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Sample records for pitchblende

  1. Contribution to the study of french pitchblendes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffroy, J.; Sarcia, J.A.

    1955-01-01

    The authors first review the characteristics of uraninite-pitchblende, as deduced of present literature. They set apart from typical pitchblende a black oxide aspect, which probably corresponds to neo-formations, and a 'para-pitchblende' aspect, which they relate to deep sur-oxidation of normal pitchblende. They insist on the easy replacement of pitchblende by silica. and give indications as to changes in vein stones (fluorite, quartz, etc...). A detailed study of paragenesis and successions in french uranium districts follows (including discussion of uranium of uranium-bearing coals). The authors attempt to classify french pitchblende veins. They are chiefly epithermal and poor in satellite ores. Three types of deposits are identified: massive - pitchblende type, silica type, fluorite type. These deposits, as those of Portugal, are included in granite, Central-European peri-batholitic types where uranium associates which Ni, Co, Bi and Ag, are in France both rare and poor. Finally, the authors attempt to bring out in the european Hercynian area a particular distribution of paragenetic types. (authors) [fr

  2. Mechanisms of metasomatism in the calcite-pitchblende system: 2. Replacement of pitchblende by calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymkov, Yu.M.

    1996-01-01

    The principal mechanisms of the nasturan replacement by calcite -intrametasomatism, frontal metasomatism, dispersive metasomatism, and transformative metasomatism - are discussed in terms of G.L. Pospelov's (1973) concept. The main chemical condition required by the process is an oxidized environment, in which the tetravalent uranium of pitchblende or transitional reduced phases (coffinite) oxidizes to yield readily soluble uranyl compounds. The latter are replaced by calcite

  3. St. Joachimstal: pitchblende, uranium and radon-induced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, R. F.; Mould, R. F.

    2006-01-01

    This article is based on a presentation given at the 2005 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. Without the mining of pitchblende at St. Joachimstal at the end of the 19 ch century, and its availability to the Curies, the discovery of radium would have been delayed. The uranium bearing are carnotide in Colorado and Utah only became available after World War I and in any event this ore was far less uranium-rich than the St. Joachimstal pitchblende. Pitchblende deposits in the Belgian Congo (now Zaire), were only processed for radium by the Union Miniere du Haut Katanga in the early 1920 s. This article briefly describes the mining activities at St. Joachimstal. Uranium are was first mined at the end of the 16 th century although lead mining had occurred since the 12 th century. By 1959 the mines were essentially depleted of pitchblende and in 1981 all but one, the Concordia mine which was then sill open, were flooded. The miners disease first recorded in the 16 th century was eventually identified as radon-induced lung cancer. Finally, speculations is made with regard to who might have discovered radium if the Curies did not, because enough pitchblende was just not available to them in Paris in the late 1890 s. (author)

  4. Isolation of ionium (230Th) from a pitchblende mineral sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.

    1974-01-01

    A method is suggested for separating ionium ( 230 Th) from a pitchblende mineral sample. It is based on the coextraction of uranium and thorium into 0.10 M 4-(5-nonyl)pyridine oxide/xylene from very dilute nitric acid. Thorium is selectively back extracted from the organic phase followed by a cation exchange concentration and purification step. The ionium separated had a 230 Th : 232 Th ratio of 0.085 +- 0.001. (orig.) [de

  5. Surficial origin of North American pitchblende and related uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    The ubiquitous association of pitchblende uranium deposits with terrestrial sediments is believed to be the natural result of formation of the orebodies by surficial processes operating under continental conditions. The major uranium deposits of North America illustrate this. The quartz-pebble conglomerate uranium deposits of Elliot Lake, Ontario, have thorium-rich uranium minerals that indicate a detrital origin. With the development of an oxygenic atmosphere before 1,700 m.y. ago, uranium was transported in solution in meteoric surface and near-surface ground water, and produced pitchblende veins in fractures in the basement and in lava flows in terrestrial environments. This accounts for the closee association of fluvial sediments with the pitchblende deposits at Beaverlodge, Rabbit Lake, Baker Lake, and Great Bear Lake, Canada. The development of land plants about 300 m.y. ago produced favorable environments within the terrestrial sandstones themselves, and resulted in the tabular uranium orebodies of the Colorado Plateau. The close relation of tabular orebodies to sedimentation is apparent when compared to recent fluvial sedimentation. In Wyoming, the stratigraphic restriction of the boundary-roll deposits to a few zones in Eocene rocks results from their being remobilized tabular deposits

  6. Apatite-brannerite-pitchblende association in hydrothermal quartz veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, B.V.; Mel'nikova, A.M.; Osipov, B.S.; Pavlov, E.G.

    1976-01-01

    A study into the vein quartz mineralization confined to the tectonic zones of crush and silicification in sedimentary-igneous rocks of the lower Paleozoic has been made. The physicochemical characteristics of minerals were studied by way of optical and electron microscopy, chemical, laser-microspectral and X-ray structural analyses, microprobing and alpha-microradiography. 3 mineral associations have been discriminated, representative of the sequence of hydrothermal mineralization. An unusual parogenesis of pitchblende and brannerite with apatite, xenotime and more recent goethite has been revealed. The results are indicative of a medium-low-temperature hydrothermal process occurring at the final stages of formation of uraniferrous quartz veins. By composition and mineralization sequence, the latters are close to low- and medium-temperature uranium-quartz-chlorite-hydromica formations with apatite, coffinite, brannerite and pitchblende. The weak initial metamictization of goethite in veins 80 to 100 million years old is due to the radioactive effect of the submicroscopic radioactive mineral impurity on the crystalline lattice

  7. Pitchblende deposits at the Wood and Calhoun mines, Central City mining district, Gilpin County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Frank R.; Butler, C.R.

    1952-01-01

    Pitchblende has been mined in commercial quantities from four gold- and silver-bearing pyrite-sphalerite-galena veins that occur in an area about one-half mile square on the south side of Quartz Hill, Central City district, Gilpin County, Colo. These veins are the Kirk, the German-Belcher, the Wood, and the Calhoun. Two of these veins, the Wood and the Calhoun, were studied in an attempt to determine the geologic factors favorable for pitchblende deposition. All accessible workings at the Wood and East Calhoun mines were mapped by tape and compass, and the distribution of radioactivity was studied in the field. Channel and chip samples were taken for chemical assay to compare radioactivity with uranium content. The pitchblende-bearing veins cat both pre-Cambrian granite gneiss and quartz-biotite schist; however, the gneiss was the more favorable host rock. Two bostonite porphyry dikes of Tertiary(?) age were crosscut by the Wood and Calhoun veins. The pitchblende occurs in lenses erratically distributed along the veins and in stringers extending outward from the veins. In the lenses it forms hard'. masses, but elsewhere it is Soft and powdery. The pitchblende is contemporaneous with the pyrite bat earlier than the sphalerite and galena in the same vein. All the observed pitchblende was at depths of less than 400 ft. The veins probably cannot be mined profitably for the pitchblende alone under present conditions.

  8. The discovery of uranium - on the history of pitchblende

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, W.

    1989-01-01

    Two hundred years ago, uranium was discovered by the pharmacist and chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth in Berlin as the 18th metal. In a changing world he studied the emerging new chemical theories and pleaded unwaveringly in favor of abandoning outmoded concepts. Klaproth was the first scientific author who published not only his personal idea of the composition of a new compound, but also gave all details of his investigation. In this way, he recognized new elements first in a speculative process and then on the basis of factual confirmation. Klaproth collected his works in six volumes, among other publications, and was one of the main contributors to an encyclopaedic chemical dictionary. He was the first full professor of chemistry at the new university of Berlin. For a long time, uranium compounds were used to stain glass and porcelain as well as in painting and in the graphic arts. Without realizing it, Henri Becquerel in 1896 first recognized the radioactive properties of the uranium compounds, which were confirmed by the Curies and by G. Bemont in the discovery of radium in residues from Joachimsthal pitchblende. (orig.) [de

  9. Purification of wastewater from the beneficiation of pitchblende ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, C.

    1988-01-01

    During and after World War II, uranium was extracted in the USA from Belgian Congo pitchblende. The extractant was a Na 2 CO 3 solution. After the uranium was reclaimed from this solution, about 1.5·10 7 iters of high-carbonate wastewater remained, and were stored at the Niagara Falls Storage in New York State. This water contained 190 ppm UO 2 ++ , about 130 pCi/I 226 Ra and traces of a wide variety of chemical contaminants. A procedure has been developed sthat precipitates these impurties in situ, reducing the dissolved U and 226 Ra activity level below 600 pCi (below 2 ppm) and 30 pCi/l respectively, and the level of 19 other chemical contaminants to specified concentrations well below the ppm level. Since the supernatant liquid was to be discharged into the adiacent Niagara River, these maximum permitted levels were essentially those for drinking water. The task divided itself into thre phases: (1) precipitating the uranium, despite the presence of a high concentration of carbonate (pH 9-10); (2) simultaneously precipitating 17 other metals, + Se and F, and (3) precipitating the radium, despite the high concentration of Ca present. The approach used for uranium made use of the fact that if CaCO 3 is precipitated in the presence of UO 2 ++ at pH 11-12, the uranium is also precipitated as calcium monouranate. A procedure based on this reaction reduced the uranium concentration from 190 to 0.1 ppm (0.033 pCi/l). The 19 trace elements were carried down on ferric hydroxide at pH 7 and pH 9. (Separate precipitations were required in order to retain amphoteric elements in the precipitate). Analysis of the final supernatant solution by ICP spectrometry or atomic absorption showed that the requirements for these elements had been met or exceeded. 2 refs.; 1 table

  10. Contribution to the study of french pitchblendes; Contribution a l'etude des pechblendes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffroy, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. de Mineralogie, Centre de Chatillon (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Sarcia, J A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Div. de la Crouzille, Haute Vienne (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The authors first review the characteristics of uraninite-pitchblende, as deduced of present literature. They set apart from typical pitchblende a black oxide aspect, which probably corresponds to neo-formations, and a 'para-pitchblende' aspect, which they relate to deep sur-oxidation of normal pitchblende. They insist on the easy replacement of pitchblende by silica. and give indications as to changes in vein stones (fluorite, quartz, etc...). A detailed study of paragenesis and successions in french uranium districts follows (including discussion of uranium of uranium-bearing coals). The authors attempt to classify french pitchblende veins. They are chiefly epithermal and poor in satellite ores. Three types of deposits are identified: massive - pitchblende type, silica type, fluorite type. These deposits, as those of Portugal, are included in granite, Central-European peri-batholitic types where uranium associates which Ni, Co, Bi and Ag, are in France both rare and poor. Finally, the authors attempt to bring out in the european Hercynian area a particular distribution of paragenetic types. (authors) [French] Les auteurs recapitulent d'abord les caracteres et les occurences de l'uraninite - pechblende, tels qu'ils peuvent etre degages de l'actuelle bibliographie. Ils exposent ensuite les faits qui du point de vue mineralogique seulement ressortent de l'etude mineralogique et chalcographique des pechblendes francaises et de leurs satellites. Ils distinguent de la pechblende-type un facies oxyde noir; correspondant probablement a une neoformation, et un facies parapechblende, qui est rapporte a une sur oxydation hypogene de la pechblende proprement dite. Ils insistent sur le facile remaniement de la pechblende par la slice; et donnent quelques precisions sur les modifications des gangues (fluorine, quartz, etc...). Suit l'etude detaillee des parageneses et des successions dans les districts uraniferes francais: Divisions du Limousin, de Grury, de Lachaux et de

  11. Contribution to the study of french pitchblendes; Contribution a l'etude des pechblendes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffroy, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. de Mineralogie, Centre de Chatillon (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Sarcia, J.A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Div. de la Crouzille, Haute Vienne (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The authors first review the characteristics of uraninite-pitchblende, as deduced of present literature. They set apart from typical pitchblende a black oxide aspect, which probably corresponds to neo-formations, and a 'para-pitchblende' aspect, which they relate to deep sur-oxidation of normal pitchblende. They insist on the easy replacement of pitchblende by silica. and give indications as to changes in vein stones (fluorite, quartz, etc...). A detailed study of paragenesis and successions in french uranium districts follows (including discussion of uranium of uranium-bearing coals). The authors attempt to classify french pitchblende veins. They are chiefly epithermal and poor in satellite ores. Three types of deposits are identified: massive - pitchblende type, silica type, fluorite type. These deposits, as those of Portugal, are included in granite, Central-European peri-batholitic types where uranium associates which Ni, Co, Bi and Ag, are in France both rare and poor. Finally, the authors attempt to bring out in the european Hercynian area a particular distribution of paragenetic types. (authors) [French] Les auteurs recapitulent d'abord les caracteres et les occurences de l'uraninite - pechblende, tels qu'ils peuvent etre degages de l'actuelle bibliographie. Ils exposent ensuite les faits qui du point de vue mineralogique seulement ressortent de l'etude mineralogique et chalcographique des pechblendes francaises et de leurs satellites. Ils distinguent de la pechblende-type un facies oxyde noir; correspondant probablement a une neoformation, et un facies parapechblende, qui est rapporte a une sur oxydation hypogene de la pechblende proprement dite. Ils insistent sur le facile remaniement de la pechblende par la slice; et donnent quelques precisions sur les modifications des gangues (fluorine, quartz, etc...). Suit l'etude detaillee des parageneses et des successions dans les districts uraniferes francais: Divisions du

  12. Review on the application of electron microprobe chemical dating method in the age research of uranium/pitchblende

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Xiangkun; Qin Mingkuan; Fan Guang

    2011-01-01

    Different micro dating methods have been developed in recent years, the advantages and disadvantages are simply introduced at first. The recent development of electron microprobe chemical dating method in the age research of uraninite/pitchblende and the used analytical conditions by the precurser are presented in detail by stages. Finally, the application foreground of this method in the age research of uraninite/pitchblende and the possible problems are systematically investigated and discussed. It is believed that this method will play a big role in the age research of uranium minerals, especially in the micro dating research of tiny uranium minerals (φ < 10 μm) and uranium micro-ores of multi-stage. (authors)

  13. Chemical composition and geological age of french pitchblendes and uraninite of Ivory Coast; Composition chimique et age geologique de pechblendes francaises et de l'uraninite de Cote d'Ivoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervet, M; Guillemin, M; Hemery, MME; Pellas, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1953-07-01

    The determination of the geological age of the uraninite of Ivory Coast in particular, has a very big importance since it permits to date the granito-gneissic basement of this part of Africa and moreover it is one of the most former known uraninites. The emotion caused in some geologists surroundings by the announcement of the date, fixed to close to 2 billions of years for this part of Africa, incited us to make control our assessment by the isotope analysis of lead. Before the concordance really astonishing of the results gotten by two entirely different methods, the publication of our works could not be differed more. The geological age of the uraninite of Coast of Ivory determined to the Laboratory of Mineralogy is of 1933 millions of years: by the calculation given with the help of the logarithmic and based shape on the chemical analysis of the uraninite (precise dosages of U, Pb and Th); by the isotope analysis, this age is about: 1940 {+-} 20 millions of years. We conducted the same operations for several French pitchblendes as the Crousille, Bauzot, Bigay. (M.B.) [French] La determination de l'age geologique de l'uraninite de Cote d'Ivoire en particulier, a une tres grosse importance puisqu'elle permet de dater le socle granito-gneissique de cette partie de l'Afrique et de plus, c'est une des plus anciennes uraninites connues. L'emotion causee dans certains milieux de geologues par l'annonce de la date, fixee a pres de 2 milliards d'annees pour cette partie de l'Afrique, nous a incites a faire controler nos determinations par l'analyse isotopique du plomb. Devant la concordance vraiment etonnante des resultats obtenus par deux methodes entierement differentes, la publication de nos travaux ne pouvait plus etre differee. L'age geologique de l'uraninite de Cote d'Ivoire determine au Laboratoire de Mineralogie est de 1933 millions d'annees: par le calcul donne a l'aide de la forme logarithmique et base sur l'analyse chimique de l'uraninite (dosages precis de U

  14. Oxidative lixiviation of pitchblende and precipitation of uranium with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.

    1958-01-01

    Earlier work on the preparation of uranium by F.A. Forward and his colleagues has shown the possibilities presented by oxidative lixiviation of ores in a carbonate medium, and the catalytic reduction of uranyl carbonate solutions by hydrogen. The carbonate attack is of considerable interest because of the selectivity of the uranium dissolution, which means it can be applied particularly to the treatment of low grade ores with a reduced consumption of cheap reagents. The subsequent reduction with hydrogen is of the same nature, and not only enables relatively dilute uranyl carbonate solutions to be treated, but also avoids any significant alteration of the attacking solution which can therefore be used again in the lixiviation stage. The experimental work, undertaken at the request of the Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique, was aimed at determining the quantitative characteristics of each of the two stages in order to ascertain their possibilities for industrial application to the principal low grade ores found in France. (author) [fr

  15. The pitchblende of Fe mine (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca) as natural analogue of spent fuel behaviour (matrix I project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Campos, R.; Gomez, P.; Cozar, J. S.; Pardillo, J.; Garralon, A.; Turrero, M. J.; Buil, B.; Pelayo, M.; Ruiz, B.; Rivas, P.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium ore deposits have been extensively studied as natural analogues to the deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. These investigations constitute an essential element of both national and international research programmes applied to the assessment of geological repositories in crystalline, clayey and even in schistose rocks. The uranium ore deposit of Fe mine (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salmanca) is placed in highly fractured schistose rocks, a geological setting that has not been envisaged in ENRESA options. However, the similarities with some of the repository features and the analogies with the processes involved in the degradation of the ore deposits made advisable its study as natural analogue. The most important features are. (Author)

  16. Oxidative lixiviation of pitchblende and precipitation of uranium with hydrogen; Lixiviation oxydante des pechblendes et precipitation de l'uranium par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Balaceanu, J C; Coussemant, F [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1958-07-01

    Earlier work on the preparation of uranium by F.A. Forward and his colleagues has shown the possibilities presented by oxidative lixiviation of ores in a carbonate medium, and the catalytic reduction of uranyl carbonate solutions by hydrogen. The carbonate attack is of considerable interest because of the selectivity of the uranium dissolution, which means it can be applied particularly to the treatment of low grade ores with a reduced consumption of cheap reagents. The subsequent reduction with hydrogen is of the same nature, and not only enables relatively dilute uranyl carbonate solutions to be treated, but also avoids any significant alteration of the attacking solution which can therefore be used again in the lixiviation stage. The experimental work, undertaken at the request of the Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique, was aimed at determining the quantitative characteristics of each of the two stages in order to ascertain their possibilities for industrial application to the principal low grade ores found in France. (author) [French] Les travaux anterieurs de F.A. FORWARD et de ses collaborateurs ont mis en evidence les possibilites que presentent, dans la preparation de l'uranium, la lixiviation oxydante des minerais en milieu carbonate, et la reduction catalytique des solutions d'uranyl carbonate par l'hydrogene. L'attaque carbonatee presente, en effet, un interet considerable du fait de la selectivite de la dissolution de l'uranium qui permet de l'appliquer en particulier au traitement des minerais pauvres avec une consommation reduite de reactifs peu couteux. La reduction subsequente par l'hydrogene presente les memes caracteres et permet non seulement de traiter des solutions relativement diluees d'uranyl carbonate, mais encore evite toute modification significative de la solution d'attaque qui peut donc etre reemployee dans l'etape de lixiviation. L'experimentation, entreprise a la demande du Commissariat a l'Energie atomique, avait pour but de determiner les caracteristiques quantitatives de chacune des deux etapes afin d'en preciser les possibilites d'application industrielle aux principaux minerais pauvres fran is. (auteur)

  17. The pitchblende of Fe mine (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca) as natural analogue of spent fuel behaviour (matrix I project); La pechblenda de la mina Fe (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca), como analogo natural del comportamiento del combustible gastado (Proyecto Matrix I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L; Campos, R; Gomez, P; Cozar, J S; Pardillo, J; Garralon, A; Turrero, M J; Buil, B; Pelayo, M; Ruiz, B; Rivas, P [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Uranium ore deposits have been extensively studied as natural analogues to the deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. These investigations constitute an essential element of both national and international research programmes applied to the assessment of geological repositories in crystalline, clayey and even in schistose rocks. The uranium ore deposit of Fe mine (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salmanca) is placed in highly fractured schistose rocks, a geological setting that has not been envisaged in ENRESA options. However, the similarities with some of the repository features and the analogies with the processes involved in the degradation of the ore deposits made advisable its study as natural analogue. The most important features are. (Author)

  18. Oxidation of uraninite: does tetragonal U3O7 occur in nature?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Ewing, R.C.; Thomas, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Samples of uraninite and pitchblende annealed at 1200 C in H 2 , and untreated pitchblende were sequentially oxidized in air at 180-190 C, 230 C, and 300 C. Uraninite and untreated pitchblende oxidized to the U 4 O 9 -type oxide, and their X-ray symmetry remained isometric up to 300 C. Reduced pitchblende after oxidation to UO 2+x and U 4 O 9 -type oxides transformed into α-U 3 O 8 at 300 C. Two major mechanisms control uraninite and untreated pitchblende stability during oxidation: (1) Th and/or REE maintain charge balance and block oxygen interstitials near impurity cations; (2) the uraninite structure saturates with respect to excess oxygen and radiation-induced oxygen interstitials. Untreated pitchblende during oxidation behaved similarly to irradiated UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel; whereas, reduced pitchblende resembled nonirradiated UO 2 . An analysis of the data in the literature, as well as our own efforts to identify U 3 O 7 in samples from Cigar Lake, Canada, failed to provide conclusive evidence of the natural occurrence of tetragonal α-U 3 O 7 . Most probably, reported occurrences of U 3 O 7 are mixtures of isometric uraninites of slightly different compositions. (orig.)

  19. Oxidation of uraninite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1993-06-01

    Samples of uraninite and pitchblende annealed at 1200 degrees C in H 2 , and untreated pitchblende were sequentially oxidized in air at 180-190 degrees C, 230 degrees C, and 300 degrees C. Uraninite and untreated pitchblende oxidized to the U 4 O 9 -type oxide, and their x-ray symmetry remained isometric up to 300 degrees C. Reduced pitchblende, after oxidation to UO 2+x and U 4 O 9 -type oxides, transformed into α-U 3 O 8 at 300 degrees C. Two major mechanisms control uraninite and untreated pitchblende stability during oxidation: 1. Th and/or lanthanide elements maintain charge balance and block oxygen interstitials near impurity cations; 2. the uraninite structure saturates with respect to excess and radiation-induced oxygen interstitials. Untreated pitchblende during oxidation behaved similarly to irradiated UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel; whereas, reduced pitchblende resembled non-irradiated UO 2 . An analysis of the data in the literature, as well as our own efforts (XRD, EMPA, SEM, AEM) to identify U 3 O 7 in samples form Cigar Lake, Canada, failed to provide conclusive evidence of the natural occurrence of tetragonal αU 3 O 7 . Most probably, reported occurrences of U 3 O 7 are mixtures of isometric uraninites of slightly different compositions, 45 refs

  20. Criteria for uranium occurrences in Saskatchewan and Australia as guides to favorability for similar deposits in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalliokoski, J.; Langford, F.F.; Ojakangas, R.W.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explain the occurrence of the large uranium deposits that have been found in northern Saskatchewan and the Northern Territory of Australia, to provide criteria to evaluate the favorability of Proterozoic rocks in the United States for similar deposits. All of these deposits belong to the class known as the Proterozoic unconformity-type pitchblende deposits. Chapters are devoted to: uranium deposits in Saskatchewan; uranium deposits of the Darwin and Arnhem Land area, Northern Territory of Australia; model for the Proterozoic unconformity-type pitchblende deposits; and evaluation of the geology of selected states for its favorability for Proterozoic unconformity-type pitchblende deposits

  1. Uranium deposits in the Eureka Gulch area, Central City district, Gilpin County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, P.K.; Osterwald, F.W.; Tooker, E.W.

    1954-01-01

    The Eureka Gulch area of the Central City district, Gilpin County, Colo., was mined for ores of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc; but there has been little mining activity in the area since World War I. Between 1951 and 1953 nine radioactive mine dumps were discovered in the area by the U.S. Geological Survey and by prospectors. the importance of the discoveries has not been determined as all but one of the mines are inaccessible, but the distribution, quantity, and grade of the radioactive materials found on the mine dumps indicate that the area is worth of additional exploration as a possible source of uranium ore. The uranium ans other metals are in and near steeply dipping mesothermal veins of Laramide age intrusive rocks. Pitchblende is present in at least four veins, and metatorbernite, associated at places with kosolite, is found along two veins for a linear distance of about 700 feet. The pitchblends and metatorbernite appear to be mutually exclusive and seem to occur in different veins. Colloform grains of pitchblende were deposited in the vein essentially contemporaneously with pyrite. The pitchblende is earlier in the sequence of deposition than galena and sphalerite. The metatorbernite replaces altered biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss and altered amphibolite, and to a lesser extent forms coatings on fractures in these rocks adjacent to the veins; the kasolite fills vugs in highly altered material and in altered wall rocks. Much of the pitchblende found on the dumps has been partly leached subsequent to mining and is out of equilibrium. Selected samples of metatorbernite-bearing rock from one mine dump contain as much as 6.11 percent uranium. The pitchblende is a primary vein mineral deposited from uranium-bearing hydrothermal solutions. The metatorbernite probably formed by oxidation, solution, and transportation of uranium from primary pitchblende, but it may be a primary mineral deposited directly from fluids of different composition from these

  2. Mineralogical Study of Workable Material Coming from Mina Fe Ciudad Rodrigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingarro Martin, E.

    1962-01-01

    A mineralogical analysis is made to ascertain the effects of acid bleaching on normalized conditions. Uranium is mainly found under uranotile, pitchblende and autunite form with an average assay of 0.4 p. ct. The loss of uranium in tailings under current conditions of attach, mainly is due to pitchblende resistance, being practically no leachable, and to uranium absorption by hydrated iron oxides and colloidal ores. This last problem will be discussed in a next paper. (Author) 5 refs

  3. Uranium deposit of Bauzot (Saone et Loire)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrat, G.H.

    1956-01-01

    The best known of the uranium ore deposits of the Morvan (a province of France) is in the form of a bundle of quartz-fluor lodes with pitchblende and B.P.G.C. ore. The pitchblende seems to have been deposited at different time in respect to the formation of the gangue minerals, but generally it is ore of the first-formed. The main concentrations of ore are always in the vicinity of dykes of basic crystalline rocks. (author) [fr

  4. Mineralogical Study of Workable Material Coming from Mina Fe Ciudad Rodrigo; Estudio mineralogico del material beneficiable procedente de la Mina Fe. Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingarro Martin, E

    1962-07-01

    A mineralogical analysis is made to ascertain the effects of acid bleaching on normalized conditions. Uranium is mainly found under uranotile, pitchblende and autunite form with an average assay of 0.4 p. ct. The loss of uranium in tailings under current conditions of attach, mainly is due to pitchblende resistance, being practically no leachable, and to uranium absorption by hydrated iron oxides and colloidal ores. This last problem will be discussed in a next paper. (Author) 5 refs.

  5. The geochronology of uranium deposits in the Great Bear batholith, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The oldest uranium mineralisation found in the Great Bear batholith during this study may be hydrothermal pitchblende-hematite veins at Hottah Lake. Their apparent age of 2058 +- 34 Ma can also be explained by the contamination of deposits only 440 +- 57 Ma old, which is the age of pitchblende veins nearby. Numerous pendants of metamorphosed, uraninite-bearing 'black sand' placers in a north-trending belt west of the Wopmay Fault are 1860 +- 20 Ma old, the age of the granites that intrude them. Mineralisation at Echo Bay is from 1500 +- 10 to 1424 +- 29 Ma old, and extends up to 30 km north and 40 km south of Echo Bay. The JD claims contain small quartz vein deposits dated at 535 +- 164 and 1092 +- 115 Ma. At Mountain Lake, pitchblende in Helikian sandstones overlying the batholith is 1076 +- 96 Ma old. Polymetallic veinlets at Mazenod Lake are 457 +- 26 Ma old. Pitchblende in a giant quartz vein at the Rayrock mine is 511 +- 86 Ma old. Small pitchblende veins east of the batholith along the Coppermine River are between 400 and 660 Ma old. All the deposits are either between approximately 395 and 660 Ma old, or indicate remobilization during this interval. These events may be related to a marine transgression and regression approximately 600 and 350 Ma ago, respectively

  6. Uranium districts defined by reconnaissance geochemistry in South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Steenfelt, A.; Kunzendorf, H.

