WorldWideScience

Sample records for pioneer space probes

  1. Roots: The Life Space Pioneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrienne Brant

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to education and youth work were transformed by two psychologists who came to the United States as Hitler rose to power. Practical theorist Kurt Lewin challenged mechanistic ideas of behavior by studying children in their natural "life space." Theory practitioner Fritz Redl applied life space concepts to work with…

  2. Roots: The Life Space Pioneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrienne Brant

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to education and youth work were transformed by two psychologists who came to the United States as Hitler rose to power. Practical theorist Kurt Lewin challenged mechanistic ideas of behavior by studying children in their natural "life space." Theory practitioner Fritz Redl applied life space concepts to work with troubled…

  3. Pioneers in Astronomy and Space Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The pioneers of astronomy and space exploration have advanced humankind's understanding of the universe. These individuals include earthbound theorists such as Aristotle, Ptolemy, and Galileo, as well as those who put their lives on the line travelling into the great unknown. Readers chronicle the lives of individuals positioned at the vanguard of astronomical discovery, laying the groundwork for space exploration past, present, and yet to come.

  4. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  5. In-Space Manufacturing: Pioneering a Sustainable Path to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide meaningful impacts to exploration technology needs, the In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) Initiative must influence exploration systems design now. In-space manufacturing offers: dramatic paradigm shift in the development and creation of space architectures; efficiency gain and risk reduction for low Earth orbit and deep space exploration; and "pioneering" approach to maintenance, repair, and logistics leading to sustainable, affordable supply chain model. In order to develop application-based capabilities in time to support NASA budget and schedule, ISM must be able to leverage the significant commercial developments, which requires innovative, agile collaborative mechanisms (contracts, challenges, SBIR's, etc.); and NASA-unique investments to focus primarily on adapting the technologies and processes to the microgravity environment. We must do the foundational work - it is the critical path for taking these technologies from lab curiosities to institutionalized capabilities: characterize, certify, institutionalize, design for Additive Manufacturing (AM). Ideally, International Space Station (ISS) U.S. lab rack or partial rack space should be identified for in-space manufacturing utilization in order to continue technology development of a suite of capabilities required for exploration missions, as well as commercialization on ISS.

  6. Implications of the Pioneer Anomaly for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Defrere, Denis

    2005-01-01

    The Doppler tracking data from two deep-space spacecraft, Pioneer 10 and 11, show an anomalous blueshift, which has been dubbed the “Pioneer anomaly”. The effect is most commonly interpreted as a real deceleration of the spacecraft - an interpretation that faces serious challenges from planetary ephemerides. The Pioneer anomaly could as well indicate an unknown effect on the radio signal itself. Several authors have made suggestions how such a blueshift could be related to cosmology. We consi...

  7. Lunar Probe Reaches Deep Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ China's second lunar probe, Chang'e-2, has reached an orbit 1.5 million kilometers from Earth for an additional mission of deep space exploration, the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense announced.

  8. The Contribution of Thermal Effects to the Acceleration of the Deep-Space Pioneer Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Páramos, Jorge; Gil, Paulo J S

    2012-01-01

    A method for the computation of the radiative momentum transfer in the Pioneer 10 & 11 spacecraft due to the diffusive and specular components of reflection is presented. The method provides a reliable estimate of the thermal contribution to the acceleration of these deep space probes and allows for a Monte-Carlo analysis from which an estimate of the impact of a possible variability of the parameters. It is shown that the whole anomalous acceleration can be explained by thermal effects. The model also allows one to estimate the expected time evolution of the acceleration due to thermal effects. The issue of thermal conduction between the different components of the spacecraft is discussed and confirmed to be negligible.

  9. The birth of NASA the work of the Space Task Group, America's first true space pioneers

    CERN Document Server

    von Ehrenfried, Dutch

    2016-01-01

    This is the story of the work of the original NASA space pioneers; men and women who were suddenly organized in 1958 from the then National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) into the Space Task Group. A relatively small group, they developed the initial mission concept plans and procedures for the U. S. space program. Then they boldly built hardware and facilities to accomplish those missions. The group existed only three years before they were transferred to the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, in 1962, but their organization left a large mark on what would follow. Von Ehrenfried's personal experience with the STG at Langley uniquely positions him to describe the way the group was structured and how it reacted to the new demands of a post-Sputnik era. He artfully analyzes how the growing space program was managed and what techniques enabled it to develop so quickly from an operations perspective. The result is a fascinating window into history, amply backed up by first person documentation ...

  10. FIREBALL-2: Pioneering Space UV Baryon Mapping (Lead Institution)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher

    This is the lead proposal of a multi-institutional submission. The Faint Intergalactic-medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) is designed to discover and map faint emission from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) for low redshift galaxies. This balloon is a modification of FIREBall-1 (FB-1), a path-finding mission built by our team with two successful flights. FB-1 provided the strongest constrains on IGM emission available from any instrument at the time. FIREBall-2 has been significantly upgraded compared to FB-1, and is nearly ready for integration and testing before an anticipated Spring 2016 launch from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. The spectrograph has been redesigned and an upgraded detector system including a groundbreaking high QE, low-noise, UV CCD detector is under final testing and will improve instrument performance by more than an order of magnitude. CNES is providing the spectrograph, gondola, and flight support team, with construction of all components nearly complete. The initial FIREBall-2 launch is now scheduled for Spring 2016. FIREBall-2 combines several innovations: -First ever multi-object UV spectrograph -Arcsecond quality balloon pointing system, developed from scratch, improved from FB-1 -Partnership of national space agencies (NASA & CNES); highly leveraged NASA resources -A Schmidt corrector built into the UV grating for better optical performance and throughput -A total of four women trained in space experimental astrophysics, including 3 Columbia Ph.Ds. and 1 Caltech Ph.D. -A total of 7 graduate students trained on FIREBall-1 (3) and FIREBall-2 (4), with opportunities for more in future flights. FIREBall-2 will test key technologies and science strategies for a future mission to map IGM emission. Its flights will provide important training for the next generation of space astrophysicists working in UV instrumentation. Most importantly, FIREBall-2 will detect emission from the CGM of nearby galaxies, providing the first census of the

  11. In-Space Manufacturing: Pioneering a Sustainable Path to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    ISM is responsible for developing the on-demand manufacturing capabilities that will be required for affordable, sustainable operations during Exploration Missions (in-transit and on-surface) to destinations such as Mars. This includes advancing the needed technologies, as well as establishing the skills & processes (such as certification and characterization) that will enable the technologies to go from novel to institutionalized. These technologies are evolving rapidly due to terrestrial markets. ISM is leveraging this commercial development to develop these capabilities within a realistic timeframe and budget. ISM utilizes the International Space Station (ISS) as a test-bed to adapt these technologies for microgravity operations and evolve the current operations mindset from earth-reliant to earth-independent.

  12. Active probing of space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang; Silevitch, Michael B.; Villalon, Elena

    1989-09-01

    During the course of the research period our efforts were focused on the following areas: (1) An examination of stochastic acceleration mechanisms in the ionosphere; (2) A study of nonequilibrium dynamics of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system; and (3) Laboratory studies of active space experiments. Reprints include: Dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body -- Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation; Laboratory study of the electron temperature in the near wake of a conducting body; New model for auroral breakup during substorms; Substorm breakup on closed field lines; New model for substorm on sets -- The pre-breakup and triggering regimes; Model of the westward traveling surge and the generation of Pi 2 pulsations; Ionospheric electron acceleration by electromagnetic waves near regions of plasma resonances; Relativistic particle acceleration by obliquely propagating electromagnetic fields; Some consequences of intense electromagnetic wave injection into space plasmas.

  13. Digital simulation of a communication link for Pioneer Saturn Uranus atmospheric entry probe, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A digital simulation study is presented for a candidate modulator/demodulator design in an atmospheric scintillation environment with Doppler, Doppler rate, and signal attenuation typical of the conditions of an outer planet atmospheric probe. The simulation results indicate that the mean channel error rate with and without scintillation are similar to theoretical characterizations of the link. The simulation gives information for calculating other channel statistics and generates a quantized symbol stream on magnetic tape from which error correction decoding is analyzed. Results from the magnetic tape data analyses are also included. The receiver and bit synchronizer are modeled in the simulation at the level of hardware component parameters rather than at the loop equation level and individual hardware parameters are identified. The atmospheric scintillation amplitude and phase are modeled independently. Normal and log normal amplitude processes are studied. In each case the scintillations are low pass filtered. The receiver performance is given for a range of signal to noise ratios with and without the effects of scintillation. The performance is reviewed for critical reciever parameter variations.

  14. Probing Stellar Dynamics With Space Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Rafael A.; Salabert, D.; Ballot, J.; Beck, P. G.; Bigot, L.; Corsaro, E.; Creevey, O.; Egeland, R.; Jiménez, A.; Mathur, S.; Metcalfe, T.; do Nascimento, J.; Pallé, P. L.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Regulo, C.

    2016-08-01

    The surface magnetic field has substantial influence on various stellar properties that can be probed through various techniques. With the advent of new space-borne facilities such as CoRoT and Kepler, uninterrupted long high-precision photometry is available for hundred of thousand of stars. This number will substantially grow through the forthcoming TESS and PLATO missions. The unique Kepler observations -covering up to 4 years with a 30-min cadence- allows studying stellar variability with different origins such as pulsations, convection, surface rotation, or magnetism at several time scales from hours to years. We study the photospheric magnetic activity of solar-like stars by means of the variability induced in the observed signal by starspots crossing the visible disk. We constructed a solar photometric magnetic activity proxy, Sph from SPM/VIRGO/SoHO, as if the Sun was a distant star and we compare it with several solar well-known magnetic proxies. The results validate this approach. Thus, we compute the Sph proxy for a set of CoRoT and Kepler solar-like stars for which pulsations were already detected. After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of 300 solar-like stars, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogs for which we study their magnetism. This allows us to put the Sun into context of its siblings.

  15. Accuracy of micro four-point probe measurements on inhomogeneous samples: A probe spacing dependence study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a probe spacing dependence study in order to estimate the accuracy of micro four-point probe measurements on inhomogeneous samples. Based on sensitivity calculations, both sheet resistance and Hall effect measurements are studied for samples (e.g. laser annealed samples...... the probe spacing is smaller than 1/40 of the variation wavelength, micro four-point probes can provide an accurate record of local properties with less than 1% measurement error. All the calculations agree well with previous experimental results.......) with periodic variations of sheet resistance, sheet carrier density, and carrier mobility. With a variation wavelength of ¿, probe spacings from 0.0012 to 1002 have been applied to characterize the local variations. The calculations show that the measurement error is highly dependent on the probe spacing. When...

  16. Accuracy of micro four-point probe measurements on inhomogeneous samples: A probe spacing dependence study

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a probe spacing dependence study in order to estimate the accuracy of micro four-point probe measurements on inhomogeneous samples. Based on sensitivity calculations, both sheet resistance and Hall effect measurements are studied for samples (e.g. laser annealed samples) with periodic variations of sheet resistance, sheet carrier density, and carrier mobility. With a variation wavelength of ¿, probe spacings from 0.0012 to 1002 have been applied to characterize the ...

  17. Reacting to nuclear power systems in space: American public protests over outer planetary probes since the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launius, Roger D.

    2014-03-01

    The United States has pioneered the use of nuclear power systems for outer planetary space probes since the 1970s. These systems have enabled the Viking landings to reach the surface of Mars and both Pioneers 10 and 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 to travel to the limits of the solar system. Although the American public has long been concerned about safety of these systems, in the 1980s a reaction to nuclear accidents - especially the Soviet Cosmos 954 spacecraft destruction and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accidents - heightened awareness about the hazards of nuclear power and every spacecraft launch since that time has been contested by opponents of nuclear energy. This has led to a debate over the appropriateness of the use of nuclear power systems for spacecraft. It has also refocused attention on the need for strict systems of control and rigorous checks and balances to assure safety. This essay describes the history of space radioisotope power systems, the struggles to ensure safe operations, and the political confrontation over whether or not to allow the launch the Galileo and Cassini space probes to the outer planets. Effectively, these efforts have led to the successful flights of 12 deep space planetary probes, two-thirds of them operated since the accidents of Cosmos 954, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl.

  18. Pioneer 12 (PN-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, D.; Fimmel, R.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for Pioneer 12 are summarized. The Pioneer 12 spacecraft is in a 24-hour elliptical orbit around Venus. Atmospheric and altimetry data are obtained mainly around periapsis, and planetary imaging is normally performed around apoapsis. The Pioneer 12 mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  19. Meteorites, Mars and Beagle 2--from novel analysis in the laboratory to pioneering experiments in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I P

    2003-11-01

    On 25 December 2003, the British-built Beagle 2 probe will land on the surface of Mars to carry out one of the most potentially important pieces of analytical science ever conceived: to search for evidence of extra terrestrial life. Dr Ian Wright of the Open University talks us through the difficulties of performing measurements in such a harsh environment.

  20. Gravitational Lens: Deep Space Probe Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    List of Abbreviations Abbreviation Page FSM Focal Space Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CMB Cosmic Microwave...concert with the sun’s gravitational lens to image nearby solar systems and/or other pertinent astronomical objects, e.g. the Cosmic Microwave Background...CMB) radiation. 1.2 Thesis Objective In Deep Space Flight and Communications Claudio Maccone uses the mass, radius , mean density, and Schwarzschild

  1. A passion for space adventures of a pioneering female NASA flight controller

    CERN Document Server

    Dyson, Marianne J

    2016-01-01

    Marianne J. Dyson recounts for us a time when women were making the first inroads into space flight control, a previously male-dominated profession. The story begins with the inspiration of the Apollo 11 landing on the Moon and follows the challenges of pursuing a science career as a woman in the 70s and 80s, when it was far from an easy path.  Dyson relates the first five space shuttle flights from the personal perspective of mission planning and operations in Houston at the Johnson Space Center, based almost exclusively on original sources such as journals and NASA weekly activity reports. The book’s historical details about astronaut and flight controller training exemplify both the humorous and serious aspects of space operations up through the Challenger disaster, including the almost unknown fire in Mission Control during STS-5 that nearly caused an emergency entry of the shuttle.  From an insider with a unique perspective and credentials to match, this a must-read for anyone interested in the worki...

  2. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  3. Hyperbolic orbit and its variation of deep-space probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Lin(刘林); WANG; Xin(王歆)

    2003-01-01

    While approaching the target body, the deep-space probe is orbiting hyperbolically before the maneuver. We discuss the variation of perturbed hyperbolic orbit using the method similar to that used in elliptic orbit. Ephemeris calculating and orbit control will benefit from the given analytical solution.

  4. Russian Space Probes Scientific Discoveries and Future Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The Soviet Union began the exploration of space with the launch of Sputnik in 1957, well over 50 years ago, and sent the first probes to the Moon, Mars, and Venus. Less well known is what these probes actually found out. What were the discoveries of Russian space science? What new discoveries may we expect in the future? Who were Russia's most important scientists? Russian Space Probes gives for the first time the definitive history of Soviet-Russian space science, and is the first book to assess the actual achievements of the Russian space program in furthering our knowledge of the Solar System. Among other projects covered are missions such as Elektron, which mapped the Earth's radiation belts; the astrophysical observatories Astron, Kvant, Gamma, and Granat; Proton, which trapped cosmic rays; Prognoz, which measured solar radiation; and the Interball, Aktivny, APEX, and Magion mission in which satellites chased each other in the Earth's magnetic tail. The final part of the book examines the future of Russ...

  5. Gaussian quantum metrology and space-time probes

    CERN Document Server

    Šafránek, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on Gaussian quantum metrology in the phase-space formalism and its applications in quantum sensing and the estimation of space-time parameters. We derive new formulae for the optimal estimation of multiple parameters encoded into Gaussian states. We discuss the discontinuous behavior of the figure of merit - the quantum Fisher information. Using derived expressions we devise a practical method of finding optimal probe states for the estimation of Gaussian channels and we illustrate this method on several examples. We show that the temperature of a probe state affects the estimation generically and always appears in the form of four multiplicative factors. We also discuss how well squeezed thermal states perform in the estimation of space-time parameters. Finally we study how the estimation precision changes when two parties exchanging a quantum state with the encoded parameter do not share a reference frame. We show that using a quantum reference frame could counter this effect.

  6. Printing Pioneer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Wang Xuan,inventor of a laser typesetting system for Chinese characters,ushers in a new age in the printing industry Anyone who reads a book or newspaper in Chinese is indebted to Wang Xuan, a pioneer in modem Chinese-language printing, just as one can thank Thomas Edison for inventing the electric light bulb. Wang invented a computerized laser photocomposition system for Chinese char-

  7. Probing electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in Momentum Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleuze, M S; Hajgato, B; Morini, F; Knippenberg, S, E-mail: michael.deleuze@uhasselt.b [Research Group of Theoretical Chemistry, Department SBG, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2010-02-01

    Orbital imaging experiments employing Electron Momentum Spectroscopy are subject to many complications, such as distorted wave effects, conformational mobility in the electronic ground state, ultra-fast nuclear dynamics in the final state, or a dispersion of the ionization intensity over electronically excited (shake-up) configurations of the cation. The purpose of the present contribution is to illustrate how a proper treatment of these complications enables us to probe in momentum space the consequences of electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in neutral and cationic states.

  8. Connecting the Pioneers, Current Leaders and the Nature and History of Space Weather with K-12 Classrooms and the General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C.; Thompson, B. J.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.; Barbier, B.; Odenwald, S.; Spadaccini, J.; James, N.; Stephenson, B.; Davis, H. B.; Major, E. R.; Space Weather Living History

    2011-12-01

    The Space Weather Living History program will explore and share the breakthrough new science and captivating stories of space environments and space weather by interviewing space physics pioneers and leaders active from the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to the present. Our multi-mission project will capture, document and preserve the living history of space weather utilizing original historical materials (primary sources). The resulting products will allow us to tell the stories of those involved in interactive new media to address important STEM needs, inspire the next generation of explorers, and feature women as role models. The project is divided into several stages, and the first stage, which began in mid-2011, focuses on resource gathering. The goal is to capture not just anecdotes, but the careful analogies and insights of researchers and historians associated with the programs and events. The Space Weather Living History Program has a Scientific Advisory Board, and with the Board's input our team will determine the chronology, key researchers, events, missions and discoveries for interviews. Education activities will be designed to utilize autobiographies, newspapers, interviews, research reports, journal articles, conference proceedings, dissertations, websites, diaries, letters, and artworks. With the help of a multimedia firm, we will use some of these materials to develop an interactive timeline on the web, and as a downloadable application in a kiosk and on tablet computers. In summary, our project augments the existing historical records with education technologies, connect the pioneers, current leaders and the nature and history of space weather with K-12 classrooms and the general public, covering all areas of studies in Heliophysics. The project is supported by NASA award NNX11AJ61G.

  9. UPF based autonomous navigation scheme for deep space probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Cui Hutao; Cui Pingyuan

    2008-01-01

    The autonomous "celestial navigation scheme" for deep space probe departing from the earth and the autonomous "optical navigation scheme" for encountering object celestial body are presented. Then, aiming at the conditions that large initial estimation errors and non-Gaussian distribution of state or measurement errors may exist in orbit determination process of the two phases, UPF (unscented particle filter) is introduced into the navigation schemes. By tackling nonlinear and non-Gaussian problems, UPF overcomes the accuracy influence brought by the traditional EKF (extended Kalman filter), UKF (unscented Kalman filter), and PF (particle filter) schemes in approximate treatment to nonlinear and non-Gaussian state model and measurement model. The numerical simulations demonstrate the feasibility and higher accuracy of the UPF navigation scheme.

  10. Probing critical surfaces in momentum space using real-space entanglement entropy: Bose versus Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsin-Hua; Yang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    A codimension-one critical surface in momentum space can be either a familiar Fermi surface, which separates occupied states from empty ones in the noninteracting fermion case, or a novel Bose surface, where gapless bosonic excitations are anchored. The presence of such surfaces gives rise to logarithmic violation of entanglement entropy area law. When they are convex, we show that the shape of these critical surfaces can be determined by inspecting the leading logarithmic term of real-space entanglement entropy. The fundamental difference between a Fermi surface and a Bose surface is revealed by the fact that the logarithmic terms in entanglement entropies differ by a factor of 2: SlogBose=2 SlogFermi , even when they have identical geometry. Our method has remarkable similarity with determining Fermi surface shape using quantum oscillation. We also discuss possible probes of concave critical surfaces in momentum space.

  11. Pioneer ACO PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Pioneer ACO PUF - To address the increasing number of requests for Pioneer ACO data, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has created a standard...

  12. A NEO-NEWTONIAN EXPLANATION OF THE PIONEER ANOMALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Greaves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For over 20 years NASA has struggled to nd an explanation for the Pioneer anomaly, an unmodelled weak acceleration towards the sun (= 8:5 x 10-10 m s-2, observed in deep space probes Pioneer 10, 11, Galileo and Ulysses (Anderson et al. 1998, 1999; Katz 1999. No consensus explanation has been given since the anomaly was rst announced, suggesting that new physics is involved. The riddle may be solved if we assume that c, the speed of light, is not a universal constant. Newtonian mechanics, together with the hypothesis by C spedes-Cur (2002 that the index of refraction is a function of the gravitational energy density of space, leads to values of c slightly higher for interstellar space dominated by the primordial energy density p* due to galaxies and far away stars, far from the gravitational in uence of Earth, Moon, and Sun. The value derived for the index of refraction of space (n0 < 1, implies a Doppler shift of the radio signal received from the probes which results in a decrease of the frequency received at Earth and interpreted as a weak acceleration towards the Sun.

  13. Modelling the reflective thermal contribution to the acceleration of the Pioneer spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, F., E-mail: frederico.francisco@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O., E-mail: orfeu.bertolami@fc.up.pt [Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gil, P.J.S., E-mail: p.gil@dem.ist.utl.pt [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica and IDMEC - Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Paramos, J., E-mail: paramos@ist.edu [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-05-23

    We present an improved method to compute the radiative momentum transfer in the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft that takes into account both diffusive and specular reflection. The method allows for more reliable results regarding the thermal acceleration of the deep-space probes, confirming previous findings. A parametric analysis is performed in order to set upper and lower bounds for the thermal acceleration and its evolution with time.

  14. Space Systems Failures Disasters and Rescues of Satellites, Rockets and Space Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s deep space missions were dispatched in pairs in case one was lost in launch or failed during its journey. Following the triumphs of the Viking landings on Mars in 1976 and both Voyagers spacecraft successfully surveying the outer giant planets of the Solar System, it was decided by NASA to cut costs and send out just a single probe. Although Magellan successfully mapped Venus by radar, it suffered from problems during the flight. Then came the loss of Mars Observer, whose engine exploded as it was preparing to enter Mars’ orbit because it was using technology designed for Earth’s satellites and the engine was not suited to spending several months in space. Later came the high-profile losses of Mars Climate Observer and Mars Polar Lander - a consequence of the faster, better, cheaper philosophy introduced by Dan Goldin in 1993. Even the highly successful Galileo mission suffered a major setback when its high-gain antenna (also based on satellite mission suffered a major setback when ...

  15. Simulation study of communication link for Pioneer Saturn/Uranus atmospheric entry probe. [signal acquisition by candidate modem for radio link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A digital simulation is presented for a candidate modem in a modeled atmospheric scintillation environment with Doppler, Doppler rate, and signal attenuation typical of the radio link conditions for an outer planets atmospheric entry probe. The results indicate that the signal acquisition characteristics and the channel error rate are acceptable for the system requirements of the radio link. The simulation also outputs data for calculating other error statistics and a quantized symbol stream from which error correction decoding can be analyzed.

  16. Space Weather Operation at KASI with Van Allen Probes Beacon Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, K. C.; Romeo, G.; Ukhorskiy, S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kessel, R.; Mauk, B.; Giles, B. L.; Gu, B. J.; Lee, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes are the first NASA mission broadcasting real time data in the Earth's radiation belts for space weather operation. Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute has contributed in data receiving from Van Allen Probes with 7 m satellite tracking antenna since 2012 and used the data for space weather operation. It takes approximately 15 minutes from measurements to produce Level 1 data. In this study, we show how the Van Allen Probes data is handled for monitoring space weather conditions at geostationary orbit (GEO) by highlighting the Saint Patrick's Day storm occurred in 2015. During storm time, Probe-A data shows a significant increase of relativistic electron flux at L=3. The electrons diffuse out and results in large increase of > 2MeV electron flux on GEO. By monitoring the radial distribution of energetic electrons, we could predict relativistic electron enhancement events that potentially threat satellite operation. We conclude that the combination of Van Allen Probes and NOAA-GOES data can provide improved space environment information to geostationary satellite operators. In addition, the lessons learned from Van Allen Probes are that more data receiving sites are necessary and data connections should be monitored for operational data service.

