associated with off‑pump coronary artery bypass (CAB) are relatively high, as the majority of patients requiring CAB are at a high risk for cardiac events. The present study aimed to establish porcine models of acute myocardial ischemia, and evaluate the protective role of shunt and active perfusion. A total of 30 pigs were randomly assigned to five groups, as follows: i) Sham (control); ii) A1 (shunt; stenosis rate, 55%); iii) A2 (shunt; stenosis rate, 75%); iv) B1 (active perfusion; stenosis rate, 55%); and v) B2 (active perfusion; stenosis rate, 75%) groups. Aortic pressure (P0), left anterior descending coronary pressure (P1), and coronary effective perfusion pressure (P1/P0) were measured. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), cardiac troponin (cTnI), creatine kinase‑myocardial band (CK‑MB), interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑10, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), and caspase‑3 were detected using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay or western blotting. The myocardial apoptosis rate was determined using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Ischemia models with stenosis rates of 55 and 75% were successfully constructed following suturing of the descending artery. Compared with the control, the 55 and 75% stenosis groups demonstrated significantly decreased P1/P0, increased expression levels of TNF‑α, cTnI, CK‑MB, IL‑6, IL‑10 and caspase‑3, an increased rate of myocardial apoptosis, and a decreased expression level of anti‑apoptotic protein, Bcl‑2. At 30 min following successful establishment of the model (ST segment elevation to 1 mm), group B demonstrated significantly increased P1/P0, decreased expression levels of TNF‑α, cTnI, CK‑MB, IL‑6, IL‑10 and caspase‑3, a decreased rate of myocardial apoptosis, and an increased expression level of anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl‑2. Furthermore, the current study indicated that active perfusion was more efficacious

  7. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  8. Modeling laser speckle imaging of perfusion in the skin (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Caitlin; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Choi, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables visualization of relative blood flow and perfusion in the skin. It is frequently applied to monitor treatment of vascular malformations such as port wine stain birthmarks, and measure changes in perfusion due to peripheral vascular disease. We developed a computational Monte Carlo simulation of laser speckle contrast imaging to quantify how tissue optical properties, blood vessel depths and speeds, and tissue perfusion affect speckle contrast values originating from coherent excitation. The simulated tissue geometry consisted of multiple layers to simulate the skin, or incorporated an inclusion such as a vessel or tumor at different depths. Our simulation used a 30x30mm uniform flat light source to optically excite the region of interest in our sample to better mimic wide-field imaging. We used our model to simulate how dynamically scattered photons from a buried blood vessel affect speckle contrast at different lateral distances (0-1mm) away from the vessel, and how these speckle contrast changes vary with depth (0-1mm) and flow speed (0-10mm/s). We applied the model to simulate perfusion in the skin, and observed how different optical properties, such as epidermal melanin concentration (1%-50%) affected speckle contrast. We simulated perfusion during a systolic forearm occlusion and found that contrast decreased by 35% (exposure time = 10ms). Monte Carlo simulations of laser speckle contrast give us a tool to quantify what regions of the skin are probed with laser speckle imaging, and measure how the tissue optical properties and blood flow affect the resulting images.

  9. Dynamic Changes of the CT Perfusion Parameters in the Embolic Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈唯唯; 漆剑频; 张进华; 黄文华; 宋金梅

    2004-01-01

    To study the dynamic changes of CT perfusion parameters during the first 12 h in the embolic cerebral ischemia models. Local cerebral ischemia model were established in 7 New Zealand white rabbits. All CT scans were performed with a GE Lightspeed 16 multislice CT. Following the baseline scan, further CT perfusion scans were performed at the same locations 20 min, 1-6 h and8, 10 and 12 h after the embolus delivery. Maps of all parameters were obtained by CT perfusion software at each time point. The brains, taken 12 h after the scan, were sliced corresponding to the positions of the CT slices and stained by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). On the basis of the TTC results, the ischemicsides were divided into 3 regions: core, penumbra and the relatively normal region. The changes of all parameters were then divided into 3 stages. In the first two hours (the first stage), the CBV dropped more remarkably in the core than in the penumbra but rose slightly in the relatively normal region while the CBF decreased and MTT, TTP extended in all regions to varying degrees. In the 2nd-5th h (the second stage), all the parameters fluctuated slightly around a certain level. In the 5th-12th h (the third stage), the CBV and CBF dropped,and MTT and TTP were prolonged or shortened slightly in the core and penumbra though much notably in the former while the CBV, CBF roseand MTT, TTP were shortened remarkably in the relatively normal region. We experimentally demonstrated that the location and extent of cerebral ischemia could be accurately assessed by CT perfusion imaging. The pathophysiology of the ischemia could be reflected by the CT perfusion to varying degrees.

  10. Identifying placental epigenetic alterations in an intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) rat model induced by gestational protein deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Buschmann, Jochen; Lewin, Geertje

    2014-06-01

    Poor maternal nutrition during gestation can lead to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), a main cause of low birth weight associated with high neonatal morbidity and mortality. Such early uterine environmental exposures can impact the neonatal epigenome to render later-in-life disease susceptibility. We established in Wistar Han rats a mild IUGR model induced by gestational protein deficiency (i.e. 9% crude protein in low protein diet vs. 21% in control, from GD 0 to 21) to identify alterations in gene expression and methylation patterns in certain genes implicated in human IUGR or in placental development. We found differential gene expression of Wnt2 and Dlk1 between IUGR and control. Notably, Wnt2 exhibited significant decrease while Dlk1 increase in IUGR placentas, correlating to decrease in fetal and placental weight. Methylation patterns encompassing 30 CpGs in the Wnt2 promoter region revealed variability in both IUGR and control placentas, but a site-specific hypomethylation was evident in IUGR placentas. Our present findings further support a key role of maternal gestational nutrition in defining the neonatal epigenome. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Quantification of tumor perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound: impact of mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doury, Maxime; Dizeux, Alexandre; de Cesare, Alain; Lucidarme, Olivier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Bridal, S. Lori; Frouin, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound has been proposed to monitor tumor therapy, as a complement to volume measurements. To assess the variability of perfusion parameters in ideal conditions, four consecutive test-retest studies were acquired in a mouse tumor model, using controlled injections. The impact of mathematical modeling on parameter variability was then investigated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of tissue blood volume (BV) and tissue blood flow (BF) based-parameters were estimated inside 32 sub-regions of the tumors, comparing the log-normal (LN) model with a one-compartment model fed by an arterial input function (AIF) and improved by the introduction of a time delay parameter. Relative perfusion parameters were also estimated by normalization of the LN parameters and normalization of the one-compartment parameters estimated with the AIF, using a reference tissue (RT) region. A direct estimation (rRTd) of relative parameters, based on the one-compartment model without using the AIF, was also obtained by using the kinetics inside the RT region. Results of test-retest studies show that absolute regional parameters have high CV, whatever the approach, with median values of about 30% for BV, and 40% for BF. The positive impact of normalization was established, showing a coherent estimation of relative parameters, with reduced CV (about 20% for BV and 30% for BF using the rRTd approach). These values were significantly lower (p  perfusion parameters.

  12. TU-G-204-03: Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement Using First Pass Analysis and Maximum Slope Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, L; Ziemer, B; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion measurement using first pass analysis (FPA) and maximum slope models. Methods: A swine animal model was prepared by percutaneous advancement of an angioplasty balloon into the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery to induce varying degrees of stenosis. Maximal hyperaemia was achieved in the LAD with an intracoronary adenosine drip (240 µg/min). Serial microsphere and contrast (370 mg/mL iodine, 30 mL, 5mL/s) injections were made over a range of induced stenoses, and dynamic imaging was performed using a 320-row CT scanner at 100 kVp and 200 mA. The FPA CT perfusion technique was used to make vessel-specific myocardial perfusion measurements. CT perfusion measurements using the FPA and maximum slope models were validated using colored microspheres as the reference gold standard. Results: Perfusion measurements using the FPA technique (P-FPA) showed good correlation with minimal offset when compared to perfusion measurements using microspheres (P- Micro) as the reference standard (P -FPA = 0.96 P-Micro + 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.97, RMSE = 0.19 mL/min/g). In contrast, the maximum slope model technique (P-MS) was shown to underestimate perfusion when compared to microsphere perfusion measurements (P-MS = 0.42 P -Micro −0.48, R{sup 2} = 0.94, RMSE = 3.3 mL/min/g). Conclusion: The results indicate the potential for significant improvements in accuracy of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion measurement using the first pass analysis technique as compared with the standard maximum slope model.

  13. An isolated perfused pig heart model for the development, validation and translation of novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perera Divaka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR techniques and imaging biomarkers are often validated in small animal models or empirically in patients. Direct translation of small animal CMR protocols to humans is rarely possible, while validation in humans is often difficult, slow and occasionally not possible due to ethical considerations. The aim of this study is to overcome these limitations by introducing an MR-compatible, free beating, blood-perfused, isolated pig heart model for the development of novel CMR methodology. Methods 6 hearts were perfused outside of the MR environment to establish preparation stability. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP, coronary blood flow (CBF, left ventricular pressure (LVP, arterial blood gas and electrolyte composition were monitored over 4 hours. Further hearts were perfused within 3T (n = 3 and 1.5T (n = 3 clinical MR scanners, and characterised using functional (CINE, perfusion and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE imaging. Perfusion imaging was performed globally and selectively for the right (RCA and left coronary artery (LCA. In one heart the RCA perfusion territory was determined and compared to infarct size after coronary occlusion. Results All physiological parameters measured remained stable and within normal ranges. The model proved amenable to CMR at both field strengths using typical clinical acquisitions. There was good agreement between the RCA perfusion territory measured by selective first pass perfusion and LGE after coronary occlusion (37% versus 36% of the LV respectively. Conclusions This flexible model allows imaging of cardiac function in a controllable, beating, human-sized heart using clinical MR systems. It should aid further development, validation and clinical translation of novel CMR methodologies, and imaging sequences.

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Abruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wall of the uterus (womb) and supplies the baby with food and oxygen through the umbilical cord. Placental abruption ... wall of the uterus (womb) and supplies the baby with food and oxygen through the umbilical cord. Placental abruption ...

  15. Drug perfusion enhancement in tissue model by steady streaming induced by oscillating microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jin Sun; Kwon, Yong Seok; Lee, Kyung Ho; Jeong, Woowon; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery into neurological tissue is challenging because of the low tissue permeability. Ultrasound incorporating microbubbles has been applied to enhance drug delivery into these tissues, but the effects of a streaming flow by microbubble oscillation on drug perfusion have not been elucidated. In order to clarify the physical effects of steady streaming on drug delivery, an experimental study on dye perfusion into a tissue model was performed using microbubbles excited by acoustic waves. The surface concentration and penetration length of the drug were increased by 12% and 13%, respectively, with streaming flow. The mass of dye perfused into a tissue phantom for 30s was increased by about 20% in the phantom with oscillating bubbles. A computational model that considers fluid structure interaction for streaming flow fields induced by oscillating bubbles was developed, and mass transfer of the drug into the porous tissue model was analyzed. The computed flow fields agreed with the theoretical solutions, and the dye concentration distribution in the tissue agreed well with the experimental data. The computational results showed that steady streaming with a streaming velocity of a few millimeters per second promotes mass transfer into a tissue.

  16. Metabolism of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate by hepatic and placental microsomes of human and baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ru; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Zharikova, Olga L; Mattison, Donald R; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2008-05-01

    Recent data from our laboratory revealed the formation of an unknown metabolite of 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-HPC), used for treatment of preterm deliveries, during its perfusion across the dually perfused human placental lobule. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug is not hydrolyzed, neither in vivo nor in vitro, to progesterone and caproate. Therefore, the hypothesis for this investigation is that 17-HPC is actively metabolized by human and baboon (Papio cynocephalus) hepatic and placental microsomes. Baboon hepatic and placental microsomes were investigated to validate the nonhuman primate as an animal model for drug use during pregnancy. Data presented here indicate that human and baboon hepatic microsomes formed several mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxylated derivatives of 17-HPC. However, microsomes of human and baboon placentas metabolized 17-HPC to its mono-hydroxylated derivatives only in quantities that were a fraction of those formed by their respective livers, except for two metabolites (M16' and M17') that are unique for placenta and contributed to 25% and 75% of the total metabolites formed by human and baboon, respectively. The amounts of metabolites formed, relative to each other, by human and baboon microsomes were different suggesting that the affinity of 17-HPC to CYP enzymes and their activity could be species-dependent.

  17. Development of the isolated dual perfused rat liver model as an improved reperfusion model for transplantation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, NA; Van Der Plaats, A; Moers, C; Leuvenink, HGD; Wiersema-Buist, J; Verkerke, GJ; Rakhorst, G; Ploeg, RJ

    2006-01-01

    The Isolated Perfused Liver (IPL) model is a widely used and appreciated in vitro method to demonstrate liver viability and metabolism. Reperfusion is performed in a controlled setting, however, via the portal vein only. To study transplant related questions concerning bile and transport of bile, th

  18. Myocardial contrast echocardiography to assess perfusion in a mouse model of ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, John A.; Li, Yinbo; Christensen, Jonathan P.; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.

    2004-04-01

    Noninvasive approaches for measuring anatomical and physiological changes resulting from myocardial ischemia / reperfusion injury in the mouse heart have significant value since the mouse provides a practical, low-cost model for modeling human heart disease. In this work, perfusion was assessed before, during and after an induced closed- chest, coronary ischemic event. Ultrasound contrast agent, similar to MP1950, in a saline suspension, was injected via cannulated carotid artery as a bolus and imaged using a Siemens Sequoia 512 scanner and a 15L8 intraoperative transducer operating in second harmonic imaging mode. Image sequences were transferred from the scanner to a PC for analysis. Regions of interest were defined in septal and anterior segments of the myocardium. During the ischemic event, when perfusion was diminished in the anterior segment, mean video intensity in the affected segment was reduced by one half. Furthermore, following reperfusion, hyperemia (enhanced blood flow) was observed in the anterior segment. Specifically, the mean video intensity in the affected segment was increased by approximately 50% over the original baseline level prior to ischemia. Following the approach of Kaul et al., [1], gamma variate curves were fitted to the time varying level of mean video intensity. This foundation suggests the possibility of quantifying myocardial blood flow in ischemic regions of a mouse heart using automated analysis of contrast image data sets. An improved approach to perfusion assessment using the destruction-reperfusion approach [2] is also presented.

  19. Ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion is safe, simple, and reliable: results from a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ahmed; Liu, Qiang; Farias, Kevin; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Tom, Cynthia; Grady, Patrick; Bennett, Ana; Diago Uso, Teresa; Eghtesad, Bijan; Kelly, Dympna; Fung, John; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Miller, Charles; Quintini, Cristiano

    2015-02-01

    Normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) is an emerging preservation modality that holds the potential to prevent the injury associated with low temperature and to promote organ repair that follows ischemic cell damage. While several animal studies have showed its superiority over cold storage (CS), minimal studies in the literature have focused on safety, feasibility, and reliability of this technology, which represent key factors in its implementation into clinical practice. The aim of the present study is to report safety and performance data on NMP of DCD porcine livers. After 60 minutes of warm ischemia time, 20 pig livers were preserved using either NMP (n = 15; physiologic perfusion temperature) or CS group (n = 5) for a preservation time of 10 hours. Livers were then tested on a transplant simulation model for 24 hours. Machine safety was assessed by measuring system failure events, the ability to monitor perfusion parameters, sterility, and vessel integrity. The ability of the machine to preserve injured organs was assessed by liver function tests, hemodynamic parameters, and histology. No system failures were recorded. Target hemodynamic parameters were easily achieved and vascular complications were not encountered. Liver function parameters as well as histology showed significant differences between the 2 groups, with NMP livers showing preserved liver function and histological architecture, while CS livers presenting postreperfusion parameters consistent with unrecoverable cell injury. Our study shows that NMP is safe, reliable, and provides superior graft preservation compared to CS in our DCD porcine model. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Establishment of an in vitro model of the human placental barrier by placenta slice culture and ussing chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dianrong; Guo, Jie; Han, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to establish an in vitro model of the human placental barrier based on placenta slice culture and Ussing chamber. The villous morphology, beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG), mRNA and efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and the permeability of the fluorescent marker were confirmed. The results showed that syncytiotrophoblast cells with abundant endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria were covered with a dense microvillus in the placenta slice. The β-hCG secretion levels in the Ussing chamber were 274.13 ± 13.52 mIU/mL at 5 h, significantly higher than that in the incubator 95.2 ± 13.14 mIU/mL, and β-hCG continued to secrete for 48 h. P-gp mRNA was expressed in the placenta slice. The Rho123 apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) value from maternal side to the fetal side was 26.34 ± 1.87 nm/s, but it was significantly increased, to 289.55 ± 6.02 nm/s after adding verapamil. The Rho123 efflux value was >2. The fluorescein Papp value was (3.42 ± 0.24) × 10(-3) nm/s. In contrast, the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD70) Papp value was (3.93 ± 0.08) × 10(-5) nm/s. This indicates that the placenta slice in the Ussing chamber had the activity of a placenta, and can act as a valuable in vitro model of placental barrier.

  1. Placental ischemia-induced increases in brain water content and cerebrovascular permeability: role of TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Junie P; Drummond, Heather A; Granger, Joey P; Ryan, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Cerebrovascular complications and increased risk of encephalopathies are characteristic of preeclampsia and contribute to 40% of preeclampsia/eclampsia-related deaths. Circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is elevated in preeclamptic women, and infusion of TNF-α into pregnant rats mimics characteristics of preeclampsia. While this suggests that TNF-α has a mechanistic role to promote preeclampsia, the impact of TNF-α on the cerebral vasculature during pregnancy remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that TNF-α contributes to cerebrovascular abnormalities during placental ischemia by first infusing TNF-α in pregnant rats (200 ng/day ip, from gestational day 14 to 19) at levels to mimic those reported in preeclamptic women. TNF-α increased mean arterial pressure (MAP, P blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in the anterior cerebrum or posterior cerebrum. We then assessed the role of endogenous TNF-α in mediating these abnormalities in a model of placental ischemia induced by reducing uterine perfusion pressure followed by treatment with the soluble TNF-α receptor (etanercept, 0.8 mg/kg sc) on gestational day 18. Etanercept reduced placental ischemia-mediated increases in MAP, anterior brain water content (P permeability (202 ± 44% in placental ischemic rats to 101 ± 28% of normal pregnant rats). Our results indicate that TNF-α mechanistically contributes to cerebral edema by increasing BBB permeability and is an underlying factor in the development of cerebrovascular abnormalities associated with preeclampsia complicated by placental ischemia.

  2. Mathematical modeling of local perfusion in large distensible microvascular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causin, Paola; Malgaroli, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    Microvessels -blood vessels with diameter less than 200 microns- form large, intricate networks organized into arterioles, capillaries and venules. In these networks, the distribution of flow and pressure drop is a highly interlaced function of single vessel resistances and mutual vessel interactions. In this paper we propose a mathematical and computational model to study the behavior of microcirculatory networks subjected to different conditions. The network geometry is composed of a graph of connected straight cylinders, each one representing a vessel. The blood flow and pressure drop across the single vessel, further split into smaller elements, are related through a generalized Ohm's law featuring a conductivity parameter, function of the vessel cross section area and geometry, which undergo deformations under pressure loads. The membrane theory is used to describe the deformation of vessel lumina, tailored to the structure of thick-walled arterioles and thin-walled venules. In addition, since venules can possibly experience negative transmural pressures, a buckling model is also included to represent vessel collapse. The complete model including arterioles, capillaries and venules represents a nonlinear system of PDEs, which is approached numerically by finite element discretization and linearization techniques. We use the model to simulate flow in the microcirculation of the human eye retina, a terminal system with a single inlet and outlet. After a phase of validation against experimental measurements, we simulate the network response to different interstitial pressure values. Such a study is carried out both for global and localized variations of the interstitial pressure. In both cases, significant redistributions of the blood flow in the network arise, highlighting the importance of considering the single vessel behavior along with its position and connectivity in the network.

  3. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  4. A pharmacodynamic model of portal hypertension in isolated perfused rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zhang; Peng-Tao Li; Xue-Yan Xu; Hang Zhou; Xin Zhao; Da-Yong Cai; Meng Song; Tao-Tao Zhang; He Yin; Ting Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To develop a pharmacodynamic model of portal hypertension from chronic hepatitis. METHODS: Pathological changes and collagen depositions were analyzed using morphometry to confirm CCl4-induced chronic hepatitis. At d0, d28, d56 and d84 of the process, the portal perfused velocities (μL/min) in isolated rat livers were exactly controlled with a quantified pump. The pressure (mmHg) was monitored with a Physiological System. The geometric concentrations of phenylephrine or acetylcholine were added to a fixed volume (300 mL) of the circulating perfusate. The equation, the median effective concentration and its 95% confidence intervals of phenylephrine or acetylcholine were regressed with Prism-4 software in nonlinear fit and various slopes. In the isolated perfused rat livers with chronic hepatitis, both median effective concentrations were defined as the pharmacodynamic model of portal hypertension. RESULTS: At d0, d28, d56 and d84, the equations of portal pressure potency from the concentrations of phenylephrine used to constrict the portal vein in isolated perfused rat livers were Y = 0.1732 + 0.3970/[1 + 10(-4.3061-0.4407 X)], Y = -0.004934 + 0.12113/[1 + 10(-3. 1247-0.3262X)], Y = 0.0104 + 0.2643/[1 + 10(-8.8462-0.9579X)], and Y = 0.01603 + 0.12107/[1 + 10(-5.1134-0.563X)]; the median effective concentrations were 1.69 × 10-10 mol/L, 2.64 × 10-10 mol/L, 5.82 × 10-10 mol/L, and 8.24 × 10-10 mol/L, respectively. The equations from the concentrations of acetylcholine used to relax the portal vein were Y = -0.4548 + 0.3274/[1 + 10(6.1538 + 0.5554X)], Y = -0.05391 + 0.06424/[1 + 10(3.8541+0.3469X)], Y = -0.2733 + 0.22978/[1 + 10(3.0472 + 0.3008X)], and Y = -0.0559 + 0.053178/[1 + 10(5.6336 + 0.5883 X)]; the median effective concentrations were 8.40 × 10-10 mol/L, 7.73 × 10-12 mol/L, 5.98 × 10-11 mol/L, and 2.66 × 10-10 mol/L, respectively. CONCLUSION: A pharmacodynamic model of portal hypertension in isolated perfused rat livers with chronic hepatitis was

  5. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion.

  6. Characterization of micro-invasive trabecular bypass stents by ex vivo perfusion and computational flow modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter KS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kendall S Hunter,1 Todd Fjield,2 Hal Heitzmann,2 Robin Shandas,1 Malik Y Kahook3 1Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 2Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA; 3University of Colorado Hospital Eye Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Micro-invasive glaucoma surgery with the Glaukos iStent® or iStent inject® (Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA is intended to create a bypass through the trabecular meshwork to Schlemm's canal to improve aqueous outflow through the natural physiologic pathway. While the iStent devices have been evaluated in ex vivo anterior segment models, they have not previously been evaluated in whole eye perfusion models nor characterized by computational fluid dynamics. Intraocular pressure (IOP reduction with the iStent was evaluated in an ex vivo whole human eye perfusion model. Numerical modeling, including computational fluid dynamics, was used to evaluate the flow through the stents over physiologically relevant boundary conditions. In the ex vivo model, a single iStent reduced IOP by 6.0 mmHg from baseline, and addition of a second iStent further lowered IOP by 2.9 mmHg, for a total IOP reduction of 8.9 mmHg. Computational modeling showed that simulated flow through the iStent or iStent inject is smooth and laminar at physiological flow rates. Each stent was computed to have a negligible flow resistance consistent with an expected significant decrease in IOP. The present perfusion results agree with prior clinical and laboratory studies to show that both iStent and iStent inject therapies are potentially titratable, providing clinicians with the opportunity to achieve lower target IOPs by implanting additional stents. Keywords: glaucoma, iStent, trabecular bypass, intraocular pressure, ab-interno, CFD

  7. The cumulative effect of assisted reproduction procedures on placental development and epigenetic perturbations in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Eric; Vrooman, Lisa A; Fischer, Erin; Ord, Teri; Mainigi, Monica A; Coutifaris, Christos; Schultz, Richard M; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2015-12-15

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are associated with several complications including low birth weight, abnormal placentation and increased risk for rare imprinting disorders. Indeed, experimental studies demonstrate ART procedures independent of existing infertility induce epigenetic perturbations in the embryo and extraembryonic tissues. To test the hypothesis that these epigenetic perturbations persist and result in adverse outcomes at term, we assessed placental morphology and methylation profiles in E18.5 mouse concepti generated by in vitro fertilization (IVF) in two different genetic backgrounds. We also examined embryo transfer (ET) and superovulation procedures to ascertain if they contribute to developmental and epigenetic effects. Increased placental weight and reduced fetal-to-placental weight ratio were observed in all ART groups when compared with naturally conceived controls, demonstrating that non-surgical embryo transfer alone can impact placental development. Furthermore, superovulation further induced overgrowth of the placental junctional zone. Embryo transfer and superovulation defects were limited to these morphological changes, as we did not observe any differences in epigenetic profiles. IVF placentae, however, displayed hypomethylation of imprinting control regions of select imprinted genes and a global reduction in DNA methylation levels. Although we did not detect significant differences in DNA methylation in fetal brain or liver samples, rare IVF concepti displayed very low methylation and abnormal gene expression from the normally repressed allele. Our findings suggest that individual ART procedures cumulatively increase placental morphological abnormalities and epigenetic perturbations, potentially causing adverse neonatal and long-term health outcomes in offspring.

  8. Placental ontogeny in Tasmanian snow skinks (genus Niveoscincus) (Lacertilia: Scincidae).

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    Stewart, James R; Thompson, Michael B

    2009-04-01

    Lizards of the viviparous genus Niveoscincus contributed importantly to a classic model for the evolution of placentation of squamate reptiles. This model predicts that: (1) placental function is correlated with placental structural complexity and (2) the type of chorioallantoic placenta attributed to three species of Niveoscincus (N. metallicus, N. ocellatus, N. pretiosus) is intermediate in complexity to a highly placentotrophic type of placenta. Recent studies of two of these species (N. metallicus, N. ocellatus) revealed additional variation in placental structure, as well as variation in the level of placentotrophy; N. metallicus is predominantly lecithotrophic, while N. ocellatus is highly placentotrophic. We used light microscopy to study placental ontogeny in two biennially reproducing species of Niveoscincus (N. greeni, N. microlepidotus) and placental morphology in late stage embryos of N. pretiosus. These data, in combination with prior studies, provide descriptions of placental structure for six of the eight species assigned to this lineage. The genus Niveoscincus has greater variation in placental structure than any other squamate lineage. We recognize four distinct groupings among these six species based on placental structure. The most highly placentotrophic species, N. ocellatus, has a complex placental morphology, yet shares these structures with a predominantly lecithotrophic species, N. microlepidotus. Thus, among species of Niveoscincus, placental structural complexity is not an infallible predictor of overall placental function.

  9. Effect of cold perfusion and perfluorocarbons on liver graft ischemia in a donation after cardiac death model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezinover, Dmitri; Ramamoorthy, Saravanan; Postula, Marek; Weller, Gregory; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Mani, Haresh; Kadry, Zakiyah; Uemura, Tadahiro; Mets, Berend; Spiess, Bruce; Brucklacher, Robert; Freeman, Willard; Janicki, Piotr K

    2014-05-15

    Effects of two perfluorocarbon (PFC) formulations (perfluorodecalin emulsion and perfluorodecalin liquid) on the quality of liver graft preservation, in a donation after cardiac death (DCD) rat model, were investigated. The significance of continuous graft perfusion during cold preservation was also explored. DCD model: 30 min after cardiopulmonary arrest was initiated, livers were excised and flushed with cold University of Wisconsin (UW) solution (± PFC) and preserved in the same solution for 8 h. The study groups were preserved as follows: group 1: no perfusion; group 2: perfusion with UW; group 3: PFC was administered before cardiac arrest and the liver was perfused with UW alone; and groups 4 and 5: perfused with UW + 1 of two PFCs. In a baseline group used only for comparison of gene expression, livers were quick-frozen after cardiac arrest. Microarrays were used to analyze liver messenger RNA transcripts. Histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ADP/ATP ratio evaluations were performed to assess the quality of graft preservation. Significant decreases in downregulation and increases in upregulation of hepatic genes (relative to baseline) were demonstrated in all perfusion groups. This trend was most pronounced in the PFC groups. Lower fat content and ADP/ATP ratio and a reduction in Caspase 3 activation were found in all perfusion groups. Hypothermic perfusion of rat DCD liver grafts with oxygenated UW solution (± PFC) produced superior preservation compared with nonperfusion storage. The observed changes in expression of hepatic genes may represent a protective effect in the DCD model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. How influential is the duration of contrast material bolus injection in perfusion CT? evaluation in a swine model.

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    Kandel, Sonja M; Meyer, Henning; Boehnert, Markus; Hoppel, Bernice; Paul, Narinder Singh; Rogalla, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of the duration of contrast material bolus injection on perfusion values in a swine model by using the maximum slope method. This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Twenty pigs (weight range, 63-77 kg) underwent dynamic volume computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys during suspended respiration. Before the CT examination, a miniature cuff-shaped ultrasonographic flow probe encircling the right renal artery was surgically implanted in each pig to obtain true perfusion values. Two sequential perfusion CT series were performed in 30 seconds, each comprising 30 volumes with identical parameters (100 kV, 200 mAs, 0.5 sec rotation time). The duration of contrast material bolus (0.5 mL/kg of body weight) was 3.8 seconds in the first series (short bolus series) and 11.5 seconds in the second series (long bolus series), and the injection flow rate was adapted accordingly. In each pig, cortical kidney volume was determined by using the volume with the highest cortical enhancement. CT perfusion values were calculated for both series by using the maximum slope method and were statistically compared and correlated with the true perfusion values from the flow probe by using linear regression analysis. Mean true perfusion and CT perfusion values (in minutes(-1)) for the short bolus series were 1.95 and 2.03, respectively (P = .22), and for the long bolus series, they were 2.02 and 1.92, respectively (P = .12). CT perfusion showed very good correlation with true perfusion in both the short (slope, 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91, 1.11) and long (slope, 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.78, 1.04) series. On the basis of the regression analysis, CT perfusion values in the short bolus series were overestimated by 1% and those in the long bolus series were underestimated by 8%. Duration of contrast material bolus injection does not influence CT perfusion values substantially. The longer, clinically preferred intravenous injection

  11. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

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    Israel L. Medeiros

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex®was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98. The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p =0.035. The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H20 in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H20 in Group 2 (p =0.816. The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p=0.87. The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0, and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm² and 137.50/mm², respectively (p=0.71. CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation.

  12. Pretreatment with intraluminal rapamycin nanoparticle perfusion inhibits neointimal hyperplasia in a rabbit vein graft model

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    Kai Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Kai Liu1*, Guangqing Cao1*, Xiquan Zhang1, Ruifang Liu2, Weiwei Zou3, Shuming Wu11Departments of Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Anesthesia, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan; 3The School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; *Kai Liu and Guangqing Cao contributed equally to this work.Purpose: Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NP are widely used as a biodegradable biomaterial in medicine. Rapamycin-eluting stents have been used for prevention of restenosis during surgery. This study investigated the effect of pretreatment with intraluminal perfusion of carbopol-encapsulated rapamycin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (RAP-PLGA-NP on neointimal hyperplasia in a rabbit vein graft model.Methods: A segment of common carotid artery was replaced with a segment of external jugular vein in 60 rabbits which were then separated into four treatment groups, ie, Group 1, in which vein grafts were pretreated with intraluminal RAP-PLGA-NP perfusion, Group 2 in which vein grafts underwent equivalent empty vehicle (PLGA-NP perfusion, Group 3, in which vein grafts received no treatment, and Group 4, which served as a sham operation group receiving normal vein contrast. On postoperative day 28, the grafts and normal veins were harvested for histologic examination, flow cytometry analysis, and high-performance liquid chromatography measurement.Results: Compared with Group 1, the intima of the grafts were thickened, the ratio of intimal area to vessel area increased, and the collagen volume index of the vein grafts increased significantly in Groups 2 and 3. The cell proliferation index in Group 1 (21.11 ± 3.15% was much lower than that in Group 2 (30.35 ± 2.69% and in Group 3 (33.86 ± 8.72%. By high-performance liquid chromatography measurement, retention of rapamycin was detected in Group 1 (11.2 ± 0.37 µg/10 mg 28 days after single drug perfusion.Conclusion: Pretreatment with intraluminal RAP

  13. Pulmonary functional MRI:an animal model study of oxygen-enhanced ventilation combined with Gd-DTPA-enhanced perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨健; 万明习; 郭佑民

    2004-01-01

    Background The assessment of regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion is essential for the evaluation of a variety of lung disorders. Pulmonary ventilation MRI using inhaled oxygen as a contrast medium can be obtained with a clinical MR scanner, without additional equipment, and has been demonstrated to be a feasible means of assessing ventilation in animal models and some clinical patients. However, few studies have reported on MR ventilation-perfusion imaging. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of oxygen-enhanced ventilation in combination with first-pass Gd-DTPA-enhanced perfusion MRI in a canine model of pulmonary embolism and airway obstruction.Methods Peripheral pulmonary embolisms were produced in eight dogs by intravenous injection of gelfoam strips at the pulmonary segmental arterial level, and airway obstructions were created in five of the dogs by inserting a self-designed balloon catheter into a secondary bronchus. Oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation images were produced by subtracting images from before and after inhalation of pure oxygen. Pulmonary perfusion MR images were acquired with a dynamic three-dimensional fast gradient-echo sequence. MR ventilation and perfusion images were read and contrasted with results from general examinations of pathological anatomy, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, and pulmonary angiography. Results Regions identified as having airway obstructions matched using both MR ventilation and perfusion imaging, but regions of pulmonary embolisms were mismatched. The area of airway obstruction defects was smaller using MR ventilation imagery than that using ventilation scintigraphy. Abnormal perfusion regions due to pulmonary embolisms were divided into defective regions and reduced regions based on the time course of signal intensity changes. In the diagnosis of pulmonary embolisms with the technique of ventilation and perfusion MRI, sensitivity and specificity were 75.0% and 98.1%, respectively, and the diagnostic

  14. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improve Cardiac Perfusion in an Ovine Immunocompetent Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Victor; Sotelo, Veronica; Delfina, Valentina; Delgado, Natalia; Rodriguez, Carlos; Suanes, Carol; Langhain, María; Ferrando, Rodolfo; Keating, Armand; Benech, Alejandro; Touriño, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold considerable promise in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Most preclinical studies of MSCs for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have been performed either in syngeneic animal models or with human cells in xenogeneic immunodeficient animals. A preferable pre-clinical model, however, would involve human MSCs in an immunocompetent animal. AMI was generated in adult sheep by inducing ischemia reperfusion of the second diagonal branch. Sheep (n = 10) were randomized to receive an intravenous injection of human MSCs (1 × 10(6) cells/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. Cardiac function and remodeling were evaluated with echocardiography. Perfusion scintigraphy was used to identify sustained myocardial ischemia. Interaction between human MSCs and ovine lymphocytes was assessed by a mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). Sheep receiving human MSCs showed significant improvement in myocardial perfusion at 1 month compared with baseline measurements. There was no change in ventricular dimensions in either group after 1 month of AMI. No adverse events or symptoms were observed in the sheep receiving human MSCs. The MLR was negative. The immunocompetent ovine AMI model demonstrates the clinical safety and efficacy of human MSCs. The human cells do not appear to be immunogenic, further suggesting that immunocompetent sheep may serve as a suitable pre-clinical large animal model for testing human MSCs.

  15. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates.

  16. Preparation, characterization, and transport of dexamethasone-loaded polymeric nanoparticles across a human placental in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hazem; Kalashnikova, Irina; White, Mark Andrew; Sherman, Michael; Rytting, Erik

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare dexamethasone-loaded polymeric nanoparticles and evaluate their potential for transport across human placenta. Statistical modeling and factorial design was applied to investigate the influence of process parameters on the following nanoparticle characteristics: particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and drug encapsulation efficiency. Dexamethasone and nanoparticle transport was subsequently investigated using the BeWo b30 cell line, an in vitro model of human placental trophoblast cells, which represent the rate-limiting barrier for maternal-fetal transfer. Encapsulation efficiency and drug transport were determined using a validated high performance liquid chromatography method. Nanoparticle morphology and drug encapsulation were further characterized by cryo-transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Nanoparticles prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) were spherical, with particle sizes ranging from 140 to 298 nm, and encapsulation efficiency ranging from 52 to 89%. Nanoencapsulation enhanced the apparent permeability of dexamethasone from the maternal compartment to the fetal compartment more than 10-fold in this model. Particle size was shown to be inversely correlated with drug and nanoparticle permeability, as confirmed with fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. These results highlight the feasibility of designing nanoparticles capable of delivering medication to the fetus, in particular, potential dexamethasone therapy for the prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

  17. Establishment of a Swine Model for Validation of Perfusion Measurement by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Anika Sauerbrey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a suitable animal model for validating dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging perfusion measurements. A total of 8 pigs were investigated by DCE-MRI. Perfusion was determined on the hind leg musculature. An ultrasound flow probe placed around the femoral artery provided flow measurements independent of MRI and served as the standard of reference. Images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner using a 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence. An arterial catheter for local injection was implanted in the femoral artery. Continuous injection of adenosine for vasodilation resulted in steady blood flow levels up to four times the baseline level. In this way, three different stable perfusion levels were induced and measured. A central venous catheter was used for injection of two different types of contrast media. A low-molecular weight contrast medium and a blood pool contrast medium were used. A total of 6 perfusion measurements were performed with a time interval of about 20–25 min without significant differences in the arterial input functions. In conclusion the accuracy of DCE-MRI-based perfusion measurement can be validated by comparison of the integrated perfusion signal of the hind leg musculature with the blood flow values measured with the ultrasound flow probe around the femoral artery.

  18. Placental transfusion: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheria, A C; Lakshminrusimha, S; Rabe, H; McAdams, R; Mercer, J S

    2017-01-01

    Recently there have been a number of studies and presentations on the importance of providing a placental transfusion to the newborn. Early cord clamping is an avoidable, unphysiologic intervention that prevents the natural process of placental transfusion. However, placental transfusion, although simple in concept, is affected by multiple factors, is not always straightforward to implement, and can be performed using different methods, making this basic procedure important to discuss. Here, we review three placental transfusion techniques: delayed cord clamping, intact umbilical cord milking and cut-umbilical cord milking, and the evidence in term and preterm newborns supporting this practice. We will also review several factors that influence placental transfusion, and discuss perceived risks versus benefits of this procedure. Finally, we will provide key straightforward concepts and implementation strategies to ensure that placental-to-newborn transfusion can become routine practice at any institution. PMID:27654493

  19. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, T R; Stewart, Donald A; Martin, Gregory T; Weaver, James C

    2004-11-17

    Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1) surface contact heating and (2) spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42 degrees C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45 degrees C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. The heat transport system model of the skin was solved by exploiting the mathematical

  20. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  1. Formulation of a statistical model of heat transfer in perfused tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baish, J W

    1994-11-01

    A new model of steady-state heat transport in perfused tissue is presented. The key elements of the model are as follows: (1) a physiologically-based algorithm for simulating the geometry of a realistic vascular tree containing all thermally significant vessels in a tissue; (2) a means of solving the conjugate heat transfer problem of convection by the blood coupled to three-dimensional conduction in the extravascular tissue, and (3) a statistical interpretation of the calculated temperature field. This formulation is radically different from the widely used Pennes and Weinbaum-Jiji bio-heat transfer equations that predict a loosely defined local average tissue temperature from a local perfusion rate and a minimal representation of the vascular geometry. Instead, a probability density function for the tissue temperature is predicted, which carries information on the most probable temperature at a point and uncertainty in that temperature due to the proximity of thermally significant blood vessels. A sample implementation illustrates the dependence of the temperature distribution on the flow rate of the blood and the vascular geometry. The results show that the Pennes formulation of the bio-heat transfer equation accurately predicts the mean tissue temperature except when the arteries and veins are in closely spaced pairs. The model is useful for fundamental studies of tissue heat transport, and should extend readily to other forms of tissue transport including oxygen, nutrient, and drug transport.