    1983-01-01

    A reconnaissance exploration survey over 14 000 km 2 of Precambrian terrain in South Greenland using stream-sediment and stream-water samples delineated a central uranium district of 2000 km 2 with enhanced uranium levels and smaller anomalous zones in the south of the field area. Limited follow-up work located 8 pitchblende occurrences in this extensive district. The pitchblende is in veins which contain quartz, calcite, iron oxide, fluorite and minor sulphides. The isotopic (U-Pb) age of the pitchblende, which ranges from 1180-1090 Ma, corresponds to the late stages of Gardar alkaline igneous activity. It is concluded, therefore, that the reconnaissance geochemistry reflects a district-wide hydrothermal event related to the late volatile differentiates derived from the highly fractionated alkaline magma. A combination of primary and secondary features have complemented each other in enhancing the geochemical reconnaissance data and emphasized its importance but has not materially altered the interpretation. (Auth.)

  7. Notes on uranium geochemistry applied to the study of intergranitic deposits and their envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrat, H.G.

    1975-01-01

    Research on the natural state of uranium, either in the form of traces in the crystal structure or in intergranitic pitchblende deposits is presented. In the former case the methods considered are those relative to post-magma development, a phenomenon having well established connections with the crystallization of uranite type ores. This can be interpreted as a preconcentration if certain genetics concepts are adopted. New aspects of these relationships will then be reported. In the latter case two kinds of research will be presented, corresponding to two types of hypotheses. First, the laying down of pitchblendes by supergenesis is based on the easy degradation of uraninite under meteoric conditions, which will be considered in the geochemical and paleogeographical contexts. Second, the hydrothermal nature of pitchblendes will find strong support in experimental studies on the fluid inclusions of the ore, its matrix and its immediate envelope and from considerations on depth tectonics [fr

  8. The uranium ore deposits in Ciudad Rodrigo Phyllites. about the possibility of new deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingarro Martin, E.; Marin Benavente, C.

    1969-01-01

    The main features of the genesis of uranium deposits of the Fe mine type, are discussed in this paper. Pitchblende ore is related with phyllites bearing organic material and with geomorphological level, fossilized by eocene sediments. As a result, new uranium ore deposits are possible under Ciudad Rodrigo tertiary basin, tertiary cover depth being little more than three hundred feet. (Author)

  9. The uranium ore deposits in Ciudad Rodrigo Phyllites. about the possibility of new deposits; Los yacimientos uraniferos en las pizarras paleozoicas de Ciudad Rodrigo. sobre la posible existencia de nuevas mineralizaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingarro Martin, E; Marin Benavente, C

    1969-07-01

    The main features of the genesis of uranium deposits of the Fe mine type, are discussed in this paper. Pitchblende ore is related with phyllites bearing organic material and with geomorphological level, fossilized by eocene sediments. As a result, new uranium ore deposits are possible under Ciudad Rodrigo tertiary basin, tertiary cover depth being little more than three hundred feet. (Author)

  10. Factors affecting radon removal from Rn-222 enriched water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Mamoon, A.

    1994-01-01

    Continued use of potable well water that has elevated levels of Rn-222 is harmful to human health. activated carbon, aeration and heating can remove radon from treated water. Water artificially enriched with Rn-222 using a pitchblende source was studied in a laboratory scale model under controlled conditions. (author), 3 figs., 3 refs

  11. Regularities of the vertical distribution of uranium-molybdenum mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V.M.; Kazantsev, V.V.; Protasov, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    The geological structure of one of ore fields of the uranium-molybdenum formation pertaining to the northern framing of a large volcano-tectonic depression is studied. The main uranium deposits are related to necks formed by neck facies of brown liparites. Three zones are singled out within the limits of the ore field. In the upper one there are small ore bodies with a low uranium content represented by phenolite-chlorite, pitchblende 3-coffinite 3-jordizite and calcinite-sulphide associations, in the middle one - the main ore bodies formed by pitchblende 1-chlorite, molybdenite 2 (jordizite)-pitchblende 2-hydromica, coffinite 2-pyrite associations; in the lower one-thin veinlets formed by coffinite-molybdenite 1-chlorite, brannerite-pyrite and pitchblende 1-chlorite associations. Dimensions of the ore deposits depend on the neck sizes: in small necks the middle zone and, rarely, the lower one are of the industrial interest; in the large ones - the upper middle and, probably, lower ones. The regularities found can be extended to other deposits of the uranium-molybdenum formation [ru

  12. Analyses of national uranium resources evaluation reference materials from New Brunswick Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Caffrey, A.J.; Helmer, R.G.; Willis, C.P.; Rogers, J.W.

    1981-10-01

    Samples of pitchblende ore, monazite sand and uranium oxide have been analyzed for uranium and thorium content by gamma-ray counting and delayed neutron counting. Relative and absolute concentrations were measured. The methods of analysis are described and the final results presented

  13. Phyllitic minerals in hydrothermal uranium deposits. I. Crystalchemistry of relict and newly formed micas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Jacques; Cathelineau, Michel

    1982-01-01

    Several generations of white micas have been recognised in four two mica granite massifs which are associated with uranium deposits in the Hercynian chain. These different generations correspond to distinct geological phenomena belonging to the deuteric and hydrothermal stages of the history of these massifs. Crystalchemical studies of these micas with the aid of the electronic microprobe show that each of these phenomena corresponds a phengite of different, well defined compositions. An increase in the phengitic character and a decrease in the paragonite component are observed over time. Strong similarities exist between micas of the same generation belonging to different granite massifs. The study of the evolution of the earliest deuteric micas during later hydrothermal phenomena, mica episyenitisation and deposition of pitchblende, has shown two opposed trends. In the case of mica episyenitisation, the micas tend to reequilibrate, while in the case of pitchblende deposition and the vein stage in general, the micas preserve their primary character [fr

  14. Evaluation of host rocks and background lithologies as secondary contributors to the uranium and rare-earth element source-term at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyslop, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    HMIP has a research programme investigating some naturally radioactive sites in the UK as geochemical analogues of radionuclide migration. The objective is to test thermodynamic database and computer codes used for modelling radionuclide migration under environmental conditions. This report describes a study of the distributions of uranium (U) and the rare-earth elements (REE) in the vicinity of pitchblende veins outcropping in the cliff at Needle's Eye on the Solway Coats, SW Scotland. This report improves the information available on the secondary source-terms of U and REE. The minerals in the country rocks are thought to be supplying only minor amounts of these elements to the groundwaters flowing into the Merse silts within the detailed study area close to the mineralisation in the cliff. The pitchblende veins are the principal source-term for U migrating into the Merse silts at the foot of the cliff. (author)

  15. Uranium deposit of Bauzot (Saone et Loire); Le gisement d'uranium de Bauzot (Saone et Loire)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrat, G H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saone et Loire (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    The best known of the uranium ore deposits of the Morvan (a province of France) is in the form of a bundle of quartz-fluor lodes with pitchblende and B.P.G.C. ore. The pitchblende seems to have been deposited at different time in respect to the formation of the gangue minerals, but generally it is ore of the first-formed. The main concentrations of ore are always in the vicinity of dykes of basic crystalline rocks. (author) [French] Bauzot, le plus connu des gisements d'uranium du Morvan est constitue d'un faisceau de filons quartzofluores, mineralise en pechblende et sulfures B.P.G.S. La pechblende semble s'etre mide en place a des periodes variables par rapport a la gangue mais en general elle constitue un des premiers mineraux deposes. Les principaux amas se situent toujours a proximite de filons de roches lamprophyriques. (auteur)

  16. Uranium and thorium deposits of Northern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This, the second edition of the uranium-thorium deposit inventory, describes briefly the deposits of uranium and/or thorium in northern Ontario, which for the purposes of this circular is defined as that part of Ontario lying north and west of the Grenville Front. The most significant of the deposits described are fossil placers lying at or near the base of the Middle Precambrian Huronian Supergroup. These include the producing and past-producing mines of the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area. Also included are the pitchblende veins spatially associated with Late Precambrian (Keweenawan) diabase dikes of the Theano Point - Montreal River area. Miscellaneous Early Precambrian pegmatite, pitchblende-coffinite-sulphide occurrences near the Middle-Early Precambrian unconformity fringing the Lake Superior basin, and disseminations in diabase, granitic rocks, alkalic complexes and breccias scattered throughout northern Ontario make up the rest of the occurrences

  17. Uranium mineralization in the Mesoproterozoic Banganapalle formation near Nagayapalle, Cuddapah Basin, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Himadri; Harikrishnan, T.; Hanumanthappa, D.; Rengarajan, M.; Saravanan, B.; Bhagat, Sangeeta; Mahendra Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Cuddapah Basin is the hub of uranium exploration for years together in India. Initial efforts were for quartz-pebble-conglomerate type mineralization. However, the emphasis later shifted towards dolostone-hosted mineralization and finally to unconformity-associated uranium mineralization. The recent finding of uranium mineralization associated with the Banganapalle Formation near Nagayapalle is the outcome of continuous exploration input in the Cuddapah Basin over years. Uranium mineralization (up to 0.278% U 3 O 8 ) associated with the Mesoproterozoic Banganapalle Formation near Nagayapalle is represented by pitchblende and autunite. Pitchblende occurs as tiny grains in the intergranular spaces and along grain boundaries; and also at places replaces pyrite and covellite grains. The geological set-up indicates that the geodomain is favourable for uranium mineralization. (author)

  18. Characteristics of mesozoic magmatic rocks in western Zhejiang and their relation with uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jiazhi

    2000-01-01

    The author summarizes characteristics of Mesozoic (Yangshanian Period) acid-intermediate volcanics, sub-volcanics and basic intrusive from aspects of formation time of rock series, petrogenic sequence, chemical composition, rock -controlling factors and petrogenic environments. It is suggested that these rocks were originated from different source areas of crust and mantle. Based on the time-space relation between different types uranium deposits and magmatic rocks, the author proposes that: the earlier stage (Earlier Cretaceous) U-hematite ores were originated from acid volcanic magmatism of crustal source, but the later stage (Late Cretaceous) pitchblende-polymetallic sulfide and pitchblende-purple fluorite rich ores were derived from basic magmatism of mantle source. Finally, the author proposes prospecting criteria of the above two types of uranium deposits

  19. Typomorphism and isomorphism of uranium hydroxides of the woelsendorfite group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, L.N.; Ryzhov, V.I.; Fedorov, O.V.; Lyubomilova, G.V.

    1985-01-01

    In oxidation zone of uranium deposit uranium hydroxides of the wolsendorfite group: calcuranoite, bauranoite, wolsendorfite and their varieties are studied. Chemical and microprobe analyses are carried out. It is established, that the minerals are encountered in the form of two generations. Early generation forms partial or complete pseudomorphosis over rich contrast pitchblende ores. The late one is encountered in the form of redeposited crystal aggregates in calcite-pitchblende streaks. Study in details of chemical composition of the group minerals permitted to establish the existence of a continuous isomorphous series with ultimate members calcuranoite and wolsendorfite with regular change in chemical and physical properties within the series. Existence of bauranoite-calcuranoite and bauranoite-wolsendorfite isomorphous series is assumed

  20. Dosimetry is Key to Good Epidemiology: Workers at Mallinckrodt Chemical Works had Seven Different Source Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Elizabeth D; Boice, John D; Golden, Ashley P; Girardi, David J; Cohen, Sarah S; Mumma, Michael T; Shore, Roy E; Leggett, Richard W; Kerr, George D

    2018-04-01

    Mallinckrodt Chemical Works was the earliest uranium processing facility in the Manhattan Project, beginning in 1942. Even then, concern existed about possible health effects resulting from exposure to radiation and pitchblende dust. This concern was well founded as the facility processed Belgian Congo pitchblende ore that was up to 60% pure uranium with high U content and up to 100 mg of radium per ton. Workers were exposed to external gamma radiation plus internal radiation from inhalation and ingestion of pitchblende dust (uranium, radium, and silica). Multiple sources of exposure were available for organ dose reconstruction to a degree unique for an epidemiologic study. Personal film badge measures available from 1945 captured external exposures. Additional external exposure included 15,518 occupational medical x-rays and 210 radiation exposure records from other facilities outside of Mallinckrodt employment. Organ dose calculations considered organ-specific coefficients that account for photon energy and job-specific orientation of workers to the radiation source during processing. Intakes of uranium and radium were based on 39,451 uranium urine bioassays and 2,341 breath radon measurements, and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 68 biokinetic models were used to estimate organ-specific radiation absorbed dose. Estimates of exposure to airborne radon and its short-lived progeny were based on radon measurements in work areas where radium-containing materials were handled or stored, together with estimated exposure times in these areas based on job titles. Dose estimates for radon and its short-lived progeny were based on models and methods recently recommended in ICRP Publication 137. This comprehensive dosimetric approach follows methods outlined by the National Council on Radiation Protection Scientific Committee 6-9 for the Million Worker Study. Annual doses were calculated for six organs: lung, brain, heart, kidney, colon

  1. Granite-related hypothermal uranium mineralization in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Wu, J.; Pan, J.; Zhu, M.

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important geological types, granite-related uranium deposits account for about 29% of the total discovered natural uranium resources in China. Most of the granite-related uranium deposits located in Taoshan - Zhuguang uranium metallogenic belt, South China. In addition to the typical pitchblende vein-type uranium mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, a new type of granite-related uranium mineralization with characteristics of hypothermal matallogenic system was discovered in South China by current studies. However, hypothermal is contact thermal to epithermal mineralization, and not the conventional intrusive high temperature mineralization. Hypothermal uranium mineralization is presented by disseminated uraninite or pitchblende stockwork in fissures in granites normally with extensive alkaline alteration. The high temperature mineral assemblage of uraninite associate with scheelite and tourmaline was identified in hypothermal uranium mineralization. Fluid inclusion studies on this type mineralization indicated the middle to high temperature (>250℃) mineralization with the mixing evidence of ore forming solution derived from deep level, and the boiling and mixing of ore forming solution are regarded as the dominant mineralization mechanism for the precipitating of uranium. In contrast to the mineralization ages of 67 Ma to 87 Ma for typical pitchblende vein mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, the mineralization age is older than 100 Ma for hypothermal uranium mineralization in granite. In the Shituling deposit, Xiazhuang uranium ore field, uraninite and pitchblende micro veins with extensive potassic alteration, chloritization and sericitization are hosted in fissures of Indo-Chinese epoch granites with the uranium mineralization age of 130 Ma to 138 Ma with a mineralization temperature of 290℃ to 330℃ indicated. Other examples sharing the similar characters of hypothermal uranium mineralization have been recognized in

  2. Radioactive mineral deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1948-01-01

    This publication was designed as a guide for uranium and thorium prospectors in Australia. Physical properties, such as color, streak, luster, hardness, fracture, and specific gravity of the uranium and thorium-bearing minerals are summarized and the various methods suitable for detecting radioactivity in minerals are described. Two colored plates show samples of pitchblende (uraninite), autunite, carnotite, monazite, and others of the most important minerals sources of uranium and thorium.

  3. Uranium behaviour in the process of tectonite formation in zones of abyssal factures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.I.; Berezina, L.A.; Sannikova, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The patterns of distribution, concentration and manifestation of uranium and thorium in tectonic formations of different ages, in deep fault zones, have been determined. It has been established that the stage of plastic deformations was not accompanied by a supply of U. The state of brittle deformations, accompanied by an intensive supply of U, is characterized by superimposed U concentrated, primarily, in melanocratic rock-forming minerals, as well as in fissures, in the form of brannerite and pitchblende

  4. Natural analogues to the spent fuel behaviour of radioactive wastes (MATRIX, FASES I y II projects); Analogos naturales de la liberacion y migracion del UO2 y elementos metalicos asociados (Proyecto MATRIX, FASES I y II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villa, L.; Campos, R.; Garralon, A.; Crespo, M. T.; Quejido, J. A.; Cozar, J. S.; Arcos, D.; Bruno, J.; Grive, M.; Domenech, C.; Duro, L.; Ruiz Sanchez-Prro, J.; Marin, F.; Izquierdo, A.; Cattetero, G.; Ortuno, F.; Floria, E.

    2005-07-01

    Uranium ore deposits have been extensively studied as natural analogues to the spent fuel behaviour of radioactive wastes. These investigations constitute an essential element of both national and international research programmes applied to the assessment of HLNW repositories and their interaction with the environment. The U ore deposit of Mina Fe (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca) is hosted in highly fractured schistose rocks, a geological setting that has not been envisaged in the ENRESA option for nuclear waste disposal. However, the processes occurring at Mina Fe maintain some analogies with those occurring in a HLNW repository: The existence of large U concentrations as pitchblende (UO{sub 2}+x), which is chemically analogous to the main component of spent nuclear fuel, which has an oxidation degree of 2.25 < x < 2.66 as a result of radiolytic oxidation. The solubility behaviour of pitchblende as a result of interaction with groundwaters of varying chemical composition can be used to validate predictive models for spent fuel stability under severe alteration conditions. Some of the weathering products of pitchblende are similar to those that have been identified during the experimental oxidative dissolution of UO{sub 2}, Sim fuel, as well as natural uraninite and pitchblende. This is a subject that has been previously investigated in other research projects. Fe(III)-oxy hydroxides in the oxidised zone of the deposit could be similar to the spent fuel container corrosion products that could be formed under redox transition conditions. These corrosion products may act as radionuclide and trace metal scavengers. (Author)

  5. A uranium-bearing coalificated wood remain from the Upper Carboniferous uranium ore deposit in the Baden-Baden region of the Black Forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheimer, F.

    1981-01-01

    From the 1973 discovered Upper Carboniferous uranium ore sandstone deposit in the Baden-Baden region (Black Forest) a uranium-bearing coalificated wood remain derived, probably the relic of a Cordaites-trunk. The chemical determinated whole uranium content of this amounts about to 40 wght.-%. Pitchblende of the collomorphic type is embedded in the vitrinite of the fossil and imitates the nearly destroyed former wood-structure. The aggregates of this mineral, surrounded by zones of contact, consist of at least two modifications of different reflectance and hardness. Radiometric analyses reveale a different disturbed radioactive equilibrium, which indicated partly loss and re-enrichment of the uranium-content in recent time. A part of the fossil is completely mineralized by pitchblende of high reflectance and associated galena. For this paragenesis the radiometric investigations proved an approached equilibrium of radioactive substances. Therefore it is to be estimated, that the pitchblende is not alterated substantially, in contrast to the embeddings in the vitrinite, rich in little reflecting and soft nasturanium. The inhomogenic mineralization of the highly coalificated fossil, also to recognise microscopically, is set in relation to the controverse genetic interpretation of the deposit. Final remarks are concerned to other uranium-enriched fossils, especially remains of bones of different origin and age. (orig.) [de

  6. Ore mineragraphy of uraniferous polymetallic sulphides at Juba, Chhattisgarh basin, Raipur district, Central India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, S.K.; Sinha, D.K.; Verma, S.C.; Singh, Rajendra

    1998-01-01

    Polymetallic sulphide mineralization associated with uranium, has been located in the subfeldspathic arenite of Rehatikhol Formation of Chhattisgarh Supergroup near Juba (21 o 20'55 N : 83 o 15'43 E ) and Banjhapali (21 o 20'16 N : 83 o 14'44 E ) villages of Raipur district, Madhya Pradesh. The present paper describes ore mineragraphy and petrographic details of ore and the host rock. Ore microscopic study carried out on 82 rock samples has revealed fracture and intergranular space filled epigenetic mineralisation of uraninite/pitchblende, coffinite (1), pyrite, galena and pyrrhotite with traces of, bornite, luzonite, chalcopyrite, covellite, argentite, sternburgite and argentopyrite, besides diagenetically developed pyrite. Silification (chert), argillitisation and minor propylitisation represent the wall rock alterations. Coffinite (II) has formed due to reaction of uraninite/pitchblende and silica. Textural studies indicate, two stages of epigenetic mineralisation. (a) Introduction of sulphides of Fe-Pb-Cu-As and Ag and related potash metasomatism and (b) infiltration of siliceous material with pyrite, pitchblende, and subsequent coffinite. Coffinite (I) is deposited on porous pyrite is dusted with galena. Supergene processes have also formed minerals like bornite, covellite, galena etc. Thus the ore mineragraphic studies indicate epigenetic hydrothermal type uraniferous polymetallic sulphide mineralisation in the Juba area of Raipur district, Madhya Pradesh. (author)

  7. Flotation of uranium from uranium ores in Canada. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuswami, S.V.; Vijayan, S.; Woods, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements are reported for the equilibrium of cupferron from solutions by uranium oxide, quartz, illite, a mixture of these three, pitchblende, pyrite and brannerite ore. The cupferron concentration ranged from 1 to 6 g/L, and the pH was 7 and 8. Most isotherms followed the Langmuir model, although Freundlich behaviour was observed for illite and pitchblende. Most adsorption was pH independent except for illite and pitchblende. The adsorption isotherms for a mixture of uranium oxide, quartz and illite in the same proportions as in the naturally occurring ore agreed with the adsorption of the pyrite-free ore at pH 8 but not pH 7. We attribute the discrepancy to the use of illite as the model clay. The specific adsorption of cupferron on quartz and illite is lower by a factor of about 50 and 5, respectively, than the adsorption on uranium oxide. Specific adsorption less than 1 mg cupferron per gm of pyrite free ore does not float the mineral. The corresponding equilibrium concentration of cupferron is 0.5 g/L. A qualitative model is given, and the implications of this work for practical operations are presented

  8. Geological setting of uranium mineralizations in the Hotagen area, Central Swedish Caledonides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeng, B.; Wilson, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium-vein-type mineralizations with economic potential occur within, or very near, a Precambrian window within the Caledonides north of Oestersund. Two main areas with uranium prospects have been located in the northwest and northeast sectors of the window by ground prospecting and by airborne radiometric and geochemical surveys. The Sjaule and Flistjaern prospects in the northwest of the window are joint-filling-type mineralizations that clearly post-date Caledonian nappe emplacement. Long narrow northeast-trending vertical joint systems with pitchblende infillings cut through basement microgranite, dolerite and acid volcanic rocks as well as Caledonian quartzite, limestone and phyllite. The mineralizations in the northeast are governed by mainly NNE vertical structures ranging from metre-wide, hydrothermally altered crush zones with pitchblende impregnations to narrow joints with pitchblende infillings. The Lilljuthatten deposit with at least 1200 tonnes uranium occupies a stockwork of crush zones in a pervasively fractured high-uranium granite near a dolerite dyke. It is suggested that the uranium was leached from the Precambrian rocks of the window by solutions generated through Caledonian metamorphism. The solutions could travel easily through the crushed rocks and precipitate their loads under conditions of lower T and P or in suitable structures. (author)

  9. Formation mechanism of uranium minerals at sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shengfu; Zhang Yun

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing the behavior and existence form of uranium in different geochemical environments, existence form of uranium and uranium minerals species, this paper expounds the formation mechanism of main commercial uranium mineral--pitchblende: (1) uranium is a valence-changeable element. It is reactivated and migrates in oxidized environment, and is reduced and precipitated in reducing environment; (2) [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- , [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 ] 2- coming from oxidized environment react with reductants such as organic matter, sulfide and low-valence iron at the redox front to form simple uranium oxide--pitchblende; (3)the adsorption of uranium by organic matter and clay minerals accelerates the reduction and the concentration of uranium. Therefore, it is considered, that the reduction of SO 4 2- by organic matter to form H 2 S, and the reduction of UO 2 2+ by H 2 S are the main reasons for the formation of pitchblende. This reaction is extensively and universally available in neutral and weakly alkaline carbonate solution. The existense of reductants such as H 2 S is the basic factor leading to the decrease of Eh in environments and the oversaturation of UO 2 2+ at the redox front in groundwater, thus accelerating the adsorption and the precipitation of uranium

  10. Uranium deposits in France and in French overseas territories; Les gisements d'uranium de la France metropolitaine et des territoires francais d'Outre-Mer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roubault, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The discover of radium element by Pierre and Marie Curie in 1898 activated the uranium ores prospecting in France and its overseas territories. Before 1945, rare and poor deposits were found with only one being operated in Madagascar and the production of nobiantalates from washing of pegmatitic eluvium. Since the setting up of the Research and Mines Department in the C.E.A. and the training of specialized exploration teams as well as the use of Geiger counters, the uranium ores prospecting has been largely developed in France. The mineralogical data resulting from studies during the pre-war period led to the discover of four main uranium ores content areas: La Crouzille deposit in Limousin characterized by large presence of pitchblende, the Bauzot deposit with massive presence of pitchblende as well, discover of mineralization traces in the Bois Noirs area where a rich uranium ore lodes were discovered afterwards and finally the madagascar deposit. Few other areas have been prospected and have got good evidences of uranium ores presence. The majority of French uranium deposits have got an 'hydrothermal' vein type with localized pitchblende or a secondary mineralization type. It described the different deposits by region and in chronological order of discover. The structural aspect and petrographic studies are discussed. The metallogenic study shows the presence of large mineralization in the French Hercynian massif. After ten years of uranium ores prospecting and mines work, it shows that France possesses numerous uranium deposits which can be qualified as large deposits and the minerals ores prospecting revealed that many deposits sites would be payable in the near future. (M.P.)

  11. Comprehensive characterization and hazard assessment of the DOE-Niagara Falls storage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.L.; Dettorre, J.F.; Jackson, D.R.; Ausmus, B.S.

    1981-06-01

    A comprehensive radioecological and nonradiological characterization and hazards assessment was conducted on DOE-Niagara Falls Storage Site. Pitchblende residues and other low-level nuclear waste have been stored on the site since 1944. The most highly radioactive residues were stored in four abandoned buildings, while other wastes were deposited in pits or piled on surface soils on the Site. Several ditches were constructed on the Site to facilitate drainage or excess precipitation. Results of the study will permit the US DOE to form an appropriate remedial action plan for the Site

  12. A study on mineralization U,REE and related processes in anomaly No.6 Khoshomy area central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidaryan, F.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium mineralization in Khoshomy prospect, located in central. part of Iran, with 303-15000 (cps) and 14 to 4000 (ppm) released, The main rock types include: gneiss, granite, pegmatite and migmatite, that influenced by pegmatite-albitic vines (quartz-heldespatic). Acidic and basic dykes, granodioritic, units and dolomite and marble have been seen. The alteration associated with the mineralization is potassic, argillic, propylitic, carbonization, silisificaition and hematitizaition. Uranium mineralization occurred in a hydrothermal phase with Cu, Mo, Ni and Au elements. Uranium primary minerals include pitchblende, coffinite, uraninite; and uranium secondary minerals include uranophane and . boltwoodite. REE mineralization occurred by the potassic phase in peginatitization process

  13. The role of chemistry in the history of radioactivity (1897-1939)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical research on radioactivity started in 1898. That year, Pierre and Marie Curie discovered in pitchblende polonium and radium. Rutherford and Soddy showed that radioactivity is an atomic phenomenon accompanied by transmutation of elements and established the basic laws of radioactive changes. The existence of isotopes was postulated after the discovery of many radioactive substances. Major discoveries in nuclear science, i.e. the atomic nucleus, the neutron and artificial radioactivity, were made with radiation sources elaborated bu chemists. Finally, in 1939, radiochemists on the search for transuranium elements, discovered nuclear fission. (authors)

  14. 200 years with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, A.