  17. Detecting 3D vegetation structure with the Galileo space probe: Can a distant probe detect vegetation structure on Earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Doughty, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal an...

  18. Probing scalar tensor theories for gravity in Redshift-Space

    CERN Document Server

    Sabiu, Cristiano G; Llinares, Claudio; Park, Changbom

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the spatial clustering statistics in redshift space of various scalar field modified gravity simulations. We utilise the two-point and the three-point correlation functions to quantify the spatial distribution of dark matter halos within these simulations and thus discern between the models. We compare $\\Lambda$CDM simulations to various modified gravity scenarios and find consistency with previous work in terms of 2-point statistics in real and redshift-space. However using higher order statistics such as the three-point correlation function in redshift space we find significant deviations from $\\Lambda$CDM hinting that higher order statistics may prove to be a useful tool in the hunt for deviations from General Relativity.

  19. Probing chemical space with alkaloid-inspired libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Michael C.; Singh, Gurpreet; Plampin, James N.; Rane, Digamber; Wang, Jenna L.; Day, Victor W.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Screening of small-molecule libraries is an important aspect of probe and drug discovery science. Numerous authors have suggested that bioactive natural products are attractive starting points for such libraries because of their structural complexity and sp3-rich character. Here, we describe the construction of a screening library based on representative members of four families of biologically active alkaloids (Stemonaceae, the structurally related cyclindricine and lepadiformine families, lupin and Amaryllidaceae). In each case, scaffolds were based on structures of the naturally occurring compounds or a close derivative. Scaffold preparation was pursued following the development of appropriate enabling chemical methods. Diversification provided 686 new compounds suitable for screening. The libraries thus prepared had structural characteristics, including sp3 content, comparable to a basis set of representative natural products and were highly rule-of-five compliant.

  20. Pioneer ACO Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Pioneer ACO Model is designed for health care organizations and providers that are already experienced in coordinating care for patients across care settings. It...

  1. Pioneering in geese

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is about pioneering in geese-- the report gives a history of the goose and its evolution from the Pleistocene to currents species of geese. The report...

  2. The Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    de Diego, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio-metric data from Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts has indicated the presence of an unmodeled acceleration starting at 20 AU, which has become known as the Pioneer anomaly. The nature of this acceleration is uncertain. In this paper we give a description of the effect and review some relevant mechanisms proposed to explain the observed anomaly. We also discuss on some future projects to investigate this phenomenon.

  3. Probing the face-space of individuals with prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Mayu; Doyle, Jaime; Humphreys, Kate; Behrmann, Marlene

    2010-05-01

    A useful framework for understanding the mental representation of facial identity is face-space (Valentine, 1991), a multi-dimensional cognitive map in which individual faces are coded relative to the average of previously encountered faces, and in which the distance among faces represents their perceived similarity. We examined whether individuals with prosopagnosia, a disorder characterized by an inability to recognize familiar faces despite normal visual acuity and intellectual abilities, evince behavior consistent with this underlying representational schema. To do so, we compared the performance of 6 individuals with congenital prosopagnosia (CP), with a group of age- and gender-matched control participants in a series of experiments involving judgments of facial identity. We used digital images of male and female faces and morphed them to varying degrees relative to an average face, to create caricatures, anti-caricatures, and anti-faces (i.e. faces of the opposite identity). Across 5 behavioral tasks, CP individuals' performance was similar to that of the control group and consistent with the face-space framework. As a test of the sensitivity of our measures in revealing face processing abnormalities, we also tested a single acquired prosopagnosic (AP) individual, whose performance on the same tasks deviated significantly from the control and CP groups. The findings suggest that, despite an inability to recognize individual identities, CPs perceive faces in a manner consistent with norm-based coding of facial identity, although their representation is likely supported by a feature-based strategy. We suggest that the apparently normal posterior cortical regions, including the fusiform face area, serve as the neural substrate for at least a coarse, feature-based face-space map in CP and that their face recognition impairment arises from the disconnection between these regions and more anterior cortical sites.

  4. Astrometric Gravitation Probe: a space mission concept for fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Fienga, Agnes; Gai, Mario; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Riva, Alberto; Busonero, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    Modern technological developments have pushed the accuracy of astrometric measurements in the visible band down to the micro-arcsec level. This allows to test theories of gravity in the weak field limit to unprecedented level, with possible consequences spanning from the validity of fundamental physics principles, to tests of theories describing cosmological and galactic dynamics without resorting to Dark Matter and Dark Energy.This is the main goal of Astrometric Gravitation Probe (AGP) mission, which will be achieved by highly accurate astrometric determination of light deflection (as a modern rendition of the Dyson, Eddington, and Robertson eclipse experiment of 1919), aberration, and of the orbits of selected Solar System objects, with specific reference to the excess shift of the pericentre effect.The AGP concept was recently proposed for the recent call for ESA M4 missions as a collaboration among several scientists coming from many different European and US institutions. Its payload is based on a 1.15 m diameter telescope fed through a coronagraphic system by four fields, two set in symmetric positions around the Sun, and two in the opposite direction, all imaged on a CCD detector. Large parts of the instrument are common mode to all fields. The baseline operation mode is the scan of the ±1.13 deg Ecliptic strip, repeated for a minimum of 3 years and up to an optimal duration of 5 years. Operations and calibrations are simultaneous, defined in order to ensure common mode instrumental effects, identified and removed in data reduction. The astrometric and coronagraphic technologies build on the heritage of Gaia and Solar Orbiter.We review the mission concept and its science case, and discuss how this measurement concepts can be scaled to different mission implementations.

  5. Probing Interstellar Dust With Space-Based Coronagraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, N J; Breckinridge, J B

    2008-01-01

    We show that space-based telescopes such as the proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph will be able to detect the light scattered by the interstellar grains along lines of sight passing near stars in our Galaxy. The relative flux of the scattered light within one arcsecond of a star at 100 pc in a uniform interstellar medium of 0.1 H atoms cm^-3 is about 10^-7. The halo increases in strength with the distance to the star and is unlikely to limit the coronagraphic detection of planets around the nearest stars. Grains passing within 100 AU of Sun-like stars are deflected by radiation, gravity and magnetic forces, leading to features in the scattered light that can potentially reveal the strength of the stellar wind, the orientation of the stellar magnetic field and the relative motion between the star and the surrounding interstellar medium.

  6. Does PIONEER measure local spacetime expansion?

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, H J; Fahr, Hans-Joerg; Siewert, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There is a longstanding mystery connected with the radiotracking of distant interplanetary spaceprobes like ULYSSES, Galileo and especially the two NASA probes PIONEER 10 and 11. Comparing radiosignals outgoing from the earth to the probe and ingoing again from the probes do show anomalous frequency shifts which up to now have been explained as caused by anomalous non-Newtonian decelerations of these probes recognizable at solar distances beyond 5 AU. In this paper we study cosmological conditions for the transfer of radiosignals between the Earth and these distant probes. Applying general relativity, we derive both the geodetic deceleration as well as the cosmological redshift and compare the resulting frequency shift with the observed effect. We find that anomalous decelerations do act on these probes which are of cosmological nature, but these are, as expected from standard cosmology, much too low to explain the observed effect. In contrast, the cosmological redshift of radiophotons suffered during the iti...

  7. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Lee, C. H.; Fang, H. K.; Cheng, C. Z. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, No.1 Ta-Hsueh Rd., Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment.

  8. Pioneering a Biobased UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Eli; Byemerwa, Jovita; Dispenza, Ross; Doughty, Benjamin; Gillyard, KaNesha; Godbole, Poorwa; Gonzales-Wright, Jeanette; Hull, Ian; Kannappan, Jotthe; Levine, Alexander; Nelakanti, Raman; Ruffner, Lydia; Shumate, Alaina; Sorayya, Aryo; Ugwu, Kyla; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    With the exponential growth of interest in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their vast array of applications in both space exploration and terrestrial uses such as the delivery of medicine and monitoring the environment, the 2014 Stanford-Brown-Spelman iGEM team is pioneering the development of a fully biological UAV for scientific and humanitarian missions. The prospect of a biologically-produced UAV presents numerous advantages over the current manufacturing paradigm. First, a foundational architecture built by cells allows for construction or repair in locations where it would be difficult to bring traditional tools of production. Second, a major limitation of current research with UAVs is the size and high power consumption of analytical instruments, which require bulky electrical components and large fuselages to support their weight. By moving these functions into cells with biosensing capabilities – for example, a series of cells engineered to report GFP, green fluorescent protein, when conditions exceed a certain threshold concentration of a compound of interest, enabling their detection post-flight – these problems of scale can be avoided. To this end, we are working to engineer cells to synthesize cellulose acetate as a novel bioplastic, characterize biological methods of waterproofing the material, and program this material’s systemic biodegradation. In addition, we aim to use an “amberless” system to prevent horizontal gene transfer from live cells on the material to microorganisms in the flight environment. So far, we have: successfully transformed Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a cellulose-producing bacterium, with a series of promoters to test transformation efficiency before adding the acetylation genes; isolated protein bands present in the wasp nest material; transformed the cellulose-degrading genes into Escherichia coli; and we have confirmed that the amberless construct prevents protein expression in wild-type cells. In addition, as

  9. The Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor T. Toth

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 × 10–9 Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of aP = (8.74 ± 1.33 × 10–10 m/s2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.

  10. Alasti pioneer / Jelena Skulskaja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Skulskaja, Jelena, 1950-

    2005-01-01

    Teatri- ja filmiuudiseid Venemaalt : Kira Muratova mängufilm "Häälestaja" ("Nastroishtshik"), Aleksandr Sokurovi töös olev mängufilm Thomas Manni ja Johann Wolfgang Goethe ainetel "Faust" ning Kirill Serebrjannikovi lavastus Sovremennikus Mihhail Kononovi romaani "Alasti pioneer" järgi, peaosas Tshulpan Hamatova. Ajalehe tiitellehel kuupäevaks "märtsi lõpp (4/05)"

  11. ULF Waves Observed at MAGDAS Stations as Probes for Litho-Space Weather Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    K.Yumoto, Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University started the MAGDAS Project effectively in May of 2005, with the installation of the first unit in Hualien, Taiwan (Yumoto et al., 2006, 2007). Since then, over 50 units have been deployed around the world. They are concentrated along three chains: (1) North and South of Japan (the so-called "210o Magnetic Meridian Chain"), (2) Dip Equator Chain, and (3) Africa Chain (the so-called "96o Magnetic Meridian Chain"). The main goals of MAGDAS project are: (1) study magnetospheric pro-cesses by distinguishing between temporal changes and spatial variations in the phenomena, (2) clarify global structures and propagation characteristics of magnetospheric variations from higher to equatorial latitudes, and (3) understand global generation mechanisms of the Solar-Terrestrial phenomena (see Yumoto, 2004). From MAGDAS observations, ULF waves are found to be used as good probes for litho-space weather study in developing and developed countries. In the present paper, we will introduce the following examples: Pc 5 magnetic amplitudes at lower-latitude MAGDAS station show a linear relation with the solar wind velocity, thus we can use the Pc 5 amplitudes as a monitoring probe of the solar wind velocity. Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations have skin depth comparable with the depth of epicentre of earthquakes in the lithosphere. Therefore, we can use Pc 3-4 as a probe for detecting ULF anomaly and precursors associated with great earthquakes. Pi 2 magnetic pulsations are observed globally at MAGDAS stations located at high, middle, low, and equatorial latitudes in night-and day-time. We can use the Pi 2s as a good indicator of onsets of magnetospheric substorms. Sudden commencements (sc), sudden impulse (si), and solar flare effects (sfe) create magnetic variations at MAGDAS stations. Therefore, MAGDAS data can be used as a probe of interplanetary shocks and interplanetary discontinuities in the solar wind, and solar flare

  12. Science with the space-based interferometer LISA. IV: probing inflation with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Caprini, Chiara; Domcke, Valerie; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Chiara Guzzetti, Maria; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Petiteau, Antoine; Ricciardone, Angelo; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the potential for the LISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced from different mechanisms during inflation. Focusing on well-motivated scenarios, we study the resulting contributions from particle production during inflation, inflationary spectator fields with varying speed of sound, effective field theories of inflation with specific patterns of symmetry breaking and models leading to the formation of primordial black holes. The projected sensitivities of LISA are used in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. We demonstrate that LISA is able to probe these well-motivated inflationary scenarios beyond the irreducible vacuum tensor modes expected from any inflationary background.

  13. Science with the space-based interferometer LISA. IV: Probing inflation with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Domcke, Valerie; Figueroa, Daniel G; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Guzzetti, Maria Chiara; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Petiteau, Antoine; Ricciardone, Angelo; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the LISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced from different mechanisms during inflation. Focusing on well-motivated scenarios, we study the resulting contributions from particle production during inflation, inflationary spectator fields with varying speed of sound, effective field theories of inflation with specific patterns of symmetry breaking and models leading to the formation of primordial black holes. The projected sensitivities of LISA are used in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. We demonstrate that LISA is able to probe these well-motivated inflationary scenarios beyond the irreducible vacuum tensor modes expected from any inflationary background.

  14. On the Transfer and Control of Space Probes Around the L1 Point of the Sun-Earth+Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xi-Yun; Liu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    The motion around the collinear libration points in the restricted three body problem is unstable. But there exist conditionally stable periodic orbits around these points. Special-purpose space probes located in the vicinity of these points (e.g., ISEE-3, SOHO) can benefit from this dynamical property, in regard to maintaining the orbit in position and the energy required of placing the probe in position. As an example, we study in this paper the launch and orbital control of a space probe around the L1 libration point in the system consisting of the Sun and the Earth-Moon. We present some theoretical and numerical simulations' results, which may serve as a basis for the realization of such a space probe in future.

  15. CO2 impact ionization-driven plasma instability observed by Pioneer Venus Orbiter at Periapsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.; Niemann, H. B.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of enhanced ac electric field noise about Pioneer Venus periapsis are shown to be related to spacecraft-generated impact ionization of the ambient CO2. The frequency of the electric field noise is found to peak in the vicinity of the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency and to closely follow the form of the neutral CO2 density profile. When the electric field noise in all channels is normalized by the square root of the CO2 number density, the ratio is constant. Since the impact electron density measured by the Pioneer Venus Langmuir probe, is observed to scale directly with the neutral CO2, the growth of the electric field amplitude is found to be linear in time with a growth rate proportional to the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency. On the basis of these results the impact ionization-driven instability is shown to be the ion acoustic instability. Implications for the lack of observations by Pioneer Venus of reflected-O(+)-driven instabilities, as have been proposed for the space shuttle, are discussed.

  16. Probing Theories of Gravity with Phase Space-Inferred Potentials of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Alejo; Kern, Nicholas; Gifford, Daniel; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Modified theories of gravity provide us with a unique opportunity to generate innovative tests of gravity. In Chameleon f(R) gravity, the gravitational potential differs from the weak-field limit of general relativity (GR) in a mass dependent way. We develop a probe of gravity which compares high mass clusters, where Chameleon effects are weak, to low mass clusters, where the effects can be strong. We utilize the escape velocity edges in the radius/velocity phase space to infer the gravitational potential profiles on scales of 0.3-1 virial radii. We show that the escape edges of low mass clusters are enhanced compared to GR, where the magnitude of the difference depends on the background field value |fR0|. We validate our probe using N-body simulations and simulated light cone galaxy data. For a DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) Bright Galaxy Sample, including observational systematics, projection effects, and cosmic variance, our test can differentiate between GR and Chameleon f(R) gravity models, ...

  17. Probing the noncommutative structure of space with a quantum harmonic oscillator driven by gravitational wave

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the quantum mechanical transitions, induced by the combined effect of Gravitational wave (GW) and noncommutative (NC) structure of space, among the states of a 2-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The phonon modes excited by the passing GW within the resonant bar-detector are formally identical to forced harmonic oscillator and they represent a length variation of roughly the same order of magnitude as the characteristic length-scale of spatial noncommutativity estimated from the phenomenological upper bound of the NC parameter. This motivates our present work. We employ a number of different GW wave-forms that are typically expected from possible astronomical sources. We find that the transition probablities are quite sensitive to the nature of polarization of the GW. We further elaborate on the particular type of sources of GW radiation which can induce transitions that can be used as effective probe of the spatial noncommutative structure.

  18. Very High Specific Energy, Medium Power Li/CFx Primary Battery for Launchers and Space Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Paul; Godillot, Gerome; Peres, Jean Paul; Corbin, Julien; Espinosa, Amaya

    2014-08-01

    Benchmark with existing technologies shows the advantages of the lithium-fluorinated carbon (Li/CFx) technology for use aboard future launchers in terms of a low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), especially for high energy demanding missions such as re-ignitable upper stages for long GTO+ missions and probes for deep space exploration.This paper presents the new results obtained on this chemistry in terms of electrical and climatic performances, abuse tests and life tests. Studies - co-financed between CNES and Saft - looked at a pure CFx version with a specific energy up to 500 Wh/kg along with a medium power of 80 to 100 W/kg.

  19. Probing the accelerating Universe with redshift-space distortions in VIPERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the growth rate of structure at z=0.8. It has been obtained from the redshift-space distortions observed in the galaxy clustering pattern in the VIMOS Public Redshift survey (VIPERS) first data release. VIPERS is a large galaxy redshift survey probing the large-scale structure at 0.5 Universe, which has been poorly explored until now. We obtain σ8 = 0.47 +/- 0.08 at z = 0.8 that is consistent with the predictions of standard cosmological models based on Einstein gravity. This measurement alone is however not accurate enough to allow the detection of possible deviations from standard gravity.

  20. Probing the Nodal Structure of Landau Level Wave Functions in Real Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindel, J R; Ulrich, J; Liebmann, M; Morgenstern, M

    2017-01-06

    The inversion layer of p-InSb(110) obtained by Cs adsorption of 1.8% of a monolayer is used to probe the Landau level wave functions within smooth potential valleys by scanning tunneling spectroscopy at 14 T. The nodal structure becomes apparent as a double peak structure of each spin polarized first Landau level, while the zeroth Landau level exhibits a single peak per spin level only. The real space data show single rings of the valley-confined drift states for the zeroth Landau level and double rings for the first Landau level. The result is reproduced by a recursive Green function algorithm using the potential landscape obtained experimentally. We show that the result is generic by comparing the local density of states from the Green function algorithm with results from a well-controlled analytic model based on the guiding center approach.

  1. Light as a probe of the structure of space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    Light is an intrinsically relativistic probe and when used in an adequately sized array of ring lasers it is sensible to the curvature and to the chirality of space-time. On this basis the GINGER experiment is being implemented at the underground National Laboratories at Gran Sasso. The experiment, whose objective is the measurement of the terrestrial frame dragging effect or deviations from it, will be presented and discussed in its foundation. Furthermore, at a bigger scale, the possibilities given by the under way GAIA mission and the proposed AGP, will be analyzed with a special attention paied to the possibility of extracting information concerning the angular momenta of the sun and the main bodies of the solar system.

  2. The Pioneer Venus Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Mountain View, CA. Ames Research Center.

    This document provides detailed information on the atmosphere and weather of Venus. This pamphlet describes the technological hardware including the probes that enter the Venusian atmosphere, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Information is provided in lay terms on the mission profile, including details of events from launch to mission end. The…

  3. Pioneers of representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Charles W

    1999-01-01

    The year 1897 was marked by two important mathematical events: the publication of the first paper on representations of finite groups by Ferdinand Georg Frobenius (1849-1917) and the appearance of the first treatise in English on the theory of finite groups by William Burnside (1852-1927). Burnside soon developed his own approach to representations of finite groups. In the next few years, working independently, Frobenius and Burnside explored the new subject and its applications to finite group theory. They were soon joined in this enterprise by Issai Schur (1875-1941) and some years later, by Richard Brauer (1901-1977). These mathematicians' pioneering research is the subject of this book. It presents an account of the early history of representation theory through an analysis of the published work of the principals and others with whom the principals' work was interwoven. Also included are biographical sketches and enough mathematics to enable readers to follow the development of the subject. An introductor...

  4. Pioneering unquenched desire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Hoffmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The book Twórczość Leśmiana w kręgu filozoficznej myśli symbolizmu rosyjskiego written by Sobieska is a pioneering attempt at combining a discussion on the literary output of the author of Dziejba leśna with the reflection stemming from the tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church. The book, notwithstanding its shortcomings and self-imposed limitations, comprehensively discusses views and opinions hitherto unknown to the Polish reader, introduces and explains the context of the findings of such thinkers as Soloviov or Biely, compares texts written by Russian symbolists with Leśmian’s poems. Sobieska categorizes the problem issues into subsequent thematic ranges (epiphany insight into the nature of being, musicality and the notion of poetical metre, creative imagination, mystical femininity in order to point at potential sources of the recontextualization of Leśmian’s poetical sensitivity. The findings, being an example of classic comparatistic studies, have been enhanced by iconological and musicological observations as well as by some additional guiding elements facilitating the understanding of Orthodox theology. The present sketch discusses the book and is complemented with a polemics with some of its methodological solutions.

  5. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  6. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  7. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V I; Koepke, M E; Raitses, Y

    2010-10-01

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  8. Pioneer Women in Chaos Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Frank Y

    2009-01-01

    The general public has been made aware of the research field of "chaos" by the book of that title by James Gleick. This paper will focus on the achievements of Sonya Kovalevskaya, Mary Cartwright, and Mary Tsingou, whose pioneer works were not mentioned in Gleick's book.

  9. The "Pioneer effect" a cosmological Foucault's experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, J L

    2002-01-01

    The reported anomalous acceleration acting on the Pioneers spacecrafts could be seen as a consequence of the existence of some local curvature in light geodesics when using the coordinate speed of light in an expanding space-time. The effect is related with the non synchronous character of the underlying metric and therefore, planets closed orbits can not reveal it. It is shown that the cosmic expansion rate -the Hubble parameter H- has been indeed detected. Additionally, a relation for an existing annual term is obtained which depends on the cosine of the ecliptic latitude of the spacecraft, suggestingan heuristic analogy between the effect and Foucault's experiment - light rays playing a similar role in the expanding space than Foucault's Pendulum does while determining Earth's rotation. This statement could be seen as a benchmark for future experiments.

  10. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  11. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  12. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  13. Is a linear probe helpful in diagnosing diseases of pulmonary interstitial spaces?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Buda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In a lung ultrasound examination, interstitial lung lesions are visible as numerous B-line artifacts, and are best recorded with the use of a convex probe. Interstitial lung lesions may result from many conditions, including cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, or interstitial lung disease. Hence difficulties in the differential diagnostics of the above clinical conditions. This article presents cases of patients suffering from interstitial lung lesions discovered in the course of lung ultrasound examination. The patients were examined with a 3.5–5.0 MHz convex probe and a 7.0–11.0 MHz linear probe. Ultrasound images have been analysed, and differences in the imaging with both probes in patients with interstitial lung lesions have been detailed. The use of a linear probe in patients with interstitial lung lesions (discovered with a convex or a micro-convex probe provides additional information on the source of the origin of the lesions.

  14. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  15. Pioneer Mothers' Memorial Forest revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Schlesinger; D.T. Funk; P.L. Roth; C.C. Myers

    1991-01-01

    The area now known as Pioneer Mothers' Memorial Forest was acquired by Joseph Cox in 1816 from the public domain. In 1944, a portion of that property, including the area referred to as Cox Woods, was established as a National Forest Research Natural Area. This beech-maple forest, located in the Knobs area of southern Indiana, is considered to be one of the few...

  16. Willa Cather and Her Pioneering Themes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菁华

    2013-01-01

      This thesis aims at the elaboration of Willa Cather’s pioneering themes based on her major works spanning over the pro⁃logue and epilogue of American pioneering age. Among which, O Pioneers! and My Antonia applause for the transcendent glory of innovative and enterprising pioneer ladies, declined in A Lost Lady and My Mortal Enemy and substituted with hedonism, affinity reliance and mammonism. In her late years, Cather resurrected her pioneering themes through the recollection of the best bygone time spent in waste west land.

  17. Estimating space-time parameters with a quantum probe in a lossy environment

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, Sebastian P

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of estimating the Schwarzschild radius of a massive body using Gaussian quantum probe states. Previous calculations assumed that the probe state remained pure after propagating a large distance. In a realistic scenario, there would be inevitable losses. Here we introduce a practical approach to calculate the Quantum Fisher Informations (QFIs) for a quantum probe that has passed through a lossy channel. Whilst for many situations loss means coherent states are optimal, we identify certain situations for which squeezed states have an advantage. We also study the effect of the frequency profile of the wavepacket propagating from Alice to Bob. There exists an optimal operating point for a chosen mode profile. In particular, employing a smooth rectangular frequency profile significantly improves the error bound on the Schwarzschild radius compared to a Gaussian frequency profile.

  18. On the accuracy of the relativistic parameters beta, gamma, and the solar oblateness coefficient J2, as deduced from ranging data of a drag-free space probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Motion in the general gravity field is described mathematically. A covariance analysis, based on two simple models, is presented. Two drag-free space probes were considered, for which the orbital elements are given.