  2. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  3. IFPA Senior Award Lecture: making sense of pre-eclampsia - two placental causes of preeclampsia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, C W; Sargent, I L; Staff, A C

    2014-02-01

    Incomplete spiral artery remodelling is the first of two stages of pre-eclampsia, typically of early onset. The second stage comprises dysregulated uteroplacental perfusion and placental oxidative stress. Oxidatively stressed syncytiotrophoblast (STB) over-secretes proteins that perturb maternal angiogenic balance and are considered to be pre-eclampsia biomarkers. We propose that, in addition and more fundamentally, these STB-derived proteins are biomarkers of a cellular (STB) stress response, which typically involves up-regulation of some proteins and down-regulation of others (positive and negative stress proteins respectively). Soluble vascular growth factor receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1) and reduced growth factor (PlGF) then exemplify positive and negative STB stress response proteins in the maternal circulation. Uncomplicated term pregnancy is associated with increasing sVEGFR-1 and decreasing PlGF, which can be interpreted as evidence of increasing STB stress. STB pathology, at or after term (for example focal STB necrosis) demonstrates this stress, with or without pre-eclampsia. We review the evidence that when placental growth reaches its limits at term, terminal villi become over-crowded with diminished intervillous pore size impeding intervillous perfusion with increasing intervillous hypoxia and STB stress. This type of STB stress has no antecedent pathology, so the fetuses are well-grown, as typifies late onset pre-eclampsia, and prediction is less effective than for the early onset syndrome because STB stress is a late event. In summary, abnormal placental perfusion and STB stress contribute to the pathogenesis of early and late onset pre-eclampsia. But the former has an extrinsic cause - poor placentation, whereas the latter has an intrinsic cause, 'microvillous overcrowding', as placental growth reaches its functional limits. This model explains important features of late pre-eclampsia and raises questions of how antecedent medical risk factors such as

  4. The Modelling of the Post-Operative Perfusion in Burns from LDI Data

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    Jan Kubicek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an empirical mathematical model serving for the time evolution of post-operative blood perfusion in burn wounds developed in the setting of surgical treatment of full thickness, or non-healing deep dermal burns involving application of Split Thickness Skin Grafts (STSG, and Autologous Platelet Concentrate (APC, with the main goal of early assessment enhancement and healing prognosis of burns. Numerical parameters of the model including a 95% confidence level prediction interval were determined using the nonlinear fit procedure. We cautiously claim that the suggested model could serve as a beneficial tool in objective comparisons of treatment efficacy and facilitating the decision making process. However, reliably determined model parameters still require a large amount of laser Doppler imaging data to be processed for individual kinds of treatment.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel Promotes Tissue Remodeling, Arteriogenesis, and Perfusion in a Rat Hindlimb Ischemia Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Ungerleider, BS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surgical and endovascular revascularization can be performed in peripheral arterial disease (PAD, 40% of patients with critical limb ischemia do not have a revascularization option. This study examines the efficacy and mechanisms of action of acellular extracellular matrix-based hydrogels as a potential novel therapy for treating PAD. We tested the efficacy of using a tissue-specific injectable hydrogel derived from decellularized porcine skeletal muscle (SKM and compared this to a new human umbilical cord-derived matrix (hUC hydrogel, which could have greater potential for tissue regeneration because of the younger age of the tissue source. In a rodent hindlimb ischemia model, both hydrogels were injected 1-week post-surgery and perfusion was regularly monitored with laser speckle contrast analysis to 35 days post-injection. There were significant improvements in hindlimb tissue perfusion and perfusion kinetics with both biomaterials. Histologic analysis indicated that the injected hydrogels were biocompatible, and resulted in arteriogenesis, rather than angiogenesis, as well as improved recruitment of skeletal muscle progenitors. Skeletal muscle fiber morphology analysis indicated that the muscle treated with the tissue-specific SKM hydrogel more closely matched healthy tissue morphology. Whole transcriptome analysis indicated that the SKM hydrogel caused a shift in the inflammatory response, decreased cell death, and increased blood vessel and muscle development. These results show the efficacy of an injectable ECM hydrogel alone as a potential therapy for treating patients with PAD. Our results indicate that the SKM hydrogel improved functional outcomes through stimulation of arteriogenesis and muscle progenitor cell recruitment.

  6. Evaluation of CMU-1 preservation solutions using an isolated perfused rat liver model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Cheng; Yong-Feng Liu; Dong-Hua Cheng; Bai-Feng Li; Ning Zhao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: CMU-1 is a new preservation solution with a low potassium concentration as well as low viscosity that is highly effective in reducing preservation injury. The purpose of this experiment is to compare the protective effect of CMU-1 solution with that of UW during cold presevation and normothermic reperfusion.METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to different preservation solution: CMU-1 group and UW group. After 6, 12 and 24 h cold storage of rat liver in different preservation solutions, the isolated perfused rat liver model was applied to reperfuse the liver for 120 min normothermically (37 ℃) with KrebsHenseleit solution, meanwhile the pH value of the preservation solution was measured. The perfusate was sampled for the evaluation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). At the end of the reperfusion, all of the bile product was collected, energy metabolic substrate and histological examination were performed.RESULTS: After preserving for 6 h, pH value of both groups did not change; after 12 h, both decreased but with no significant difference. After 24 h, pH value in UW solution group significantly decreased. The total adenine nudeotides level and AEC in liver tissue decreased with preservation time, but they were higher in CMU-1 group. And the amount of bile product after perfusion for 120 min in CMU-1 group was much more than that in UW group. However,there were no significant differences in ALT and LDH levels between two groups. Histology showed no difference.CONCLUSION: The preservation effect of CMU-1 solution is similar with that of UW solution. However, CMU-1 solution shows some advantages over UW solution in energy metabolism, preventing intracellular acidosis and bile product.

  7. Phthalate monoesters in perfusate from a dual placenta perfusion system, the placenta tissue and umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Mortensen, Gerda K; Hedegaard, Morten;

    2006-01-01

    Fetal exposure to phthalates may be associated with adverse reproductive effects, including cryptorchidism and decreased semen quality. Information about human placental transfer is needed to qualify the hypotheses. A dual recirculating placenta perfusion system to monitor concentrations of eight...... phthalate monoesters in fetal and maternal perfusates was established. In addition to perfusate background measures of phthalate monoesters, the concentrations in umbilical cord plasma and placenta tissue were measured. Monomethyl phthalate (mMP), monoethyl phthalate (mEP), monobutyl phthalate (m...

  8. Understanding and modeling alternating tangential flow filtration for perfusion cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William; Scully, Jennifer; Zhang, Di; Feng, Gang; Lavengood, Mathew; Condon, Jason; Knighton, John; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Alternating tangential flow (ATF) filtration has been used with success in the Biopharmaceutical industry as a lower shear technology for cell retention with perfusion cultures. The ATF system is different than tangential flow filtration; however, in that reverse flow is used once per cycle as a means to minimize fouling. Few studies have been reported in the literature that evaluates ATF and how key system variables affect the rate at which ATF filters foul. In this study, an experimental setup was devised that allowed for determination of the time it took for fouling to occur for given mammalian (PER.C6) cell culture cell densities and viabilities as permeate flow rate and antifoam concentration was varied. The experimental results indicate, in accordance with D'Arcy's law, that the average resistance to permeate flow (across a cycle of operation) increases as biological material deposits on the membrane. Scanning electron microscope images of the post-run filtration surface indicated that both cells and antifoam micelles deposit on the membrane. A unique mathematical model, based on the assumption that fouling was due to pore blockage from the cells and micelles in combination, was devised that allowed for estimation of sticking factors for the cells and the micelles on the membrane. This model was then used to accurately predict the increase in transmembane pressure during constant flux operation for an ATF cartridge used for perfusion cell culture.

  9. Four dimensional optoacoustic imaging of perfusion in preclinical breast tumor model in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís.; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mandal, Subhamoy; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in clinical management and preclinical studies of cancer. Application of optical molecular imaging technologies, in combination with highly specific contrast agent approaches, eminently contributed to understanding of functional and histological properties of tumors and anticancer therapies. Yet, optical imaging exhibits deterioration in spatial resolution and other performance metrics due to light scattering in deep living tissues. High resolution molecular imaging at the whole-organ or whole-body scale may therefore bring additional understanding of vascular networks, blood perfusion and microenvironment gradients of malignancies. In this work, we constructed a volumetric multispectral optoacoustic tomography (vMSOT) scanner for cancer imaging in preclinical models and explored its capacity for real-time 3D intravital imaging of whole breast cancer allografts in mice. Intrinsic tissue properties, such as blood oxygenation gradients, along with the distribution of externally administered liposomes carrying clinically-approved indocyanine green dye (lipo-ICG) were visualized in order to study vascularization, probe penetration and extravasation kinetics in different regions of interest within solid tumors. The use of v-MSOT along with the application of volumetric image analysis and perfusion tracking tools for studies of pathophysiological processes within microenvironment gradients of solid tumors demonstrated superior volumetric imaging system performance with sustained competitive resolution and imaging depth suitable for investigations in preclinical cancer models.

  10. Clinical Research of Three-dimensional Color Power Ultrasound Combined with Color Doppler Imaging for the Assessment of Placental Perfusion in Patients with Pregnancy-induced Hypertension%三维能量超声联合彩色多普勒监测妊娠高血压综合征患者胎盘血流的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷蓓; 刘雪玲; 连溯; 成平; 骆峰; 伍业冬; 李坚

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨三维超声彩色能量成像(3D-CPA)联合彩色多普勒超声(CDFI)技术定量评价妊娠高血压综合征(PIH)患者胎盘血流情况的价值.方法 90例PIH孕妇中,轻度子痫前期53例(P-L组),重度子痫前期37例(P-H组),同期选取100例正常孕妇为正常对照组(N组).对所有孕妇胎盘床血管进行三维重建,采用VOCAL软件测量血管化指数(VI),血流指数(FI),血管化血流指数(VFI).采用CDFI测量脐动脉收缩期/舒张期血流速度峰值(S/D),并与正常对照组比较.结果 P-L组、P-H组与N组S/D值比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),P-H组高于P-L组、N组(P<0.01).P-L组、P-H组VI、FI、VFI与N组比较,差异有统计学意义(P均<0.01),均为P-H组<P-L组<N组.结论 PIH患者S/D值升高,VI、FI、VFI值降低,且以重度子痫前期为明显.3D-CPA技术可更早更精确地提示PIH患者的胎盘血流灌注情况.%Objective To investigate the clinical value of three-dimensional color power angiography (3D-CPA) and color Doppler flow imaging ( CDFI) in the quantitate assessment of placental perfusion in pregnancy induced hypertension( PIH) patients. Methods Ninty pregnant women with PIH were divided into the mild pre-eclampsia group( n =53 , Group P-L) and severe pre-eclampsia group ( n = 37, Group P-H) , 100 healthy pregnant women as the controls( Group N). Three-dimensional reconstruction of placental vascular was performed ,and placental vascularization index(VI) ,flow index(FI) ,and vascularization-f1ow index(VFI) were measured with VOCAL software. CDFI was used to measure the umbilical blood flow systolic to diastolic (S/D). The data in PIH patients were compared with the controls. Results There was significant difference in S/D between Group P-L and Group N ,as well as between Group P-H and Group N ( P < 0. 01) , and S/D was significantly higher in Group P-H than in Group P-L, and Group N (P <0. 01) . VI,FI and VFI showed significant difference between Group P

  11. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy

  12. A liver perfusion model for studies of selective adherence and transient halting of portal blood leukocytes in sinusoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durowicz, Sergiusz; Olszewski, Waldemar L

    2003-01-15

    Portal blood leukocytes play an important, but still poorly defined, role in the immune processes of the liver. In our previous studies, we showed that certain leukocyte subsets are selectively halted in the liver. These cells marginate in sinusoids and, together with resident Kupffer and endothelial sinusoidal cells, participate in antiviral and antitumor processes. The molecular mechanisms of margination and cooperation with resident sinusoidal cells require clarification. However, in vivo harvesting of portal blood leukocytes is associated with cumbersome cannulation of portal and hepatic veins and manipulation of the liver, causing major disturbances in splanchnic blood flow and liver blood supply, totally distorting sinusoidal blood perfusion and leukocyte margination. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed an in situ normothermic rat liver perfusion model permitting quantitative observations of blood leukocyte extraction in sinusoids. First, liver was flushed through the portal vein and the effluent leukocytes, named liver-associated leukocytes (LAL1), were collected from hepatic veins. Then, the liver was perfused for 60 min with 50 ml of blood using a semiclosed perfusion system. Upon completion of perfusion, the liver portal vasculature was flushed again to retrieve the leukocytes extracted from the perfusing blood (LAL2). These cells were characterized with respect to their phenotype and cytotoxicity. The mean leukocyte count of the washout before perfusion was 1.04+/-0.2x10(6)/g of liver tissue and 0.9+/-0.1x10(6)/g after 60 min of perfusion, indicating retention by the perfused liver, the live leukocyte extracting capacity. To further evaluate the efficiency of perfusion, FITC-labelled leukocytes were added to the perfusing leukocyte-free blood. Around 95% of the postperfusion washout LALs were FITC(+). Heat-killed leukocytes did not marginate in sinusoids. Preincubation of leukocytes with substances able to lower adhesion capacity, such as

  13. Hepatotoxic effects of polidocanol in a model of autologously perfused porcine livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse-Siestrup, Christian; Unger, Volker; Pfeffer, Jeanette; Dinh, Q Thai; Nagel, Stefan; Springer, Jochen; Witt, Christian; Wussow, Anke; Groneberg, David A

    2004-12-01

    Polidocanol is an effective sclerosing agent that consists of 95% hydroxypolyethoxydodecane and 5% ethyl alcohol and is known to have a low risk of complications. However, since the compound has been proposed for the local treatment of liver diseases, the potential for topical hepatic side effects should be examined. Therefore, the new model of normothermic-hemoperfused isolated porcine slaughterhouse livers was used to examine polidocanol-hepatotoxicity encompassing the advantages of slaughterhouse organs to reduce animal experiments and autologous blood as an optimal perfusate. Polidocanol was administered via the hepatic artery and portal vein and the effects of the sclerosant on organ function parameters were compared with those in an untreated control group. In contrast to the untreated control organs, significant differences were found in the polidocanol group for parameters such as alanine aminotransferase or organ weight after perfusion. The most striking differences were found for hepatic bile flow, which dropped in the polidocanol group to 0.24+/-0.02 ml/min per 1000 g after administration of the compound compared with 3.80+/-1.08 ml/min per 1000 g in the control group. In summary, the present observations indicate a risk of hepatotoxic effects of polidocanol. Clinicians should be aware of this problem and the use of polidocanol for intrahepatic sclerosing should be restricted to specialized centers.

  14. Chelidonium majus and its effects on uterine contractility in a perfusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzel, Julian; Geisler, Klaudija; Strahl, Olga; Grundtner, Philipp; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dittrich, Ralf

    2013-07-01

    The herbal agent celandine is thought to have mainly spasmolytic effects, but in the uterus it is regarded as promoting contractions, which can offer promising and innovative options for optimizing artificial reproduction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of celandine on the uterine muscle, using a perfusion model of swine uteri. Sixteen swine uteri were perfused with Krebs-Ringer solution. Celandine (Chelidonium, Paverysat; Johannes Bürger Ysatfabrik Ltd., Bad Harzburg, Germany) was administered at increasing dosages. Intrauterine pressure (IUP) was recorded using an intrauterine double-chip microcatheter (Urobar 8 DS-F, Raumedic, Rehau AG & Co., Rehau, Germany). Differences in pressure (ΔP) and area under the curve (ΔAUC) after drug administration in the uterine body and uterine horn in the various dilution series were noted. A paired Student's t-test was used to evaluate differences between groups, with significance set at PChelidonium majus might be used to promote targeted sperm transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved GFR and renal plasma perfusion following remote ischaemic conditioning in a porcine kidney transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Soendergaard, Peter; Secher, Niels G

    2012-01-01

    systemic protection against ischaemic injuries. Using a porcine kidney transplantation model with donor (63 kg) recipient (15 kg) size mismatch, we investigated the effects of recipient rIC on early renal plasma perfusion and GFR. Brain death was induced in donor pigs (n = 8) and kidneys were removed...... and kept in cold storage until transplantation. Nephrectomized recipient pigs were randomized to rIC (n = 8) or non-rIC (n = 8) with one kidney from the same donor in each group. rIC consisted of 4 × 5 min clamping of the abdominal aorta. GFR was significantly higher in the rIC group compared with non......-rIC (7.2 ml/min vs. 3.4 ml/min; ΔGFR = 3.7 ml/min, 95%-CI: 0.3-7.2 ml/min, P = 0.038). Renal plasma perfusion in both cortex and medulla measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was significantly higher over time in the rIC group compared with non-rIC. This experimental...

  16. Comprehensive model for simultaneous MRI determination of perfusion and permeability using a blood-pool agent in rats rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazelaire, Cedric de [Saint Louis Hospital, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Siauve, Nathalie; Fournier, Laure; Clement, Olivier; Kerviler, Eric de; Cuenod, Charles Andre [George Pompidou European Hospital, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Frouin, Frederique [INSERM U494, Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Robert, Philippe [Guerbet Laboratoire Guerbet, Recherche et Developpement, Paris (France)

    2005-12-01

    To present a new compartmental analysis model developed to simultaneously measure tissue perfusion and capillary permeability in a tumor using MRI and a macromolecular contrast medium. Rhadomyosarcomas were implanted subcutaneously in 20 rats and studied by 1.5-T MRI using a fast gradient echo sequence (2D fast SPGR TR/TE/{alpha} 13 ms/1.2 ms/60 ) after injection of a macromolecular contrast medium. The left ventricle and tumor signal intensities were converted into concentrations and modeled using compartmental analysis, yielding tumor perfusion F, distribution volume V{sub distribution}, volume transfer constant K{sup trans}, rate constant of influx k{sub pe}, and initial extraction (fraction) E. Tumor perfusion was F=43{+-}29 ml.min{sup -1}.100 g{sup -1}. The permeability study allowed the measurement of k{sub pe}=0.37{+-}0.12 min{sup -1} and K{sup trans}=0.01{+-}0.0031 min{sup -1}. The blood volume could be assimilated to the distribution volume (V{sub distribution}=2.9{+-}1.01%) since the capillary leakage was small. The simultaneous assessment of perfusion and permeability allowed quantification of the initial extraction (fraction) E=2.34{+-}1.05%. Quantification of both tumor perfusion and capillary leakage is feasible using MRI using a macromolecular blood pool agent. The method should improve tumor characterization. (orig.)

  17. Comparing model-based and model-free analysis methods for QUASAR arterial spin labeling perfusion quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Michael A; Woolrich, Mark W; Petersen, Esben T; Golay, Xavier; Payne, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Amongst the various implementations of arterial spin labeling MRI methods for quantifying cerebral perfusion, the QUASAR method is unique. By using a combination of labeling with and without flow suppression gradients, the QUASAR method offers the separation of macrovascular and tissue signals. This permits local arterial input functions to be defined and "model-free" analysis, using numerical deconvolution, to be used. However, it remains unclear whether arterial spin labeling data are best treated using model-free or model-based analysis. This work provides a critical comparison of these two approaches for QUASAR arterial spin labeling in the healthy brain. An existing two-component (arterial and tissue) model was extended to the mixed flow suppression scheme of QUASAR to provide an optimal model-based analysis. The model-based analysis was extended to incorporate dispersion of the labeled bolus, generally regarded as the major source of discrepancy between the two analysis approaches. Model-free and model-based analyses were compared for perfusion quantification including absolute measurements, uncertainty estimation, and spatial variation in cerebral blood flow estimates. Major sources of discrepancies between model-free and model-based analysis were attributed to the effects of dispersion and the degree to which the two methods can separate macrovascular and tissue signal. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prediction of fetal acidemia in placental abruption

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, Yoshio; OGAWA, Masaki; KONNO, Jun; MITANI, Minoru; MATSUI, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the major predictive factors for fetal acidemia in placental abruption. Methods A retrospective review of pregnancies with placental abruption was performed using a logistic regression model. Fetal acidemia was defined as a pH of less than 7.0 in umbilical artery. The severe abruption score, which was derived from a linear discriminant function, was calculated to determine the probability of fetal acidemia. Results Fetal acidemia was seen in 43 survivors (43/222, 19%)....

  19. Three-dimensional perfused human in vitro model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewski, Tomasz; Cornforth, Terri; Snow, Sophie A; Ouro-Gnao, Larissa; Rowe, Cliff; Large, Emma M; Hughes, David J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To develop a human in vitro model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), utilising primary hepatocytes cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) perfused platform. METHODS Fat and lean culture media were developed to directly investigate the effects of fat loading on primary hepatocytes cultured in a 3D perfused culture system. Oil Red O staining was used to measure fat loading in the hepatocytes and the consumption of free fatty acids (FFA) from culture medium was monitored. Hepatic functions, gene expression profiles and adipokine release were compared for cells cultured in fat and lean conditions. To determine if fat loading in the system could be modulated hepatocytes were treated with known anti-steatotic compounds. RESULTS Hepatocytes cultured in fat medium were found to accumulate three times more fat than lean cells and fat uptake was continuous over a 14-d culture. Fat loading of hepatocytes did not cause any hepatotoxicity and significantly increased albumin production. Numerous adipokines were expressed by fatty cells and genes associated with NAFLD and liver disease were upregulated including: Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1, fatty acid-binding protein 3 and CYP7A1. The metabolic activity of hepatocytes cultured in fatty conditions was found to be impaired and the activities of CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 were significantly reduced, similar to observations made in NAFLD patients. The utility of the model for drug screening was demonstrated by measuring the effects of known anti-steatotic compounds. Hepatocytes, cultured under fatty conditions and treated with metformin, had a reduced cellular fat content compared to untreated controls and consumed less FFA from cell culture medium. CONCLUSION The 3D in vitro NAFLD model recapitulates many features of clinical NAFLD and is an ideal tool for analysing the efficacy of anti-steatotic compounds. PMID:28127194

  20. Establishment of a Swine Model for Validation of Perfusion Measurement by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Anika Sauerbrey; Stefan Hindel; Marc Maaß; Christine Krüger; Andreas Wissmann; Martin Kramer; Benno Nafz; Lutz Lüdemann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a suitable animal model for validating dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging perfusion measurements. A total of 8 pigs were investigated by DCE-MRI. Perfusion was determined on the hind leg musculature. An ultrasound flow probe placed around the femoral artery provided flow measurements independent of MRI and served as the standard of reference. Images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner using a 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence. An arte...

  1. A 3D porous media liver lobule model: the importance of vascular septa and anisotropic permeability for homogeneous perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbaut, Charlotte; Vierendeels, Jan; Siggers, Jennifer H; Repetto, Rodolfo; Monbaliu, Diethard; Segers, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic blood circulation is complex, particularly at the microcirculatory level. Previously, 2D liver lobule models using porous media and a 3D model using real sinusoidal geometries have been developed. We extended these models to investigate the role of vascular septa (VS) and anisotropic permeability. The lobule was modelled as a hexagonal prism (with or without VS) and the tissue was treated as a porous medium (isotropic or anisotropic permeability). Models were solved using computational fluid dynamics. VS inclusion resulted in more spatially homogeneous perfusion. Anisotropic permeability resulted in a larger axial velocity component than isotropic permeability. A parameter study revealed that results are most sensitive to the lobule size and radial pressure drop. Our model provides insight into hepatic microhaemodynamics, and suggests that inclusion of VS in the model leads to perfusion patterns that are likely to reflect physiological reality. The model has potential for applications to unphysiological and pathological conditions.

  2. Quantitative arterial spin labelling perfusion measurements in rat models of renal transplantation and acute kidney injury at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Klotz, Sarah; Hoeger, Simone; Yard, Benito A.; Kraemer, Bernhard K. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Medicine V

    2017-05-01

    To employ ASL for the measurement of renal cortical perfusion in particular renal disorders typically associated with graft loss and to investigate its potential to detect and differentiate the related functional deterioration i.e., in a setting of acute kidney injury (AKI) as well as in renal grafts showing acute and chronic transplant rejection. 14 Lewis rats with unilateral ischaemic AKI and 43 Lewis rats with renal grafts showing acute or chronic rejections were used. All ASL measurements in this study were performed on a 3 T MR scanner using a FAIR True-FISP approach to assess renal blood flow (RBF). Perfusion maps were calculated and the cortical blood flow was determined using a region-of-interest based analysis. RBF of healthy and AKI kidneys as well as of both rejection models, were compared. In a subsample of 20 rats, creatinine clearance was measured and correlated with cortical perfusion. RBF differs significantly between healthy and AKI kidneys (P < 0.001) with a mean difference of 213 ± 80 ml/100 g/min. Renal grafts with chronic rejections show a significantly higher (P < 0.001) mean cortical perfusion (346 ± 112 ml/100 g/min) than grafts with acute rejection (240 ± 66 ml/100 g/min). Both transplantation models have a significantly (P < 0.001) lower perfusion than healthy kidneys. Renal creatinine clearance is significantly correlated (R = 0.85, P < 0.001) with cortical blood flow. Perfusion measurements with ASL have the potential to become a valuable diagnostic tool, regarding the detection of renal impairment and the differentiation of disorders that lead to a loss of renal function and that are typically associated with graft loss.

  3. Isolated lung perfusion with gemcitabine for the treatment of pulmonary metastases : Experimental study in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, B.P. van

    2003-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion is an experimental surgical technique for the treatment of pulmonary metastases in order to improve the current 5-year survival of approximately 40 % after surgical resection of manually palpable metastases. Several drugs have been tested in animals models and five phase I st

  4. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Pelgrim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT, including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET. This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD, as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings.

  5. Optimal Duration of Acquisition for Dynamic Perfusion CT Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using the Patlak Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hom, J.; Dankbaar, J. W.; Schneider, T.; Cheng, S. -C.; Bredno, J.; Wintermark, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A previous study demonstrated the need to use delayed acquisition rather than first-pass data for accurate blood-brain barrier permeability surface product (BBBP) calculation from perfusion CT (PCT) according to the Patlak model, but the optimal duration of the delayed acquis

  6. Time Development Models for Perfusion Provocations Studied with Laser-Doppler Flowmetry, Applied to Iontophoresis and PORH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Mul, Frits F. M.; Blaauw, Judith; Smit, Ries J.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Aarnoudse, Jan G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Clinical acceptance of laser-Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) of microcirculation suffers from lack of quantitatively reliable signal data, due to varying tissue constitution, temperature, hydration, etc. In this article, we show that a novel approach using physiological models for res

  7. Modeling of the contrast-enhanced perfusion test in liver based on the multi-compartment flow in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Rohan, Eduard; Jonášová, Alena

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with modeling the liver perfusion intended to improve quantitative analysis of the tissue scans provided by the contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). For this purpose, we developed a model of dynamic transport of the contrast fluid through the hierarchies of the perfusion trees. Conceptually, computed time-space distributions of the so-called tissue density can be compared with the measured data obtained from CT; such a modeling feedback can be used for model parameter identification. The blood flow is characterized at several scales for which different models are used. Flows in upper hierarchies represented by larger branching vessels are described using simple 1D models based on the Bernoulli equation extended by correction terms to respect the local pressure losses. To describe flows in smaller vessels and in the tissue parenchyma, we propose a 3D continuum model of porous medium defined in terms of hierarchically matched compartments characterized by hydraulic permeabilities. The 1D ...

  8. Experimental evaluation and computational modeling of tissue damage from low-flow push-pull perfusion sampling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, David E; Hains, Leah; Li, David; Bull, Joseph; Lentz, Stephen I; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-03-15

    Neurochemical monitoring via sampling probes is valuable for deciphering neurotransmission in vivo. Microdialysis is commonly used; however, the spatial resolution is poor. Recently push-pull perfusion at low flow rates (50nL/min) has been proposed as a method for in vivo sampling from the central nervous system. Tissue damage from such probes has not been investigated in detail. In this work, we evaluated acute tissue response to low-flow push-pull perfusion by infusing the nuclear stains Sytox Orange and Hoechst 33342 through probes implanted in the striatum for 200min, to label damaged and total cells, respectively, in situ. Using the damaged/total labeled cell ratio as a measure of tissue damage, we found that 33±8% were damaged within the dye region around a microdialysis probe. We found that low-flow push-pull perfusion probes damaged 24±4% of cells in the sampling area. Flow had no effect on the number of damaged cells for low-flow push-pull perfusion. Modeling revealed that shear stress and pressure gradients generated by the flow were lower than thresholds expected to cause damage. Comparison with existing methods.Push-pull perfusion caused less tissue damage but yielded 1500-fold better spatial resolution. Push-pull perfusion at low flow rates is a viable method for sampling from the brain with potential for high temporal and spatial resolution. Tissue damage is mostly caused by probe insertion. Smaller probes may yield even lower damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A simplified subnormothermic machine perfusion system restores ischemically damaged liver grafts in a rat model of orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berendsen Tim A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver donor shortages stimulate the development of strategies that incorporate damaged organs into the donor pool. Herein we present a simplified machine perfusion system without the need for oxygen carriers or temperature control, which we validated in a model of orthotopic liver transplantation. Methods Rat livers were procured and subnormothermically perfused with supplemented Williams E medium for 3 hours, then transplanted into healthy recipients (Fresh-SNMP group. Outcome was compared with static cold stored organs (UW-Control group. In addition, a rat liver model of donation after cardiac death was adapted using a 60-minute warm ischemic period, after which the grafts were either transplanted directly (WI group or subnormothermically perfused and transplanted (WI-SNMP group. Results One-month survival was 100% in the Fresh-SNMP and UW-Control groups, 83.3% in the WI-SNMP group and 0% in the WI group. Clinical parameters, postoperative blood work and histology did not differ significantly between survivors. Conclusion This work demonstrates for the first time in an orthotopic transplantation model that ischemically damaged livers can be regenerated effectively using practical subnormothermic machine perfusion without oxygen carriers.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  11. Preliminary study of CT in combination with MRI perfusion imaging to assess hemodynamic changes during angiogenesis in a rabbit model of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Zhang,1 Baoqi Shi,1 Zhaoxin Liu,1 Mingmin Zhang,1 Weijing Zhang21Radiology Department, Baotou Cancer Hospital, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, 2Department of Mathematics, College of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: This study used CT (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to identify correlations between perfusion parameters for squamous cell lung carcinoma and tumor angiogenesis in a rabbit model of VX2 lung cancer.Methods: VX2 tumors were implanted in the lungs of 35 New Zealand White rabbits. CT and MRI perfusion scanning were performed on days 14, 17, 21, 25, and 28 after tumor implantation. CT perfusion parameters were perfusion, peak enhanced increment, transit time peak, and blood volume, and MRI perfusion parameters were wash in rate, wash out rate, maximum enhancement rate, and transit time peak. CT and MRI perfusion parameters were obtained at the tumor rim, in the tumor tissue, and in the muscle tissue surrounding the tumor.Results: On CT perfusion imaging, t values for perfusion, peak enhanced increment, and blood volume (tumor rim versus muscle were 16.31, 11.79, and 5.21, respectively (P 0.05. On MRI perfusion imaging, t values for wash in rate, wash out rate, and maximum enhancement rate (tumor rim versus muscle were 18.14, 8.79, and 6.02, respectively (P 0.05.Conclusion: A combination of CT and MRI perfusion imaging demonstrated hemodynamic changes in a rabbit model of VX2 lung cancer, and provides a theoretical foundation for treatment of human squamous cell lung carcinoma.Keywords: perfusion imaging, rabbits, animal model, lung, squamous carcinoma cell

  12. Modelling of human transplacental transport as performed in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Line; Mørck, Thit Aarøe; Zuri, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Placenta perfusion models are very effective when studying the placental mechanisms in order to extrapolate to real-life situations. The models are most often used to investigate the transport of substances between mother and foetus, including the potential metabolism of these. We have studied th...

  13. Altered feto-placental vascularization, feto-placental malperfusion and fetal growth restriction in mice with Egfl7 loss of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, Lauretta A; Hurtado, Romulo; Hinds, Samantha; Poulos, Michael G; Butler, Jason M; Stuhlmann, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    EGFL7 is a secreted angiogenic factor produced by embryonic endothelial cells. To understand its role in placental development, we established a novel Egfl7 knockout mouse. The mutant mice have gross defects in chorioallantoic branching morphogenesis and placental vascular patterning. Microangiography and 3D imaging revealed patchy perfusion of Egfl7(-/-) placentas marked by impeded blood conductance through sites of narrowed vessels. Consistent with poor feto-placental perfusion, Egfl7 knockout resulted in reduced placental weight and fetal growth restriction. The placentas also showed abnormal fetal vessel patterning and over 50% reduction in fetal blood space. In vitro, placental endothelial cells were deficient in migration, cord formation and sprouting. Expression of genes involved in branching morphogenesis, Gcm1, Syna and Synb, and in patterning of the extracellular matrix, Mmrn1, were temporally dysregulated in the placentas. Egfl7 knockout did not affect expression of the microRNA embedded within intron 7. Collectively, these data reveal that Egfl7 is crucial for placental vascularization and embryonic growth, and may provide insight into etiological factors underlying placental pathologies associated with intrauterine growth restriction, which is a significant cause of infant morbidity and mortality. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Placental gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    David, A. L.; Ashcroft, R

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy uses genetic material as a drug delivery vehicle to express therapeutic proteins. Placental gene therapy may be useful for correction of two important obstetric conditions, foetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia in which there is a failure of the physiological trophoblast remodelling of the uterine spiral arteries in early pregnancy. The patient in this scenario is the foetus. Placental gene therapy might be justifiable when: there is reasonable certainty that the foetus wil...

  15. Theoretical Models for the Quantification of Lung Injury Using Ventilation and Perfusion Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Brook

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two approaches to modelling lung disease: one based on a multi-compartment statistical model with a log normal distribution of ventilation perfusion ratio (V˙/Q˙ values; and the other on a bifurcating tree which emulates the anatomical structure of the lung. In the statistical model, the distribution becomes bimodal, when the V˙/Q˙ values of a randomly selected number of compartments are reduced by 85% to simulate lung disease. For the bifurcating tree model a difference in flow to the left and right branches coupled with a small random variation in flow ratio between generations results in a log normal distribution of flows in the terminal branches. Restricting flow through branches within the tree to simulate lung disease transforms this log normal distribution to a bi-modal one. These results are compatible with those obtained from experiments using the multiple inert gas elimination technique, where log normal distributions of V˙/Q˙ ratio become bimodal in the presence of lung disease.

  16. Pharmacodynamic modeling of anti-cancer activity of tetraiodothyroacetic acid in a perfused cell culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yun Lin

    Full Text Available Unmodified or as a poly[lactide-co-glycolide] nanoparticle, tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac acts at the integrin αvβ3 receptor on human cancer cells to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and xenograft growth. To study in vitro the pharmacodynamics of tetrac formulations in the absence of and in conjunction with other chemotherapeutic agents, we developed a perfusion bellows cell culture system. Cells were grown on polymer flakes and exposed to various concentrations of tetrac, nano-tetrac, resveratrol, cetuximab, or a combination for up to 18 days. Cells were harvested and counted every one or two days. Both NONMEM VI and the exact Monte Carlo parametric expectation maximization algorithm in S-ADAPT were utilized for mathematical modeling. Unmodified tetrac inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells and did so with differing potency in different cell lines. The developed mechanism-based model included two effects of tetrac on different parts of the cell cycle which could be distinguished. For human breast cancer cells, modeling suggested a higher sensitivity (lower IC50 to the effect on success rate of replication than the effect on rate of growth, whereas the capacity (Imax was larger for the effect on growth rate. Nanoparticulate tetrac (nano-tetrac, which does not enter into cells, had a higher potency and a larger anti-proliferative effect than unmodified tetrac. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of harvested cells revealed tetrac and nano-tetrac induced concentration-dependent apoptosis that was correlated with expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, such as p53, p21, PIG3 and BAD for nano-tetrac, while unmodified tetrac showed a different profile. Approximately additive anti-proliferative effects were found for the combinations of tetrac and resveratrol, tetrac and cetuximab (Erbitux, and nano-tetrac and cetuximab. Our in vitro perfusion cancer cell system together with mathematical modeling successfully described the anti

  17. Modulation and modeling of monoclonal antibody N-linked glycosylation in mammalian cell perfusion reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Daniel J; Scibona, Ernesto; Serra, Elisa; Bielser, Jean-Marc; Souquet, Jonathan; Stettler, Matthieu; Broly, Hervé; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Villiger, Thomas K

    2017-09-01

    Mammalian cell perfusion cultures are gaining renewed interest as an alternative to traditional fed-batch processes for the production of therapeutic proteins, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The steady state operation at high viable cell density allows the continuous delivery of antibody product with increased space-time yield and reduced in-process variability of critical product quality attributes (CQA). In particular, the production of a confined mAb N-linked glycosylation pattern has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy and bioactivity. In this study, we show that accurate control of flow rates, media composition and cell density of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell perfusion bioreactor allowed the production of a constant glycosylation profile for over 20 days. Steady state was reached after an initial transition phase of 6 days required for the stabilization of extra- and intracellular processes. The possibility to modulate the glycosylation profile was further investigated in a Design of Experiment (DoE), at different viable cell density and media supplement concentrations. This strategy was implemented in a sequential screening approach, where various steady states were achieved sequentially during one culture. It was found that, whereas high ammonia levels reached at high viable cell densities (VCD) values inhibited the processing to complex glycan structures, the supplementation of either galactose, or manganese as well as their synergy significantly increased the proportion of complex forms. The obtained experimental data set was used to compare the reliability of a statistical response surface model (RSM) to a mechanistic model of N-linked glycosylation. The latter outperformed the response surface predictions with respect to its capability and reliability in predicting the system behavior (i.e., glycosylation pattern) outside the experimental space covered by the DoE design used for the model parameter estimation. Therefore, we can

  18. Intramyocardial sustained delivery of placental growth factor using nanoparticles as a vehicle for delivery in the rat infarct model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shum-Tim D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ziyad Mohammed Binsalamah1, Arghya Paul2, Afshan Afsar Khan2, Satya Prakash2, Dominique Shum-Tim11Divisions of Cardiac Surgery and Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, 2Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaBackground: Acute myocardial ischemia results in scar formation with ventricular dilatation and eventually heart failure. Placental growth factor (PlGF is reported to stimulate angiogenesis and improve cardiac function. In this study, it was hypothesized that intramyocardial injection of PlGF contained in nanoparticles can be released at the site of action for an extended time period as a sustained slow-release protective mechanism that accelerates myocardial recovery in a rat model of ischemic cardiomyopathy.Methods: PlGF-loaded chitosan-alginate nanoparticles were injected into an acute myocardial infarction model in rats (n = 10 per group. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed at different time intervals. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the serum cytokines levels at 8 weeks. Hearts were stained with Masson's trichrome for scar area analysis. Immunofluorostaining was performed to evaluate the extent of myocardial angiogenesis at the infarction border. PlGF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the in vitro release kinetics of PlGF-loaded nanoparticles.Results: At 8 weeks after coronary ligation, hearts that were treated with PlGF-loaded chitosan-alginate nanoparticles had significant increases in left-ventricular function (P < 0.01, vascular density (P < 0.01, and in the serum level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (P < 0.05. There was significant decrease in scar area formation (P < 0.05 and in serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 (P < 0.01. In vitro PlGF-release kinetic studies showed a

  19. Relaxin as a protective substance in preservation solutions for organ transplantation, as shown in an isolated perfused rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnert, M U; Armbruster, F P; Hilbig, H

    2008-05-01

    Reperfusion injury, a well-known problem in organ transplantation, results from multiple pathologic mechanisms, including platelet/mast cell activation and peroxidation of cell membrane lipids. Relaxin was originally described as an insulin-like hormone produced in the ovaries during pregnancy. It causes vessel dilation and inhibition of platelet and mast cell activation. The present study investigated the protective effect of relaxin against reperfusion injury in liver tissue. We used a model of isolated perfused rat liver to simulate liver transplantation. Organ preservation was performed identical to human transplantation in 20 male Wistar rats. During preservation we applied 64 ng/mL relaxin. In contrast controls (n = 10) had no relaxin treatment. To quantify cell damage, we measured malonyldialdehyde (MDA; end product of lipid peroxidation) and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO; marker for accumulation of neutrophil granulocytes) in the perfusates. The livers were examined immunohistochemically for the same parameters. Relaxin as an additional substance in preservation solutions decreased perfusate MPO and MDA levels by up to 30%, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Our preliminary data suggested that relaxin is a promising agent to reduce hepatocyte damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury. Quantitative analysis of MDA and MPO levels in the perfusate is the subject of an ongoing study.

  20. Elevated placental adenosine signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Takayuki; Sun, Kaiqi; Parchim, Nicholas F; Li, Jessica; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Anren; Hart, Laura A; Blackwell, Sean C; Sibai, Baha M; Chan, Lee-Nien L; Chan, Teh-Sheng; Hicks, M John; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-02-24

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. This pathogenic condition is speculated to be caused by placental abnormalities that contribute to the maternal syndrome. However, the specific factors and signaling pathways that lead to impaired placentas and maternal disease development remain elusive. Using 2 independent animal models of preeclampsia (genetically engineered pregnant mice with elevated adenosine exclusively in placentas and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model), we demonstrated that chronically elevated placental adenosine was sufficient to induce hallmark features of preeclampsia, including hypertension, proteinuria, small fetuses, and impaired placental vasculature. Genetic and pharmacological approaches revealed that elevated placental adenosine coupled with excessive A₂B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling contributed to the development of these features of preeclampsia. Mechanistically, we provided both human and mouse evidence that elevated placental CD73 is a key enzyme causing increased placental adenosine, thereby contributing to preeclampsia. We determined that elevated placental adenosine signaling is a previously unrecognized pathogenic factor for preeclampsia. Moreover, our findings revealed the molecular basis underlying the elevation of placental adenosine and the detrimental role of excess placental adenosine in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, and thereby, we highlight novel therapeutic targets. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Optimization of an Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Liver Model: Clearance Studies with 7-Ethoxycoumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption (VO2), vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) leakage, and meta...