    1989-01-01

    A short history beginning with the French Revolution and attendant scientific revolution in chemistry and the discovery of a new element from pitchblende, the notable contributions made by Klaproth, Peligot, Roentgen, Curie, and Planck are mentioned. The works of Rutherford, Einstein, Joliot, Joliot-Curie, Chadwick, Szilard, Hahn and Strassmann leading up to the discovery of fission are also briefly explained. The political and military implications (World War II) are described. The feature article concludes with an account of postwar nuclear-political history and the establishment of international scientific cooperation. 36 refs

  15. Uranium mineralization of migmatite in southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Mingyue

    1987-09-01

    The uranium mineralization occurs in migmatite in the form of disseminated uraninite is a new type found in southern China. According to the forms of uraninite existence in orebodies, it can be divided into primary and reworked subtypes. The principal uranium mineral in the deposits of primary subtype is uraninite, but those in reworked subtype are pitchblende and relict uraninite. The formation of uranium mineralization is considered as a result of remobilization, migration and local concentration caused by preferential melting of the uranium-rich strata.

  16. Uranium mineralization of migmatite in southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue.

    1987-01-01

    The uranium mineralization occurs in migmatite in the form of disseminated uraninite is a new type found in southern China. According to the forms of uraninite existence in orebodies, it can be divided into primary and reworked subtypes. The principal uranium mineral in the deposits of primary subtype is uraninite, but those in reworked subtype are pitchblende and relict uraninite. The formation of uranium mineralization is considered as a result of remobilization, migration and local concentration caused by preferential melting of the uranium-rich strata

  17. X-ray spectrum local method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdonin, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    General characteristic and bases of X-ray spectrum local method used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of the mineral chemical composition with volumetric locality of several cubic micrometers. The method is based on the excitation in a sample of characteristic and bremsstrahlung spectra by means of a narrow electron beam at 5-50 keV accelerating voltage. Application of the method when studying uranium minerals and ores is considered. The method allows to determine the uranium presence forms in the ores, morphological features of the minerals, mineral microstructure, UO 2 and UO 3 ratios for unhydrous uraninites and pitchblendes and also to determine mineralization age

  18. Discussion on the genesis and mineralization of sandstone type uranium deposit in the southern-central Longchuanjiang basin, western Yunnan province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yuqi; Li Mangen

    2002-01-01

    The author mainly discusses the character of the depositional systems, geological structures and ore-bearing series in the south-central Longchuanjiang basin, and points out that the uranium mineralization is closely related to the two depositional discontinuities caused by the tectonic evolution. Based on the characteristics of uranium mineralization in the area, pitchblende, uranium blacks and phosphuranylite are discovered in No. 382 uranium deposit and radiometric super-micro-minerals in No. 381 deposit. The research on the uranium mineralization age in No. 382 deposit shows that the mineralization in the south-central part of the basin has genetically multi-staged

  19. Discussions of the uranium geology working groups IGC, Sydney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The report is divided into six working group discussions on the following subjects: 1) Chemical and physical mechanisms in the formation of uranium mineralization, geochronology, isotope geology and mineralogy; 2) Sedimentary basins and sandstone-type uranium deposits; 3) Uranium in quartz-pebble conglomerates; 4) Vein and similar type deposits (pitchblende); 5) Other uranium deposits; 6) Relation of metallogenic, tectonic and zoning factors to the origin of uranium deposits. Each working group paper contains a short introductory part followed by a discussion by the working group members

  20. Search for an elusive 4.4-MeV α emitter in uranium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, R.J.; Illige, J.D.; Hulet, E.K.

    1979-12-01

    A search for an unidentified 4.4-MeV α-emitter in Belgian Congo pitchblende and uranium raffinates is described, and a history of observations of 4.4-MeV activity over the last 55 years in radiogenic haloes, zinc ores, monazite, thorite, huttonite, ultrabasic and other abyssal rocks, osmiridium, uranium ores, and raffinates of uranium is given. No evidence of excess 4.4-MeV activity was shown in any of the chemically separated fractions investigated. Upper limits for 4.4-MeV α activity in each of four studied samples are given

  1. The mines of Jackymov

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The history of the mines in the vicinity of Jackymov, a small town in Central Europe is given. These mines have been worked for several hundred years and from them has been brought forth a variety of products including silver, uranium and radium, the latter being isolated from Jackymov pitch-blende and identified by Marie Curie. The health effects of the miners mining radioactive ores are briefly discussed. The development of Jackymov as a spa resort using the mine water containing radium is also described. (U.K.)

  2. Uranium mineralization in the Lower Mahadek Sandstones of Laitduh Area, East Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahendra Kumar, K.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Ranganath, N.

    2008-01-01

    Significant uranium mineralization hosted in feldspathic sandstone of Upper Cretaceous Lower Mahadek Formation has been located at Laitduh, East Khasi Hills district, Meghalaya. Two mineralized horizons have been identified within Lower Mahadek Formation with vertical separation of 30 m. Samples from upper horizon have assayed upto 0.17% U 3 O 8 , whereas samples from lower mineralized horizon have assayed upto 0.50% U 3 O 8 . The radioactive minerals identified are coffinite and pitchblende occurring in association with carbonaceous matter. (author)

  3. Imouraren - uranium leaching tests and specificities with analcites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattinne-Morice, A.; Belieres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Imouraren is a sedimentary uranium deposit (total > 150 000 tU, average U ~ 0.08 %), located in Niger (~ 100 km from Agadez). Uranium mineralization is trapped in sandstones and is widely oxidized (uranotyle, metatuyamunite), but a part remains reduced (pitchblende, uraninite). The sandstones have a peculiar mineralogical assemblage (analcite partly chloritized) which can affect uranium recovery. Several acid heap leaching tests have been completed to determine the most suitable process parameters. Microscopic studies and XRD analysis performed on fresh ore and on leached residue highlight the complex behavior of uranium and the associated mineralogical families during the tests. (author)

  4. The geology of the Cluff Lake uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, C.T.

    1978-01-01

    The uranium deposits discovered by Amok (Canada) Ltd. in the Cluff Lake area of northwestern Saskatchewan occur at or near the southern edge of the uplifted basement core of the Carswell circular structure. Two types of mineralization, distinguishable by their geological and structural setting and mineral paragenesis, have been recognized. The N-Claude type is characterized by a relatively simple mineral assemblage, consisting of uraninite or pitchblende with coffinite, and is accompanied by variable amounts of graphite and organic matter, and Fe, Cu, Pb and Mo sulphides. Both N and Claude orebodies occur within quartzofeldpathic gneisses of the basement core. On the other hand, the D-type ore has a complex mineral assemblage consisting of: uraninite, pitchblende, tucholite and coffinite, along with native gold and selenium; gold tellurides, and selenides of Pb, Bi, Ni and Co; sulphides of Fe, Cu and Pb; and organic matter. The D orebody occurs within carbonaceous shales at the base of the Athabasca Formation as well as in fault zones in regolithic quartzofeldspathic gneisses above the inverted unconformity. An age of 1050 m.y., which is consistent with a period (circa 1200-1000 m.y.) of widespread hydrothermal activity and uranium mineralization or reworking within and adjacent to the Athabasca Basin, has been obtained from uranium mineralization from the D orebody. Later reworking (circa 470 m.y.) of the mineralization occurred at the intersection of older mineralized shear zones with radial faults produced during meteorite impact. (auth)

  5. The geology of uranium mineralization at Mika, N.E. Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I.I.; Okujeni, C.P.; Elegba, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium mineralization at Mike is located near Zing in Taraba State, N.E., Nigeria. The host rock consist of a sheared Pan-African medium-grained granite which is in places intruded by rhyolite and siliceous veins. Numerous joints, faults and fractures criss-cut the area. Some of the fractures are filled with secondary quartz. The ore occurs in two parallel N-S trending shear Zones with the western limb hosting a rhyolite body. Drill section reveals a subsurface extension of the mineralization. In the upper limb, mineralization consisting of metal autunite and coffinite occurs associated with the rhyolite body. In lower ore limb meta-autunite, coffinite and pitchblende occur along a set of two parallel shear surface. The pitchblende occurs massive and as vein lets in association with sulphides. The ore body is marked by distinct hydrothermal alteration zones which feature sericitization, silicification, hematization and kaolination. Reactivated regional structures of NE-SW and the N140oE and N170E played an important role in the formation of Mika mineralization. These acted as channel and as mechanical barrier for the mineralization fluid. The bimodal magmatism of the Burashika group is postulated to be related to the process of mineralization in view of the ubiquitous rhyolite in the mineralized bodies

  6. Hydrogeochemical modelling of an active system of uranium fixation by organic soils and sediments (Needle's Eye, Scotland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.; Schmitt, J.M.; Ledoux, E.; Hooker, P.J.; Escalier des Orres, P.

    1993-01-01

    Uranium accumulation in organic-rich sediments can be closely modelled by assuming that the dominant effect of the uranium-organic matter interaction is the direct or indirect reduction of uranyl compounds to form U(IV) minerals, especially uraninite-pitchblende. Application of this model to the Needle's Eye (Scotland) site where uranium is actively accumulating in Quaternary sediments demonstrates that uranium accumulation is both effective and rapid in environments involving shallow, organic-rich, reducing horizons. The period of uranium deposit formation at Needle's Eye is estimated to be as short as 5000 years. The transport of uranium to the site of deposition by oxidizing groundwaters and the channelling of these oxidizing uraniferous groundwaters are identified as important factors involved in the rapid accumulation of uranium. The regional hydrogeological model indicates that a fault in the area appears to act as a hydraulic screen for the uraniferous groundwaters. On one side of the fault the Quaternary sediments are well drained whilst on the other the flow of groundwater seeps out creating a major flux just at the bottom of the organic-rich layers. The local hydrogeological model shows that the groundwater flow is vertical in this area. A third significant factor in the development of these uranium accumulations is the presence of a significant nearby source of leachable primary uranium. In the case of the Needle's Eye site this is in the form of some thirty 185 ± 20 Ma, pitchblende-bearing veins. 32 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs

  7. Uranium deposits associated to tertiary acid volcanism of the Pena Blanca Sierra (Chihuahua, Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniel, B.

    1986-12-01

    The uraniferous deposits located in the Sierra de Pena Blanca (Chihuahua, Mexico) are the consequence of successive events that modified acid volcanic rocks. The devitrification of the Nopal Formation, vitroclastic tuffs, is esential in the cooling history because it releases uranium that becomes available. The uranium present in fluids as uranylcarbonate complexes, precipitate along the lamellea of hematite (exsolutions of the ilmenites). The presence of sulfur causes the destabilization of the ilmenites with uranium oxide (pitchblende - titanium oxide - pyrite), the pseudomorph of magnetites (pitchblende - pyrite) and the transformation of hematite into pyrite. The silice coming from the kaolinization of feldspars recristallizes as microcristalline quartz so that the rock appears compact. Fractures cause the uplifting of the lower unit of Nopal formation. It has been altered to montmorillonite. A carbonatation of this tuff has been observed and these two types of alteration occur after kaolinization. The Escuadra formation overlies the Nopal formation. The deposition takes place on an eroded basement where a soil developed. The two formations will together undergo transformations due to the saturation level and the primary ore will be only oxidized or oxidized, transported and reconcentrated. Late and localized thermal activities have been observed and may be the result of tectonic movements occurring after the supergene modification [fr

  8. Case-control study communities with uranium ores deposit/examining versus communities without uranium, or other ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letkovicova, M.; Letkovic, M.; Daniel, J.; Licivjansky, J.

    2008-01-01

    That is why the present study has been carried out to show, by means of both classical epidemiological and up-to-date mathematical methods, whether there is a difference in the health status of people living in areas with occurrence of pitchblende and those living in areas without any territorial contact with coal or ore mining or with deposits of any known exploitable minerals. The present study on differences in demography and health of population in municipalities with deposits or even with a history of stopping of uranium in comparison with municipalities without any mining or stopping past has been worked out in cooperation of URANPRES in Spisska Nova Ves and the company ENVIRONMENT in Nitra, Slovakia. The background data were provided by the fund ( database ) of the geological data of Uranpres as well as by the author' s databases of Environment, Inc., and the Statistical Office of the Slovak republic in Bratislava. The methods used for comparison have been either the common epidemiological ones, or the up-to-date mathematical methods. There was no difference between municipalities with and without occurrence of pitchblende within their cadastre. On the contrary, municipalities with a uranium extraction history seem to be balanced in respect of all indicators observed, with a long life expectancy, without any impairment of reproduction, with a lower incidence of cancer, and with a decidedly acceptable index of growth. The inhabitants neither have any health troubles nor do they think so and they do not intend to leave their municipalities. (authors)

  9. Decomposition of diverse solid inorganic matrices with molten ammonium bifluoride salt for constituent elemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, Matthew J.; Kellogg, Cyndi M.; Parker, Cyrena M.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Corbey, Jordan F.; Grate, Jay W.

    2017-09-01

    Ammonium bifluoride (ABF, NH4F·HF) is a well-known reagent for converting metal oxides to fluorides and for its applications in breaking down minerals and ores in order to extract useful components. It has been more recently applied to the decomposition of inorganic matrices prior to elemental analysis. Herein, a sample decomposition method that employs molten ABF sample treatment in the initial step is systematically evaluated across a range of inorganic sample types: glass, quartz, zircon, soil, and pitchblende ore. Method performance is evaluated across the two variables: duration of molten ABF treatment and ABF reagent mass to sample mass ratio. The degree of solubilization of these sample classes are compared to the fluoride stoichiometry that is theoretically necessary to enact complete fluorination of the sample types. Finally, the sample decomposition method is performed on several soil and pitchblende ore standard reference materials, after which elemental constituent analysis is performed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Elemental recoveries are compared to the certified values; results indicate good to excellent recoveries across a range of alkaline earth, rare earth, transition metal, and actinide elements.

  10. Mineralogical-geochemical specificity of the uranium mineralization superposed on the oxidized rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulatov, S.G.; Shchetochkin, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    Taking as an example a uranium deposit connected with oxidation zones developing along the strata, the author examines the mineralogical and geochemical features of a pitchblende-sooty uraninite mineralization superimposed on limonitized sandstones. The typical relations between ore mineralization with new formations of the infiltration oxidation process and the changes caused by the action of rising thermal solutions on the rocks are given. Based on these relations, two generations of different ages of rich pitchblende-sooty uraninite ores are distinguished, separated by the time of development of the oxidation processes. The typical change around the ore is a reduction of limonitized rocks, accompanied by their pyritization, clarification and hematitization. The ore concentrations were formed as a result of the action of rising thermal solutions that had interacted with oxidized rocks. The development of late oxidation processes caused the redistribution of these ore concentrations and their downward shift along the stratum slope following the limonitization boundary. On the basis of the data presented, comments of a forecasting and prospecting nature are made. (author)

  11. Uranium mobility in non-oxidizing brines: field and experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giblin, A.M.; Appleyard, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    The present distribution of U in the Wollaston Sediments in Saskatchewan can be related to the movement of brines as revealed in Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-metasomes. Experiments were conducted at 60 and 200 0 C under stringently non-oxidizing conditions using solvents ranging from distilled water to a Ca-Na-K brine formulated to simulate the major element composition of the Salton Sea geothermal brines. The experiments were conducted on natural pitchblende (UOsub(2.67)) and synthetic uraninite (UOsub(2.01)). Natural pitchblende was more strongly dissolved than the synthetic uraninite, and the synthetic Salton Sea brine was a more potent solvent than distilled water, 1:4 diluted Salton Sea brine, or pure NaCl brine. Within analytical limits of detection the dissolved U is present in the uranous (U 4+ ) state. The evidence demonstrates empirically the mechanism of dissolution of naturally occurring U minerals in reduced brines and describes a geological case where this appears to have happened. (author)

  12. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern; Nilsson, Kersti; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2011-12-01

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  13. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern [WSP Sverige AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, Kersti [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  14. The characteristics of soda metasomatite type uranium mineralization for proterozoic strata in the central-southern part of Kang-Dian earth's axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Farong

    1995-12-01

    The uranium mineralization for Proterozoic strata in the central-southern part of Kang-Dian earth's axis can be divided into four typy (sandstone, soda metasomatite, proterozoic epimetamorphics and quartzite). The soda metasomatite type is the dominant type of uranium mineralization and has the prospecting potential in the area. The characteristics of this type uranium mineralization and the problems of metallogenesis are discussed. Soda metasomatite type uranium mineralization is controlled by soda metasomatite and structure. Uranium exists mainly in the forms of minerals (pitchblende, uranate). Its cell parameter is high and oxygenated coefficient is low, belonging to moderate-low temperature hydrothermal origin. The metallogenetic materials originated from deep-seated crust and country rocks. The metallogenetic solution includes a great quantity of atmospheric water, besides hydrothermal solution from deep-seated crust. The metallogene underwent the two stages i.e. Jinnin and Chengjiang. (4 tabs., 3 figs.)

  15. SULPHUR DIOXIDE LEACHING OF URANIUM CONTAINING MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Rabbits, F.T.; Hester, K.D.; Smith, H.W.

    1958-12-01

    A process is described for extracting uranlum from uranium containing material, such as a low grade pitchblende ore, or mill taillngs, where at least part of the uraniunn is in the +4 oxidation state. After comminuting and magnetically removing any entrained lron particles the general material is made up as an aqueous slurry containing added ferric and manganese salts and treated with sulfur dioxide and aeration to an extent sufficient to form a proportion of oxysulfur acids to give a pH of about 1 to 2 but insufficient to cause excessive removal of the sulfur dioxide gas. After separating from the solids, the leach solution is adjusted to a pH of about 1.25, then treated with metallic iron in the presence of a precipitant such as a soluble phosphate, arsonate, or fluoride.

  16. Evaluation of the exploration drilling result of TML-3, TML-4, TML-5, TML-6 at Tanah Merah sector West Kalimantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manto-Widodo; Sartapa; Widito, P

    2000-01-01

    Previous researcher obvioused that the uranium favourable zone at Tanah Merah has been existed, it is oriented NW-SE. In those zones have been discovered uranium mineralizations of NW-SE orientation and sub vertical dipping. This research intend to get knowledge about the uranium geology, character and geometry of the sub surface mineralization using exploration drilling. The result shows that lithologically the area dominated by biotite quartzite which is intruded by granitic rocks and lamprophyres. The mineralization consist of uraninite/ pitchblende associated by pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrhotite, ilmenite, molybdenite, quartz, feldsphart and biotite. It seems to be granitic related mineralization as a vein type. Surface mineralization could be correlable to those of sub surface with in the lensoid or tabular shape favourable zones. Geological reserve of those mineralization is about 157 ton U 3 O 8

  17. Mineralización de uranio en la Sierra de Velasco, La Rioja

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morello, O.; Aparicio González, P.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution describes an uranium mineralization found in the Sierra de Velasco, La Rioja Province, Northwest of Ar¬gentina. In the study area crop out granites, pegmatites and metamorphic rocks. The host rocks of the mineralization are the La Chinchilla Granite (Carboniferous) and the La Cébila metamorphic Complex (Precambrian-Ordovician). The mine¬ralization is perigranitic and occurs disseminated, in fractures and in the contact between the granite and the metamorphic rocks. In the La Chinchilla Granite was identified a U-Nb-Ta oxide, and in the metamorphic rocks U-silicates (uranophane, uranophane-beta), U-phosphates (phurcalite and meta-autunite) and uranium oxides (pitchblende and coffinite) were found. (authors) [es

  18. Concentration of radionuclides in building materials and soils in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackers, J.G.

    1985-11-01

    About 150 samples of building materials used in the Netherlands have been analysed by gamma spectrometry for their Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 concentrations. From 26 samples of soils the radioactivity concentration was measured. Calibration was performed by the use of a large volume standard source made as a mixture of monazite, pitchblende and silica. The results are reported in Bq.kg -1 ; the statistical error is within 5% (standard deviation) and for most of the results the systematic error is smaller than 15%. Most of the building materials and all soil samples revealed activity concentrations smaller than 100 Bq.kg -1 for Ra-226 and Th-232 and smaller than 1000 Bq.kg -1 for K-40. Part of the results is compared with data published elsewhere. (Auth.)

  19. On the origin of whewellite in a hydrothermal uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galimov, Eh.M.; Tugarinov, A.I.; Nikitin, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    Whewellite (calcium oxalate - Ca(COO) 2 H 2 O) is one of the rare minerals that occur principally in rocks of sedimentary origin. The authors of the article explained the origin of whewellite selected on a hydrothermal uranium deposit. To do this, they investigated the isotope composition of the carbon contained in the mineral and also of the carbon in the accompanying calcite and carbonaceous material. It was established that hydrothermal whewellite is markedly different in isotope composition from diagenetic whewellite. The whewellite investigated is a product of oxidation-reduction reactions that have taken place in a hydrothermal solution and in which organic substances are involved. U 6+ was reduced and precipitated in the form of pitchblende and the oxidized forms of organic substances including oxalic acid, were formed, with subsequent precipitation of the oxalate in the form of whewellite. (V.Ya.)

  20. Denver radium site's - Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolski, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    In developing this case history of the Denver radium sites, an attempt is made to establish the Colorado carnotite connection from the point of discovery to early development and its eventual role in the inception of the National Radium Institute and Denver's radium legacy. Early exploitive mining activities and the exportation of the highest grades of uranium ore to Europe greatly disturbed key officials at the U.S. Bureau of Mines. With its proximity to known carnotite deposits and industrial capacity, Denver's destiny as one of America's early radium production centers became a reality by 1914. With African pitchblend discoveries, Belgium competition spelled the beginning of the end of Denver's romance with radium by 1920. The sites where Denver made or used its radium were lost in obscurity for 60 years and rediscovered in 1979. Thirty one sites and a characterization of their radioactive impact are now a part of the Superfund National Priorities listing for eventual cleanup

  1. Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil: a natural analogue study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Pocos de Caldas natural analogue project is an internationally funded project hosted by Brazil; the contributary organizations are SKB (Sweden), NAGRA (Switzerland), DOE (United Kingdom) and the DOE (United States). The Project is a multidisciplinary study of two mineralized areas within an alkaline igneous caldera complex located near the town of Pocos de Caldas in the state of Minas Gerais. One area, the Osamu Utsumi mine, is characterized by redox deposits of secondary remobilized pitchblende, and the other area, Morro do Ferro, comprises a highly weathered deposit of thorium and REE with subordinate uranium. The project, scheduled for three years (1986-1989), is now entering its third and final year. The pilot and feasibility studies, which characterized the first year, helped to establish the major drilling programme and the sampling protocols for both rock and groundwater studies which constituted the major part of the second year. The latest status of the investigations are briefly reported

  2. Utilization of plastic detectors in autoradiographic studies of radioactive minerals from the Lagoa Real uranium Province, state of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, P.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A short account on an autoradiographic technique using plastic detectors, it's methodology, application and results is presented. With this technique the distribution of radioactive minerals in rocks can be studied in detail. As radioactive source for this study, samples mineralized in uraninite and/or pitchblende were used. The utilized detectors were the CR-39 (a polymer plate) and films of celulose nitrate: CA-80-15 and CN-85. The mineralization is associated to mafics (amphibole, pyroxene, biotite, garnet, etc.) and to plagioclase (albite or albite-oligoclase), occurring as small inclusions and also in microfractures, cleavages and grain boundaries, mainly among plagioclase crystals which occur close to or practically touching mafic minerals. (Author) [pt

  3. Epigenetic-hydrothermal origin of the sediment-hosted Muellenbach uranium deposit, Baden-Baden, W-Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockamp, O.; Zuther, M.; Clauer, N.

    1987-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous sediments on the margin of the northern Black Forest granite massif are the host rocks of the Muellenbach uranium deposit. According to K/Ar datings the sericites formed during the Jurassic (150 Ma), an age also interpreted from U/Pb ratios for the crystallization of the pitchblende. Based on vitrinite reflectance the mineralization temperature is estimated to be 240 0 -290 0 C. It is postulated that the hydrothermal solutions were supplied via deep-seated faults bordering and crosscutting the granite massif and the sedimentary trough which is an intramontane basin. In its immediate vicinity the rift valley of the Rhein graben developed. Uranium deposits in comparable settings are supposed to be predominately of epigenetic-hydrothermal origin. (orig./HP)

  4. Mode of distribution of uranium mineralization and sequence of the formation of minerals in albitites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechishnikov, N.P.; Kramar, O.A.; Rapovich, F.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of analysis and generalization of factural material data on the distribution nature of accessory uranium mineralization in albitites permitting to judge of the role and textural-structural peculiarities of enclosing rocks in mineralization localization are given. It is shown that the uranium mineral formation is closely related with the albitite formation and proceeded during two stages. A main mass of primary uranium minerals (brannerites and uraninites) in the form of impregnated mineralization was formed during the first uraninite-brannerite-albitite stage. Uranium oxides, silicates and titanates in the shape of veines formed. During the second coffinite-pitchblende-chloritic stage the formation of uranium oxides, silicates and titanates occured. Uranium mineralization in albitites developes in zones of cataclasm, small jointing, mylonitization localizing in fine-grained aggregates. A main mass of primary uranium minerals in albitites (brannerite, uraninite relates to neogenic during metasomatosis dark-coloured minerals (riebenite, aegirine, chlorite)

  5. Role of organic matter in uranium mineralisation in Vempalle dolostone; Cuddapah basin, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Sukanta; Bhagat, Sangeeta; Zakaulla, Syed; Kumar, Suresh; Rai, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    Dolostone of Vempalle Formation near Tummalapalle hosts large uranium deposit (>100,000 tonnes with an average grade of 0.045% U_3O_8). It is a unique type of uranium deposit because carbonate formations have been considered to be among the least uraniferous of all the rocks of the Earth's crust due to mobility of uranium in aqueous fluid in the presence of carbonate and bicarbonate ions. Vempalle dolostone hosts syn-sedimentary uranium mineralization in the form of discrete uranium phases (pitchblende and coffinite) associated with collophane, and adsorbed uranium in organic matter. The organic matter has played dual role of concentrating uranium from solution and also chemically reducing it to pitchhblende and coffinite. (author)

  6. On stages of hydrothermal mineralization of molybdenum-uranium ore manifestation in volcanic edifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, P.D.; Mamotin, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Volcanogenic-intrusive complex of the ore manifestation region is represented by various facies of liparite and granitoid formation rocks. Numerous dislocations with breaks in continuity and the corresponding feathering fissures relate to 3 stages of hydrothermal mineralization of rocks. Quartz-sericite-kaolin metasomatites were formed at the earlier (volcanic) stage. Tourmalinization was associated with the middle stage which accompanied the granitoid intrusive formation. The later mineralization stage was accompanied by formation of beresites and molibdenum-uranium ores. Identification was controlled by the dislocation, ore bodies had the shape of lens, vein or small nest. 7 stages separated by shores were identified at the ore stage: quartz-sericite pyritic; quartz-pyrite-arsenopyritic; sulfide-pitchblendic; chalcedonic; ankeritic; quartz-calcitic and pyrite-ankeritic

  7. Geochemical analogue study in the Krunkelbach mine, Menzenschwand, southern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes an investigation of the mineralogy, geochemistry and hydrochemistry of water-bearing zones in the Krunkelbach vein-type U deposit, Southern Germany. The U ore body is aligned parallel and a few metres apart from a major water-bearing structure. Oxidation of pitchblende and of iron sulfides has been extensive down to a depth of at least 240 m. U retardation is due to neoformation of U (VI) -phases and to fixation on iron hydroxides, gorceixite and clay minerals. Under the prevailing conditions, Ra is fixed in baryte, but Ba and probably Ra were more mobile during earlier stages of the oxidation event, probably due to the presence of intermediate valence sulphur species as a product of pyrite oxidation

  8. Uranium occurrences in the volcanic rocks of Upper Mahakam, east Kalimantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokolelono, S.; Agoes, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Kawat area, which is about 35 km 2 in size, is located in the Upper Mahakam region and is one of the areas being prospected in Kalimantan. It has already been covered by general, detailed and systematic prospection. The Kawat area formed a tectonical depression and was intercepted by the volcanic products of various episodes. The regional stratigraphy of this area, from the bottom upwards, is as follows: Unit 1: quartzite and ophiolitic green rock; Unit 2: black shale, sometimes with boulders of quartzite and radiolarite; Unit 3: massive conglomeratic sandstone, alternating with claystone and sandstone sequences; Unit 4: sandstone, siltstone and claystone, with an intercalation of volcanic rocks. Uraniferous occurrences are reflected by anomalous zones located in the volcanic facies of Unit 4, usually in aphanitic rhyolite. Mineralization consists of pitchblende associated with molybdenite and pyrite. Although the Kawat area is very remote, future development is of great interest. (author). 4 figs

  9. Isotopic composition of terrestrial atmospheric xenon and the chain reactions of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukolyukov, Yu.A.; Meshick, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    From the comparison of terrestrial atmospheric Xe with the primordial Xe (solar, AVCC), a strange component with a fine structure at 132 Xe and 131 Xe have been found. It was shown that the isotopic composition of this component can be explained neither by mass fractionation of primordial Xe, nor by an admixture of fission products of known nuclei. An analogous Xe was extracted at a low temperature from substances of the natural nuclear reactor, fine-grain samples from Colorado type deposits, ordinary pitchblendes and samples from the epicenter of a A-bomb explosion. It was proved that the strange Xe is a result of different migration rates of β-radioactive Xe precursors which are fission fragments. It is quite possible that the strange component of atmospheric Xe originated as a result of global neutron-induced fission processes during early stages of geological history of the Earth. (orig.) [de

  10. Natural decay series radionuclide studies at the Needle's Eye Natural Analogue Site, II, 1989-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, A.B.; Whitton, A.M.; Shimmield, T.M.; Jemielita, R.A.; Scott, R.D.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-12-01

    HMIP has a research programme investigating some naturally radioactive sites as geochemical analogues of radionuclide migration. The objective is to test thermodynamic databases and computer codes used for modelling radionuclide migration under environmental conditions. This report describes the study of transport and retardation processes affecting natural radionuclides, mainly uranium (U), in the vicinity of pitchblende veins in the cliff at Needle's Eye on the Solway Coast, SW Scotland. The natural decay series results from this study have been used to develop a well constrained geochemical model within which the codes can be tested. A conceptual geochemical model for the behaviour of U at the site was developed in stage I of the study; work in stage II is concerned with improving the information available on the U source term, groundwater chemistry, U aqueous phase specification, U retardation by fracture-lining minerals during fissure flow of groundwater, U-organic associations and loss of U from the site by stream drainage. (author)

  11. Decay calculations on medium-level and actinide-containing wastes from the LWR fuel cycle. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, H.O.