  19. Fiber-Optic Imaging Probe Developed for Space Used to Detect Diabetes Through the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Chenault, Michelle V.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; Sebag, J.; Suh, Kwang I.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes mellitus, which can severely impair eyesight by causing cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Cataracts are 1.6 times more common in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, and cataract extraction is the only surgical treatment. In many cases, diabetes-related ocular pathologies go undiagnosed until visual function is compromised. This ongoing pilot project seeks to study the progression of diabetes in a unique animal model by monitoring changes in the lens with a safe, sensitive, dynamic light-scattering probe. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), has the potential to diagnose cataracts at the molecular level. Recently, a new DLS fiber-optic probe was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for noncontact, accurate, and extremely sensitive particle-sizing measurements in fluid dispersions and suspensions (ref. 1). This compact, portable, and rugged probe is free of optical alignment, offers point-and-shoot operation for various online field applications and challenging environments, and yet is extremely flexible in regards to sample container sizes, materials, and shapes. No external vibration isolation and no index matching are required. It can measure particles as small as 1 nm and as large as few micrometers in a wide concentration range from very dilute (waterlike) dispersions to very turbid (milklike) suspensions. It is safe and fast to use, since it only requires very low laser power (10 nW to 3 mW) with very short data acquisition times (2 to 10 sec).

  20. The Use of Langmuir Probes in Non-Maxwellian Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Brace, Larry H.

    1998-01-01

    Disturbance of the Maxwellian plasma may occur in the vicinity of a spacecraft due to photoemission, interactions between the spacecraft and thermospheric gases, or electron emissions from other devices on the spacecraft. Significant non-maxwellian plasma distributions may also occur in nature as a mixture of ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas or secondaries produced by photoionization in the thermosphere or auroral precipitation. The general formulas for current collection (volt-ampere curves) by planar, cylindrical, and spherical Langmuir probes in isotropic and anisotropic non-maxwellian plasmas are examined. Examples are given of how one may identify and remove the non-maxwellian components in the Langmuir probe current to permit the ionospheric parameters to be determined. Theoretical volt-ampere curves presented for typical examples of non-maxwellian distributions include: two-temperature plasmas and a thermal plasma with an energetic electron beam. If the non-ionospheric electrons are Maxwellian at a temperature distinct from that of the ionosphere electrons, the volt-ampere curves can be fitted directly to obtain the temperatures and densities of both electron components without resorting to differenting the current. For an arbitrary isotropic distribution, the current for retarded particles is shown to be identical for the three geometries. For anisotropic distributions, the three probe geometries are not equally suited for measuring the ionospheric electron temperature and density or for determining the distribution function in the presence of non-maxwellian back-round electrons.

  1. Ultrahigh-energy photons as probes of Lorentz symmetry violations in stringy space-time foam models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccione, Luca; Liberati, Stefano; Sigl, Günter

    2010-07-09

    The time delays between γ rays of different energies from extragalactic sources have often been used to probe quantum gravity models in which Lorentz symmetry is violated. It has been claimed that these time delays can be explained by or at least put the strongest available constraints on quantum gravity scenarios that cannot be cast within an effective field theory framework, such as the space-time foam, D-brane model. Here we show that this model would predict too many photons in the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray flux to be consistent with observations. The resulting constraints on the space-time foam model are much stronger than limits from time delays and allow for Lorentz violation effects way too small for explaining the observed time delays.

  2. The atmospheric circulation of a nine-hot Jupiter sample: Probing circulation and chemistry over a wide phase space

    CERN Document Server

    Kataria, Tiffany; Lewis, Nikole K; Visscher, Channon; Showman, Adam P; Fortney, Jonathan J; Marley, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    We present results from an atmospheric circulation study of nine hot Jupiters that comprise a large transmission spectral survey using the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. These observations exhibit a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths which suggest diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. By utilizing the specific system parameters for each planet, we naturally probe a wide phase space in planet radius, gravity, orbital period, and equilibrium temperature. First, we show that our model "grid" recovers trends shown in traditional parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly equatorial superrotation and increased day-night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature. We show how spatial temperature variations, particularly between the dayside and nightside and west and east terminators, can vary by hundreds of K, which could imply large variations in Na, K, CO and CH4 abundances in those regions. These chemical variations can be large enough...

  3. Ultra high energy photons as probes of Lorentz symmetry violations in stringy space-time foam models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Liberati, Stefano [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-03-15

    The time delays between gamma-rays of different energies from extragalactic sources have often been used to probe quantum gravity models in which Lorentz symmetry is violated. It has been claimed that these time delays can be explained by or at least put the strongest available constraints on quantum gravity scenarios that cannot be cast within an effective field theory framework, such as the space-time foam, D-brane model. Here we show that this model would predict too many photons in the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux to be consistent with observations. The resulting constraints on the space-time foam model are much stronger than limits from time delays and allow for Lorentz violations effects way too small for explaining the observed time delays. (orig.)

  4. In vitro cultured cells as probes for space radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, A.; Perrella, G.; Curcio, F.; Ambesi-Impiombato, F.S. [Dipartimento di Patologia e Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Universita di Udine, P.le S. Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    1999-12-06

    Near future scenarios of long-term and far-reaching manned space missions, require more extensive knowledge of all possible biological consequences of space radiation, particularly in humans, on both a long-term and a short-term basis. In vitro cultured cells have significantly contributed to the tremendous advancement of biomedical research. It is therefore to be expected that simple biological systems such as cultured cells, will contribute to space biomedical sciences. Space represents a novel environment, to which life has not been previously exposed. Both microgravity and space radiation are the two relevant components of such an environment, but biological adaptive mechanisms and efficient countermeasures can significantly minimize microgravity effects. On the other hand, it is felt that space radiation risks may be more relevant and that defensive strategies can only stem from our deeper knowledge of biological effects and of cellular repair mechanisms. Cultured cells may play a key role in such studies. Particularly, thyroid cells may be relevant because of the exquisite sensitivity of the thyroid gland to radiation. In addition, a clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5 cells) is available in culture, which is well characterized and particularly fit for space research.

  5. Reminiscence of the Glory of Pioneering Spirits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菁华

    2013-01-01

      At the end of pioneering age, the women pioneers were substituted by lost ladies from whom the innovation, self-reli⁃ance, tolerance and endurance yielded to nihilism, reliant affinity, mammonism and hedonism. To reminisce the glory of pioneering splendors in the integration with the waste west land spiritually and alienation to the materialized modern society, Cather regressed to the memorable bygones in“The Best Years”, The Professor's House and elegized the spiritual pioneering by means of infusing Christianity into the uncultivated indigenous inhabitants in Death Comes for the Archbishop.

  6. Probing phase-space noncommutativity through quantum mechanics and thermodynamics of free particles and quantum rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, Catarina; Santos, Jonas F G

    2014-01-01

    Novel quantization properties related to the state vectors and the energy spectrum of a two-dimensional system of free particles are obtained in the framework of noncommutative (NC) quantum mechanics (QM) supported by the Weyl-Wigner formalism. Besides reproducing the magnetic field aspect of the Zeeman effect, the momentum space NC parameter introduces mutual information properties quantified by the linear entropy related to the relevant Hilbert space coordinates. Supported by the QM in the phase-space, the thermodynamic limit is obtained, and the results are extended to three-dimensional systems. The noncommutativity imprints on the thermodynamic variables related to free particles are identified and, after introducing some suitable constraints to fix an axial symmetry, the analysis is extended to two- and- three dimensional quantum rotor systems, for which the quantization aspects and the deviation from standard QM results are verified.

  7. Probing the noncommutative effects of phase space in the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Kai; Yang, Huan-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    We study the noncommutative corrections on the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect when both the coordinate-coordinate and momentum-momentum noncommutativities are considered. This study is motivated by the recent observation that there is no net phase shift in the time-dependent AB effect on the ordinary space, and therefore tiny derivation from zero can indicate new physics. The vanishing of the time-dependent AB phase shift on the ordinary space is preserved by the gauge and Lorentz symmetries. However, on the noncomutative phase space, while the ordinary gauge symmetry can be kept by the Seiberg-Witten map, but the Lorentz symmetry is broken. Therefore nontrivial noncommutative corrections are expected. We find there are three kinds of noncommutative corrections in general: 1) $\\xi$-dependent correction which comes from the noncommutativity among momentum operators; 2) momentum-dependent correction which is rooted in the nonlocal interactions in the noncommutative extended model; 3) momentum-independent c...

  8. Salute to some nursing pioneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H. Harrison

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available This is indeed a very wide meaning for the word, ‘Pioneer’, and it was with some trepidation that I approached this subject. After all, it could end up by being a sort of Biographical Directory of Nurses in South Africa and this is certainly not what our readers would like in this particular journal. In any case, Searle’s History of the Development of Nursing in South Africa covers this field very fully and adequately. So just what sort of people do we regard as pioneers of nursing in our country? Where do we begin? Can one be totally objective about it or would my choice be different from that of readers because of a more subjective attitude.

  9. Sir David Brewster: polarization pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Kinsell L.

    1992-12-01

    Sir David Brewster, Scottish physicist of the Nineteenth Century, was one of the pioneers in the investigation of the polarization of light. Every physics student is familiar with the Brewster angle of reflection, and the Brewster neutral point of skylight polarization is a well- known feature in atmospheric optics. He was at one time the most honored natural philosopher in Britain, having received numerous medals plus a knighthood for his work in the polarization of light. This paper, having arisen from my new biography of Brewster, traces his polarization work throughout his most productive period in the first half of the last century. It is of interest to science historians, as well as to those working in the field of polarization phenomena.

  10. Photons with sub-Planckian Energy Cannot Efficiently Probe Space-Time Foam

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanbei; Ma, Yiqiu

    2015-01-01

    Extra-galactic sources of photons have been used to constrain space-time quantum fluctuations in the Universe. In these proposals, the fundamental "fuzziness" of distance caused by space-time quantum fluctuations has been directly identified with fluctuations in optical paths. Phase-front corrugations deduced from these optical-path fluctuations are then applied to light from extra-galactic point sources, and used to constrain various models of quantum gravity. However, when a photon propagates in three spatial dimensions, it does not follow a specific ray, but rather samples a finite, three-dimensional region around that ray --- thereby averaging over space-time quantum fluctuations all through that region. We use a simple, random-walk type model to demonstrate that, once the appropriate wave optics is applied, the averaging of neighboring space-time fluctuations will cause much less distortion to the phase front. In our model, the extra suppression factor due to diffraction is the wave length in units of th...

  11. The Role Played by Space-based Probes in our Understanding of the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchetto, Ferdinando Duccio

    Over the last fifteen years a growing fleet of modern space-based astronomical telescopes has changed drastically our view of the universe. Most of these accomplishments build upon the work of ground-based astronomers over many decades, or even centuries. The combination of telescopes observing the universe at many different wavelengths has converted many prior hypotheses, for which supporting empirical data were scant, ambiguous and painfully difficult to obtain, into clearly and decisively demonstrated truth. But space observatories have gone well beyond that. In particular the Hubble Space Telescope with its combination of sharp images and deep dynamic range, has provided a detailed view of the unimagined complexity and diversity of the universe, as well as its startling beauty. It has yielded numerous surprises and raised new fundamental questions on the basic structure and laws that govern the universe. To answer these questions will require the efforts of ground-based and new space-based observatories working in combined programs over many years. In my talk I will illustrate some of the key discoveries that these space-based observatories have made such as: the deep imaging the distant universe; the calibration of the distance scale and the determination of the age of the universe; the discovery of the acceleration of the expansion rate of the universe, which requires a "dark energy" or new physics to explain it; the detection and measurement of supermassive black holes and the solution to the long standing problem of the nature of Quasars; the solution to the problem of whether Gamma Ray sources originated in our galaxy or at cosmological distances; the renewed interest in the problem of the birth of Stars and the formation of Planetary Systems; the death of Stars and the formation of supernovae, black holes and neutron stars and last but not least the exciting studies of the planets and satellites in our own dynamic solar system

  12. Probing cosmology and gravity with redshift-space distortions around voids

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaus, Nico; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic voids in the large-scale structure of the Universe affect the peculiar motions of objects in their vicinity. Although these motions are difficult to observe directly, the clustering pattern of their surrounding tracers in redshift space is influenced in a unique way. This allows to investigate the interplay between densities and velocities around voids, which is solely dictated by the laws of gravity. With the help of N-body simulations and derived mock-galaxy catalogs we calculate the average density fluctuations inside and outside voids identified with a watershed algorithm in redshift space and compare the results with the expectation from general relativity and the LCDM model of cosmology. We find that simple linear-theory predictions work remarkably well in describing the dynamics of voids even on relatively small scales. Adopting a Bayesian inference framework, we determine the full posterior probability distribution of our model parameters and forecast the achievable accuracy on measurements of ...

  13. Probing space charge and resolving overlimiting current mechanisms at the microchannel-nanochannel interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Liel, Uri; Leibowitz, Neta; Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-07-01

    We present results demonstrating the space charge-mediated transition between classical, diffusion-limited current and surface-conduction dominant over-limiting current in a shallow microchannel-nanochannel device. The extended space charge layer develops at the depleted microchannel-nanochannel entrance at high current and is correlated with a distinctive maximum in the dc resistance. Experimental results for a shallow surface-conduction dominated system are compared with theoretical models, allowing estimates of the effective surface charge at high voltage to be obtained. In comparison to an equilibrium estimate of the surface charge obtained from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, it is further observed that the effective surface charge appears to change under applied voltage.

  14. Active probing of space plasmas. Final report, 25 October 1985-30 September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, C.; Silevitch, M.B.; Villalon, E.

    1989-09-01

    During the course of the research period our efforts were focused on the following areas: (1) An examination of stochastic acceleration mechanisms in the ionosphere; (2) A study of nonequilibrium dynamics of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system; and (3) Laboratory studies of active space experiments. Reprints include: Dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body -- Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation; Laboratory study of the electron temperature in the near wake of a conducting body; New model for auroral breakup during substorms; Substorm breakup on closed field lines; New model for substorm on sets -- The pre-breakup and triggering regimes; Model of the westward traveling surge and the generation of Pi 2 pulsations; Ionospheric electron acceleration by electromagnetic waves near regions of plasma resonances; Relativistic particle acceleration by obliquely propagating electromagnetic fields; Some consequences of intense electromagnetic wave injection into space plasmas.

  15. A comment on "the far future of exoplanet direct characterization"--the case for interstellar space probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    Following on from ideas presented in a recent paper by Schneider et al. on "The Far Future of Exoplanet Direct Characterization," I argue that they have exaggerated the technical obstacles to performing such "direct characterization" by means of fast (order 0.1c) interstellar space probes. A brief summary of rapid interstellar spaceflight concepts that may be found in the literature is presented. I argue that the presence of interstellar dust grains, while certainly something that will need to be allowed for in interstellar vehicle design, is unlikely to be the kind of showstopper suggested by Schneider et al. Astrobiology as a discipline would be a major beneficiary of developing an interstellar spaceflight capability, albeit in the longer term, and I argue that astrobiologists should keep an open mind to the possibilities.

  16. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  17. Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Ananthanarayan

    2007-11-01

    At the international linear collider large beam polarization of both the electron and positron beams will enhance the signature of physics due to interactions that are beyond the standard model. Here we review our recently obtained results on a general model-independent method of determining for an arbitary one-particle inclusive state the space-time structure of such new physics through the beam polarization dependence and angular distribution of the final state particle.

  18. In-Space Manufacturing (ISM): Pioneering Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    ISM Objective: Develop and enable the manufacturing technologies and processes required to provide on-demand, sustainable operations for Exploration Missions. This includes development of the desired capabilities, as well as the required processes for the certification, characterization & verification that will enable these capabilities to become institutionalized via ground-based and ISS demonstrations.

  19. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface.

  20. Weak Lensing from Space I: Prospects for The Supernova/Acceleration Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Rhodes, J; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Astier, Pierre; Barrelet, E; Bebek, C; Bergstr, L; Bercovitz, J; Bester, M; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Carithers, W C; Commins, Eugene D; Day, C; Deustua, S; Di Gennaro, R S; Ealet, A; Eriksson, M; Fruchter, A S; Genat, J F; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Harris, S; Harvey, P; Heetderks, H; Holland, S; Huterer, D; Karcher, A; Kolbe, W F; Krieger, B; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Levi, M; Levin, D; Linder, E V; Loken, S; Malina, R; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Mostek, N; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nugent, P; Oluseyi, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Perlmutter, S; Pratt, R; Prieto, E; Robinson, K; Roe, N; Sholl, M; Schubnell, M S; Smadja, G; Smoot, G F; Spadafora, A; Tarl, G; Tomasch, A; Von der Lippe, H; Vincent, D; Walder, J P; Wang, G; Rhodes, Jason; Refregier, Alexandre; Massey, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The proposed Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite has been recognized as an ideal instrument to measure the accelerating expansion of the universe through the distance moduli to type Ia supernovae. We show that SNAP will also be excellent for surveys of weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure. Many of the requirements for precise photometry are compatible with those to accurately measure the shapes of background galaxies. We describe two surveys to be performed by SNAP. A 15 square degree ``deep'' survey will find clusters/groups and allow two-and three-dimensional dark matter maps to be made. A 300 square degree ``wide'' survey will be used to provide global constraints on cosmological parameters including Omega_M and w, the dark energy equation of state parameter. Both surveys will be conducted in 9 wide-band optical and near-IR filters, enabling photometric redshifts to be calculated. This first paper in a three part series outlines the survey strategies and introduces the SNAP instrum...

  1. Availability of feature-oriented scanning probe microscopy for remote-controlled measurements on board a space laboratory or planet exploration Rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2009-06-01

    Prospects for a feature-oriented scanning (FOS) approach to investigations of sample surfaces, at the micrometer and nanometer scales, with the use of scanning probe microscopy under space laboratory or planet exploration rover conditions, are examined. The problems discussed include decreasing sensitivity of the onboard scanning probe microscope (SPM) to temperature variations, providing autonomous operation, implementing the capabilities for remote control, self-checking, self-adjustment, and self-calibration. A number of topical problems of SPM measurements in outer space or on board a planet exploration rover may be solved via the application of recently proposed FOS methods.

  2. Probing Hawking and Unruh effects and quantum field theory in curved space by geometric invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Capolupo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The presence of noncyclic geometric invariant is revealed in all the phenomena where particle generation from vacuum or vacuum condensates appear. Aharonov--Anandan invariants then can help to study such systems and can represent a new tool to be used in order to provide laboratory evidence of phenomena particulary hard to be detected, such as Hawking and Unruh effects and some features of quantum field theory in curved space simulated by some graphene morphologies. It is finally suggested that a very precise quantum thermometer can be built by exploiting geometric invariants properties.

  3. The Pioneer's Anomalous Doppler Drift as a Berry Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, J L

    2004-01-01

    The detected anomalous frequency drift acceleration in Pioneer's radar data finds its explanation in a Berry phase that obtains the quantum state of a photon that propagates within an expanding space-time. The clock acceleration is just the adiabatic expansion rate and an analogy between the effect and Foucault's experiment is fully suggested. In this sense, light rays play a similar role in the expanding space than Foucault's Pendulum does while determining Earth's rotation. On the other hand, one could speculate about a suitable future experiment at "laboratory" scales able to measure the local cosmological expansion rate using the procedure of outlined in this paper.

  4. Narrowing the conformational space sampled by two-domain proteins with paramagnetic probes in both domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Soumyasri; Hu Xiaoyu [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Keizers, Peter H. J.; Liu Weimin [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Luchinat, Claudio, E-mail: luchinat@cerm.unifi.it; Nagulapalli, Malini [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Overhand, Mark [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Sgheri, Luca [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo, Sezione di Firenze, CNR (Italy); Ubbink, Marcellus [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Calmodulin is a two-domain protein which in solution can adopt a variety of conformations upon reorientation of its domains. The maximum occurrence (MO) of a set of calmodulin conformations that are representative of the overall conformational space possibly sampled by the protein, has been calculated from the paramagnetism-based restraints. These restraints were measured after inclusion of a lanthanide binding tag in the C-terminal domain to supplement the data obtained by substitution of three paramagnetic lanthanide ions to the calcium ion in the second calcium binding loop of the N-terminal domain. The analysis shows that the availability of paramagnetic restraints arising from metal ions placed on both domains, reduces the MO of the conformations to different extents, thereby helping to identify those conformations that can be mostly sampled by the protein.

  5. k-space image correlation to probe the intracellular dynamics of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzin, M.; Sironi, L.; Chirico, G.; D'Alfonso, L.; Inverso, D.; Pallavicini, P.; Collini, M.

    2016-04-01

    The collective action of dynein, kinesin and myosin molecular motors is responsible for the intracellular active transport of cargoes, vesicles and organelles along the semi-flexible oriented filaments of the cytoskeleton. The overall mobility of the cargoes upon binding and unbinding to motor proteins can be modeled as an intermittency between Brownian diffusion in the cell cytoplasm and active ballistic excursions along actin filaments or microtubules. Such an intermittent intracellular active transport, exhibited by star-shaped gold nanoparticles (GNSs, Gold Nanostars) upon internalization in HeLa cancer cells, is investigated here by combining live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and the spatio-temporal correlation, in the reciprocal Fourier space, of the acquired image sequences. At first, the analytical theoretical framework for the investigation of a two-state intermittent dynamics is presented for Fourier-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). Then simulated kICS correlation functions are employed to evaluate the influence of, and sensitivity to, all the kinetic and dynamic parameters the model involves (the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport states, the diffusion coefficient and drift velocity of the imaged particles). The optimal procedure for the analysis of the experimental data is outlined and finally exploited to derive whole-cell maps for the parameters underlying the GNSs super-diffusive dynamics. Applied here to the GNSs subcellular trafficking, the proposed kICS analysis can be adopted for the characterization of the intracellular (super-) diffusive dynamics of any fluorescent or scattering biological macromolecule.

  6. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  7. Gravity field estimation from future space missions - TOPEX/POSEIDON, Gravity Probe B, and ARISTOTELES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.

    Accurate knowledge of the gravity field is a firm requirement in any study of Planet Earth. Space techniques have so far demonstrated their superiority in the global mapping of the gravity field based on ground tracking and altimeter data mostly. Numerical and analytical simulation studies of the upcoming geophysically relevant missions that will most likely carry GPS receivers, indicate significant improvements in the accuracy as well as the resolution of the gravity field. TOPEX will improve by some two orders of magnitude the long wavelength part (to degree about 20), while GP-B will contribute in the long as well as medium wavelength part of the spectrum (up to degree about 60). The gradiometer measurements on ARISTOTELES will contribute in the medium and short wavelength regions (from degree 30 up); GPS tracking of the spacecraft though will provide additional information for the long wavelength gravity and will help resolve it to accuracies comparable to those obtained from GP-B. With the mean rms coefficient error per degree kept below 10 exp -10, geophysical signals such as the post-glacial rebound, tidal variations, and secular and periodic variations of the zonal field rise above the noise level and become readily observable processes.

  8. Grote Reber, Radio Astronomy Pioneer, Dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Grote Reber, one of the earliest pioneers of radio astronomy, died in Tasmania on December 20, just two days shy of his 91st birthday. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang. His self- financed experiments laid the foundation for today's advanced radio-astronomy facilities. Grote Reber Grote Reber NRAO/AUI photo "Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the Universe and has earned the Nobel Prize for several major contributions. All radio astronomers who have followed him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work," said Dr. Fred Lo, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Reber was the first to systematically study the sky by observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole new view of the Universe. The continuing importance of new ways of looking at the Universe is emphasized by this year's Nobel Prizes in physics, which recognized scientists who pioneered X-ray and neutrino observations," Lo added. Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space. As an amateur operator, Reber had won awards and communicated with other amateurs around the world, and later wrote that he had concluded "there were no more worlds to conquer" in radio. Learning of Jansky's discovery gave Reber a whole new challenge that he attacked with vigor. Analyzing the problem as an engineer, Reber concluded that what he needed was a parabolic-dish antenna, something quite uncommon in the 1930s. In 1937, using his own funds, he constructed a 31.4-foot-diameter dish antenna in his back yard. The strange contraption attracted curious attention from his neighbors and became

  9. The Anomalous Acceleration of the Pioneer Spacecrafts

    CERN Document Server

    de Diego, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts have revealed an unexplained constant acceleration of a_A = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^(-10) m s^(-2) towards the Sun, also known as the Pioneer anomaly. Different groups have analyzed the Pioneer data and have got the same results, which rules out computer programming and handling errors. Attempts to explain this phenomenon arguing intrinsic causes on-board the spacecrafts failed or have lead to inconclusive results. Therefore, the Pioneer anomalous acceleration has motivated the interest of researchers to find out explanations that could bring insight upon the forces acting in the outer Solar Systems or a hint to discover new natural laws.