  2. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass : the role of hemodilution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Nick J.; de lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B. A.; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Begieneman, Mark P. V.; Niessen, Hans W.; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue

  3. Novel perfused compression bioreactor system as an in vitro model to investigate fracture healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar eHoffmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary bone fracture healing is a physiological process that leads to functional tissue regeneration via endochondral bone formation. In vivo studies have demonstrated that early mobilization and the application of mechanical loads enhances the process of fracture healing. However, the influence of specific mechanical stimuli and particular effects during specific phases of fracture healing remain to be elucidated. In this work, we have developed and provided proof-of-concept of an in vitro human organotypic model of physiological loading of a cartilage callus, based on a novel perfused compression bioreactor system (PCB. We then used the fracture callus model to investigate the regulatory role of dynamic mechanical loading. Our findings provide a proof-of-principle that dynamic mechanical loading applied by the PCB can enhance the maturation process of mesenchymal stromal cells towards late hypertrophic chondrocytes and the mineralization of the deposited extracellular matrix. The PCB provides a promising tool to study fracture healing and for the in vitro assessment of alternative fracture treatments based on engineered tissue grafts or pharmaceutical compounds, allowing for the reduction of animal experiments.

  4. Regional lung perfusion estimated by electrical impedance tomography in a piglet model of lung collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, João Batista; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo; Melo, Alexandre; Maripuu, Enn; Sandström, Mattias; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Hedenstierna, Göran; Amato, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the regional match between alveolar ventilation and perfusion in critically ill patients requires simultaneous measurements of both parameters. Ideally, assessment of lung perfusion should be performed in real-time with an imaging technology that provides, through fast acquisition of sequential images, information about the regional dynamics or regional kinetics of an appropriate tracer. We present a novel electrical impedance tomography (EIT)-based method that quantitatively estimates regional lung perfusion based on first-pass kinetics of a bolus of hypertonic saline contrast. Pulmonary blood flow was measured in six piglets during control and unilateral or bilateral lung collapse conditions. The first-pass kinetics method showed good agreement with the estimates obtained by single-photon-emission computerized tomography (SPECT). The mean difference (SPECT minus EIT) between fractional blood flow to lung areas suffering atelectasis was -0.6%, with a SD of 2.9%. This method outperformed the estimates of lung perfusion based on impedance pulsatility. In conclusion, we describe a novel method based on EIT for estimating regional lung perfusion at the bedside. In both healthy and injured lung conditions, the distribution of pulmonary blood flow as assessed by EIT agreed well with the one obtained by SPECT. The method proposed in this study has the potential to contribute to a better understanding of the behavior of regional perfusion under different lung and therapeutic conditions.

  5. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine.

  6. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S; Wisner, Erik R; Johnson, Lynelle R; Stern, Joshua A; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t-test. The mean TRE

  7. Feasibility of quantitative lung perfusion by 4D CT imaging by a new dynamic-scanning protocol in an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Brown, Matt; McNitt-Gray, Mike

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to test a new dynamic Perfusion-CT imaging protocol in an animal model and investigate the feasibility of quantifying perfusion of lung parenchyma to perform functional analysis from 4D CT image data. A novel perfusion-CT protocol was designed with 25 scanning time points: the first at baseline and 24 scans after a bolus injection of contrast material. Post-contrast CT scanning images were acquired with a high sampling rate before the first blood recirculation and then a relatively low sampling rate until 10 minutes after administrating contrast agent. Lower radiation techniques were used to keep the radiation dose to an acceptable level. 2 Yorkshire swine with pulmonary emboli underwent this perfusion- CT protocol at suspended end inspiration. The software tools were designed to measure the quantitative perfusion parameters (perfusion, permeability, relative blood volume, blood flow, wash-in & wash-out enhancement) of voxel or interesting area of lung. The perfusion values were calculated for further lung functional analysis and presented visually as contrast enhancement maps for the volume being examined. The results show increased CT temporal sampling rate provides the feasibility of quantifying lung function and evaluating the pulmonary emboli. Differences between areas with known perfusion defects and those without perfusion defects were observed. In conclusion, the techniques to calculate the lung perfusion on animal model have potential application in human lung functional analysis such as evaluation of functional effects of pulmonary embolism. With further study, these techniques might be applicable in human lung parenchyma characterization and possibly for lung nodule characterization.

  8. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P liver diseases.

  9. Patterns of histological changes following hepatic electrolytic ablation in an ex-vivo perfused model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Ong, Seok Ling; West, Kevin; McGregor, Angus; Maddern, Guy J; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Lloyd, David M; Dennison, Ashley R

    2012-10-01

    Electrolytic ablation (EA) destroys the liver by releasing toxic radicles and producing modifications in the local pH without increasing the tissue temperature. We assessed the histological changes produced by EA using an ex-vivo perfused model. Five porcine livers were harvested, preserved in ice and reperfused for six hours in an extracorporeal circuit using autologous normothermic blood. One hour after reperfusion EA was performed and liver biopsies collected at the end of the experiments. The main necrotic zone consisted of coagulative necrosis, sinusoidal dilatation and haemorrhage with an unusual morphological pattern. The coagulative necrosis and haemorrhage affected mainly the peripheral area of the lobule with relative sparing of the area surrounding the centrilobular vein. Contrasting with this sinusoidal dilatation appeared to be more prominent in the centrilobular area. EA produces patterns of tissue destruction that have not been observed with the more commonly used thermal techniques. Further studies should obtain more information about the influence of adjacent biliary and vascular structures so that appropriate clinical trials can be designed.

  10. Femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Akira; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ishida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis rabbit model by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Steroid-induced osteonecrosis was produced by single intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone in 15 rabbits. Eight rabbits underwent PEMF stimulation (PEMF group) and seven did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before PEMF stimulation, immediately before steroid administration, and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed. ER, IS, and AUC in the control group significantly decreased after steroid administration compared with before administration (P<0.05). In PEMF group, IS significantly decreased; however, ER and AUC showed no significant differences after steroid administration compared with before. ER and IS in PEMF group were higher than in control group until 10th day, and AUC was higher until 5th day after steroid administration (P<0.05). PEMF stimulation restrains the decrease in blood flow after steroid administration.

  11. Alternans in genetically modified Langendorff-perfused murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Sabir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alternans and arrhythmogenicity was studied in genetically modified murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT during Langendorff perfusion, before and after treatment with catecholamines and a β-adrenergic antagonist. Heterozygous (RyR2p/s and homozygous (RyR2s/s RyR2-P2328S hearts, and wild-type (WT controls, were studied before and after treatment with epinephrine (100 nM and 1 µM and propranolol (100 nM. Monophasic action potential recordings demonstrated significantly greater incidences of arrhythmia in RyR2s/p and RyR2s/s hearts as compared to WTs. Arrhythmogenicity in RyR2s/s hearts was associated with alternans, particularly at short baseline cycle lengths. Both phenomena were significantly accentuated by treatment with epinephrine and significantly diminished by treatment with propranolol, in full agreement with clinical expectations. These changes took place, however, despite an absence of changes in action potential durations, ventricular effective refractory periods or restitution curve characteristics. Furthermore pooled data from all hearts in which arrhythmia occurred demonstrated significantly greater alternans magnitudes, but similar restitution curve slopes, to hearts that did not demonstrate arrhythmia. These findings thus further validate the RyR2-P2328S murine heart as a model for human CPVT, confirming an alternans phenotype in common with murine genetic models of the Brugada syndrome and the congenital long-QT syndrome type 3. In contrast to these latter similarities, however, this report demonstrates the dissociation of alternans from changes in the properties of restitution curves for the first time in a murine model of a human arrhythmic syndrome.

  12. In silico multi-scale model of transport and dynamic seeding in a bone tissue engineering perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, T J; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Cartmell, S H; Halliday, I; Care, C M

    2013-04-01

    Computer simulations can potentially be used to design, predict, and inform properties for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors. In this work, we investigate the flow properties that result from a particular poly-L-lactide porous scaffold and a particular choice of perfusion bioreactor vessel design used in bone tissue engineering. We also propose a model to investigate the dynamic seeding properties such as the homogeneity (or lack of) of the cellular distribution within the scaffold of the perfusion bioreactor: a pre-requisite for the subsequent successful uniform growth of a viable bone tissue engineered construct. Flows inside geometrically complex scaffolds have been investigated previously and results shown at these pore scales. Here, it is our aim to show accurately that through the use of modern high performance computers that the bioreactor device scale that encloses a scaffold can affect the flows and stresses within the pores throughout the scaffold which has implications for bioreactor design, control, and use. Central to this work is that the boundary conditions are derived from micro computed tomography scans of both a device chamber and scaffold in order to avoid generalizations and uncertainties. Dynamic seeding methods have also been shown to provide certain advantages over static seeding methods. We propose here a novel coupled model for dynamic seeding accounting for flow, species mass transport and cell advection-diffusion-attachment tuned for bone tissue engineering. The model highlights the timescale differences between different species suggesting that traditional homogeneous porous flow models of transport must be applied with caution to perfusion bioreactors. Our in silico data illustrate the extent to which these experiments have the potential to contribute to future design and development of large-scale bioreactors.

  13. Risk factors of placental abruption

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during pregnancy. Multiple factors are known to be associated with increase of risk of placental abruption such as alcohol, cocaine use and cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for placental abruption in an Iranian women population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case - control study birth records included 78 cases with placental abruption and 780 randomly selected co...

  14. Alveolar ventilation to perfusion heterogeneity and diffusion impairment in a mathematical model of gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Melo, M. F.; Loeppky, J. A.; Caprihan, A.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a two-compartment model of pulmonary gas exchange in which alveolar ventilation to perfusion (VA/Q) heterogeneity and impairment of pulmonary diffusing capacity (D) are simultaneously taken into account. The mathematical model uses as input data measurements usually obtained in the lung function laboratory. It consists of two compartments and an anatomical shunt. Each compartment receives fractions of alveolar ventilation and blood flow. Mass balance equations and integration of Fick's law of diffusion are used to compute alveolar and blood O2 and CO2 values compatible with input O2 uptake and CO2 elimination. Two applications are presented. The first is a method to partition O2 and CO2 alveolar-arterial gradients into VA/Q and D components. The technique is evaluated in data of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The second is a theoretical analysis of the effects of blood flow variation in alveolar and blood O2 partial pressures. The results show the importance of simultaneous consideration of D to estimate VA/Q heterogeneity in patients with diffusion impairment. This factor plays an increasing role in gas alveolar-arterial gradients as severity of COPD increases. Association of VA/Q heterogeneity and D may produce an increase of O2 arterial pressure with decreasing QT which would not be observed if only D were considered. We conclude that the presented computer model is a useful tool for description and interpretation of data from COPD patients and for performing theoretical analysis of variables involved in the gas exchange process.

  15. In silico coronary wave intensity analysis: application of an integrated one-dimensional and poromechanical model of cardiac perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jack; Nordsletten, David; Cookson, Andrew; Rivolo, Simone; Smith, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Coronary wave intensity analysis (cWIA) is a diagnostic technique based on invasive measurement of coronary pressure and velocity waveforms. The theory of WIA allows the forward- and backward-propagating coronary waves to be separated and attributed to their origin and timing, thus serving as a sensitive and specific cardiac functional indicator. In recent years, an increasing number of clinical studies have begun to establish associations between changes in specific waves and various diseases of myocardium and perfusion. These studies are, however, currently confined to a trial-and-error approach and are subject to technological limitations which may confound accurate interpretations. In this work, we have developed a biophysically based cardiac perfusion model which incorporates full ventricular-aortic-coronary coupling. This was achieved by integrating our previous work on one-dimensional modelling of vascular flow and poroelastic perfusion within an active myocardial mechanics framework. Extensive parameterisation was performed, yielding a close agreement with physiological levels of global coronary and myocardial function as well as experimentally observed cumulative wave intensity magnitudes. Results indicate a strong dependence of the backward suction wave on QRS duration and vascular resistance, the forward pushing wave on the rate of myocyte tension development, and the late forward pushing wave on the aortic valve dynamics. These findings are not only consistent with experimental observations, but offer a greater specificity to the wave-originating mechanisms, thus demonstrating the value of the integrated model as a tool for clinical investigation.

  16. Correspondence of CT perfusion imaging to pathological manifestations in rabbit models of hyperacute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingwu Lou; Yi Fan; Lizhong Jia; Weidong Hu; Yan Teng; Guangfu Yang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Could the infarction be diagnosed quickly and accurately at the acute stage by CT perfusion imaging (CTPI) technology? Whether the images of CTPI will correspond with the pathological changes or not? All the questions need to be solved by experimental and clinical studies.OBJECTIVE: To reveal the rules of perfusion map changes and guide the early diagnosis of hyperacute cerebral infarction by analyzing the correlation of CTPI with pathological manifestations for hyperacute cerebral infarction.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Experimental Center of Medical Radiology, Longgang Central Hospital of Shenzhen City.MATERIALS: Forty-two adult New Zealand rabbits of (2.6±0.5) kg, either male or female, were randomly divided into experimental group (n =36) and control group (n =6). Six rabbits in the experimental group were observed after ischemia for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 hours respectively, and 1 rabbit in the control group was observed at each corresponding time point.METHODS: The experiments were carded out in the Experimental Center of Medical Radiology,Longgang Central Hospital of Shenzhen City from March 2003 to July 2004, Rabbit models of cerebral scanned at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 hours after ischemia respectively. The dynamic CT scan slice was 13 mm from the anterior edge of the frontal cortex, and six fake color functional images were obtained, including cerebral blood flow map (CBF map), cerebral blood volume map (CBV map), peak to enhancement map (PE map),flow without vessels map, time to peak map (TP map), time to start map (TS map). The manifestations and (ROI) were drawn separately on the CBF map, CBV map, TP map and TS map. The blood flow parameters of focal and contralateral cerebral tissues could be obtained to calculate relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF,rCBF=focal CBF/contralateral CBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, rCBV= focal CBV/contralateral CBV), a relative time to peak (rTP, rTP= focal TP

  17. Blood perfusion in osteomyelitis studied with [(15)O]water PET in a juvenile porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Nielsen, Ole L; Afzelius, Pia;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteomyelitis is a serious disease which can be difficult to treat despite properly instituted antibiotic therapy. This appears to be related at least partly to degraded vascularisation in the osteomyelitic (OM) lesions. Studies of perfusion in OM bones are, however, few and not quant......BACKGROUND: Osteomyelitis is a serious disease which can be difficult to treat despite properly instituted antibiotic therapy. This appears to be related at least partly to degraded vascularisation in the osteomyelitic (OM) lesions. Studies of perfusion in OM bones are, however, few...... that perfusion will be less elevated in OM lesions than in soft tissue (ST) infection. The study comprised 11 juvenile pigs with haematogenous osteomyelitis induced by injection of Staphylococcus aureus into the right femoral artery 1 week before scanning (in one pig, 2 weeks). The pigs were dynamically PET...

  18. Ventricular Fibrillation Waveform Changes during Controlled Coronary Perfusion Using Extracorporeal Circulation in a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Christopher L.; Baetiong, Alvin; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai

    2016-01-01

    Background Several characteristics of the ventricular fibrillation (VF) waveform have been found predictive of successful defibrillation and hypothesized to reflect the myocardial energy state. In an open-chest swine model of VF, we modeled “average CPR” using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and assessed the time course of coronary blood flow, myocardial metabolism, and myocardial structure in relation to the amplitude spectral area (AMSA) of the VF waveform without artifacts related to chest compression. Methods VF was induced and left untreated for 8 minutes in 16 swine. ECC was then started adjusting its flow to maintain a coronary perfusion pressure of 10 mmHg for 10 minutes. AMSA was calculated in the frequency domain and analyzed continuously with a 2.1 s timeframe and a Tukey window that moved ahead every 0.5 s. Results AMSA progressively declined during untreated VF. With ECC, AMSA increased from 7.0 ± 1.9 mV·Hz (at minute 8) to 12.8 ± 3.3 mV·Hz (at minute 14) (p < 0.05) without subsequent increase and showing a modest correlation with coronary blood flow of borderline statistical significance (r = 0.489, p = 0.0547). Myocardial energy measurements showed marked reduction in phosphocreatine and moderate reduction in ATP with increases in ADP, AMP, and adenosine along with myocardial lactate, all indicative of ischemia. Yet, ischemia did not resolve during ECC despite a coronary blood flow of ~ 30% of baseline. Conclusion AMSA increased upon return of coronary blood flow during ECC. However, the maximal level was reached after ~ 6 minutes without further change. The significance of the findings for determining the optimal timing for delivering an electrical shock during resuscitation from VF remains to be further explored. PMID:27536996

  19. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)-1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min-1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that

  20. A Naive-Bayes model observer for detection and localization of perfusion defects in cardiac SPECT-MPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parages, Felipe M.; O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers (MO) are widely used in medical imaging to act as surrogates of human observers in task-based image quality evaluation, frequently towards optimization of reconstruction algorithms. In SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), a realistic task-based approach involves detection and localization of perfusion defects, as well as a subsequent assessment of defect severity. In this paper we explore a machine-learning MO based on Naive- Bayes classification (NB-MO). NB-MO uses a set of polar-map image features to predict lesion detection, localization and severity scores given by five human readers for a set of simulated 3D SPECT-MPI patients. The simulated dataset included lesions with different sizes, perfusion-reduction ratios, and locations. Simulated projections were reconstructed using two readily used methods namely: FBP and OSEM. For validation, a multireader multi-case (MRMC) analysis of alternative free-response ROC (AFROC) curve was performed for NB-MO and human observers. For comparison, we also report performances of a statistical Hotelling Observer applied on polar-map images. Results show excellent agreement between NB-MO and humans, as well as model's good generalization between different reconstruction treatments.

  1. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  2. Transplacental transfer of monomethyl phthalate and mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in a human placenta perfusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Hedegaard, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    and after perfusion were also analyzed. Placentas were obtained immediately after elective cesarean section and dually perfused in a recirculation system. mMP or mEHP was added to maternal perfusion medium to obtain concentrations at 10 and 25 microg/L, respectively. The placental transfer was followed...... plasma samples. mMP and possibly other short-chained phthalate monoesters in maternal blood can cross the placenta by slow transfer, whereas the results indicate no placental transfer of mEHP. Further studies are recommended....

  3. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  4. Isolated swine heart ventricle perfusion model for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, Misael O; Mangual, Jan O; Ebner, Armin D; Ritter, James A

    2008-09-01

    An isolated swine heart ventricle perfusion model was developed and used under physiologically relevant conditions to study implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT). A stent coil was fabricated from a ferromagnetic SS 430 wire and used to capture 100-nm diameter magnetite particles that mimicked magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs). Four key cases were studied: (1) no stent and no magnet (control), (2) no magnet but with a stent, (3) no stent but with a magnet (traditional MDT), and (4) with a stent and a magnet (IA-MDT). When applied, the magnetic field was fixed at 0.125T. The performance of the system was based on the capture efficiency (CE) of the magnetite nanoparticles. The experiments done in the absence of the magnetic field showed minimal retention of any nanoparticles whether the stent was present or not. The experiments done in the presence of the magnetic field showed a statistically significant increase in the retention of the nanoparticles, with a marked difference between the traditional and IA-MDT cases. Compared to the control case, in one case there was nearly an 11-fold increase in CE for the IA-MDT case compared to only a threefold increase in CE for the traditional MDT case. This enhanced performance by the IA-MDT case was typical of all the experiments. Histology images of the cross-section of the coronary artery revealed that the nanoparticles were captured mainly in the vicinity of the stent. Overall, the IA-MDT results from this work with actual tissue were very encouraging and similar to those obtained from other non-tissue and theoretical studies; but, they did point to the need for further studies of IA-MDT.

  5. Construction and Analysis of Three-dimensional Graphic Model of Single-chain Fv Derived from an Anti-human Placental Acidic Isoferritin Monoclonal Antibody by Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chun; SHEN Guanxin; ZHU Huifen; YANG Jing; ZHANG Yue; FENG Jiannan; SHEN Beifen

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) graphic model of a single-chain Fv (scFv) which was derived from an anti-human placental acidic isoferritin (PAF) monoclonal antibody (Mab) was constructed by a homologous protein-predicting computer algorithm on Silicon graphic computer station.The structure, surface static electricity and hydrophobicity of scFv were investigated. Computer graphic modelling indicated that all regions of scFv including the linker, variable regions of the heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains were suitable. The VH region and the VL region were involved in composing the "hydrophobic pocket". The linker was drifted away VH and VL regions. The complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of VH and VL regions surrounded the "hydrophobic pocket". This study provides a theory basis for improving antibody affinity, investigating antibody structure and analyzing the functions of VH and VL regions in antibody activity.

  6. PPAR Signaling in Placental Development and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Yaacov; Sadovsky, Yoel; Shalom-Barak, Tali

    2008-01-01

    With the major attention to the pivotal roles of PPARs in diverse aspects of energy metabolism, the essential functions of PPARgamma and PPARbeta/delta in placental development came as a surprise and were often considered a nuisance en route to their genetic analysis. However, these findings provided an opportune entrée into placental biology. Genetic and pharmacological studies, primarily of knockout animal models and cell culture, uncovered networks of PPARgamma and PPARdelta, their heterodimeric RXR partners, associated transcriptional coactivators, and target genes, that regulate various aspects of placental development and function. These studies furnish both specific information about trophoblasts and the placenta and potential hints about the functions of PPARs in other tissues and cell types. They reveal that the remarkable versatility of PPARs extends beyond the orchestration of metabolism to the regulation of cellular differentiation, tissue development, and trophoblast-specific functions. This information and its implications are the subject of this review.

  7. 三维能量彩色多普勒超声用于检测子痫前期孕妇胎盘组织血流灌注的价值%Investigate of three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound used in placental perfusion assessment in pre-eclampsia pregnancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马小卿; 吴青青; 李萍; 王琪; 李蔓

    2009-01-01

    、新生儿出生体重、低出生体重儿百分比和胎盘重量均明显低于正常孕妇组(P0.05), placental VI, FI, VFI of severe preeclampsia group and chronic hypertension with severe pre-eclampsia group were significantly lower than the normal group (P0.05) ; (2) Gestationul age after birth, birth weight, low newborn weight rate and placental weight:(38.7±1.5 ) weeks, (3280±520) g, 3%, (568±141) g in normal group; (37.9±1.0) weeks, (2971±265) g, 0,(576±98) g in mild pre-eclampsia group; (33.2±2.6) weeks, (1820±737) g,58%, (458±154) g in severe pre-eclampsia group; (32.6±2.6) weeks, (1497±533) g, 7/9, (396±141) g in chronic hypertension with pre-eclampsia group. The normal group and mild pre-eclampsia group in gestationul age after birth, birth weight, low newborn weight rate and placental weight were not significant difference (P>0.05); severe pre-eelampsia and chronic hypertension with severe pre-eclampsia group in them were significantly lower than the normal group (P<0.01) and than mild pre-eclampsia group (P<0.05).Conclusions (1) Placental blood flow perfusion of the severe pre-eclampsia and pre-eclampsia with chronic hypertension of pregnancy decreased resulting in clinically lower placental weight, birth weight and gestational age at delivery, but there were no obvious differences in umbilical blood flow S/D values. (2) The investigation was helpful to clinical diagnosis in the placenta perfusion of pre-eclampsia by three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound.

  8. Chronic renoprotective effect of pulsatile perfusion machine RM3 and IGL-1 solution in a preclinical kidney transplantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuillier Raphael

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machine perfusion (MP of kidney graft provides benefits against preservation injury, however decreased graft quality requires optimization of the method. We examined the chronic benefits of MP on kidney grafts and the potential improvements provided by IGL-1 solution. Method We used an established autotransplantation pig kidney model to study the effects of MP against the deleterious effects of warm ischemia (WI: 60 minutes followed by 22 hours of cold ischemia in MP or static cold storage (CS followed by autotransplantation. MPS and IGL-1 solutions were compared. Results Animal survival was higher in MPS-MP and both IGL groups. Creatinine measurement did not discriminate between the groups, however MPS-MP and both IGL groups showed decreased proteinuria. Chronic fibrosis level was equivalent between the groups. RTqPCR and immunohistofluorescent evaluation showed that MP and IGL-1 provided some protection against epithelial to mesenchymal transition and chronic lesions. IGL-1 was protective with both MP and CS, particularly against chronic inflammation, with only small differences between the groups. Conclusion IGL-1 used in either machine or static preservation offers similar levels of protection than standard MP. The compatibility of IGL-1 with both machine perfusion and static storage could represent an advantage for clinical teams when choosing the correct solution to use for multi-organ collection. The path towards improving machine perfusion, and organ quality, may involve the optimization of the solution and the correct use of colloids.

  9. Deleterious Effects of Intra-arterial Administration of Particulate Steroids on Microvascular Perfusion in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmel, Elisabeth; Segal, Nicolas; Mirshahi, Massoud; Azzazene, Dalel; Le Marchand, Sylvie; Wybier, Marc; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine the in vivo effects of several particulate steroids on microvascular perfusion by using intravital microscopy in a mice model and to investigate the in vitro interactions between these particulate steroids and red blood cells (RBCs). Materials and Methods The study was conducted in agreement with the guidelines of the National Committee of Ethic Reflection on Animal Experimentation. By using intravital microscopy of mouse cremaster muscle, the in vivo effects of several particulate steroids on microvascular perfusion were assessed. Four to five mice were allocated to each of the following treatment groups: saline solution, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, a nonparticulate steroid, and the particulate steroids cortivazol, methylprednisolone, triamcinolone, and prednisolone. By using in vitro blood microcinematography and electron microscopy, the interactions between these steroids and human RBCs were studied. All results were analyzed by using nonparametric tests. Results With prednisolone, methylprednisolone, or triamcinolone, blood flow was rapidly and completely stopped in all the arterioles and venules (median RBC velocity in first-order arterioles, 5 minutes after administration was zero for these three groups) compared with a limited effect in mice treated with saline, dexamethasone, and cortivazol (20.3, 21.3, and 27.5 mm/sec, respectively; P steroids. Conclusion Several particulate steroids have an immediate and massive effect on microvascular perfusion because of formation of RBC aggregates associated with the transformation of RBCs into spiculated RBCs. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  10. Mapping the dynamics of brain perfusion using functional ultrasound in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Clément; Isabel, Clothilde; Martin, Abraham; Dussaux, Clara; Savoye, Anne; Emmrich, Julius; Montaldo, Gabriel; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Urban, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, tissue outcome ranges from normal to infarcted depending on depth and duration of hypoperfusion as well as occurrence and efficiency of reperfusion. However, the precise time course of these changes in relation to tissue and behavioral outcome remains unsettled. To address these issues, a three-dimensional wide field-of-view and real-time quantitative functional imaging technique able to map perfusion in the rodent brain would be desirable. Here, we applied functional ultrasound imaging, a novel approach to map relative cerebral blood volume without contrast agent, in a rat model of brief proximal transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to assess perfusion in penetrating arterioles and venules acutely and over six days thanks to a thinned-skull preparation. Functional ultrasound imaging efficiently mapped the acute changes in relative cerebral blood volume during occlusion and following reperfusion with high spatial resolution (100 µm), notably documenting marked focal decreases during occlusion, and was able to chart the fine dynamics of tissue reperfusion (rate: one frame/5 s) in the individual rat. No behavioral and only mild post-mortem immunofluorescence changes were observed. Our study suggests functional ultrasound is a particularly well-adapted imaging technique to study cerebral perfusion in acute experimental stroke longitudinally from the hyper-acute up to the chronic stage in the same subject.

  11. Model-based cell number quantification using online single-oxygen sensor data for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, T; Papantoniou, I; Sonnaert, M; Schrooten, J; Aerts, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Online and non-invasive quantification of critical tissue engineering (TE) construct quality attributes in TE bioreactors is indispensable for the cost-effective up-scaling and automation of cellular construct manufacturing. However, appropriate monitoring techniques for cellular constructs in bioreactors are still lacking. This study presents a generic and robust approach to determine cell number and metabolic activity of cell-based TE constructs in perfusion bioreactors based on single oxygen sensor data in dynamic perfusion conditions. A data-based mechanistic modeling technique was used that is able to correlate the number of cells within the scaffold (R(2)  = 0.80) and the metabolic activity of the cells (R(2)  = 0.82) to the dynamics of the oxygen response to step changes in the perfusion rate. This generic non-destructive measurement technique is effective for a large range of cells, from as low as 1.0 × 10(5) cells to potentially multiple millions of cells, and can open-up new possibilities for effective bioprocess monitoring.

  12. Transplantation and Perfusion of Microvascular Fragments in a Rodent Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    options are available for the treatment of volumetric muscle loss (VML). An important consideration that needs to be addressed for the development ...fibroblasts that underwent vascular and myogenic development in vitro resulted in substantial tissue perfusion when implanted in an abdominal defect...Greene AS (2000) Development of an implantable muscle stimulator: measurement of stimulated angiogenesis and poststimulus vessel regression

  13. In vivo Gd-DTPA concentration for MR lung perfusion measurements: Assessment with computed tomography in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, Michael [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Risse, Frank; Semmler, Wolfhard [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Campus Kiel (Germany); Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Szabo, Gabor [University Heidelberg, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A linear relationship between MR signal and contrast-agent concentration (CAC) of the arterial-input function (AIF) is crucial for MR lung-perfusion quantification. The aim was to determine the in-vivo real maximum CAC of the AIF, using cine CT measurements in a porcine model. A dilution series (Gd-DTPA, 0-20 mM) was examined by clinical time-resolved 3D-GRE MRI and by MDCT in cine CT mode. Using the CT setup, data were acquired in five pigs immediately after the injection of 0.05 mmol and 0.07 mmol/kg BW Gd-DTPA. For phantom measurements, mean signal values were determined using a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and for animal measurements, a ROI was placed in the pulmonary trunk of the cine CT perfusion data sets. The CT phantom measurements were used to calculate the in-vivo maximum CAC corresponding to the HU values obtained in the pulmonary trunk by the cine CT study. Linearity of the AIF of the CT perfusion measurements was verified using the MR phantom measurement results. MR phantom measurements demonstrated linearity for concentrations of 0-4 mM. CT phantom measurements showed linear relation for the entire CAC range. Comparing in-vivo and in-vitro measurements, three of five CA injections at 0.05 mmol/kg and all 0.07 mmol/kg injections exceeded the range of linearity in MRI. The CA dose for quantification of lung perfusion with time-resolved MR studies must be chosen carefully since even with low doses (0.05 mmol/kg) the CAC may exceed the range of linearity in the AIF. (orig.)

  14. Maternal-fetal hepatic and placental metabolome profiles are associated with reduced fetal growth in a rat model of maternal obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mumme, Karen; Gray, Clint; Reynolds, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    : Metabolomic profiling was used to reveal altered maternal and fetal metabolic pathways in a model of diet induced obesity during pregnancy, leading to reduced fetal growth. Methods: We examined the metabolome of maternal and fetal livers, and placenta following a high fat and salt intake. Sprague–Dawley rats...... were assigned to (a) control diet (CD; 1 % salt, 10 % kcal from fat), (b) high salt diet (SD; 4 % salt, 10 % kcal from fat), (c) high fat diet (HF; 1 % salt, 45 % kcal from fat) or (d) high-fat high-salt diet (HFSD; 4 % salt, 45 % kcal from fat) 21 days prior to pregnancy and during gestation......Introduction: Maternal obesity is associated with a range of pregnancy complications, including fetal growth restriction (FGR), whereby a fetus fails to reach its genetically determined growth. Placental insufficiency and reduced nutrient transport play a role in the onset of FGR. Objectives...

  15. Transplacental transfer of acrylamide and glycidamide are comparable to that of antipyrine in perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annola, Kirsi; Karttunen, Vesa; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Myllynen, Päivi; Segerbäck, Dan; Heinonen, Seppo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2008-11-10

    Most drugs can penetrate the placenta but there are only a few studies on placental transfer of environmental toxic compounds. In this study, we used dual recirculating human placental perfusion to determine the transfer rate through the placenta of a neurotoxic and carcinogenic compound found in food, acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide. Putative acrylamide metabolism into glycidamide during the 4-h perfusions and acrylamide-derived DNA adducts in placental DNA after perfusions were also analyzed. Placentas were collected immediately after delivery and kept physiologically functional as confirmed by antipyrine kinetics, glucose consumption and leak from fetal to maternal circulation. Acrylamide (5 or 10 microg/ml) or glycidamide (5 microg/ml), both with antipyrine (100 microg/ml), was added to maternal circulation. Acrylamide and glycidamide were analyzed in the perfusion medium by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Acrylamide and glycidamide crossed the placenta from maternal to fetal circulation with similar kinetics to antipyrine, suggesting fetal exposure if the mother is exposed. The concentrations in maternal and fetal circulations equilibrated within 2h for both studied compounds and with both concentrations. Acrylamide metabolism into glycidamide was not detected during the 4-h perfusions. Moreover, DNA adducts were undetectable in the placentas after perfusions. However, fetuses may be exposed to glycidamide after maternal metabolism. Although not found in placental tissue after 4h of perfusion, it is possible that glycidamide adducts are formed in fetal DNA.

  16. Effect of mouth-rinse formulations on oral malodour processes in tongue-derived perfusion biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, S; Hewett, K; Greenman, J

    2012-03-01

    An in vitro matrix biofilm perfusion model of tongue-derived microcosms for studying volatile sulfur compound (VSC) biogenesis has been previously described. The model was modified in order to monitor H(2)S in situ by use of a specialized electrode assembly based on microbial fuel cell technology. This system was designed to give real-time measurements expressed as electrode power output, which were proportional to H(2)S levels, measured by other means. In addition to the model modifications, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the biofilm responses following single or multiple exposure to biocidal, biostatic or VSC-inhibiting active compounds used in products. Tongue-derived biofilms (n = 6 per experiment) were perfused with one-fifth strength BHI at 20 ml h(-1) pH 7.2 and pulsed with putative treatment agent, placebo and controls including Zn(2+) ions and chlorhexidine (CHX). Compared with their pre-treatment conditions, all biofilms responded to the treatments in terms of reductions in hydrogen sulfide generation (as detected by the biofilm-electrode response) and other microbial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as detected using a selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry analyser. The microbiological analysis of the treated and control biofilms show that test products (formulations with active agents) all gave reduced cell populations compared to the control biofilm. An order of effects (magnitude and duration) suggests that both the test agent and CHX produced the strongest reductions, distinct from the responses obtained for the placebo and water controls, which were largely similar. It is concluded that the in vitro perfusion model may be used to replicate many of the activities and reactions believed to be occurring by the tongue biofilm microflora within a real mouth, including H(2)S and VOC biogenesis and their inhibition by exposure to active agents.

  17. Automatic assessment of cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on Active Appearance Models (AAM) is applied for automatic registration of myocardial perfusion MRI. A semi-quantitative perfusion assessment of the registered image sequences is presented. This includes the formation of perfusion maps for three parameters; maximum up...

  18. Effect of Low-Pressurized Perfusion with Different Concentration of Elastase on the Aneurysm Formation Rate in the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Model in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Maoxiao; Yan, Yunfeng; Li, Xinhe; Feng, Tingting; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Mingduo; Zhao, Quanming

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an animal model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the key to study the pathogenesis and the pathophysiological features of AAAs. We investigated the effects of low-pressurized perfusion with different concentrations of elastase on aneurysm formation rate in the AAA model. Fifty male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, C, D, and E groups. 10 μL of normal saline was perfused into the abdominal aorta in group A and 1 U/mL, 10 U/mL, 100 U/mL, or 200 U/mL of elastase was, respectively, perfused for the other four groups. All the animals were perfused for 7 min. Doppler ultrasound examinations of the abdominal aorta were performed before surgery and on day 14 after surgery. The rabbits were sacrificed and the perfused segment of the abdominal aorta was observed visually and after staining. The aneurysm formation rate of group A, group B, group C, group D, and group E was, respectively, 0%, 0%, 33.3%, 102.5-146.8%, and 241.5-255.2%. The survival rate of five groups was 90%, 90%, 90%, 90%, and 40%, respectively. So, we concluded that low-pressurized perfusion with 100 U/mL of elastase can effectively establish AAAs in rabbits with a high aneurysm formation rate.

  19. Protective effects of prostaglandin E1 perfusion against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rabbit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xifan Mei; Yansong Wang; Chang Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is known to be protective in ischemia-reperfusion of heart, lung, renal, and liver tissue. It still remains to be determined whether PGE1 exhibits similar protection against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rabbit model. OBJECTIVE: To observe the large, ventral horn, motor neurons of the spinal cord, as well as limb function, and to investigate whether perfusion of PGE1 exhibits protective effects against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rabbit model. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Controlled observation. The experiment was performed at the Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University between June and October 2007. MATERIALS: Twenty male, New Zealand white rabbits, weighing 2.0 kg and of mixed gender, were used in the present study. The following chemicals and compounds were used: prostaglandin El injectable powder, as well as malondialdehyde and ATPase kits. Animal intervention was in accordance with animal ethical standards. METHODS: We separated rabbits into control and experimental groups randomly, with 10 rabbits in each group. Rabbits were used as spinal cord ischemia models by segmentally cross-clamping the infrarenal aorta. The control group was subsequently perfused for five minutes with blood and saline solution, and the experimental group was perfused for 5 minutes with blood and saline solution containing PGE1 (100 ng/kg/min). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The neurological function of the hind limbs was assessed 12, 24, and 48 hours after model establishment. All animals were sacrificed and spinal cords were harvested for histological analyses. The large motor neurons in the ventral horn of L1-7 were observed by inverted microscope. RESULTS: All 20 rabbits were included in the final analysis, without any loss. In the ventral horn of the L5-7 segments, there were more large motor neurons that appeared viable in the experimental group than the control group (P<0

  20. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhoumeng [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wang, Ran [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Institute of Food Safety, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Ross, Matthew K. [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Filipov, Nikolay M., E-mail: filipov@uga.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data

  1. Validation of an in vitro 3D bone culture model with perfused and mechanically stressed ceramic scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bouet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An engineered three dimensional (3D in vitro cell culture system was designed with the goal of inducing and controlling in vitro osteogenesis in a reproducible manner under conditions more similar to the in vivo bone microenvironment than traditional two-dimensional (2D models. This bioreactor allows efficient mechanical loading and perfusion of an original cubic calcium phosphate bioceramic of highly controlled composition and structure. This bioceramic comprises an internal portion containing homogeneously interconnected macropores surrounded by a dense layer, which minimises fluid flow bypass around the scaffold. This dense and flat layer permits the application of a homogeneous loading on the bioceramic while also enhancing its mechanical strength. Numerical modelling of constraints shows that the system provides direct mechanical stimulation of cells within the scaffold. Experimental results establish that under perfusion at a steady flow of 2 µL/min, corresponding to 3 ≤ Medium velocity ≤ 23 µm/s, mouse calvarial cells grow and differentiate as osteoblasts in a reproducible manner, and lay down a mineralised matrix. Moreover, cells respond to mechanical loading by increasing C-fos expression, which demonstrates the effective mechanical stimulation of the culture within the scaffold. In summary, we provide a “proof-of-concept” for osteoblastic cell culture in a controlled 3D culture system under perfusion and mechanical loading. This model will be a tool to analyse bone cell functions in vivo, and will provide a bench testing system for the clinical assessment of bioactive bone-targeting molecules under load.

  2. The suitability of an in situ perfusion model for permeability determinations: utility for BCS class I biowaiver requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Seung; Mitchell, Stefanie; Kijek, Paul; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Amidon, Gordon L

    2006-01-01

    The FDA has published recommendations for sponsors who wish to request a waiver of in vivo bioavailability (BA) or bioequivalence (BE) studies for immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms based on the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Biowaivers can be requested for IR formulations in which the active ingredient is shown to be a BCS class I drug: that is, a drug showing high permeability and high solubility over a pH range of 1-7.5. For permeability determinations, a variety of experimental methods can be used, such as the rat in situ single pass perfusion or Caco-2 cell culture models, once the suitability of the particular method is established. Following the recommended procedure for assessing the suitability of permeability determinations, we determined the permeability of 20 test drugs using the in situ single pass perfusion model in rats. The test compounds were coperfused through jejunal intestinal segments with an internal permeability reference standard (metoprolol) over a 90 min time period. Sample analysis was performed by HPLC, and the ratio of the effective permeability, Peff (cm/s), of test compound to that of metoprolol was determined. To address the question of test drug permeabilities that approach that of the internal standard, we propose that a statistical analysis such as the "0.8-1.25 rule" used for in vivo or in vitro bioequivalence studies provide guidance for permeability classification using the in situ single pass perfusion model. We developed a method using the 90% confidence interval of the permeability ratio of the test to internal reference standard in order to differentiate between high and low permeability compounds. This analysis allowed for the proper permeability classification of all of the test compounds and suggests a robust means for assessing drug permeability classification.