    1981-12-01

    1. The radiotoxicity index as inherent property of the radionuclide inventory was calculated for medium-level and actinide-containing wastes. The calculations were based on the annual limits of intake of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance as well as the new values of annual limits of intake from ICRP-30. The latter imply a higher rating of the toxicity of transuranium nuclides and a lower rating of Sr-90, Tc-99, and Ra-226. Thus, the annual radiotoxicity index is controlled by the transuranics after 10 to 100 years. 2. From the comparison of the radiotoxicity index of conditional and packed wastes with the same volume of uranium ore, it was evaluated that the relative radiotoxicity of the medium-level wastes decreases below the level of pitchblende after less than 100 years and below a 3% uranium ore after less than 2000 of decay. However, based on ICRP-30, the relative radiotoxicity index decreases below the level of pitchblende after 1000 years and decays to the level of the 3% uranium ore at about 10 5 years. 3. The comparison of the radiotoxicity concentration of the total disposal layer with a uranium ore deposit shows that the radiotoxicity concentration based on ICRP-30 of the self-heating wastes placed in single boreholes decays within 2000 years (high level waste within 3000 years) below the level of a uranium ore deposit of 0.2% uranium. The radiotoxicity concentration of the medium-level process waste and the alpha-waste disposed off in disposal chambers decreases to the level of a uranium ore deposit with 0.4 to 6% uranium after about 10 4 years, and 1% after about 10 5 years. (orig./HP) [de

  12. The South Greenland regional uranium exploration programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Tukiainen, T.; Nyegaard, P.; Wallin, B.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the work and results of the last two field seasons (1080 and 1982) of the Syduran Project. The field work was concentrated in the Motzfeldt Centre and the Granite zone with a short reconnaissance of five uranium anomalies in the Migmatite Complex. The results from the Motzfeldt Centre show that it is composed of at least 6 syenite units which can be divided into two major phases of igneous activity. The radioactive mineralisation has been mapped by gamma-spectrometer and has proved to be very extensive. Uranium mineral occurrences found in the Granite Zone occur in the many faults and fractures, which dissect the area. A study of the fractures and fault movements in the zone makes it possible to suggest an overall structural framework in which to place the uranium occurrences in the zone. Field work on the Igaliko peninsula was confined to a small area known as Puissagtag where four pitchblende veins have been discovered. Numerous uraniferous showings, associated with fractures, have been located in the Vatnaverfi peninsula south of the Igaliko Fjord. Mineralogical studies have shown that 12 of these showings contain pitchblende, that 7 of them contain coffinite and that most of them contain brannerite. The most interesting find during the 1982 field season was in the Migmatite Complex. Five anomalously high uranium areas in the complex were explored briefly with the helicopter-borne scintillometer. Near a place called Igdlorssuit, where a particlarly high gamma-spectrometer anomaly was found during the reconnaissance gamma-spectrometer survey, a large raft of meta-sediments in rapakivi granite was found, in which radioactive mineralisation occurred. This proved to be due to fine disseminated uraninite which occurs over some 150 m of strike length with a width of 1-2 m. The results confirm that there is a good possibility of finding exploitable uranium mineral occurrences in South Greenland. (author)

  13. Oxidation-reduction phenomena in tabular uranium-vanadium bearing sandstone from the Salt Wash deposits (Upper Jurassic) of the Cottonwood Wash district (Utah, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, J.D.

    1984-02-01

    A braided to meandering fluvial environment has been postulated for this area after a sedimentological study. The mineralization is spatially related with conifer derived organic matter and wood is preserved in these sediments because of the reducing environment of deposition. The degree of maturation of the organic matter has been estimated from chemical analyses. Results show the presence of variable diagenetic oxidation depending on the environment. The organic matter which was least affected by this oxidation have attained a thermal maturation characteristic of the end stage of diagenesis. The high grade ore is situated at the edges of or within the trunks of trees (which remained permeable during diagenesis) and at the boundaries of the carbonaceous beds. Geochemical study shows there to be good correlation between uranium and vanadium. Uranium occurs as pitchblende, coffinite or as impregnations in the vanadiferous clay cement. A detailed study of clays shows an association of chlorite and roscoelite which most probably contain V 3+ . Fluid inclusion study suggests burying temperatures of >= 100 0 C and shows the existance of brines before the mineralization. The following genetical model is proposed. Low Eh uraniferous solutions move through a reduced pyritised environment. The low degree of oxidation of the pyrites propagates the destabilization of the clastic iron-titanium oxides which release vanadium and the dissociation of uranylcarbonates. Then, the deposit of pitchblende, coffinite, montroseite and vanadiferous clays took place in association with a secondary pyrite. When the rocks were uplifted to the subsurface, uranium (IV) and vanadium (III) were remobilised in an oxidising environment to form a secondary mineralization essentially represented by tyuyamunite [fr

  14. Geochemical modelling of the weathering zone of the 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Spain): A natural analogue for nuclear spent fuel alteration and stability processes in radwaste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, D.; Perez del Villar, L.; Bruno, J.; Domenech, C.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain) has been studied in the context of Enresa's programme for U-mine sites restoration and also as a natural analogue for processes in high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) geological disposal. The investigations encompassed an array of geoscience disciplines, such as structural geology, mineralogy, hydrogeology and elemental and isotopic geochemistry and hydrogeochemistry of the site. Based on the obtained results, a conceptual mineralogical and geochemical model was performed integrating the main geochemical processes occurring at the site: the interaction between oxidised and slightly acidic water with pyrite, pitchblende, calcite and dolomite, as essential minerals of the U fracture-filling mineralisation, and hydroxyapatite from the host rock, as the main source of P. This conceptual model has been tested in a systematic numerical model, which includes the main kinetic (pyrite and pitchblende dissolution) and equilibrium processes (carbonate mineral dissolution, and goethite, schoepite and autunite secondary precipitation). The results obtained from the reactive-transport model satisfactorily agree with the conceptual model previously established. The assumption of the precipitation of coffinite as a secondary mineral in the system cannot be correctly evaluated due to the lack of hydrochemical data from the reducing zone of the site and valid thermodynamic and kinetic data for this hydrated U(IV)-silicate. This precipitation can also be hampered by the probable existence of dissolved U(IV)-organic matter and/or uranyl carbonate complexes, which are thermodynamically stable under the alkaline and reducing conditions that prevail in the reducing zone of the system. Finally, the intense downwards oxic and acidic alteration in the upper part of the system is of no relevance for the performance assessment of a HLNW disposal. However, the acidic and oxidised conditions are quickly buffered to neutral-alkaline and reducing at very

  15. Radiological surveys of properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1981-03-01

    Results of the radiological surveys conducted at three properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area as well as one additional location downstream from the Middlesex Sampling Plant (Willow Lake), are presented. The survey revealed that the yard around the church rectory on Harris Avenue is contaminated with a 226 Ra-bearing material, probably pitchblende ore from the former Middlesex Sampling Plant. The elevated 226 Ra concentrations around and, to a lesser extent, underneath the rectory are leading to elevated 222 Rn concentrations in air in the rectory and elevated alpha contamination levels (from radon daughters) on surfaces inside the rectory. External gamma radiation levels in the rectory yard are well above background levels, and beta-gamma dose rates at many points in the yard are above federal guidelines for the release of property for unrestricted use. The radiological survey of a parking lot at the Union Carbide plant in Bound Brook, New Jersey revealed that a nearly circular region of 50-ft diam in the lot showed above-background external gamma radiation levels. Two isolated spots within this region showed concentrations of uranium in soil above the licensable level stated in 10 CFR 40. Soil samples taken in the area of elevated gamma radiation levels generally showed nearly equal activities of 226 Ra and 238 U. The survey at the residences on William Street in Piscataway, revealed that the front yeard is generally contaminated from near the surface to a depth of 1.5 to 2.5 ft with 226 Ra-bearing material, possibly pitchblende ore. The remainder of the yard shows scattered contaminaion. External gamma radiation levels inside the house are above the background level near some outside walls

  16. From gold leaf to thermal neutrons: One hundred years of radioactivity and geological exploration (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    In 1789 Klaproth extracted ‘Uranit,’ from shiny black ‘Bechblende’ ore obtained from the George Wagsfort silver mine at Johanngeorgenstadt in the Erzegebirge (Ore Mountains), Saxony, Germany. He believed it to be a new chemical element (but what he had obtained was actually an oxide; uranium was first isolated in its pure metallic form by Peligot in 1856, following an earlier attempt in 1841). By 1816 pitchblende had also been found in Hungary & Cornwall, England. In1871, an English metallurgist, Richard Pearce, visiting the USA, discovered two cwt. of pitchblende ‘thrown away on a refuse-heap’ at the Wood Mine, Gilpin Co., Colorado. He returned the following year and leased the mine, which subsequently supplied the ore to MMe. Curie. In 1867, Saint-Victor had noticed the blackening of silver halide emulsion by uranium compounds, but it was Becquerel who, in a series of experiments in 1896, first showed that they emitted a radiation which was not the same as that from a Crookes tube (X-rays). In 1898 both Mme Curie and Schmidt independently described the radioactivity of thorium and its compounds but she realised, from her electrometer experiments, that uranium minerals might contain a yet more active element than either U or Th. By the end of 1900, the U-decay series had been elucidated, and during 1903-4, a radioactive gas found to exist in soil, water, air and crude petroleum, was shown to be identical with radium ‘emanation.’ Wolcott (1904) suggested that it might be used to prospect for U and Th ores. Nevertheless, for the next 25 years, investigations were largely confined to the laboratory with instrumental development and studies of radiochemisty, mineralogy, autoradiography, pleochroic haloes and contemplating radioactive heating of the Earth. However, there were exceptions: In 1905 von dem Borne used electrometer measurements to locate veins of pitchblende in a mine, and Ambronn (1921) measured the activity of successive core samples taken

  17. Cachoeira Uranium Deposit, Lagoa Real, Bahia, Brazil – Kinematic, compositional and fluid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, F.; Miano, S.

    2014-01-01

    system, after main metamorphism/metasomatism occurred. Consequently hydrothermal process dominated the system, resulting in the formation of fluorite, calcite and an excess of silica as brown chalcedony. Uranium minerals also formed, as secondary phosphate, hydro-silicates, hydrated oxides and pechblende, under lower temperature conditions. In a still Ca-rich system sphene and brannerite, together with late calcite could form: FeOTiO_2 + Ca + UO_2 + SiO_2 = CaTiSiO_5 + (Ca,U)(Ti,Fe)_2O_6 (brannerite), marking destabilization of primary ilmenite and uraninite formed in metasomatic stage. Formation of fluorite and calcite corresponds to the next hydrothermal episode: UF_6 + CaTiSiO_5 = CaF_2 + TiO_2 + SiO_2 + pitchblende. Brannerite is also destabilized in favor of calcite, rutile, pitchblende and hematite under higher oxygen fugacity condition: (Ca,U)(Ti,Fe)_2O_2 + CO_2 + O_2 = CaCO_3 + TiO_2 + Fe_2O_3 + pitchblende, the excess of silica forming chalcedony. (author)

  18. Remediation of Canada's historic haul route for radium and uranium ores - the northern transportation route - 59303

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, Brian; Wenzel, Chris; Owen, Michael; Gardiner, Mark; Brown, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Established in the 1930's, the Northern Transportation Route (NTR) served to transport pitchblende ore 2,200 km from the Port Radium Mine in Canada's Northwest Territories to Fort McMurray in Alberta. From there, the ore was shipped 3,000 km by rail to the Town of Port Hope, Ontario, where it was refined for its radium content and used for medical purposes. Later, transport and refinement focussed on uranium. The corridor of lakes, rivers, portages and roads that made up the NTR included a number of transfer points, where ore was unloaded and transferred to other barges or trucks. Ore was occasionally spilled during these transfer operations and, in some cases, subsequently distributed over larger areas as properties were re-developed or modified. In addition, relatively small volumes of ore were sometimes transported by air to the south. Since 1991, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office (LLRWMO), working with communities and its consulting contractors, has conducted surveys to identify and characterize spill sites along the NTR where soils exhibit elevated concentrations of uranium, radium and/or arsenic. In addition to significant areas of impact in Fort McMurray, contamination along the NTR was centered in the Sahtu region near Great Bear Lake and along the southern part of the Slave River. Early radiological investigations found contaminated buildings and soil and occasionally discrete pieces of pitchblende ore at many transfer points and storage areas along the NTR. Where possible, survey work was undertaken in conjunction with property redevelopment activity requiring the relocation of impacted soils (e.g., at Tulita, Fort Smith, Hay River, and Fort McMurray). When feasible to consolidate contaminated material locally, it was placed into Long Term Management Facilities developed to manage and monitor the materials over extended timelines. Radiological activity generated by these engineered facilities are generally below thresholds established by

  19. The Past Informs the Future: An Overview of the Million Worker Study and the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, John D; Ellis, Elizabeth D; Golden, Ashley P; Girardi, David J; Cohen, Sarah S; Chen, Heidi; Mumma, Michael T; Shore, Roy E; Leggett, Richard W

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of ongoing work on the Million Worker Study (MWS), highlighting some of the key methods and progress so far as exemplified by the study of workers at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (MCW). The MWS began nearly 25 y ago and continues in a stepwise fashion, evaluating one study cohort at a time. It includes workers from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manhattan Project facilities, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated nuclear power plants, industrial radiographers, U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) nuclear weapons test participants, and physicians and technologists working with medical radiation. The purpose is to fill the major gap in radiation protection and science: What is the risk when exposure is received gradually over time rather than briefly as for the atomic bomb survivors? Studies published or planned in 2018 include leukemia (and dosimetry) among atomic veterans, leukemia among nuclear power plant workers, mortality among workers at the MCW, and a comprehensive National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report on dosimetry for the MWS. MCW has a singular place in history: the 40 tons (T) of uranium oxide produced at MCW were used by Enrico Fermi on 2 December 1942 to produce the first manmade sustained and controlled nuclear reaction, and the atomic age was born. Seventy-six years later, the authors followed the over 2,500 MCW workers for mortality and reconstructed dose from six sources of exposure: external gamma rays from the radioactive elements in pitchblende; medical x rays from occupationally required chest examinations; intakes of pitchblende (uranium, radium, and silica) measured by urine samples; radon breath analyses and dust surveys overseen by Robley Evans and Merril Eisenbud; occupational exposures received before and after employment at MCW; and cumulative radon concentrations and lung dose from the decay of radium in the work environment. The unique

  20. Preliminary Report on the White Canyon Area, San Juan County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, William Edward Barnes; Trites, A.F.; Beroni, E.P.; Feeger, J.A.

    1952-01-01

    The White Canyon area in San Juan County, Utah, contains known deposits of copper-uranium ore and is currently being mapped and studied by the Geological Survey. To date, approximately 75 square miles, or about 20 percent of the area, has been mapped on a scale 1 inch=1 mile. The White Canyon area is underlain by more than 2,000 feet of sedimentary rocks, Carboniferous to Jurassic(?) in age. The area is on the flank of the Elk Ridge anticline, and the strata have a regional dip of 1 deg to 2 deg SW. The Shinarump conglomerate of Late Triassic age is the principal ore-bearing formation. The Shinarump consists of lenticular beds of sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, clay, and siltstone, and ranges in thickness from a feather edge to as much as 75 feet. Locally the sandstones contain silicified and carbonized wood and fragments of charcoal. These vegetal remains are especially common in channel-fill deposits. Jointing is prominent in the western part of the area, and apparently affects all formations. Adjacent to the joints some of the redbeds in the sequence are bleached. Deposits of copper-uranium minerals have been found in the Moenkopi, Shinarump, and Chinle formations, but the only production of ore has been from the Shinarump conglomerate. The largest concentration of these minerals is in the lower third of the Shinarump, and the deposits seem to be controlled in part by ancient channel fills and in part by fractures. Locally precipitation of the copper and uranium minerals apparently has been aided by charcoal and clays. Visible uranium minerals include both hard and soft pitchblende and secondary hydrosulfates, phosphates, and silicates. In addition, unidentified uranium compounds are present in carbonized wood and charcoal, and in veinlets of hydrocarbons. Base-metal sulfides have been identified in all prospects that extend beyond the oxidized zone. Secondary copper minerals in the oxidized zone include the hydrous sulfates and carbonates, and possibly

  1. The role of lead and excess oxygen in uranite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Robert Morris

    1957-01-01

    Analysed samples of uraninite were x-rayed, annealed by heating to 550° and 900° for various times in a nitrogen atmosphere, and x-rayed again. A decrease in unit cell size was generally observed. Calculations on the basis of Vegard's Law showed that the ordering of the interstitial oxygen ions could account for the decrease in cell size on annealing. The interstitial oxygens are not necessarily completely disordered before annealing. The degree of original disorder is dependent on the Rare Earth/ThO2 ratio; for high ThO2 and low rare earths, the interstitial oxygens are completely random. The degree of disorder apparently depends solely on the composition, and not on the past history of the sample; this implies that the oxygens are being continuously disordered, perhaps by alpha particles, to the equilibrium point determined by the R.E./ThO2 ratio. The degree of ordering of the interstitial oxygens also accounts for the difference in cell size between vein pitchblendes and those from the sediments of the Colorado Plateau. A study was also made of the degree of oxidation of uraninites. Although the uranium in many pegmatitic uraninites is more oxidized than can be obtained with the cubic UO2 phase in the laboratory, if the atoms proxying for uranium are calculated into the structural formula, and the lead is assumed to be radiogenic and calculated as original uranium, almost all pegmatitic uraninites fall into the range of interstitial oxygen content obtainable in the laboratory. This fact supports the auto-oxidation hypothesis. Many of the vein and sedimentary pitchblendes have compositions close to U3O8, although they are cubic. They may gave crystallized as U3O8, the decomposed to the cubic phase and a amorphous phase. This suggests that the stability range of U3O8 includes only very exceptional natural conditions. Vegard's Law calculations, studies of zoning in crystals, differential leaching, polished section textures, and other lines of evidence indicate

  2. Geochemical modelling of the weathering zone of the 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Spain): A natural analogue for nuclear spent fuel alteration and stability processes in radwaste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos, D. [AMPHOS XXI Consulting S.L., Passeig de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: david.arcos@amphos21.com; Perez del Villar, L. [CIEMAT, Dpto.de Medio Ambiente, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bruno, J.; Domenech, C. [AMPHOS XXI Consulting S.L., Passeig de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    The 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain) has been studied in the context of Enresa's programme for U-mine sites restoration and also as a natural analogue for processes in high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) geological disposal. The investigations encompassed an array of geoscience disciplines, such as structural geology, mineralogy, hydrogeology and elemental and isotopic geochemistry and hydrogeochemistry of the site. Based on the obtained results, a conceptual mineralogical and geochemical model was performed integrating the main geochemical processes occurring at the site: the interaction between oxidised and slightly acidic water with pyrite, pitchblende, calcite and dolomite, as essential minerals of the U fracture-filling mineralisation, and hydroxyapatite from the host rock, as the main source of P. This conceptual model has been tested in a systematic numerical model, which includes the main kinetic (pyrite and pitchblende dissolution) and equilibrium processes (carbonate mineral dissolution, and goethite, schoepite and autunite secondary precipitation). The results obtained from the reactive-transport model satisfactorily agree with the conceptual model previously established. The assumption of the precipitation of coffinite as a secondary mineral in the system cannot be correctly evaluated due to the lack of hydrochemical data from the reducing zone of the site and valid thermodynamic and kinetic data for this hydrated U(IV)-silicate. This precipitation can also be hampered by the probable existence of dissolved U(IV)-organic matter and/or uranyl carbonate complexes, which are thermodynamically stable under the alkaline and reducing conditions that prevail in the reducing zone of the system. Finally, the intense downwards oxic and acidic alteration in the upper part of the system is of no relevance for the performance assessment of a HLNW disposal. However, the acidic and oxidised conditions are quickly buffered to neutral-alkaline and

  3. Uranium districts in South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Tukiainen, T.; Wallin, B.

    1981-01-01

    A short review is given of reconnaissance work in South Greenland. The work has demonstrated that there are areas in the Motzfeldt centre of at least 1 km 2 with continuously high radioactivity. If the uranium content of these radioactive zones are sufficiently high, then potential ore tonnages could prove to be substantial. The reconnaissance exploration has proved that uranium mineralization is widely distributed in the Narssaq-Narssarssuaq district. It is, no doubt, responsible for the high uranium values in the exploration geochemical samples. Although the size of the pitchblende occurences which have been found so far are small, the high grade of the mineralisation, the great frequency of the fracturing and the evidence for an all pervasive mineralising event over a wide area indicate that there is a good possibility of finding economic mineralisation within the Narssaq-Narssarssuaq area. The area as a whole may, perhaps, be termed a ''uranium mineral district''. As the potential targets are small, only detailed follow-up exploration will establish this. At the same time more detailed work on individual showings, and geological mapping to demonstrate the relative ages of the various petrological and mineralising events, will establish the possible origin of this uranium mineralisation. (author)

  4. Geology and uranium mineralization in Sarana sector, Kalan, West Kalimantan based on drilling data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartapa; I Gde Sukadana

    2011-01-01

    Favourable zone of uranium mineralization in Sarana sector with NE-SW direction are contained in metapelite rock and some in muscovite quartzite. Mineralization of uranium is occurred fill in the fields of parallel fractures with stochasticity by ENE-WSW direction, and moderate to strong inclination to the north. Three points drilling with the depth of 126.6, 174.50, and 150.90 meter has been conducted. This study is aimed to obtain the knowledge of geology, and geometry of sub-surface uranium mineralization. Geologically, research area are consists of metapelite, muscovite quartzite and biotite quartzite with milli metric - centi metric thicknesses. Uranium mineralization are in forms of veins or tabular as uraninite and pitchblende associated with pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, ilmenite and molybdenite. Uranium Mineralization on the surface could be correlated with sub-surface from bore-hole data, with the result that zone of uranium mineralization in lenses or tabular form with sub-vertical dip may be identified. (author)

  5. Na-metasomatism in the uranium fields of Singhbhum Shear zone, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Anjan

    2013-01-01

    Singhbhum Shear Zone (SSZ) of eastern India hosts uranium, copper and apatite-magnetite mineralization, which occurs either independently or overlaps in space. SSZ is a nearly 200 km long, 1-5 km wide, intensely techtonized, northward-convex, arcuate mobile belt that separates the Archaean cratonic nucleus to its south from the Proterozoic North Singhbhum Fold Belt on the north. Except Bagjata mines in the eastern sector, majority of the known uranium deposits and mines (e.g. Jaduguda, Bhatin, Narwapahar, Banduhurang and Mohuldih) are situated in the central sector of the shear zone. All the deposits are of low grade (0.05% U 3 O 8 ) and low to medium tonnage. The common rock types of the SSZ are quartz-chlorite schists, quartzsericite schists, quartzite, metaconglomerate, soda granite, quartz-albite bearing schists/gneisses, granophyres and tourmalinite. The mineralization occur as lenticular to tabular bodies, which are (pene-) concordant with dominant planer structures, i.e. foliation parallel with the lithological layering (S 3 II S 0 ). Principal uranium mineral is uraninite with low thorium (UO 2 /ThO 2 =70-150), high lead (PbO =14-15%) and moderate REE contents with minor pitchblende and some secondary minerals near the surface. Many ore minerals, particularly the sulfide phases of Ni, Co, Mo, Cu and Fe are common

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Italian Republic comprises a 1200 - Km - long peninsula ex- tending from southern Europe into the Mediterranean Sea, and a number of adjacent islands, among which the principals are Sicily and Sardinia. The total area is in excess of 300,000 Sq.Km, the islands account for some 50, 000 Sq.Km. From a physiographic and morphologic point of view, Italy mainly consists of the Alpine region and the Po valley to the North and of the Appennine range and small Coastal plains to the Centre and South. Plains occupied only 20% of the total area, hills and mountains, up to 4,810 m of elevation, contribute almost equally to the remaining 80%. The most promising uranium mineralizations have been found in the Bergamasc Alps, near the small town of Novazza. Pitchblende and minor sphalerite (formation temperature, 80 deg. - 100 deg. C) occur disseminated in volcanics of permian age. The host rocks at the Novazza uranium deposit, consist of an acid ignimbrite with cineritic texture. The rocks have been affected by metasomatism which brought abundant neo-formation minerals such as silica, sericite, carbonates and minor adularia, albite and muscovite. The reasonably assured resources of the Novazza deposit have been estimated to be 1,200 ton of U having a grade of 900 p.p.m. U. Estimated additional resources are 1,000 ton U. Production is scheduled to start in 1980

  7. Modeling of geochemical processes related to uranium mobilization in the groundwater of a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, P.; Garralon, A.; Buil, B.; Turrero, Ma.J.; Sanchez, L.; Cruz, B. de la

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the processes leading to uranium distribution in the groundwater of five boreholes near a restored uranium mine (dug in granite), and the environmental impact of restoration work in the discharge area. The groundwater uranium content varied from < 1 μg/L in reduced water far from the area of influence of the uranium ore-containing dyke, to 104 μg/L in a borehole hydraulically connected to the mine. These values, however, fail to reflect a chemical equilibrium between the water and the pure mineral phases. A model for the mobilization of uranium in this groundwater is therefore proposed. This involves the percolation of oxidized waters through the fractured granite, leading to the oxidation of pyrite and arsenopyrite and the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. This in turn leads to the dissolution of the primary pitchblende and, subsequently, the release of U(VI) species to the groundwater. These U(VI) species are retained by iron hydroxides. Secondary uranium species are eventually formed as reducing conditions are re-established due to water-rock interactions

  8. Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in Alaska, 1953

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzko, John J.; Bates, Robert G.