  10. Innovation in education, ICT and pioneer teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bocconi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflections on the role of "pioneer teachers" as a potential key figure in the innovation process of the school, with particular reference to the European Framework Programme project Ulearn eLearning.

  11. WEST PIONEER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    The West Pioneer Wilderness Study Area is in the Pioneer Mountains, Beaverhead County, Montana. A mineral-resource study of the area identified eight areas with molybdenum potential, four areas with gold-silver potential, one area with tungsten potential, and one area with barite potential. Several small mines were encountered, but none were accessible for the purposes of resource evaluation. No energy resources were identified in the study.

  12. New developments at Hunveyor and Husar space probe model constructions in Hungarian Universities and Colleges: status report of 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegzi, S.; Bérczi, Sz.; Hudoba, Gy.; Magyar, I.; Lang, A.; Istenes, Z.; Weidinger, T.; Tepliczky, I.; Varga, T.; Hargitai, H.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Hunveyor and Husar space probe models are the main school robotics program in Hungary in the last decade initiated by our Cosmic Materials Space research Group (CMSRG). As a new form of planetary science education in Hungary students build their lander and rover robots and test them on test tables, carry out simulations, and go with their instruments to field works of planetary geology analog sites. Recently 10 groups work in this program and here is a status report about the new results. Planetary robot construction and simulations steps We summarized in 10 steps the main "constructional and industrial research and technology" description of planetary material studying and collecting by space probes (landers, rovers). We focused on the activity we began and teach to carry out at those steps. (Main planets considered were the Moon and Mars): 1. Reconnaissance and survey of the surface of a planet by orbital space probes (i.e. Lunar Orbiter, MGS, MRO etc.) Our studies: photogeology, geomorphology, preparations to cartography. 2. Mapping of the surface of the selected planet with geographical and stratigraphical methods. We (CMSRG) prepared thematic maps on Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus [1] and Atlas (3) in the series [2,3]. 3. Identification of various surface materials by albedo, spectroscopic [4], thermal IR, identification and selection of the target sites. (in terrestrial analog sites during field works) 4. Planning the space probe system lander and rover working together (MPF-Sojourner type assembly). Planning of the Hunveyor and Husar models. 5. Construction and manufacturing lander and rover units. All Hunveyor groups built their models [5]. 6. Launching and traveling the space probes to the planetary surface. (No rocket building, we simulate [6] some events during the voyage only). 7. Measuring the planetary surface environment on the surface of target planet [7]. (CMSRG) groups carry out test-table measurements [8] and simulations, and later they

  13. A salute to the pioneers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-02-01

    An historical account is given of the pioneers who were instrumental in opening up the electrical frontier and paved the way for its phenomenal growth over the past century. The work of Franklin, Volta and Faraday, experimenters of the 18. and 19. century, is mentioned, along with the musings of Roger Bacon, a 13. century philosopher and scientist who postulated theories about magnetism, and that of William Gilbert of some three centuries later who formulated the definition of 'frictional electricity', noting the properties of attraction created by rubbing together amber and other substances. Mention is also made of the discoveries in the 18. and 19. centuries of Andre Marie Ampere of France, Luigi Galvani of Italy, Georg Simon Ohm and Heinrich Rudolph Hertz of Germany, Hans Christian Oersted of Denmark, Joseph Henry of the United States, William Grove and James Clerk Maxwell of Britain, and Aubrey Fessenden of Canada. An account is given of the discoveries of the Yugoslavian-born Nikola Tesla, whose work bridged the 19. and 20. centuries and who made singularly important contributions to the theory of electrical distribution systems, transformers, arc lights, dynamos, electric motors, steam turbines, thermomagnetics and radio systems. His invention of the polyphase alternating current system in 1888 was the turning point for the age of electricity that pushed the geographical distribution boundaries of electricity beyond the restrictive limitations of direct current used for Thomas Edison's electric light system. His work, with the timely support of George Westinghouse, opened the floodgates to electrical progress to bring new levels of productivity to business and industry and a higher standard of living for everyone. Many of the artifacts and memorabilia associated with the development of electrical technology are preserved in special exhibits and museums throughout the country. Brief accounts of some of the publicly accessible exhibits are

  14. Pioneer neurons of the antennal nervous system project to protocerebral pioneers in the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, George; Ehrhardt, Erica

    2015-11-01

    The twin nerve tracts of the antenna of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria are established early in embryogenesis by sibling pairs of pioneers which delaminate from the epithelium into the lumen at the antennal tip. These cells can be uniquely identified via their co-expression of the neuronal labels horseradish peroxidase and the lipocalin Lazarillo. The apical pioneers direct axons toward the antennal base where they encounter guidepost-like cells called base pioneers which transiently express the same molecular labels as the apical pioneers. To what extent the pioneer growth cones then progress into the brain neuropil proper, and what their targets there might be, has remained unclear. In this study, we show that the apical antennal pioneers project centrally beyond the antennal base first into the deutocerebral, and then into the protocerebral brain neuropils. In the protocerebrum, we identify their target circuitry as being identified Lazarillo-positive cells which themselves pioneer the primary axon scaffold of the brain. The apical and base antennal pioneers therefore form part of a molecularly contiguous pathway from the periphery to an identified central circuit of the embryonic grasshopper brain.

  15. Deep-space probes

    CERN Document Server

    Matloff, Gregory L

    2000-01-01

    This excellent book by Dr Gregory Matloff could be viewed as a large multi­ disciplinary compendium of past research, current investigations and future research in astronautics. However, unlike conventional works that are usually closed, this book is an open guide in three main respects: it contains progressive exercises as the chapter and section topics evolve, it provides the reader with many updated references, and it clearly indicates projected research areas that could become current research in the near future. For a student, the included exercises could be transformed into small worksheets or notebooks featuring many modern symbolic or algebraic computation systems that run on desktop or laptop computers. Thus, rapid and progressive study is possible - a sort of learning library driven by the author and by the bibliography at the end of each chapter. More than 340 references for both professionals and students have been selected to provide the reader with a sound basis for expanding his or her knowled...

  16. Women in Space — Following Valentina

    CERN Document Server

    Shayler, David J

    2005-01-01

    Space exploration has developed from early, unmanned space probes through the pioneering years of the ‘Manned’ Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions, to missions that now include women in the crew as a matter of course. Dave Shayler tells the story of the first woman balloonist in 1784 to their breakthrough as astronauts and cosmonauts in a range of professional roles. He covers the contribution women have made to space exploration and draws on interviews with Shuttle and Mir crew members who were women. These interviews detail the achievements of the first female Shuttle commander and the first female resident crew member of the International Space Station. These and many other events are presented in a detailed and highly readable account that recalls the difficult path to space exploration by women.

  17. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  18. Jupiter after Pioneer - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    In December 1973, Pioneer 10 became the first spacecraft to reach the vicinity of Jupiter. The spacecraft passed through the Jovian magnetosphere in two weeks and sent back more than 300 pictures of the big planet. Measurements were conducted of EM fields, energetic particles, and micrometeoroids. Radio occultations observed are discussed along with observations in the infrared and ultraviolet range, magnetic measurements, questions of trajectory analysis, and data obtained with the aid of a plasma analyzer. Pioneer 10 has confirmed as inescapable the fact that Jupiter radiates more energy than it receives from the sun.

  19. A Pioneer in Social Studies in Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In May 1942, Li Youyi published his book on Han-Bo trade and the economic and educational organizations in Tibetan lamaseries. With 60 years devoted to Tibetan studies, Li is indeed a pioneer in the field. Now, aged 90, he is widely regarded as a sociologist who pioneered social studies in Tibet.Li entered Tibet in 1944 together with Shen Zonglian, Liu Shengqi and Li Maoyi. They belonged to the Office in Charge of Tibetan Affairs, stationed in Lhasa by the Nationalist government. The decision was made following the

  20. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  1. Pioneer fauna of nepheline-containing tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkova, I. V.; Kalmykova, V. V.; Liskovaya, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    The zoological analysis of nepheline-containing sands deposited in tailings 10-40 years ago showed that the pioneer colonists of this technogenic substrate are collembolan and mites, whose proportions depend on the succession of the bacterial and fungal components of the microbiota. The pioneer groups of mesofauna on 10- to 30-year-old tailings include carnivorous herpetobiontic arthropods and phytophagous insects. An impoverished version of the fauna of northern-taiga podzols is developed in the sands rehabilitated more than 40 years ago.

  2. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Comparative analysis and approximations of space-charge formation in Langmuir probes with plane, cylindrical and spherical electrodes including temperature effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdeblanquez, Eder [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad del Zulia, Apartado 4011- A 526, Maracaibo, Venezuela and Centro de Investigacion de Matematicas Aplicadas Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad del Zulia, Apartado 10486, Maracaibo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: eder@luz.edu.ve

    2008-10-15

    In this paper the space-charge effects in Langmuir probes are compared for different kinds of symmetries: plane, cylindrical and spherical. A detailed analysis is performed here including temperature effects, and therefore kinetic theory is used instead of fluid equations as used by other authors. The nonlinear equations obtained here have been solved first by numerical computation and later by approximations using Bessel functions. The accuracy of each approximation is also discussed. Space-charge effects are more important in plane geometries than in the case of cylindrical or spherical symmetries.

  4. Miniature Sensor Probe for O2, CO2, and H2O Monitoring in Space Suits Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced space suit technologies require lightweight, low-power, durable sensors for monitoring critical life support constituents. Current technology cannot provide...

  5. THE ANOMALOUS ACCELERATION OF THE PIONEER SPACECRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. de Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Los datos radiométricos de las naves Pioneer 10 y 11 han revelado una aceleración constante no explicada de aA = (8:74+-1:33 X 10-10ms-2 dirigida hacia el Sol, también conocida como la anomalía del Pioneer. Distintos grupos han analizado los datos de los Pioneer y han obtenido los mismos resultados, lo que descarta errores en los códigos de computadora y en el manejo de los datos. Los intentos por explicar este fenómeno argumentando causas intrínsecas a bordo de las naves fracasaron o han conducido a resultados no concluyentes. Debido a esto, la aceleración anómala del Pioneer ha motivado el interés de los investigadores por encontrar explicaciones que puedan echar luz sobre las fuerzas que actúan en el Sistema Solar exterior o que den una pista para descubrir nuevas leyes naturales.

  6. Elwood Murray: Pioneering Methodologist in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Judi

    2014-01-01

    Elwood Murray (1897-1988) was a pioneer in communication education. Beginning in the 1930s, he applied nontraditional methods in the speech classroom to encourage students to internalize and apply what they learned, and to view knowledge holistically. Drawing on the work of Kunkel, Moreno, Lewin, and Korzybski, Murray focused on developing skills…

  7. Elwood Murray: Pioneering Methodologist in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Judi

    2014-01-01

    Elwood Murray (1897-1988) was a pioneer in communication education. Beginning in the 1930s, he applied nontraditional methods in the speech classroom to encourage students to internalize and apply what they learned, and to view knowledge holistically. Drawing on the work of Kunkel, Moreno, Lewin, and Korzybski, Murray focused on developing skills…

  8. Competing Environmental Ethics in Cooper's "The Pioneers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnassar, Sabri

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the environmental worthiness of James Fenimore Cooper's "The Pioneers" and analyzes the various and competing environmental ethics that Cooper introduces in this novel through his descriptions of the different relationships between humans and the natural world. Among these different environmental ethics are the…

  9. Pioneers for the Study on Yangshi Lei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张威; 李晓丹

    2003-01-01

    The architectural graphics and archives of Yangshi Lei collected in the National Library of China and other institutions are of great importance for the research on the architectural history of China. This paper introduces the pioneers for the study on Yangshi Lei and their innovative checkup and research work.

  10. A Pioneer of Collegiate Women's Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    This article features North Carolina State University's Kay Yow, a pioneer of collegiate women's sports. An Olympic gold medal champion whose entire coaching career has been spent in her home state of North Carolina, Yow has amassed a remarkable lifetime win-loss record of 729-337. She is one of only six coaches to have won at least 700 career…

  11. The Now Frontier. Pioneer to Jupiter. Man Links Earth and Planets. Issue No. 1-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973

    This packet of space science instructional materials includes five issues related to the planet Jupiter. Each issue presents factual material about the planet, diagramatic representations of its movements and positions relative to bright stars or the earth, actual photographs and/or tables of data collected relevant to Pioneer 10, the spacecraft…

  12. The mechanical design of an imaging photopolarimeter for the Jupiter missions (Pioneer 10 and 11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodak, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical design and fabrication are discussed of the imaging photopolarimeter (IPP), a multifunction space-qualified instrument used on the Jupiter Pioneer missions. The extreme environmental requirements for the structural design, optical system, and mechanisms are described with detailed discussion of some of the design and fabrication problems encountered.

  13. Science Park of Universities in Jiangsu Province Nanjing Jingang Science Pioneering Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> The Nanjing Jingang Science Pioneering Center was estab-lished in August 2000. It is located at Tower A, Jingang Building, 251 Heyan Road, Nanjing, and has a 28-story and 25,000m2 of space for the incubation of projects of

  14. Pioneers of laser propulsion: Saenger, Marx, Moeckel, and Kantrowitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Max M.; Hey, John D.

    2002-09-01

    The strength of empires and civilizations has often depended on novel forms of transportation: the Viking long boat, the Roman road, Iberian galleons, French and British steam ships, Indian trains, the car of the early twentieth century, the plane of the middle and the rocket of late. But Space has now come up against a barrier: the enormous and barely affordable expense of putting things into orbit and the unaffordable energy required to travel to the stars. The recent advent of very energetic lasers may reduce the cost. The pioneering ideas of the mid sixties appear less fanciful. Laser space propulsion is about to become such an important topic that its scientific origin and engineering roots need to be investigated. This is by no means an exhaustive survey. We review here the laser propulsion work of four eminent experts: Eugen Saenger, George Marx, Wolfgang Moeckel and Arthur Kantrowitz.

  15. Discovering Ourselves by Unfolding Our Panorama: Interviewing Pioneers in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, P. Paul; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines significant events that have influenced the personal and professional development of pioneers in the counseling field who have been interviewed in the "Journal of Counseling and Development." Presents some of the pioneers' observations and reflections about counselor training. (ABL)

  16. Miniature Sensor Probe for O2, CO2, and H2O Monitoring in Space Suits Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced space suits require lightweight, low-power, durable sensors for monitoring critical life support materials. No current compact sensors have the tolerance...

  17. On the possible onset of the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the observed onset of the Pioneer anomaly after Saturn encounter by Pioneer 11 is not necessarily due to mismodeling of solar radiation pressure but instead reflects a physically relevant characteristic of the anomaly itself. We employ the principles of a recently proposed cosmological model termed "the theory of inertial centers" along with an understanding of the fundamental assumptions taken by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to attempt to model this sudden onset. Due to an ambiguity that arises from the difference in the DSN definition of expected light-time with light-time according to the theory of inertial centers, we are forced to adopt a seemingly arbitrary convention to relate DSN-assumed clock-rates to physical clock-rates for this model. We offer a possible reason for adopting the convention employed in our analysis; however, we remain skeptical. Nevertheless, with this convention, one finds that this theory is able to replicate the previously reported Hubble-like beha...

  18. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. III: Probing the expansion of the Universe using gravitational wave standard sirens

    CERN Document Server

    Tamanini, Nicola; Barausse, Enrico; Sesana, Alberto; Klein, Antoine; Petiteau, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the capability of various configurations of the space interferometer eLISA to probe the late-time background expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens. We simulate catalogues of standard sirens composed by massive black hole binaries whose gravitational radiation is detectable by eLISA, and which are likely to produce an electromagnetic counterpart observable by future surveys. The main issue for the identification of a counterpart resides in the capability of obtaining an accurate enough sky localisation with eLISA. This seriously challenges the capability of four-link (2 arm) configurations to successfully constrain the cosmological parameters. Conversely, six-link (3 arm) configurations have the potential to provide a test of the expansion of the universe up to $z\\sim 8$ which is complementary to other cosmological probes based on electromagnetic observations only. In particular, in the most favourable scenarios, they can provide a significant constraint on $H_0$ at ...

  19. Chameleon effect and the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, John D

    2012-01-01

    The possibility that the apparent anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft may be due, at least in part, to a chameleon field effect is examined. A small spacecraft, with no thin shell, can have a more pronounced anomalous acceleration than a large compact body, such as a planet, having a thin shell. The chameleon effect seems to present a natural way to explain the differences seen in deviations from pure Newtonian gravity for a spacecraft and for a planet, and appears to be compatible with the basic features of the Pioneer anomaly, including the appearance of a jerk term. However, estimates of the size of the chameleon effect indicate that its contribution to the anomalous acceleration is negligible. We conclude that any inverse-square component in the anomalous acceleration is more likely caused by an unmodelled reaction force from solar-radiation pressure, rather than a chameleon field effect.

  20. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  1. a Study of the Pioneer Anomaly:. New Data and Objectives for New Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Toth, Viktor T.; Kellogg, Larry R.; Lau, Eunice L.; Lee, Kyong J.

    The Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft yielded the most precise navigation in deep space to date. However, their radiometric tracking data has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, Doppler frequency drift. The drift is a blue shift, uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 × 10-9 Hz/s and can be interpreted as a constant sunward acceleration of each particular spacecraft of aP = (8.74±1.33) × 10-10 m/s2 (or, alternatively, a time acceleration of at = (2.92±0.44) × 10-18 s/s2). This signal has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. We discuss the current state of the efforts to retrieve the entire data sets of the Pioneer 10 and 11 radiometric Doppler data. We also report on the availability of recently recovered telemetry files that may be used to reconstruct the engineering history of both spacecraft using original project documentation and newly developed software tools. We discuss possible ways to further investigate the discovered effect using these telemetry files in conjunction with the analysis of the much extended Pioneer Doppler data. In preparation for this new upcoming investigation, we summarize the current knowledge of the Pioneer anomaly and review some of the mechanisms proposed for its explanation. We emphasize the main objectives of this new study, namely (i) analysis of the early data that could yield the true direction of the anomaly and thus, its origin, (ii) analysis of planetary encounters, which should say more about the onset of the anomaly (e.g. Pioneer 11's Saturn flyby), (iii) analysis of the entire dataset, which should lead to a better determination of the temporal behavior of the anomaly, (iv) comparative analysis of individual anomalous accelerations for the two Pioneers with the data taken from similar heliocentric distances, (v) the detailed study of on-board systematics, and (vi) development of a thermal-electric-dynamical model using on-board telemetry. The outlined

  2. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Poyatos-Martínez, David; Weinmann, Frank

    2016-06-24

    The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP). The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique.

  3. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites †

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Poyatos-Martínez, David; Weinmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP). The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique. PMID:27347966

  4. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP. The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique.

  5. Tripler pioneers telemedicine across the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplain, C B; Lindborg, C E; Norton, S A; Hastings, J E

    1993-12-01

    Between January and August 1993, 59 medical teleconsultations were conducted successfully between the video teleconference center at Tripler Army Medical Center on Oahu and the video teleconference center on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This pioneer effort in the Pacific connected 2 archipeligoes separated by more than 2,200 nautical miles. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions were made in the specialties of orthopedics, dermatology, radiology, urology, pediatrics, ophthalmology and physical therapy. Geographic isolation no longer means limited medical specialty care.

  6. Sigmund Freud: pioneer in energy healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stephen D; Edwards, David J

    2010-02-01

    Energy healing is a popular contemporary term for forms of healing that facilitate a natural healing process through harmonizing, rebalancing, and releasing energy flow disturbed or blocked by disease and illness. Biographical evidence indicates that Freud used physical, suggestive, and radiant forms of energy healing, and that his personal life, metapsychology, and psychoanalysis were founded on dynamic, energetic experiences and conceptualizations. Analysis of Freud's life and work leads to the conclusion that in experience, theory, and practice, Freud typified the traditional role of therapist and was a pioneer in modern forms of energy healing.

  7. The Phase Space of z~1.2 SpARCS Clusters: Using Herschel to probe Dust Temperature as a Function of Environment and Accretion History

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, A G; Yee, H K C; Muzzin, A; Wilson, G; van der Burg, R F J; Balogh, M L; Shupe, D L

    2015-01-01

    We present a five-band Herschel study (100-500um) of three galaxy clusters at z~1.2 from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). With a sample of 120 spectroscopically-confirmed cluster members, we investigate the role of environment on galaxy properties utilizing the projected cluster phase space (line-of-sight velocity versus clustercentric radius), which probes the time-averaged galaxy density to which a galaxy has been exposed. We divide cluster galaxies into phase-space bins of (r/r200) x (v/sigma_v), tracing a sequence of accretion histories in phase space. Stacking optically star-forming cluster members on the Herschel maps, we measure average infrared star formation rates, and, for the first time in high-redshift galaxy clusters, dust temperatures for dynamically distinct galaxy populations---namely, recent infalls and those that were accreted onto the cluster at an earlier epoch. Proceeding from the infalling to virialized (central) regions of phase space, we find a steady...

  8. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  9. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  10. John Dique: dialysis pioneer and political advocate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Charles R P

    2016-02-01

    John Dique (1915-1995) epitomized the internationalism of medicine, the intellectual and manual dexterity of many pioneers of dialysis, and the social concern evinced by many nephrologists. Born in Burma of French, German, British and Indian ancestry; educated in India; an Anglo-Indian who described himself as British without ever having visited Britain; he moved to Australia in 1948 to escape the murderous inter-ethnic conflict that befell multicultural India as it and Pakistan became independent. Settling in Brisbane, he pioneered several novel medical techniques. After inventing some simple equipment to facilitate intravenous therapy, he established a neonatal exchange blood transfusion programme. Then, between 1954 and 1963, he personally constructed and operated two haemodialysis machines with which to treat patients suffering from acute renal failure, the first such treatment performed in Australasia. His patients survival results were, for the era, remarkable. He subsequently helped found the Royal Australasian College of Pathologists and went on to establish a successful private pathology practice. The latter years of his life, however, saw him become a social and political advocate. He fiercely opposed the emerging ideologies of multiculturalism and social liberalism that, he predicted, would seriously damage the national fabric of Western society. Public vilification ensued, his medical achievements disregarded. It does seem likely, however, that in none of the areas that he touched - whether medical, social, or political - has the last word yet been said.

  11. Solar cosmic ray measurements at high heliocentric latitudes. [proposed space missions of solar probes to study solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of what might result from a program of solar cosmic ray observations on 'out-of-the-ecliptic' spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: (1) The magnetic fields of the sun at high latitudes, (2) propagation of fast charged particles in the solar corona and in interplanetary space at high latitudes, (3) origin of interplanetary particle populations and the solar wind, (4) other particle phenomena in interplanetary space (e.g., acceleration of shock waves), and (5) effect of spacecraft mission characteristics on solar cosmic ray studies at high latitudes. Maps of polar coronal magnetic fields are shown.

  12. Solar extreme ultraviolet sensor and advanced langmuir probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    For more than two decades, the staff of the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL) has collaborated with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in the design and implementation of Langmuir probes (LP). This program of probe development under the direction of Larry Brace of GSFC has evolved methodically with innovations to: improve measurement precision, increase the speed of measurement, and reduce the weight, size, power consumption and data rate of the instrument. Under contract NAG5-419 these improvements were implemented and are what characterize the Advanced Langmuir Probe (ALP). Using data from the Langmuir Probe on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Brace and Walter Hoegy of GSFC demonstrated a novel method of monitoring the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux. This led to the idea of developing a sensor similar to a Langmuir probe specifically designed to measure solar EUV (SEUV) that uses a similar electronics package. Under this contract, a combined instrument package of the ALP and SEUV sensor was to be designed, constructed, and laboratory tested. Finally the instrument was to be flight tested as part of sounding rocket experiment to acquire the necessary data to validate this method for possible use in future earth and planetary aeronomy missions. The primary purpose of this contract was to develop the electronics hardware and software for this instrument, since the actual sensors were suppied by GSFC. Due to budget constraints, only a flight model was constructed. These electronics were tested and calibrated in the laboratory, and then the instrument was integrated into the rocket payload at Wallops Flight Facility where it underwent environmental testing. After instrument recalibration at SPRL, the payload was reintegrated and launched from the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks Alaska. The payload was successfully recovered and after refurbishment underwent further testing and developing to improve its performance for future use.

  13. Measuring planetary field parameters by scattered cubes from the Husar-5 rover: educational space probe construction for a field work mission with great number of 5 cm sized sensorcube units launched from the rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Kocsis, A.; Gats, J.

    2015-10-01

    The Hunveyor-Husar project tries to keep step with the main trends in the space research, in our recent case with the so called MSSM (Micro Sized Space- Mothership) and NPSDR (Nano, Pico Space Devices and Robots). [1]Of course, we do not want to scatter the smaller probe-cubes from a mothership, but from the Husar rover, and to do it on the planetary surface after landing.