  3. Comprehensive metabolic modeling of multiple 13C-isotopomer data sets to study metabolism in perfused working hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, Scott B; Kelleher, Joanne K; Rouf, Rosanne; Muoio, Deborah M; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-10-01

    In many forms of cardiomyopathy, alterations in energy substrate metabolism play a key role in disease pathogenesis. Stable isotope tracing in rodent heart perfusion systems can be used to determine cardiac metabolic fluxes, namely those relative fluxes that contribute to pyruvate, the acetyl-CoA pool, and pyruvate anaplerosis, which are critical to cardiac homeostasis. Methods have previously been developed to interrogate these relative fluxes using isotopomer enrichments of measured metabolites and algebraic equations to determine a predefined metabolic flux model. However, this approach is exquisitely sensitive to measurement error, thus precluding accurate relative flux parameter determination. In this study, we applied a novel mathematical approach to determine relative cardiac metabolic fluxes using (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) aided by multiple tracer experiments and integrated data analysis. Using (13)C-MFA, we validated a metabolic network model to explain myocardial energy substrate metabolism. Four different (13)C-labeled substrates were queried (i.e., glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and oleate) based on a previously published study. We integrated the analysis of the complete set of isotopomer data gathered from these mouse heart perfusion experiments into a single comprehensive network model that delineates substrate contributions to both pyruvate and acetyl-CoA pools at a greater resolution than that offered by traditional methods using algebraic equations. To our knowledge, this is the first rigorous application of (13)C-MFA to interrogate data from multiple tracer experiments in the perfused heart. We anticipate that this approach can be used widely to study energy substrate metabolism in this and other similar biological systems. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. A disposition kinetic study of Tramadol in bile duct ligated rats in perfused rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Zohre; Mohammadi, Saeid; Nezami, Alireza; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Ardakani, Yalda Hosseinzadeh; Lavasani, Hoda; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic drug and is used to treat chronic pain. In this study, the effects of Bile Duct Ligation (BDL) on the pharmacokinetics of tramadol in a liver recirculating perfusion system of male rats were used. Twenty-four Wistar male rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, sham and two weeks BDL and four weeks BDL. Serum levels of liver enzymes were measured before perfusion and the pharmacokinetics of tramadol was evaluated by using liver recirculating perfusion system. Tramadol and metabolites concentrations were determined by HPLC-FL. The sharp increase in liver enzymes level in both BDL groups was observed and significant changes were also observed in liver weight and volume. Tramadol metabolites concentration significantly decreased compared with the control and sham group (Ptramadol and increase in the half-life of the elimination of tramadol in rats with BDL suggests that personalized treatment and the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) data examination are necessary for patients with bile duct diseases and the dose of tramadol should be accordingly adjusted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of Renal Perfusion in a Canine Model Using FS069, A New Transpulmonary Echocontrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarek, Sameh K.; Kates, Marc A.; Murgo, Joseph P.; Moreno, Carlos A.; Revall, Susan; Cheirif, Jorge

    1997-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated the safety and efficacy of FS069, a new transpulmonary echocontrast agent, for myocardial opacification. To our knowledge, no information exists regarding the use of this agent for transcutaneous assessment of renal perfusion. We studied 14 mongrel dogs using intravenously administered FS069. Renal ultrasound imaging was performed with a Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1500 using a 3.5-MHz transducer. Renal blood flow (ReBF) was altered using renal artery occlusion in four dogs and dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg IV) in ten dogs. Renal perfusion was quantitatively assessed before and after each intervention using background subtracted peak intensity. ReBF was assessed with radiolabeled microspheres in ten dogs. Renal opacification was observed in all 14 dogs at baseline. The intravenous contrast dose required to produce optimal renal opacification ranged from 0.3-0.7 cc. After renal artery occlusion, peak intensity was reduced from 5.4 +/- 5.8 to 0.93 +/- 1.1 units (r = 0.99, P change from baseline). The inverse relation between ReBF and peak intensity observed suggests vasoconstriction of the afferent arterioles in response to dipyridamole and a reduced clearance of the contrast. These findings are in agreement with previous data demonstrating decreased renal thallium clearance postdipyridamole administration. Our data document the feasibility to assess renal perfusion under various flow states after intravenous injection of FS069.

  6. Haemodynamic resistance model of monochorionic twin pregnancies complicated by acardiac twinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umur, Asli [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam(Netherlands); Gemert, Martin J C van [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ross, Michael G [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor University of California-Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrence, CA 9050 (United States); Nikkels, Peter G J [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-07-21

    An acardiac twin is a severely malformed monochorionic twin fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart. It grows during pregnancy, because it is perfused by its developmentally normal co-twin (called the pump twin) via a set of placental arterioarterial and venovenous anastomoses. The pump twin dies intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases due to congestive heart failure, polyhydramnios and prematurity. Because the pathophysiology of this pregnancy is currently incompletely understood, we modified our previous haemodynamic model of monochorionic twins connected by placental vascular anastomoses to include the analysis of acardiac twin pregnancies. We incorporated the fetoplacental circulation as a resistance circuit and used the fetal umbilical flow that perfuses the body to define fetal growth, rather than the placental flow as done previously. Using this modified model, we predicted that the pump twin has excess blood volume and increased mean arterial blood pressure compared to those in the acardiac twin. Placental perfusion of the acardiac twin is significantly reduced compared to normal, as a consequence of an increased venous pressure, possibly implying reduced acardiac placental growth. In conclusion, the haemodynamic analysis may contribute to an increased knowledge of the pathophysiologic consequences of an acardiac body mass for the pump twin. (note)

  7. Acute retinal ischemia caused by controlled low ocular perfusion pressure in a porcine model. Electrophysiological and histological characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhn, Maria Voss; Warfvinge, Karin; Scherfig, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish, and characterize a porcine model of acute, controlled retinal ischemia. The controlled retinal ischemia was produced by clamping the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in the left eye to 5 mm Hg for 2 h. The OPP was defined as mean arterial blood pressure...... (MAP) minus the intraocular pressure (IOP). It was clamped to 0-30 mm Hg by continuous monitoring of MAP and adjustment of the IOP, which was controlled by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Inner retinal function was assessed by induced multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) with comparisons...

  8. Placental apoptosis in recurrent miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Atia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an interactive and dynamic biological process involved in all phases of embryogenesis. We aimed to study the effect of placental apoptosis on recurrent miscarriage (RM. Placental tissue samples were collected from 40 women with RM (study group and 30 women with sporadic spontaneous abortion (control group. Samples were prepared and stained immunohistochemically with markers for both the apoptotic protein (p53 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 antibodies. Our results showed that expression of the apoptotic (p53 protein was significantly increased in the placental tissues of the RM group (p = 0.003. By contrast, the expression of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 antibodies was significantly increased in the placental tissues of the control group (p = 0.025. We concluded that placental apoptosis plays a crucial role in pregnancy continuation. However, increased p53 expression in placental tissue in early pregnancy could negatively affect pregnancy continuation.

  9. The Role of Placental Tryptophan Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayr, Peter; Blaschitz, Astrid; Stocker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the mechanisms and consequences of degradation of tryptophan (Trp) in the placenta, focusing mainly on the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), one of three enzymes catalyzing the first step of the kynurenine pathway of Trp degradation. IDO1 has been implicated in regulation of feto-maternal tolerance in the mouse. Local depletion of Trp and/or the presence of metabolites of the kynurenine pathway mediate immunoregulation and exert antimicrobial functions. In addition to the decidual glandular epithelium, IDO1 is localized in the vascular endothelium of the villous chorion and also in the endothelium of spiral arteries of the decidua. Possible consequences of IDO1-mediated catabolism of Trp in the endothelium encompass antimicrobial activity and immunosuppression, as well as relaxation of the placental vasotonus, thereby contributing to placental perfusion and growth of both placenta and fetus. It remains to be evaluated whether other enzymes mediating Trp oxidation, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2, Trp 2,3-dioxygenase, and Trp hydroxylase-1 are of relevance to the biology of the placenta. PMID:24904580

  10. Placental specializations in lecithotrophic viviparous squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R

    2015-09-01

    Squamate reptiles have been thought to be predisposed to evolution of viviparity because embryos of most oviparous species undergo considerable development in the uterus prior to oviposition. A related hypothesis proposes that prolonged intrauterine gestation, an intermediate condition leading to viviparity, requires little or no physiological adjustment, other than reduction in thickness of the eggshell. This logical framework is often accompanied by an assumption that mode of parity (oviparity, viviparity) and pattern of embryonic nutrition (lecithotrophy, placentotrophy) are independent traits that evolve in sequence. Thus, specializations for viviparity should be absent in some lecithotrophic viviparous species. Studies of species of lizards with geographic variation in mode of parity challenge this scenario by demonstrating that placental specializations are correlated with viviparity. Uterine specializations for placental transport of calcium to viviparous embryos alter uterine physiology compared to oviparous females. In addition, comparative studies of oviparous and viviparous species, i.e., in which gene flow is disrupted, reveal that both uterine and embryonic structural modifications are commonly associated with viviparity, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of placental specializations. Studies of squamate reproductive biology support two hypotheses: 1) evolution of viviparity requires physiological adjustments of the uterine environment, and 2) evolution of viviparity promotes relatively rapid adaptations for placentation. Models for the evolution of viviparity from oviparity, or for reversals from viviparity to oviparity, should reflect current understanding of squamate reproductive biology and future studies should be designed to challenge these models.

  11. Numerical modeling of coupled nitrification-denitrification in sediment perfusion cores from the hyporheic zone of the Shingobee River, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, R.W.; Jackman, A.P.; Duff, J.H.; Triska, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrification and denitrification kinetics in sediment perfusion cores were numerically modeled and compared to experiments on cores from the Shingobee River MN, USA. The experimental design incorporated mixing groundwater discharge with stream water penetration into the cores, which provided a well-defined, one-dimensional simulation of in situ hydrologic conditions. Ammonium (NH+4) and nitrate (NO-3) concentration gradients suggested the upper region of the cores supported coupled nitrification-denitrification, where groundwater-derived NH+4 was first oxidized to NO-3 then subsequently reduced via denitrification to N2. Nitrification and denitrification were modeled using a Crank-Nicolson finite difference approximation to a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Both processes were modeled using first-order reaction kinetics because substrate concentrations (NH+4 and NO-3) were much smaller than published Michaelis constants. Rate coefficients for nitrification and denitrification ranged from 0.2 to 15.8 h-1 and 0.02 to 8.0 h-1, respectively. The rate constants followed an Arrhenius relationship between 7.5 and 22 ??C. Activation energies for nitrification and denitrification were 162 and 97.3 kJ/mol, respectively. Seasonal NH+4 concentration patterns in the Shingobee River were accurately simulated from the relationship between perfusion core temperature and NH+4 flux to the overlying water. The simulations suggest that NH+4 in groundwater discharge is controlled by sediment nitrification that, consistent with its activation energy, is strongly temperature dependent. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Detection of Microcirculatory Dysfunction in Small Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Shi

    Full Text Available To evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (CT perfusion imaging (CTPI for identifying microcirculatory dysfunction in small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury in a porcine model.Fifty-two pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1 the IR group (n = 24, where intestinal ischemia was induced by separating and clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h (IR-1h, IR-2h, IR-3h, and IR-4h; n = 6, respectively; (2 the sham-operated (SO group (n = 20, where the SMA was separated without clamping and controlled at postoperative 3, 4, 5, and 6 h (SO-3h, SO-4h, SO-5h, and SO-6h; n = 5, respectively; (3 the ischemia group (n = 4, where the SMA was separated and clamped for 2 h, without reperfusion, and (4 baseline group (n = 4, an additional group that was not manipulated. Small intestinal CTPI was performed at corresponding time points and perfusion parameters were obtained. The distal ileum was resected to measure the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD and for histopathological examination.The perfusion parameters of the IR groups showed significant differences compared with the corresponding SO groups and the baseline group (before ischemia. The blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface (PS among the 4 IR groups were significantly different. BF and BV were significantly negatively correlated with MDA, and significantly positively correlated with SOD in the IR groups. Histopathologically, the effects of the 2-h ischemic loops were not significantly exacerbated by reperfusion.CTPI can be a valuable tool for detecting microcirculatory dysfunction and for dynamic monitoring of small intestinal IR injury.

  13. Coupled modeling of tumour angiogenesis, tumour growth,and blood perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a more realistic mathematical simulation method to investigate the dynamic process of tumour angio-genesis by fully coupling the vessel growth,tumour growth and associated blood perfusion.The tumour growth and angiogenesis are coupled by the chemical microenvironment and the cell-matrix interaction.The haemodynamic calculation is carried out on the new vasculature,and an estimation of vessel collapse is made according to the wall shear stress criterion.The results are consistent with phy...

  14. Elevated Adenosine Induces Placental DNA Hypomethylation Independent of A2B Receptor Signaling in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aji; Wu, Hongyu; Iriyama, Takayuki; Zhang, Yujin; Sun, Kaiqi; Song, Anren; Liu, Hong; Peng, Zhangzhe; Tang, Lili; Lee, Minjung; Huang, Yun; Ni, Xin; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent pregnancy hypertensive disease with both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that global placental DNA hypomethylation is observed in patients with preeclampsia and is linked to altered gene expression and disease development. However, the molecular basis underlying placental epigenetic changes in preeclampsia remains unclear. Using 2 independent experimental models of preeclampsia, adenosine deaminase-deficient mice and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced mouse model of preeclampsia, we demonstrate that elevated placental adenosine not only induces hallmark features of preeclampsia but also causes placental DNA hypomethylation. The use of genetic approaches to express an adenosine deaminase minigene specifically in placentas, or adenosine deaminase enzyme replacement therapy, restored placental adenosine to normal levels, attenuated preeclampsia features, and abolished placental DNA hypomethylation in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 (an ectonucleotidase that converts AMP to adenosine) prevented the elevation of placental adenosine in the autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model and ameliorated preeclampsia features and placental DNA hypomethylation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that elevated placental adenosine-mediated DNA hypomethylation predominantly occurs in spongiotrophoblasts and labyrinthine trophoblasts and that this effect is independent of A2B adenosine receptor activation in both preeclampsia models. Extending our mouse findings to humans, we used cultured human trophoblasts to demonstrate that adenosine functions intracellularly and induces DNA hypomethylation without A2B adenosine receptor activation. Altogether, both mouse and human studies reveal novel mechanisms underlying placental DNA hypomethylation and potential therapeutic approaches for preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Developmental programing: impact of testosterone on placental differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, E M; Astapova, O; Steckler, T L; Veiga-Lopez, A; Padmanabhan, V

    2014-08-01

    Gestational testosterone treatment causes maternal hyperinsulinemia, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), low birth weight, and adult reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions. Sheep models of IUGR demonstrate placental insufficiency as an underlying cause of IUGR. Placental compromise is probably the cause of fetal growth retardation in gestational testosterone-treated sheep. This study tested whether testosterone excess compromises placental differentiation by its androgenic action and/or via altered insulin sensitivity. A comparative approach of studying gestational testosterone (aromatizable androgen) against dihydrotestosterone (non-aromatizable androgen) or testosterone plus androgen antagonist, flutamide, was used to determine whether the effects of testosterone on placental differentiation were programed by its androgenic actions. Co-treatment of testosterone with the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, was used to establish whether the effects of gestational testosterone on placentome differentiation involved compromised insulin sensitivity. Parallel cohorts of pregnant females were maintained for lambing and the birth weight of their offspring was recorded. Placental studies were conducted on days 65, 90, or 140 of gestation. Results indicated that i) gestational testosterone treatment advances placental differentiation, evident as early as day 65 of gestation, and culminates in low birth weight, ii) placental advancement is facilitated at least in part by androgenic actions of testosterone and is not a function of disrupted insulin homeostasis, and iii) placental advancement, while helping to increase placental efficiency, was insufficient to prevent IUGR and low-birth-weight female offspring. Findings from this study may be of relevance to women with polycystic ovary syndrome, whose reproductive and metabolic phenotype is captured by the gestational testosterone-treated offspring. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  16. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. NIR fluorescent image-based evaluation of gastric tube perfusion after esophagectomy in preclinical model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Quan, Yuhua; Han, Kook Nam; Choi, Byeong Hyun; Choi, Yeonho; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kim, Beop-Min

    2016-03-01

    This study was to evaluate the feasibility of near infrared (NIR) fluorescent images as a tool for evaluating the perfusion of the gastric tube after esophagectomy. In addition, we investigated the time required to acquire enough signal to confirm the presence of ischemia in gastric tube after injection of indocyanine green (ICG) through peripheral versus and central venous route. 4 porcine underwent esophagogastrostomy and their right gastric arteries were ligated to mimic ischemic condition of gastric tube. ICG (0.6mg/kg) was intravenously injected and the fluorescence signal-to-background ratios (SBR) were measured by using the custom-built intraoperative color and fluorescence imaging system (ICFIS). We evaluated perfusion of gastric tubes by comparing their SBR with esophageal SBR. In ischemic models, SBR of esophagus was higher than that of gastric tube (2.8+/-0.54 vs. 1.7+/-0.37, pperfusion in few minutes after releasing the ligation of right gastric artery. In addition, in comparison study according to the injection route of ICG, The time to acquire signal stabilization was faster in central than in peripheral route (119 +/- 65.1 seconds in central route vs. 295+/-130.4 in peripheral route, p<0.05). NIR fluorescent images could provide the real-time information if there was ischemia or not in gastric tube during operation. And, central injection of ICG might give that information faster than peripheral route.

  18. The effects of continuous and intermittent reduced speed modes on renal and intestinal perfusion in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Egemen; Chorpenning, Katherine; Liu, Maxine Qun; Bonugli, Katherine; Tamez, Dan; Lenox, Mark; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the continuous-flow output on renal and intestinal microcirculation have not been extensively studied. To address this, the Heartware HVAD pump loaded with continuous and intermittent reduced speed (IRS) modes was implanted in four sheep and then operated at low and high speeds to mimic partial and complete unloading of the left ventricle. Then microsphere and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies were used to assess renal and intestinal tissue perfusion at various pump speeds and flow modes as compared with baseline (pump off). Arterial and venous oxygen (T02) and carbon dioxide (TCO2) contents were measured to assess changes in intestinal metabolism. Renal and intestinal regional blood flows did not produce any significant changes compared with baseline values in either continuous or IRS modes and speeds. The venous TO2 and TCO2 significantly increased in continuous and IRS modes and speeds compared with baseline. Our data suggested that renal and intestinal tissue perfusions were not adversely affected by continuous and IRS modes either in partial or complete unloading. Intestinal venous hyperoxia and increased TCO2 may be the evidence of intestinal arteriovenous shunting along with increased intestinal tissue metabolism. Longer-term studies are warranted in chronic heart failure models.

  19. Modeling and optimization of Look-Locker spin labeling for measuring perfusion and transit time changes in activation studies taking into account arterial blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, S T; Bowtell, R; Gowland, P A

    2008-02-01

    This work describes a new compartmental model with step-wise temporal analysis for a Look-Locker (LL)-flow-sensitive alternating inversion-recovery (FAIR) sequence, which combines the FAIR arterial spin labeling (ASL) scheme with a LL echo planar imaging (EPI) measurement, using a multireadout EPI sequence for simultaneous perfusion and T*(2) measurements. The new model highlights the importance of accounting for the transit time of blood through the arteriolar compartment, delta, in the quantification of perfusion. The signal expected is calculated in a step-wise manner to avoid discontinuities between different compartments. The optimal LL-FAIR pulse sequence timings for the measurement of perfusion with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and high temporal resolution at 1.5, 3, and 7T are presented. LL-FAIR is shown to provide better SNR per unit time compared to standard FAIR. The sequence has been used experimentally for simultaneous monitoring of perfusion, transit time, and T*(2) changes in response to a visual stimulus in four subjects. It was found that perfusion increased by 83 +/- 4% on brain activation from a resting state value of 94 +/- 13 ml/100 g/min, while T*(2) increased by 3.5 +/- 0.5%. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Cardioprotective activity of placental growth factor combined with oral supplementation of L-arginine in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Liyun Luo,1,* Bairong Chen,1,* Yin Huang,1 Zibin Liang,2 Songbiao Li,1 Yuelan Yin,1 Jian Chen,1 Wei Wu1 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Oncological Radiotherapy, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: Exogenous administration of placental growth factor (PlGF stimulates angiogenesis and improves ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI, and supplementation with L-arginine ameliorates endothelial function. The objective of the present study was to compare the cardioprotective effects of combination therapy of PlGF and L-arginine with those of direct administration of PlGF alone in a rat model of AMI.Materials and methods: Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham group, normal saline group, L-arginine group, PlGF group, and combination group (PlGF + L-arginine. An AMI rat model was established by ligation of the left anterior descending of coronary arteries. After 4 weeks of postligation treatment, cardiac function, scar area, angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and collagen I protein content, and plasma concentration of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP were studied. Echocardiography, Masson’s staining, immunohistochemical analyses, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed.Results: Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS, and capillary and arteriole densities were higher in the PlGF group than in the normal saline group (P<0.01. Scar area, collagen I protein content, and plasma concentration of BNP were decreased in the PlGF group (P<0.01. Myocardial eNOS protein level was elevated in the L-arginine group and PlGF + L-arginine group (P<0.01. Compared with the PlGF group, LVEF, LVFS, myocardial eNOS, and capillary and arteriole densities were

  1. Intestinal absorption of forsythoside A in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion and in vitro Caco-2 cell models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHOU; Liu-qing DI; Juan WANG; Jin-jun SHAN; Shi-jia LIU; Wen-zheng JU; Bao-chang CAI

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the mechanisms underlying the intestinal absorption of the major bioactive component forsythoside A (FTA) extracted from Forsythiae fructus.Methods:An in vitro Caco-2 cell model and a single-pass intestinal perfusion in situ model in SD rats were used.Results:In the in vitro Caco-2 cell model,the mean apparent permeability value (Papp-value) was 4.15x 107 cm/s in the apical-tobasolateral (AP-BL) direction.At the concentrations of 2.6-10.4 μg/mL,the efflux ratio of FTA in the bi-directional transport experiments was approximately 1.00.After the transport,>96% of the apically loaded FTA was retained on the apical side,while >97% of the basolaterally loaded FTA was retained on the basolateral side.The Papp-values of FTA were inversely correlated with the transepithelial electrical resistance.The paracellular permeability enhancers sodium caprate and EDTA,the P-gp inhibitor verapamil and the multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) inhibitors cyclosporine and MK571 could concentration-dependently increase the Papp-values,while the uptake (OATP) transporter inhibitors diclofenac sodium and indomethacin could concentration-dependently decrease the Papp-values.The intake transporter SGLT1 inhibitor mannitol did not cause significant change in the Papp-values.In the in situ intestinal perfusion model,both the absorption rate constant (Ka) and the effective permeability (Peff-values) following perfusion of FTA 2.6,5.2,and 10.4 μg/mL via the duodenum,jejunum and ileum had no significant difference,although the values were slightly higher for the duodenum as compared to those in the jejunum and ileum.The low,medium and high concentrations of verapamil caused the largest increase in the Peff-values for duodenum,jejunum and ileum,respectively.Sodium caprate,EDTA and cyclosporine resulted in concentration-dependent increase in the Peff-values.Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin caused concentration-dependent decrease in the Peff-values.Mannitol did

  2. Intrathoracic Pressure Regulation Improves Cerebral Perfusion and Cerebral Blood Flow in a Porcine Model of Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Anja; Rees, Jennifer; Kwon, Young; Matsuura, Timothy; McKnite, Scott; Lurie, Keith G

    2015-08-01

    Brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in children and adults in their most productive years. Use of intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) to generate negative intrathoracic pressure during the expiratory phase of positive pressure ventilation improves mean arterial pressure and 24-h survival in porcine models of hemorrhagic shock and cardiac arrest and has been demonstrated to decrease intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in these models. Application of IPR for 240 min in a porcine model of intracranial hypertension (ICH) will increase CPP when compared with controls. Twenty-three female pigs were subjected to focal brain injury by insertion of an epidural Foley catheter inflated with 3 mL of saline. Animals were randomized to treatment for 240 min with IPR set to a negative expiratory phase pressure of -12 cmH2O or no IPR therapy. Intracranial pressure, mean arterial pressure, CPP, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were evaluated. Intrathoracic pressure regulation significantly improved mean CPP and CBF. Specifically, mean CPP after 90, 120, 180, and 240 min of IPR use was 43.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 44.0 ± 2.7 mmHg, 44.5 ± 2.8 mmHg, and 43.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, respectively; a significant increase from ICH study baseline (39.5 ± 1.7 mmHg) compared with control animals in which mean CPP was 36.7 ± 1.4 mmHg (ICH study baseline) and then 35.9 ± 2.1 mmHg, 33.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 33.9 ± 3.0 mmHg, and 36.0 ± 2.7 mmHg at 90, 120, 180, and 240 min, respectively (P blood flow, as measured by an invasive CBF probe, increased in the IPR group (34 ± 4 mL/100 g-min to 49 ± 7 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) but not in controls (27 ± 1 mL/100 g-min to 25 ± 5 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) (P = 0.01). Arterial pH remained unchanged during the entire period of IPR compared with baseline values and control values. In this anesthetized pig model of ICH, treatment with IPR significantly improved CPP and CBF. This therapy may be of clinical value by noninvasively

  3. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling function-perfusion behavior in liver lobules including tissue, blood, glucose, lactate and glycogen by use of a coupled two-scale PDE-ODE approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricken, T; Werner, D; Holzhütter, H G; König, M; Dahmen, U; Dirsch, O

    2015-06-01

    This study focuses on a two-scale, continuum multicomponent model for the description of blood perfusion and cell metabolism in the liver. The model accounts for a spatial and time depending hydro-diffusion-advection-reaction description. We consider a solid-phase (tissue) containing glycogen and a fluid-phase (blood) containing glucose as well as lactate. The five-component model is enhanced by a two-scale approach including a macroscale (sinusoidal level) and a microscale (cell level). The perfusion on the macroscale within the lobules is described by a homogenized multiphasic approach based on the theory of porous media (mixture theory combined with the concept of volume fraction). On macro level, we recall the basic mixture model, the governing equations as well as the constitutive framework including the solid (tissue) stress, blood pressure and solutes chemical potential. In view of the transport phenomena, we discuss the blood flow including transverse isotropic permeability, as well as the transport of solute concentrations including diffusion and advection. The continuum multicomponent model on the macroscale finally leads to a coupled system of partial differential equations (PDE). In contrast, the hepatic metabolism on the microscale (cell level) was modeled via a coupled system of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Again, we recall the constitutive relations for cell metabolism level. A finite element implementation of this framework is used to provide an illustrative example, describing the spatial and time-depending perfusion-metabolism processes in liver lobules that integrates perfusion and metabolism of the liver.

  5. Multiparametric Monitoring of Early Response to Antiangiogenic Therapy: A Sequential Perfusion CT and PET/CT Study in a Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Im Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To perform dual analysis of tumor perfusion and glucose metabolism using perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT for the purpose of monitoring the early response to bevacizumab therapy in rabbit VX2 tumor models and to assess added value of FDG-PET to perfusion CT. Methods. Twenty-four VX2 carcinoma tumors implanted in bilateral back muscles of 12 rabbits were evaluated. Serial concurrent perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT were performed before and 3, 7, and 14 days after bevacizumab therapy (treatment group or saline infusion (control group. Perfusion CT was analyzed to calculate blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface area product (PS; FDG-PET was analyzed to calculate SUVmax, SUVmean, total lesion glycolysis (TLG, entropy, and homogeneity. The flow-metabolic ratio (FMR was also calculated and immunohistochemical analysis of microvessel density (MVD was performed. Results. On day 14, BF and BV in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group. There were no significant differences in all FDG-PET-derived parameters between both groups. In the treatment group, FMR prominently decreased after therapy and was positively correlated with MVD. Conclusions. In VX2 tumors, FMR could provide further insight into the early antiangiogenic effect reflecting a mismatch in intratumor blood flow and metabolism.

  6. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  7. Relaxin as an additional protective substance in preserving and reperfusion solution for liver transplantation, shown in a model of isolated perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnert, Markus U; Hilbig, Heidegard; Armbruster, Franz P

    2005-05-01

    Reperfusion injury is a problem in organ transplantation. Relaxin causes vessel dilation and inhibition of platelet and mast cell activation. The study investigates the protective effect of relaxin on liver tissue against cell damage during organ preservation and reperfusion. Liver transplantation was simulated in a model of isolated perfused rat liver. Relaxin was applicated during reperfusion and/or preservation. To quantify cell damage, we examined the perfusate for malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), and liver tissue underwent immunohistochemical study. Relaxin as an additional substance in preserving/reperfusion solution decreases MPO and MDA levels in the perfusate and immunohistochemical study. Relaxin seems to have a protective effect against cell damage in ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  8. Risk factors of placental abruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooria Seyedhosseini Ghaheh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during pregnancy. Multiple factors are known to be associated with increase of risk of placental abruption such as alcohol, cocaine use and cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for placental abruption in an Iranian women population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case - control study birth records included 78 cases with placental abruption and 780 randomly selected controls were investigated. Statistical analysis for comparing the studied risk factors between groups was performed using Pearson ′ s Chi-square test along with presenting relevant odds ratio (OR. Results: From 7301 deliveries included in the study, 78 (1% was complicated placental abruption. Women aged 35 or more likely for experiencing (OR = 3.650, 95% confidence interval [CL] = 1.57-6.83 and those who had a previous cesarean section (OR = 2.65, 95% CL = 3.91- 33.41 were in higher risk for placental abruption ([50 cases] 64% vs. [28 cases] 36% P < 0.01. Conclusion: The results indicate that among the placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during the pregnancy and one of the major obstetrical emergency.

  9. Risk factors of placental abruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaheh, Hooria Seyedhosseini; Feizi, Awat; Mousavi, Maryam; Sohrabi, Davood; Mesghari, Leila; Hosseini, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during pregnancy. Multiple factors are known to be associated with increase of risk of placental abruption such as alcohol, cocaine use and cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for placental abruption in an Iranian women population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case – control study birth records included 78 cases with placental abruption and 780 randomly selected controls were investigated. Statistical analysis for comparing the studied risk factors between groups was performed using Pearson's Chi-square test along with presenting relevant odds ratio (OR). Results: From 7301 deliveries included in the study, 78 (1%) was complicated placental abruption. Women aged 35 or more likely for experiencing (OR = 3.650, 95% confidence interval [CL] = 1.57-6.83) and those who had a previous cesarean section (OR = 2.65, 95% CL = 3.91- 33.41) were in higher risk for placental abruption ([50 cases] 64% vs. [28 cases] 36% P < 0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that among the placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during the pregnancy and one of the major obstetrical emergency. PMID:24174950

  10. Sexual dimorphism of the feto-placental phenotype in response to a high fat and control maternal diets in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tarrade

    Full Text Available Maternal environment during early developmental stages plays a seminal role in the establishment of adult phenotype. Using a rabbit model, we previously showed that feeding dams with a diet supplemented with 8% fat and 0.2% cholesterol (HH diet from the prepubertal period and throughout gestation induced metabolic syndrome in adult offspring. Here, we examined the effects of the HH diet on feto-placental phenotype at 28 days post-coïtum (term = 31 days in relation to earlier effects in the blastocyst (Day 6. At 28 days, both male and female HH fetuses were intrauterine growth retarded and dyslipidemic, with males more affected than females. Lipid droplets accumulated in the HH placentas' trophoblast, consistent with the increased concentrations in cholesteryl esters (3.2-fold, triacylglycerol (2.5-fold and stored FA (2.12-fold. Stored FA concentrations were significantly higher in female compared to male HH placentas (2.18-fold, p<0.01, whereas triacylglycerol was increased only in HH males. Trophoblastic lipid droplet accumulation was also observed at the blastocyst stage. The expression of numerous genes involved in lipid pathways differed significantly according to diet both in term placenta and at the blastocyst stage. Among them, the expression of LXR-α in HH placentas was reduced in HH males but not females. These data demonstrate that maternal HH diet affects the blastocyst and induces sex-dependent metabolic adaptations in the placenta, which appears to protect female fetuses from developing severe dyslipidemia.

  11. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle-cell interactions itself.

  12. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle–cell interactions itself. PMID:27877820

  13. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle-cell interactions itself.

  14. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-04-07

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of (99m)Tc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman's rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  15. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of 99mTc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman’s rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  16. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES 130/0.4 impairs intestinal barrier integrity and metabolic function: findings from a mouse model of the isolated perfused small intestine.

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    Yuk Lung Wong

    Full Text Available The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine.An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7 or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7. Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio, morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis, fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation were evaluated in both groups.Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01, an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001, an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001 and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001. Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces.A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small intestine.

  17. Quantitative renal perfusion measurements in a rat model of acute kidney injury at 3T: testing inter- and intramethodical significance of ASL and DCE-MRI.

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    Fabian Zimmer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To establish arterial spin labelling (ASL for quantitative renal perfusion measurements in a rat model at 3 Tesla and to test the diagnostic significance of ASL and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI in a model of acute kidney injury (AKI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: ASL and DCE-MRI were consecutively employed on six Lewis rats, five of which had a unilateral ischaemic AKI. All measurements in this study were performed on a 3 Tesla MR scanner using a FAIR True-FISP approach and a TWIST sequence for ASL and DCE-MRI, respectively. Perfusion maps were calculated for both methods and the cortical perfusion of healthy and diseased kidneys was inter- and intramethodically compared using a region-of-interest based analysis. RESULTS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both methods produce significantly different values for the healthy and the diseased kidneys (P<0.01. The mean difference was 147±47 ml/100 g/min and 141±46 ml/100 g/min for ASL and DCE-MRI, respectively. ASL measurements yielded a mean cortical perfusion of 416±124 ml/100 g/min for the healthy and 316±102 ml/100 g/min for the diseased kidneys. The DCE-MRI values were systematically higher and the mean cortical renal blood flow (RBF was found to be 542±85 ml/100 g/min (healthy and 407±119 ml/100 g/min (AKI. CONCLUSION: Both methods are equally able to detect abnormal perfusion in diseased (AKI kidneys. This shows that ASL is a capable alternative to DCE-MRI regarding the detection of abnormal renal blood flow. Regarding absolute perfusion values, nontrivial differences and variations remain when comparing the two methods.

  18. Dietary red palm oil supplementation reduces myocardial infarct size in an isolated perfused rat heart model

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    Esterhuyse Adriaan J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims Recent studies have shown that dietary red palm oil (RPO supplementation improves functional recovery following ischaemia/reperfusion in isolated hearts. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary RPO supplementation on myocardial infarct size after ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The effects of dietary RPO supplementation on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2 activation and PKB/Akt phosphorylation were also investigated. Materials and methods Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups and fed a standard rat chow diet (SRC, a SRC supplemented with RPO, or a SRC supplemented with sunflower oil (SFO, for a five week period, respectively. After the feeding period, hearts were excised and perfused on a Langendorff perfusion apparatus. Hearts were subjected to thirty minutes of normothermic global ischaemia and two hours of reperfusion. Infarct size was determined by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Coronary effluent was collected for the first ten minutes of reperfusion in order to measure MMP2 activity by gelatin zymography. Results Dietary RPO-supplementation decreased myocardial infarct size significantly when compared to the SRC-group and the SFO-supplemented group (9.1 ± 1.0% versus 30.2 ± 3.9% and 27.1 ± 2.4% respectively. Both dietary RPO- and SFO-supplementation were able to decrease MMP2 activity when compared to the SRC fed group. PKB/Akt phosphorylation (Thr 308 was found to be significantly higher in the dietary RPO supplemented group when compared to the SFO supplemented group at 10 minutes into reperfusion. There was, however, no significant changes observed in ERK phosphorylation. Conclusions Dietary RPO-supplementation was found to be more effective than SFO-supplementation in reducing myocardial infarct size after ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Both dietary RPO and SFO were able to reduce MMP2 activity, which suggests that MMP2 activity does not play a major role in

  19. Placental Transmogrification of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Il Hwan; Kwon, Woo Cheol; Eom, Min Seob; Kim, Young Ju; Hwan, Joong Hwan [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Placental transmogrification is a very rare lung disease, where the alveoli resemble the chorionic villi of placenta, and this change is a characteristic finding. A 31-year-old female patient presented with cough and dyspnea that had begun 2 weeks prior to admission. Along with giant bulla found in the left upper lung field, subsegmental consolidation was also identified in the lingular segment on plain chest radiograph and CT scan. Wedge resection was performed to remove the bulla. Pathologic examination of the resected bulla revealed destruction of the normal structures and characteristic villous and papillary changes. These changes led to a diagnosis of placental transmogrification. We made an encounter of an unusual placental transmogrification which had different image findings from other reported transmogrification cases. Thus, we report an atypical placental transmogrification case where both consolidation and giant bulla coexist.

  20. Placental abruption: a persisting killer

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    Shakuntala Amirchand Chhabra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Placental abruption, common disorder in obstetric practice, enigma too, is uniquely fraught with dangers to mother baby. Objectives of study were to study trends of placental abruption, risk factors, management strategies to learn more for reduction in morbidity-mortality of mother-baby, even with low resources, also get insight for future research. Methods: Records of cases of placental abruption managed over 27 years (between 1985 to 2011 were divided into three yearly blocks, A to I and analysed. Details including operative procedures like dilatation-curettage, Caesarean Section (CS or Ante-Partum Haemorrhage (APH in past, disorders like chronic hypertension, threatened abortion, pregnancy specific hypertension, diabetes, anaemia in index pregnancy, management done maternal-neonatal outcome were analysed using stata 6 software. Results: There were 66,459 births during analysis period with 667 cases of placental abruption, 1% births, increasing trends from, 0.73% between 1985-1987 to, 1.11% in 2009-2011. In these 667 cases of placental abruption, 211 (32.5% perinatal deaths occurred. Ratio of perinatal deaths due to placental abruption to overall perinatal deaths increased from 2.12% (8 cases between 1985-1987 (Block A to 5.12% (37 cases between 2009-2011 (Block I. Case fatality in cases of placental abruption has been fluctuating between 3 to 5% till 2004, contributing to around 12-15%, maternal mortality, with no fatality in last 7 years. Conclusions: Cases of placental abruption have been increasing with no obvious reason. In recent past maternal deaths could be prevented but perinatal deaths, have been persisting actually more in last decade. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 604-609

  1. Adenoviral-mediated placental gene transfer of IGF-1 corrects placental insufficiency via enhanced placental glucose transport mechanisms.

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    Helen N Jones

    Full Text Available Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that over-expression of human insulin-like growth factor -1 (hIGF-1 in the placenta corrects fetal weight deficits in mouse, rat, and rabbit models of intrauterine growth restriction without changes in placental weight. The underlying mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. To investigate the effect of intra-placental IGF-1 over-expression on placental function we examined glucose transporter expression and localization in both a mouse model of IUGR and a model of human trophoblast, the BeWo Choriocarcinoma cell line.At gestational day 18, animals were divided into four groups; sham-operated controls, uterine artery branch ligation (UABL, UABL+Ad-hIGF-1 (10(8 PFU, UABL+Ad-LacZ (10(8 PFU. At gestational day 20, pups and placentas were harvested by C-section. For human studies, BeWo choriocarcinoma cells were grown in F12 complete medium +10%FBS. Cells were incubated in serum-free control media ± Ad-IGF-1 or Ad-LacZ for 48 hours. MOIs of 10∶1 and 100∶1 were utilized. The RNA, protein expression and localization of glucose transporters GLUT1, 3, 8, and 9 were analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry.In both the mouse placenta and BeWo, GLUT1 regulation was linked to altered protein localization. GLUT3, localized to the mouse fetal endothelial cells, was reduced in placental insufficiency but maintained with Ad-I GF-1 treatment. Interestingly, GLUT8 expression was reduced in the UABL placenta but up-regulated following Ad-IGF-1 in both mouse and human systems. GLUT9 expression in the mouse was increased by Ad-IGF-1 but this was not reflected in the BeWo, where Ad-IGF-1 caused moderate membrane relocalization.Enhanced GLUT isoform transporter expression and relocalization to the membrane may be an important mechanism in Ad-hIGF-1mediated correction of placental insufficiency.