    1955-01-01

    During the summer of 1953 the areas investigated for radioactive deposits in Alaska were on Nikolai Creek near Tyonek and on Likes Creek near Seward in south-central Alaska where carnotite-type minerals had been reported; in the headwaters of the Peace River in the eastern part of the Seward Peninsula and at Gold Bench on the South Fork of the Koyukuk River in east-central Alaska, where uranothorianite occurs in places associated with base metal sulfides and hematite; in the vicinity of Port Malmesbury in southeastern Alaska to check a reported occurrence of pitchblende; and, in the Miller House-Circle Hot Springs area of east-central Alaska where geochemical studies were made. No significant lode deposits of radioactive materials were found. However, the placer uranothorianite in the headwaters of the Peace River yet remains as an important lead to bedrock radioactive source materials in Alaska. Tundra cover prevents satisfactory radiometric reconnaissance of the area, and methods of geochemical prospecting such as soil and vegetation sampling may ultimately prove more fruitful in the search for the uranothorianite-sulfide lode source than geophysical methods.

  9. Remote sensing applied in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradsen, K.; Nilsson, G.; Thyrsted, T.

    1985-01-01

    A research project, aiming at investigation the use of remote sensing in uranium exploration, has been accomplished on data from South Greenland. During the project, analyses have been done on pure remote sensing data (Landsat MSS) and on integrated data of various types, including geochemical, aeromagnetic, radiometric and geological data in addition to the MSS data. Ratioing, factor analysis and discriminant analysis were used for enhancement of colour anomalies which correspond to oxidation zones. Some of the anomalies coincide with U and Nb mineralizations. Lineaments were mapped visually from photoprints, digitized and analysed statistically. A sinusoidal model could be applied to the general directional frequency distribution and was used to define ten classes of significant directions. Three of these directions were of major geological significance. Thus some of the major alkaline intrusions are situated at the intersections of some of the lineaments, a particular NE-SW trending lineament coincides with a geochemical boundary and pitchblende occurrences may be related to a WNW-ESE direction. The various types of data set were brought onto format of the Landsat images and collected in a data base. Representing three different types of data (Landsat MSS-band 7, aeromagnetic data and the geochemical Fe-content of stream sediments) on basis of intensity, hue and saturation revealed new features among which can be mentioned a possible indication of a subsurface continuation of one of the major alkaline intrusions. (author)

  10. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO 2 as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 deg C and 60 deg C, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  11. Thermoluminescence applied to uranium exploration and genesis of the Westmoreland uranium deposits - implications for the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochman, M.B.M.; Ypma, P.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Westmoreland uranium deposits occur on the northern flank of the Murphy Tectonic Ridge in the upper member of the Westmoreland Conglomerate. Uranium mineralisation is spatially associated with the contact of the overlying basaltic Siegal Volcanics and the margins of intrusive dolerite dykes which are geochemically similar to the Siegal Volcanics. Thermoluminescence measurements on 800 samples from within the orebodies and surrounding host rock have indicated that all of the Westmoreland Conglomerate has suffered major radiation damage attributable to at least 10 ppm uranium over 10 9 years. The underlying rhyolitic Mid Proterozoic Cliffdale Volcanics have distinctive TL glow curves indicative of radiation sensitisation caused by high uranium contents. These volcanics are part of the Mid Proterozoic volcanic event known to be enriched in uranium. The Westmoreland Conglomerate has been derived by erosion of the uranium-rich Cliffdale Volcanics and associated Nicholson Granite Complex which makes it likely that the Westmoreland Conglomerate had a high inherent uranium content. It is proposed that this precontained uranium within the Westmoreland Conglomerate was remobilized in a convective cell system possibly triggered by intrusion of dolerite dykes, or by a later rejuvenation of vertical structures which provided an ascending heat flow. Pitchblende was precipitated where suitable reducing conditions existed close to the basic volcanics and dykes

  12. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process; Estudios de disolucion de analogos naturales de combustible nuclear irradiado y de fases de U(VI)-Silicio representativas de un proceso de alteracion oxidativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Morales, I

    2000-07-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO{sub 2} as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 degree centigree and 60 degree centigree, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  13. Underground geologic evaluation of the Grossschloppen vein-uranium deposit, West Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, S.C.; Erickson, A.J.; Kolb, S.G.; Maclean, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Grossschloppen vein-uranium deposit, Bavaria, West Germany, was examined utilizing underground workings during 1980-82 by Esso Er/ZETA/ GMbH, an affiliate of Exxon Minerals Company (EMC). Geologic evaluation entailed dense drilling of a portion of the deposit from workings constructed specifically for the program. Discovered in 1977, the deposit was initially explored by surface diamond drillholes which allowed definition of a 30-60 m wide vein system discontinuously mineralized along a 1000 m strike length and to at least a 450 m depth. The underground program was conceived as a cost effective procedure to answer questions on vein correlation, grade continuity and variability. A 1200 m decline allowed access for detailed sampling of approximately 10% of the known area of mineralization. Fanned drillholes, logged by gamma probe, were spaced to provide intersections of veins at 10 to 20 m intervals. Six cross cuts also penetrate the pitchblende and uranophane mineralization which occurs in 0.1 to 2.5 m thick quartz veins. Detailed cross-sections and level plans were constructed for resource estimates of the intensively studied portion of the vein system. The program resulted in the discovery of local, high grade areas and an average grade in the evaluated area nearly double that expected from surface drilling

  14. Uranium occurrence at Serra dos Quintos, Parelhas, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favali, J.C.; Pires, A.C.R.

    1974-01-01

    The uraniferous showing of Serra dos Quintos near Parelhas, RN, was one of the first discoveries in the Serido belt and it was very interesting because of its uraninite-bearing sheared structure and polymetallic assemblage. The proposed model is the vein-type, the mineralization occurring is lens-like bodies with uranium remobilized from ancient sediments by later Precambrian faulting. The area is made up by migmatites and ectinites of the Caico Complex, Lower Precambrian and quartzites and conglomerates belonging to the Serido Complex, Upper Precambriam. Pegmatites cross-cut the units as concordant and discordant bodies. Structurally the prospect lies on the east flank of the Serra dos Quintos anticline, a north-northeasternly striking structure. The following uranium minerals are known at the locality: uranite, pitchblende (rare), kasolite, autunite and uranophane. Among the metallic minerals, magnetite, pyrite, pirrotite, chalcopyrite and galena are identified. The gangue is composed of quartz, calcite, chlorite and epidote. The drilling program has indicated a mineralized zone 400 meters long, tested to 60 bellow surface with an average of 0,2% U 3 O 8 over 0,90 m in thickness [pt

  15. Geological and geochronological evidence for the effect of Paleogene and Miocene uplift of the Northern Ordos Basin on the formation of the Dongsheng uranium district, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yi, Chao; Dong, Qian; Cai, Yu-Qi; Liu, Hong-Xu

    2018-02-01

    The Dongsheng uranium district, located in the northern part of the Ordos Basin, contains the largest known sandstone-hosted uranium deposit in China. This district contains (from west to east) the Daying, Nalinggou, and Dongsheng uranium deposits that host tens of thousands of metric tonnes of estimated recoverable uranium resources at an average grade of 0.05% U. These uranium orebodies are generally hosted by the lower member of the Zhiluo Formation and are dominantly roll or tabular in shape. The uranium deposits in this district formed during two stages of mineralization (as evidenced by U-Pb dating) that occurred at 65-60 and 25 Ma. Both stages generated coffinite, pitchblende, anatase, pyrite, and quartz, with or without sericite, chlorite, calcite, fluorite, and hematite. The post-Late Cretaceous uplift of the Northern Ordos Basin exposed the northern margins of the Zhiluo Formation within the Hetao depression at 65-60 Ma, introducing groundwater into the formation and generating the first stage of uranium mineralization. The Oligocene (∼25 Ma) uplift of this northern margin exposed either the entirety of the southern flank of the Hetao depression or only the clastic sedimentary part of this region, causing a second gravitational influx of groundwater into the Zhiluo Formation and forming the second stage of uranium mineralization.

  16. Uranium's scientific history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    The bicentenary of the discovery of uranium coincides with the fiftieth anniversary of the discovery of fission, an event of worldwide significance and the last episode in the uranium -radium saga which is the main theme of this paper. Uranium was first identified by the German chemist Martin Klaproth in 1789. He extracted uranium oxide from the ore pitchblende which was a by-product of the silver mines at Joachimsthal in Bohemia. For over a century after its discovery, the main application for uranium derived from the vivid colours of its oxides and salts which are used in glazes for ceramics, and porcelain. In 1896, however, Becquerel discovered that uranium emitted ionizing radiation. The extraction by Pierre and Marie Curie of the more radioactive radium from uranium in the early years of the twentieth century and its application to the treatment of cancer shifted the chief interest to radium production. In the 1930s the discovery of the neutron and of artificial radioactivity stimulated research in a number of European laboratories which culminated in the demonstration of fission by Otto Frisch in January 1939. The new found use of uranium for the production of recoverable energy, and the creation of artificial radioelements in nuclear reactors, eliminated the radium industry. (author)

  17. The geology, hydrogeology and geochemistry of the Needle's Eye natural analogue site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey has been carrying out a research investigation of the Needle's Eye site at Southwick on the Solway coast in south-western Scotland. This study of a naturally radioactive geochemical system has the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This summary report describes results from the integrated use of hydrogeological, mineralogical and geochemical techniques applied to the study of the transport and distribution of uranium. Pitchblende veins exposed in the cliffs are a major source of soluble uranium in ground-waters flowing into organic-rich post-glacial flood plain and intertidal mudflat deposits. Organic matter both living and dead has played a key role in the retardation of uranium in these sediments. Chemical transport modelling of the uranium dispersion/retardation is described and the implications for performance assessment work are discussed. Computer codes used: CHEMVAL (thermodynamic data base constants). CHIMERE (chemical equilibrium code). METIS (flow code). PHREEQE (chemical equilibrium code). STELE (coupled chemical transport code)

  18. The location of uranium in source rocks and sites of secondary deposition at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site, Dumfries and Galloway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, I.R.; Hyslop, E.K.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.

    1989-08-01

    The British Geological Survey has been conducting a co-ordinated research programme at the natural analogue site of Needle's Eye at Southwick on the Solway coast in SW Scotland. This study of a naturally radioactive geochemical system has been carried out with the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This report describes results of integrated mineralogical techniques which have been applied to the study of both the 'source-term' and sites of secondary accumulation of uranium. Pitchblende in a polymetallic-carbonate breccia vein exposed in ancient sea-cliffs is the main source of labile uranium although other uranium-bearing minerals present in the granodiorite and hornfelsed siltstone host-rocks present probable ancillary leachable sites. In keeping with the complex chemistry of the primary sulphide-rich mineralization, a large variety of secondary U minerals has been recorded among which arsenates and hydrous silicates appear to predominate. Uranium transported in groundwaters draining the cliffs has accumulated in organic-rich estuarine/intertidal mudflat sediments of Quaternary age. Charged particle track registration techniques have demonstrated convincingly the effectiveness of humidified organic matter in retarding uranium transport and, coupled with scanning electron microscopy, have indicated an important role of living plants and bacteria in uranium uptake and concentration. (author)

  19. The location of uranium in source rocks and sites of secondary deposition at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site, Dumfries and Galloway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, I.R.; Hyslop, E.K.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey has been conducting a coordinated research programme at the natural analogue site of Needle's Eye at Southwick on the Solway coast in south-west Scotland. This study of a naturally radioactive geochemical system has been carried out with the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This report describes results of integrated mineralogical techniques which have been applied to the study of both the source-term and sites of secondary accumulation of uranium. Pitchblende in a polymetallic-carbonate breccia vein exposed in ancient sea-cliffs is the main source of labile uranium although other uranium-bearing minerals present in the granodiorite and hornfelsed siltstone host-rocks present probable ancillary leachable sites. In keeping with the complex chemistry of the primary sulphide-rich mineralization, a large variety of secondary U minerals has been recorded among which arsenates and hydrous silicates appear to predominate. Uranium transported in groundwaters draining the cliffs has accumulated in organic-rich estuarine/intertidal mudflat sediments of Quaternary age. Charged particle track registration techniques have demonstrated convincingly the effectiveness of humified organic matter in retarding uranium transport and, coupled with scanning electron microscopy, have indicated the important role of living plants and bacteria in uranium uptake and concentration. Computer codes used: CHEMVAL; CHEMTARD 5 figs.; 64 plates; 37 refs

  20. Ore petrography of a sedimentary uranium deposit, Live Oak County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomber, B.J.; Ledger, E.B.; Tieh, T.T.

    1986-01-01

    Samples from the McLean 5 open-pit uranium mine, a small high-grade deposit located along a normal fault in the Miocene Oakville sandstone of Live Oak County, Texas, have been studied for uranium abundance, distribution, and nature of occurrence on the microscopic level. The host sandstone is composed of quartz, feldspars, and volcanic rock fragments, cemented by sparry calcite. Authigenic minerals include iron disulfide minerals (dominantly pyrite and some marcasite) and small amounts of clays, Ti oxides, and opal. High-grade ore (to 3% U) occurs along the fault, decreasing to less than 1,000 ppm within 10 m from the fault. The ore mineral is amorphous pitchblende and exhibits botryoidal morphology. The microscopic occurrence of uranium, documented by fission-track mapping of petrographic thin sections, is presented in detail. Uranium occurs abundantly as grain coatings and fillings in intergranular spaces in samples with high uranium content, where calcite cement has been partially or totally leached as mineralization proceeded. Lesser amounts are adsorbed onto leucoxene (microcrystalline anatase), mud clasts, and altered igneous rock fragments. Adsorbed uranium is the major code of occurrence in samples, with lower uranium contents farther from the orebody. Textural relations indicate that iron sulfides formed both before and after mineralization. Initial mineralization was by adsorption onto aggregates of fine particles of Ti oxide and clay minerals of various origins. With dissolution of cement and continued uranium influx, uranium precipitated as grain coatings and pore fillings

  1. On indicators of genetic relation between uranium-bearing bitumen with oil-like substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Mineralogical indicators are considered which confirm that uranium-bearing (containing pitchblende) solid carbon substrates in the process of their formation had a stage of liquid-viscous state, and were sedimented in a close association with solid oil bitumens. The following cases are studied: 1) in concentrated macroextracts of uranium-bearing bitumens fine relicts of coloured oreless bitumens, less oxidated and carbonizated, are found sporadically in the passing light; 2) indicators of the development of black uranium-bearing bitumen along separate extracts or joint agregates of kerito- and asphalt-like substrates are observed in passing light within the veinlets of solid bitumens being in carbonate rocks; 3) linses of solid bitumens of fragmentary rock have zone structure according to the observation in passing light. The direct relation between black uranium-bearing bitumens and solid hydrocarbons which can form out of oil-like substances. Initial substances for them were defferent; resinous bitumens in the first case, kerito- and asphalt-like substances - in the second one, and paraffin substances - in the third one. It shows the nonselective character of the formation out of them of black uranium-bearing bitumens due to the processes of oxidation and carbonization [ru

  2. A study of U-Pb isotopic evolutionary system in Chanziping uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weichang; Huang Shijie; Xia Yuliang.

    1988-01-01

    Chanziping uranium deposit occurred in the black siliceous slate of Lower cambrian. The uranium mineralization was controlled by both interstratified fault belt and the ore-bearing beds. Based on the study of the U-Pb isotopic system of the various rocks, ores and minerals in the ore-bearing beds, the authors find out the obvious disequilibrium of U-Pb isotopic composition in most rock samples which indicates the loss of uranium form the ore-bearing beds and surrounding granite. Its counting loss ranges from 30 to 80%. The age of rich ores of the U-Pb concordance diagram and the U-Pb three stage model are t 1 = 523 ± 19M. Y. , t 2 = 22 ± 2 M.Y.. The isochronal ages for pitchblend are 75 ± 4 M.Y., 43 ± 7 M.Y., and for rock is 416 M.y.. These data shows that the uranium in ore-bearing beds was mainly derived from the ore-bearing beds itself and partly from the surrounding granite. The ore deposit can be considered to be of stratabound uranium deposit of sedimentation and late transformation type

  3. Uranium mineralization of the Witwatersrand and Dominion Reef systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, P.R.; Bowles, J.F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium-bearing minerals in the Witwatersrand and Dominion Reef sediments have been studied by ore microscopic, electron microprobe, fission track and neutron activation analytical methods to determine the controls of uranium mineralization. In the Dominion Reef, which represents a high-energy banket type of depositional environment, allogenic thorian uraninite occurs in hydraulic equivalence with allogenic pyrite, quartz and possibly also gold in the sediments which have uranium-thorium ratios between 3.1 and 5.6 indicating substantial amounts of thorium-rich resistate minerals. The Witwatersrand sediments have uranium-thorium ratios ranging between 7.1 and 19.6 indicating lesser amounts of resistates which is consistent with the lower-energy depositional environment. The proximal or nearshore deposits are of banket type but are distinguished from the Dominion Reef by the abundance of concretionary pyrite formed within the Basin and the presence of carbonaceous matter. The distal deposits formed at greater distance from the shoreline contain decaying organic material which has precipitated both uranium and gold from solution. Subsequent metamorphism has resulted in the formation of carbonaceous material bearing finely disseminated low-thorium pitchblende and a fine dissemination of gold associated with sulphides and arsenides. (author)

  4. U-Pb age for some base-metal sulfide deposits in Ireland: genetic implications for Mississippi Valley-type mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duane, M.J.; Welke, H.J.; Allsopp, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that links the timing of vein-type (Cu-Ag(U)) to stratiform Mississippi Valley-type (MVT, Pb-Zn) ore events in Ireland. The rare occurrence of pitchblende, coffinite(?), and brannerite mineralization, which is regarded as a precursor component to the sulfide mineralization in the Gortdrum deposit (Ireland), provides the first direct radiometric dating tool for these carbonate-hosted deposits. The U-Pb (340 +25/-20 Ma) and Pb-Pb (359 +/- 26 Ma) whole-rock ages constrain the uranium and base-metal mineralizing events to the Early Carboniferous. The data support a model according to which MVT and earlier uranium mineralization stages of some major ore bodies resulted from fracturing coincident with large basin-dewatering events. The Pb-Pb and concordia data are consistent with an Early Carboniferous age for the mineralization at Gortdrum and agree closely with a previously published Rb-Sr age of 359 +/- 22 Ma, obtained for Missouri glauconites. Furthermore, other comparative geologic data from Ireland and from North American MVT mineral provinces support a model of Pb-Zn-Cu(U) mobilization on a regional scale that implicates the later closing stages of the proto-Atlantic. 40 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  5. Uranium prospecting; La prospection de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roubault, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    This report is an instruction book for uranium prospecting. It appeals to private prospecting. As prospecting is now a scientific and technical research, it cannot be done without preliminary studies. First of all, general prospecting methods are given with a recall of fundamental geologic data and some general principles which are common with all type of prospecting. The peculiarities of uranium prospecting are also presented and in particular the radioactivity property of uranium as well as the special aspect of uranium ores and the aspect of neighbouring ores. In a third part, a description of the different uranium ores is given and separated in two different categories: primary and secondary ores, according to the place of transformation, deep or near the crust surface respectively. In the first category, the primary ores include pitchblende, thorianite and rare uranium oxides as euxenite and fergusonite for example. In the second category, the secondary ores contain autunite and chalcolite for example. An exhaustive presentation of the geiger-Mueller counter is given with the presentation of its different components, its functioning and utilization and its maintenance. The radioactivity interpretation method is showed as well as the elaboration of a topographic map of the measured radioactivity. A brief presentation of other detection methods than geiger-Mueller counters is given: the measurement of fluorescence and a chemical test using the fluorescence properties of uranium salts. Finally, the main characteristics of uranium deposits are discussed. (M.P.)

  6. Uranium prospecting; La prospection de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roubault, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    This report is an instruction book for uranium prospecting. It appeals to private prospecting. As prospecting is now a scientific and technical research, it cannot be done without preliminary studies. First of all, general prospecting methods are given with a recall of fundamental geologic data and some general principles which are common with all type of prospecting. The peculiarities of uranium prospecting are also presented and in particular the radioactivity property of uranium as well as the special aspect of uranium ores and the aspect of neighbouring ores. In a third part, a description of the different uranium ores is given and separated in two different categories: primary and secondary ores, according to the place of transformation, deep or near the crust surface respectively. In the first category, the primary ores include pitchblende, thorianite and rare uranium oxides as euxenite and fergusonite for example. In the second category, the secondary ores contain autunite and chalcolite for example. An exhaustive presentation of the geiger-Mueller counter is given with the presentation of its different components, its functioning and utilization and its maintenance. The radioactivity interpretation method is showed as well as the elaboration of a topographic map of the measured radioactivity. A brief presentation of other detection methods than geiger-Mueller counters is given: the measurement of fluorescence and a chemical test using the fluorescence properties of uranium salts. Finally, the main characteristics of uranium deposits are discussed. (M.P.)

  7. Stratigraphic implications of uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, F.F.

    1980-01-01

    One of the most consistent characteristics of economic uranium deposits is their restricted stratigraphic distribution. Uraninite deposited with direct igneous affiliation contains thorium, whereas chemical precipitates in sedimentary rocks are characterized by thorium-free primary uranium minerals with vanadium and selenium. In marine sediments, these minerals form low-grade disseminations; but in terrestrial sediments, chiefly fluvial sandstones, the concentration of uranium varies widely, with the high-grade portions constituting ore. Pitchblende vein deposits not only exhibit the same chemical characteristics as the Colorado-type sandstone deposits, but they have a stratigraphically consistent position at unconformities covered by fluvial sandstones. If deposits in such diverse situations have critical features in common, they are likely to have had many features of their origin in common. Thus, vein deposits in Saskatchewan and Australia may have analogues in areas that contain Colorado-type sandstone deposits. In New Mexico, the presence of continental sandstones with peneconformable uranium deposits should also indicate good prospecting ground for unconformity-type vein deposits. All unconformities within the periods of continental deposition ranging from Permian to Cretaceous should have uranium potential. Some situations, such as the onlap of the Abo Formation onto Precambrian basement in the Zuni Mountains, may be directly comparable to Saskatchewan deposition. However, uranium occurrences in the upper part of the Entrada Sandstone suggest that unconformities underlain by sedimentary rocks may also be exploration targets

  8. A brief history of the American radium industry and its ties to the scientific community of its early Twentieth Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    Federally funded remedial action projects are presently underway in New Jersey and Colorado at sites containing 226 Ra and other radionuclides from radium-uranium ore extraction plants that operated during the early twentieth century. They are but the latest chapter in the story of an American industry that emerged and perished in the span of three decades. Major extraction plants were established in or near Denver (CO), Pittsburgh (PA), and New York City (NY) to process radium from ore that came largely from the carnotite deposits of western Colorado and eastern Utah. The staffs of these plants included some of the finest chemists and physicists in the nation, and the highly-refined radium products found a variety of uses in medicine and industry. The discovery of high-grade pitchblende ores in the Belgian Congo and the subsequent opening of an extraction plant near Antwerp, Belgium, in 1992, however, created an economic climate that put an end to the American radium industry. The geologic, chemical, and engineering information gathered during this era formed the basis of the uranium industry of the later part of the century, while the tailings and residues came to be viewed as environmental problems during the same period

  9. Proterozoic stratabound dolostone-hosted uranium mineralisation in the Komantula - Reddypalle area, Cuddapah basin, Anantpur district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, U.P.; Pandit, S.A.; Gangadharan, G.R.; Panda, Arjuna; Roy, Minati

    1998-01-01

    The Komantula-Reddypalle area constitutes the northern sector of the 160 km long, uranium mineralised belt along the western and southern margins of the Cuddapah basin. The mineralisation is hosted by impure dolostone of the Vempalle Formation of Cuddapah Supergroup and occurs in the form of pitchblende, coffinite and U-Ti complexes. Uranium minerals occur along the bedding plane, carbonate-phosphate mineral contact, suture boundaries of microstylolites, and grain boundaries of clasts. The ore bearing horizon has been traced for about 65 kms and samples have assayed from 0.01% to 0.67% U 3 O 8 with negligible thorium. The source of uranium for this mineralisation appears to be the nearby fertile basement granitic rocks present in the western margins of Cuddapah basin. This mineralisation as compared with those found in the Tummallapalle-Rachkuntapalle area in the southern sector, contains high Cu (65-8100 ppm) and low P 2 O 5 (0.07-0.59 wt%) and significant but varying Mo (20-292 ppm). Stratigraphically, this area differs from that of Tummalapalle-Rachkuntapalle area to its south in two respects, viz., absence of intraformational conglomerate below and presence of a non-radioactive limestone above the radioactive dolostone. (author)

  10. Petrography and mineralogy of alteration halos around the Cigar Lake deposit and their relation to the mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacquet, A.; Weber, F.

    1993-01-01

    Around the Cigar Lake orebody, the present zoneography of alteration halos reflects several alteration episodes, some of which are anterior to and others coeval with the mineralizing events and have a regional extension. In the main pod, the uraninite mineralization was dated 1341 ± 12 Ma. In the sandstones, it is surrounded by ferromagnesian chlorites with a variable sudoitic character. This proximal alteration halo grades into a more distal envelope, visible in the sandstone and in the basement, that is composed of magnesium sudoite and 3T hydromuscovite. During this mineralizing event, dravite crystallized in the form of urchin-like clusters in the basement and xenotime overgrowth, around altered zircon, and apatite formed in the sandstones. Around the main pod and in some perched orebodies, an alteration zone of vanadium-bearing ferrikaolinite and iron-bearing 3T hydromuscovite, crosscut by a later siderite, surrounds the pitchblende dated 323 ± 4 Ma. Coffinite and an aluminous hydromuscovite crystallized during a later fracture event. The aluminous hydromuscovite also appears, with a silica-carbon-uranium complex, in perched mineralizations. Kaolinization and iron-sulfide oxidation into iron hydroxides occurred in perched orebodies that were more exposed to meteoric alteration. 19 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs [fr

  11. Innovative systems for mixed waste retrieval and/or treatment in confined spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekete, L.J.; Ghusn, A.E.

    1993-03-01

    Fernald established operations in 1951 and produced uranium and other metals for use at other DOE facilities. A part of the sitewide remediation effort is the removal, treatment, and disposal of the K-65 wastes from Silos 1 and 2. These silos contain radium-bearing residues from the processing of pitchblende ore. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis was prepared to evaluate the removal action alternatives using the preliminary characterization data and select a preferred alternative. The selected alternative consisted of covering the K-65 residues and the silo dome. The remediation of the K-65 wastes consists of the retrieval and treatment of the wastes prior to final disposal, which has not yet been determined. Treatment will be performed in a new facility to be built adjacent to the silos. The wastes must be retrieved from silos in an efficient and reliable way and delivered to the treatment facility. The first challenge of covering the wastes with bentonite has been successfully met. The second phase of retrieving the wastes from the silos is not due for a few years. However, conceptual design and configuration of the retrieval system have been developed as part of the Conceptual Design Report. The system is based on the utilization of hydraulic mining techniques, and is based on similar successful applications. This report describes the emplacement of the bentonite grant and the design for the slurry retrieval system

  12. WA uranium find under detailed study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Results of detailed geological surveys of CRA's Kintyre prospect in Western Australia have confirmed the presence of uranium in significant quantities with a number of features that make it promising for mining. The deposit is set in the remote Rudall River area, about 1,200 kilometres northeast of Perth. So far, probable ore reserves of 15,000 tonnes of U 3 O 8 and possible reserves of 15,000 tonnes have been identified and announced. Grades vary widely within a range of 1.5 to 4kg per tonne. The bulk of the ore body lies within 160 metres of the surface, which means it could be mined by open cut methods. The uranium mineralisation has been encountered in bands of pitchblende occurring as veins within the host rock. Current indications are that conventional acid/leach solvent extraction processes can be used to extract the uranium. The Kintyre deposit lies about 700 metres inside the northern boundary of Western Australia's Rudall River National Park. Exploration by CRA at the southern end of the park, in the vicinity of Mt. Cotton, has been halted temporarily. While the Kintyre geological results to date are most encouraging, studies are now being carried out to determine the commercial potential of the deposit

  13. Contribution to the radioactivity of Um Ara granitic pluton, south-eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Reedy, M.W.; Kamel, A.F.; Mansour, S.E.I.