  14. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. III: probing the expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanini, Nicola; Caprini, Chiara; Barausse, Enrico; Sesana, Alberto; Klein, Antoine; Petiteau, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the capability of various configurations of the space interferometer eLISA to probe the late-time background expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens. We simulate catalogues of standard sirens composed by massive black hole binaries whose gravitational radiation is detectable by eLISA, and which are likely to produce an electromagnetic counterpart observable by future surveys. The main issue for the identification of a counterpart resides in the capability of obtaining an accurate enough sky localisation with eLISA. This seriously challenges the capability of four-link (2 arm) configurations to successfully constrain the cosmological parameters. Conversely, six-link (3 arm) configurations have the potential to provide a test of the expansion of the universe up to z ~ 8 which is complementary to other cosmological probes based on electromagnetic observations only. In particular, in the most favourable scenarios, they can provide a significant constraint on H0 at the level of 0.5%. Furthermore, (ΩM, ΩΛ) can be constrained to a level competitive with present SNIa results. On the other hand, the lack of massive black hole binary standard sirens at low redshift allows to constrain dark energy only at the level of few percent.

  15. Sir Victor Horsley: pioneer craniopharyngioma surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, José M; Prieto, Ruth; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Sir Victor Horsley (1857-1916) is considered to be the pioneer of pituitary surgery. He is known to have performed the first surgical operation on the pituitary gland in 1889, and in 1906 he stated that he had operated on 10 patients with pituitary tumors. He did not publish the details of these procedures nor did he provide evidence of the pathology of the pituitary lesions operated on. Four of the patients underwent surgery at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (Queen Square, London), and the records of those cases were recently retrieved and analyzed by members of the hospital staff. The remaining cases corresponded to private operations whose records were presumably kept in Horsley's personal notebooks, most of which have been lost. In this paper, the authors have investigated the only scientific monograph providing a complete account of the pituitary surgeries that Horsley performed in his private practice, La Patologia Chirurgica dell'Ipofisi (Surgical Pathology of the Hypophysis), written in 1911 by Giovanni Verga, Italian assistant professor of anatomy at the University of Pavia. They have traced the life and work of this little-known physician who contributed to the preservation of Horsley's legacy in pituitary surgery. Within Verga's pituitary treatise, a full transcription of Horsley's notes is provided for 10 pituitary cases, including the patients' clinical symptoms, surgical techniques employed, intraoperative findings, and the outcome of surgery. The descriptions of the topographical and macroscopic features of two of the lesions correspond unmistakably to the features of craniopharyngiomas, one of the squamous-papillary type and one of the adamantinomatous type. The former lesion was found on necropsy after the patient's sudden death following a temporal osteoplastic craniectomy. Surgical removal of the lesion in the latter case, with the assumed nature of an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma, was successful. According to the

  16. Oral history in radiography: Listening to pioneers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, Christine [International Development Facilitator, Robert Winston Building, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.m.ferris@shu.ac.uk; Winslow, Michelle [University of Sheffield, Oral History Society, Academic Unit of Supportive Care, Sykes House, Little Common Lane, Sheffield S11 9NE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.winslow@sheffield.ac.uk

    2009-12-15

    We explore the professional value of the collection and analysis of oral histories in the history of radiography. Drawing on oral histories collected from radiographers, we analyse accounts of experiences to identify common themes, some of which are of current significance, whilst others have faded from existence. 15 oral histories were collected from radiographers whose combined practice spans the years 1930-1973. The sample consists of 6 male and 9 female radiographers. Themes identified in the oral histories include radiographers as invisible pioneers who worked in professionally unclaimed territory and their dangerous working environment. The oral histories reveal the working world of the radiographer as having encompassed a practice ethos where challenges became an accepted part of work. We gain insight into less observable aspects of the radiographer's role, the difficulties they faced, how they invented techniques and equipment, and how they managed their practice including protecting the public from ionising radiation sources.

  17. Thomas K. Jeffers: pioneer of coccidiosis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H D

    2012-01-01

    Thomas K. Jeffers has made many significant contributions to our understanding of the biology of the parasite Eimeria, the cause of coccidiosis in poultry. His work has had direct practical application for the control of this widespread disease. Topics discussed include Jeffers' pioneering work concerned with genetics of the host response to infection, the nature of biological and immunological intraspecific variation, drug resistance and discovery, field surveys of resistance, and his most recognized achievement-the demonstration that the lifecycle of coccidia may be altered by artificial selection. Parasites so modified are attenuated but retain their immunogenicity, a discovery that has led to the development of live vaccines that are inherently non-pathogenic. This article provides a brief biography and describes the contributions that Jeffers has made to our knowledge of coccidiosis.

  18. A Pioneer of Global Change Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ One summer's day in 1984, a meteorologist came all the way from the United States to Prof. Ye Duzheng, a CAS atmospheric scientist in Beijing, in the hope of establishing cooperative research into global climate change, a field unfamiliar to most scientists in the world at that time. His proposal immediately caught the interest of Ye, who was then president of the Chinese Meteorological Society and vice-president of CAS. Prof. Ye believed it to be an extremely important issue requiring sustained and collaborative attention. Already in his seventies, he found some young researchers to work with him in the field. Two decades later, global change is now recognized as a major science branch. As a pioneer of this branch, Prof. Ye was awarded the prestigious Prize of the World Meteorological Organization in 2003, and honored with China's National Supreme S&T Award in 2005.

  19. Pioneer Venus polarimetry and haze optical thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, W. J. J.; Wauben, W. M. F.; Travis, L. D.; Hovenier, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus mission provided us with high-resolution measurements at four wavelengths of the linear polarization of sunlight reflected by the Venus atmosphere. These measurements span the complete phase angle range and cover a period of more than a decade. A first analysis of these data by Kawabata et al. confirmed earlier suggestions of a haze layer above and partially mixed with the cloud layer. They found that the haze exhibits large spatial and temporal variations. The haze optical thickness at a wavelength of 365 nm was about 0.06 at low latitudes, but approximately 0.8 at latitudes from 55 deg poleward. Differences between morning and evening terminator have also been reported by the same authors. Using an existing cloud/haze model of Venus, we study the relationship between the haze optical thickness and the degree of linear polarization. Variations over the visible disk and phase angle dependence are investigated. For that purpose, exact multiple scattering computations are compared with Pioneer Venus measurements. To get an impression of the variations over the visible disk, we have first studied scans of the polarization parallel to the intensity equator. After investigating a small subset of the available data we have the following results. Adopting the haze particle characteristics given by Kawabata et al., we find a thickening of the haze at increasing latitudes. Further, we see a difference in haze optical thickness between the northern and southern hemispheres that is of the same order of magnitude as the longitudinal variation of haze thickness along a scan line. These effects are most pronounced at a wavelength of 935 nm. We must emphasize the tentative nature of the results, because there is still an enormous amount of data to be analyzed. We intend to combine further polarimetric research of Venus with constraints on the haze parameters imposed by physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere.

  20. 75 FR 17798 - Pioneer Bond Fund, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... subsidiary of Pioneer Global Asset Management S.p.A. and its parent UniCredit S.p.A. The Adviser is..., Pioneer Short Term Income Fund, Pioneer Strategic Income Fund, Pioneer Variable Contracts Trust (together, the ``Trusts'') and Pioneer Investment Management, Inc. (the ``Adviser''). Filing Dates: The...

  1. Synthesis-enabled probing of mitosene structural space leads to improved IC₅₀ over mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhitong; Touve, Mollie; Barnes, Josue; Reich, Norbert; Zhang, Liming

    2014-08-25

    A DNA crosslinking approach, which is distinct but related to the double alkylation by mitomycin C, involving a novel electrophilic spiro-cyclopropane intermediate is hypothesized. Rational design and substantial structural simplification permitted the expedient chemical synthesis and rapid discovery of MTSB-6, a mitomycin C analogue which is twice as potent as mitomycin C against the prostate cancer cells. MTSB-6 shows improvements in its selective action against noncancer prostate cells over mitomycin C. This hypothesis-driven discovery opens novel yet synthetically accessible mitosene structural space for discovering more potent and less toxic therapeutic candidates.

  2. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  3. Probing seismic solar analogues through observations with the NASA Kepler space telescope and HERMES high-resolution spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; García, R A; Nascimento,, J do; Duarte, T S S; Mathis, S; Regulo, C; Ballot, J; Egeland, R; Castro, M; Pérez-Herńandez, F; Creevey, O; Tkachenko, A; van Reeth, T; Bigot, L; Corsaro, E; Metcalfe, T; Mathur, S; Palle, P L; Prieto, C Allende; Montes, D; Johnston, C; Andersen, M F; van Winckel, H

    2016-01-01

    Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the \\Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al. (2016a,b) and Beck et al (2016a,b), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By invest...

  4. Pioneers! O Pioneers!’ and Whitman’s Early German Translators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Steinroetter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This response to Kirsten Harris's essay on British socialist reactions to Walt Whitman's poem "Pioneers! O Pioneers!" traces some of the political and cultural issues raised by Harris in the context of Whitman's early German translators, inviting a comparative discussion of key aspects of the poem's transatlantic reception in these two important European cultural contexts. While Whitman's poetry often represented an ideal vehicle for progressive and even revolutionary messages in the eyes of his early German translators, its political complexity and ambiguity allowed it to appeal to translators and readers of different, sometimes even opposed political leanings, both left and right. Given the interest that 'Pioneers!' held for British socialists, as Harris describes, the poem's translation history in Germany provides an intriguing counterpoint in some notable aspects. It seems to have been largely ignored by early German socialists, while for the nationalist Wilhelm Schölermann, one of the first German translators of Whitman's poetry to include the poem in his selection (1904 and single it out for its significance, the poem was of special interest as a vision of what his country could aspire to after a cultural rebirth.

  5. Probing Seismic Solar Analogues Through Observations With The NASA Kepler Space Telescope and Hermes High-Resolution Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; Salabert, D.; Garcia, R. A.; do Nascimento, J., Jr.; Duarte, T. S. S.; Mathis, S.; Regulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Egeland, R.; Castro, M.; Pérez-Herńandez, F.,; Creevey, O.; Tkachenko, A.; van Reeth, T.; Bigot, L.; Corsaro, E.; Metcalfe, T.; Mathur, S.; Palle, P. L.; Allende Prieto, C.; Montes, D.; Johnston, C.; Andersen, M. F.; van Winckel, H.

    2016-11-01

    Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al (2016ab) and Beck et al. (2016ab), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By investigating the chromospheric and photospheric activity of the solar analogues in this sample, it was shown that for a large fraction of these stars the measured activity levels are compatible to levels of the 11-year solar activity cycle 23. A clear correlation between the lithium abundance and surface rotation was found for rotation periods shorter than the solar value. Comparing the lithium abundance measured in the solar analogues to evolutionary models with the Toulouse-Geneva Evolutionary Code (TGEC), we found that the solar models calibrated to the Sun also correctly describe the set of solar/stellar analogs showing that they share the same internal mixing physics. Finally, the star KIC3241581 and KIC10644353 are discussed in more detail.

  6. Nuclear power in space. Use of reactors and radioactive substances as power sources in satellites and space probes; Kaernkraft i rymden. Anvaendningen av reaktorer och radioaktiva aemnen som kraftkaellor i satelliter och rymdsonder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoestbaeck, Lars

    2008-11-15

    Today solar panels are the most common technique to supply power to satellites. Solar panels will work as long as the power demand of the satellite is limited and the satellite can be equipped with enough panels, and kept in an orbit that allows enough sunlight to hit the panels. There are various types of space missions that do not fulfil these criteria. With nuclear power these types of missions can be powered regardless of the sunlight and as early as 1961 the first satellite with a nuclear power source was placed in orbit. Out of seventy known space missions that has made use of nuclear power, ten have had some kind of failure. In no case has the failure been associated with the nuclear technology used. This report discusses to what degree satellites with nuclear power are a source for potential radioactive contamination of Swedish territory. It is not a discussion for or against nuclear power in space. Neither is it an assessment of consequences if radioactive material from a satellite would reach the earth's surface. Historically two different kinds of Nuclear Power Sources (NPS) have been used to generate electric power in space. The first is the reactor where the energy is derived from nuclear fission of 235U and the second is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) where electricity is generated from the heat of naturally decaying radionuclides. NPS has historically only been used in space by United States and the Soviet Union (and in one failing operation Russia). Nuclear Power Sources have been used in three types of space objects: satellites, space probes and moon/Mars vehicles. USA has launched one experimental reactor into orbit, all other use of NPS by the USA has been RTG:s. The Soviet Union, in contrast, only launched a few RTG:s but nearly forty reactors. The Soviet use of NPS is less transparent than the use in USA and some data published on Soviet systems are more or less well substantiated assessments. It is likely that also future

  7. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Observations of T Dwarfs: Brown Dwarf Multiplicity and New Probes of the L/T Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, A J; Cruz, K L; Reid, I N; Leggett, S K; Liebert, J; Burrows, A; Brown, M E; Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Leggett, Sandy K.; Liebert, James; Burrows, Adam; Brown, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS imaging survey of 22 T-type field brown dwarfs. Five are resolved as binary systems with angular separations of 0"05-0"35, and companionship is established on the basis of component F110W-F170M colors (indicative of CH4 absorption) and low probabilities of background contamination. Prior ground-based observations show 2MASS 1553+1532AB to be a common proper motion binary. The properties of these systems - low multiplicity fraction (11[+7][-3]% resolved, as corrected for sample selection baises), close projected separations (a = 1.8-5.0 AU) and near-unity mass ratios - are consistent with previous results for field brown dwarf binaries. Three of the binaries have components that span the poorly-understood transition between L dwarfs and T dwarfs. Spectral decomposition analysis of one of these, SDSS 1021-0304AB, reveals a peculiar flux reversal between its components, as its T5 secondary is ~30% brighter at 1.05 and 1.27 micron than its T1 primary. This...

  8. Probing structure and microstructure of epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films by reciprocal space mapping and pole figure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y., E-mail: yanling.ge@tkk.fi [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 16200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Heczko, O. [Institute of Physics, AS CR, Na Slovance 2, CZ-18221 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Hannula, S.-P. [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 16200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Faehler, S. [IFW Dresden, PO Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    The crystal structure and complex twinning microstructure of epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films on (1 0 0) MgO substrates was studied by X-ray diffraction using 2{theta} scans, pole figure measurements and reciprocal space mapping (RSM). The orientation distribution of all variants is visualized by RSM, which forms the basis for a better understanding of the crystallographic relation between variants and substrate. Above the martensitic transformation temperature the film consists of single austenite phase with lattice constant a = 5.81 A at 419 K. At room temperature some epitaxially grown residual austenite with a = 5.79 A remains at the interface with the substrate, followed by an intermediate layer exhibiting orthorhombic distortion, a{sub trans} = 6.05 A, b{sub trans} = 5.87 A, c{sub trans} = 5.73 A and a major fraction of 14M (7M) martensite, a = 6.16 Ab = 5.79 Ac = 5.48 A. The seven-layered modulation of this metastable martensite structure is directly observed by RSM. The intermediate phase observed close to interface indicates the existence of an instable, pre-adaptive martensite phase with a short stacking period.

  9. Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772): pioneer of neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Riech, Sheryl; Verma, Ketan; Loukas, Marios; Mortazavi, Martin; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron

    2011-08-01

    Emanuel Swedenborg is widely accredited for his religious fervor and devout dedication to his spirituality. He spearheaded the creation of what is known today as the New Jerusalem Church. However, Swedenborg also served as a prominent figure in the European Enlightenment, making noteworthy strides in the fields of mathematics and science. His acumen for science instilled in the medical world groundbreaking ideas that would forever innovate the practice of medicine. Not only did Swedenborg describe intricacies of the cerebral cortex but he also discovered the perivascular spaces, the foramen of Magendie, and the cerebrospinal fluid. He noted the importance of the pituitary gland or "arch gland" in maintaining normal neurological function. Lastly, in a period where the cortex was given no significant function, Swedenborg developed the idea of somatotopic organization, and this was almost 100 years prior to Fritsch and Hitzig. It is on the shoulders of such great pioneers as Emanuel Swedenborg that we base our current understanding of the nervous system.

  10. VISTA: Pioneering New Survey Telescope Starts Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    A new telescope - VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) - has just started work at ESO's Paranal Observatory and has made its first release of pictures. VISTA is a survey telescope working at infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest telescope dedicated to mapping the sky. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. Spectacular new images of the Flame Nebula, the centre of our Milky Way galaxy and the Fornax Galaxy Cluster show that it is working extremely well. VISTA is the latest telescope to be added to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. It is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA's main mirror is 4.1 metres across and is the most highly curved mirror of this size and quality ever made - its deviations from a perfect surface are less than a few thousandths of the thickness of a human hair - and its construction and polishing presented formidable challenges. VISTA was conceived and developed by a consortium of 18 universities in the United Kingdom [1] led by Queen Mary, University of London and became an in-kind contribution to ESO as part of the UK's accession agreement. The telescope design and construction were project-managed by the Science and Technology Facilities Council's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (STFC, UK ATC). Provisional acceptance of VISTA was formally granted by ESO at a ceremony at ESO's Headquarters in Garching, Germany, attended by representatives of Queen Mary, University of London and STFC, on 10 December 2009 and the telescope will now be operated by ESO. "VISTA is a unique addition to ESO's observatory on Cerro Paranal. It will play a pioneering role in surveying the southern sky at infrared wavelengths and will find many interesting targets for further study by the Very Large Telescope, ALMA and

  11. Less Mundane Explanation of Pioneer Anomaly from Q-Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been various explanations of Pioneer blueshift anomaly in the past few years; nonetheless no explanation has been offered from the viewpoint of Q-relativity physics. In the present paper it is argued that Pioneer anomalous blueshift may be caused by Pioneer spacecraft experiencing angular shift induced by similar Q- relativity effect which may also affect Jupiter satellites. By taking into consideration “aether drift” effect, the proposed method as described herein could explain Pioneer blueshift anomaly within 0.26% error range, which speaks for itself. Another new proposition of redshift quantization is also proposed from gravitational Bohr-radius which is consistent with Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization. Further observation is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  12. Does Increased Spending on Pharmaceutical Marketing Inhibit Pioneering Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Denis G; Troyer, Jennifer L

    2016-04-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticized for developing and aggressively marketing drugs that do not provide significant health benefits relative to existing drugs but retain the benefits of patent protection. Critics argue that drug marketing increases health care expenditures and provides a disincentive for pioneering drug innovation. However, evidence that marketing expenditures have any relationship to new drug approvals has been anecdotal. We hypothesized that, at publicly traded pharmaceutical firms, increased marketing expenditures will result in a reduced volume of pioneering new drugs in comparison to less innovative new drugs. We also hypothesized that additional research and development spending will result in an increased volume of pioneering new drugs in comparison to less innovative drugs. Results confirm our hypotheses. Specific policy recommendations for altering firms' incentives for the development of pioneering drugs are provided.

  13. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  14. Pioneering new approaches. Educating girls in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namuddu, K

    1993-01-01

    education. Women's groups are also questioning policies that bar girls from reentering school after a childhood pregnancy. Uganda has a program to help girls resume their studies after pregnancy, but not within the main educational system. Pioneering new approaches is occurring and the Rockefeller Foundation is taking the lead in an 18-member international donor group in supporting the promotion of female education.

  15. 76 FR 83 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition and Environmental Assessment for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition... has received a petition from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., seeking a determination of...) from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. (Pioneer) of Johnston, IA, seeking a determination...

  16. Active Probing of Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    corroborate the &*skty 111"- or a very negatively charged body. In previous publica . 1la Wolene af Ot presac o m Ornbaemn farW~ beW h IOMt ad #k tions...have evolved into periodic spikes. The middle and botcom panels of Figura 4 represent the nor- malized energetic particle density (cm- 2 ) cona.ined on

  17. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    Invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pioneered a novel aspect for the surface metrology concept. A range of scanning probe methods have been developed over the years based on different sorts of tip-surface interaction: electrical, optical, thermal, force. Reproducible and fast fabrication......Bits were investigated by imaging optical gratings. In most cases, the NanoBits showed better performance than the standard pyramid AFM probes, and long scan experiments proved that (i) the NanoBits did not get blunt even after 100 scans (continuous 30 h imaging), and (ii) stiction into the slit...

  18. Pioneer and Voyager observations of Forbush decreases between 6 and 24 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.; Webber, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed phenomenological description of deep space Forbush decreases is given, using Voyager and Pioneer data. The transient reduction in cosmic ray intensity can be produced by (1) reflection at the shock front; (2) increased modulation associated with the disturbed region behind the shock; (3) a barrier mechanism involving large-scale tangential discontinuities; or (4) particle drifts in the enhanced magnetic field by the post-shock region. The presence of a well-defined precursor peak clearly indicates that particle reflection is important. Forbush decreases appear to be an important component in the long-term modulation.

  19. Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Nekovee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is being intensively researched as the enabling technology for license-exempt access to the so-called TV White Spaces (TVWS, large portions of spectrum in the UHF/VHF bands which become available on a geographical basis after digital switchover. Both in the US, and more recently, in the UK the regulators have given conditional endorsement to this new mode of access. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in technology, regulation, and standardisation of cognitive access to TVWS. It examines the spectrum opportunity and commercial use cases associated with this form of secondary access.

  20. Axogenesis in the antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria revisited: the base pioneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Erica; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George

    2015-01-01

    The antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria comprises two parallel pathways projecting to the brain, each pioneered early in embryogenesis by a pair of sibling cells located at the antennal tip. En route, the growth cones of pioneers from one pathway have been shown to contact a guidepost-like cell called the base pioneer. Its role in axon guidance remains unclear as do the cellular guidance cues regulating axogenesis in the other pathway supposedly without a base pioneer. Further, while the tip pioneers are known to delaminate from the antennal epithelium into the lumen, the origin of this base pioneer is unknown. Here, we use immunolabeling and immunoblocking methods to clarify these issues. Co-labeling against the neuron-specific marker horseradish peroxidase and the pioneer-specific cell surface glycoprotein Lazarillo identifies not only the tip pioneers but also a base pioneer associated with each of the developing antennal pathways. Both base pioneers co-express the mesodermal label Mes3, consistent with a lumenal origin, whereas the tip pioneers proved Mes3-negative confirming their affiliation with the ectodermal epithelium. Lazarillo antigen expression in the antennal pioneers followed a different temporal dynamic: continuous in the tip pioneers, but in the base pioneers, only at the time their filopodia and those of the tip pioneers first recognize one another. Immunoblocking of Lazarillo expression in cultured embryos disrupts this recognition resulting in misguided axogenesis in both antennal pathways.

  1. Interstellar Probe: The Next Step To Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-07-01

    In the years following the discovery of the solar wind, the term "heliosphere" was coined and defined as "the region of interplanetary space where the solar wind is flowing supersonically." In June 1971, with the development of the Pioneer probes to Jupiter and beyond well underway, a session of the American Astronautical Society meeting considered scientific exploration reaching beyond the solar system and into the interstellar medium. Despite many discussions, studies, and meetings since, the most recent held under the auspices of the Keck Institute for Space Studies (8-11 September 2014 and 13-15 January 2015), such missions have been relegated to the '"future" due to the large distances and solar system escape speeds contemplated for their execution. In the meantime, the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), consisting of the twin Voyager spacecraft almost 40 years since their respective launches, are making inroads into this region beyond the termination shock of the solar wind, a new region of the solid bodies of the solar system has been opened by the New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system, and the Cassini Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have remotely sensed neutral atoms that have provided significant clues to the global structure of the interaction of the solar wind and interstellar medium. It is now time for a dedicated mission to the regime beyond the solar system to explore our galactic environment. A first, near-term implementation can be carried out with the near-current flight system technology. What is also clear is that the high speeds required will limit the spacecraft to a relatively small mass of no more than ~500 kg, regardless of the propulsion details. The recent success of the New Horizons mission at the Pluto system illustrates that with modern technologies, such spacecraft sizes can still accommodate the means to produce paradigm-shifting science, providing for a compelling scientific mission. The

  2. Franz Ulinski, an Almost Forgotten Early Pioneer of Rocketry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, B. P.