  2. A1M/α1-microglobulin protects from heme-induced placental and renal damage in a pregnant sheep model of preeclampsia.

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    Lena Wester-Rosenlöf

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is a serious pregnancy complication that manifests as hypertension and proteinuria after the 20(th gestation week. Previously, fetal hemoglobin (HbF has been identified as a plausible causative factor. Cell-free Hb and its degradation products are known to cause oxidative stress and tissue damage, typical of the PE placenta. A1M (α1-microglobulin is an endogenous scavenger of radicals and heme. Here, the usefulness of A1M as a treatment for PE is investigated in the pregnant ewe PE model, in which starvation induces PE symptoms via hemolysis. Eleven ewes, in late pregnancy, were starved for 36 hours and then treated with A1M (n = 5 or placebo (n = 6 injections. After injections, the ewes were re-fed and observed for additional 72 hours. They were monitored for blood pressure, proteinuria, blood cell distribution and clinical and inflammation markers in plasma. Before termination, the utero-placental circulation was analyzed with Doppler velocimetry and the kidney glomerular function was analyzed by Ficoll sieving. At termination, blood, kidney and placenta samples were collected and analyzed for changes in gene expression and tissue structure. The starvation resulted in increased amounts of the hemolysis marker bilirubin in the blood, structural damages to the placenta and kidneys and an increased glomerular sieving coefficient indicating a defect filtration barrier. Treatment with A1M ameliorated these changes without signs of side-effects. In conclusion, A1M displayed positive therapeutic effects in the ewe starvation PE model, and was well tolerated. Therefore, we suggest A1M as a plausible treatment for PE in humans.

  3. Quantitative 3D micro-CT imaging of the human feto-placental vasculature in intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langheinrich, A C; Vorman, S; Seidenstücker, J; Kampschulte, M; Bohle, R M; Wienhard, J; Zygmunt, M

    2008-11-01

    Placental vascular development matches fetal growth and development. Quantification of the feto-placental vasculature in placentas from pregnancies is complicated by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) revealed confounding results. Therefore, the feto-placental vascular volume in IUGR placentas was assessed by 3D micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Placental probes from IUGR (n=24) and healthy control placentas (n=40) were perfused in situ with Microfil or BaSO(4) and randomly chosen samples were scanned by micro-CT. Using 3D images, we quantitated the feto-placental vascular volume fraction (VVF). A subanalysis was performed at three different levels, reaching from the chorionic plate artery (level A), to intermediate arteries (level B) and capillary system (level C). Results were complemented by histology. The significance of differences in vascular volume measurements was tested with analysis of variance [ANOVA]. Microfil perfused placentas showed a total vascular volume fraction of 20.5+/-0.9% in healthy controls. In contrast, the VVF decreased to 7.9+/-0.9% (pfeto-placental vascular tree in healthy controls and pregnancies complicated by IUGR.

  4. Placental exosomes in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Murray D; Peiris, Hassendrini N; Kobayashi, Miharu; Koh, Yong Q; Duncombe, Gregory; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    While there is considerable contemporary interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in normal and complicated pregnancies and their utility as biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, progress in the field is hindered by a lack of standardized extracellular vesicle taxonomy and isolation protocols. The term "extracellular vesicle" is nonspecific and refers to all membrane-bound vesicles from nanometer to micrometer diameters and of different biogenic origins. To meaningfully ascribe biological function and/or diagnostic and therapeutic utility to extracellular vesicles, and in particular exosomes, greater specificity and vesicle characterization is required. The current literature relating to exosome biology must be interpreted in this context. Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle that are specifically defined by an endosomal biogenesis and particle size (40-120 nm) and density (1.13-1.19 g/mL(-1)). Exosomes are specifically package with signaling molecules (including protein, messenger RNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA) and are released by exocytosis into biofluid compartments. Exosomes regulate the activity of both proximal and distal target cells, including translational activity, angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis. As such, exosomal signaling represents an integral pathway mediating intercellular communication. During pregnancy, the placenta releases exosomes into the maternal circulation from as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Release is regulated by factors that include both oxygen tension and glucose concentration and correlates with placental mass and perfusion. The concentration of placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma increases progressively during gestation. Exosomes isolated from maternal plasma are bioactive in vitro and are incorporated into target cells by endocytosis. While the functional significance of placental exosomes in pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, available

  5. Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes,, Don; Black, Sylvester M.

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and “pearls of wisdom”/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  6. A model for filtered backprojection reconstruction artifacts due to time-varying attenuation values in perfusion C-arm CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Dennerlein, Frank; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Boese, Jan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-06-01

    Filtered backprojection is the basis for many CT reconstruction tasks. It assumes constant attenuation values of the object during the acquisition of the projection data. Reconstruction artifacts can arise if this assumption is violated. For example, contrast flow in perfusion imaging with C-arm CT systems, which have acquisition times of several seconds per C-arm rotation, can cause this violation. In this paper, we derived and validated a novel spatio-temporal model to describe these kinds of artifacts. The model separates the temporal dynamics due to contrast flow from the scan and reconstruction parameters. We introduced derivative-weighted point spread functions to describe the spatial spread of the artifacts. The model allows prediction of reconstruction artifacts for given temporal dynamics of the attenuation values. Furthermore, it can be used to systematically investigate the influence of different reconstruction parameters on the artifacts. We have shown that with optimized redundancy weighting function parameters the spatial spread of the artifacts around a typical arterial vessel can be reduced by about 70%. Finally, an inversion of our model could be used as the basis for novel dynamic reconstruction algorithms that further minimize these artifacts.

  7. A model for filtered backprojection reconstruction artifacts due to time-varying attenuation values in perfusion C-arm CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim [Department of Computer Science, Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Dennerlein, Frank; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Boese, Jan [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Angiography and Interventional X-Ray Systems, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Fahrig, Rebecca, E-mail: andreas.fieselmann@informatik.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Center, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    Filtered backprojection is the basis for many CT reconstruction tasks. It assumes constant attenuation values of the object during the acquisition of the projection data. Reconstruction artifacts can arise if this assumption is violated. For example, contrast flow in perfusion imaging with C-arm CT systems, which have acquisition times of several seconds per C-arm rotation, can cause this violation. In this paper, we derived and validated a novel spatio-temporal model to describe these kinds of artifacts. The model separates the temporal dynamics due to contrast flow from the scan and reconstruction parameters. We introduced derivative-weighted point spread functions to describe the spatial spread of the artifacts. The model allows prediction of reconstruction artifacts for given temporal dynamics of the attenuation values. Furthermore, it can be used to systematically investigate the influence of different reconstruction parameters on the artifacts. We have shown that with optimized redundancy weighting function parameters the spatial spread of the artifacts around a typical arterial vessel can be reduced by about 70%. Finally, an inversion of our model could be used as the basis for novel dynamic reconstruction algorithms that further minimize these artifacts.

  8. The isolated blood-perfused pig ear: an inexpensive and animal-saving model for skin penetration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, J; van Eck, P; Elliott, G R; de Kort, W L; Wolthuis, O L

    1992-04-01

    To overcome most of the disadvantages of current models to investigate percutaneous penetration of drugs or toxic substances, a model is proposed here based on the isolated pig ear, which is obtained at the slaughterhouse, and perfused with oxygenated blood from the same pig. To determine the viability of the preparations, we measured glucose consumption and lactate production as metabolic parameters, Na+ and K+ ions, as well as lactate dehydrogenase activity in blood as markers for cell damage, whereas vasomotor reactivity was assessed by administering noradrenaline and isoxsuprine. After 60 min of equilibration, only insignificant changes in these parameters were observed during the subsequent 3-hr test period (longer periods were not tested). A slight weight increase was noted during the total period 4 hr, presumably due to slight edema formation. On the basis of several types of measurements, such as in vivo blood flow and ear temperature and in vitro glucose metabolism, standard procedures were developed. It is concluded that this technique offers an easy to handle, cost-efficient, and animal-saving model for skin penetration studies that lacks most of the disadvantages of existing models.

  9. Collimator optimization and collimator-detector response compensation in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    The collimator is the primary factor that determines the spatial resolution and noise tradeoff in myocardial perfusion SPECT images. In this paper, the goal was to find the collimator that optimizes the image quality in terms of a perfusion defect detection task. Since the optimal collimator could depend on the level of approximation of the collimator-detector response (CDR) compensation modeled in reconstruction, we performed this optimization for the cases of modeling the full CDR (including geometric, septal penetration and septal scatter responses), the geometric CDR, or no model of the CDR. We evaluated the performance on the detection task using three model observers. Two observers operated on data in the projection domain: the Ideal Observer (IO) and IO with Model-Mismatch (IO-MM). The third observer was an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO), which operated on reconstructed images. The projection-domain observers have the advantage that they are computationally less intensive. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process, i.e. it has a perfect model of the CDR. The IO-MM takes into account the mismatch between the true (complete and accurate) model and an approximate model, e.g. one that might be used in reconstruction. We evaluated the utility of these projection domain observers in optimizing instrumentation parameters. We investigated a family of 8 parallel-hole collimators, spanning a wide range of resolution and sensitivity tradeoffs, using a population of simulated projection (for the IO and IO-MM) and reconstructed (for the CHO) images that included background variability. We simulated anterolateral and inferior perfusion defects with variable extents and severities. The area under the ROC curve was estimated from the IO, IO-MM, and CHO test statistics and served as the figure-of-merit. The optimal collimator for the IO had a resolution of 9-11 mm FWHM at 10 cm, which is poorer resolution than typical collimators

  10. Imaging and assessment of placental function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Mary

    2011-09-01

    The placenta is the vital support organ for the developing fetus. This article reviews current ultrasound (US) methods of assessing placental function. The ability of ultrasound to detect placental pathology is discussed. Doppler technology to investigate the fetal, placental, and maternal circulations in both high-risk and uncomplicated pregnancies is discussed and the current literature on the value of three-dimensional power Doppler studies to assess placental volume and vascularization is also evaluated. The article highlights the need for further research into three-dimensional ultrasound and alternative methods of placental evaluation if progress is to be made in optimizing placental function assessment.

  11. The Hepatoprotection Provided by Taurine and Glycine against Antineoplastic Drugs Induced Liver Injury in an Ex Vivo Model of Normothermic Recirculating Isolated Perfused Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Heidari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid is a non-protein amino acid found in high concentration in different tissues. Glycine (Amino acetic acid is the simplest amino acid incorporated in the structure of proteins. Several investigations indicate the hepatoprotective properties of these amino acids. On the other hand, antineoplastic agents-induced serum transaminase elevation and liver injury is a clinical complication. The current investigation was designed to screen the possible hepatoprotective properties of taurine and glycine against antineoplastic drugs-induced hepatic injury in an ex vivo model of isolated perfused rat liver. Rat liver was perfused with different concentration (10 μM, 100 μM and 1000 μM of antineoplastic drugs (Mitoxantrone, Cyclophosphamide, Cisplatin, 5 Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin and Dacarbazine via portal vein. Taurine and glycine were administered to drug-treated livers and liver perfusate samples were collected for biochemical measurements (ALT, LDH, AST, and K+. Markers of oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity and glutathione were also assessed in liver tissue. Antineoplastic drugs caused significant pathological changes in perfusate biochemistry. Furthermore, markers of oxidative stress were significantly elevated in drug treated livers. It was found that taurine (5 and 10 mM and glycine (5 and 10 mM administration significantly mitigated the biomarkers of liver injury and attenuated drug induced oxidative stress. Our data indicate that taurine and glycine supplementation might help as potential therapeutic options to encounter anticancer drugs-induced liver injury.

  12. Improved Perfusion MR Imaging Assessment of Intracerebral Tumor Blood Volume and Antiangiogenic Therapy Efficacy in a Rat Model with Ferumoxytol

    OpenAIRE

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Muldoon, Leslie L; Li, Xin; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Our findings suggest that, at perfusion MR imaging, more consistent estimations of relative cerebral blood volume are provided with ferumoxytol than with gadolinium-based contrast agents regardless of the permeability of the tumor vasculature.

  13. Error analysis of the quantification of hepatic perfusion using a dual-input single-compartment model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shohei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-11-01

    We performed an error analysis of the quantification of liver perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) data using a dual-input single-compartment model for various disease severities, based on computer simulations. In the simulations, the time-density curves (TDCs) in the liver were generated from an actually measured arterial input function using a theoretical equation describing the kinetic behavior of the contrast agent (CA) in the liver. The rate constants for the transfer of CA from the hepatic artery to the liver (K1a), from the portal vein to the liver (K1p), and from the liver to the plasma (k2) were estimated from simulated TDCs with various plasma volumes (V0s). To investigate the effect of the shapes of input functions, the original arterial and portal-venous input functions were stretched in the time direction by factors of 2, 3 and 4 (stretching factors). The above parameters were estimated with the linear least-squares (LLSQ) and nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) methods, and the root mean square errors (RMSEs) between the true and estimated values were calculated. Sensitivity and identifiability analyses were also performed. The RMSE of V0 was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, k2 and K1p in an increasing order. The RMSEs of K1a, K1p and k2 increased with increasing V0, while that of V0 tended to decrease. The stretching factor also affected parameter estimation in both methods. The LLSQ method estimated the above parameters faster and with smaller variations than the NLSQ method. Sensitivity analysis showed that the magnitude of the sensitivity function of V0 was the greatest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in a decreasing order, while the variance of V0 obtained from the covariance matrices was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in an increasing order. The magnitude of the sensitivity function and the variance increased and decreased, respectively, with increasing disease severity and decreased

  14. Long-term effects of cerebral hypoperfusion on neural density and function using misery perfusion animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Asuka; Tajima, Yosuke; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Taniguchi, Junko; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Urushihata, Takuya; Aoki, Ichio; Kanno, Iwao; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Ikoma, Yoko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-04-27

    We investigated the chronic effects of cerebral hypoperfusion on neuronal density and functional hyperemia using our misery perfusion mouse model under unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO). Neuronal density evaluated 28 days after UCCAO using [(11)C]flumazenil-PET and histology indicated no neurologic deficit in the hippocampus and neocortex. CBF response to sensory stimulation was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Percentage changes in CBF response of the ipsilateral hemisphere to UCCAO were 18.4 ± 3.0%, 6.9 ± 2.8%, 6.8 ± 2.3% and 4.9 ± 2.4% before, and 7, 14 and 28 days after UCCAO, respectively. Statistical significance was found at 7, 14 and 28 days after UCCAO (P < 0.01). Contrary to our previous finding (Tajima et al. 2014) showing recovered CBF response to hypercapnia on 28 days after UCCAO using the same model, functional hyperemia was sustained and became worse 28 days after UCCAO.

  15. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care provider injects ...

  16. TU-CD-BRA-08: Single-Energy Computed Tomography-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging: Proof-Of-Principle in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T; Boone, J [University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Kent, M; Wisner, E [University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Fujita, Y [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary perfusion imaging has provided significant insights into pulmonary diseases, and can be useful in radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively establish proof-of-principle in a canine model for single-energy CT-based perfusion imaging, which has the potential for widespread clinical implementation. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on: (1) acquisition of inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) of the two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the pre-contrast image from post-contrast image, yielding a map of Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement. These subtraction image data sets hypothetically represent perfused blood volume, a surrogate for perfusion. In an IACUC-approved clinical trial, we acquired pre- and post-contrast CT scans in the prone posture for six anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated dogs. The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The registration accuracy was quantified using the target registration errors (TREs) for 50 pulmonary landmarks in each dog. The gradient of HU enhancement between gravity-dependent (ventral) and non-dependent (dorsal) regions was evaluated to quantify the known effect of gravity, i.e., greater perfusion in ventral regions. Results: The lung volume difference between the two scans was 4.3±3.5% on average (range 0.3%–10.1%). DIR demonstrated an average TRE of 0.7±1.0 mm. HU enhancement in lung parenchyma was 34±10 HU on average and varied considerably between individual dogs, indicating the need for improvement of the contrast injection protocol. HU enhancement in ventral (gravity-dependent) regions was found to be greater than in dorsal regions. A population average ventral-to-dorsal gradient of HU enhancement was strong (R{sup 2}=0.94) and statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: This canine study demonstrated relatively accurate DIR and a strong ventral

  17. Molecules consolidate the placental mammal tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springer, M.S.; Stanhope, M.J.; Madsen, O.; Jong, W.W.W. de

    2004-01-01

    Deciphering relationships among the orders of placental mammals remains an important problem in evolutionary biology and has implications for understanding patterns of morphological character evolution, reconstructing the ancestral placental genome, and evaluating the role of plate tectonics and dis

  18. Molecules consolidate the placental mammal tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springer, M.S.; Stanhope, M.J.; Madsen, O.; Jong, W.W.W. de

    2004-01-01

    Deciphering relationships among the orders of placental mammals remains an important problem in evolutionary biology and has implications for understanding patterns of morphological character evolution, reconstructing the ancestral placental genome, and evaluating the role of plate tectonics and

  19. Placental Cadmium Levels Are Associated with Increased Preeclampsia Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Jessica E; Ray, Paul; Bodnar, Wanda; Cable, Peter H; Boggess, Kim; Offenbacher, Steven; Fry, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposure to heavy metals is a potentially modifiable risk factor for preeclampsia (PE). Toxicologically, there are known interactions between the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) and essential metals such as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), as these metals can protect against the toxicity of Cd. As they relate to preeclampsia, the interaction between Cd and these essential metals is unknown. The aims of the present study were to measure placental levels of Cd, Se, and Zn in a cohort of 172 pregnant women from across the southeast US and to examine associations of metals levels with the odds of PE in a nested case-control design. Logistic regressions were performed to assess odds ratios (OR) for PE with exposure to Cd controlling for confounders, as well as interactive models with Se or Zn. The mean placental Cd level was 3.6 ng/g, ranging from 0.52 to 14.5 ng/g. There was an increased odds ratio for PE in relationship to placental levels of Cd (OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2). The Cd-associated OR for PE increased when analyzed in relationship to lower placental Se levels (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.5) and decreased with higher placental Se levels (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.5-1.9). Similarly, under conditions of lower placental Zn, the Cd-associated OR for PE was elevated (OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 0.8-3.9), whereas with higher placental Zn it was reduced (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.8-2.0). Data from this pilot study suggest that essential metals may play an important role in reducing the odds of Cd-associated preeclampsia and that replication in a larger cohort is warranted.

  20. Placental lactogen levels in diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursell, W; Brudenell, M; Chard, T

    1973-04-14

    A prospective study has been carried out of placental lactogen levels in pregnancy complicated by diabetes mellitus. The levels were higher than those in normal pregnant subjects; the higher levels were related to increased placental and fetal weight but more closely to the former; and lower levels were found when there was clinical evidence of placental dysfunction. Those patients requiring the largest insulin increment for the control of their diabetes in the pregnancy have placental lactogen levels in the higher range.

  1. A mathematical model and computational framework for three-dimensional chondrocyte cell growth in a porous tissue scaffold placed inside a bi-directional flow perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhawath Hossain, Md; Bergstrom, D J; Chen, X B

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro chondrocyte cell culture for cartilage tissue regeneration in a perfusion bioreactor is a complex process. Mathematical modeling and computational simulation can provide important insights into the culture process, which would be helpful for selecting culture conditions to improve the quality of the developed tissue constructs. However, simulation of the cell culture process is a challenging task due to the complicated interaction between the cells and local fluid flow and nutrient transport inside the complex porous scaffolds. In this study, a mathematical model and computational framework has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional (3D) cell growth in a porous scaffold placed inside a bi-directional flow perfusion bioreactor. The model was developed by taking into account the two-way coupling between the cell growth and local flow field and associated glucose concentration, and then used to perform a resolved-scale simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The simulation predicts the local shear stress, glucose concentration, and 3D cell growth inside the porous scaffold for a period of 30 days of cell culture. The predicted cell growth rate was in good overall agreement with the experimental results available in the literature. This study demonstrates that the bi-directional flow perfusion culture system can enhance the homogeneity of the cell growth inside the scaffold. The model and computational framework developed is capable of providing significant insight into the culture process, thus providing a powerful tool for the design and optimization of the cell culture process.

  2. Development of a Phantom Tissue for Blood Perfusion Measurements and Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Estimation in Living Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar

    2007-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to mimic the non-directional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on the clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue whe...

  3. Intrapritoneal Hemorrhage after Placental Abruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Sakhavar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A placental abruption or abruptio placentae (where in the placental lining has separated from the uterus of the mother is one of the complications caused by trauma during pregnancy. It lets the blood flow to infiltrate in the uterine lining and to develop Couvelaire uterus (also known as uteroplacental apoplexy and uterine atony (a condition in which a woman's uterine muscles lose the ability to contract after childbirth; however, it rarely develops considerable hemoperitoneum which needs hysterectomy. In this report, a unique case of placental abruption caused by trauma in a 28-year-old Afghan woman is introduced in which severity and duration of trauma because of delay in reaching health equipped center led to developing massive hemoperitoneum (infiltration of great amount of blood into the abdominal cavity and its complications.

  4. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  5. [Evaluation of a new technique of extracorporeal perfusion of the swine liver on a swine-primate model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufigeau, M; Wolf, P; Azimzadeh, A; Godfrin, Y; Beller, J P; Boudjema, K; Jaeck, D; Kieny, R; Cinqualbre, J

    1996-01-01

    With the increasing success of liver transplantation there is an urgent need for developing an artificial liver support system to be used in patients with liver failure. An extracorporeal porcine liver perfusion machine was successfully tested in animals with experimental liver failure. Livers were flushed, removed from 35 kg pigs and placed in a heated sterile cassette. The portal vein and the hepatic artery of the graft were connected to the arterial system of the animals. The perfusion pressure of the hepatic artery was regulated via a pressure-flow computerized feed-back device. The venous flow was reinfused from the hepatic veins of the graft to the jugular vein of the animals. The experimental work consisted in two steps: 1. evaluation of clinical and biological consequences of liver perfusion in healthy animals (Group A = pigs, n = 3; group B = primates, n = 3); 2. evaluation of the efficiency of the liver perfusion in animals with ischemic liver failure (Groupe D = pigs, n = 6). The control group (Group C = pigs, n = 7) consisted of pigs with ischemic liver failure without hepatic support. No major clinical or biological adverse effects are reported in groups A and B excepted a thrombocytmia and a marked increase in serum transaminases levels in group B. Liver function as assessed by the bile flow was good in both groups. Comatose pigs with ischemic hepatic failure (group D) recovered a subnormal neurological status in five out of six cases. Serum ammoniemia level were significantly decreased (from 1076 +/- 163 to 255 +/- 32 umol/l). A decrease in serum bilirubine levels and an improvement in the coagulation profile were observed in the perfused animals. Pigs and primates tolerated the perfusion procedure well and beneficial effects were observed in perfused pigs with experimental liver failure.

  6. Plasma placental lactogen in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuramulu, N

    1978-01-01

    Plasma placental lactogen (HPL) and urinary oestrogen levels were investigated in pregnant women belonging to low and high socio-economic groups. Plasma HPL levels increased progressively with increasing gestation in women of both the socio-economic groups. The mean values in the two groups were not statistically different at any period of gestation. No correlation was observed between the birth weight of the infant and the maternal plasma placental lactogen levels at term. A positive correlation was observed between urinary oestrogen excretion and plasma HPL concentration.

  7. Simultaneous determination of nine model compounds in permeability samples using RP-HPLC: application to prove the cassette administration principle in single pass intestinal perfusion study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahajuddin; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Raju, K S R; Nafis, Asad; Jain, Girish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and specific reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method for simultaneous determination of atenolol, paracetamol, hydrochlorothiazide, caffeine, cephalexin, metoprolol, propranolol, ketoprofen along with phenol red (a non-absorbable compound) in samples obtained from intestinal in situ single-pass perfusion studies, was developed and validated. Chromatography was carried out on RP18 column with mobile phase comprising of 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) and methanol in gradient mode. The calibration curves were linear for all nine permeability model compounds (r² > 0.999) across the concentration range of 1.25-40 μg/ml. The coefficient of variation for intra and inter-day assay precision was between 0.04 and 3.08% and the accuracy was between 98.39 and 109.45%. Stability studies were carried out at different storage conditions and all the analytes were found to be stable. The method was successfully applied for analysing the permeability samples obtained from in situ single pass perfusion studies. The effective permeability (P(eff)) values obtained upon cassette administration were in close proximity to the permeability values obtained upon single administration of model compounds. In conclusion, the developed RP-HPLC method can be used for high throughput cassette validation of rat in situ perfusion model for intestinal permeability assessment.

  8. Oxcarbazepine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles: development and permeability studies across in vitro models of the blood–brain barrier and human placental trophoblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopalco A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Lopalco,1–3,* Hazem Ali,1,* Nunzio Denora,3 Erik Rytting1,4,5 1Department of Obstretrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy – Drug Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy; 4Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 5Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Encapsulation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs into nanoparticles may offer promise for treating pregnant women with epilepsy by improving brain delivery and limiting the transplacental permeability of AEDs to avoid fetal exposure and its consequent undesirable adverse effects. Oxcarbazepine-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by a modified solvent displacement method from biocompatible polymers (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid [PLGA] with or without surfactant and PEGylated PLGA [Resomer® RGPd5055]. The physical properties of the developed nanoparticles were determined with subsequent evaluation of their permeability across in vitro models of the blood–brain barrier (hCMEC/D3 cells and human placental trophoblast cells (BeWo b30 cells. Oxcarbazepine-loaded nanoparticles with encapsulation efficiency above 69% were prepared with sizes ranging from 140–170 nm, polydispersity indices below 0.3, and zeta potential values below −34 mV. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the amorphous state of the nanoencapsulated drug. The apparent permeability (Pe values of the free and nanoencapsulated oxcarbazepine were comparable across both cell types, likely due to rapid drug release kinetics. Transport studies using fluorescently-labeled nanoparticles (loaded with coumarin-6 demonstrated increased permeability of surfactant-coated nanoparticles

  9. Computed Tomography Perfusion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Histopathological Findings After Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation: An In Vivo Pig Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Graumann, Ole

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates how computed tomography perfusion scans and magnetic resonance imaging correlates with the histopathological alterations in renal tissue after cryoablation. A total of 15 pigs were subjected to laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation on both kidneys. After intervention......, each animal was randomized to a postoperative follow-up period of 1, 2, or 4 weeks, after which computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed. Immediately after imaging, open bilateral nephrectomy was performed allowing for histopathological examination...... of the cryolesions. On computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging examinations, rim enhancement was observed in the transition zone of the cryolesion 1week after laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation. This rim enhancement was found to subside after 2 and 4 weeks of follow-up, which was consistent...

  10. The effects of dietary supplementation during pregnancy on placental morphology, pathology, and histomorphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, D; Kristal, A; Navarro, C; Chauhan, P; Blanc, W; Naeye, R; Susser, M W

    1984-06-01

    We related the macroscopic and microscopic morphology and the histomorphometry of the placenta to prenatal nutritional supplementation. In the Prenatal Project, a controlled clinical trial, three dietary treatments (supplement, a high-protein beverage; complement, a balanced protein-calorie beverage, or routine vitamin and mineral tablets) were randomly allocated to poor Black pregnant women, and the outcome was assessed. Herein we report the effects on placental morphology and histomorphometry. There were significantly fewer preterm deliveries in the complement group, and this was reflected by an increase in the size of decidual cells, an index associated with placental aging. Several other characteristics of the placentas of the complement group may have been more directly associated with improved perinatal outcome: decreased intervillous fibrin, lower incidence of gross surface infarct, and smaller (and presumably less edematous) cells of the villous stroma, may have mediated increased placental perfusion. There was no evidence of any placental change associated with the increase in very preterm delivery and the highly significant depressed birth weight among preterm deliveries in the supplement group. The significantly lower incidence of meconium staining of Wharton's jelly among controls seems likely to have been a chance finding. While there were several other indices that reflected placental aging, the significantly increased chorioamnionitis, acute funisitis , and acute decidual inflammation among placentas of those who delivered prematurely [the former two associated with very early delivery (less than 35 wk gestation)] were likely to have been involved as causes of premature delivery.

  11. Placental diversity in malagasy tenrecs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enders, A C; Blankenship, T N; Goodman, S M;

    2007-01-01

    Placentation in tenrecs of the subfamily Oryzorictinae, family Tenrecidae, has not been described previously. The structure of the placenta of this group and especially of the genus Microgale was investigated to determine its similarity or dissimilarity to previously described placentas of the te...

  12. PLACENTAL SIZE AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The human placenta, a transient organ or pregnancy provides information about fetal well - being and pregnancy outcome . AIMS: To study the placental ultrasound characters in relation to perinatal outcomes . SETTINGS: Tertiary care hospital in southern India . METHODS AND MATERIAL S: The study sample comprised 500 consecutive women who presented to the Depart ment of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the King George Hospital who met the inclusion criteria. Ultrasonographic study was performed using a transabdominal 3.5 MHz volume transducer. Post natally the weight of the baby and of the placenta was recorded. Perina tal outcome was assessed by birth weight, APGAR score and the need for admission in neonatal intensive care unit. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : Pearson’s correlation analysis and Chi square test was used. Statistical significance was considered at a p value <0.05 . RESULTS: The mean placental thickness was 3.10 cm; 76% (n:380 had normal thickness. Mean placental diameter was 21.306 cm, and its weight varied from 310 women 62% (n:310. Correlation of placental thickness (normal and abnormal, with birth weight, the difference was significant ( <0.001. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound forms a readily available, fairly safe, effective non - invasive method to identify and prevent fetal malnutrition in a cost - effective way.

  13. Compilation of basal metabolic and blood perfusion rates in various multi-compartment, whole-body thermoregulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitzer, Avraham; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The assignments of basal metabolic rates (BMR), basal cardiac output (BCO), and basal blood perfusion rates (BBPR) were compared in nine multi-compartment, whole-body thermoregulation models. The data are presented at three levels of detail: total body, specific body regions, and regional body tissue layers. Differences in the assignment of these quantities among the compared models increased with the level of detail, in the above order. The ranges of variability in the total body BMR was 6.5 % relative to the lowest value, with a mean of 84.3 ± 2 W, and in the BCO, it was 8 % with a mean of 4.70 ± 0.13 l/min. The least variability among the body regions is seen in the combined torso (shoulders, thorax, and abdomen: ±7.8 % BMR and ±5.9 % BBPR) and in the combined head (head, face, and neck ±9.9 % BMR and ±10.9 % BBPR), determined by the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. Much more variability is apparent in the extremities with the most showing in the BMR of the feet (±117 %), followed by the BBPR in the arms (±61.3 %). In the tissue layers, most of the bone layers were assigned zero BMR and BBPR, except in the shoulders and in the extremities that were assigned non-zero values in a number of models. The next lowest values were assigned to the fat layers, with occasional zero values. Skin basal values were invariably non-zero but involved very low values in certain models, e.g., BBPR in the feet and the hands. Muscle layers were invariably assigned high values with the highest found in the thorax, abdomen, and legs. The brain, lung, and viscera layers were assigned the highest of all values of both basal quantities with those of the brain layers showing rather tight ranges of variability in both basal quantities. Average basal values of the "time-seasoned" models presented in this study could be useful as a first step in future modeling efforts subject to appropriate adjustment of values to conform to most recently available and reliable data.

  14. Maternal Administration of Sildenafil Citrate Alters Fetal and Placental Growth and Fetal-Placental Vascular Resistance in the Growth-Restricted Ovine Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyston, Charlotte; Stanley, Joanna L; Oliver, Mark H; Bloomfield, Frank H; Baker, Philip N

    2016-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) causes short- and long-term morbidity. Reduced placental perfusion is an important pathogenic component of IUGR; substances that enhance vasodilation in the uterine circulation, such as sildenafil citrate (sildenafil), may improve placental blood flow and fetal growth. This study aimed to examine the effects of sildenafil in the growth-restricted ovine fetus. Ewes carrying singleton pregnancies underwent insertion of vascular catheters, and then, they were randomized to receive uterine artery embolization (IUGR) or to a control group. Ewes in the IUGR group received a daily infusion of sildenafil (IUGR+SC; n=10) or vehicle (IUGR+V; n=8) for 21 days. The control group received no treatment (n=9). Umbilical artery blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasound and the resistive index (RI) calculated. Fetal weight, biometry, and placental weight were obtained at postmortem after treatment completion. Umbilical artery RI in IUGR+V fell less than in controls; the RI of IUGR+SC was intermediate to that of the other 2 groups (mean±SEM for control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: ∆RI, 0.09±0.03 versus -0.01±0.02 versus 0.03±0.02; F(2, 22)=4.21; P=0.03). Compared with controls, lamb and placental weights were reduced in IUGR+V but not in IUGR+SC (control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: fetal weight, 4381±247 versus 3447±235 versus 3687±129 g; F(2, 24)=5.49; P=0.01 and placental weight: 559.7±35.0 versus 376.2±32.5 versus 475.2±42.5 g; F(2, 24)=4.64; P=0.01). Sildenafil may be a useful adjunct in the management of IUGR. An increase in placental weight and fall in fetal-placental resistance suggests that changes to growth are at least partly mediated by changes to placental growth rather than alterations in placental efficiency.

  15. A Rodent Model of Cardiac Donation After Circulatory Death and Novel Biomarkers of Cardiac Viability During Ex Vivo Heart Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Mark J; Miller, Sally D; Cheung, Anson; Bashir, Jamil; Wong, Stephanie; Seidman, Michael A; Boyd, John H

    2017-08-01

    Organ donation after circulatory death (DCD) is increasingly being used as a means of addressing the organ supply/demand mismatch in solid organ transplantation. There is reluctance to use DCD hearts, due to an inability to precisely identify hearts that have suffered irreversible injury. We investigated novel biomarkers and clinically relevant endpoints across a spectrum of warm ischemic times, before and during ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP), to identify features associated with a nonviable cardiac phenotype. Donor rats sustained a hypoxic cardiac arrest, followed by variable acirculatory standoff periods (DCD groups). Left ventricular function, histochemical injury, and differences in left ventricular gene expression were studied before, and during, EVHP. As warm ischemic time exposure increased in DCD groups, fewer hearts were functional during EVHP, and ventricular function was increasingly impaired. Histochemical assessment identified severely injured hearts during EVHP. A novel gene expression signature identified severely injured hearts during EVHP (upregulation of c-Jun, 3.19 (2.84-3.60); P = 0.0014; HMOX-1, 3.87 (2.72-5.50); P = 0.0037; and Hsp90, 7.66 (6.32-9.27); P < 0.0001 in DCD20), and may be useful in identifying high-risk hearts at the point of harvest (Hsp90). We demonstrate that our preclinical model recapitulates the cardio-respiratory decompensation observed in humans, and that EVHP appears necessary to unmask distinguishing features of severely injured DCD hearts. Furthermore, we outline a clinically relevant multimodal approach to assessing candidate DCD hearts. Novel mRNA signatures correlated with elevations in cardiac Troponin-I in severely injured hearts during EVHP, and may also detect injury at the point of harvest.

  16. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  17. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model of shear stress distribution during neotissue growth in a perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Y; Luyten, F P; Schrooten, J; Papantoniou, I; Geris, L

    2015-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies use flow through perfusion bioreactors to apply mechanical stimuli to cells seeded on porous scaffolds. Cells grow on the scaffold surface but also by bridging the scaffold pores leading a fully filled scaffold following the scaffold's geometric characteristics. Current computational fluid dynamic approaches for tissue engineering bioreactor systems have been mostly carried out for empty scaffolds. The effect of 3D cell growth and extracellular matrix formation (termed in this study as neotissue growth), on its surrounding fluid flow field is a challenge yet to be tackled. In this work a combined approach was followed linking curvature driven cell growth to fluid dynamics modeling. The level-set method (LSM) was employed to capture neotissue growth driven by curvature, while the Stokes and Darcy equations, combined in the Brinkman equation, provided information regarding the distribution of the shear stress profile at the neotissue/medium interface and within the neotissue itself during growth. The neotissue was assumed to be micro-porous allowing flow through its structure while at the same time allowing the simulation of complete scaffold filling without numerical convergence issues. The results show a significant difference in the amplitude of shear stress for cells located within the micro-porous neo-tissue or at the neotissue/medium interface, demonstrating the importance of taking along the neotissue in the calculation of the mechanical stimulation of cells during culture.The presented computational framework is used on different scaffold pore geometries demonstrating its potential to be used a design as tool for scaffold architecture taking into account the growing neotissue. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2591-2600. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Immersed Boundary Models for Quantifying Flow-Induced Mechanical Stimuli on Stem Cells Seeded on 3D Scaffolds in Perfusion Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Odenthal, Tim; Luyten, Frank P.; Ramon, Herman; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactors regulate flow conditions in order to provide cells with oxygen, nutrients and flow-associated mechanical stimuli. Locally, these flow conditions can vary depending on the scaffold geometry, cellular confluency and amount of extra cellular matrix deposition. In this study, a novel application of the immersed boundary method was introduced in order to represent a detailed deformable cell attached to a 3D scaffold inside a perfusion bioreactor and exposed to microscopic flow. The immersed boundary model permits the prediction of mechanical effects of the local flow conditions on the cell. Incorporating stiffness values measured with atomic force microscopy and micro-flow boundary conditions obtained from computational fluid dynamics simulations on the entire scaffold, we compared cell deformation, cortical tension, normal and shear pressure between different cell shapes and locations. We observed a large effect of the precise cell location on the local shear stress and we predicted flow-induced cortical tensions in the order of 5 pN/μm, at the lower end of the range reported in literature. The proposed method provides an interesting tool to study perfusion bioreactors processes down to the level of the individual cell’s micro-environment, which can further aid in the achievement of robust bioprocess control for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27658116

  19. Iron chelators do not reduce cold-induced cell injury in the isolated perfused rat kidney model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels-Stringer, M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Wouterse, A.C.; Steenbergen, E.; Russel, F.G.M.; Kramers, C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro, cold-induced injury is an important contributor to renal tubular cell damage. It is mediated by iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and can be prevented by iron chelation. We studied whether iron chelators can prevent cold-induced damage in the isolated perfused

  20. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  1. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara;

    2016-01-01

    in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated...... placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, “PlaNet”, will bridge academia, industry...... and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice....

  2. Increased placental fatty acid transporter 6 and binding protein 3 expression and fetal liver lipid accumulation in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Paula; Harris, Jessica; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with increased fetal growth and adiposity, which, in part, is determined by transplacental nutrient supply. Trophoblast uptake and intracellular trafficking of lipids are dependent on placental fatty acid transport proteins (FATP), translocase (FAT/CD36), and fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). We hypothesized that maternal obesity in mice leads to increased placental expression of FAT/CD36, FATPs, and FABPs, and lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. C57/BL6J female mice were fed either a control (C; n = 10) or an obesogenic (OB; n = 10) high-fat, high-sugar diet before mating and throughout pregnancy. At E18.5, placentas and fetal livers were collected. Trophoblast plasma membranes (TPM) were isolated from placental homogenates. Expression of FAT/CD36 and FATP (TPM) and FABP (homogenates) was determined by immunoblotting. Gene expression was assessed by RT-quantitative PCR. Sections of fetal livers were stained for Oil Red O, and lipid droplets were quantified. TPM protein expression of FAT/CD36, FATP 2, and FATP 4 was comparable between C and OB groups. Conversely, TPM FATP 6 expression was increased by 35% in OB compared with C placentas without changes in mRNA expression. FABPs 1, 3-5 and PPARγ were expressed in homogenates, and FABP 3 expression increased 27% in OB compared with C placentas; however, no changes were observed in mRNA expression. Lipid droplet accumulation was 10-fold higher in the livers of fetuses from OB compared with C group. We propose that increased lipid transport capacity in obese mice promotes transplacental fatty acid transport and contributes to excess lipid accumulation in the fetal liver.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion area detector CT for non-small cell lung cancer patients: Influence of mathematical models on early prediction capabilities for treatment response and recurrence after chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Seki, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    To determine the capability and influence of the mathematical method on dynamic contrast-enhanced (CE-) perfusion area detector CT (ADCT) for early prediction of treatment response as well as progression free and overall survival (PFS and OS) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Sixty-six consecutive stage III NSCLC patients underwent dynamic CE-perfusion ADCT examinations, chemoradiotherapy and follow-up examinations. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria were used to divide all patients into responders and non-responders. Differences in each of the indices for all targeted lesions between measurements obtained 2 weeks prior to the first and the third course of chemotherapy were determined for all patients. ROC analyses were employed to determine the capability of perfusion indices as markers for distinguishing RECIST responders from non-responders. To evaluate their capability for early prediction of therapeutic effect, OS of perfusion index-based responders and non-responders were compared by using the Kaplan-Meier method followed by log-rank test. Area under the curve (Az) for total perfusion by means of the dual-input maximum slope method was significantly larger than that of pulmonary arterial perfusion using the same method (p=0.007) and of perfusion with the single-input maximum slope method (p=0.007). Mean OS demonstrated significantly difference between responder- and non-responder groups for total perfusion (p=0.02). Mathematical models have significant influence on assessment for early prediction of treatment response, disease progression and overall survival using dynamic CE-perfusion ADCT for NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal factors associated with fetal growth and birthweight are independent determinants of placental weight and exhibit differential effects by fetal sex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Cecilie Paasche Roland

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Maternal nutritional and metabolic factors influence the developmental environment of the fetus. Virtually any nutritional factor in the maternal blood has to pass the placental membranes to reach the fetal blood. Placental weight is a commonly used measure to summarize placental growth and function. Placental weight is an independent determinant of fetal growth and birthweight and modifies the associations between maternal metabolic factors and fetal growth. We hypothesized that maternal factors known to be related to fetal growth, newborn size and body composition are determinants of placental weight and that effects of maternal metabolic factors on placental weight differ between the genders. METHODS: The STORK study is a prospective longitudinal study including 1031 healthy pregnant women of Scandinavian heritage with singleton pregnancies. Maternal determinants (parity, body mass index, gestational weight gain and fasting plasma glucose of placental weight were explored by linear regression models, stratified by fetal sex. RESULTS: Parity, maternal BMI, gestational weight gain and fasting glucose had positive effects on placental weight. There was a sex specific effect in these associations. Fasting glucose was significantly associated with placental weight in females but not in males. CONCLUSION: Maternal factors known to influence fetal growth, birthweight and neonatal body composition are determinants of placental weight. The effect of maternal factors on placental weight is influenced by sex as illustrated in the relation between maternal glucose and placental weight.