    1988-01-01

    Um Ara area lies in the southern part of the eastern desert between latitudes 22 0 30' and 22 0 41'N and longitudes 33 0 46' and 33 0 54'E. Several types of granitic varieties ranging from high silica granite (SiO 2 >75%) to low silica granite (SiO 2 68-70%) occur in Um Ara granitic pluton. Surface samples were collected from the high anomalous locations in the pluton together with trenches samples (about 50cm in depth). The U content in the surface samples ranges from 69 to 7 ppm while in trenches samples, it ranges from 38 to 759 ppm. The thorium content on the other hand ranges from 34 to 402 ppm in surface samples and from 158 to 316 ppm in trenches samples. Some samples show no Th contents. The Th/U ratios ranges from 0.065 to 3.137 in surface samples and from 0.386 to 2.590 in trenches samples. An enrichment of U content is the main feature characterising this granitic pluton, it is mainly connected with the fractured zones. Uranium is mostly present as secondary U mineralization accompanied by Fe, Mn and to some extent by carbonate materials. A hydrothermal origin could be considered for this U mineralization in the pluton. Primary U mineralization (pitchblende) together with secondary mineralization was observed in some locations in the area disseminated in the granite, this reflects the syngenetic origin of this granitic type

  14. The uranium deposits of Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The principal types of uranium deposits in Ontario are carbonatites and fenites, alkalic volcanic rocks, pegiatites, calc-silicate rocks, pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerates, polymictic conglomerates and some pelitic rocks, and various 'pitchblende' deposits including late Precambrian unconformities, possibly late Precambrian diabase dikes, and other unconformities: carbonates, sandstones, lignites, and semi-pelitic rocks of middle and upper Precambrian age. Only red unzoned pegmatite and the pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerate have supported production. Ontario reasonably assured and estimated resources in the economic and subeconomic categories in 1977 amounted to 553 000 tonnes U, and 1977 production was 4000 tonnes U. Measured, indicated, and inferred resources in the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area are at least 400 000 tonnes U. The latter deposits are also a significant thorium resource. Geological features reflecting major changes in physics and chemistry are prime controls on distribution of uranium deposits. Geological province and subprovince boundaries, major faults, higher metamorphic grades, domain boundaries related to quartz monzonite batholiths, alkalic complexes, and the distribution of carbonate rocks are examples of such geological features

  15. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  16. Organic matter in uranium concentration during ancient bed oxidation of carboniferons sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglova, V.G.; Uspenskij, V.A.; Dement'ev, P.K.; Kochenov, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the organic matter accompanying the process of epigenetic ore formation are studied using the example of a deposit localized in carboniferous molasse strata of the Cretaceous period. Peculiarities of the organic matter as the main mineralization agent are studied by a complex of physical and themical methods. A distinct relationship between the uranium concentration and the degree of organic matter oxigenation is a most characteristic feature of the ore localization, however, there is no direct correlation between the contents of uranium and organic matter in ores. Uranium minerallzation was accumulated during infiltration of acid uraniferous.waters into grey stratum in the process of the bed oxidation zone formation oxidizing. Brown coal matter possessing a maximum adsorbability, as compared to other sedimentary rocks, apprared to be the uranium precipitator. The adsorption was accompanie by the formation of proper uranium minerals (coffinite, pitchblende) due to uranium reduction by oxidizing organic matter. Thus, the oxidative epigenesis was an are-forming process with the uranium concentration on organic matter proportionally to oxidation of the latter

  17. Geochemical prospecting techniques for ore deposits in periglacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitul'ko, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    Necessity and prospects of the implementation of geochemical methods of search in periglacial regions are discussed. The behaviour of chemical elements under the conditions of oxide and sulphate cryogenic topographies whose development has common regularities is analyzed. According to the specificity of migration the observed elements have been divided into four groups: active, mobile, low-mobile and inert migrants. Uranium which is present in ores in the form of pitchblende in oxide zones of the oxidation is actively redistributed. In zones of the oxidation of rare metal metasomatites connected with alkalic ultrabasic rocks only that part of U is mobile which being released from pyrochlore forms the regenerated uranium black and the partial enrichment of the iron gossan. Th like other elements of the 4-th group in all oxidation zones is observed to accumulate in minerals - concentrators: thorite, pyrochlore and so on. A diagram is plotted which characterizes the migration of elements whithin aureole landscapes as well as in automonous and dependent topographies of ore-free areas. The complex nature of secondary aureoles displays the most complete anomalous spectrum of elements - indicators of mineralization. The table of the most typical elements - indicators of the secondary scattering of some endogenic deposits of the cryolitic zone is given

  18. Biotechnology for uranium extraction and environmental control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    India is looking forward to augmenting mining and extraction of uranium mineral for its nuclear energy needs. Being a radio-active mineral, mining and processing of uranium ore deposits need be carried out in an environmentally acceptable fashion. In this respect, a biotechnological approach holds great promise since it is environment-friendly, cost-effective and energy-efficient. There are several types of microorganisms which inhabit uranium ore bodies and biogenesis plays an important role in the mineralisation and transport of uranium-bearing minerals under the earth's crust. Uranium occurrences in India are only meagre and it becomes essential to tap effectively all the available resources. Uraninite and pitchblende occurring along with sulfide mineralisation such as pyrite are ideal candidates for bioleaching. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans present ubiquitously in the ore deposits can be isolated, cultured and utilised to bring about efficient acidic dissolution of uranium. Many such commercial attempts to extract uranium from even lean ores using acidophilic autotrophic bacteria have been made in different parts of the world. Anaerobes such a Geobacter and Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) can be effectively used in uranium mining for environmental control. Radioactive uranium mined wastes and tailing dumps can be cleaned and protected using microorganisms. In this lecture use of biotechnology in uranium extraction and bioremediation is illustrated with practical examples. Applicability of environment-friendly biotechnology for mining and extraction of uranium from Indian deposits is outlined. Commercial potentials for bioremediation in uranium-containing wastes are emphasised. (author)

  19. From trace chemistry to single atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry in the vast majority of experimental works deals with the trace amount of radioactive matters. Accordingly, the concept of trace chemistry is at the heart of hot atom chemistry. Some aspects of the chemistry at trace scale and at subtrace scale are presented together with the related problems of speciation and the complication which may arise due to the formation of radio colloids. The examples of 127 I(n,γ) 128 I and 132 Te (β - ) 132 I are shown, and the method based on radioactivity was used. The procedure of separating the elements in pitchblende is shown as the example of the chemistry of traces. 13 27 Al+ 2 4 He→ 0 1 n+ 15 30 P and 15 30 P→ 14 30 Si+e + +V are shown, and how to recognize the presence of radioactive colloids is explained. The formation of radiocolloids is by the sorption of a trace radioelement on pre-existing colloidal impurity or the self-condensation of monomeric species. The temporal parameters of the nature of reactions at trace concentration are listed. The examples of Class A and Class B reactions are shown. The kinetics of reactions at trace level, radon concentration, anthropogenic Pu and natural Pu in environment, the behavior of Pu atoms and so on are described. (K.I.)

  20. The mineralogy and genesis of uranium in rhyolitic ignimbrites of Precambrian age from Duobblon, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.A.T.

    1982-01-01

    The Duobblon rhyolitic ignimbrites, of middle Precambrian age are 60 m thick. They consist of at least three flows with varying degrees of welding and have undergone devitrification, producing lithophysal and spherulitic textures. They are overlain by thick fluviatile red-bed-type conglomerates and sandstones, which in turn are capped by terrestrial acid volcanics. Uranium enrichments of up to 3000 ppm U occur within two or three peneconcordant tabular horizons which are mostly lithophysae-bearing. Fission-track investigations of the ignimbrites and overlying conglomerates and sandstones, which supplement earlier mineralogical studies, show that U occurs as fine pitchblende disseminations; as complex uranotitanates associated with Fe-Ti-Mn oxides; and as coatings associated with matrix sericite. Small amounts of U are present in such primary accessory minerals as sphene, apatite, and zircon. It is suggested that oxidizing U-bearing solutions, generated partly during devitrification of the ignimbrites and partly from the overlying volcano-sedimentary pile, produced the U enrichments with later sulphide deposition, along the more permeable lithophysal horizons in the ignimbrites. (author)

  1. Uranium deposits of Lagoa Real uranium Province, state of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, C.I.; Carvalho Filho, C.A. de; Hashizume, B.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Uranium Province of Lagoa Real is situated in the south-central part of the state of Bahia and constitutes, at the present moment, one of the most promising uranium districts of Brazil. The first anomaly was recorded in 1977 and, since then intense exploration and evaluation has been carried out in the area, resulting in the characterization of six ore deposits until now. Simultaneously, NUCLEBRAS has performed tests to establish the beneficiation characteristics of the ore, and developed preliminary mining plans. The host rock for the ore mineralization is related to sodic metasomatism and controlled by lithology and structure. The ore exhibits granoblastic texture, fine to coarse grain size, and the principal uranium minerals are uraninite, and, in minor quantities, pitchblende and uranophane. The solubility is over 90% of the U 3 O 8 contained, with an average acid consumption of 35 Kg per ton of ore treated. This paper presents a brief description of the main ore deposits and touches on their general characterisitcs. As an example, the deposit 'Jazida Cachoeira' is dealt with in greater detail, since this deposit is considered in the present context to be the most important one in the province. (Author) [pt

  2. Uraniferous albitites from the Lagoa Real Uranium Province, state of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, W. de; Raposo, C.; Matos, E.C. de

    1984-01-01

    The Uranium Province of Lagoa Real is located in the region of Caetite, throughout the south-central portion of the state of Bahia. The basic chronostratigraphic units are the metamorphic rocks - granitic rocks and gneisses of the Archean basement - and cataclastic metasomatic rocks - albitites and quartzo-feldspathic lithologies of the lower Proterozoic. The albitites, host rocks for the uranium mineralization, occur regionally as numerous lenticular and discontinuos bodies arranged submeridionally according to two main alignments forming an arc, and are therefore called linear albities in allusion to similar features in Kasachstan, Russia, where they were first given this designation. The name albitite was employed to designate the metasomatites in which albitite dominates over the other minerals. The uranium mineralization consists of uraninite and pitchblende and is confined to the ore zones of those albitites containing aegirine, alkali-amphiboles, andradite, biotite and carbonates Furthermore, it displays lithologic-structural control, the morphology being controlled by the location of shear zones. This mineralization usually takes the shape of ore shoots which pitch in the direction and dip of the lineation. The authors describe the various types of albitites (mineralized or unmineralized) and their structural and petrographic characteristics, mode of occurence, geometry, metasomatic alterations, chemistry, uranium mineralization, as well as their genetic aspects. (Author) [pt

  3. Fractal theory of radon emanation from solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semkow, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The author developed a fractal theory of Rn emanation from solids, based on α recoil from the α decay of Ra. Range straggling of the recoiling Rn atoms in the solid state is included and the fractal geometry is used to describe the roughness of the emanating surface. A fractal dimension D of the surface and the median projected range become important parameters in calculating the radon emanating power E R from solids. A relation between E R and the specific surface area measured by the gas adsorption is derived for the first time, assuming a uniform distribution of the precursor Ra throughout the samples. It is suggested that the E R measurements can be used to determine D of the surfaces on the scale from tens to hundreds of nm. One obtains, for instance, D = 2.17 ± 0.06 for Lipari volcanic glass and D = 2.83 ± 0.03 for pitchblende. In addition, the author suggests a new process of penetrating recoil and modify the role of indirect recoil. The penetrating recoil may be important for rough surfaces, in which case Rn loses its kinetic energy by penetrating a large number of small surface irregularities. The indirect recoil may be important at the very last stage of energy-loss process, for kinetic energies below ∼ 5 keV

  4. Natural Pu-traces within the continental crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganz, M.; Barth, H.; Fuest, M.; Molzahn, D.; Brandt, R.

    1991-01-01

    Pu-traces are observed in the environmental all over the world, 'man made'-Pu as well as 'natural' Pu ( 239 Pu). 239 Pu occurs within a range of about 10 -12 g Pu/g sample in pitchblende. In the FRG, the deep-drilling project 'KTB, Kontinentales Tiefbohrprogramm', was started with the aim to obtain a very deep hole (14 km). We wanted to establish upper concentration limits for plutonium in samples from KTB. For a first investigation, we obtained a 400 g sample of granite from a pre-drill of KTB. Its Pu-concentration was ≤ (4.5 ± 2.5)x10 -16 g 239 Pu/g sample. To compare this result to the Pu-content in geological brines, we obtained a sample from a borehole at the Salton Sea Geothermal field (Southeastern California). In this sample we found an upper concentration limit of (2.1 ± 1.0)x10 -16 g 239 Pu/g sample. (orig.)

  5. Petrogenesis of the Bosworgey granitic cusp in the SW England tin province and its implications for ore mineral genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, T. K.; Basham, I. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Bosworgey granite cusp forms an apical portion of the concealed northern extension of the Tregonning-Godolphin granite ridge. It is characterised by unusually high values of B, P, Mn, Fe, As, Cu, Nb, Ta, Bi, Sn, W, U and S which are present largely as tourmaline, apatite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, bismuth, columbite, cassiterite, wolframite and uraninite; and low levels of Zr, Hf, Ti and REE present in zircon, ilmenite and monazite. The granite is classified as Sn and W “specialised” (Tischendorf, 1974) and it belongs to the ilmenite series of Japanese workers. The classification of Chappell and White (1974) (“S” and “I” type granites) is shown to be inapplicable to Cornubian rocks although the Bosworgey samples show characteristics of “S” type granites. The accessory mineral assemblages are typical of high temperature lodes (cassiterite, wolframite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite) and the assamblage is concluded to be the cusp analogue of hypothermal lodes produced by extreme differentiation and concentration of volatiles. It is speculated that such granites could provide the parent material for the mesothermal crosscourse mineralisation (pitchblende, bismuth, pyrite, galena, sphalerite).

  6. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C.; Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D.

    1993-03-01

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated

  7. Las mineralizaciones de uranio en las rocas volcánicas de Macusani. Puno (Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arribas, A.

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The Macusani U deposits, located 150 km. NNW of the Titicaca lake, in Perú, are characterized by certain petrological, mineralogical and tectonic features which make them a unique type of U mineralization among those normally associated with pyroclastic rocks. These features can be outlined as follows: l. The U minerals occur almost exclusively in the upper levels of the volcanic pile. 2. The host rocks, Plio-Quatemaryi,gnimbrites of rhyolitic to rhyodacitic composition, consist of quartz, sanidine, oligoclase and biotite, and occasionally muscovite and andalusite. These minerals occur within a partially devitrified g1assy matrix that contains numerous xenoliths of pelitic material. 3. Biotite, smoky quartz and andalusite are specially abundant in the U-bearing tuffaceous layers.
    4. The ore minerals consist of massive pitchblende and very scarce Fe sulphides, Due to the intense weathering, gummites and secondary U minerals, mainly phosphates and silicates, predominate in the outcrops and mining works.
    5. The pitchblende fills fractures which range from a few centimeters to several meters in length, and from less than 1 mm. to 10 cm. in width. Some of these fractures are subvertical and due to contraction, and coincide with the columnar jointing of the ignimbrites. Others are subhorizontal and parallel to a conjugated, ductile shear joint system which was developed by the compaction and adjustment of the competent layers which host the U mineralizations.
    According to these features, a preliminary model to explain the origin of this particular type of U deposits is proposed in this paper.

    Los caracteres petrográficos, mineralógicos y tectónicos de los indicios uraníferos de Macusani, situados 150 kilómetros al NNW del lago Titicaca, en Perú, hacen de estas mineralizaciones un caso único entre los yacimientos de U asociados con rocas piroclásticas. Así los estudios llevados a cabo demuestran que:
    1. Los

  8. Athabasca basin unconformity-type uranium deposits. A special class of sandstone-type deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeve, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two major episodes of uranium metallogenesis are recognized in Northern Saskatchewan. The first is of late-Hudsonian age and gave rise to metamorphic-hydrothermal pitchblende deposits of simple mineralogy at Beaverlodge (primary mineralization: 1780+-20 m.y.). The second and more important episode of approximately Grenvillian age rendered unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca Basin (primary mineralization: 1000-1300 m.y.). The late-Hudsonian deposits at Beaverlodge were overprinted by this second event and new deposits of complex mineralogy were formed in that area. The metallogenetic importance of a third and much later episode which gave rise to mineralization within the Athabasca Formation is uncertain at the moment. With regards to metallogenesis of the unconformity-type deposits, presently available evidence favours a diagenetic-hydrothermal rather than a near-surface supergene or a magmatic/metamorphic hydrothermal model. The diagenetic-hydrothermal model relates uranium mineralization to 'red bed-type' diagenetic processes in the Athabasca Formation involving post-depositional oxidation and leaching, which continued for several hundred million years after deposition. Ore deposits were formed by interaction, under conditions of deep burial at elevated temperatures and pressures, of a uraniferous oxidizing Athabasca aquifer with reducing, graphite-bearing, metamorphic rocks of the basin floor. The large-scale convection required for such interaction may have been induced by mafic magmatic activity coeval with the episode of mineralization. The diagenetic-hydrothermal model displays close similarities with metallogenetic models developed for certain sandstone-type deposits. (author)

  9. Microbiological analysis at the Osamu Utsumi mine and Morro do Ferro analogue study sites, Pocos de Caldas, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.M.; Vialta, A.; McKinley, I.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Pocos de Caldas project is a wide-ranging natural analogue study focussed on a number of areas of concern in the performance assessment of the disposal of radioactive waste. Part of the work has involved characterising microbial populations and their influence in various processes. Core material and groundwaters have been sampled for microbiological content at various depths form boreholes at the Osamu Utsumi open pit uranium mine and Morro do Ferro Th/REE ore body. Microbes were found in all samples but numbers do not appear to be related to depth. Analyses of groundwaters gave higher numbers than with solid material and demonstrated the presence of sulphur cycle bacteria. These observations have been compared with predictions of a model used in performance assessment to calculate the maximum biomass/microbial activity based on constraints set by available nutrients and energy. The main conclusions of this analysis are: 1. Low microbial activities can be supported by the energy and nutrients supplied by alteration processes at or around the redox front. The maximum annual production of approximately equal to 0.01 - 0.1 g biomass (dry)/m 2 of redox front is in reasonable agreement with observed standing populations. 2. The presence of high concentrations of sulphate reducing bacteria around the redox front indicate a complex sulphur geochemistry which may be predominantly microbially catalysed and could explain the nodular form of pitchblende concretions and the presence of secondary pyrite. 3. There is little trace element mobilisation by organic byproducts and the main role of microbes in this system is to catalyse specific redox reactions. (au)

  10. The South Greenland uranium exploration programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Tukiainen, T.; Wallin, B.

    1982-11-01

    This is the final report of the reconnaissance phase of the SYDURAN Project which was initiated in 1st. December 1978 to outline areas of increased uranium potential where more detailed prospection would be warranted. Districts and smaller zones in South Greenland which have the potential for containing economically exploitable uranium occurrences were defined using airborne gamma-spectroscopic, reconnaissance geochemical and geological methods. Other districts and areas have been shown to have no uranium potential and can be eliminated. The three promising districts are: 1. a 2000 square kilometre sub-circular district surrounding Ilimaussaq complex in which there are small high grade pitchblende occurences in faults and fractures in the surrounding granite. 2. the eastern area of the Motzfeldt Centre where large parts of the centre is mineralised and may give rise to exploitable, large tonnage, low grade uranium ore with associated niobium and rare earth elements in extractable quantities. 3. uraniferous rich districts or zones associated with the migmatitic supracrustal units in the area between Kap Farvel and Lindenows Fjord. The areas which were eliminated from having any uranium potential include: the Ketilidian supracrustal unit. the Nunarssuit alkaline complex. The uranium mineralisation in South Greenland is confined to two Proterozoic episodes: a) a late phase of granitisation and migmatisation with the formation of disseminated uraninite in the Migmatite Complex in the south of the project area between 1700-1800 m.y. and, b) hydrothermal activity associated with Gardar magmatic events between 1090-1170 m.y. in the central Granite Zone. Future work should be directed towards the definition and location of drilling targets. (EG)

  11. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure

  12. Water-rock interactions in discharge areas of Xiangshan Fossil hydrothermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Wenbin

    1992-01-01

    Xiangshan Fossil hydrothermal system is located within a volcanic basin of south-eastern China. The fact that most metal mineralizations were found in the discharge areas of the fossil hydrothermal system shows that the discharge areas were special geochemical fields. This paper discusses some important water-rock interactions in the discharge areas of Xiangshan fossil hydrothermal system. When the fluids circulating in the deep section of the hydrothermal system went upward to the discharge area, the physico-chemical conditions under which the fluids were saturated changed so considerably that the original physico-chemical equilibria were broken. Consequently, the fluids tended to move to new equilibrium by means of regulating their chemical compositions. Temperature and pressures of the fluids could be declined greatly in discharge area; the difference of temperature and pressure are determined to be 100--150 C and 1--2 x 10 7 Pa. As a result, a large amount of CO 2 in solution escaped from the fluids in the discharge area, and UO 2 (CO 3 ) n 2(1-n) , stable in CO 2 -rich solutions, could be decomposed into UUO 2 2+ , which could be easily reduced into pitchblende associated by calcite and hematite. The pH values for the fluids tended to increase with the CO 2 escaping, however, the interactions between the hydrothermal fluids and the wall rocks (dominantly aluminosilicate) served as the buffers for the pH, and regulated the pH value around neutral point. The buffer effect was of great importance to uranium mineralization. In addition, isotope exchangements between the fluids and rocks took place extensively

  13. Contribution to characteristics of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsche, R.; Dahlkamp, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium oxides from pegmatitic, metamorphic and metasomatic uranium occurrences were investigated with the objective to check for differences in their physico-chemical properties and, whether such properties are sufficiently distinct to be applied as an exploration tool. Research methods included microscopy, electron microprobe and X-ray diffractometry amended by determinations of reflectance, Vickers hardness, unit-cell dimension and oxidation grade. Tentative research results are as follows: (a) U-oxides (uraninites) of pegmatites always contain significant amounts of Th (1,5-10 wt.% ThO2). (b) U-oxides from metasomatic environments have high, but variable contents of Fe, Ca, Ti, Si and Th (around 10 wt.%), Th being low. (c) U-oxides crystallised during metamorphism contain minor impurities of the above listed elements (total of oxides < 2 wt.%). (d) Redistributed U-oxides have elevated amounts of these elements. (e) Unit-cell dimensions of U-oxides tend to reflect a complex function of formation temperature, oxidation grade and the influence of incorporated elements caused by their radius and electro-negativity. (f) A global negative correlation of unit-cell dimension and oxidation grade of uranium oxides is indicated but based on widely varying ratios of the two parameters. (g) Colloform U-oxide (pitchblende) is characterised by elevated Ca-contents (1-5 wt.% CaO) and an almost complete lack of Th (< 1 wt.% ThO2). (h) Idiomorphic U-oxide (uraninite) is commonly low in Ca (< 1.5 wt.% CaO) but contains relatively high Th values. (i) The reflectance of U-oxides generally correlates positively with Vickers hardness and unit-cell dimension, but the incorporation of other elements in the lattice of U-oxides may cause strong interference. (author)

  14. Regulatory control of radioactivity and nuclear fuel cycle in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.; Jennekens, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The mining of pitchblende for the extraction of radium some four decades ago resulted in a largely unwanted by-product, uranium, which set the stage for Canada to be one of the first countires in the world to embark upon a nuclear energy program. From this somewhat unusual beginning, the Canadian program expanded beyond mining of uranium-bearing ores to include extensive research and development in the field of radio-isotope applications, research and power reactors, nuclear-fuel conversion and fabrication facilities, heavy-water production plants and facilities for the management of radioactive wastes. As in the case of any major technological development, nuclear energy poses certain risks on the part of those directly engaged in the industry and on the part of the general public. What characterizes these risks is not so much their physical nature as the absence of long-term experience and the confidence resulting from it. The early development of regulatory controls in the nuclear field in Canada was very much influenced by security considerations but subsequently evolved to include radiological protection and safety requirements commensurate with the expanding application of nuclear energy to a wide spectrum of peaceful uses. A review of Canadian nuclear regulatory experience will reveal that the risks posed by the peaceful uses of nuclear energy can be controlled in such a manner as to ensure a high level of safety. Recent events and development have shown however that emphasis on the risks associated with low-probability, high-consequence events must not be allowed to mask the importance of health and safety measures covering the entire fuel cycle

  15. Acidic volcanic rock and its potential as an objective for uranium prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Torres, R.; Yza Dominguez, R.; Chavez Aguirre, R.; Constantino, H.E.S.E.

    1976-01-01

    The geographical distribution of recent Mexican volcanic rocks is continuous; the older formations are dispersed in isolated outcrops. Continental volcanic events, acidic and basal, took place in the Caenozoic, Mesozoic and Palaeozoic; basic submarine volcanism predominated in the Mesozoic, Palaeozoic and late Precambrian. Access to the Sierra Madre Occidental, a circum-Pacific mountain range covered by rhyolitic rocks, is limited, which restricts the sections studied. Calderas, sources of volcanic emission and preliminary litho-stratigraphic sections have been delimited on the eastern edge of the range. Subduction by the ocean magmatized the continent from the Permian onwards, extravasating and depositing cyclically various magmata through inverted and normal cortical throws. The Sierra Pena Blanca (Chihuahua) section consists of epiclastic and pyroclastic rocks. A calcareous conglomerate is overburdened by alternate basal tuffs and imbricates, forming five units. In the uraniferous district of the Sierra Pena Blanca the hydrothermal alteration argillitized both components of the ''Nopal'' formation. Primary minerals (pitchblende) are found together with silicification. Leaching favours secondary mineralization (uranium silicates) associated with opals. After extrapolation of the features, the following are considered worth-while objectives: the faces, offsets and prolongations of the Sierra Madre Occidental and the southern volcanic mesetas south of the Mexican Transcontinental Rift. Similar objectives of Mesozoic or Palaeozoic age exist in central and southern Mexico. Possible objectives for uranium are: the acidic volcanic rock of the southern and south-western United States of America, the circum-Pacific acidic volcanic rocks of North America and the acidic volcanic mesetas of Central America and in the Andes. (author)

  16. Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes: II. St. Louis Airport Storage Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLASS) became radioactively contaminated as a result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy is considering various remedial action options for the SLASS under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This report describes the results of geochemical investigations, carried out to support the FUSRAP activities and to aid in quantifying various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples from the site were characterized, and sorption ratios for uranium and radium and apparent concentration limit values for uranium were measured in soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. The uranium and radium concentrations in soil samples were significantly above background near the old contaminated surface horizon (now at the 0.3 - to 0.9 - m depth); the maximum values were 1566 μg/g and 101 pCi/g, respectively. Below about the 6 - m depth, the concentrations appeared to be typical of those naturally present in soils of this area (3.8 +- 1.2 μg/g and 3.1 +- 0.6 pCi/g). Uranium sorption ratios showed stratigraphic trends but were generally moderate to high (100 to 1000 L/kg). The sorption isotherm suggested an apparent uranium concentration limit of about 200 mg/L. This relatively high solubility can probably be correlated with the carbonate content of the soil/groundwater systems. The lower sorption ratio values obtained from the sorption isotherm may have resulted from changes in the experimental procedure or the groundwater used. The SLASS appears to exhibit generally favorable behavior for the retardation of uranium solubilized from waste in the site. Parametric tests were conducted to estimate the sensitivity of uranium sorption and solubility to the pH and carbonate content of the system

  17. Formation of albitite-hosted uranium within IOCG systems: the Southern Breccia, Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montreuil, Jean-François; Corriveau, Louise; Potter, Eric G.