    2002-01-01

    During the early period of rocket development several pioneers originating from the former Austro-Hungarian empire contributed their ideas to the new field of rocketry. The most well known - regarded as the "father of rocketry" in Western Europe - is Hermann Oberth. The others were Max Valier, Franz von Hoefft, Guido von Pirquet, Hermann Potocnik, Friedrich Schmiedl, Franz Ulinski, Eugen Saenger and others. Franz Ulinski (1890-1974) was born 1890 in Blosdorf, Moravia (now Mljadejow, Czech Republic). After attending schools in Wels, Upper Austria, he started a career in the Austro-Hungarian Army in 1910. During his service he worked beginning 1917 at an airplane engine plant in Fischamend and in 1919/20 at the "Fliegerarsenal" (aircraft arsenal) in Vienna. End of 1920 the army of the remaining republic of Austria had to severely reduce its forces and Ulinski was superannuated without further payment. Since 1917 he was also inscribed at the College for Advanced Technology in Vienna ("Technische Hochschule Wien"), but he never graduated, instead he autodidactically attained the VDI-Engineering-Diploma (VDI = "Verein Deutscher Ingenieure"- Association of German Engineers). During 1921-1924 he worked as a development engineer and later as a design engineer for a car factory. In 1925 he set up and ran his own company (radio sale enterprise) and in 1929 an engineering workshop. From 1938 to 1945 he first served as technical staff and later as a design engineer at the Siebel- Flugzeugwerke (Airplane-Factory) in Halle/Saale, Germany. After the Second World War he was employed as a design engineer at different engineering companies in Austria and he died 1974 in Wels. Ulinski's first contact with the topic of space flight occurred during the time period when he was a member of the Austro- Hungarian Army. Ulinski was one of the first in the german speaking part of Europe to publish an article with his ideas about space flight in 1920 (three years before Herman Oberth

  3. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, A.; Burke, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967-1917) addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories: 1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms. 2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms. 3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside. He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella experiments, the first attempts to simulate cosmic phenomena within a

  4. Carl Størmer Auroral Pioneer

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Alv

    2013-01-01

    This biography summarizes the seminal contributions to auroral and space science of Carl Størmer (1874 - 1957). He was the first to develop precise photographic methods to calculate heights and morphologies of diverse auroral forms during four solar cycles. Størmer independently devised numerical techniques to determine the trajectories of high-energy charged particles allowed and forbidden in the Earth’s magnetic field. His theoretical analyses explained cosmic ray access to the upper atmosphere, 20 years before they were identified by other scientists. Størmer’s crowning achievement, “The Polar Aurora,” published when he was 81 years old, stands to this day as a regularly cited guide in graduate-level courses on space physics.   The authors present the life of this prodigious scientist in relation to the cultural life of early 20th century in Norway and to the development of the space sciences in the post-Sputnik era.

  5. Support for Temporally Varying Behavior of the Pioneer Anomaly from the Extended Pioneer 10 and 11 Doppler Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Toth, Viktor T.; Ellis, Jordan; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2011-08-01

    The Pioneer anomaly is a small sunward anomalous acceleration found in the trajectory analysis of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. As part of the investigation of the effect, the analysis of recently recovered Doppler data for both spacecraft has been completed. The presence of a small anomalous acceleration is confirmed by using data spans more than twice as long as those that were previously analyzed. We examine the constancy and direction of the Pioneer anomaly and conclude that (i) the data favor a temporally decaying anomalous acceleration (˜2×10-11m/s2/yr) with an over 10% improvement in the residuals compared to a constant acceleration model, (ii) although the direction of the acceleration remains imprecisely determined, we find no support in favor of a Sun-pointing direction over the Earth-pointing or along the spin-axis directions, and (iii) support for an early “onset” of the acceleration remains weak in the pre-Saturn Pioneer 11 tracking data. We present these new findings and discuss their implications for the nature of the Pioneer anomaly.

  6. Small Probe Reentry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), and its research partner, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (CPSLO), will develop an integrated Small Probe Reentry System (SPRS) for low...

  7. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data chan

  8. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  9. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967–1917 addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories:

    1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms.
    2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms.
    3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside.

    He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella

  10. Lessons Learned from the Pioneers 10/11 for a Mission to Test the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Turyshev, S G; Anderson, J D; Turyshev, Slava G.; Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the radio-metric tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between 20--70 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun has consistently indicated the presence of an anomalous, small, constant Doppler frequency drift. The drift is a blue-shift, uniformly changing with rate a_t = (2.92 +/- 0.44) x 10^(-18) s/s^2. It can also be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a_P = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^(-8) cm/s^2 directed towards the Sun. Although it is suspected that there is a systematic origin to the effect, none has been found. As a result, the nature of this anomaly has become of growing interest. Here we discuss the details of our recent investigation focusing on the effects both external to and internal to the spacecraft, as well as those due to modeling and computational techniques. We review some of the mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and show their inability to account for the observed behavior of the anomaly. We also present lessons learned from this investigation for a po...

  11. [Water use of re-vegetation pioneer tree species Schima superba and Acacia mangium in hilly land of South China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhao, Ping; Ni, Guang-Yan; Zhu, Li-Wei; Zhao, Xiu-Hua; Zhao, Pei-Qiang; Niu, Jun-Feng

    2014-04-01

    The xylem sap flows of two pioneer tree species, i.e., Acacia mangium and Schima superba, in degraded hill lands of South China, were continually monitored with Granier' s thermal dissipation probes during 2004-2007 and 2008-2012, respectively, and their seasonal transpiration changes at different tree age levels were compared. The results showed that the annual transpiration of both species increased with tree ages, and S. superba demonstrated a higher value than A. mangium. The average annual whole-tree transpiration of S. superba (7014.76 kg) was higher than that of A. mangium (3704.97 kg). A. mangium (511.46-1802.17 kg) had greater seasonal variation than S. superba (1346.48-2349.35 kg). The standard regression coefficients (beta) of transpiration (Eh), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for both species increased with soil moisture, suggesting the increase of soil moisture generated a greater sensitivity of plants to environmental factors. Partial correlation analysis revealed that soil moisture played an important role in the seasonal variation of transpiration of both species. The optimum soil moistures of S. superba and A. mangium were 0.22-0.40 and 0.29-0.30 (V/V), respectively, indicating the native pioneer species S. superba better adapted to water deficit compared with exotic pioneer species A. mangium.

  12. "Mid-Week Pictorial": Pioneer American Photojournalism Magazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Keith

    In 1914 (22 years before the inception of "Life" magazine), the "New York Times" began publishing "Mid-Week Pictorial" to absorb a flood of war pictures pouring in from Europe. Several sociological and technological forces shaped "Mid-Week Pictorial" as a pioneer of American photojournalism magazines,…

  13. Greenness: Pioneering a New Path of Ecological Civilization Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    liang Yong; Gong Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    In May 2015,The Opinion on Accelerating Ecological Civilization Construction by the CPC Central Committee and the State Council for the first time conceives the concept of greenness,and requests the coordinate promotion of new-type industrialization,urbanization,informationization,cultural modernization and greenness.Greenness is a profound innovation from theory to practice,pioneers a new path of

  14. Positioning Reduction of Deep Space Probes Based on VLBI Tracking%深空探测器VLBI跟踪定位归算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔书波

    2011-01-01

    . (2) Develop software modules for the correction of various observational errors related to the transmis-sion medium, quasi-clock bias and gravitational retardation, in particular, the correction of the quasi-clock uncertainty based on observations of extragalactic radio sources with known coordinates, for the enhancement of the systematicness and integrity of the current soft-ware. (3) Improve the function of the existing software on the reduction of observations of differential, phase referencing and same beam VLBI with simulation and real data tests. (4) Investigate the application of Kalman filter to the positioning reduction of deep space probes and develop related software systems.In summary, the progress in this dissertation is made in the positioning reduction of deep space probes tracked by VLBI concerning the algorithm study, software development, real observation processing and so on, while a further study is still urgent and arduous.

  15. Intraguild predation in pioneer predator communities of alpine glacier forelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raso, Lorna; Sint, Daniela; Mayer, Rebecca; Plangg, Simon; Recheis, Thomas; Brunner, Silvia; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Pioneer communities establishing themselves in the barren terrain in front of glacier forelands consist principally of predator species such as carabid beetles and lycosid spiders. The fact that so many different predators can co-inhabit an area with no apparent primary production was initially explained by allochthonous material deposited in these forelands. However, whether these populations can be sustained on allochthonous material alone is questionable and recent studies point towards this assumption to be flawed. Intraguild predation (IGP) might play an important role in these pioneer predator assemblages, especially in the very early successional stages where other prey is scarce. Here, we investigated IGP between the main predator species and their consumption of Collembola, an important autochthonous alternative prey, within a glacier foreland in the Ötztal (Austrian Alps). Multiplex PCR and stable isotope analysis were used to characterize the trophic niches in an early and late pioneer stage over 2 years. Results showed that intraguild prey was consumed by all invertebrate predators, particularly the larger carabid species. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the DNA detection frequency of IGP prey was not significantly higher in early than in late pioneer stage, which was corroborated by the stable isotope analysis. Collembola were the most frequently detected prey in all of the predators, and the overall prey DNA detection patterns were consistent between years. Our findings show that IGP appears as a constant in these pioneer predator communities and that it remains unaffected by successional changes. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. On the Origin of the Dark Matter/Energy in the Universe and the Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham A. Ungar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Einstein's special relativity is a theory rich of paradoxes, one of which is the recently discovered Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox. According to this Paradox, the relativistic invariant mass of a galaxy of moving stars exceeds the sum of the relativistic invariant masses of the constituent stars owing to their motion relative to each other. This excess of mass is the mass of virtual matter that has no physical properties other than positive relativistic invariant mass and, hence, that reveals its presence by no means other than gravity. As such, this virtual matter is the dark matter that cosmologists believe is necessary in order to supply the missing gravity that keeps galaxies stable. Based on the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox we offer in this article a model which quantifies the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts and other deep space missions, and explains the presence of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. It turns out that the origin of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe lies in the Paradox, and that the origin of the Pioneer anomaly results from neglecting the Paradox. In order to appreciate the physical significance of the Paradox within the frame of Einstein's special theory of relativity, following the presentation of the Paradox we demonstrate that the Paradox is responsible for the extension of the kinetic energy theorem and of the additivity of energy and momentum from classical to relativistic mechanics. Clearly, the claim that the acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts is anomalous is incomplete, within the frame of Einstein's special relativity, since those who made the claim did not take into account the presence of the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox (which is understandable since the Paradox, published in the author's 2008 book, was discovered by the author only recently. It remains to test how well the Paradox accords with observations.

  17. On the Origin of the Dark Matter/Energy in the Universe and the Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungar A. A.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Einstein’s special relativity is a theory rich of paradoxes, one of which is the recently discovered Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox . According to this Paradox, the rela- tivistic invariant mass of a galaxy of moving stars exceeds the sum of the relativistic invariant masses of the constituent stars owing to their motion relative to each other. This excess of mass is the mass of virtual matter that has no physical properties other than positive relativistic invariant mass and, hence, that reveals its presence by no means other than gravity. As such, this virtual matter is the dark matter that cosmologists be- lieve is necessary in order to supply the missing gravity that keeps galaxies stable. Based on the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox we offer in this article a model which quan- tifies the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts and other deep space missions, and explains the presence of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. It turns out that the origin of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe lies in the Para- dox, and that the origin of the Pioneer anomaly results from neglecting the Paradox. In order to appreciate the physical significance of the Paradox within the frame of Ein- stein’s special theory of relativity, following the presentation of the Paradox we demon- strate that the Paradox is responsible for the extension of the kinetic energy theorem and of the additivity of energy and momentum from classical to relativistic mechanics. Clearly, the claim that the acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts is anomalous is incomplete, within the frame of Einstein’s special relativity, since those who made the claim did not take into account the presence of the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox (which is understandable since the Paradox, published in the author’s 2008 book, was discovered by the author only recently. It remains to test how well the Paradox accords with observations.

  18. Artificial intelligence. Fears of an AI pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stuart; Bohannon, John

    2015-07-17

    From the enraged robots in the 1920 play R.U.R. to the homicidal computer H.A.L. in 2001: A Space Odyssey, science fiction writers have embraced the dark side of artificial intelligence (AI) ever since the concept entered our collective imagination. Sluggish progress in AI research, especially during the “AI winter” of the 1970s and 1980s, made such worries seem far-fetched. But recent breakthroughs in machine learning and vast improvements in computational power have brought a flood of research funding— and fresh concerns about where AI may lead us. One researcher now speaking up is Stuart Russell, a computer scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, who with Peter Norvig, director of research at Google, wrote the premier AI textbook, Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, now in its third edition. Last year, Russell joined the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom as an AI expert focusing on “risks that could lead to human extinction.” Among his chief concerns, which he aired at an April meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, run by the United Nations, is the danger of putting military drones and weaponry under the full control of AI systems. This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity.

  19. Support for temporally varying behavior of the Pioneer anomaly from the extended Pioneer 10 and 11 Doppler data sets

    CERN Document Server

    Turyshev, Slava G; Ellis, Jordan; Markwardt, Craig B

    2011-01-01

    The Pioneer anomaly is a small sunward anomalous acceleration found in the trajectory analysis of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. As part of the investigation of the effect, analysis of recently recovered Doppler data for both spacecraft has been completed. The presence of a small anomalous acceleration is confirmed using data spans more than twice as long as those that were previously analyzed. We examine the constancy and direction of the Pioneer anomaly, and conclude that: i) the data favor a temporally decaying anomalous acceleration (~2\\times 10^{-11} m/s^2/yr) with an over 10% improvement in the residuals compared to a constant acceleration model; ii) although the direction of the acceleration remains imprecisely determined, we find no support in favor of a Sun-pointing direction over the Earth-pointing or along the spin-axis directions, and iii) support for an early "onset" of the acceleration remains weak in the pre-Saturn Pioneer 11 tracking data. We present these new findings and discuss their imp...

  20. 76 FR 33306 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model, Request for Applications; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Care Organization Model: Request for Applications.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Alexander... http://innovations.cms.gov/areas-of-focus/seamless-and-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable...

  1. 基于深空探测器下行信号的太阳风观测及通信链路的影响综述∗%A Review of Observations of Solar Winds and Solar Impact on Deep-Space Telecommunications Using Downlink Signals From Space Probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐云秋; 孔德庆

    2015-01-01

    Deep-space telecommunications will be severely affected by solar winds and the solar corona during a Superior Solar Conjunction. In this paper we discuss effects of inhomogeneous solar winds on signals in deep-space telecommunications. The effects include intensity scintillations, phase scintillations, and spectral-broadening phenomena. We then give a comprehensive review of observations of signal scintillations induced by solar winds and solar coronal events using downlink signals from deep-space probes. Our review is based on our investigation of dozens of papers related to the subject. We propose a scheme to observe signal scintillations using communication signals of existing space probes. The scheme aims to advance the Chinese deep-space exploration plan. The scheme can be applied in conjunction with data communications and orbital measurements of deep-space probes once the Chinese deep-space exploration starts.%在上合期间,日冕和太阳风严重影响深空通信链路。论述了非均匀太阳风对深空通信的影响,综述了基于深空探测器下行信号的太阳风观测,以及通过反演技术进行太阳风和日冕特性研究的国内外进展。以我国的深空探测为背景,提出一套基于探测器下行信号的太阳风观测方案,并可利用现有探测器进行预先观测研究。在我国深空探测任务开始后,在数据通信和测轨的同时,进行全过程的观测实验。

  2. 75 FR 32356 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, designated as transformation event 305423, which has... evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International in its petition for a determination...

  3. 78 FR 32231 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Plant Pest Risk Assessment, Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Plant... regarding a request from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., seeking a determination of nonregulated status... regulated under 7 CFR part 340. APHIS received a petition (APHIS Petition Number 11-063-01p) from Pioneer...

  4. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a corn line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., designated as event DP-32138-1... on our evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., in its petition for...

  5. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a maize line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., designated as maize event DP... on our evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., in its petition for...

  6. 76 FR 34712 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model; Extension of the Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ...: This notice extends the deadlines for the submission of the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model...-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco . Application Submission Deadline: Applications must be postmarked on or before August 19, 2011. The Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model ] Application is available...

  7. 75 FR 2592 - Pioneer Industrial Railway Co.-Trackage Rights Exemption-Central Illinois Railroad Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Pioneer Industrial Railway Co.--Trackage Rights Exemption-- Central Illinois...) has agreed to grant non-exclusive local trackage rights to Pioneer Industrial Railway Co. (PIRY) over... Kellar Branch. See STB Docket No. AB-1056X, Pioneer Industrial Railway Co.--Discontinuance of Service...

  8. A mechanistic approach to understanding range shifts in a changing world: What makes a pioneer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, J C; Krause, J S; Perez, J H; Chmura, H E; Németh, Z; Word, K R; Calisi, R M; Meddle, S L

    2015-10-01

    A species' range can be thought of as a manifestation of the ecological niche in space. Within a niche, evolution has resulted in traits that maximize fitness. Across millennia, natural oscillations in temperature have caused shifts in the geographic location of appropriate habitat and with corresponding changes in species' ranges. Contemporary climate change and human disturbance may lead to rapid range expansion or contractions with largely unknown consequences. Birds provide an excellent case study of this phenomenon with some taxa expanding range and others contracting even to the point of extinction. What leads some populations to expand while others contract? Are there physiological and behavioral attributes of "pioneers" at the forefront of a range shift/expansion? The concept of allostasis provides a framework with which to begin to evaluate when a species will be able to successfully expand into new habitat. This tool allows the integration of normal energetic demands (e.g. wear and tear of daily and seasonal routines) with novel challenges posed by unfamiliar and human altered environments. Allostasis is particularly attractive because it allows assessment of how individual phenotypes may respond differentially to changing environments. Here, we use allostasis to evaluate what characteristics of individuals and their environment permit successful range expansion. Understanding variation in the regulatory mechanisms that influence response to a novel environment will be fundamental for understanding the phenotypes of pioneers.

  9. The Pioneer riddle, the quantum vacuum and the acceleration of light

    CERN Document Server

    Ranada, A F

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the same phenomenological Newtonian model recently proposed by the author to explain the cosmological evolution of the fine structure constant suggests furthermore an explanation of the unmodelled acceleration $a_P\\simeq 8.5\\times 10^{-10}m/s^2$ of the Pioneer 10/11 spaceships reported by Anderson {\\em et al} in 1998. In the view presented here, it is argued that the permittivity and permeability of empty space are decreasing adiabatically, and the light is accelerating therefore, as a consequence of the progressive thinning down of the quantum vacuum due to the combined effect of its gravitational interaction with all the expanding universe and the fourth Heisenberg relation. It is suggested that the spaceships do not have any extra acceleration (but follow the unchanged Newton laws), the observed effect being due to an adiabatic acceleration of the light equal to $a_P$, which has the same observational radio signature as the anomalous acceleration of the Pioneers.

  10. Optimized tracking of RF carriers with phase noise, including Pioneer 10 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to track very weak signals from distant spacecraft is limited by the phase instabilities of the received signal and of the local oscillator employed by the receiver. These instabilities ultimately limit the minimum loop bandwidth that can be used in a phase-coherent receiver, and hence limit the ratio of received carrier power to noise spectral density which can be tracked phase coherently. A method is presented for near real time estimation of the received carrier phase and additive noise spectrum, and optimization of the phase locked loop bandwidth. The method was used with the breadboard Deep Space Network (DSN) Advanced Receiver to optimize tracking of very weak signals from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now more distant that the edge of the solar system. Tracking with bandwidths of 0.1 Hz to 1.0 Hz reduces tracking signal threshold and increases carrier loop signal to noise ratio (SNR) by 5 dB to 15 dB compared to the 3 Hz bandwidth of the receivers now used operationally in the DSN. This will enable the DSN to track Pioneer 10 until its power sources fails near the end of the century.

  11. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed to in an inter......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  12. Pioneers of paediatrics: Professor Salah Abdelrahman Ali Taha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the contributions of Professor Salah Abdelrahman Ali Taha (1927–1988), one of the pioneers in paediatrics in Sudan and Saudi Arabia. He graduated from Kitchener School of Medicine (renamed, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum[U of K]) in 1952 and was awarded an MD from the U of K in 1973, having accomplished a survey on the prevalence and underlying causes of childhood malnutrition in 14 villages. His impact was remarkable in establishing child health services in Sudan and Saudi Arabia, and in laying the foundation of the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud University. He was also an active researcher in various fields in child health, and was pioneering in those related to nutrition. Following his return to Sudan, Dr Salah A Taha was elected Member of Parliament from his rural district in Gezira State and was the Speaker of the House of Parliament in 1986. PMID:27493360

  13. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  14. A Quick and Dirty Approach to Verify the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Unzicker, A; Schmidle, Daniel; Unzicker, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We present source code for the computer algebra system Mathematica that analyzes the motion of the Pioneer spacecraft using the public available ephemeris data from JPL's website. Within 15 minutes, the reader can verify that the Pioneer anomalous acceleration a_p (1) exists in the order of magnitude of c H_0, (2) is not due to mismodeling of gravitational attraction, solar pressure or spacecraft attitude maneuvers. The simple code of about 100 lines may easily be extended by the reader to include further tests. Due to the limitations of our approach, we do not know (1) whether the unknown raw data were correctly processed to generate the trajectory files (2) how the apparent mismatch of ephemerides before 1990 had occurred.

  15. Study of photoemission and work function of large surface areas, phase 3, phase 4. [wavelength dependences of photoelectric space probe materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The photoemission of materials which might be used in probe measurements of the exo-atmospheric electric field is considered by evaluating the wavelength dependence of their photoelectric yield for eleven elements over the range 800 to 3200 A. Yield data for zinc, copper beryllium, platinum, cadmium, graphite, carbon, gold, silver, tantalum, and tungsten show that copper-beryllium is a preferred material. Silver has one of the highest photoemissions when exposed to solar radiation.

  16. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Before Franz Boas: Pioneering Women in American Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tarducci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the impact of the feminist movement in anthropological theory and practice was the recovery of the life and work of women who, despite occupying a peripheral site, made significant contributions to the field. In this paper I focus on the trajectories of these pioneers who, in a time of fast socioeconomic changes (last decades or xix Century and the early xx Century and despite they were self taught, were fundamental to the professionalization of anthropology.

  18. Pioneer 10 studies of interplanetary shocks at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Pioneer 10 Ames plasma analyzer data collected in the 6.1 to 12.6 AU range of heliocentric distances (November 1974 to April 1977) have been examined for interplanetary shock waves. Eighteen shock signatures have been identified, with four of these being of the reverse type and the remainder the forward type. Sonic Mach numbers in the range from 3 to 10 are estimated for these events.

  19. Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology: Integrating Nutrition and Child Development Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of Maureen Black's career as a pediatric psychologist. It traces the transition of the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) from a section of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA) to an independent division of APA, which occurred during my presidency of SPP. The article addresses three aspects of pediatric psychology that have been central to my...

  20. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  1. Space, time, matter

    CERN Document Server

    Weyl, Hermann

    1999-01-01

    Excellent introduction probes deeply into Euclidean space, Riemann's space, Einstein's general relativity, gravitational waves and energy, and laws of conservation. "A classic of physics." - British Journal for Philosophy and Science.

  2. 77 FR 35959 - Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources...Tex, LLC (Atlas) and Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc. (Pioneer), filed in the above referenced..., Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc., 5205 North O'Connor Blvd., Suite 200, Irving, TX 75039, by...

  3. Morrow, Reiff, Receive 2013 Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington Awards: Citation for Cherilynn Ann Morrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ramon

    2014-08-01

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington (SPARC) Education and Public Outreach Award for Cherilynn Morrow recognizes years of pioneering work on behalf of the space science community in the area of education and public outreach (E/PO).

  4. Emission-Line Galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) Grism Survey. II: The Complete Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzkal, Nor; Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E; Grogin, Norman A; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Walsh, Jeremy R; Hathi, Nimish P; Cohen, Seth H; Bellini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W; Straughn, Amber N; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 1e9} M_sun decreases by an order of magnitude at z<0.5 relative to the number at 0.5

  5. On the gravitational origin of the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Siutsou, I A

    2009-01-01

    From Doppler tracking data and data on circular motion of astronomical objects we obtain a metric of the Pioneer Anomaly. The metric resolves the issue of manifest absence of anomaly acceleration in orbits of the outer planets and extra-Pluto objects of the Solar system. However, it turns out that the energy-momentum tensor of matter, which generates such a gravitational field in GR, violates energy dominance conditions. At the same time the equation of state derived from the energy-momentum tensor is that of dark energy with $w=-1/3$. So the model proposed must be carefully studied by "Grand-Fit" investigations.

  6. Geometrical rectification of spin-scan images from Pioneer 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, R. N.; Burke, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Images of Saturn received from Pioneer 11 suffer from geometrical distortions due to the curvilinear scan lines and the unequal sampling intervals in orthogonal directions, which are inherent in spin-scan imaging. In this paper geometrical image rectification by polynomial transformation based on control points is discussed. Factors that affect the accuracy of reconstruction are shown to include the spatial distribution and spatial density of control points, and the order of the polynomial distortion model. A computer implementation of the technique is described.