  5. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, M.-Y.; Lee, T.-H.; Yang, S.-T.; Kuo, H.-H.; Chyi, T.-K.; Liu, H.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  6. Macrosomia has its roots in early placental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, N; Quant, H S; Sammel, M D; Parry, S

    2014-09-01

    We sought to determine if early placental size, as measured by 3-dimensional ultrasonography, is associated with an increased risk of delivering a macrosomic or large-for-gestational age (LGA) infant. We prospectively collected 3-dimensional ultrasound volume sets of singleton pregnancies at 11-14 weeks and 18-24 weeks. Birth weights were collected from the medical records. After delivery, the ultrasound volume set were used to measure the placental volume (PV) and placental quotient (PQ = PV/gestational age), as well as the mean placental and chorionic diameters (MPD and MCD, respectively). Placental measures were analyzed as predictors of macrosomia (birth weight ≥4000 g) and LGA (birth weight ≥90th percentile). The 578 pregnancies with first trimester volumes included 44 (7.6%) macrosomic and 43 (7.4%) LGA infants. 373 subjects also had second trimester volumes available. A higher PV and PQ were both significantly associated with macrosomia and LGA in both the first and second trimesters. Second trimester MPD was significantly associated with both outcomes as well, while second trimester MCD was only associated with LGA. The above associations remained significant after adjusting for maternal demographic variables such as race, ethnicity, age and diabetes. Adjusted models yielded moderate prediction of macrosomia and LGA (AUC: 0.71-0.77). Sonographic measurement of the early placenta can identify pregnancies at greater risk of macrosomia and LGA. Macrosomia and LGA are already determined in part by early placental growth and development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimising cell aggregate expansion in a perfused hollow fibre bioreactor via mathematical modelling.

    KAUST Repository

    Chapman, Lloyd A C

    2014-08-26

    The need for efficient and controlled expansion of cell populations is paramount in tissue engineering. Hollow fibre bioreactors (HFBs) have the potential to meet this need, but only with improved understanding of how operating conditions and cell seeding strategy affect cell proliferation in the bioreactor. This study is designed to assess the effects of two key operating parameters (the flow rate of culture medium into the fibre lumen and the fluid pressure imposed at the lumen outlet), together with the cell seeding distribution, on cell population growth in a single-fibre HFB. This is achieved using mathematical modelling and numerical methods to simulate the growth of cell aggregates along the outer surface of the fibre in response to the local oxygen concentration and fluid shear stress. The oxygen delivery to the cell aggregates and the fluid shear stress increase as the flow rate and pressure imposed at the lumen outlet are increased. Although the increased oxygen delivery promotes growth, the higher fluid shear stress can lead to cell death. For a given cell type and initial aggregate distribution, the operating parameters that give the most rapid overall growth can be identified from simulations. For example, when aggregates of rat cardiomyocytes that can tolerate shear stresses of up to 0:05 Pa are evenly distributed along the fibre, the inlet flow rate and outlet pressure that maximise the overall growth rate are predicted to be in the ranges 2.75 x 10(-5) m(2) s(-1) to 3 x 10(-5) m(2) s(-1) (equivalent to 2.07 ml min(-1) to 2.26 ml min(-1)) and 1.077 x 10(5) Pa to 1.083 x 10(5) Pa (or 15.6 psi to 15.7 psi) respectively. The combined effects of the seeding distribution and flow on the growth are also investigated and the optimal conditions for growth found to depend on the shear tolerance and oxygen demands of the cells.

  8. Computer modeling of the combined effects of perfusion, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity on tissue heating patterns in radiofrequency tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Liu, Zhengjun; Humphries, Stanley; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2008-11-01

    To use an established computer simulation model of radiofrequency (RF) ablation to characterize the combined effects of varying perfusion, and electrical and thermal conductivity on RF heating. Two-compartment computer simulation of RF heating using 2-D and 3-D finite element analysis (ETherm) was performed in three phases (n = 88 matrices, 144 data points each). In each phase, RF application was systematically modeled on a clinically relevant template of application parameters (i.e., varying tumor and surrounding tissue perfusion: 0-5 kg/m(3)-s) for internally cooled 3 cm single and 2.5 cm cluster electrodes for tumor diameters ranging from 2-5 cm, and RF application times (6-20 min). In the first phase, outer thermal conductivity was changed to reflect three common clinical scenarios: soft tissue, fat, and ascites (0.5, 0.23, and 0.7 W/m- degrees C, respectively). In the second phase, electrical conductivity was changed to reflect different tumor electrical conductivities (0.5 and 4.0 S/m, representing soft tissue and adjuvant saline injection, respectively) and background electrical conductivity representing soft tissue, lung, and kidney (0.5, 0.1, and 3.3 S/m, respectively). In the third phase, the best and worst combinations of electrical and thermal conductivity characteristics were modeled in combination. Tissue heating patterns and the time required to heat the entire tumor +/-a 5 mm margin to >50 degrees C were assessed. Increasing background tissue thermal conductivity increases the time required to achieve a 50 degrees C isotherm for all tumor sizes and electrode types, but enabled ablation of a given tumor size at higher tissue perfusions. An inner thermal conductivity equivalent to soft tissue (0.5 W/m- degrees C) surrounded by fat (0.23 W/m- degrees C) permitted the greatest degree of tumor heating in the shortest time, while soft tissue surrounded by ascites (0.7 W/m- degrees C) took longer to achieve the 50 degrees C isotherm, and complete ablation

  9. Studying Closed Hydrodynamic Models of “In Vivo” DNA Perfusion in Pig Liver for Gene Therapy Translation to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra, Luis; Miguel, Antonio; Pérez-Enguix, Daniel; Montalvá, Eva; García-Gimeno, María Adelaida; Noguera, Inmaculada; Díaz, Ana; Pérez, Judith; Sanz, Pascual; López-Andújar, Rafael; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Aliño, Salvador F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Expressing exogenous genes after naked DNA delivery into hepatocytes might achieve sustained and high expression of human proteins. Tail vein DNA injection is an efficient procedure for gene transfer in murine liver. Hydrodynamic procedures in large animals require organ targeting, and improve with liver vascular exclusion. In the present study, two closed liver hydrofection models employing the human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT) gene are compared to reference standards in order to evaluate their potential clinical interest. Material and Methods A solution of naked DNA bearing the hAAT gene was retrogradely injected in 7 pig livers using two different closed perfusion procedures: an endovascular catheterization-mediated procedure (n = 3) with infrahepatic inferior vena cava and portal vein blockage; and a surgery-mediated procedure (n = 4) with completely sealed liver. Gene transfer was performed through the suprahepatic inferior cava vein in the endovascular procedure and through the infrahepatic inferior vena cava in the surgical procedure. The efficiency of the procedures was evaluated 14 days after hydrofection by quantifying the hAAT protein copies per cell in tissue and in plasma. For comparison, samples from mice (n = 7) successfully hydrofected with hAAT and healthy human liver segments (n = 4) were evaluated. Results Gene decoding occurs efficiently using both procedures, with liver vascular arrest improving its efficiency. The surgically closed procedure (sealed organ) reached higher tissue protein levels (4x10^5- copies/cell) than the endovascular procedure, though the levels were lower than in human liver (5x10^6- copies/cell) and hydrofected mouse liver (10^6- copies/cell). However, protein levels in plasma were lower (p<0.001) than the reference standards in all cases. Conclusion Hydrofection of hAAT DNA to “in vivo” isolated pig liver mediates highly efficient gene delivery and protein expression in tissue. Both endovascular and

  10. Infant sex-specific placental cadmium and DNA methylation associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, April F., E-mail: april.mohanty@va.gov [Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, 1730 Minor Ave, Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Farin, Fred M., E-mail: freddy@u.washington.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt Way N.E., Suite #100, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Bammler, Theo K., E-mail: tbammler@u.washington.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt Way N.E., Suite #100, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); MacDonald, James W., E-mail: jmacdon@uw.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt Way N.E., Suite #100, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Afsharinejad, Zahra, E-mail: zafshari@u.washington.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt Way N.E., Suite #100, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Burbacher, Thomas M., E-mail: tmb@uw.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Box: 357234, 1705 N.E. Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Siscovick, David S., E-mail: dsiscovick@nyam.org [Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, 1730 Minor Ave, Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that maternal cadmium (Cd) burden and fetal growth associations may vary by fetal sex. However, mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. Objectives: Among 24 maternal-infant pairs, we investigated infant sex-specific associations between placental Cd and placental genome-wide DNA methylation. Methods: We used ANOVA models to examine sex-stratified associations of placental Cd (dichotomized into high/low Cd using sex-specific Cd median cutoffs) with DNA methylation at each cytosine-phosphate-guanine site or region. Statistical significance was defined using a false discovery rate cutoff (<0.10). Results: Medians of placental Cd among females and males were 5 and 2 ng/g, respectively. Among females, three sites (near ADP-ribosylation factor-like 9 (ARL9), siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3 (SIAH3), and heparin sulfate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulfotransferase 4 (HS3ST4) and one region on chromosome 7 (including carnitine O-octanoyltransferase (CROT) and TP5S target 1 (TP53TG1)) were hypomethylated in high Cd placentas. Among males, high placental Cd was associated with methylation of three sites, two (hypomethylated) near MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus (MECOM) and one (hypermethylated) near spalt-like transcription factor 1 (SALL1), and two regions (both hypomethylated, one on chromosome 3 including MECOM and another on chromosome 8 including rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 10 (ARHGEF10). Differentially methylated sites were at or close to transcription start sites of genes involved in cell damage response (SIAH3, HS3ST4, TP53TG1) in females and cell differentiation, angiogenesis and organ development (MECOM, SALL1) in males. Conclusions: Our preliminary study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations, possibly accounting for previously reported differences in Cd-fetal growth associations across fetal sex. Larger studies are needed to replicate and extend these

  11. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR AND CORONARY NEOANGIOGENESIS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoangiogenesis in coronary heart disease is a protective reaction aimed to improve ischemic myocardial perfusion, by increasing the number and size of arterial collaterals. Placental growth factor (PlGF is one of the key peptides regulating angiogenic processes in atherosclerosis. In particular, a number of investigators have shown that injection of recombinant PlGF into the system or regional blood flow can stimulate neoangiogenesis. On the other hand, there is evidence confirming the involvement of PlGF in the progression of atherosclerosis and in the development of acute coronary syndrome. In this connection, the problem of investigating the efficiency and safety of possible use of PlGF preparations, as well as its place in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome remains urgent

  12. Characterization of placental cholesterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie L; Wassif, Christopher A; Vaisman, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) are born with multiple congenital abnormalities. Postnatal cholesterol supplementation is provided; however, it cannot correct developmental malformations due to in utero cholesterol deficit. Increased transport of cholesterol from maternal to fetal...... circulation might attenuate congenital malformations. The cholesterol transporters Abca1, Abcg1, and Sr-b1 are present in placenta; however, their potential role in placental transport remains undetermined. In mice, expression analyses showed that Abca1 and Abcg1 transcripts increased 2-3-fold between...... embryonic days 13.5 and 18.5 in placental tissue; whereas, Sr-b1 expression decreased. To examine the functional role of Abca1, Abcg1 and Sr-b1 we measured the maternal-fetal transfer of (14)C-cholesterol in corresponding mutant embryos. Disruption of either Abca1 or Sr-b1 decreased cholesterol transfer...

  13. Transport of nanoparticles through the placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvietis, Vytautas; Zalgeviciene, Violeta; Didziapetriene, Janina; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are organic or inorganic substances, the size of which ranges from 1 to 100 nm, and they possess specific properties which are different from those of the bulk materials in the macroscopic scale. In a recent decade, NP were widely applied in biomedicine as potential probes for imaging, drug-delivery systems and regenerative medicine. However, rapid development of nanotechnologies and their applications in clinical research have raised concerns about the adverse effects of NP on human health and environment. In the present review, special attention is paid to the fetal exposure to NP during the period of pregnancy. The ability to control the beneficial effects of NP and to avoid toxicity during treatment requires comprehensive knowledge about the distribution of NP in maternal body and possible penetration through the maternal-fetal barrier that might impair the embryogenesis. The initial in vivo and ex vivo studies imply that NP are able to cross the placental barrier, but the passage to the fetus depends on the size and the surface coating of NP as well as on the experimental model. The toxicity assays indicate that NP might induce adverse physiological effects and impede embryogenesis. The molecular transport mechanisms which are responsible for the transport of nanomaterials across the placental barrier are still poorly understood, and there is a high need for further studies in order to resolve the NP distribution patterns in the organism and to control the beneficial effects of NP applications during pregnancy without impeding the embryogenesis.

  14. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  15. Placental chimerism in early human pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Halder

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background0 : Human chimerism is rare and usually uncovered through investigations of ambiguous genitalia or blood grouping or prenatal diagnosis. Most of the publications on placental chimerism are mainly case reports. There is no systematic search with sensitive techniques for placental chimerism in human. Aim0 : This study was aimed to asses placental chimerism through two sensitive molecular techniques i.e., interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative fluorescent PCR. Material and methods0 : Placental chimerism was analyzed using X & Y dual color fluorescent in-situ hybridization onto 154 placentae from natural conceptions, obtained at termination of pregnancy between 7 to 16 weeks of gestation. Results0 : Three cases of placental sex chromosome chimerism were observed (1.95%. Exclusion of maternal contamination and diagnosis was confirmed later by quantitative fluorescent PCR. Conclusion0 : This finding indicates that placental chimerism in early human pregnancy is not rare.

  16. Computed Tomography Perfusion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Histopathological Findings After Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation: An In Vivo Pig Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Graumann, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how computed tomography perfusion scans and magnetic resonance imaging correlates with the histopathological alterations in renal tissue after cryoablation. A total of 15 pigs were subjected to laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation on both kidneys. After intervention...... with the microscopic examinations revealing of fibrotic scar tissue formation in the peripheral zone of the cryolesion. On T2 magnetic resonance imaging sequences, a thin hypointense rim surrounded the cryolesion, separating it from the adjacent renal parenchyma. Microscopic examinations revealed hemorrhage and later...... of coagulative necrosis 1 week after laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation, which was partially replaced by fibrotic scar tissue 4 weeks following laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation. Both computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging found the renal collecting system to be involved at all 3 stages...

  17. IFPA meeting 2016 workshop report II: Placental imaging, placenta and development of other organs, sexual dimorphism in placental function and trophoblast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Jennifer; Burton, Graham J; Clifton, Vicki; Collins, Sally; Frias, Antonio E; Gierman, Lobke; Grigsby, Peta; Jones, Helen; Lee, Cheryl; Maloyan, Alina; Markert, Udo R; Morales-Prieto, Diana M; Murthi, Padma; Myatt, Leslie; Pollheimer, Jurgen; Roberts, Victoria; Robinson, Wendy; Salafia, Carolyn; Schabel, Matthias; Shah, Dinesh; Sled, John; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Weber, Maja; O'Tierney-Ginn, Perrie F

    2017-03-06

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2016 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops addressed challenges, strengths and limitations of techniques and model systems for studying the placenta, as well as future directions for the following areas of placental research: 1) placental imaging; 2) sexual dimorphism; 3) placenta and development of other organs; 4) trophoblast cell lines.

  18. Dynamic myocardial perfusion in a porcine balloon-induced ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Levi, Jacob; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is an application that should greatly benefit from spectral CT through the significant reduction of beam hardening (BH) artifacts using mono-energetic (monoE) image reconstructions. We used a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare) and developed advanced processing tools (registration, segmentation, and deconvolution-based flow estimation) for quantitative myocardial CTP in a porcine ischemia model with different degrees of coronary occlusion using a balloon catheter. The occlusion severity was adjusted with fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. The SDCT scanner is a single source, dual-layer detector system, which allows simultaneous acquisitions of low and high energy projections, hence enabling accurate projection-based material decomposition and effective reduction of BH-artifacts. In addition, the SDCT scanner eliminates partial scan artifacts with fast (0.27s), full gantry rotation acquisitions. We acquired CTP data under different hemodynamic conditions and reconstructed conventional 120kVp images and projection-based monoenergetic (monoE) images for energies ranging from 55keV-to-120keV. We computed and compared myocardial blood flow (MBF) between different reconstructions. With balloon completely deflated (FFR=1), we compared the mean attenuation in a myocardial region of interest before iodine arrival and at peak iodine enhancement in the left ventricle (LV), and we found that monoE images at 70keV effectively minimized the difference in attenuation, due to BH, to less than 1 HU compared to 14 HU with conventional 120kVp images. Flow maps under baseline condition (FFR=1) were more uniform throughout the myocardial wall at 70keV, whereas with 120kVp data about 12% reduction in blood flow was noticed on BH-hypoattenuated areas compared to other myocardial regions. We compared MBF maps at different keVs under an ischemic condition (FFR ratio (CNRf ) between LAD ischemic and remote healthy

  19. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of fetal growth abnormalities in

  20. Relaxin as a protective substance in the preserving solution for liver transplantation: spectrophotometric in vivo imaging of local oxygen supply in an isolated perfused rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnert, Markus U; Armbruster, Franz Paul; Hilbig, Heidegard

    2009-04-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a problem in organ transplantation. Relaxin is known to have a protective effect against liver injury caused by IRI. Using a model of isolated perfused rat liver, the local oxygen supply in liver tissue was investigated by spectrophotometric in vivo imaging and compared to the protective effect of relaxin shown by immunohistochemical measurement of myeloperoxidase and malonyldialdehyde activities as determinants of oxidative stress. In relaxin-treated liver tissue, spectrophotometry showed a better oxygen supply and decreased myeloperoxidase and malonyldialdehyde activities. Our data suggest that relaxin can influence the oxygen distribution in liver tissue and reduce cell damage caused by IRI.

  1. Placental oxygen transport estimated by the hyperoxic placental BOLD MRI response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard; Sinding, Marianne; Peters, David A;

    2015-01-01

    cases of severe early onset FGR, placental BOLD MRI was performed in a 1.5 Tesla MRI system (TR:8000 msec, TE:50 msec, Flip angle:90). Placental histological examination was performed in the FGR cases. In normal pregnancies, the average hyperoxic placental BOLD response was 12.6 ± 5.4% (mean ± SD...

  2. Placental Vesicles Carry Active Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Their Activity is Reduced in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mejia, Carolina; Kandzija, Neva; Zhang, Wei; Mhlomi, Vuyane; Cerdeira, Ana Sofia; Burdujan, Alexandra; Tannetta, Dionne; Dragovic, Rebecca; Sargent, Ian L; Redman, Christopher W; Kishore, Uday; Vatish, Manu

    2017-08-01

    Preeclampsia, a multisystem hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is associated with increased systemic vascular resistance. Placentae from patients with preeclampsia have reduced levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and, thus, less nitric oxide (NO). Syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV), comprising microvesicles (STBMV) and exosomes, carry signals from the syncytiotrophoblast to the mother. We hypothesized that STBEV-bound eNOS (STBEV-eNOS), capable of producing NO, are released into the maternal circulation. Dual-lobe ex vivo placental perfusion and differential centrifugation was used to isolate STBEV from preeclampsia (n=8) and normal pregnancies (NP; n=11). Plasma samples of gestational age-matched preeclampsia and NP (n=6) were used to isolate circulating STBMV. STBEV expressed placental alkaline phosphatase, confirming placental origin. STBEV coexpressed eNOS, but not inducible nitric oxide synthase, confirmed using Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunodepletion. STBEV-eNOS produced NO, which was significantly inhibited by N  (G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (eNOS inhibitor; Ppreeclampsia-perfused placentae had lower levels of STBEV-eNOS (STBMV; Ppreeclampsia women had lower STBEV-eNOS expression compared with that from NP women (Ppreeclampsia placentae, as well as in plasma. The lower STBEV-eNOS NO production seen in preeclampsia may contribute to the decreased NO bioavailability in this disease. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Factors affecting the placental transfer of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikov, M.R.; Kelman, B.J. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to consider factors that affect the availability and transport of actinides from maternal blood, through the placenta, to the conceptus. These factors, of particular importance in scaling results from animals to man, include the route and temporal pattern of administration, the mass and physicochemical state of material administered, metabolism of the pregnant animal and fetal organs or tissue, and species-specific changes in placental structure relative to stage of gestation at exposure. Preliminary concepts for descriptive and kinetic models are proposed to integrate these results, to identify additional information required for developing more comprehensive models, and to provide a basis for scaling to human pregnancies for purposes of radiation dosimetry.

  4. Placental sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites is mediated by the interaction between VAR2CSA and chondroitin sulfate A on syndecan-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres Pereira, Marina; Mandel Clausen, Thomas; Pehrson, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans......-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor...... for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial...

  5. Placental Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites Is Mediated by the Interaction Between VAR2CSA and Chondroitin Sulfate A on Syndecan-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres Pereira, Marina; Mandel Clausen, Thomas; Pehrson, Caroline;

    2016-01-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans......-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor...... for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial...

  6. Quantification of MRI measured myocardial perfusion reserve in healthy humans: a comparison with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate a noninvasive quantitative MRI technique, the K(i) perfusion method, for myocardial perfusion in humans using (13)N-ammonia PET as a reference method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten healthy males (64 +/- 8 years) were examined with combined PET and MRI perfusion imaging at rest...... and during stress induced by dipyridamole in order to determine the myocardial perfusion reserve. Myocardial and blood time concentration curves obtained by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and (13)N-ammonia PET were fitted by a two-compartment perfusion model. RESULTS: Mean perfusion values (+/-SD) derived from the MRI...... as a quantitative marker for myocardial perfusion in healthy humans....

  7. Bubble dynamics in perfused tissue undergoing decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, S; Nir, A; Kerem, D

    1981-02-01

    A mathematical model describing bubble dynamics in a perfused tissue undergoing decompression is presented, taking into account physical expansion and inward diffusion from surrounding supersaturated tissue as growth promoting factors and tissue gas elimination by perfusion, tissue elasticity, surface tension and inherent unsaturation as resolving driving forces. The expected behavior after a step reduction of pressure of a bubble initially existing in the tissue, displaying both growth and resolution has been demonstrated. A strong perfusion-dependence of bubble resolution time at low perfusion rates is apparent. The model can account for various exposure pressures and saturation fractions of any inert gas-tissue combination for which a set of physical and physiological parameters is available.

  8. Absence of Y chromosome in human placental site trophoblastic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Pei; Wang, Hanlin L; Chu, Peiguo; Yang, Bin; Huang, Jiaoti; Baergen, Rebecca N; Sklar, Jeffrey; Yang, Ximing J; Soslow, Robert A

    2007-10-01

    Placental site trophoblastic tumor is a neoplasm of extravillous intermediate trophoblast at the implantation site, preceded in the majority of cases by a female gestational event. Our pilot investigation suggested that the development of this tumor might require a paternally derived X chromosome and the absence of a Y chromosome. Twenty cases of placental site trophoblastic tumor were included in this study. Genotyping at 15 polymorphic loci and one sex determination locus was performed by multiplex PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis. X chromosome polymorphisms were determined by PCR amplification of exon 1 of the human androgen receptor gene using primers flanking the polymorphic CAG repeats within this region. Genotyping at 15 polymorphic loci was informative and paternal alleles were present in all tumors, confirming the trophoblastic origin of the tumors. The presence of an X chromosome and the absence of a Y chromosome were observed in all tumors. Among 13 cases in which analysis of the X chromosome polymorphism was informative, all but one demonstrated at least two X alleles and seven cases showed one identifiable paternal X allele. These results confirm a unique pathogenetic mechanism in placental site trophoblastic tumor, involving an exclusion of the Y chromosome from the genome and, therefore, a tumor arising from the trophectoderm of a female conceptus. As epigenetic regulations of imprinting during X chromosome inactivation are of significant biological implications, placental site trophoblastic tumor may provide an important model for studying the sex chromosome biology and the proliferative advantage conferred by the paternal X chromosome.

  9. Placental Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites Is Mediated by the Interaction Between VAR2CSA and Chondroitin Sulfate A on Syndecan-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres Pereira, Marina; Mandel Clausen, Thomas; Pehrson, Caroline; Mao, Yang; Resende, Mafalda; Daugaard, Mads; Riis Kristensen, Anders; Spliid, Charlotte; Mathiesen, Line; E Knudsen, Lisbeth; Damm, Peter; G Theander, Thor; R Hansson, Stefan; A Nielsen, Morten; Salanti, Ali

    2016-08-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the placental syncytium. However, the identity of the CSPG core protein and the cellular impact of the interaction have remain elusive. In this study we identified the specific CSPG core protein to which the CS is attached, and characterized its exact placental location. VAR2CSA pull-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial fusion of the BeWo cells, triggered by forskolin treatment, caused an increased expression of placental CS-modified syndecan-1. In line with this, we show that rVAR2 binding to placental CS impairs syndecan-1-related Src signaling in forskolin treated BeWo cells, but not in untreated cells.

  10. EFFECTS OF SECRETABLE PLACENTAL FACTORS UPON SECRETION OF CYTOKINES BY THP-1 MONOCYTE-LIKE CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. S. Onokhina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Мonocytes in feto-placental circulation are exposed to factors secreted by placental tissue. These factors influence monocyte functions in pregnancy. In present study, an in vitro model (monocyte-like THP-1 cells was used for assessing effects of soluble placental factors obtained from women with physiological pregnancies, or preeclampsia cases. The following effects of placental factors were revealed: increased secretion of VEGF by THP-1 cells along with decreased secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 under the influence of placental factors from the I. trimester of pregnancy in comparison with III. trimester. Secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 by THP-1 cells was increased, and secretion of soluble TNFRII was decreased upon co-cultivation with soluble placental factors from the women with preeclampsia, as compared with placental products from physiological pregnancies.The work is supported by grants ГК № 02.740.11.0711 from Ministry of Education and Science, and НШ-3594.2010.7 grant from the President of Russian Federation.

  11. Hypertension produced by placental ischemia in pregnant rats is associated with increased soluble endoglin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Gilbert, Sara A B; Arany, Marietta; Granger, Joey P

    2009-02-01

    Recent clinical studies indicate that an excess of angiostatic factors, such as soluble endoglin (sEng), is related to the occurrence of preeclampsia. Although recent clinical studies report that sEng is increased in preeclamptic women, the mechanisms underlying its overexpression remain unclear. Evidence suggests that hypoxia and induction of heme oxygenase-1 have opposing effects on sEng expression, the former stimulatory and the latter inhibitory. Hence, we hypothesized that placental ischemia because of reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) in the pregnant rat would increase sEng expression and decrease heme oxygenase-1. Mean arterial pressure was obtained via arterial catheter, and serum and placental proteins were measured by Western blot. Mean arterial pressure was increased (132+/-3 mm Hg versus 102+/-2 mm Hg; Papu] versus 0.05+/-0.01 apu; Papu versus 1.45+/-0.42 apu; Papu versus 0.68+/-0.09 apu; Papu versus 2.5+/-0.1 apu; P<0.05) expression decreased in the RUPP compared with normal pregnant dams. The present findings support our hypothesis that placental ischemia because of RUPP increases the expression of sEng and shifts the balance of angiogenic factors in the maternal circulation toward an angiostatic state. The present study provides further evidence that placental ischemia is a strong in vivo stimulus of angiostatic factors during pregnancy.

  12. The impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzinger Silvana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methadone is the therapeutic agent of choice for the treatment of opiate addiction in pregnancy. The co-consumption (heroin, cocaine which may influence the effects of methadone is frequent. Therefore, the impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone and the placental tissue was investigated under in vitro conditions. Methods Placentae (n = 24 were ex-vivo perfused with medium (m (control, n = 6, m plus methadone (n = 6, m plus methadone and cocaine (n = 6 or m plus methadone and heroin (n = 6. Placental functionality parameters like antipyrine permeability, glucose consumption, lactate production, hormone production (hCG and leptin, microparticles release and the expression of P-glycoprotein were analysed. Results Methadone accumulated in placental tissue. Methadone alone decreased the transfer of antipyrine from 0.60 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.06 (fetal/maternal ratio, mean +/- SD, P Conclusion The combination of cocaine or heroin with methadone increase antipyrine permeability. Changes of MPs resemble findings seen in oxidative stress of syncytiotrophoblast.

  13. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 90...... patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after...... starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. RESULTS: 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion...

  14. Co-Exposure Effects of LPS with Various Aflatoxin B1 Doses in Isolated Perfused Rat Liver Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Koohi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activation of inflammatory cells can cause more chemicals induced-hepatotoxicity. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is a fungal toxin that induces acute hepatotoxicity in humans and animals. This study was conducted to examine the effect of co-exposure LPS and various aflatoxin B1 doses on the damage hepatic parameters in isolated perfused rat liver. Methods: Thirty-two male wistar rats (250-300g were divided to eight groups including Control and LPS; three groups with various doses of AFB1 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 ppm and three groups with various doses of AFB1 and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS (300 ppm. Activity of Aspartate transaminase (AST and Alanine transaminase (ALT were determined in perfusate. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and Glutathione (GSH concentrations were measured in homogenate liver. Results: At two groups of AFB 1 (with LPS and without LPS at AFB1 concentrations of 0.1 and 1 ppm, elevation of AST and ALT enzymes activity were indicated. Values of GSH in both of groups (AFB 1 with LPS and without LPS had reduced at concentration of 1 ppm. TBARS concentrations were enhanced in AFB1 concentration of 1 ppm in both of groups (with LPS and without LPS, however in comparison between groups (with LPS and without LPS in similar concentrations significant different did not observe (P<0.05. Conclusion: Non-injurious dose of LPS did not enhance liver susceptibility to various doses of AFB1 in perfused rat liver. This may be in part of due to extrahepatic factors, which contribute, in more liver damage.

  15. Maternal Outcomes According to Placental Position in Placental Previa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Gyu Jang, Ji Sun We, Jae Un Shin, Yun Jin Choi, Hyun Sun Ko, In Yang Park, Jong Chul Shin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to elucidate whether the location of placenta below uterine incision in cesarean section is important in the development of maternal complications in placenta previa patients.Methods: The study was conducted on 409 patients 414 parturition at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 to December 2009. The subjects were divided to two groups: the group whose placenta was located in the anterior portion of the uterus (anterior group and the group whose placenta was located in the posterior portion of the uterus (posterior group. And then they are compared to each other. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors.Results: In the anterior group, regardless of confounding factors, the incidence of excessive blood loss (OR 2.97; 95% CI: 1.64-5.37, massive transfusion (OR 3.31; 95% CI: 1.33-8.26, placental accreta (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.40-4.83, and hysterectomy (OR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.39-8.68 was higher.Conclusion: Sonographic determination of the placental position where its location beneath the uterine incision is very important to predict maternal outcomes in placenta previa patients, and such cases, close attention should be paid for massive hemorrhage.

  16. Dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Ribeiro, Tarcisio P.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2011-07-01

    This paper conducts a dosimetric investigation on the myocardial perfusion image protocol, together with a literature reviewing, motivated by the significant statistic increasing on mortality, morbidity and disability associated with cardiovascular disease, surpassing infectious diseases. Nuclear Cardiology plays a role n the diagnostic functional evaluation of the heart and in the prognostic of patients with suspected or known cardiac ischemia. In the context of unstable myocardial ischemic syndrome, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure performed by administering a radiopharmaceutical targeted to the heart. As tool for this study are that the images obtained by thoracic angiotomography and abdominal aorta as a anatomic and functional information for model reproduction in SISCODES - System of Codes for Absorbed Dose Calculations based on Stochastic Methods. Data were manipulated in order to create a voxel computational model of the heart to be running in MCNP - Monte Carlo Neutron Particle Code. . It was assumed a homogeneous distribution of Tl-201 in cardiac muscle. Simulations of the transport of particles through the voxel and the interaction with the heart tissue were performed. As a result, the isodose curves in the heart model are displayed as well as the dose versus volume histogram of the heart muscle. We conclude that the present computational tools can generate doses distributed in myocardial perfusion. (author)

  17. Examining a hypothetical quantitative model for better approximation of culprit coronary artery and site of stenosis on 99mTc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sushanta; Sen, Srabani; Das, Debasis; Basu, Sandip

    2016-10-01

    A hypothetical quantitative model of analyzing gated myocardial perfusion SPECT is proposed and examined for the feasibility of its use as a predictor of diseased coronary artery and approximating the site of stenosis to determine whether it could serve as a useful noninvasive complement for coronary angiography. The extent and severity of perfusion defects on rest gated myocardial perfusion imaging SPECT-images were assessed on a five-point scale in a standard 17-segment model and total perfusion deficit was quantified by automated software. The first step was to locate the diseased coronary artery using a quantitative method: for this, the score of each segment belonging to a particular coronary artery was determined using a systematic presumptive approach. After determination of specific coronary artery segments, the scores of the contiguous segments in three short axis slices (apical, middle, and basal) were summed for six subdivisions (anterior, anterolateral, inferolateral, inferior, anteroseptal, and inferoseptal). The site of stenosis was determined from (a) the initial approximation of the involved segments with a defect score of 2-4 and (b) subsequent calculation of the defect score of each of the six subdivisions and allocating the site through a preassigned number for each coronary artery. For each coronary artery, only the subdivision with the highest defect score was considered. Proximal, middle, and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD) were considered to be represented when the summed value of a subdivision within a particular arterial territory was more than or equal to 7, between 5 and 7, 5 and 3, respectively. For the left circumflex and right coronary artery, summed scores (of respective subdivisions) of more than or equal to 5 and between 3 and 5 were preassigned to proximal and distal stenosis, respectively. The results were then correlated with the coronary angiographic data. On coronary angiography, proximal LAD occlusion

  18. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Capellini

    Full Text Available Placental invasiveness-the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood-is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness.

  19. Placental urocortins and CRF in late gestation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepels, P.P.L.M.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.; Bulten, J.; Smits, P.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Lotgering, F.K.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Placental corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) are thought to induce labor via activation of CRF receptor type 1 (CRF-R1) leading to several feed forward mechanisms in the placental, fetal and maternal compartments. Recently, receptor type 2 (CRF-R2) selective ligands called urocortin 2 and 3 (Ucn

  20. Placental iron uptake and its regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bierings (Marc)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIron transport in pregnancy is an active one-way process, from mother to fetus. Early in gestation fetal iron needs are low, and so is trans-placental transport, but as erythropoiesis develops, rising fetal iron needs are met by trans-placental iron transport. Apparently, the fetus is pr

  1. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  2. Placental ABC transporters, cellular toxicity and stress in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Keelan, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-25

    The human placenta, in addition to its roles as a nutrient transfer and endocrine organ, functions as a selective barrier to protect the fetus against the harmful effects of exogenous and endogenous toxins. Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins limit the entry of xenobiotics into the fetal circulation via vectorial efflux from the placenta to the maternal circulation. Several members of the ABC family, including proteins from the ABCA, ABCB, ABCC and ABCG subfamilies, have been shown to be functional in the placenta with clinically significant roles in xenobiotic efflux. However, recent findings suggest that these transporters also protect placental tissue by preventing the cellular accumulation of cytotoxic compounds such as lipids, sterols and their derivatives. Such protective functions are likely to be particularly important in pregnancies complicated by inflammatory or oxidative stress, where the generation of toxic metabolites is enhanced. For example, ABC transporters have been shown to protect against the harmful effects of hypoxia and oxidative stress through increased expression and efflux of oxysterols and glutathione conjugated xenobiotics. However, this protective capacity may be diminished in response to the same stressors. Several studies in primary human trophoblast cells and animal models have demonstrated decreased expression and activity of placental ABC transporters with inflammatory, oxidative or metabolic stress. Several clinical studies in pregnancies complicated by inflammatory conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes support these findings, although further studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of the relationships between placental ABC transporter expression and activity, and placental function in stressed pregnancies. Such studies are necessary to fully understand the consequences of pregnancy disorders on placental function and viability in order to optimise pregnancy

  3. Perfusion Linearity and Its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pianykh, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion analysis computes blood flow parameters (blood volume, blood flow, mean transit time) from the observed flow of contrast agent, passing through the patient's vascular system. Perfusion deconvolution has been widely accepted as the principal numerical tool for perfusion analysis, and is used routinely in clinical applications. This extensive use of perfusion in clinical decision-making makes numerical stability and robustness of perfusion computations vital for accurate diagnostics and patient safety. The main goal of this paper is to propose a novel approach for validating numerical properties of perfusion algorithms. The approach is based on Perfusion Linearity Property (PLP), which we find in perfusion deconvolution, as well as in many other perfusion techniques. PLP allows one to study perfusion values as weighted averages of the original imaging data. This, in turn, uncovers hidden problems with the existing deconvolution techniques, and may be used to suggest more reliable computational approac...

  4. Placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry in pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.R. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of radiation dose estimates to the fetus is often important in nuclear medicine. To obtain the best estimates of radiation dose to the fetus, the best biological and physical models should be employed. In this paper, after identification of radiopharmaceuticals often administered to women of childbearing age, the most recent data available on the placental crossover of these radiopharmaceuticals was used (with standard kinetic models describing the maternal distribution and retention and with the best available physical models) to obtain fetal dose estimates for these radiopharmaceuticals were identified as those most commonly administered to women of childbearing years. The literature yielded information on placental crossover of 15 radiopharmaceuticals, from animal or human data. Radiation dose estimates are presented in early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-months gestation for these radiopharmaceuticals, as well as for many others used in nuclear medicine (the latter considering only maternal organ contributions to fetal dose). 46 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  6. A tri-exponential model for intravoxel incoherent motion analysis of the human kidney: In silico and during pharmacological renal perfusion modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bel, René; Gurney-Champion, Oliver J; Froeling, Martijn; Stroes, Erik S G; Nederveen, Aart J; Krediet, C T Paul

    2017-06-01

    In the kidneys, there is both blood flow through the capillaries and flow of pre-urine through the tubuli and collecting ducts. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI measures both blood and pre-urine flow when using a tri-exponential intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model. Our aim was to systematically investigate and optimize tri-exponential IVIM-analysis for the kidney and test its sensitivity to renal perfusion changes in humans. The tri-exponential fit probes the diffusion coefficient (D), the intermediate (D*i) and fast (D*f) pseudo-diffusion coefficients, and their signal fractions, fD, fi and ff. First, we studied the effects of fixing the D*-coefficients of the tri-exponential fit using in silico simulations. Then, using a 3T MRI scanner, DW images were acquired in healthy subjects (18-24 years) and we assessed the within-subject coefficient of variation (wsCV, n=6). Then, renal perfusion was modulated by Angiotensin II infusion during which DW imaging of the kidneys and phase contrast MRI of the renal artery was performed (n=8). Radioisotope clearing tests were used to assess the glomerular filtration rate. Simulations showed that fixing the D*-coefficients - which could potentially increase the fit stability - in fact decreased the precision of the model. Changes in D*-coefficients were translated into the f-parameters instead. Fixing D*-coefficients resulted in a stronger response of the fit parameters to the intervention. Using this model, the wsCVs for D, fD, fi and ff were 2.4%, 0.8%, 3.5%, 19.4% respectively. fi decreased by 14% (p=0.059) and ff increased by 32% (p=0.004) between baseline and maximal Angiotensin II dose. ff inversely correlated to renal plasma flow (R=-0.70, ptri-exponential model. The model is able to track renal perfusion changes induced by Angiotensin II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nomenclature and placental mammal phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgen Kristofer M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An issue arising from recent progress in establishing the placental mammal Tree of Life concerns the nomenclature of high-level clades. Fortunately, there are now several well-supported clades among extant mammals that require unambiguous, stable names. Although the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature does not apply above the Linnean rank of family, and while consensus on the adoption of competing systems of nomenclature does not yet exist, there is a clear, historical basis upon which to arbitrate among competing names for high-level mammalian clades. Here, we recommend application of the principles of priority and stability, as laid down by G.G. Simpson in 1945, to discriminate among proposed names for high-level taxa. We apply these principles to specific cases among placental mammals with broad relevance for taxonomy, and close with particular emphasis on the Afrotherian family Tenrecidae. We conclude that no matter how reconstructions of the Tree of Life change in years to come, systematists should apply new names reluctantly, deferring to those already published and maximizing consistency with existing nomenclature.