    2015-03-01

    Uranium and polymetallic U mineralization hosted within brecciated albitites occurs one kilometer south of the magnetite-rich Au-Co-Bi-Cu NICO deposit in the southern Great Bear magmatic zone (GBMZ), Canada. Concentrations up to 1 wt% U are distributed throughout a 3 by 0.5 km albitization corridor defined as the Southern Breccia zone. Two distinct U mineralization events are observed. Primary uraninite precipitated with or without pyrite-chalcopyrite ± molybdenite within magnetite-ilmenite-biotite-K-feldspar-altered breccias during high-temperature potassic-iron alteration. Subsequently, pitchblende precipitated in earthy hematite-specular hematite-chlorite veins associated with a low-temperature iron-magnesium alteration. The uraninite-bearing mineralization postdates sodic (albite) and more localized high-temperature potassic-iron (biotite-magnetite ± K-feldspar) alteration yet predates potassic (K-feldspar), boron (tourmaline) and potassic-iron-magnesium (hematite ± K-feldspar ± chlorite) alteration. The Southern Breccia zone shares attributes of the Valhalla (Australia) and Lagoa Real (Brazil) albitite-hosted U deposits but contains greater iron oxide contents and lower contents of riebeckite and carbonates. Potassium, Ni, and Th are also enriched whereas Zr and Sr are depleted with respect to the aforementioned albitite-hosted U deposits. Field relationships, geochemical signatures and available U-Pb dates on pre-, syn- and post-mineralization intrusions place the development of the Southern Breccia and the NICO deposit as part of a single iron oxide alkali-altered (IOAA) system. In addition, this case example illustrates that albitite-hosted U deposits can form in albitization zones that predate base and precious metal ore zones in a single IOAA system and become traps for U and multiple metals once the tectonic regime favors fluid mixing and oxidation-reduction reactions.

  18. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, W A; Leggett, R W; Haywood, F F

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure.

  19. Design report for the interim waste containment facility at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    Low-level radioactive residues from pitchblende processing and thorium- and radium-contaminated sand, soil, and building rubble are presently stored at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York. These residues and wastes derive from past NFSS operations and from similar operations at other sites in the United States conducted during the 1940s by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and subsequently by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The US Department of Energy (DOE), successor to MED/AEC, is conducting remedial action at the NFSS under two programs: on-site work under the Surplus Facilities Managemnt Program and off-site cleanup of vicinity properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. On-site remedial action consists of consolidating the residues and wastes within a designated waste containment area and constructing a waste containment facility to prevent contaminant migration. The service life of the system is 25 to 50 years. Near-term remedial action construction activities will not jeopardize or preclude implementation of any other remedial action alternative at a later date. Should DOE decide to extend the service life of the system, the waste containment area would be upgraded to provide a minimum service life of 200 years. This report describes the design for the containment system. Pertinent information on site geology and hydrology and on regional seismicity and meteorology is also provided. Engineering calculations and validated computer modeling studies based on site-specific and conservative parameters confirm the adequacy of the design for its intended purposes of waste containment and environmental protection

  20. Inhalation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.; Jackson, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In previous studies the biological dispositions of individual long-lived alpha members of the uranium chain ( 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th) were determined during and following repeated inhalation exposures of rats to pitchblende (26 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore. Although finely dispersed ore in secular equilibrium was inhaled, 230 Th/ 234 U radioactivity ratios in the lungs rose from 1.0 to 2.5 during 8 weeks of exposures and increased to 9.2 by four months after cessation of exposures. Marked non-equilibrium levels were also found in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, kidneys, liver, and femur. Daily exposures of beagle dogs to high levels of this ore for 8 days resulted in lung 230 Th/ 234 U ratios of >2.0. Daily exposures of dogs to lower levels (0.1 mg/1) for 6 months, with sacrifice 15 months later, resulted in lung and thoracic lymph node 230 Th/ 234 U ratios ranging from 3.6 to 9 and nearly 7, respectively. The lungs of hamsters exposed to carnotite (4 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore in current lifespan studies show 230 Th/ 234 U ratios as high as 2.0 during daily inhalation of this ore in secular equilibrium. Beagle dogs sacrificed after several years of daily inhalations of the same carnotite ore plus radon daughters also showed marked non-equilibrium ratios of 230 Th/ 234 U, ranging from 5.6 to 7.4 in lungs and 6.2 to 9.1 in thoracic lymph nodes. This pattern of higher retention of 230 Th than 234 U in lungs, thoracic lymph nodes, and other tissues is thus consistent for two types of uranium ore among several species and suggests a reevaluation of maximum permissible air concentrations of ore, currently based only on uranium content

  1. Bhima Basin, Karnataka, India uranium mineralisation in the Neoproterozoic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achar, K.K.; Pandit, S.A.; Natarajan, V.; Kumar, M.K.; Dwivedy, K.K.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the geological analogy of known uranium mineralisation in other Proterozoic basins of India, the Bhima basin in northern Karnataka, covering an area of 5200 sq km, was taken up for uranium exploration. An integrated approach involving exploration techniques such as terrain analysis using satellite imageries, jeep-borne radiation survey, regional hydrogeochemical sampling and ground radiometric surveys were used. In addition gamma-ray logging of borewells drilled for water have enabled delineation of subsurface mineralisation at Gogi. Uranium mineralisation is associated with: (1) altered phosphatic limestone along the cherty limestone-shale boundary as at Ukinal, (2) brecciated non-phosphatic limestone as at Gogi, and (3) basic enclaves in the basement granites, as at Gogi East. Uranium occurs essentially as adsorbed phase on limonite and absorbed in collophane in the phosphatic limestone as at Ukinal. Mineralisation at Gogi is characterised by intense fracturing and brecciation apparently related to E-W trending Kurlagere-Gogi fault and is essentially low temperature (c.200 deg. C) hydrothermal nature represented by coffinite (thin veins and globular aggregates) along with pitchblende, pyrite (both framboidal and euhedral), pyrrhotite, haematite and anatase. Mineralisation is both syngenetic - remobilised as in the phosphatic limestones (Ukinal) and epigenetic hydrothermal (Gogi). The spatial relation of the unconformity, basement faults, and uranium - bearing basic enclaves within the basement points to the importance of the unconformity as a surface for fluid transport and fixation in conducive hosts. Presence of labile uranium in the basement granites with significant groundwater anomalies (up to 309 ppb U) enhances such possibilities. (author)

  2. Sandstone uranium deposits: analogues for surf disposal in some sedimentary rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    Sandstone uranium deposits are well suited as analogs for SURF. These deposits typically occur as tabular or lensoid masses of uraniferous sandstone, commonly where the argillaceous mineral and organic content is high. Primary minerals consist of pitchblende and/or coffinite, with possibly some urano-organic phases as well. The ore is usually associated with authigenic ferromagnesian clay minerals, such as chlorite and/or authigenic illite and/or mixed layer smectite-illite; and with pyrite ± jordisite ± seleniferrous species ± calcite. Organic matter is usually associated with the ore. The clay minerals in the ore zones are commonly vanadiferrous. The genesis of the sandstone uranium deposits is now fairly well understood and allows semi-quantitative estimates to be placed on behaviour of analog-elements for many constituents of SURF (or HLW). Prior to mineralization, oxidized species of U, V, Se, Mo, As are carried together as oxyanions; these species precipitate in a restricted range of Eh-pH when reducing conditions are met. Concomitant with removal of these species, due to formation of reduced, insoluble species, several other elements of interest are concentrated in the ore zones as well. Chalcophile elements, such as Cu, Co, Mn, Zn, Cd, Sb, and others are fixed in authigenic sulfide phases, and the alkalis Rb, K, and Cs are fixed in the authigenic illite and illitic mixed layer clays. The alkaline earth elements Sr and Ba are commonly fixed in sulfate-rich rock. The rare earth elements (REE) are incorporated into authigenic clay minerals or into oxy-hydroxide phases. (author)

  3. The use of tetracycline as complexing agent for the separation of interfering elements during uranium activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrauskas, R.

    1984-01-01

    A method was developed for uranium separation, when its determination could not be performed by non-destructive neutron activation analysis due to the presence of interfering elements. Th, Zn, Na, Ta, Fe, W, Mo, Ag and the lanthanides were considered interferents because some of these elements, via (n, γ) reactions, form the same radioisotopes produced in the fission of 235 U, or radioisotopes that emit gamma-rays with energies close to the ones emitted by 239 Np or by the fission products of 235 U. Besides they could form radioisotopes whose Compton continuum makes difficult the detection of the gamma-rays of 239 Np and the fission products of 235 U. The separation method is based on the extraction of uranium from the interfering elements using a solution of tetracycline in benzyl alcohol. Adequate conditions for the separation were studied and extraction curves of uranium and interferents were obtained separately and in the presence of a solution of uranium ore from the IAEA. Separation of uranium from Na, Ag and Zn was achieved with a single extraction operation and by controlling the pH of the aqueous phase. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was used as masking agent for uranium separation from Fe, Th and lanthanides. For other elements, the separation was partial, meaning that about 11% of W, 32% of Mo and 5% of Ta were extracted together with uranium after two extraction operations (extraction and washing). Chemical separation presented a recovery of 97% for uranium. After separation an aliquot of organic phase containing uranium was irradiated for uranium and isotopic ratio 235 U/ 238 U determinations. This method was applied in the analysis of the following ores: standard S-7 (pitchblende) provided by IAEA, monazite and an ore called 'goianita' from the state of Goias (GO, Brazil). The accuracy and precision of results were discussed, and the isotopic ratio results indicated that the ores analysed present an isotopic abundance of natural uranium. (Author

  4. 238U, and its decay products, in grasses from an abandoned uranium mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Edgar; Maskall, John; Millward, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Bioaccumulation of radioactive contaminants by plants is of concern particularly where the sward is an essential part of the diet of ruminants. The abandoned South Terras uranium mine, south west England, had primary deposits of uraninite (UO2) and pitchblende (U3O8), which contained up to 30% uranium. When the mine was active uranium and radium were extracted but following closure it was abandoned without remediation. Waste rock and gangue, consisting of inefficiently processed minerals, were spread around the site, including a field where ruminants are grazed. Here we report the activity concentrations of 238U, 235U 214,210Pb, and the concentrations of selected metals in the soils, roots and leaves of grasses taken from the contaminated field. Soil samples were collected at the surface, and at 30 cm depth, using an auger along a 10-point transect in the field from the foot of a waste heap. Whole, individual grass plants were removed with a spade, ensuring that their roots were intact. The soils and roots and grass leaves were freeze-dried. Activity concentrations of the radionuclides were determined by gamma spectroscopy, following 30 days incubation for development of secular equilibrium. Dried soils, roots and grasses were also digested in aqua regia and the concentrations of elements determined by ICP techniques. Maximum activity concentrations of 238U, 235U, 214Pb and 210Pb surface soils were 63,300, 4,510, 23,300 and 49,400 Bq kg-1, respectively. The mean 238U:235U ratio was 11.8 ± 1.8, an order of magnitude lower than the natural value of 138, indicating disequilibrium within the decay chain due to mineral processing. Radionuclides in the roots had 5 times lower concentration and only grass leaves in the vicinity of the waste heap had measureable values. The mean soil to root transfer factor for 238U was 36%, the mean root to leaf was 3% and overall only 0.7% of 238U was transferred from the soil to the leaves. The roots contained 0.8% iron, possibly as

  5. Eldorado Port Hope refinery - uranium production (1933-1951)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of pitchblende in 1930 by Gilbert LaBine at Great Bear Lake (GBL), North West Territories, uranium has played a central role in the growth of the Canadian mining sector and it in turn has propelled the country into it's present position as the world's top uranium producer. The rich ore mined there was used originally by Eldorado Gold Mines Limited to build a business based on the extraction of radium, which was selling at $70,000 a gram at the time, and silver which was present in the ore in commercial amounts. The mine site on GBL became known as Port Radium. In 1933 Eldorado brought a refinery on-line at Port Hope, Ontario nearly 4,000 miles away from the mine, and began to produce radium, silver and uranium products. Initially uranium played a minor role in the business and the products were sold into the ceramics industry to manufacture a variety of crockery with long-lasting colours. In addition, there were sales and loans of uranium products to research laboratories that were exploring nuclear energy for possible use in weapons and power generation, as the potential for this was clearly understood from 1939 onwards. These laboratories included the National Research Council (George Laurence), Columbia University (Enrico Fermi) and International Chemical Industries (J.P. Baxter). With the beginning of World War II the radium business suffered from poor sales and by 1940 the mine was closed but the refinery continued operation, using accumulated stockpiles. By 1942 uranium had become a strategic material, the mine was reopened, and the refinery began to produce large quantities of uranium oxide destined for The Manhattan Project. As events unfolded Eldorado was unable to produce sufficient ore from GBL so that a large quantity of ore from the Belgian Congo was also processed at Port Hope. Ultimately, as a result of the efforts of this enterprise, World War II was finally ended by use of atomic weapons. After World War II the refinery

  6. Eldorado Port Hope refinery - uranium production (1933-1951)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E

    2008-03-15

    Since the discovery of pitchblende in 1930 by Gilbert LaBine at Great Bear Lake (GBL), North West Territories, uranium has played a central role in the growth of the Canadian mining sector and it in turn has propelled the country into it's present position as the world's top uranium producer. The rich ore mined there was used originally by Eldorado Gold Mines Limited to build a business based on the extraction of radium, which was selling at $70,000 a gram at the time, and silver which was present in the ore in commercial amounts. The mine site on GBL became known as Port Radium. In 1933 Eldorado brought a refinery on-line at Port Hope, Ontario nearly 4,000 miles away from the mine, and began to produce radium, silver and uranium products. Initially uranium played a minor role in the business and the products were sold into the ceramics industry to manufacture a variety of crockery with long-lasting colours. In addition, there were sales and loans of uranium products to research laboratories that were exploring nuclear energy for possible use in weapons and power generation, as the potential for this was clearly understood from 1939 onwards. These laboratories included the National Research Council (George Laurence), Columbia University (Enrico Fermi) and International Chemical Industries (J.P. Baxter). With the beginning of World War II the radium business suffered from poor sales and by 1940 the mine was closed but the refinery continued operation, using accumulated stockpiles. By 1942 uranium had become a strategic material, the mine was reopened, and the refinery began to produce large quantities of uranium oxide destined for The Manhattan Project. As events unfolded Eldorado was unable to produce sufficient ore from GBL so that a large quantity of ore from the Belgian Congo was also processed at Port Hope. Ultimately, as a result of the efforts of this enterprise, World War II was finally ended by use of atomic weapons. After World War II the

  7. Marie Curie: Physicist and Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Ruth

    Marie Sklodowska was born in Warsaw on November 7, 1867. Girls were not allowed to attend college in Poland, so Marie found a well-paying post as a governess in rural village which she held for three years while helping her older sister complete medical school in Paris. Then Marie moved to Paris and graduated first in her class at the Sorbonne with a master's degree in physics in 1893. In 1895, she married the talented young physicist, Pierre Curie. Marie decided to investigate the radioactive components of the mineral pitchblende for her dissertation. The work involved chemical analysis of a ton of material in an unheated shed. Pierre joined her and at the end of 1898, the Curies announced the discovery of radium and polonium. Through 1899, Marie labored to measure the atomic weight of radium. In 1903, Marie earned her doctorate, the first for a woman in France, and the Curies split the Nobel Prize in Physics with Henri Becquerel. They became widely known, besieged by the press and frequently invited to make presentations and be awarded honors. They hated fame and both suffered bad health. In April, 1906, Pierre Curie was struck by a wagon and killed instantly. Marie was left as a single mother with two young daughters. Fortunately, the Sorbonne hired her to fill Pierre's position. In 1911, she was rejected for membership in the French Academy of Science because she was a woman. Also in 1911, she was accused of having an affair with a married French physicist Paul Langevin. The resulting scandal hit the press and brought angry mobs to her home. In the middle of this hullaballoo, she was informed that she had won a second Nobel Prize, this time in Chemistry. When World War I broke out, Marie mounted x-ray units on cars and became a heroine. She visited the United States in 1921 where President Harding presented her with a gram of radium. She continued her scientific studies in spite of declining health until her death in 1934. Professor Emerita.

  8. Chapter 5-Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.

    2010-01-01

    The ore pitchblende was discovered in the 1750's near Joachimstal in what is now the Czech Republic. Used as a colorant in glazes, uranium was identified in 1789 as the active ingredient by chemist Martin Klaproth. In 1896, French physicist Henri Becquerel studied uranium minerals as part of his investigations into the phenomenon of fluorescence. He discovered a strange energy emanating from the material which he dubbed 'rayons uranique.' Unable to explain the origins of this energy, he set the problem aside. About two years later, a young Polish graduate student was looking for a project for her dissertation. Marie Sklodowska Curie, working with her husband Pierre, picked up on Becquerel's work and, in the course of seeking out more information on uranium, discovered two new elements (polonium and radium) which exhibited the same phenomenon, but were even more powerful. The Curies recognized the energy, which they now called 'radioactivity,' as something very new, requiring a new interpretation, new science. This discovery led to what some view as the 'golden age of nuclear science' (1895-1945) when countries throughout Europe devoted large resources to understand the properties and potential of this material. By World War II, the potential to harness this energy for a destructive device had been recognized and by 1939, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman showed that fission not only released a lot of energy but that it also released additional neutrons which could cause fission in other uranium nuclei leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction and an enormous release of energy. This suggestion was soon confirmed experimentally by other scientists and the race to develop an atomic bomb was on. The rest of the development history which lead to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is well chronicled. After World War II, development of more powerful weapons systems by the United States and the Soviet Union continued to advance nuclear science. It was this defense

  9. Exploitation and use of raw materials resources for manufacturing nuclear fuels. Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, Dan; Nica, Dan Bujor; Iuhas, Tiberius; Muntean, Ioan

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear fuel for Cernavoda Romanian nuclear power plant is based on natural uranium cycle implying mining, concentration-refining and UO 2 manufacturing. For the Uranium National Company securing the raw materials necessary for fuel element manufacturing implies the following sources: - from the production cumulated till the year 2001 in the Security and Consumption Stock; - from the current production of uranium ore. Romania posses two categories of deposits which ensure at present and in the future the uranium ore production: active deposits and production center at Crucea-Botusana; - deposits proposed for the exploitation activity at Tulghes - Grinties. Other two important centers of production in Banat and Bihor ceased the production since 1999 due to the deposit depletion. The uranium reserve of Romania is estimated to 9,233 tones in geological deposits of high confidence level plus 6,344 tones in resources still not searched. The medium- and long-term strategy of CNU to fructify the uranium reserves of Romania is in concordance with the current government policy and is based upon two major investments: - opening a new production unit at Tulghes-Grinties; - Refurbishment of plants R1 and E1. The main amount of uranium currently used for making the needed nuclear fuel comes today from the production center Crucea-Botusana. Here the exploitation is based mainly on pitchblende-rich deposits. Uranium ore processing and concentration is made at 'R' and 'E' plants at Feldioara able to ensure an annual capacity of 300 tones UO 2 . In the assesment of the amount of uranium needed in the nuclear fuel fabrication the degree of uranium recovery was also taken into account. The uranium supply implied by the new electro-nuclear plants to be installed till 2025 was evaluated by taking into account the future advanced fuel solutions, SEU and RU, what will diminish the natural uranium consumption to 55% and 66%, respectively. The price of nuclear fuel has been estimated

  10. Solubility properties of synthetic and natural meta-torbernite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretaz, Fanny; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Clavier, Nicolas; Vitorge, Pierre; Mesbah, Adel; Descostes, Michael; Poinssot, Christophe; Dacheux, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Meta-torbernite, Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2ṡ8H2O, is one of the most common secondary minerals resulting from the alteration of pitchblende. The determination of the thermodynamic data associated to this phase appears to be a crucial step toward the understanding the origin of uranium deposits or to forecast the fate and transport of uranium in natural media. A parallel approach based on the study of both synthetic and natural samples of meta-torbernite (H3O)0.4Cu0.8(UO2)2(PO4)2ṡ7.6H2O was set up to evaluate its solubility constant. The two solids were first thoroughly characterized and compared by means of XRD, SEM, X-EDS analyses, Raman spectroscopy and BET measurements. The solubility constant was then determined in both under- and supersaturated conditions: the obtained value appeared close to logKs,0°(298 K) = -52.9 ± 0.1 whatever the type of experiment and the sample considered. The joint determination of Gibbs free energy (ΔRG°(298 K) = 300 ± 2 kJ mol-1) then allowed the calculation of ΔRH°(298 K) = 40 ± 3 kJ mol-1 and ΔRS°(298 K) = -879 ± 7 J mol-1 K-1. From these values, the thermodynamic data associated with the formation of meta-torbernite (H3O)0.4Cu0.8(UO2)2(PO4)2ṡ7.6H2O were also evaluated and found to be consistent with those previously obtained by calorimetry, showing the reliability of the method developed in this work. Finally, the obtained data were implemented in a calculation code to determine the conditions of meta-torbernite formation in environmental conditions typical of a former mining site. SI=log({Q}/{Ks}) with Q=∏i( where νi is the stoichiometric coefficient (algebraic value) of species i and ai the nonequilibrium activity of i.

  11. Suppression of the radon background by a prototype PICASSO emulsion container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocan, J.; Bocarov, V.; Cermak, P.; Konicek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Stekl, I.; Leroy, C.; Jilek, K.

    2004-01-01

    A new PICASSO droplet detector is under development for its installation at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The concept of the PICASSO experiment rests on an approach consisting of the detection of Cold Dark Matter (CDM) candidate particles, the neutralino in particular, through the use of large mass superheated droplet modular detectors. The sources of background signal for PICASSO detector are gamma rays, mips's, neutrons, radon and alpha particles due to U/Th contamination of the detector and its environment. Droplet detectors have high efficiency for detecting neutrons while being insensitive to mip's, gamma rays when operated at proper temperature and pressure. As in the case of other low background experiments radon is a very important source of background. Radon can diffuse into the detector during fabrication, storage, operation and induce an alpha background by its disintegration. The purpose of our long-term measurement was to define the tightness and penetrability of the PICASSO emulsion container against radon. The PICASSO box has been placed into a bigger plastic box and a Si detector has been installed in both boxes. The source of radon (pitchblende) has been inserted into an outer plastic box to obtain a high level radon environment. Radon monitoring was based on an electrostatic collection of its progeny 218 Po and 214 Po on the Si detector entrance window with spectroscopic counting of alpha particles (e.g. [2]). The spectrometer TAIP was used for a particle energy measurement. The spectrometer was developed at the Czech Technical University in Prague. The spectrometer contains all the spectrometric modules needed for energy measurement as well as the source of voltage for Si detector. It also includes digital memory to save spectra during measurement (up to 1792 spectra). Two long-time tests (2 months and 2.5 months) were performed. Radon concentrations in both containers (the outer plastic box, the PICASSO container) have been measured

  12. Exploration for sandstone- type uranium mineralisation in the Siwaliks of northwestern Himalaya, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarnkar, B.M.; Kothari, P.K.; Umamaheswar, K.; Srinivasan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Siwalik Group with a thickness of about 6000m of fluvial sediments of middle Miocene to Pleistocene age has been explored extensively over two decades for U, using various types of exploration techniques involving air-borne gamma-ray spectrometry, radiation jeep survey, hydrogeochemical survey, ground radiometric survey, radon survey, exploratory drilling and mining, Exploration effort by the Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and Research (AMD) has helped in identifying numerous uranium occurrences spread over the entire Siwalik belt between Poonch (Jammu and Kashmir) in the west and Tanakpur (Uttar Pradesh) in the east, in the northwest Himalaya. Eight significant zones were delineated, mostly confining to distinct stratigraphic horizons of the transition zone between Middle and Upper Siwaliks, and occasionally the transition zone between Lower and Middle Siwaliks. These mineralised zones have a considerable lateral extent of up to 12 km and are associated with sandstones and rarely conglomerates. Uranium mineralisation occurs in the form of peneconcordant lensoidal bodies with individual lenses traceable from a few tens of metres to 700m, sub-parallel to strike or dip, with average grades varying from 0.020 - 0.060% U 3 O 8 and thickness less than a metre to 4m. The host rock of uranium mineralisation is predominantly sandstone containing carbonaceous matter, pyrite and clay pellets. The sandstone is often arkosic and micaceous, and termed as lithic wacke and arkosic wacke. The uranium minerals present are uraninite, pitchblende, coffinite and secondary minerals such as tyuyamunite, metatyuyamunite, uranophane, bayleyite, andersonite, schoepite, liebegite, swartzite, schroekingerite, wulfenite, billictite, betauranophane, autunite and torbernite. Relatively higher concentrations or Se, Mo, Cu, Co, V and Au have been noted in a few uranirerous zones. Concentration or uranium in the Siwalik clastic sediments is controlled by the redox interface

  13. Liquid scintillation for NORM in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moebius, Siegurd; Moebius, Rolf; Bartenbach, Martin; Ramamonjisoa, Tiana

    2008-01-01

    Natural radionuclides of Radium, Lead and Polonium are trapped along with crude oil and gas and accumulate as scale deposits on equipment in the oil industries. Problems arise by residues and sludge where such Norm often becomes concentrated during the process of extraction, transport, and storage of crude oil. Additionally, Radon is accumulated in natural gas or is co extracted into oil as organic phase where it equilibrates with its Progenies. Thus Norm creates a possible hazard to workers both by external radiation exposure and internal due to incorporation during intervention work, and to the environment due to waste disposal. The determination of 222 Rn, 226,228 Ra, 210 Pb, and 210 Po in the various production stages is a precondition for an efficient Radiation Protection Management. We have studied the applicability of Liquid Scintillation L S for the measurement of NORM in the oil and gas industry. Our investigations show that 226 Ra may be quantified by L S in solid scale deposits as carbonate and sulphate after grinding and as carbonate additionally after dissolution. Then, an organic L S scintillation cocktail like Betaplate Scint is added and the sample stored for Rn equilibration. While 222 Rn is quantitatively extracted from the solution, only 20 to 30% are emanated as free Rn from the powder into the organic phase. Emanation yield versus grain size and sample amount has been studied using synthetic Ra/Ca-carbonate powder and grinded Pitchblende ore samples. 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb in carbonate may be determined by α/β-discriminating L S after dissolution, mutual separation on Radium Rad Disk filters and final elution with DHC and EDTA. From these results the isotopic ratio of Radium isotopes in the different scale fractions may be determined. 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb in production and waste waters may be quantified accordingly. Radon in oil fractions has been measured as 0.1 to 2% solution in Betaplate Scint with sensitivity down to 5 Bq/l. From

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of uranium in evaporation basin sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M. C.; Morris, D. E.; Hunter, D. B.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), CA, used for the containment of irrigation drainage waters contain elevated levels of uranium (U) resulting from the extensive leaching by carbonate-rich irrigation waters of the local agricultural soils that contain low levels of naturally-occurring U. The SJV ponds are subjected to changes in redox chemistry with cycles of drying and flooding. Our past studies have shown that U in the SJV Pond 14 surface sediments is present as mostly the oxidized and soluble form, U(VI). However, we were uncertain whether the U in the soil was only present as a U oxide of mixed stoichiometry, such as U 3O 8(s) (pitchblende) or other species. Here we present characterization information, which includes wet chemical and in situ spectroscopic techniques (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and low temperature time-resolved luminescence spectroscopies) for samples from two SJV Pond sediments. Surface sediments from SJV Pond 16 were characterized for average oxidation state of U with XANES spectroscopy. The fraction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the Pond 16 sediments decreased with depth with U(IV) being the dominant oxidation state in the 5 cm to 15 cm depth. Two luminescent U(VI) species were identified in the surface sediments from Pond 14; a U(VI)-tricarbonate phase and another phase likely comprised of U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate. The luminescent U(VI) population in the Pond 16 sediments is dominated by species with comparable spectral characteristics to the U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate species found in the Pond 14 sediments. The luminescence spectroscopic results were complemented by wet chemical U leaching methods, which involved the use of carbonate and sulfuric acid solutions and oxidizing solutions of peroxide, hypochlorite and Mn(IV). Leaching was shown to decrease the total U concentration in the sediments in all cases. However, results from luminescence studies of the residual fraction in the leached