  7. HTRF(®): pioneering technology for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degorce, François

    2006-12-01

    Cisbio international pioneered the field of homogeneous fluorescence methodologies and time-resolved fluorescence resonance in particular, through its proprietary technology, HTRF(®). The development was based on Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn's research on rare earth fluorescence properties (awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987) and on Cisbio's expertise in homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF). The technology is used in assay development and drug screening, most notably in high-throughput screening applications. This highly powerful technology is particularly applied to the areas of G-protein-coupled receptor and kinase screening, as well as a series of targets related to inflammation, metabolic diseases and CNS disorders.

  8. A century of influence: Part 1. Orthodontic pioneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The story of orthodontics during the first 100 years of Journal publication can be told through the people who lived it. As part of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics' Centennial Celebration, we present 100 people who most influenced the specialty during the last 100 years. Part 1 describes the orthodontic pioneers who were born in the 1800 s. They were broadly educated in the sciences, and most studied orthodontics with Angle, Dewey, or Lischer. They were innovators and inventors, and they laid the foundation of the specialty during the early years of the 20th century.

  9. FATHI YAKAN THE PIONEER OF ISLAMIC ACTIVISM IN LEBANON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Rabil

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the ideology of Fathi Yakan, the pioneer of Sunni Islamism in Lebanon and a principal founder of the Islamist party al-­‐Jama'a al-­‐Islamiya.  It also traces the establishment of  al_Jama'a as the first organized Islamist party in Lebanon.  As Secretary General of al-­‐Jama'a, Fathi Yakan blazed the ideological trail for Islamism's participation in Lebanon's political realm.  Significantly, Yakan's political activism, in much the same vein as that of Druze "Socialist" Kamal Jumblat, was also more about removing Maronite hegemony over the state.

  10. SNAP 19 Pioneer F and G. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    The generator developed for the Pioneer mission evolved from the SNAP 19 RTG`s launched aboard the NIMBUS III spacecraft. In order to satisfy the power requirements and environment of earth escape trajectory, significant modifications were made to the thermoelectric converter, heat source, and structural configuration. Specifically, a TAGS 2N thermoelectric couple was designed to provide higher efficiency and improved long term power performance, and the electrical circuitry was modified to yield very low magnetic field from current flow in the RTG. A new heat source was employed to satisfy operational requirements and its integration with the generator required alteration to the method of providing support to the fuel capsule.

  11. Women in science 50 fearless pioneers who changed the world

    CERN Document Server

    Ignotofsky, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    A charmingly illustrated and educational book, New York Times best seller Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from the ancient to the modern world. Full of striking, singular art, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

  12. Exo-C: a Probe-Scale Space Mission to Directly Image and Spectroscopically Characterize Exoplanetary Systems Using an Internal Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Brenner, Michael P.; Warfield, Keith R.; Dekens, Frank G.; Belikov, Ruslan; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Cahoy, Kerri L.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Dubovitsky, Serge; hide

    2014-01-01

    "Exo-C" is NASA's first community study of a modest aperture space telescope designed for high contrast observations of exoplanetary systems. The mission will be capable of taking optical spectra of nearby exoplanets in reflected light, discover previously undetected planets, and imaging structure in a large sample of circumstellar disks. It will obtain unique science results on planets down to super-Earth sizes and serve as a technology pathfinder toward an eventual flagship-class mission to find and characterize habitable exoplanets. We present the mission/payload design and highlight steps to reduce mission cost/risk relative to previous mission concepts. At the study conclusion in 2015, NASA will evaluate it for potential development at the end of this decade. Keywords: Exoplanets, high contrast imaging, optical astronomy, space mission concepts

  13. Unique pioneer microbial communities exposed to volcanic sulfur dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Reiko; Kim, Seok-Won; Sato, Yoshinori; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kamijo, Takashi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Newly exposed volcanic substrates contain negligible amounts of organic materials. Heterotrophic organisms in newly formed ecosystems require bioavailable carbon and nitrogen that are provided from CO2 and N2 fixation by pioneer microbes. However, the knowledge of initial ecosystem developmental mechanisms, especially the association between microbial succession and environmental change, is still limited. This study reports the unique process of microbial succession in fresh basaltic ash, which was affected by long-term exposure to volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). Here we compared the microbial ecosystems among deposits affected by SO2 exposure at different levels. The results of metagenomic analysis suggested the importance of autotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria, particularly those involved in CO2 and N2 fixation, in the heavily SO2 affected site. Changes in the chemical properties of the deposits after the decline of the SO2 impact led to an apparent decrease in the iron-oxidizer abundance and a possible shift in the microbial community structure. Furthermore, the community structure of the deposits that had experienced lower SO2 gas levels showed higher similarity with that of the control forest soil. Our results implied that the effect of SO2 exposure exerted a selective pressure on the pioneer community structure by changing the surrounding environment of the microbes.

  14. Doomed pioneers: Event deposition and bioturbation in anaerobic marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, K.A. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA)); Follmi, K.B. (Geologisches Institut, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-05-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows, in exclusive association with gravity flow deposits within otherwise unbioturbated sediments, indicate that event deposition in oxygen-depleted sedimentary environments may be accompanied by the appearance of allochthonous infauna. In the Miocene Monterey Formation of Alta California and in the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California Sur, the authors observe compelling evidence that some turbulent sedimentation events entrain living decapod crustaceans. Upon deposition in anaerobic environments, these imported burrowers rework substantial quantities of laminated, commonly organic-rich sediment, in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of oxygen-depleted environmental conditions limits the survival time of these transported infaunal dwellers and renders them doomed pioneers. The occurrence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes, ichnogenera that are generally observed in normal-marine, neritic environments, in anoxic hemipelagic host sediments have been problematic for paleoenvironmental interpretation; in some cases, these features have been incorrectly interpreted to indicate bottom water ventilation and reoxygenation on a basin-wide scale. Accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace fossil assemblages will permit more precise understanding of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  15. Pioneer 10 and 11 orbit determination analysis shows no discrepancy with Newton-Einstein's laws of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Modenini, Dario

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the investigation of the navigation anomaly of Pioneer 10 and 11 probes which became known as the Pioneer Anomaly. It appeared as a linear drift in the Doppler data received by the spacecraft, which has been ascribed to an approximately constant sunward acceleration of about $8.5 \\times 10^{-13} km/s^2$. Since then, the existence of the anomaly has been confirmed independently by several groups and a large effort was devoted to find its origin. The present study consists of two main parts: thermal modeling of the spacecraft throughout its trajectory, and orbit determination analysis. Based on existing documentation and published telemetry data we built a thermal finite element model of the spacecraft, whose complexity has been constrained to a degree allowing for sensitivity analysis, leading to the computation of its formal uncertainty. The trajectory analysis and orbit determination was carried out using NASA/JPL's ODP (Orbit Determination Program) and our results show that orbita...

  16. Pioneer 10 and 11 orbit determination analysis shows no discrepancy with Newton-Einstein laws of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenini, D.; Tortora, P.

    2014-07-01

    The present work describes our investigation of the navigation anomaly of the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes which became known as the Pioneer Anomaly. It appeared as a linear drift in the Doppler data received by the spacecraft, which has been ascribed to an approximately constant Sunward acceleration of about 8.5×10-13 km/s2. Since then, the existence of the anomaly has been confirmed independently by several groups and a large effort was devoted to find its origin. Recently, different analyses were published where the authors claimed the acceleration due to anisotropic thermal emission to be the most likely cause of the unexplained acceleration. Here we report the methodology and the results of an independent study carried out in the last years, aimed at supporting the thermal origin of the anomaly. This work consists of two main parts: thermal modeling of the spacecraft throughout its trajectory, and orbit determination analysis. Based on existing documentation and published telemetry data, we built a thermal finite element model of the spacecraft, whose complexity has been constrained to a degree allowing for sensitivity analysis, leading to the computation of its formal uncertainty. The trajectory analysis and orbit determination were carried out using NASA/JPL's Orbit Determination Program, and our results show that orbital solutions are achieved that do not require the addition of any "unknown" acceleration other than that of thermal origin.

  17. Practice and Probing on Urban Road Green Space Landscape Planning of CBD%城市CBD道路绿地景观规划实践与探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐英

    2011-01-01

    Landscape planning and design of the road green space in a city plays an important role in urban construction and development.The standard of road green space is even more higher in central business district (CBD) for its special urban landscape features.It includes not only the construction of the overall image of road landscape, but also a unique cultural atmosphere of CBD.Taking Lin-gang CBD in Jiangyin as example, planning theory, the overall layout and characteristic positioning in road green space design were discussed.%城市中央商务区(CBD)特殊的环境景观特征对道路绿地景观营造提出了更高的要求,既包括道路景观整体形象的建构,也包括CBD特有文化氛围的创造.以江阴市临港新城中央商务区道路绿地景观规划为例,探讨其在理念、总体布局和特色定位等方面的规划控制.

  18. The theory of Langmuir probes in strong electrostatic potential structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The operation of collecting and emitting Langmuir probes and double probes within time-stationary strong electrostatic potential structures is analyzed. The cross sections of spherical and cylindrical probes to charged particles within the structures are presented and used to obtain the current-voltage characteristics of idealized probes. The acquisition of plasma parameters from these characteristics is outlined, and the operation of idealized floating double-probe systems is analyzed. Probe surface effects are added to the idealized theory, and some surface effects pertinent to spacecraft probes are quantified. Magnetic field effects on idealized probes are examined, and the time required for floating probes to change their potentials by collecting charge and by emitting photoelectrons is discussed. Calculations on the space-charge effects of probe-perturbed beams and on the space-charge limiting of electron emission are given in an appendix.

  19. 在ILC上用γγ→Z过程检验非对易时空标度%Probing Noncommutative Space-Time Scale Using γγ Z at ILC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小刚; 李学潜

    2007-01-01

    In this talk we report our work on testing Noncommutative Space-Time Scale Using γγ → Z at ILC. In ordinary space-time theory, decay of a spin-1 particle into two photons is strictly forbidden due to the Yang's Theorem. With noncommutative space-time this process can occur. This process thus provides an important probe for noncommutative space-time. The γγ collision mode at the ILC provides an ideal place to carry out such a study. Assuming an integrated luminosity of 500fb-1, we show that the constraint which can be achieved on Г(Z→ γγ) is three to four orders of magnitude better than the current bound of 5.2 × 10-5 GeV.The noncommutative scale can be probed up to a few TeVs.%讨论关于在ILC用gamma gamma到Z过程检验非对易时空能标(原文发在hep-ph/0604115).在通常时空量子场论中,由杨氏定理可知一个自旋为1的粒子不可能衰变为两个光子.但在非对易时空中此过程是允许的.因此这个过程能作为检验非对易时空的工具.ILC的光子对撞模式能实现这个过程.如果总亮度能达到500fb-1,我们证明对Gamma(Z to gamma gamma)宽度的测量精度将比现有限制(<5.2×10-5GeV)好3-4个数量级.对非对易时空能标的检测可高达几个TeV.

  20. Propagation of a large Forbush decrease in cosmic-ray intensity past the earth, Pioneer 11 at 34 AU and Pioneer 10 at 53 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, James A.; Fillius, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of a large Forbush decrease in cosmic-ray intensity at the earth, Pioneer II and Pioneer 10 are reported. The Pioneer 10 data show a large impulsive decrease in cosmic-ray intensity at the greatest distance from the sun observed to date. The apparent radial speed of propagation of the Forbush decrease was about 820 km/s, independent of the radial distance. The observations reported here and similar previous observations provide the basis for a new quantitative model of the propagation of Forbush decreases in the outer heliosphere.

  1. Radioisotope Power: A Key Technology for Deep Space Explorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, George R.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Duddzinski, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    A Radioisotope Power System (RPS) generates power by converting the heat released from the nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes, such as Plutonium-238 (Pu-238), into electricity. First used in space by the U.S. in 1961, these devices have enabled some of the most challenging and exciting space missions in history, including the Pioneer and Voyager probes to the outer solar system; the Apollo lunar surface experiments; the Viking landers; the Ulysses polar orbital mission about the Sun; the Galileo mission to Jupiter; the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn; and the recently launched New Horizons mission to Pluto. Radioisotopes have also served as a versatile heat source for moderating equipment thermal environments on these and many other missions, including the Mars exploration rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. The key advantage of RPS is its ability to operate continuously, independent of orientation and distance relative to the Sun. Radioisotope systems are long-lived, rugged, compact, highly reliable, and relatively insensitive to radiation and other environmental effects. As such, they are ideally suited for missions involving long-lived, autonomous operations in the extreme conditions of space and other planetary bodies. This paper reviews the history of RPS for the U.S. space program. It also describes current development of a new Stirling cycle-based generator that will greatly expand the application of nuclear-powered missions in the future.

  2. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  3. A Fast-Response Atmospheric Turbulence (FRAT) Probe with Gas-Sampling Ducts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to design, construct and test a high-frequency-response air-data probe, the Fast Response Atmospheric Turbulence probe (FRAT probe)...

  4. Spontaneous Symmetry Probing

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    For relativistic quantum field theories, we consider Lorentz breaking, spatially homogeneous field configurations or states that evolve in time along a symmetry direction. We dub this situation "spontaneous symmetry probing" (SSP). We mainly focus on internal symmetries, i.e. on symmetries that commute with the Poincare group. We prove that the fluctuations around SSP states have a Lagrangian that is explicitly time independent, and we provide the field space parameterization that makes this manifest. We show that there is always a gapless Goldstone excitation that perturbs the system in the direction of motion in field space. Perhaps more interestingly, we show that if such a direction is part of a non-Abelian group of symmetries, the Goldstone bosons associated with spontaneously broken generators that do not commute with the SSP one acquire a gap, proportional to the SSP state's "speed". We outline possible applications of this formalism to inflationary cosmology.

  5. COUNTERING RADICALISATION ACROSS EUROPE – THE PIONEERING ISDEP PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozila Kana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The changing landscape of the global terrorism threat coupled with increasing concern about home grown extremism means that the need to tackle the root causes of radicalisation across the European Union has never been greater. The pathway to violent extremism and terrorism is, however, undeniably complex. Frontline practitioners working with those vulnerable to radicalisation need to have the right tools to allow them to recognise, respond to and challenge ideologies and narratives associated with any form of terrorism. A pioneering EU Commission funded project is the first of its kind designed to offer consistency around, and increase awareness of, counter radicalisation specifically for frontline practitioners. Improving Security by Democratic Participation (ISDEP is a two year programme based on the EU Commission’s Prevent strand of the Counter Terrorism Strategy. Training themes focus on helping practitioners to identify the influences and vulnerabilities that shape an individual’s thought processes towards violent extremism.

  6. A tribute to Oscar Buneman -- Pioneer of plasma simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buneman, R.; Barker, R.J. (Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Washington, DC (United States)); Peratt, A.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Brecht, S.H. (Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., CA (United States)); Langdon, A.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). X-Division); Lewis, H.R. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1994-02-01

    Highlights are presented from among the many contributions made by Oscar Buneman to the science, engineering, and mathematics communities. Emphasis is placed not only on ''what'' this pioneer of computational plasma physics contributed but, of equal importance, on ''how'' he made his contributions. Therein lies the difference between technical competence and scientific greatness. The picture which emerges illustrates the open-mindedness, enthusiasm, intellectual/physical stamina, imagination, intellectual integrity, interdisciplinary curiosity, and deep humanity that made this individual unique. As a gentleman and a scholar, he had mastered the art of making cold technical facts ''come to life.'' Oscar Buneman died peacefully at his home near Stanford University on Sunday, January 24th, 1993. The profound influence he has had on many of his colleagues guarantees his immortality.

  7. Florence Nightingale: creator of modern nursing and public health pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2008-09-01

    In starting this series of articles on distinguished women in nursing, medicine and the related healthcare professions, the choice of the first name is obvious. Florence Nightingale is, I suggest, the most famous female in the long history of medicine and is a name that is known and revered throughout the world. Most people--even those in 'the trade'--think of her as 'the lady with the lamp', the heroine who went out to the Crimean War and nursed the sick and wounded at Scutari. Important though this was, her main contribution was her continued work, long after the war, in nursing organisation and training, hospital planning, public and military health and her pioneering work in the efficient gathering of medical statistics.

  8. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  9. Constraining an Expanding Locally Anisotropic metric from the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P Castelo

    2012-01-01

    It is discussed the possibility of a fine-tuneable contribution to the two way Doppler acceleration either towards, either outwards the Sun for heliocentric distances above 20 AU by considering a background described by an Expanding Locally Anisotropic (ELA) metric. This metric encodes both the standard local Schwarzschild gravitational effects and the cosmological Universe expansion effects allowing simultaneously to fine-tune other gravitational effects at intermediate scales, which may be tentatively interpreted as a covariant parameterization of either cold dark matter either gravitational interaction corrections. Are derived bounds for the ELA metric functional parameter by considering the bounds on the deviation from standard General Relativity imposed by the current updated limits for the Pioneer anomaly, taking in consideration both the natural outgassing and on-board radiation pressure, resulting in an average Doppler acceleration outwards the Sun of a_p = +0.4^{+2.1}_{-2.0} x 10^{-10} (m/s^2). It is...

  10. Reinterpreting the Pioneer anomaly and its annual residual

    CERN Document Server

    Boom, P G

    2005-01-01

    In addition to its long-term constancy, the Pioneer spacecraft anomaly appears to only exist for bodies whose mass is less than that of: planets, moons, comets, and heavy asteroids of known mass. Assuming the observational evidence is reliable, and not the result of an unknown systematic effect, a violation of the Weak Principle of Equivalence is implied. To propose an additional force fails to satisfy this constraint. This paper presents a new hypothesis involving additional field energy in the form of: a finite number of lunar sourced constant amplitude (Lorentz invariant) wave-like undulations upon the gravitational field. Although apparently a futile suggestion, the author's model overcomes concerns regarding wave dissipation, wave generation, and the apparent constancy of the anomaly. A shortfall in motion arises because a tiny proportion of spacecraft kinetic energy is directed into a superposition of non-translational longitudinal oscillatory components. The restriction of this effect to low mass bodie...

  11. Pioneering of Schools with International Standard to Respond the Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipnugraha Ipnugraha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet respond the challenges of globalization Indonesia Government held a Pioneering of Schools with International Standard (RSBI. As an international standard schools pilot, these schools prepared gradually through the guidance by government and stakeholders. Within a certain period of four years it is expected that the schools is able to fulfill and meet the criteria of Schools with International Standard (SBI. Actually, in it’s implementation, RSBI faces many challenges, among others, were expensive anda require modern infrastructure, require a qualified teacher, SBI criteria and English implementation in education not yet possessed constitutional base. With RSBI it will form a national school with national education standards that have international quality and its graduates are able to compete internationally

  12. Boleslas Matuszewski: Pioneer of medical film-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matanović Dragana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Boleslas Matuszewski, born in 1856, was a pioneer in medical film-making. He worked simultaneously on improving his movie camera, film-making, collecting film documentation, and the idea of establishing an archive of medical films. Although his first attempts at filming and showing surgical operations didn't gain widespread approval, he was not discouraged, and succeeded in garnering support from a number of French doctors, who realized the importance of his ideas, not only in filming and forming medical film documentation, but also in the use of film for educative purposes. His visionary ideas gained acceptance when Dr. Doyen, on the occasion of the 66th Convention of the British Medical Society, in 1898, used film material as part of his lecture. Shortly afterwards, the Medical Academy took steps to show certain operative techniques, which represented both the confirmation and fruition of Matuszewski's ideas about filmmaking and the establishment of an archive of medical films.

  13. Flight performance of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, L. J.; Powe, J. S.; Smith, Marcie

    1987-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) solar panel power output capability has degraded much more severely than has the power output capability of solar panels that have operated in earth-orbiting spacecraft for comparable periods of time. The incidence of solar proton events recorded by the spacecraft's scientific instruments accounts for this phenomenon only in part. It cannot explain two specific forms of anomalous behavior observed: 1) a variation of output per spin with roll angle, and 2) a gradual degradation of the maximum output. Analysis indicates that the most probable cause of the first anomaly is that the solar cells underneath the spacecraft's magnetometer boom have been damaged by a reverse biasing of the cells that occurs during pulsed shadowing of the cells by the boom as the spacecraft rotates. The second anomaly might be caused by the effects on the solar array of substances from the upper atmosphere of Venus.

  14. Public health nursing pioneer: Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock 1863-1939.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Joellen W; Watson, John Charles

    2003-01-01

    Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock was one of many distinguished nursing leaders of the 19th and early 20th centuries who attended a women's college before enrolling in a nurse training school. Like many of her contemporaries with equally impeccable family credentials, Hitchcock was something of an enigma to her family for choosing nursing over teaching, the most common acceptable career for women of her social class. Hitchcock's endowment of character, according to contemporary Lavinia Dock, exemplified the best of her Puritan roots. Her contributions to the evolution of public health nursing and the integration of public health nursing content into curriculums of training schools rivalled the achievements in higher education of her famous father, grandfather, and brother but garnered no comparable recognition. Her life presents an interesting case for analysis of an independent woman, a characteristic shared by many pioneers in the early years of public health nursing: 1893 to 1920.

  15. Redox pioneer: Professor Wulf Dröge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinscherf, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Dr. Wulf Dröge is recognized here as a redox pioneer because he has published as first author an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 2000 times and over 10 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. One of the key discoveries (1987) was the stimulatory effect of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide on lymphocyte functions, which triggered a series of studies on the role of reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and its precursor cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. He discovered abnormally low cysteine and glutathione levels in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and the age-related decline in the postabsorptive plasma cysteine concentration, which is believed to cause age-related oxidative stress. He developed a theoretical concept of the mechanism of aging and death, which is outlined in his books Avoiding the First Cause of Death and Challenging the Limits of the Human Lifespan.

  16. New Horizons and the onset of the Pioneer anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Michael Martin

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between about 20 70 AU from the Sun has indicated the presence of an unmodeled, small, constant, Doppler blue shift which can be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a=(8.74±1.33)×10 cm/s directed approximately towards the Sun. In addition, there is early (roughly modeled) data from as close in as 5 AU which indicates there may have been an onset of the anomaly near Saturn. We observe that the data now arriving from the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt could allow a relatively easy, direct experimental test of whether this onset is associated with distance from the Sun (being, for example, an effect of drag on dark matter). We strongly urge that this test be done.

  17. New Horizons and the Onset of the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, Michael Martin

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between about 20 - 70 AU from the Sun has indicated the presence of an unmodeled, small, constant, Doppler blue shift which can be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a_P= (8.74 \\pm 1.33) \\times 10^{-8} cm/s^2 directed approximately {\\it towards} the Sun. In addition, there is early (roughly modeled) data from as close in as 5 AU which indicates there may have been an onset of the anomaly near Saturn. We observe that the data now arriving from the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt could allow a relatively easy, direct experimental test of whether this onset is associated with distance from the Sun (being, for example, an effect of drag on dark matter). We strongly urge that this test be done.

  18. Grete Kellenberger-Gujer: Molecular biology research pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citi, Sandra; Berg, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Grete Kellenberger-Gujer was a Swiss molecular biologist who pioneered fundamental studies of bacteriophage in the mid-20(th) century at the University of Geneva. Her life and career stories are reviewed here, focusing on her fundamental contributions to our early understanding of phage biology via her insightful analyses of phenomena such as the lysogenic state of a temperate phage (λ), genetic recombination, radiation's in vivo consequences, and DNA restriction-modification; on her creative personality and interactions with peers; and how her academic advancement was affected by gender, societal conditions and cultural attitudes of the time. Her story is important scientifically, putting into perspective features of the scientific community from just before the molecular biology era started through its early years, and also sociologically, in illustrating the numerous "glass ceilings" that, especially then, often hampered the advancement of creative women.

  19. Pioneers in pediatric psychology: integrating nutrition and child development interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Maureen M

    2015-05-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of Maureen Black's career as a pediatric psychologist. It traces the transition of the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) from a section of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA) to an independent division of APA, which occurred during my presidency of SPP. The article addresses three aspects of pediatric psychology that have been central to my career: pediatric nutritional problems, global child development, and the advancement of children's health and development through policy-related strategies. The article concludes with Lessons Learned and Recommendations for the future of pediatric psychology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Propulsion by light: visions of the German pioneer Eugen Saenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Willy L.

    2005-03-01

    Although the laser was not yet invented Eugen Sanger, one of the most prominent German personalities in the early development of hypersonic flight and rocket technology suggested to use photons for the propulsion of spacecrafts in the fifties. In contrast to current schemes which are mostly aimed at laser induced ablation processes, Eugen Sanger started with the idea of using the radiation pressure itself for propulsion purposes. A review of his pioneering work in that area will be supported by numerous historical documents and personal remembrance showing his effort to promote unconventional ideas. The paper also emphasizes how some of the original concepts are being revisited and partly implemented by using today's laser technology.