  8. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  9. Effects of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation on oxygen metabolism and tissue perfusion in sheep models of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Songqiao; Huang Yingzi; Wang Maohua; Chen Qiuhua; Liu Ling; Xie Jianfeng; Tan Li

    2014-01-01

    Background High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) allows for small tidal volumes at mean airway pressures (mPaw) above that of conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV),but the effect of HFOV on hemodynamics,oxygen metabolism,and tissue perfusion in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unclear.We investigated the effects of HFOV and CMV in sheep models with ARDS.Methods After inducing ARDS by repeated lavage,twelve adult sheep were randomly divided into a HFOV or CMV group.After stabilization,standard lung recruitments (40 cmH2O × 40 seconds) were performed.The optimal mPaw or positive end-expiratory pressure was obtained by lung recruitment and decremental positive end-expiratory pressure titration.The animals were then ventilated for 4 hours.The hemodynamics,tissue perfusion (superior mesenteric artery blood flow,pHi,and Pg-aCO2),oxygen metabolism and respiratory mechanics were examined at baseline before saline lavage,in the ARDS model,after model stabilization,and during hourly mechanical ventilation for up to 4 hours.A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was applied to evaluate differences between the groups.Results The titrated mPaw was higher and the tidal volumes lower in the HFOV group than the positive end-expiratory pressure in the CMV group.There was no significant difference in hemodynamic parameters between the HFOV and CMV groups.There was no difference in the mean alveolar pressure between the two groups.After lung recruitment,both groups showed an improvement in the oxygenation,oxygen delivery,and DO2.Lactate levels increased in both groups after inducing the ARDS model.Compared with the CMV group,the superior mesenteric artery blood flow and pHi were significantly higher in the HFOV group,but the Pg-aCO2 decreased in the HFOV group.Conclusion Compared with CMV,HFOV with optimal mPaw has no significant side effect on hemodynamics or oxygen metabolism,and increases gastric tissue blood perfusion.

  10. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  11. Intestinal and placental zinc transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Dianne

    2004-02-01

    Mammalian members of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) and zrt-, irt-like protein (ZIP) families of Zn transporters, initially identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thalania spp., have been cloned during the last 8 years and have been classified as families SLC30 and SLC39 respectively. The cloning of human Zn transporters ZnT-like transporter 1 (hZTL1)/ZnT5 (SLC30A5) and hZIP4 (SLC39A4) were major advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of dietary Zn absorption. Both transporters are localised at the enterocyte apical membrane and are, therefore, potentially of fundamental importance in dietary Zn uptake. hZTL1 mediates Zn uptake when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and hZIP4 is mutated in most cases of the inherited Zn deficiency disease acrodermatitis enteropathica. Localisation of hZTL1/ZnT5 at the apical membrane of the placental syncytiotrophoblast indicates a fundamental role in the transfer of Slc30 Zn to the foetus. Observations in rodent models indicate that in the intestine increased Zn availability increases expression of Zn transporters. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells show a similar response to increasing the Zn2+ concentration of the nutrient medium in relation to the expression of mRNA corresponding to several Zn transporters and that of ZnT1 (SLC30A1) and hZTL1/ZnT5 proteins. In the human placental cell line JAR, however, expression at the mRNA level of a number of Zn transporters is not modified by Zn availability, whilst ZnT1 and hZTL1/ZnT5 proteins are reduced under Zn-supplemented conditions. These differences between Caco-2 and JAR cells in Zn transporter gene responses to Zn supply may reflect the different extracellular Zn concentrations encountered by the corresponding cell types in vitro.

  12. Newborn body fat: associations with maternal metabolic state and placental size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla M Friis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal body composition has implications for the health of the newborn both in short and long term perspective. The objective of the current study was first to explore the association between maternal BMI and metabolic parameters associated with BMI and neonatal percentage body fat and to determine to which extent any associations were modified if adjusting for placental weight. Secondly, we examined the relations between maternal metabolic parameters associated with BMI and placental weight. METHODS: The present work was performed in a subcohort (n = 207 of the STORK study, an observational, prospective study on the determinants of fetal growth and birthweight in healthy pregnancies at Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Fasting glucose, insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acids, HDL- and total cholesterol were measured at week 30-32. Newborn body composition was determined by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA. Placenta was weighed at birth. Linear regression models were used with newborn fat percentage and placental weight as main outcomes. RESULTS: Maternal BMI, fasting glucose and gestational age were independently associated with neonatal fat percentage. However, if placental weight was introduced as a covariate, only placental weight and gestational age remained significant. In the univariate model, the determinants of placenta weight included BMI, insulin, triglycerides, total- and HDL-cholesterol (negatively, gestational weight gain and parity. In the multivariable model, BMI, total cholesterol HDL-cholesterol, gestational weight gain and parity remained independent covariates. CONCLUSION: Maternal BMI and fasting glucose were independently associated with newborn percentage fat. This effect disappeared by introducing placental weight as a covariate. Several metabolic factors associated with maternal BMI were associated with placental weight, but not with neonatal body fat. Our findings are consistent with a concept

  13. Monitoring Stroke Progression: In Vivo Imaging of Cortical Perfusion, Blood—Brain Barrier Permeability and Cellular Damage in the Rat Photothrombosis Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schoknecht, Karl; Prager, Ofer; Vazana, Udi; Kamintsky, Lyn; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Figge, Lena; Chassidim, Yoash; Schellenberger, Eyk; Kovács, Richard; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we describe a longitudinal in vivo fluorescence imaging approach for the evaluation of cortical perfusion, BBB dysfunction, free radical formation and cellular injury using the photothrombosis...

  14. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method.

  15. A simple mathematical model and practical approach for evaluating citric acid cycle fluxes in perfused rat hearts by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Bouet, F; Herve, M

    1997-04-15

    We propose a simple mathematical model and a practical approach for evaluating the flux constant and the absolute value of flux in the citric acid cycle in perfused organs by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. We demonstrate that 13C-NMR glutamate spectra are independent of the relative sizes of the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments and the exchange rates of glutamates, unless there is a difference in 13C chemical shifts of glutamate carbons between the two compartments. Wistar rat hearts (five beating and four KCl-arrested hearts) were aerobically perfused with 100% enriched [2-(13)C]acetate and the kinetics of glutamate carbon labeling from perchloric acid extracts were studied at various perfusion times. Under our experimental conditions, the citric acid cycle flux constant, which represents the fraction of glutamate in exchange with the citric acid cycle per unit time, is about 0.350 +/- 0.003 min(-1) for beating hearts and 0.0741 +/- 0.004 min(-1) for KCl-arrested hearts. The absolute values of the citric acid flux for beating hearts and for KCl-arrested hearts are 1.06 +/- 0.06 micromol x min(-1) x mg(-1) and 0.21 +/- 0.02 micromol x min(-1) x g(-1), respectively. The fraction of unlabeled acetate determined from the proton signal of the methyl group is small and essentially the same in beating and arrested hearts (7.4 +/- 1.7% and 8.8 +/- 2.1%, respectively). Thus, the large difference in the Glu C2/C4 between beating and arrested hearts is not due to the important contribution from anaplerotic sources in arrested hearts but simply to a substantial difference in citric acid cycle fluxes. Our model fits the experimental data well, indicating a fast exchange between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate in the mitochondria of rat hearts. Analysis of the flux constant, calculated from the half-time of glutamate C4 labeling given in the literature, allows for a comparison of the citric acid flux for various working conditions in different animal species.

  16. Feto- and utero-placental vascular adaptations to chronic maternal hypoxia in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Rennie, Monique Y; Hoggarth, Johnathan; Yu, Lisa X; Rahman, Anum; Kingdom, John C; Seed, Mike; Macgowan, Christopher K; Sled, John G

    2017-09-01

    Chronic fetal hypoxia is one of the most common complications of pregnancy and is known to cause fetal growth restriction. The structural adaptations of the placental vasculature responsible for growth restriction with chronic hypoxia are not well elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic maternal hypoxia in combination with micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy, we found several placental adaptations that were beneficial to fetal growth including capillary expansion, thinning of the interhaemal membrane and increased radial artery diameters, resulting in a large drop in total utero-placental vascular resistance. One of the mechanisms used to achieve the rapid increase in capillaries was intussusceptive angiogenesis, a strategy used in human placental development to form terminal gas-exchanging villi. These results contribute to our understanding of the structural mechanisms of the placental vasculature responsible for fetal growth restriction and provide a baseline for understanding adaptive physiological responses of the placenta to chronic hypoxia. The fetus and the placenta in eutherian mammals have a unique set of compensatory mechanisms to respond to several pregnancy complications including chronic maternal hypoxia. This study examined the structural adaptations of the feto- and utero-placental vasculature in an experimental mouse model of chronic maternal hypoxia (11% O2 from embryonic day (E) 14.5-E17.5). While placental weights were unaffected by exposure to chronic hypoxia, using micro-computed tomography, we found a 44% decrease in the absolute feto-placental arterial vascular volume and a 30% decrease in total vessel segments in the chronic hypoxia group compared to control group. Scanning electron microscopy imaging showed significant expansion of the capillary network; consequently, the interhaemal membrane was 11% thinner to facilitate maternal-fetal exchange in the chronic hypoxia placentas. One of the mechanisms for the rapid

  17. The evolution of epitheliochorial placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Anthony M; Enders, Allen C

    2013-01-01

    Epitheliochorial placentation is a derived condition and has evolved separately in strepsirrhine primates and laurasiatherians (pangolins, whales, and hoofed mammals). Usually it is associated with a long gestation period, small litters, and precocial young. Oxygen transfer is facilitated by indenting of the uterine and trophoblast epithelia by maternal and fetal capillaries, respectively. Histotrophic nutrition is important, and adaptations include areolas and hemophagous regions. In pigs and horses, for example, iron is transported as uteroferrin secreted from the uterine glands and taken up by areolas. In the horse, invasive trophoblast cells form cups within the endometrium that are the source of equine chorionic gonadotropin. In ruminants, binucleate trophoblast cells fuse with uterine epithelial cells to form trinucleate cells or plaques that secrete pregnancy hormones. There is evidence of immunosuppression in connection with these more invasive types of trophoblasts. The epitheliochorial condition may be advantageous for long pregnancies in large animals.

  18. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-07

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  19. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CORRELATION OF PLACENTAL THICKNESS WITH FETAL GESTATIONAL AGE AND GRADING OF PLACENTAL MATURIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Comparative correlation of placental thickness with foetal gestational age, and evaluation of placental maturity by ultrasonography. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study includes 100 normal singleton gestations between 10 to 40 weeks of gestation referred to our centre for routine antenatal ultrasound examination. All the women were evaluated by transabdominal ultrasonography. Foetal gestational age in weeks was determined by crown rump length, biparietal diameter, head circumference, abdominal circumference and femoral length. Placental thickness was measured in millimeters. All the placentae were graded using ultrasonographic grading system. RESULTS Our observations revealed that the placental thickness gradually increased from 11.8 mm at 12 weeks to 38.5 mm at 39 weeks. Placental thickness almost corresponds to advancing gestational age exhibiting a linear and direct growth. Progressive maturity changes were noted in placenta with advancing gestational age. CONCLUSION Placental thickness measured at cord insertion site can be used as one of the parameter for estimating foetal gestational age. Placental thickness measurement can also be used to differentiate certain abnormal conditions related to thick and thin placenta. Ultrasonographic placental grading helps to rule out certain conditions associated with premature or delayed placental maturation

  20. Hypoxia and the anticoagulants dalteparin and acetylsalicylic acid affect human placental amino acid transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Jens Kleppa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulants, e.g. low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA are prescribed to women at risk for pregnancy complications that are associated with impaired placentation and placental hypoxia. Beyond their role as anticoagulants these compounds exhibit direct effects on trophoblast but their impact on placental function is unknown. The amino acid transport systems A and L, which preferably transfer essential amino acids, are well-described models to study placental nutrient transport. We aimed to examine the effect of hypoxia, LMWHs and ASA on the activity of the placental amino acid transport systems A and L and associated signalling mechanisms. METHODS: The uptake of C14-MeAIB (system A or H3-leucin (system L was investigated after incubation of primary villous fragments isolated from term placentas. Villous tissue was incubated at 2% O2 (hypoxia, 8% O2 and standard culture conditions (21% O2 or at 2% O2 and 21% O2 with dalteparin or ASA. Activation of the JAK/STAT or mTOR signalling pathways was determined by Western analysis of total and phosphorylated STAT3 or Raptor. RESULTS: Hypoxia decreased system A mediated MeAIB uptake and increased system L mediated leucine uptake compared to standard culture conditions (21% O2. This was accompanied by an impairment of STAT3 and a stimulation of Raptor signalling. System L activity increased at 8% O2. Dalteparin treatment reduced system A and system L activity under normoxic conditions and ASA (1 mM decreased system A and L transporter activity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our data underline the dependency of placental function on oxygen supply. LMWHs and ASA are not able to reverse the effects of hypoxia on placental amino acid transport. These findings and the uncovering of the signalling mechanisms in more detail will help to understand the impact of LMWHs and ASA on placental function and fetal growth.

  1. Comparison of two different blood pumps on delivery of gaseous microemboli during pulsatile and nonpulsatile perfusion in a simulated infant CPB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Myers, John L; Undar, Akif

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two different blood pumps (Jostra roller pump vs. Medos deltastream DP1 rotary pump) on delivery of gaseous microemboli during pulsatile and nonpulsatile perfusion in a simulated infant cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) model. The Jostra and Medos pump were used in parallel pattern. The circuit was primed with lactated ringer's solution (700 ml) and the postfilter pressure was maintained at 100 mm Hg. Three transducers (postpump, postoxygenator and postfilter sites) of the Emboli Detection and Classification (EDAC) Quantifier were inserted into the CPB circuit to detect and classify gaseous microemboli. Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 500 to 1250 ml/min (250 ml/min increments). The arterial filter purge line was kept open during all trials. After injecting 20 ml air into the venous line, 2-minute segments of data were recorded simultaneously through three transducers. This entire process was repeated six times for each unique combination of blood pump, flow rate and perfusion mode, yielding a total of 96 experiments. Independent of perfusion mode and flow rate, Medos pump delivered less gaseous microemboli than Jostra pump at the postpump site, but only at 1,250 ml/min of pump flow rate the differences reached statistical significance (p < 0.01). There was no difference in delivery at the postfilter site. Compared with nonpulsatile flow, pulsatile flow transferred significantly more gaseous microemboli at the postpump site at 1,250 ml/min of pump flow rate in both groups (p < 0.01). The majority of gaseous microemboli were trapped by the membrane oxygenator. The results of this study confirm that rotary pump could deliver less gaseous microemboli than roller pump at the postpump site when a fixed volume air was introduced into the venous line. Pulsatile flow could transfer more gaseous microemboli at the postpump site, no matter which blood pump was used. Only few gaseous microemboli appeared at the postfilter

  2. Hyperemesis gravidarum and placental dysfunction disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudijs, Heleen M; Savitri, Ary I; Browne, Joyce L; Amelia, Dwirani; Baharuddin, Mohammad; Grobbee, Diederick E; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence about the consequence of hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) on pregnancy outcomes is still inconclusive. In this study, we evaluated if occurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum is associated with placental dysfunction disorders and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was

  3. Postpartum deaths: piglet, placental, and umbilical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rootwelt, V; Reksen, O; Farstad, W; Framstad, T

    2013-06-01

    The fetal growth of the piglet is highly dependent on its placenta, and the newborn piglet birth weight is highly associated with postpartum death. However, there is little information available in the literature on the assessment of the placenta in relation to postpartum death in piglets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the placental area and placental weight, status of the umbilical cord, and piglet birth characteristics, such as blood parameters, vitality score, and birth weight on postpartum death. All live born piglets in litters from 26 Landrace-Yorkshire sows were monitored during farrowing and the status of each was recorded, including placental area and placental weight and blood variables obtained from the piglets and umbilical veins. Out of the 386 live-born piglets, 16.8% died before weaning at 5 wk. Among these, 78.5% died within the first 3 d of life. Mean blood concentration of lactate was increased in piglets that did not survive to weaning (P = 0.003). Concentrations of hemoglobin and hematocrit were decreased (P Piglets born with a broken umbilical cord had a reduced vitality score vs. piglets born with an intact umbilical cord (P = 0.021), and they had an increased probability of dying before weaning (P = 0.050). Mean birth weight, body mass index, placental area (P piglets that died before weaning vs. those that survived. Birth weight and placental area were furthermore negatively associated with live litter size. Blood concentrations of IgG and albumin recorded at d 1 were decreased in piglets that died before weaning (P < 0.01), and blood concentration of albumin was positively associated with placental area (P < 0.001). We conclude that placental area and placental weight, status of the umbilical cord, birth weight, body mass index, blood concentrations of lactate, hemoglobin, and hematocrit recorded at birth, and blood concentrations of IgG and albumin recorded at d 1 were associated with postpartum death in this study

  4. Deoxynivalenol transport across the human placental barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeanette K S; Vikström, Anna C; Turner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    with the ex vivo dual perfusion model. The concentration of DON on the foetal side after 4h was about 21% of that on the maternal side at t=0. These results support the data from the BeWo monolayer model in respect to the transport rate of DON, and are consistent with our hypothesis of foetal exposure to DON...... revealed frequent human exposure. This study reports on DON transfer across the human placenta. Firstly, in vitro studies with the BeWo b30 clone were used as a rapid screening model showing transfer of DON through a stable confluent cell monolayer. Five term placentas were then used to study DON transfer...

  5. Deoxynivalenol transport across the human placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jeanette K S; Vikström, Anna C; Turner, Paul; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2011-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most commonly detected mycotoxin contaminant of cereal crops and cereal based food products in temperate regions of the world. DON causes adverse health effects in animals, passes through to the foetus and causes foetal abnormalities in animals. Biomonitoring for DON has revealed frequent human exposure. This study reports on DON transfer across the human placenta. Firstly, in vitro studies with the BeWo b30 clone were used as a rapid screening model showing transfer of DON through a stable confluent cell monolayer. Five term placentas were then used to study DON transfer with the ex vivo dual perfusion model. The concentration of DON on the foetal side after 4h was about 21% of that on the maternal side at t=0. These results support the data from the BeWo monolayer model in respect to the transport rate of DON, and are consistent with our hypothesis of foetal exposure to DON during pregnancy.

  6. Comparative aspects of trophoblast development and placentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Allen C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on the number of tissues separating maternal from fetal blood, placentas are classified as epitheliochorial, endotheliochorial or hemochorial. We review the occurrence of these placental types in the various orders of eutherian mammals within the framework of the four superorders identified by the techniques of molecular phylogenetics. The superorder Afrotheria diversified in ancient Africa and its living representatives include elephants, sea cows, hyraxes, aardvark, elephant shrews and tenrecs. Xenarthra, comprising armadillos, anteaters and sloths, diversified in South America. All placentas examined from members of these two oldest superorders are either endotheliochorial or hemochorial. The superorder Euarchontoglires includes two sister groups, Glires and Euarchonta. The former comprises rodents and lagomorphs, which typically have hemochorial placentas. The most primitive members of Euarchonta, the tree shrews, have endotheliochorial placentation. Flying lemurs and all higher primates have hemochorial placentas. However, the lemurs and lorises are exceptional among primates in having epitheliochorial placentation. Laurasiatheria, the last superorder to arise, includes several orders with epitheliochorial placentation. These comprise whales, camels, pigs, ruminants, horses and pangolins. In contrast, nearly all carnivores have endotheliochorial placentation, whilst bats have endotheliochorial or hemochorial placentas. Also included in Laurasiatheria are a number of insectivores that have many conserved morphological characters; none of these has epitheliochorial placentation. Consideration of placental type in relation to the findings of molecular phylogenetics suggests that the likely path of evolution in Afrotheria was from endotheliochorial to hemochorial placentation. This is also a likely scenario for Xenarthra and the bats. We argue that a definitive epitheliochorial placenta is a secondary specialization and that it

  7. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Stewart, Errol; Desjardins, Lise; Hadway, Jennifer; Morrison, Laura; Crukley, Cathie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia. Methods Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT) and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Tumor blood flow (BF) and standardized uptake value (SUV) were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR). Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining. Results Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV) and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004), SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007), FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031). However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001). Conclusions FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor. PMID:28264009

  8. Integrative understanding of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction using in vitro models: from ventilated/perfused lung to single arterial myocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Yoo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contractile response of a pulmonary artery (PA to hypoxia (hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction; HPV is a unique physiological reaction. HPV is beneficial for the optimal distribution of blood flow to differentially ventilated alveolar regions in the lung, thereby preventing systemic hypoxemia. Numerous in vitro studies have been conducted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying HPV. These studies indicate that PA smooth muscle cells (PASMCs sense lowers the oxygen partial pressure (PO2 and contract under hypoxia. As for the PO2-sensing molecules, a variety of ion channels in PASMCs had been suggested. Nonetheless, the modulator(s of the ion channels alone cannot mimic HPV in the experiments using PA segments and/or isolated organs. We compared the hypoxic responses of PASMCs, PAs, lung slices, and total lungs using a variety of methods (e.g., patch-clamp technique, isometric contraction measurement, video analysis of precision-cut lung slices, and PA pressure measurement in ventilated/perfused lungs. In this review, the relevant results are compared to provide a comprehensive understanding of HPV. Integration of the influences from surrounding tissues including blood cells as well as the hypoxic regulation of ion channels in PASMCs are indispensable for insights into HPV and other related clinical conditions.

  9. The distinct proteome of placental malaria parasites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, Michal; Hixson, Kim K.; Anderson, Lori; Ogata, Yuko; Mutabingwa, Theonest K.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2007-09-01

    Malaria proteins expressed on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) mediate adhesion and are targeted by protective immune responses. During pregnancy, IE sequester in the placenta. Placental IE bind to the molecule chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and preferentially transcribe the gene that encodes VAR2CSA, a member of the PfEMP1 variant surface antigen family. Over successive pregnancies women develop specific immunity to CSA-binding IE and antibodies to VAR2CSA. We used tandem mass spectrometry together with accurate mass and time tag technology to study IE membrane fractions of placental parasites. VAR2CSA peptides were detected in placental IE and in IE from children, but the MC variant of VAR2CSA was specifically associated with placental IE. We identified six conserved hypothetical proteins with putative TM or signal peptides that were exclusively expressed by the placental IE, and 11 such proteins that were significantly more abundant in placental IE. One of these hypothetical proteins, PFI1785w, is a 42kDa molecule detected by Western blot in parasites infecting pregnant women but not those infecting children.

  10. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and ti...

  11. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 90...... starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. RESULTS: 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion...... with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared...

  12. CT perfusion of the liver: principles and applications in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2014-08-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging-such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods-remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented.

  13. Optimization of in situ perfused rat intestine-liver model%大鼠原位肠肝血管灌流模型的优化及完善

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王素军; 莫李立; 杨本坤; 臧林泉; 潘雪刁; 王桂香; 谭毓治; 谢海棠

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To optimize perfusate composition of in situ perfused rat intestine-liver model and achieve the best perfusate formula. METHODS: The perfusion conditions were optimized t respectively. The Krebs-Ringer NaHCOs solution with bovine serum albumin and manni-tol and the Krebs-Ringer NaHCO3 solution with bovine serum albumin and dextran two T40 were contrasted for finding out the best perfusate medium. Then bovine serum albumin content in the optimal perfusion medium was optimized. RESULTS :K-R solution with bovine serum albumin and dextran T40 group was better than K-R solution with bovine serum albumin and mannitol group; 5% bovine serum albumin in perfusate is a more economic and ideal proportions. CONCLUSION: 5% bovine serum albumin in perfusate is a more economic and ideal proportions.%目的:对大鼠原位肠肝血管灌流模型的灌流液组成成分进行优化,以获取最佳灌流液配方.方法:对灌流条件进行优化,分别对Krebs-Ringer(K-R)液加牛血清白蛋白和甘露醇、K-R液加牛血清白蛋白和右旋糖酐T-40二者进行对比,找出最佳的灌流介质.然后对最佳的灌流介质中牛血清白蛋白的含量进行了优化.结果:K R液加牛血清白蛋白和右旋糖酐T-40组优于K-R液加牛血清白蛋白和甘露醇组;5%牛血清白蛋白的灌流液是一个较为经济理想的灌流液.结论:在灌流介质中5%牛血清白蛋白是一个较为理想和经济的比例.

  14. Hypothermic Machine Perfusion of Kidney Grafts: Which Pressure is Preferred?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Doorschodt; M.C.J.M. Schreinemachers; M. Behbahani; S. Florquin; J. Weis; M. Staat; R.H. Tolba

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effect of the perfusion pressure (PP) during machine perfusion (MP) on the preservation quality of kidney grafts, we compared mean PPs of 25 and 30 mmHg using a porcine autotransplantation model. After assessment of the microcirculation, animals underwent left nephrectomy. Thereafter,

  15. The placental exposome: Placental determinants of fetal adiposity and postnatal body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Lewis (R.); H. Demmelmair (Hans); R. Gaillard (Romy); N. Godfrey; S. Hauguel-De Mouzon (S.); B. Huppertz (B.); E. Larque (E.); R. Saffery (R.); M.E. Symonds (M.); G. Desoye (G.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOffspring of obese and diabetic mothers are at increased risk of being born with excess adiposity as a consequence of their intrauterine environment. Excessive fetal fat accretion reflects additional placental nutrient transfer, suggesting an effect of the maternal environment on placent

  16. The placental exposome: Placental determinants of fetal adiposity and postnatal body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Lewis (R.); H. Demmelmair (Hans); R. Gaillard (Romy); N. Godfrey; S. Hauguel-De Mouzon (S.); B. Huppertz (B.); E. Larque (E.); R. Saffery (R.); M.E. Symonds (M.); G. Desoye (G.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOffspring of obese and diabetic mothers are at increased risk of being born with excess adiposity as a consequence of their intrauterine environment. Excessive fetal fat accretion reflects additional placental nutrient transfer, suggesting an effect of the maternal environment on placent

  17. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable ext

  18. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  19. SUBMERGED PERFUSION BIOREACTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    to flow out of the body. USE - A biological device for cell culturing, enzymatic reactions or filtering of fluid (claimed). ADVANTAGE - The device has simple setup without the need of external pumping mechanisms to obtain a perfusion flow system. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - A biological device comprises a body...

  20. Hypoxia and Reoxygenation: a Possible Mechanism for Placental Oxidative Stress in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Ho Hung

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a human pregnancy-specific disorder that is diagnosed by the new appearance of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks' gestation. It is a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, and the only intervention that effectively reverses the syndrome is delivery. Oxidative stress of the placenta is considered to be a key intermediary step in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia, but the cause for the stress remains unknown. Hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R injury, as a result of intermittent placental perfusion secondary to deficient trophoblast invasion of the endometrial arteries, is a possible mechanism. In this review, we present evidence to show that there is a plausible basis from which to assume that blood flow in the intervillous space will be intermittent in all normal pregnancies. The intermittency will be exacerbated by impaired conversion of the spiral arteries, or by the presence of atherotic changes that reduce their caliber as seen in preeclampsia. Placental oxidative stress can be the consequences of fluctuations in oxygen concentrations after H/R through the actions of reactive oxygen species. On this basis, there will be a complete spectrum of placental changes among the normal, the late onset and the early onset preeclamptic states. Viewing the syndrome as a continuum of H/R insults provides new insight into the pathophysiology of pregnancy that will hopefully lead to improved clinical interventions.

  1. Placental lactogen secretion during prolonged-pregnancy in the rat: the ovary plays a pivotal role in the control of placental function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, K; Furuyama, N; Takahashi, M

    1991-10-01

    The serum of rats at mid-pregnancy contains at least 2 distinct placental lactogen (PL)-like substances tentatively termed placental lactogen-alpha (PL-alpha) and placental lactogen-beta (PL-beta) (Endocrinol Japon 38: 533-540, 1991). We have investigated the secretory patterns of three placental lactogens (PL-alpha, PL-beta and placental lactogen-II) during normal pregnancy and in two prolonged-pregnancy models. Pregnancy was prolonged by the introduction of new corpora lutea by inducing ovulation on day 15 of pregnancy by successive treatments with PMSG (30 IU/rat, sc on day 12) and hCG (10 IU/rat, iv on day 14), and in the second model by progesterone implants on day 15 of pregnancy. During normal pregnancy, each of the 3 PLs exhibited only one secretory peak in the serum; PL-alpha and PL-beta on day 12 and placental lactogen II (PL-II) on day 20. Interestingly, in the rats with new sets of corpora lutea, serum PL-alpha and PL-beta levels began to increase again on day 18 and showed peaks on day 20 for PL-alpha and on day 22 for PL-beta. In this model, the initiation of PL-II secretion was not affected, but high levels were maintained until day 26, when parturition occurred. In rats receiving either PMSG or hCG, the secretory patterns of the PLs were similar to as those during normal pregnancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Is there any correlation between model-based perfusion parameters and model-free parameters of time-signal intensity curve on dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in breast cancer patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Boram; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dukyong [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hyunee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To find out any correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) model-based parameters and model-free parameters, and evaluate correlations between perfusion parameters with histologic prognostic factors. Model-based parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) of 102 invasive ductal carcinomas were obtained using DCE-MRI and post-processing software. Correlations between model-based and model-free parameters and between perfusion parameters and histologic prognostic factors were analysed. Mean Kep was significantly higher in cancers showing initial rapid enhancement (P = 0.002) and a delayed washout pattern (P = 0.001). Ve was significantly lower in cancers showing a delayed washout pattern (P = 0.015). Kep significantly correlated with time to peak enhancement (TTP) (ρ = -0.33, P < 0.001) and washout slope (ρ = 0.39, P = 0.002). Ve was significantly correlated with TTP (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.002). Mean Kep was higher in tumours with high nuclear grade (P = 0.017). Mean Ve was lower in tumours with high histologic grade (P = 0.005) and in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor status (P = 0.047). TTP was shorter in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor status (P = 0.037). We could acquire general information about the tumour vascular physiology, interstitial space volume and pathologic prognostic factors by analyzing time-signal intensity curve without a complicated acquisition process for the model-based parameters. (orig.)

  3. The placental RCAS1 expression during stillbirth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetlak Tomasz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Independently of the fetal death cause the beginning and course of stillbirth is closely related with the growing cytotoxic activity at the maternal-fetal interface. RCAS1 participates in the inhibition of maternal immune response during pregnancy. The alterations of RCAS1 protein expression in placental cells seem to determine the beginning of the labor and participate in the placental abruption. The aim of the present study was to investigate RCAS1 expression in placentas obtained following stillbirths or normal term births. Methods: RCAS1 expression was evaluated by Western blot method with the use of monoclonal anti-RCAS1 antibody in 67 placental tissue samples. Pregnant women were divided into four groups according to the mode of labor onset – spontaneous or induced, and the type of labor, stillbirth or labor at term. Placental beta-Actin expression was chosen as a control protein. Relative amounts of placental RCAS1 were compared with the use of Student's t-test, whereas beta-Actin control data were compared with the use of Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The average relative amount of RCAS1 was significantly lower in women with induced stillbirths than in women with induced labor at term. Similarly, significantly lower RCAS1 placental levels were observed in patients with spontaneous stillbirths than in women with spontaneous labor at term. Significant differences in RCAS1 expression were also observed with the respect to the beginning of the stillbirth: spontaneous and induced. Lowest RCAS1 placental levels were observed in women with spontaneous stillbirth. Conclusions: These preliminary results indicate that the alterations of RCAS1 expression in the human placenta may be involved in the changes of maternal immune system that take place during stillbirth.

  4. Uterine Activin-Like Kinase 4 Regulates Trophoblast Development During Mouse Placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jia; Fullerton, Paul T; Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Su, Gloria H; Matzuk, Martin M

    2015-12-01

    The placenta is the first organ to develop after fertilization. It forms an interface between the maternal uterus and growing fetus to allow nutrient uptake, waste elimination, and gas exchange for a successful pregnancy in both mice and humans. In the past 2 decades, in vivo and in vitro approaches have been used to show that several members of the TGF-β superfamily regulate embryo implantation and placental development. Nodal, a TGF-β superfamily ligand, is essential for mesendoderm formation and left-right axis patterning during embryogenesis, and Nodal null mutants exhibit abnormal placental organization with expansion of trophoblast giant cells and a decrease of spongiotrophoblast and labyrinth. To better understand the importance of Nodal signaling in the uterus, we established a mouse model to conditionally ablate activin-like kinase 4 (ALK4; the Nodal type 1 receptor) using Cre recombinase driven by the progesterone receptor promoter sequences (Pgr-Cre). Alk4 conditional knockout females are subfertile due to placental abnormalities and fetal loss in pregnancy, with a placental disorganization phenotype similar to what is observed in Nodal null mice. Thus, Nodal likely functions as an indirect regulator of placental development by binding to type 1 and type 2 receptors on maternal decidual cells to stimulate expression of unknown regulators of placental development. Our findings not only describe the generation of a mouse model that enables study of Nodal signaling in placentation but also provides insights into the pathogenesis of pregnancy complications in humans, including spontaneous abortion, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, and preterm birth.

  5. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate kinetics differentiate normal, stunned, hibernating, and nonviable myocardium in a perfused rat heart model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, David R. [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Liu, Zhonglin [University of Arizona School of Medicine, Tucson, AZ (United States); Johnson, Gerald; Okada, Robert D. [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma, OK (United States); University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK (United States); Beju, Delia [Oklahoma State University School of Medicine, Tulsa, OK (United States); Khaw, Ban An [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-10-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate is an infarct-avid imaging agent. However, patients may have mixtures of normal, irreversibly injured, stunned, and hibernating myocardium. The purposes were to determine {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate uptake and clearance kinetics in these four conditions, and its ability to determine the extent of injury. Twenty-two perfused rat hearts were studied: controls (n = 5), stunned (n = 5; 20-min no-flow followed by 5-min reflow), hibernating (n = 6; 120-min low flow at 4 ml/min), and ischemic-reperfused (n = 6; 120-min no-flow followed by reflow). {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate was then infused. Tracer activity was monitored using a NaI scintillation detector and a multichannel analyzer. Creatine kinase, electron microscopy, and triphenyltetrazolium chloride determined viability. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate 10-min myocardial uptake was significantly greater in ischemic-reperfused (2.50 {+-} 0.09) (cpm, SEM) than in control (1.74 {+-} 0.07), stunned (1.68 {+-} 0.11), and hibernating (1.59 {+-} 0.11) (p < 0.05). Tracer retention curves for ischemic-reperfused were elevated at all time points as compared with the other groups. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate 60-min myocardial uptake was significantly greater in ischemic-reperfused (7.60 {+-} 0.63) than in control (1.98 {+-} 0.15), stunned (1.79 {+-} 0.08), and hibernating (2.33 {+-} 0.15) (p < 0.05). The 60-min well-counted tracer activity ratio of ischemic-reperfused to control was 9:1 and corroborated the NaI detector results. Creatine kinase, triphenyltetrazolium chloride, and electron microscopy all demonstrated significantly greater injury in ischemic-reperfused compared to the other groups. An excellent correlation was observed between viability markers and tracer activity (r = 0.99 triphenyltetrazolium chloride; r = 0.90 creatine kinase). {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate activity continually and progressively increased in irreversibly injured myocardium. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate uptake was strongly correlated with myocardial necrosis as

  6. Evolutionary perspectives into placental biology and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward B. Chuong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In all mammals including humans, development takes place within the protective environment of the maternal womb. Throughout gestation, nutrients and waste products are continuously exchanged between mother and fetus through the placenta. Despite the clear importance of the placenta to successful pregnancy and the health of both mother and offspring, relatively little is understood about the biology of the placenta and its role in pregnancy-related diseases. Given that pre- and peri-natal diseases involving the placenta affect millions of women and their newborns worldwide, there is an urgent need to understand placenta biology and development. Here, we suggest that the placenta is an organ under unique selective pressures that have driven its rapid diversification throughout mammalian evolution. The high divergence of the placenta complicates the use of non-human animal models and necessitates an evolutionary perspective when studying its biology and role in disease. We suggest that diversifying evolution of the placenta is primarily driven by intraspecies evolutionary conflict between mother and fetus, and that many pregnancy diseases are a consequence of this evolutionary force. Understanding how maternal–fetal conflict shapes both basic placental and reproductive biology – in all species – will provide key insights into diseases of pregnancy.

  7. A Long-term Co-perfused Disseminated Tuberculosis-3D Liver Hollow Fiber Model for Both Drug Efficacy and Hepatotoxicity in Babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Ramachandran, Geetha; Deshpande, Devyani; Shuford, Stephen; Crosswell, Howland E; Cirrincione, Kayle N; Sherman, Carleton M; Swaminathan, Soumya; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of disseminated tuberculosis in children≤6years has not been optimized. The pyrazinamide-containing combination regimen used to treat disseminated tuberculosis in babies and toddlers was extrapolated from adult pulmonary tuberculosis. Due to hepatotoxicity worries, there are no dose-response studies in children. We designed a hollow fiber system model of disseminated intracellular tuberculosis with co-perfused three-dimensional organotypic liver modules to simultaneously test for efficacy and toxicity. We utilized pediatric pharmacokinetics of pyrazinamide and acetaminophen to determine dose-dependent pyrazinamide efficacy and hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen concentrations that cause hepatotoxicity in children led to elevated liver function tests, while 100mg/kg pyrazinamide did not. Surprisingly, pyrazinamide did not kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis up to fourfold the standard dose as monotherapy or as combination therapy, despite achieving high intracellular concentrations. Host-pathogen RNA-sequencing revealed lack of a pyrazinamide exposure transcript signature in intracellular bacteria or of phagolysosome acidification on pH imaging. Artificial intelligence algorithms confirmed that pyrazinamide was not predictive of good clinical outcomes in children≤6years who had extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Thus, adding a drug that works inside macrophages could benefit children with disseminated tuberculosis. Our in vitro model can be used to identify such new regimens that could accelerate cure while minimizing toxicity.

  8. The impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Antoine; Obrist, Cristina; Wenzinger, Silvana; von Mandach, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone is the therapeutic agent of choice for the treatment of opiate addiction in pregnancy. The co-consumption (heroin, cocaine) which may influence the effects of methadone is frequent. Therefore, the impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone and the placental tissue was investigated under in vitro conditions. Methods Placentae (n = 24) were ex-vivo perfused with medium (m) (control, n = 6), m plus methadone (n = 6), m plus methadone and cocaine (n = 6) or m plus methadone and heroin (n = 6). Placental functionality parameters like antipyrine permeability, glucose consumption, lactate production, hormone production (hCG and leptin), microparticles release and the expression of P-glycoprotein were analysed. Results Methadone accumulated in placental tissue. Methadone alone decreased the transfer of antipyrine from 0.60 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.06 (fetal/maternal ratio, mean +/- SD, P < 0.01), whereas the combination with cocaine or heroin increased it (0.56 +/- 0.08 to 0.68 +/- 0.13, P = 0.03 and 0.58 +/- 0.21 to 0.71 +/- 0.24; P = 0.18). Microparticles (MPs) released from syncytiotrophoblast into maternal circuit increased by 30% after cocaine or heroin (P < 0.05) and the expression of P-glycoprotein in the tissue increased by ≥ 49% after any drug (P < 0.05). All other measured parameters did not show any significant effect when methadone was combined with cocaine or heroine. Conclusion The combination of cocaine or heroin with methadone increase antipyrine permeability. Changes of MPs resemble findings seen in oxidative stress of syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:19519880

  9. Relation between utero-placental and feto-placental circulations: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flo, Kari; Wilsgaard, Tom; Acharya, Ganesh

    2010-10-01

    To explore the relation between total utero-placental (TQ(uta)) and feto-placental (Q(uv)) blood flows and establish longitudinal reference ranges for the TQ(uta)/Q(uv) ratio and the mean uterine artery and umbilical artery pulsatility (UtaPI/UAPI) and resistance index (UtaRI/UARI) ratios. Prospective longitudinal observational study. University hospital in Norway. Fifty-three low-risk pregnant women. Uterine artery and umbilical vein blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasonography at 4-weekly intervals from 22(+0) to 39(+6) weeks of gestation. Ratios between utero-placental and feto-placental volume blood flows and between indices of uterine and umbilical artery impedance. The TQ(uta)/Q(uv) ratio had a significant association with the gestational age (p feto-placental circulations do not appear to be affected by each other under physiological conditions. We have established longitudinal reference ranges for the utero-placental and feto-placental blood flow and impedance ratios during the second half of pregnancy.