  15. The natural radioactivity in the Serido Pegmatite Province - Rio Grande do Norte State (Brazil): assessment and monitoring of water's source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Thomas F.C; Petta, Reinaldo A.; Malanca, Alberto; Guimaraes Guedes, Anderson; Pastura, Valeria F.S.; Sindern, Sven

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This abstract show the preliminary considerations of a study accomplished on the radioactive minerals, primary and secondary uranium minerals that occur in the pegmatites of the Serido Region, State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil and their influence on the several sources of water provision and on population nuclei of the area from the municipal district of Parelhas and Ecuador. In general, the pegmatite from the area of Ecuador-Parelhas present high environmental radioactivity so much due to the dispersed uranium in the crystalline structure of minerals (columbite-tantalite, albite, microcline, quartz, phosphate minerals, tourmaline, lepidolite and apatite), as primary and secondary uranium minerals (uraninite, pitchblende, gummite, autunite, torbernite, and uranium-bearing opal, etc.). These uranium minerals appear associates to the fracture and voids in the pegmatite and in the tourmaline-bearing granite. These minerals were identified by petrography, X-Rays diffraction, ultraviolet fluorescence analysis, infrared spectroscopy, radioactivity (HPGe gamma spectrometry), thermal behavior and chemical analysis (ICP-MS and AAS, Microprobe). Geochemistry and hydrochemistry preliminary environmental studies on the pegmatites bodies from Serido Region show gamma radiation level which between 150 to 30.000 cps; uranium (U 3 O 8 ) and thorium (ThO 2 ) content in Columbite-Tantalite (and/or polycrase) varying between 0,3% - 3,0% and 0,1% - 0,5% respectively, and the coating existent in these minerals show uranium contents varying between 20% to 60%. While the soil samples gathered in Ecuador/Parelhas districts show an average activity of 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 40 K of 27.1/39.1; 33.74/48.5; 260.1/234.8 (Bq.kg -1 , dry-weight), respectively, and the corresponding kerma rate (l) in air are 50 and 67 nGyh -1 ], suggesting that the acid underground waters and others oxidizers attack and dissolve the radioactive minerals from pegmatite, generating solutions rich in U 6

  16. The origin of the Avram Iancu U-Ni-Co-Bi-As mineralization, Băiţa (Bihor) metallogenic district, Bihor Mts., Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajzon, Norbert; Szentpéteri, Krisztián; Szakáll, Sándor; Kristály, Ferenc

    2015-10-01

    The Băiţa metallogenic district in the Bihor Mountains is a historically important mining area in Romania. Uranium mining took place between 1952 and 1998 from various deposits, but very little is known about the geology and mineralogy of these deposits. In this paper, we describe geology and mineralogy of uranium mineralization of the Avram Iancu uranium mine from waste dump samples collected before complete remediation of the site. Texturally and mineralogically complex assemblages of nickeline, cobaltite-gersdorffite solid solution, native Bi, Bi-sulfosalts, molybdenite, and pyrite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite occur with uraninite, "pitchblende," and brannerite in most of the ore samples. The association of nickel, cobalt, and arsenic with uranium is reminiscent of five-element association of vein type U-Ni-Co-Bi-As deposits; however, the Avram Iancu ores appear to be more replacement-type stratiform/stratabound. Avram Iancu ore samples contain multistage complex, skarn, uranium sulfide, arsenide assemblages that can be interpreted to have been formed in the retrograde cooling stages of the skarn hydrothermal system. This mineralizing system may have built-up along Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene "Banatite" intrusions of diorite-to-granite composition. The intrusions crosscut the underlying uraniferous Permian formations in the stacked NW-verging Biharia Nappe System. The mineralization forms stacked, multilayer replacement horizons, along carbonate-rich lithologies within the metavolcanic (tuffaceous) Muncel Series. Mineral paragenesis and some mineral chemistry suggest moderate-to-high <450, i.e., 350-310 °C, formation temperatures for the uranium sulfide stage along stratigraphically controlled replacement zones and minor veins. Uranium minerals formed abundantly in this early stage and include botryoidal, sooty and euhedral uraninite, brannerite, and coffinite. Later and/or lower-temperature mineral assemblages include heterogeneous, complexly zoned arsenide

  17. Techniques Currently Used in Uranium Prospecting in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, H. W.; Smith, A. Y. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada)

    1969-03-15

    The sequence of existing practice in the search for uranium deposits in Canada begins with the establishment of a factual classification of types of uranium deposits and the criteria for recognition of the geological environment favourable to each type. The next step is the careful appraisal of geological maps and reports to determine regions and, more specifically, rock formations in which these criteria exist. Guidelines in the selection of such areas were given in a recent Geological Survey paper by S M. Roscoe. In most areas, once a favourable region or formation is selected, initial field investigation is preceded by an airborne scintillometer or airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey. Detailed geological mapping is usually done, particularly by the larger companies, with special attention to the cause of anomalies. The form of geological studies is dependent on the type of uranium deposit, in the Elliot Lake area sedimentological studies comprise the mam guidelines in the search for ore whereas structural interpretation is the keynote in such areas as Uranium City. Detailed scintillometer grid surveys on the ground are used subsequently to pinpoint the targets to be surface trenched or diamond drilled. The drilling pattern is also governed by the type of deposit. Down-hole scintillometer probes are used to extrapolate data obtained by more costly chemical assays. Research is being conducted, both by private industry and by the Geological Survey of Canada, into improved design and sensitivity of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry, and airborne magnetometers. The Geological Survey is testing AFMAG equipment, and plans to cover the Uranium City area, where pitchblende-bearing veins are in or close to faults. Geochemical research is being undertaken on the behaviour of uranium ions, in stream sediments, in soils, and in surface waters, relative to their use in prospecting for uranium deposits. Recent analyses for radon in surface waters has shown a closer

  18. Review and interpretation of previous work and new data on the hydrogeology of the Schwartzwalder Uranium Mine and vicinity, Jefferson County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Wild, Emily C.

    2011-01-01

    The Schwartzwalder deposit is the largest known vein type uranium deposit in the United States. Located about eight miles northwest of Golden, Colorado it occurs in Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and was formed by hydrothermal fluid flow, mineralization, and deformation during the Laramide Orogeny. A complex brittle fault zone hosts the deposit comprising locally brecciated carbonate, oxide, and sulfide minerals. Mining of pitchblende, the primary ore mineral, began in 1953 and an extensive network of underground workings was developed. Mine dewatering, treatment of the effluent and its discharge into the adjacent Ralston Creek was done under State permit from about 1990 through about 2008. Mining and dewatering ceased in 2000 and natural groundwater rebound has filled the mine workings to a current elevation that is above Ralston Creek but that is still below the lowest ground level adit. Water in the 'mine pool' has concentrations of dissolved uranium in excess of 1,000 times the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standard of 30 milligrams per liter. Other dissolved constituents such as molybdenum, radium, and sulfate are also present in anomalously high concentrations. Ralston Creek flows in a narrow valley containing Quaternary alluvium predominantly derived from weathering of crystalline bedrock including local mineralized rock. Just upstream of the mine site, two capped and unsaturated waste rock piles with high radioactivity sit on an alluvial terrace. As Ralston Creek flows past the mine site, a host of dissolved metal concentrations increase. Ralston Creek eventually discharges into Ralston Reservoir about 2.5 miles downstream. Because of highly elevated uranium concentrations, the State of Colorado issued an enforcement action against the mine permit holder requiring renewed collection and treatment of alluvial groundwater. As part of planned mine reclamation, abundant data were collected and compiled into a report by Wyman and Effner

  19. A study of contaminated soils near Crucea-Botus, ana uranium mine (East Carpathians, Romania): metal distribution and partitioning of natural actinides with implications for vegetation uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, L.; Bilal, E.

    2012-04-01

    Between 1962 and 2009, National Company of Uranium - CNU, the former Romanian Rare Metals Mining Company, mined over 1,200,000 tones of pitchblende ore in the East Carpathians (Crucea-Botušana area, Bistrita Mountains). The exploration and mining facilities include 32 adits, situated between 780 and 1040 m above sea level. Radioactive waste resulted from mining are disposed next to the mining facilities. Mine dumps (32) cover an area of 364,000 square meters and consist of waste rock (rocks with sub-economic mineralization) and gangue minerals. Older dumps (18) have been already naturally reclaimed by forest vegetation, which played an important role in stabilizing the waste dump cover and in slowing down the uranium migration processes. The soils samples have been collected from different mine dumps in the Crucea-Botušana uranium deposit, mainly from 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 1/30 and 950 mine waste galleries. Soil samples were collected from the upper part and slope at each mine dump, from the vegetation root zones. Total uranium concentration in soils collected from Crucea-Botušana site ranged from 6.10 to 680.70 ppm, with a mean of 52.48 ppm (dry wt.). Total thorium varies between 7.70 and 115.30 ppm (dry wt.). This indicates that the adsorption of the radioactive elements by the soils is high and variable, influenced by the ore dump - sample relationship. The sequential extraction has emphasized the fact that the uranium is associated with all the mineral fractions present in the soil samples. A great percentage of U can be found in the carbonate (21.77%), organic (15.04%) and oxides fractions (15.88%) - in accordance with the high absorbed/adsorbed properties of this element. The percentage of uranium detected in the exchangeable fraction is rather small - 2.16%. It is also to be expected that the uranium should be irreversible adsorbed by the organic matter and by the clay minerals due to its ionic radius and to its positive charge. The fact that 21.77% of the

  20. Exploration and uranium mining in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, M.

    2014-01-01

    features are important in trapping the mineralisation which is often of roll front type, either reduced consisting in pitchblende and coffinite (Akouta, Arlit, Afasto, Madaouela) or oxidized (Imouraren). The main exploration companies of Uranium in the basin of Tim Mersoï (Northern Iullemenden) are: • AREVA-Niger for the uranium-bearing prospecting permits of Imouraren, Afouday, Agebout; • Cominak for the uranium-bearing prospecting permit Western Afasto; • NorthWestern Mineral Ventures Inc for the uranium-bearing prospecting permits Irhazer and Ingal; • North Atlantic Resources Ltd. for the uranium-bearing prospecting permit Abélajouad; • CNUC for the uranium-bearing permit of Tiguida • Goviex for uranium permit of Madaouéla; • International Uranium Ltd for the uranium-bearing prospecting permits of Agelal I, II, III, IV and Aserka I, II, III, IV; • Total Uranium Corporation for the licences of Chock Negouran I, II, III and IV; • Trend Field Holding SA for the uranium-bearing prospecting permits Tagaza II and IV. (author)

  1. A new genetic interpretation for the Caotaobei uranium deposit associated with the shoshonitic volcanic rocks in the Hecaokeng ore field, southern Jiangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sheng Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Combined with in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS zircon UPb geochronology, published and unpublished literature on the Caotaobei uranium deposit in southern Jiangxi province, China, is re-examined to provide an improved understanding of the origin of the main ore (103 Ma. The Caotaobei deposit lies in the Hecaokeng ore field and is currently one of China's largest, volcanic-related uranium producers. Unlike commonly known volcanogenic uranium deposits throughout the world, it is spatially associated with intermediate lavas with a shoshonitic composition. Uranium mineralization (pitchblende occurs predominantly as veinlets, disseminations, and massive ores, hosted by the cryptoexplosive breccias rimming the Caotaobei crater. Zircons from one latite define four distinct 206Pb/238U age groups at 220–235 Ma (Triassic, 188 Ma (Early Jurassic, 131–137 Ma (Early Cretaceous, and 97–103 Ma (Early-Late Cretaceous transition, hereafter termed mid-Cretaceous. The integrated age (134 ± 2 Ma of Early Cretaceous zircons (group III is interpreted as representing the time of lava emplacement. The age data, together with the re-examination of literature, does not definitively support a volcanogenic origin for the generation of the deposit, which was proposed by the previous workers based mainly on the close spatial relationship and the age similarity between the main ore and volcanic lavas. Drill core and grade-control data reveal that rich concentrations of primary uranium ore are common around the granite porphyry dikes cutting the lavas, and that the cryptoexplosive breccias away from the dikes are barren or unmineralized. These observations indicate that the emplacement of the granite porphyries exerts a fundamental control on ore distribution and thus a genetic link exists between main-stage uranium mineralization and the intrusions of the dikes. Zircon overgrowths of mid-Cretaceous age (99.6

  2. El proyecto de El Berrocal: síntesis preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardillo, J.

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available El Berrocal is an international research project on the natural radionuclide migration in a fissured granitic environment. This project is being carried out in the El Berrocal zone, north of the village of Nombela (Toledo. The gelogical formation studied is a granitic pluton with an epithermal vein-type mineralization comprising quartz, sphalerite, pyrite and chalcopyrite; and pitchblende, pyrite, carbonates and barite. The activities of the project are focused on the structural, lithological, geochemical, hydrochemical and hydrogeological aspects of the granite-U mineralization system, in order to establish a migration model of the natural radionuclides of the environment. The concurrence of the tectonic, hydrothermal and supergenic processes has originated several U remobilizations during the deuteric, hydrothermal and supergenic alteration phases, which affected the system. These phases are responsible of the mineralogical species and present distribution of this element within the system. The Th remobilization is much more limited, due to its different geochemical behavior. The present water-rock interaction processes account for the different types of water existing in the system, which are sulphatic, in the shallowest zones, and calcium bicarbonated in the deepest. The U contents in these waters vary from 1 to 100 ppb. The hydrogeology of the zone is controlled, at a local scale, by the topography and the fracture network, and the mineralized quartz dyke plays a major role on the groundwater flow. The isotopic analyses of the U and Th series in the infill materials seem to indicate recent sorption-desorption U processes and coprecipitation with carbonates.«El Berrocal», es un proyecto internacional de investigación sobre la migración de radionucleidos naturales en un medio granítico fisurado. Este proyecto se está desarrollando en la zona de El Berrocal, situada al norte de Nombela (Toledo, en un plutón granítico con una

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Burma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    There is no information on production of nuclear raw materials in Burma, although there are some uranium occurrences. Hunting Geophysics Ltd has done some aerial prospecting work in the area of Victoria Point in Southern Burma. All the data collected has been plotted on several maps and issued to various Burmese organizations, with a complete report. The follow-up ground exploration was done by a prospecting party headed by Dr Gjelsvik. The Hunting Geophysics' and Dr Gjelsvik reports are not available in the IAEA. The Raw Materials Division in the Union of Burma Atomic Energy Center commenced operations in 1955. The area of Mogok was selected by U Soo Win, the head of the Division, as most favourable for uranium exploration. The region is mountainous, with heavy forest cover. A ground gamma-ray survey was carried out in Mogok Mineral Belt by two geologists accompanied by two assistants, at a spacing of one km. This work showed monazite in all streams over an area of about 150 sq km and has given a detailed studies led to the discovery of some uraninite and pitchblende in the overburden of an old lode. Based, on these first discoveries the Government of Burma requested assistance from the IAEA and an expert was sent there for a period of one year. His field work was mainly limited in the Mogok Mineral Belt, however some reconnaissance field trips were made in other parts of the country. Dr D L Searle concluded that the Mogok area represents a zone of high temperature mineralization but a lower temperature form of uranium mineralization may have developed along the outer edges of the principal high grade zone. He recommended that the area between the Mogok scarp and the Shweli River be systematically traversed. Uranium bearing minerals in Burma are the following: monazite bearing beach sands near Amherst, Tenasserim; monazite placers from near Momeik, Northern Shan States; uraninte crystals from the gem-gravels around Mogok; a radioactive anomaly in syenite at

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Burma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-10-15

    There is no information on production of nuclear raw materials in Burma, although there are some uranium occurrences. Hunting Geophysics Ltd has done some aerial prospecting work in the area of Victoria Point in Southern Burma. All the data collected has been plotted on several maps and issued to various Burmese organizations, with a complete report. The follow-up ground exploration was done by a prospecting party headed by Dr Gjelsvik. The Hunting Geophysics' and Dr Gjelsvik reports are not available in the IAEA. The Raw Materials Division in the Union of Burma Atomic Energy Center commenced operations in 1955. The area of Mogok was selected by U Soo Win, the head of the Division, as most favourable for uranium exploration. The region is mountainous, with heavy forest cover. A ground gamma-ray survey was carried out in Mogok Mineral Belt by two geologists accompanied by two assistants, at a spacing of one km. This work showed monazite in all streams over an area of about 150 sq km and has given a detailed studies led to the discovery of some uraninite and pitchblende in the overburden of an old lode. Based, on these first discoveries the Government of Burma requested assistance from the IAEA and an expert was sent there for a period of one year. His field work was mainly limited in the Mogok Mineral Belt, however some reconnaissance field trips were made in other parts of the country. Dr D L Searle concluded that the Mogok area represents a zone of high temperature mineralization but a lower temperature form of uranium mineralization may have developed along the outer edges of the principal high grade zone. He recommended that the area between the Mogok scarp and the Shweli River be systematically traversed. Uranium bearing minerals in Burma are the following: monazite bearing beach sands near Amherst, Tenasserim; monazite placers from near Momeik, Northern Shan States; uraninte crystals from the gem-gravels around Mogok; a radioactive anomaly in syenite at

  5. Iron oxi-hydroxides characterization and associated elements (S, Se, As, Mo, V, Zr) in the redox environments favorable for uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Tony

    2015-01-01

    zirconium content in oxi-hydroxides from Niger deposit, volcanic source. This typical mobility of zirconium is particularly expressed in the uranium front in Ebba deposit by the precipitation of authigenic crystals of zircon contemporary of pitchblende. The mineralogical and geochemical data obtained in this work on the Zoovch Ovoo deposit (Mongolia) allow us to propose an original model for its formation: uranium did not precipitate massively in upstream edge of front, because not radiation halo is visible in cathodoluminescence in detrital minerals in the oxidized area. Uranium precipitated when the oxidizing water met with sedimentary facies having a fairly strong reducing power to allow uranium reduction. The precipitation occurs in a particular location of the formation: paleo-lake where organic matter and pyrite are abundant. (author)

  6. Geochemical elements mobility during the history of a paleo-Proterozoic clastic sedimentary basin, the Athabasca Basin (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kister, P.

    2003-10-01

    episodes of U deposition (during which U has been brought to the U orebody), and the episodes of remobilization, during which U oxides have partly or totally lost their radiogenic lead. Summary of the results: Some elements have remained immobile (Zr) since their initial sedimentary deposition, or were transferred from one phase to another (Al, Th). Other elements have been transported during fluid flow events that occurred: (1) on a basin wide scale during diagenesis (REE, Y, Sr, Fe), (2) at the unconformity and in the vicinity of the fault zones that represent preferential fluid flow pathways between the basement and the sandstone cover (U, Ni, As, B, Mg, K, Fe, Sr, REE). The successive tectonic events related to the geodynamical context that lead to the formation of the high-grade U concentrations (1460 Ma, 1335 Ma and 1275 Ma in the McArthur River deposit), did not however systematically occur in the whole basin (1275 Ma only in the Shea Creek deposit), (3) during the late fault reactivation events associated with the basin uplift (U, Pb, Ni, S, Sr, REE), which caused the partial remobilization of the uranium oxides. 4 main processes of remobilization have been evidenced: cationic substitution, recrystallization, dissolution and/or redeposition as pitchblende. The exceptionally high grade and tonnages of some deposits seem to be related to a larger number of U depositional events and to a less intense later remobilization. U, Pb as well as Y and REE, considered as chemical analogue of long-life radionuclides present in nuclear waste (Am, Cm), have been proved to be mobile during the history of the Athabasca basin. However their mobility results from conditions that are by far too catastrophic for a deep geological nuclear waste disposal (high permeability, tectonic activity, redox interface, chloride brines, great depth, very long time scales). (author)

  7. Exploration for uranium in the Bhima basin in parts of Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, S.A.; Natarajan, V.; Dhana Raju, R.

    2002-01-01

    Bhima basin, the smallest and youngest Purana (Meso-/Neo-proterozoic) basin of India, is known for huge reserves of quality-limestone that supports a large-scale cement industry in it. But for this, it remained for long as a 'terra incognita' for mineral exploration including radioactive minerals till the discovery of notable uranium mineralisation, first in a phosphatic limestone/calcitic phosphorite near Ukinal in 1995 and later a better-grade in a non-phosphatic, brecciated limestone at Gogi in 1996. Though the former was recorded intermittently for nearly 700m near Ukinal, detailed (sub-surface) exploration was not done, since U is mostly in the adsorbed form with collophane. On the contrary, the latter is promising, since ore microscopic study on a uraniferous sample from Gogi has pointed to hydrothermal vein-type mineralisation in the form of easily leachable coffinite and pitchblende that are intimately associated with reductants of organic matter and pyrite-dominant sulphides. Semi-detailed survey at Gogi was not of much help to prove the extension of mineralisation due to constraints like very few outcrops, soil-cover, vegetation, a big village and a large lake close by. At this juncture, resort was made to a novel technique of gamma-ray logging of nearly 30 drinking water borewells in the village, Gogi, and this proved highly rewarding as the data documented the presence of U-mineralisation of medium-grade and notable thickness. Subsequent multi disciplined and multifaceted exploration, including subsurface, mostly by core-drilling since May, 1997 with an aggregate of nearly 24,000m at Gogi, has established that (a) the rocks hosting hydrothermal vein type U-mineralisation are brecciated limestone (Shahabad formation) and deformed basement granitoid within a post-sedimentary tectonised zone, (b) the mineralisation in limestone (i) occurs as hangwall and footwall bands, (ii) has a strike extension of nearly 2 km with both ends still open, (iii) extends

  8. Origen, transporte y deposición del uranio en los yacimientos en pizarras de la provincia de Salamanca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arribas, A.

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The numerous U deposits occurring in the schist-graywacke complex (CEG of the Iberian Peninsula, characterized by the mineral association carbonates, pitchblende (coffinite, adularia and Fe sulphides, have both a considerable economic importance and a high metallogenic interest as their origin has not been convincingly explained yet. In fact, since 1959,these mineralizations have been successively attributed lo the concentration of U in fractured and brecciated zones of the schists due to one of these processes : magmatic, by transportation of U in hydrotermal fluids related to the evolution and emplacement of the Hercynian granites; supergenic , by the release of U from the Hercynian granites during the weathering and erosion processes which gave place to the Pliocene peneplain; segregation, by leachin, g of U from plutonic rocks under the effects of late- and /or post-Hercynian tectonic movements; and diffusion, by concentration of U from fertile metasediments by thermal diffusion or hydrothermal flow.
    In this paper, taking into account field and laboratory studies carried out recently in the FE mine, so far the most important Spanish U deposit of this kind, the above mentioned hypothesis are discussed and the main metallogenic features of the orebody are given, Among these, the most significant are: the high geochemica1 U content, 30 to 200 ppm, of the CEG carbonaceous slates prevalent in the area; the nature and alteration processes, chloritization and hematitization, of the host rocks; the radiometrie age of the pitchblende 37 to 57 m. y.; the low temperature mineral association; the peculiar gravitational textures of the ore minerals; the temperature and salinity of the fluid inc1usions of the carbonates, ranging from 230º to less than 70º C, and from 0 to 25% NaCl equiv , respectively; and the shallow tectonic activity giving place to the hydraulic fracturing and fault breccias controlling the ore deposition. Finally, he FE

  9. Alteration of uraniferous and native copper concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Styles, M.T.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Kemp, S.J. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-01

    very variable, both from one sample to another and from one point on a sample to another. This study largely confirms the observations reported in the pilot study. The alteration of the copper is dominated by copper oxides. This the earliest alteration product observed and comprises principally cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O), with probable minor tenorite (CuO). The cuprite typically forms colloform layers on the copper surface, and localised lobate embayments or corrosion pits that 'eat' more deeply into the copper metal. Microchemical observations reveal evidence for the enrichment of copper in the mudstone matrix immediately adjacent to the altered copper sheets. The copper concentration drops from around 100% in the cuprite rims of the sheets down to around 1 wt % over a distance of about 20 gm from the altered sheets. With increasing distances away from the sheets there is a more gradual decrease in copper concentration over distances of 100-200 {mu}m to the local background level of the host rock - which may be as high as 2-3 wt % in some places but is generally of the order of 0. 1 wt % Cu{sub 2}0. The high copper concentration could be due to redistribution of copper from the corroded sheets. Alternatively, it could represent a diffusive 'halo' of copper enhancement around the original mineralised structure (bedding laminae or fracture) that formed at the same time as the copper sheets. In both cases, the observations indicate that diffusion occurred over distances of only a few hundreds of micro metres in the mudstone or siltstone matrix. The uraniferous 'fish-eye' concretions contain high concentration of uranium within their cores. Most of the uranium is concentrated in the outer edges of the dark vanadium-rich core of the concretion and subsequent concentric bands of vanadium enriched diffusion bands, and associated fin-like structures. Here, it is present largely as uranium silicate and subordinate uraninite (pitchblende), closely

  10. Canada's regulatory framework: The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper will discuss the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and Canada's Regulatory Framework with respect to Low- and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste. The management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste must be ensured in a consistent, environmentally responsible and economical manner throughout its lifecycle -- from its production to the final disposal option. Radioactive waste has been produced in Canada since the early 1930s when the first radium/uranium mine began operating at Port Radium in the Northwest Territories. Pitchblende ore was transported from the Port Radium mine to Port Hope, Ontario where it was refined to produce radium for medical purposes. At present, radioactive waste is generated in Canada from the various stages and uses associated with the nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining/milling to nuclear reactor operations to radioisotope manufacture and use. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment; and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The CNSC was established in 2000 under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. The CNSC was created to replace the former Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), which was founded in 1946. Under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, CNSC's mandate involves four major areas: regulation of the development, production and use of nuclear energy in Canada to protect health, safety and the environment; regulation of the production, possession, use and transport of nuclear substances, and the production, possession and use of prescribed equipment and prescribed information; implementation of measures respecting international control of the development, production, transport and use of nuclear energy and substances, including measures respecting the

  11. Alteration of uraniferous and native copper concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Styles, M.T.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Kemp, S.J.

    2002-03-01

    very variable, both from one sample to another and from one point on a sample to another. This study largely confirms the observations reported in the pilot study. The alteration of the copper is dominated by copper oxides. This the earliest alteration product observed and comprises principally cuprite (Cu 2 O), with probable minor tenorite (CuO). The cuprite typically forms colloform layers on the copper surface, and localised lobate embayments or corrosion pits that 'eat' more deeply into the copper metal. Microchemical observations reveal evidence for the enrichment of copper in the mudstone matrix immediately adjacent to the altered copper sheets. The copper concentration drops from around 100% in the cuprite rims of the sheets down to around 1 wt % over a distance of about 20 gm from the altered sheets. With increasing distances away from the sheets there is a more gradual decrease in copper concentration over distances of 100-200 μm to the local background level of the host rock - which may be as high as 2-3 wt % in some places but is generally of the order of 0. 1 wt % Cu 2 0. The high copper concentration could be due to redistribution of copper from the corroded sheets. Alternatively, it could represent a diffusive 'halo' of copper enhancement around the original mineralised structure (bedding laminae or fracture) that formed at the same time as the copper sheets. In both cases, the observations indicate that diffusion occurred over distances of only a few hundreds of micro metres in the mudstone or siltstone matrix. The uraniferous 'fish-eye' concretions contain high concentration of uranium within their cores. Most of the uranium is concentrated in the outer edges of the dark vanadium-rich core of the concretion and subsequent concentric bands of vanadium enriched diffusion bands, and associated fin-like structures. Here, it is present largely as uranium silicate and subordinate uraninite (pitchblende), closely associated with copper, nickel and cobalt