  10. Perfusion abnormalities in hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, P; Roulet-Perez, E; Maeder-Ingvar, M; Moessinger, A C; Gudinchet, F; Meuli, R

    2009-04-01

    Cerebrovascular changes are rarely discussed in patients with hemimegalencephaly. These alterations have previously been associated with epileptical activity. We report the case of a 36-week gestation neonate presenting with total right hemimegalencephaly, as demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in the first days of life. Perfusion-weighted imaging displayed a clear hypervascularization of the right hemisphere. Diffusion-tensor imaging showed an arrangement of white matter fibers concentrically around the ventricle on the right hemisphere. AngioMRI showed an obvious asymmetry in the size of the middle cerebral arteries, with the right middle cerebral artery being prominent. The baby was free of clinical seizures during his first week of life. An electroencephalogram at that time displayed an asymmetric background activity, but no electrical seizures. Perfusion anomalies in hemimegalencephaly may not necessarily be related to epileptical activity, but may be related to vessel alterations. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  11. Modelo experimental de perfusão pulmonar ex vivo em ratos: avaliação de desempenho de pulmões submetidos à administração de prostaciclina inalada versus parenteral An experimental rat model of ex vivo lung perfusion for the assessment of lungs after prostacyclin administration: inhaled versus parenteral routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Francisco Guerreiro Cardoso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar um modelo experimental de administração de prostaglandina I2 (PGI2 por via inalatória vs. parenteral e avaliar o desempenho funcional dos pulmões em um sistema de perfusão pulmonar ex vivo. MÉTODOS: Quarenta ratos Wistar foram anestesiados, ventilados, submetidos a laparotomia com ressecção do esterno e anticoagulados. O tronco da artéria pulmonar foi canulado. Todos os animais foram submetidos a ventilação mecânica. Os animais foram randomizados em quatro grupos (10 ratos/grupo: salina nebulizada (SN; salina parenteral (SP; PGI2 nebulizada (PGI2N; e PGI2 parenteral (PGI2P. A dose de PGI2 nos grupos PGI2N e PGI2P foi de 20 e 10 µg/kg, respectivamente. Os blocos cardiopulmonares foram submetidos in situ a perfusão anterógrada com solução de baixo potássio e dextrana a 4ºC via artéria pulmonar, extraídos em bloco e armazenados a 4ºC por 6 h. Os blocos foram ventilados e perfundidos em um sistema ex vivo por 50 min, sendo obtidas medidas de mecânica ventilatória, hemodinâmica e trocas gasosas. RESULTADOS: Houve redução da pressão arterial pulmonar média após a nebulização em todos os grupos (p OBJECTIVE:To present a model of prostaglandin I2 (PGI2 administration (inhaled vs. parenteral and to assess the functional performance of the lungs in an ex vivo lung perfusion system. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats were anesthetized and placed on mechanical ventilation followed by median sterno-laparotomy and anticoagulation. The main pulmonary artery was cannulated. All animals were maintained on mechanical ventilation and were randomized into four groups (10 rats/group: inhaled saline (IS; parenteral saline (PS; inhaled PGI2 (IPGI2; and parenteral PGI2 (PPGI2. The dose of PGI2 used in the IPGI2 and PPGI2 groups was 20 and 10 µg/kg, respectively. The heart-lung blocks were submitted to antegrade perfusion with a low potassium and dextran solution via the pulmonary artery, followed by en bloc extraction and

  12. Confined placental mosaicism in short term culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Bojana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding of fetal chromosomal mosaicism complicates genetic counseling, as well as pregnancy management. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of confined placental mosaicism in short term culture of chorionic villous samples. We conducted a retrospective review of karyotype analysis results obtained after chorionic villous sampling (CVS in two years period. A 420 samples of chorionic villi were taken transabdominally and obtained by a semidirect method (overnight incubating culture. All fetuses with CVS mosaicism were under the intensive perinatal care. In all cases of chromosome mosaicism the additional karyotyping was performed from fetal blood samples after 22nd gestational week in order to exclude true fetal mosaicism. After delivery newborns were examined by experienced pediatrician. From 420 analyzed samples in 11 (2,6% cases we found placental mosaicism. No anomalies were seen in genetic sonogram of this fetuses and mosaicism was confirmed only in one case. Confined placental mosaicism (CPM was found in 2,1% (9/420 of all analyzed cases, and it made 90% of all placental mosaicism. In 60% (6/10 of placental mosaicism cases we found mosaicism with single aberrant cell. Trisomy 21 mosaicism was the most frequent aberration found in 30% of cases. Finding of mosaicism in chorionic villi sample is at special importance for genetic counseling, because every case has to be reveled individually regarding the type and level of mosaicism. Anyway, in every case of placental mosaicism intensive antenatal monitoring is necessary, with additional chromosome analysis from different tissue in consideration of previous findings.

  13. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain.

  14. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara; Desoye, Gernot; Hansson, Stefan; Kenna, Gerry; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Markert, Udo R; Powles-Glover, Nicola; Schneider, Henning; Leach, Lopa

    2016-09-01

    The human placenta is a critical life-support system that nourishes and protects a rapidly growing fetus; a unique organ, species specific in structure and function. We consider the pressing challenge of providing additional advice on the safety of prescription medicines and environmental exposures in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, "PlaNet", will bridge academia, industry and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations.

  16. Monitoring stroke progression: in vivo imaging of cortical perfusion, blood-brain barrier permeability and cellular damage in the rat photothrombosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoknecht, Karl; Prager, Ofer; Vazana, Udi; Kamintsky, Lyn; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Figge, Lena; Chassidim, Yoash; Schellenberger, Eyk; Kovács, Richard; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon

    2014-11-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia is among the main causes of death and disability worldwide. The ischemic core often progresses, invading the peri-ischemic brain; however, assessing the propensity of the peri-ischemic brain to undergo secondary damage, understanding the underlying mechanisms, and adjusting treatment accordingly remain clinically unmet challenges. A significant hallmark of the peri-ischemic brain is dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), yet the role of disturbed vascular permeability in stroke progression is unclear. Here we describe a longitudinal in vivo fluorescence imaging approach for the evaluation of cortical perfusion, BBB dysfunction, free radical formation and cellular injury using the photothrombosis vascular occlusion model in male Sprague Dawley rats. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction propagated within the peri-ischemic brain in the first hours after photothrombosis and was associated with free radical formation and cellular injury. Inhibiting free radical signaling significantly reduced progressive cellular damage after photothrombosis, with no significant effect on blood flow and BBB permeability. Our approach allows a dynamic follow-up of cellular events and their response to therapeutics in the acutely injured cerebral cortex.

  17. Lower Placental Leptin Promoter Methylation in Association with Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution during Pregnancy and Placental Nitrosative Stress at Birth in the ENVIRONAGE Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenen, Nelly D; Vrijens, Karen; Janssen, Bram G; Roels, Harry A; Neven, Kristof Y; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Lefebvre, Wouter; De Boever, Patrick; Nawrot, Tim S

    2017-02-01

    Particulate matter with a diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) affects human fetal development during pregnancy. Oxidative stress is a putative mechanism by which PM2.5 may exert its effects. Leptin (LEP) is an energy-regulating hormone involved in fetal growth and development. We investigated in placental tissue whether DNA methylation of the LEP promoter is associated with PM2.5 and whether the oxidative/nitrosative stress biomarker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NTp) is involved. LEP DNA methylation status of 361 placentas from the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort was assessed using bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing. Placental 3-NTp (n = 313) was determined with an ELISA assay. Daily PM2.5 exposure levels were estimated for each mother's residence, accounting for residential mobility during pregnancy, using a spatiotemporal interpolation model. After adjustment for a priori chosen covariates, placental LEP methylation was 1.4% lower (95% CI: -2.7, -0.19%) in association with an interquartile range increment (7.5 μg/m3) in second-trimester PM2.5 exposure and 0.43% lower (95% CI: -0.85, -0.02%) in association with a doubling of placental 3-NTp content. LEP methylation status in the placenta was negatively associated with PM2.5 exposure during the second trimester, and with placental 3-NTp, a marker of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Additional research is needed to confirm our findings and to assess whether oxidative/nitrosative stress might contribute to associations between PM2.5 and placental epigenetic events. Potential consequences for health during the neonatal period and later in life warrant further exploration. Citation: Saenen ND, Vrijens K, Janssen BG, Roels HA, Neven KY, Vanden Berghe W, Gyselaers W, Vanpoucke C, Lefebvre W, De Boever P, Nawrot TS. 2017. Lower placental leptin promoter methylation in association with fine particulate matter air pollution during pregnancy and placental nitrosative stress at birth in the ENVIRONAGE cohort. Environ Health Perspect 125:262-268;

  18. Short-Term Exposure to Urban Air Pollution and Influences on Placental Vascularization Indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettfleisch, Karen; Bernardes, Lisandra Stein; Carvalho, Mariana Azevedo; Pastro, Luciana Duzolina Manfré; Vieira, Sandra Elisabete; Saldiva, Silvia R D M; Saldiva, Paulo; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that air pollution can affect human health and that certain pollutant gases lead to adverse obstetric outcomes, such as preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. We evaluated the influence of individual maternal exposure to air pollution on placental volume and vascularization evaluated in the first trimester of pregnancy. This was a cross-sectional study on low-risk pregnant women living in São Paulo, Brazil. The women carried passive personal NO2 and O3 monitors in the week preceding evaluation. We employed the virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) technique using three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound to evaluate placental volume and placental vascular indexes [vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization flow index (VFI)]. We analyzed the influence of pollutant levels on log-transformed placental vascularization and volume using multiple regression models. We evaluated 229 patients. Increased NO2 levels had a significant negative association with log of VI (p = 0.020 and beta = -0.153) and VFI (p = 0.024 and beta = -0.151). NO2 and O3 had no influence on the log of placental volume or FI. NO2, an estimator of primary air pollutants, was significantly associated with diminished VI and VFI in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  19. The effect of placenta previa on fetal growth and pregnancy outcome, in correlation with placental pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, E; Miremberg, H; Grinstein, E; Mizrachi, Y; Schreiber, L; Bar, J; Kovo, M

    2016-12-01

    To compare the clinical characteristics and placental histopathology between pregnancies complicated by placenta previa and controls. Between 2009 and 2015, cesarean deliveries (CDs) of 119 pregnancies with placenta previa were identified from which maternal outcomes, neonatal outcomes and placental pathology were reviewed. Results were compared with CDs matched for maternal age and pregnancy complications (control group, n=119). Placental lesions were classified into maternal and fetal vascular supply lesions and inflammatory response. Composite neonatal outcome was defined as one or more of early neonatal complications. Small-for-gestational age (SGA) was defined as birth weight ⩽10th percentile. Placentas from the previa group had higher rates of weights previa group as compared with controls. After controlling for potential confounding bias using multivariable logistic regression models, placenta previa remained statistically significantly associated with placental maternal (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.9, P=0.009) and fetal (aOR 7.05, 95% CI 2.4-20.2, Pplacenta previa in the current study. These findings may suggest that abnormal placentation is accompanied by suboptimal implantation that interferes with fetal growth.

  20. A dating success story: genomes and fossils converge on placental mammal origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami Anjali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The timing of the placental mammal radiation has been a source of contention for decades. The fossil record of mammals extends over 200 million years, but no confirmed placental mammal fossils are known prior to 64 million years ago, which is approximately 1.5 million years after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg mass extinction that saw the end of non-avian dinosaurs. Thus, it came as a great surprise when the first published molecular clock studies suggested that placental mammals originated instead far back in the Cretaceous, in some cases doubling divergence estimates based on fossils. In the last few decades, more than a hundred new genera of Mesozoic mammals have been discovered, and molecular divergence studies have grown from simple clock-like models applied to a few genes to sophisticated analyses of entire genomes. Yet, molecular and fossil-based divergence estimates for placental mammal origins have remained remote, with knock-on effects for macro-scale reconstructions of mammal evolution. A few recent molecular studies have begun to converge with fossil-based estimates, and a new phylogenomic study in particular shows that the palaeontological record was mostly correct; most placental mammal orders diversified after the K-Pg mass extinction. While a small gap still remains for Late Cretaceous supraordinal divergences, this study has significantly improved the congruence between molecular and palaeontological data and heralds a broader integration of these fields of evolutionary science.

  1. The role of placental nutrient sensing in maternal-fetal resource allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Paula; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The placenta mediates maternal-fetal exchange and has historically been regarded as a passive conduit for nutrients. However, emerging evidence suggests that the placenta actively responds to nutritional and metabolic signals from the mother and the fetus. We propose that the placenta integrates a multitude of maternal and fetal nutritional cues with information from intrinsic nutrient-sensing signaling pathways to match fetal demand with maternal supply by regulating maternal physiology, placental growth, and nutrient transport. This process, which we have called placental nutrient sensing, ensures optimal allocation of resources between the mother and the fetus to maximize the chances for propagation of parental genes without jeopardizing maternal health. We suggest that these mechanisms have evolved because of the evolutionary pressures of maternal undernutrition, which result in decreased placental growth and down-regulation of nutrient transporters, thereby limiting fetal growth to ensure maternal survival. These regulatory loops may also function in response to maternal overnutrition, leading to increased placental growth and nutrient transport in cases of maternal obesity or gestational diabetes. Thus, placental nutrient sensing modulates maternal-fetal resource allocation to increase the likelihood of reproductive success. This model implies that the placenta plays a critical role in mediating fetal programming and determining lifelong health.

  2. The Role of Placental Nutrient Sensing in Maternal-Fetal Resource Allocation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Paula; Powell, Theresa L.; Jansson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The placenta mediates maternal-fetal exchange and has historically been regarded as a passive conduit for nutrients. However, emerging evidence suggests that the placenta actively responds to nutritional and metabolic signals from the mother and the fetus. We propose that the placenta integrates a multitude of maternal and fetal nutritional cues with information from intrinsic nutrient-sensing signaling pathways to match fetal demand with maternal supply by regulating maternal physiology, placental growth, and nutrient transport. This process, which we have called placental nutrient sensing, ensures optimal allocation of resources between the mother and the fetus to maximize the chances for propagation of parental genes without jeopardizing maternal health. We suggest that these mechanisms have evolved because of the evolutionary pressures of maternal undernutrition, which result in decreased placental growth and down-regulation of nutrient transporters, thereby limiting fetal growth to ensure maternal survival. These regulatory loops may also function in response to maternal overnutrition, leading to increased placental growth and nutrient transport in cases of maternal obesity or gestational diabetes. Thus, placental nutrient sensing modulates maternal-fetal resource allocation to increase the likelihood of reproductive success. This model implies that the placenta plays a critical role in mediating fetal programming and determining lifelong health. PMID:25122064

  3. Placental lesions and outcome in preterm born children : the relation between placental lesions, neonatal morbidity and neurological development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, Annemiek

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the link between the mother and her fetus during pregnancy and plays a crucial role in fetal growth and development. A less than optimal placental function as a result of placental lesions, may lead to maternal and or fetal problems. It is known that placental lesions are an importan

  4. Diffusion model for iontophoresis measured by laser-Doppler perfusion flowmetry, applied to normal and preeclamptic pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; Blaauw, Judith; Smit, Andries J.; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    We present a physical model to describe iontophoresis time recordings. The model is a combination of monodimensional material diffusion and decay, probably due to transport by blood flow. It has four adjustable parameters, the diffusion coefficient, the decay constant, the height of the response, an

  5. Perfusion Based Cell Culture Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, A.; Emnéus, J.; Dufva, M.

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.

  6. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.......Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...

  7. Estimation of the parameter covariance matrix for aone-compartment cardiac perfusion model estimated from a dynamic sequencereconstructed using map iterative reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Qi,Jinyi; Ghosh Roy, Dilip N.

    2004-01-01

    In dynamic cardiac SPECT estimates of kinetic parameters ofa one-compartment perfusion model are usually obtained in a two stepprocess: 1) first a MAP iterative algorithm, which properly models thePoisson statistics and the physics of the data acquisition, reconstructsa sequence of dynamic reconstructions, 2) then kinetic parameters areestimated from time activity curves generated from the dynamicreconstructions. This paper provides a method for calculating thecovariance matrix of the kinetic parameters, which are determined usingweighted least squares fitting that incorporates the estimated varianceand covariance of the dynamic reconstructions. For each transaxial slicesets of sequential tomographic projections are reconstructed into asequence of transaxial reconstructions usingfor each reconstruction inthe time sequence an iterative MAP reconstruction to calculate themaximum a priori reconstructed estimate. Time-activity curves for a sumof activity in a blood region inside the left ventricle and a sum in acardiac tissue region are generated. Also, curves for the variance of thetwo estimates of the sum and for the covariance between the two ROIestimates are generated as a function of time at convergence using anexpression obtained from the fixed-point solution of the statisticalerror of the reconstruction. A one-compartment model is fit to the tissueactivity curves assuming a noisy blood input function to give weightedleast squares estimates of blood volume fraction, wash-in and wash-outrate constants specifying the kinetics of 99mTc-teboroxime for theleftventricular myocardium. Numerical methods are used to calculate thesecond derivative of the chi-square criterion to obtain estimates of thecovariance matrix for the weighted least square parameter estimates. Eventhough the method requires one matrix inverse for each time interval oftomographic acquisition, efficient estimates of the tissue kineticparameters in a dynamic cardiac SPECT study can be obtained with

  8. Intra-Arterial MR Perfusion Imaging of Meningiomas: Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intravenous MR Perfusion Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alastair J.; Alexander, Matthew D.; McCoy, David B.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Moftakhar, Parham; Amans, Matthew R.; Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew; Dowd, Christopher F.; Halbach, Van V.; Higashida, Randall T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Saloner, David; Hetts, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the ability of IA MR perfusion to characterize meningioma blood supply. Methods Studies were performed in a suite comprised of an x-ray angiography unit and 1.5T MR scanner that permitted intraprocedural patient movement between the imaging modalities. Patients underwent intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) T2* dynamic susceptibility MR perfusion immediately prior to meningioma embolization. Regional tumor arterial supply was characterized by digital subtraction angiography and classified as external carotid artery (ECA) dural, internal carotid artery (ICA) dural, or pial. MR perfusion data regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed in regions with different vascular supply to extract peak height, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT). Linear mixed modeling was used to identify perfusion curve parameter differences for each ROI for IA and IV MR imaging techniques. IA vs. IV perfusion parameters were also directly compared for each ROI using linear mixed modeling. Results 18 ROIs were analyzed in 12 patients. Arterial supply was identified as ECA dural (n = 11), ICA dural (n = 4), or pial (n = 3). FWHM, rCBV, and rCBF showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IA MR perfusion. Peak Height and FWHM showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IV MR perfusion. RCBV and MTT were significantly lower for IA perfusion in the Dural ECA compared to IV perfusion. Relative CBF in IA MR was found to be significantly higher in the Dural ICA region and MTT significantly lower compared to IV perfusion. PMID:27802268

  9. Low birth weight in response to salt restriction during pregnancy is not due to alterations in uterine-placental blood flow or the placental and peripheral renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, Sandra Márcia; Furukawa, Luzia Naôko Shinohara; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa Massola; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Seguro, Antonio Carlos; Patriarca, Giuliana; Coelho, Michella Soares; Dolnikoff, Miriam Sterman; Heimann, Joel Claudio

    2008-09-03

    angiotensins I and II were lower in the HS group than in the NS and LS groups. Placental angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT(1)) gene expression and levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were higher in HS dams, as were uterine blood flow and cardiac output. The degree of salt intake did not influence plasma sodium, potassium or creatinine. Although fractional sodium excretion was higher in HS dams than in NS and LS dams, fractional potassium excretion was unchanged. In conclusion, findings from this study indicate that the reduction in fetal weight in response to salt restriction during pregnancy does not involve alterations in uterine-placental perfusion or the RAS. Moreover, no change in fetal weight is observed in response to salt overload during pregnancy. However, salt overload did lead to an increase in placental weight and uterine blood flow associated with alterations in maternal plasma and placental RAS. Therefore, these findings indicate that changes in salt intake during pregnancy lead to alterations in uterine-placental perfusion and fetal growth.

  10. Protective mechanisms of end-ischemic cold machine perfusion in DCD liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Andrea; de Rougemont, Olivier; Graf, Rolf; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify protective mechanisms of cold machine perfusion in liver grafts donated after cardiac death. Pig livers exposed to 60-min warm ischemia were cold stored for 7 h or treated after 6-h cold storage with 1-h hypothermic oxygenated perfusion (HOPE) through the portal vein. Different physical (perfusion pressure) and chemical (oxygen, mitochondrial transition pore inhibition) parameters were analyzed during machine perfusion to dissect key steps of mechanism. HOPE treatment led to a significant slowdown of mitochondrial respiration rate during 1-h machine perfusion. After reperfusion following low pressure HOPE, mitochondrial injury, nuclear injury, Kupffer cell activation and endothelial injury were significantly improved, as tested on an isolated liver perfusion model. In contrast, machine perfusion with deoxygenated perfusate showed no protection from hepatocyte injury and Kupffer cell activation. However, endothelial injury was also prevented by low pressure machine perfusion in the absence of oxygen. Perfusion with higher pressure provoked endothelial damage and Kupffer cell activation. The mechanisms of protection by hypothermic machine perfusion appear to be at least twofold. First, oxygenation under hypothermic conditions protects from mitochondrial and nuclear injury by downregulation of mitochondrial activity before reperfusion. Second, cold perfusion itself, under low pressure conditions, prevents endothelial damage, independently of oxygen. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Placental Development in Ongoing Pregnancy and Miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Reus (Averil)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In this thesis three-dimensional ultrasound, three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound, virtual reality and histologic examination of the chorionic villous vascularization were used to investigate early placental development in normal ongoing pregnancy as well as misca

  12. A RADIOIMMUNOASSAY FOR PLACENTAL PROTEIN PP5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShui-Long; DUGuo-Guang; ZHENGShu-Rong; LIUXin-Jun; YANRen-Ying

    1989-01-01

    A radioimmunoasay of high sendtivity end smbility was developed For placental proteinPP5 (PP5), a syncytiotrophoblast product oF the human placenta. We measured 94 samples from 17 normal nonpregnant women, 47 normal pregnant women, and 30 samples

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Accreta, Increta and Percreta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Being 35 or older Being pregnant before Having placenta previa How can you reduce your risk for placental conditions? One way to reduce your chances for having these ... In some cases, the placenta doesn’t develop correctly or work as well ...

  14. Placental Malaria: From Infection to Malfunction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Malaria during pregnancy is a major factor in infant morbidity and mortality. In this issue of Cell Host and Microbe, Conroy et al. (2013) propose that C5a, a product of complement cascade activation, counteracts the placental vascular remodeling response induced by Plasmodium infection and contributes to fetal growth restriction. Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia.

  15. Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A rare case of histologically proven placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD with fetal omphalocele in a 22-year-old patient is reported. Material and Methods. Antenatal ultrasound of this patient showed hydropic placenta with a live fetus of 17 weeks period of gestation associated with omphalocele. Cordocentesis detected the diploid karyotype of the fetus. Patient, when prognosticated, choose to terminate the pregnancy in view of high incidence of fetal and placental anomalies. Subsequent histopathological examination of placenta established the diagnosis to be placental mesenchymal dysplasia. Conclusion. On clinical and ultrasonic grounds, suspicion of P.M.D. arises when hydropic placenta with a live fetus presents in second trimester of pregnancy. Cordocentesis can detect the diploid karyotype of the fetus in such cases. As this condition is prognostically better than triploid partial mole, continuation of pregnancy can sometimes be considered after through antenatal screening and patient counseling. However, a definite diagnosis of P.M.D. is made only on placental histology by absence of trophoblast hyperplasia and trophoblastic inclusions.

  16. Evolution of factors affecting placental oxygen transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, A M

    2009-01-01

    states, are more amenable to analysis. This is exemplified by factors contributing, respectively, to blood oxygen affinity and placental diffusing capacity. Comparative genomics has given fresh insight into the evolution of the beta-globin gene complex. In higher primates, duplication of an embryonic...

  17. Perfusão pulmonar anterógrada "versus" retrógrada na preservação pulmonar para transplante em modelo canino de viabilidade pulmonar pós-morte Antegrade versus retrograde lung perfusion in pulmonary preservation for transplantation in a canine model of post-mortem lung viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlo Kohmann

    1999-04-01

    reperfusão (p = 0,01 e ao término do período de avaliação (p = 0,01. Os autores concluem que, neste modelo experimental, a perfusão retrógrada hipotérmica resulta em função superior do enxerto após 3 horas de isquemia normotérmica sob ventilação mecânica.Lung retrieval following cardio-circulatory arrest has been studied experimentally, however severe ischemia/reperfusion injury requires improved methods of graft preservation. Allograft perfusion with crystalloid solution delivered via pulmonary artery (antegrade perfusion remains the standard procedure, however it does not provide adequate washout of the blood retained within the bronchial circulation which may trigger reperfusion injury. This has led the authors to test the impact of antegrade versus retrograde (via left atrium perfusion of lung grafts submitted to 3 hours of warm ischemia after cardio-circulatory arrest in a dog model of left lung allotransplantation. Twelve donor dogs were sacrificed with thiopental sodium and kept under mechanical ventilation at room temperature for 3 hours. They were randomized and the heart-lung blocks harvested after being perfused in a retrograde (group I, n = 6 or antegrade (group II, n = 6 fashion with modified Euro-Collins solution. Twelve recipient animals were submitted to a left lung transplant receiving the grafts from both groups and the assessment was performed during 6 hours. Hemodynamic parameters were similar for animals in both groups. The gas exchange (arterial PaO2 and PaCO2 in recipients of group I (retrograde perfusion was significantly better when compared to recipients of grafts perfused via pulmonary artery. Intracellular ATP did not show difference between the groups, however there was a measurable drop in its values when samples obtained upon extraction were compared to those measured after reperfusion and at the end of the assessment. The authors concluded that retrograde perfusion yields better pulmonary function after 6 hours of reperfusion

  18. Oxidative stress status and placental implications in diabetic rats undergoing swimming exercise after embryonic implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-05-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control-nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised-nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic-diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised-diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. CT perfusion image processing: analysis of liver tumors

    OpenAIRE

    D’Antò, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT imaging of the liver has potential to improve evaluation of tumour angiogenesis. Quantitative parameters can be obtained applying mathematical models to Time Attenuation Curve (TAC). However, there are still some difficulties for an accurate quantification of perfusion parameters due, for example, to algorithms employed, to mathematical model, to patient’s weight and cardiac output and to the acquisition system. In this thesis, new parameters and alternative methodologies ab...

  20. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  1. Measuring myocardial perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, A A; Kastrup, J

    2015-01-01

    -pass of non-ionic and ionic contrast agents, respectively. Absolute quantification with CMR has yet to be established in routine clinical practice, while CT has yet to prove its diagnostic and prognostic value. The upcoming years may change the way we diagnose and treat patients suspected of having CAD......Recently, focus has changed from anatomical assessment of coronary arteries towards functional testing to evaluate the effect of stenosis on the myocardium before intervention. Besides positron-emission tomography (PET), cardiac MRI (CMR), and cardiac CT are able to measure myocardial perfusion...

  2. A hemodynamic evaluation of the Levitronix Pedivas centrifugal pump and Jostra Hl-20 roller pump under pulsatile and nonpulsatile perfusion in an infant CPB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Noel; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Wang, Shigang; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The hemodynamic comparison of the Jostra HL-20 and the Levitronix PediVAS blood pumps is the focus this study, where pressure-flow waveforms and hemodynamic energy values are analyzed in the confines of a pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.The pseudo pediatric patient was perfused with flow rates between 500 and 900 ml/min (100 ml/min increments) under pulsatile and nonpulsatile mode. The Levitronix continuous flow pump utilized a customized controller to engage in pulsatile perfusion with equivalent pulse settings to the Jostra HL-20 roller pump. Hemodynamic measurements and waveforms were recorded at the precannula location, while the mean arterial pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg for each test. Glycerin water was used as the blood analog circuit perfusate. At each flow rate 24 trials were conducted yielding a total of 120 experiments (n=60 pulsatile and n=60 nonpulsatile).Under nonpulsatile perfusion the Jostra roller pump produced small values for surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) due to its inherent pulsatility, while the Levitronix produced values of essentially zero for SHE. When switching to pulsatile perfusion, the SHE levels for both the Jostra and Levitronix pump made considerable increases. In comparing the two pumps under pulsatile perfusion, the Levitronix PediVAS produced significantly more surplus and total hemodynamic energy than did the Jostra roller pump each pump flow rate.The study suggests that the Levitronix PediVAS centrifugal pump has the capability of achieving quality pulsatile waveforms and delivering more SHE to the pseudo patient than the Jostra HL-20 roller pump. Further studies are warranted to investigate the Levitronix under bovine blood studies and with various pulsatile settings.

  3. Changes of cerebral hemodynamics in CT perfusion imaging of rabbit models with cerebral microembolism%兔脑微栓塞模型脑血流动力学的CT灌注动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张放; 姚振威; 冯晓源; 孙华平

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨兔脑微栓塞模型CT灌注成像(CT perfusion imaging,CTPI)脑血流动力学的动态变化规律.方法 30只新西兰兔,随机分成两组,A组:假手术对照组5只,B组:微栓塞组25只.经颈外动脉向颈内动脉注入直径约0.5 mm的SiO2颗粒10枚,分别于栓塞后30 min、3h、6h、12 h及24 h行CTPI,24 h处死动物取脑组织行HE染色.根据HE染色结果将模型分为缺血组和梗死组,分别观察其脑血流量(cerebral blood flow,CBF)、脑血容积(cerebral blood volume,CBV)和平均通过时间(mean transit time,MTT)的动态变化规律.结果 A组CTPI及HE染色均未见明显异常.B组3只因实验意外死亡,1只因下肢静脉穿刺失败导致CTPI失败,21只行CTPI,其中18只灌注异常,3只未见明显异常.18只灌注异常的兔中,HE染色10只脑梗死,7只脑缺血,1只未见明显异常.30 min时7只缺血兔脑不同程度低灌注,表现为CBF降低,MTT延长,CBV无显著变化,3~6h低灌注进一步加重,CBV值略降低,12h低灌注不同程度恢复,24 h进一步恢复.30 min时10只梗死兔脑明显低灌注,表现为CBF及CBV显著降低,MTT显著延长,3只兔低灌注分别在3h、6h及12 h不同程度恢复,然后下一时间又迅速降低并随着时间延长进一步加剧,其余7只兔低灌注程度随时间延长逐渐加剧或在一定水平上波动.结论 脑缺血3~6h低灌注最明显,12~ 24 h低灌注不同程度恢复,而脑梗死随时间延长低灌注程度不断加重或一过性恢复后再次加重.脑缺血的特征是CBF和CBV的不匹配,缺血组织CBF显著降低,CBV无显著变化,而脑梗死则表现为这两个参数的一致性下降.%Objective To study the changes of cerebral hemodynamics revealed by CT perfusion imaging ( CTPI) in rabbit models of cerebral microembolism. Methods Thirty normal New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups; Group A (n =5) underwent sham operation, group B (n =25) underwent an operation of microembolism

  4. The effects of pravastatin on the normal human placenta: Lessons from ex-vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swissa, Shani S.; Feinshtein, Valeria; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Holcberg, Gershon; Dukler, Doron

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Research in animal models and preliminary clinical studies in humans support the use of pravastatin for the prevention of preeclampsia. However, its use during pregnancy is still controversial due to limited data about its effect on the human placenta and fetus. Methods In the present study, human placental cotyledons were perfused in the absence or presence of pravastatin in the maternal reservoir (PraM). In addition, placental explants were treated with pravastatin for 5, 24 and 72 h under normoxia and hypoxia. We monitored the secretion of placental growth factor (PlGF), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), soluble endoglin (sEng), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and activation and the fetal vasoconstriction response to angiotensin-II. Results The concentrations of PlGF, sFlt-1 and sEng were not significantly altered by pravastatin in PraM cotyledons and in placental explants compared to control. Under hypoxic conditions, pravastatin decreased sFlt-1 concentrations. eNOS expression was significantly increased in PraM cotyledons but not in pravastatin-treated placental explants cultured under normoxia or hypoxia. eNOS phosphorylation was not significantly affected by pravastatin. The feto-placental vascular tone and the fetal vasoconstriction response to angiotensin-II, did not change following exposure of the maternal circulation to pravastatin. Conclusion We found that pravastatin does not alter the essential physiological functions of the placenta investigated in the study. The relevance of the study lays in the fact that it expands the current knowledge obtained thus far regarding the effect of the drug on the normal human placenta. This data is reassuring and important for clinicians that consider the treatment of high-risk patients with pravastatin, a treatment that exposes some normal pregnancies to the drug. PMID:28199380

  5. Fetal hydantoin syndrome: inhibition of placental folic acid transport as a potential mechanism for fetal growth retardation in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, M.; Barnard, J.A.; Said, H.M.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1985-04-01

    Maternal hydantoin ingestion during pregnancy results in a well defined clinical entity termed ''fetal hydantoin syndrome''. The clinical characteristics of this syndrome includes growth retardation, and congenital anomalies. Because folic acid is essential for protein synthesis and growth, and since hydantoin interferes with intestinal transport of folic acid, the authors postulated that part of the fetal hydantoin syndrome may be due to inhibition of placental folic acid by maternal hydantoin. Therefore, they studied in vivo placental folate transport in a well-established model for fetal hydantoin syndrome in the rat. Our results indicate that maternal hydantoin ingestion, significantly decreased fetal weight and placental and fetal uptake of folate compared to controls. To determine whether maternal hydantoin ingestion has a generalized or specific effect on placental function, they examined placental and fetal zinc transport in the same model. Our results indicate that zinc transport is not altered by hydantoin ingestion. They conclude that maternal hydantoin ingestion results in fetal growth retardation which may be due in part to inhibition of placental folate transport.

  6. Administration of interleukin-17 soluble receptor C suppresses TH17 cells, oxidative stress, and hypertension in response to placental ischemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Denise C; Hogg, James P; Scott, Jeremy; Wallace, Kedra; Herse, Florian; Moseley, Janae; Wallukat, Gerd; Dechend, Ralf; LaMarca, Babbette

    2013-12-01

    Preeclampsia, new onset hypertension with proteinuria during pregnancy, is associated with chronic inflammation and placental oxidative stress (ROS). Chronic interleukin-17 (IL-17) increases blood pressure, autoantibodies (angiotensin II type I receptor [AT1-AA]), and ROS during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to determine whether T-helper 17 (TH17) suppression via IL-17 recombinant receptor C (IL-17RC) decreases pathophysiology associated with placental ischemia (reduced uterine perfusion pressure [RUPP]). On gestation day 14, miniosmotic pumps infusing 100 pg of IL-17RC per day were implanted into pregnant rats undergoing RUPP. On gestation day 18, carotid catheters were inserted. On gestation day 19, mean arterial pressure was recorded and TH17 cells, oxidative stress, and AT1-AA were measured and analyzed via 1-way ANOVA. Mean arterial pressure increased from 101 ± 2 mm Hg in normal pregnant rats (n = 19) to 120 ± 1 mm Hg in RUPP rats (n = 17) but decreased to 110 ± 2 mm Hg in RUPP+IL-17RC rats (n = 22). Pup weight decreased from 2.28 ± 0.2 g in normal pregnant rats to 1.96 ± 0.3 g in RUPP rats but was significantly increased to 2.01 ± 0.1 in RUPP+IL-17RC rats. TH17 cells were 1.77% in RUPP rats but decreased to 0.65% in RUPP+IL-17RC rats. Urinary isoprostanes were normalized in RUPP+IL-17RC rats (52 pg/µg) compared with 89 pg/µg in RUPP controls. Placental ROS was 652 relative light units in RUPP rats but decreased to 337 relative light units in RUPP+IL-17RC rats. AT1-AA was 17.27 ± 0.7 bpm in RUPP rats but decreased to 5.00 ± 0.5 bpm in RUPP+IL-17RC rats. With this study, we show that infusion of IL-17RC blunts TH17s, oxidative stress, AT1-AA, and hypertension in the RUPP model of preeclampsia, indicating that TH17 cells may play an important role in disease pathophysiology.

  7. Computational micro-scale model of control of extravascular water and capillary perfusion in the air blood barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Enrico; Aliverti, Andrea; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    A computational model of a morphologically-based alveolar capillary unit (ACU) in the rabbit is developed to relate lung fluid balance to mechanical forces between capillary surface and interstitium during development of interstitial edema. We hypothesize that positive values of interstitial liquid pressure Pliq impact on capillary transmural pressure and on blood flow. ACU blood flow, capillary recruitment and filtration are computed by modulating vascular and interstitial pressures. Model results are compared with experimental data of Pliq increasing from ~-10 (control) up to ~4cmH2O in two conditions, hypoxia and collagenase injection. For hypoxia exposure, fitting data requires a linear increase in hydraulic conductivity Lp and capillary pressure PC, that fulfils the need of increase in oxygen delivery. For severe fragmentation of capillary endothelial barrier (collagenase injection), fitting requires a rapid increase in both hydraulic and protein permeability, causing ACU de-recruitment, followed by an increase in PC as a late response to restore blood flow. In conclusion, the model allows to describe the lung adaptive response to edemagenic perturbations; the increase in Pliq, related to the low interstitial compliance, provides an efficient control of extravascular water, by limiting microvascular filtration.

  8. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M Fichter

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps.After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7.ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27% was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%, although not statistically significant (P = 0,083. After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%. Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations.Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies.

  9. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  10. Angiogenic imbalance and diminished matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 underlie regional decreases in uteroplacental vascularization and feto-placental growth in hypertensive pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Junior, Carlos A; Chen, Juanjuan; Cui, Ning; Chiang, Charles L; Zhu, Minglin; Ren, Zongli; Possomato-Vieira, Jose S; Khalil, Raouf A

    2017-09-11

    Preeclampsia is a form of hypertension-in-pregnancy (HTN-Preg) with unclear mechanism. Generalized reduction of uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) could be an initiating event leading to uteroplacental ischemia, angiogenic imbalance, and HTN-Preg. Additional regional differences in uteroplacental blood flow could further affect the pregnancy outcome and increase the risk of preeclampsia in twin or multiple pregnancy, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. To test the hypothesis that regional differences in angiogenic balance and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) underlie regional uteroplacental vascularization and feto-placental development, we compared fetal and placental growth, and placental and myoendometrial vascularization in the proximal, middle and distal regions of the uterus (in relation to the iliac bifurcation) in normal pregnant (Preg) and RUPP rats. Maternal blood pressure and plasma anti-angiogenic soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1)/placenta growth factor (PIGF) ratio were higher, and average placentae number, placenta weight, litter size, and pup weight were less in RUPP than Preg rats. The placenta and pup number and weight were reduced, while the number and diameter of placental and adjacent myoendometrial arteries, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels/activity were increased, and sFlt-1/PlGF ratio was decreased in distal vs proximal uterus of Preg rats. In RUPP rats, the placenta and pup number and weight, the number and diameter of placental and myoendometrial arteries, and MMP-2 and -9 levels/activity were decreased, and sFlt-1/PlGF ratio was increased in distal vs proximal uterus. Treatment with sFlt-1 or RUPP placenta extract decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 in distal segments of Preg uterus, and treatment with PIGF or Preg placenta extract restored MMP levels in distal segments of RUPP uterus. Thus, in addition to the general reduction in placental and fetal growth during uteroplacental ischemia, localized angiogenic imbalance and diminished MMP-2

  11. Warm vs. cold perfusion techniques to rescue rodent liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Andrea; Kron, Philipp; Graf, Rolf; Dutkowski, Philipp; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2014-12-01

    A variety of liver perfusion techniques have been proposed to protect liver grafts prior to implantation. We compared hypothermic and normothermic oxygenated perfusion techniques in a rat liver transplant model, using higher risk grafts obtained after cardiac arrest (DCD). Rat livers were subjected to 30 or 60 min in situ warm ischemia, without application of heparin. Livers were excised and stored for 4 h at 4°C, mimicking DCD organ procurement, followed by conventional organ transport. In experimental groups, DCD liver grafts received a 4 h normothermic oxygenated perfusion through the portal vein and the hepatic artery instead of cold storage. The perfusate consisted of either full blood or leukocyte-depleted blood (normothermic groups). Other livers underwent hypothermic oxygenated perfusion (HOPE) for 1 h after warm ischemia and 4 h cold storage (HOPE group). Liver injury was assessed during machine perfusion and after isolated liver reperfusion, and by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). DCD livers, subjected to normothermic perfusion, disclosed reduced injury and improved survival compared to cold storage after limited warm ischemia of 30 min (70%; 7/10), but failed to protect from lethal injury in grafts exposed to 60 min warm ischemia (0%; 0/10). This finding was consistent with Kupffer and endothelial cell activation in cold stored and normothermic perfused livers. In contrast, HOPE protected from hepatocyte and non-parenchymal cell injury and led to 90% (9/10) and 63% (5/8) animal survival after 30 and 60 min of donor warm ischemia, respectively. This is the first evidence that HOPE is superior to normothermic oxygenated perfusion in a clinically relevant model through modulation of the innate immunity and endothelial cell activation. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Knöspel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR, while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  13. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöspel, Fanny; Jacobs, Frank; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; De Bondt, An; van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Snoeys, Jan; Monshouwer, Mario; Richter, Marco; Strahl, Nadja; Seehofer, Daniel; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2016-04-16

    Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR)), while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR) metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.