  1. Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology: Smashing Silos and Breaking Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertlieb, Donald

    2016-11-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of my career as a pediatric psychologist. Educational and professional experiences often involved confrontations with silos and boundaries set by traditions limiting understanding and impact on children's healthy development. A pedigree in developmental psychology clashed with identity, guild, and loyalty dimensions of clinical psychology. A research emphasis challenged the emergent harmony of the scientist-practitioner models. The medical center and its silos collided with those of arts and sciences academia. Evolving as an applied developmental scientist specializing in pediatric psychology allowed for a gratifying and meaningful career with a range of scientific, pedagogical, and policy contributions. An abiding orientation toward human rights and social justice sustained progress and generativity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Flight performance of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, L. J.; Powe, J. S.; Smith, Marcie

    1987-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) solar panel power output capability has degraded much more severely than has the power output capability of solar panels that have operated in earth-orbiting spacecraft for comparable periods of time. The incidence of solar proton events recorded by the spacecraft's scientific instruments accounts for this phenomenon only in part. It cannot explain two specific forms of anomalous behavior observed: 1) a variation of output per spin with roll angle, and 2) a gradual degradation of the maximum output. Analysis indicates that the most probable cause of the first anomaly is that the solar cells underneath the spacecraft's magnetometer boom have been damaged by a reverse biasing of the cells that occurs during pulsed shadowing of the cells by the boom as the spacecraft rotates. The second anomaly might be caused by the effects on the solar array of substances from the upper atmosphere of Venus.

  3. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat Flow Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The heat flow probe directly answers requirements in the topic: S1.11 Lunar Science Instruments and Technology: "Geophysical Measurements: Systems, subsystems, and...

  4. Sapphire Viewports for a Venus Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will demonstrate that sapphire viewports are feasible for use in Venus probes. TvU's commercial viewport products have demonstrated that...

  5. 76 FR 29249 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model: Request for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... participate in the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model for a period beginning in 2011 and ending...://innovations.cms.gov/areas-of-focus/seamless-and-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco . Application Submission... Accountable Care Organization Model or the application process. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background...

  6. Willem J Kolff (1911-2009): physician, inventor and pioneer: father of artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Megan

    2012-08-01

    Medical pioneer Willem Johan Kolff was an inspirational father, son, physician and inventor. He founded the development of the first kidney dialysis machine, pioneered advances in the heart and lung machine, laid down the foundations for the first mainland blood bank in Europe and successfully implanted the first artificial heart into humans.

  7. Scanning microscopic four-point conductivity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Bøggild, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating microscopic four-point probes is presented. The method uses silicon-based microfabrication technology involving only two patterning steps. The last step in the fabrication process is an unmasked deposition of the conducting probe material, and it is thus possible to select...... the conducting material either for a silicon wafer or a single probe unit. Using shadow masking photolithography an electrode spacing (pitch) down to 1.1 mum was obtained, with cantilever separation down to 200 run. Characterisation measurements have shown the microscopic probes to be mechanically very flexible...

  8. Interspecific variation in vitamin E levels and the extent of lipid peroxidation in pioneer and non-pioneer species used in tropical forest restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Daniele R; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-09-01

    Reforestation projects have gained interest over recent years due to the loss of biodiversity in tropical regions as a result of large deforestation by anthropogenic actions. However, better knowledge on the tolerance of plant species to environmental stresses is needed for reforestation success. Here, we evaluated the photoprotective and antioxidant capacity, in terms of vitamin E accumulation, of five pioneer (Platypodium elegans Vogel, Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil, Cecropia pachystachya Trécul. and Aegiphila sellowiana Cham.) and five non-pioneer (Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão, Cedrela fissilis Vell., Genipa americana L., Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. and Hymenaea courbaril L.) species, in relation to the extent of lipid peroxidation in leaves. Furthermore, we examined differences between sun and shade leaves on vitamin E accumulation and the extent of lipid peroxidation. Pioneer plants showed on average 33% higher malondialdehyde levels, an indicator of lipid peroxidation, than non-pioneer species, but no significant differences in vitamin E contents. In contrast, a marked interspecific variation was observed in the levels of α-tocopherol and its precursor, γ-tocopherol. Natural variation revealed interesting relationships between vitamin E levels and the extent of lipid peroxidation in leaves. The pioneer species, P. elegans, did not accumulate α-tocopherol and displayed the highest levels of malondialdehyde. Sun and shade leaves accumulated vitamin E levels to a similar extent, except for the pioneer L. pacari and the non-pioneer C. langsdorffii, the former accumulating more α-tocopherol in sun leaves and the latter in shade leaves. We conclude that interspecific variation is higher than both leaf type and successional-group variation in terms of vitamin E accumulation and the extent of lipid peroxidation, and that vitamin E levels, particularly those of α-tocopherol, negatively correlate with the extent of lipid

  9. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  10. 78 FR 13312 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition, Plant Pest Risk Assessment, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition... Plant Health Inspection Service has received a petition from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc... has received a petition (APHIS Petition Number 11-244-01p) from Pioneer Hi-Bred International,...

  11. 77 FR 39696 - Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc.; Notice of Intent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...-000] Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc.; Notice of Intent...-Continent WestTex, LLC and Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc. (Atlas and Pioneer), as joint applicants, in...: Geology and soils; Land use; Water resources, fisheries, and wetlands; Cultural resources; Vegetation and...

  12. Subpallial origin of a population of projecting pioneer neurons during corticogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante-Oria, Javier; Carleton, Alan; Ortino, Barbara; Kremer, Eric J; Fairén, Alfonso; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2003-10-14

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex are generated in the ventricular zone of the pallium whereas the subpallium provides the cortex with inhibitory interneurons. The marginal zone contains a subpial stream of migratory interneurons and two different classes of transient neurons, the pioneer neurons provided with corticofugal axons, and the reelin-expressing Cajal-Retzius cells. We found in cultured slices that the medial ganglionic eminence provides the reelin-negative pioneer neurons of the marginal zone. Pioneer neurons sent long projection axons that went through the cortical plate and reached the subplate and the lateral border of the lateral ganglionic eminence. In the cultured slices, pioneer neurons were functionally mature: they displayed a voltage-gated sodium current, expressed functional alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, and showed gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) postsynaptic events that were modulated by presynaptic AMPA receptors. Pioneer neurons expressed the adhesion molecules L1 and TAG-1; the latter has been reported to control tangential migrations to the neocortex [Denaxa, M., Chan, C.-H., Schachner, M., Parnavelas, J. & Karagogeos, D. (2001) Development (Cambridge, U.K.) 128, 4635-4644], and we show here that the pioneer neurons of the marginal zone are the cellular substrate of such a function. Finally, we show that, in early corticogenesis, reelin controls both the tangential migration of cortical interneurons toward the cortical plate and the tangential migration of pioneer neurons toward the marginal zone.

  13. Pioneering the red planet; adventures on Martian soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Peijl, I.; Veraart, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mars has always obsessed humankind - the Red planet, the ‘New Earth’. And with the recent successful landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover, Mars is closer than ever. Ever since 1960, we have actively been sending probes and rovers to observe the planet, but not without defeat. The road to the red planet

  14. Pioneering the red planet; adventures on Martian soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Peijl, I.; Veraart, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mars has always obsessed humankind - the Red planet, the ‘New Earth’. And with the recent successful landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover, Mars is closer than ever. Ever since 1960, we have actively been sending probes and rovers to observe the planet, but not without defeat. The road to the red planet

  15. Pioneer vegetation on ash dumps in Oswiecim (southern Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojarczuk, T.; Kuczynski, B.

    1972-01-01

    The authors found fifty-three plant species growing on the ash dumps in Oswiecim, while in 1963 twenty-two species only were encountered there. Most of the self-sown plants belong to calciphilous, ruderal and xerophilous species. The pH of the ashes amounts to 9.5. Some of them, e.g. Matricaria chamomilla are index plants for acid habitats; others were hitherto encountered in wet habitats, e.g. Rumex obtusifolias, Myricaria germanica, Epilobium roseum, and others. Their occurrence on ash dumps is possible thanks to the considerable amount of precipitation (465 mm) during the vegetative period. The mosses are the pioneers of these dumps, e.g. Funaria hygromertrica and Bryum argenteum, which usually appear on the site of fire. The authors are of the opinion that a better knowledge of the plants appearing spontaneously on dumps and waste heaps may provide many useful conclusions which will help to obtain positive results at the recultivation of spoil heaps and industrial wastes. 9 references, 3 tables.

  16. Hermann Karsten, pioneer of geologic mapping in northwestern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, K. R.

    2015-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a regional map of Nueva Granada (present-day Colombia, Panama and parts of Venezuela and Ecuador) was published by German botanist and geologist Hermann Karsten (1817-1908). Karsten's work was incorporated by Agustín Codazzi (1793-1859), an Italian who emigrated to Venezuela and Colombia to serve as a government cartographer and geographer, in his popular Atlas geográfico e histórico de la Republica de Colombia (1889). Geologic mapping and most observations provided in this 1889 atlas were taken from Karsten's Géologie de l'ancienne Colombie bolivarienne: Vénézuela, Nouvelle-Grenade et Ecuador (1886), as cited by Manual Paz and/or Felipe Pérez, who edited this edition of the atlas. Karsten defined four epochs in Earth history: Primera - without life - primary crystalline rocks, Segunda - with only marine life - chiefly sedimentary rocks, Tercera - with terrestrial quadrupeds and fresh water life forms life - chiefly sedimentary rocks, and Cuarta - mankind appears, includes diluvial (glacigenic) and post-diluvial terranes. He noted that Colombia is composed of chiefly of Quaternary, Tertiary and Cretaceous plutonic, volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and that Earth's internal heat (calor central) accounted, by escape of inner gases, for volcanism, seismicity and uplift of mountains. Karsten's regional mapping and interpretation thus constitutes the primary source and ultimate pioneering geologic research.

  17. Vivien Thomas (1910-1985): the backstage pioneer and educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Ting Justin

    2014-06-01

    Vivien Thomas (1910-1985) was an African-American scientist, pioneer, and renowned educator. Thomas's contributions to cardiovascular surgery were unequivocal, and yet it was only after his death that he gained more widespread recognition. Thomas's more notable work involves aiding in the discovery of the cause of traumatic shock, designing and guiding the first operation to treat Tetralogy of Fallot, carrying out the first atrial septectomy, and helping develop the electrical defibrillator. Thomas struggled amidst the adversities of racism and the Great Depression (1929-1941), armed merely with a high school degree. Nevertheless, his genius and determination eventually led him to receive an honorary doctorate from John Hopkins University. His story inspired the creation of the award winning PBS documentary in 2003 Partners of the Heart and also the 2004 Emmy Award-winning HBO film Something the Lord Made. This article will aim to provide an overview to the more notable events in Thomas's amazing tale, with a particular focus on his work on the Tetralogy of Fallot.

  18. The Experimental V4X Stirling Engine - A Pioneering Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundholm, Gunnar

    2003-11-01

    A Swedish double-acting 35 kW V4 Stirling engine was developed in a pioneering effort with a number of simplified and novel design features. The overall design was made with the intention to fit a passenger car. The engine used standard automotive journal bearing technology, a new robust crosshead design, and sliding seals. A balancing shaft was used to remove first-order imbalances. Cooler, regenerator and heater geometry were first inherited from the Philips 4-65 swash-plate engine. Later a sequence of experimental heaters were designed and tested. Very little has until now been published on this engine, since its development was discontinued in favour of the double-crankshaft U4 engines 4-95 (P40), 4-275 (P75 Mk II and III) and 4-123 (MOD1). These designs were in turn later abandoned (with exception of the solar P40 engine) because of problems with for instance rattling gears. The V4 design concept was then revived in the automotive 60 kW MOD2 engine and the successful Kockums submarine 75 kW V4-275 engine. This paper describes the innovative design features, heater performance results and applications used for the development of fast power control.

  19. Driving an electric vehicle. A sociological analysis on pioneer users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, M. [EDF R and D, Electricite de France, Research and Development, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Jemelin, C. [6T research bureau, 11 rue Duhesme, 75018 Paris (France); Louvet, N. [EPFL, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic School, 11 rue Duhesme, 75018 Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    In most of the western countries, car is the prevalent means of transport for local mobility. At the same time, sensitivity to environmental issues is increasing, correlated to the consciousness that carbon dioxide emissions have to be reduced. In regard to these two trends (individual mobility and public opinions favourable to a reduction of carbon emissions), energy-efficient vehicles will probably develop in the future-car manufacturers actually prepare new offers for the mass market. Comparable cases have occurred during the last decades-probably more modest but full of learning: some local authorities have promoted innovations based on electric vehicles in the 1990s, and some people have chosen this kind of cars for their daily travels. This article deals with these pioneers (This article comes from a communication at the ECEEE Summer Study, June 2009, Panel 6: Energy efficiency in transport and mobility.). Reporting studies carried out in 2006 and 2008, we intend to identify the reasons of this innovative modal choice, to show the difficulties that electric vehicle drivers then encountered and to analyse the patterns of use that governed their mobility and their use of electric vehicles.

  20. The teacher training process through distance education: a pioneer experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Massaru Fujita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents briefly the actions conducted in the formation process and established partnerships to achieve the pioneering educational process of Distance Education (DE courses of the State University of Londrina (UEL-PR. The methodological design was developed according to the Qualitative Approach of Action-Research type that prioritizes the development and analysis of the process along with the "meaning" that people give to things and your life than actually the product itself. The data collected through questionnaires at the end of the course signal impressions (positive and constructive criticism we received and the meanings experienced teacher students (testimonials, chats, discussion forums, projects in the courses offered. The experience lived in these three courses: Virtual Learning Environment (60 hours; Tutoring in distance education (60 hours and Teaching Materials in Distance Education (60 hours, from its conception to its actual conclusion, make us think that we are on the right way and by TDIC, new horizons may open up to the institution in short- and medium-term.

  1. Bing Zhi: pioneer of modern biology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Le Kang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Located in the lobby of the Institute of Zoology at Chinese Academy of Sciences,is a bronze statue of Dr.Bing Zhi.Many passers-by,especially the young ones,would ask who this person is and what he has accomplished.The short answer is,according to the plate of the statue,that he is a pioneer zoologist and educator and the founder of modern biology in China.The more detailed answer involves the word"first"for quite a few significances:As a biologist,Bing Zhi is the co-founder of the first non-governmental scientific society of China,the co-founder of the first Chinese scientific journal,the founder of the first biology department in China,the founder of the first biological research institute in China,and the founder of China Zoological Society; as an educator,he trained many young men who later became renowned specialists in their own areas.

  2. Theodore H. Bullock: pioneer of integrative and comparative neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, G K H; Zupanc, M M

    2008-02-01

    Theodore H. Bullock (1905-2005) was a pioneer of integrative and comparative neurobiology and one of the founders of neuroethology. His work--distinguished by the tremendous number of different research themes and animal taxa studied--provided the basis for a comprehensive analysis of brain evolution. Among his major achievements are: one of the first physiological analyses of rhythmic central pattern generators; the first simultaneous recording from both the presynaptic and postsynaptic region of a chemical synapse; the demonstration of intercellular communication through graded potentials; and the discovery of two novel sensory organs formed by infrared receptors in pit vipers and electroreceptors in electric fish. He was also one of the first who applied computational tools to the analysis of complex neural signals and to perform a comparative analysis of cognitive events. His two-volume treatise "Structure and function in the nervous system of invertebrates" (with G. Adrian Horridge) remains the most comprehensive, authoritative review of this topic ever written. In addition to his research merits, his legacy is particularly based on his cosmopolitan way of thinking and acting, his large, worldwide school of students, and his committed advocacy for comparative and systems-oriented neurobiology.

  3. [The pioneer otolaryngologists in Eretz-Israel: 1911-1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golz, Avishay

    2013-07-01

    Until 1911 there was no ear nose and throat (ENT) specialist in Eretz-Israel. Dr. Moshe Sherman, an ENT specialist, disembarked at the port of Jaffa on August 4, 1911. He had trained in Moscow, and was the first otolaryngologist in the country. Between 1911 and 1948, over 100 otolaryngologists arrived in Eretz-Israel and were dispersed throughout the country from Safed and Tiberias in the North to Rehovot in the South. These physicians brought modern and advanced European medicine to Israel. Many left their imprint on the development of ENT medicine in the country, laying the foundations of today's otolaryngologic services both in clinical and academic spheres. ENT medicine, like other fields of medicine, evolved following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Many departments were opened and equipped with the best modern instruments and technology. Department heads are the pupils of our pioneer physicians. The memory of these talented and dedicated physicians should be remembered and cherished by their successors and all physicians in Israel.

  4. Pioneer fly-by of Saturn and its rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, T.; Esposito, L.

    1981-01-01

    Results acquired by the imaging photopolarimeter on board Pioneer 11 during the spacecraft fly-by of Saturn and its rings on September 1, 1979 are reviewed. Analysis of the broadband photometry and polarimetry obtained of the Saturn atmosphere has been used to determine a cloud top height of 300 mb and a scale height of the aerosol distribution about 1/4 that of the ambient gas, and to point out differences between the forward scattering and belt and zone characteristics of the Saturn and Jupiter atmospheres. Images of Saturn's rings have been used to derive a profile of ring optical depth between 1.22 and 2.35 Saturn radii, and reveal new divisions and thin rings and azimuthal variations in the brightness of the A ring not observable from earth. Linear polarization observations of Titan in red and blue light reveal that the aerosols near the top of the atmosphere have radii less than about 0.09 micron and that the optical thickness of the small aerosol layer is about 0.6 above an effectively depolarizing surface, and indicate radii of 2845 + or - 25 km and 2880 + or - 22 km in red and blue light, respectively. Earth-based and spacecraft data are consistent with the formation of rings structures as a result of Poynting-Robertson drag and gravitational satellite resonances with the original ice and rock particles.

  5. Osseointegrated prostheses for rehabilitation following amputation : The pioneering Swedish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Brånemark, Rickard

    2017-04-01

    The direct attachment of osseointegrated (OI) prostheses to the skeleton avoids the inherent problems of socket suspension. It also provides physiological weight bearing, improved range of motion in the proximal joint, as well as osseoperceptive sensory feedback, enabling better control of the artificial limbs by amputees. The present article briefly reviews the pioneering efforts on extremity osseointegration surgeries in Sweden and the development of the OPRA (Osseointegrated Prostheses for the Rehabilitation of Amputees) program. The standard implant design of the OPRA system and surgical techniques are described as well as the special rehabilitation protocols based on surgical sites. The results of long-term follow-up for transradial, transhumeral, and thumb amputee operations are briefly reported including the prospective study of transfemoral amputees according to OPRA protocol. The importance of refinement on implant designs and surgical techniques based on the biomechanical analysis and early clinical trials is emphasized. Future aspects on osseointegration surgery are briefly described, including novel treatment options using implanted electrodes.

  6. Historiography of psychology in Brazil: pioneer works, recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Regina Helena de Freitas; Jacó-Vilela, Ana Maria; Massimi, Marina

    2010-08-01

    The evolution of the historiography of psychology in Brazil is surveyed, to describe how the field has evolved from the seminal works of the pioneer, mostly self-taught, psychologists, to the now professional historians working from a variety of theoretical models and methods of inquiry. The first accounts of the history of psychology written by Brazilians and by foreigners are surveyed, as well as the recent works made by researchers linked to the Work Group on the History of Psychology of the Brazilian Association of Research and Graduate Education in Psychology and published in periodicals such as Memorandum and Mnemosine. The present historiography focuses mainly the relationship of psychological knowledge to specific social and cultural conditions, emphasizing themes such as women's participation in the construction of the field, the development of psychology as a science and as a profession in education and health, and the development of psychology as an expression of Brazilian culture and of the experience of resistance of local communities to domination. To reveal this process of identity construction, a cultural historiography is an important tool, coupled with methodological pluralism.

  7. Darwin and Mendel: who was the pioneer of genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    Although Mendel is now widely recognized as the founder of genetics, historical studies have shown that he did not in fact propose the modern concept of paired characters linked to genes, nor did he formulate the two "Mendelian laws" in the form now given. Furthermore, Mendel was accused of falsifying his data, and Mendelism has been met with scepticism because of its failure to provide scientific explanation for evolution, to furnish a basis for the process of genetic assimilation and to explain the inheritance of acquired characters, graft hybridization and many other facts. Darwin was the first to clearly describe almost all genetical phenomena of fundamental importance, and was the first to present a developmental theory of heredity--Pangenesis, which not only greatly influenced many subsequent theories of inheritance, particularly those of de Vries, Galton, Brooks and Weismann, but also tied all aspects of variation, heredity and development together, provided a mechanism for most of the observable facts, and is supported by increasing evidence. It has also been indicated that Darwin's influence on Mendel, primarily from The Origin, is evident. The word "gene" was derived from "pangen", itself a derivative of "Pangenesis" which Darwin had coined. It seems that Darwin should have been regarded as the pioneer, if not of transmissional genetics, of developmental genetics and molecular genetics.

  8. Does the Neptunian system of satellites challenge a gravitational origin for the Pioneer anomaly?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    If the Pioneer Anomaly was a genuine dynamical effect of gravitational origin, it should also affect the orbital motions of the solar system's bodies moving in the space regions in which the PA manifested itself in its presently known form, i.e. as a constant and uniform acceleration approximately directed towards the Sun with a non-zero magnitude (8.74+/-1.33) x 10^-10 m s^-2 after 20 au from the Sun. We preliminarily investigate its effects on the orbital motions of the Neptunian satellites Triton, Nereid and Proteus, located at about 30 au from the Sun, both analytically and numerically. The analytical calculations show that the PA-induced radial and transverse perturbations of Triton are of the order of a few km yr^-1, those of Nereid are about 10+/-100 km yr^-1, while Proteus experiences radial and transverse shifts of the order of 0.1 km yr^-1. The out-of-plane perturbations are negligible, apart from that of Nereid which amounts to about 20 km yr^-1. The corresponding orbital uncertainties obtained fro...

  9. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  10. Pioneer 10 observation of the solar wind proton temperature heliocentric gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Solar wind isotropic proton temperatures as measured out to 12.2 AU heliocentric distance by the Ames plasma analyzer aboard Pioneer 10 are presented as consecutive averages over three Carrington solar rotations and discussed. The weighted least-squares fit of average temperature to heliocentric radial distance, R, yields the power law R sup -.52. These average proton temperatures are not correlated as well with Pioneer 10's heliocentric radial distance (-.85) as are the corresponding average Zurich sunspot numbers R sub z (-.95). Consequently, it is difficult to isolate the spatial gradient in the Pioneer 10 solar wind proton temperatures using that data alone.

  11. Public choice economics and space policy: realising space tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patrick

    2001-03-01

    Government space agencies have the statutory responsibility to suport the commercialisation of space activities. NASA's 1998 report "General Public Space Travel and Tourism" concluded that passenger space travel can start using already existing technology, and is likely to grow into the largest commercial activity in space: it is therefore greatly in taxpayers' economic interest that passenger space travel and accommodation industries should be developed. However, space agencies are doing nothing to help realise this — indeed, they are actively delaying it. This behaviour is predicted by 'public choice' economics, pioneered by Professors George Stigler and James Buchanan who received the 1982 and 1986 Nobel prizes for Economics, which views government organisations as primarily self-interested. The paper uses this viewpoint to discuss public and private roles in the coming development of a space tourism industry.

  12. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  13. Growth Adapted Tensegrity Structures - A New Calculus for the Space Economy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tensegrity engineering is a newly established discipline pioneered by one of the authors - with the mathematical rigor to deliver safe minimal mass...

  14. Duchenne De Boulogne: a pioneer in neurology and medical photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, André

    2005-08-01

    Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne was born 200 years ago in Boulogne-sur-Mer (Pas-de-Calais, France). He studied medicine in Paris and became a physician in 1831. He practiced general medicine in his native town for about 11 years and then returned to Paris to initiate pioneering studies on electrical stimulation of muscles. Duchenne used electricity not only as a therapeutic agent, as it was commonly the case earlier in the 19th century, but chiefly as a physiological investigation tool to study the anatomy of the living body. Without formal appointment he visited hospital wards across Paris searching for rare cases of neuromuscular disorders. He built a portable electrical device that he used to functionally map all bodily muscles and to study their coordinating action in health and disease. He gave accurate descriptions of many neuromuscular disorders, including pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy to which his name is still attached (Duchenne muscular dystrophy). He also invented a needle system (Duchenne's histological harpoon) for percutaneous sampling of muscular tissue without anesthesia, a forerunner of today's biopsy. Duchenne summarized his work in two major treatises entitled De l'électrisation localisée (1855) and Physiologie des mouvements (1867). Duchenne's iconographic work stands at the crossroads of three major discoveries of the 19th century: electricity, physiology and photography. This is best exemplified by his investigation of the mechanisms of human physiognomy in which he used localized faradic stimulation to reproduce various forms of human facial expression. The album that complements his book on this issue is considered a true incunabulum of photography. Duchenne de Boulogne, a shy but hard-working, acute and ingenious observer, became one of most original clinicians of the 19th century. He died in Paris in 1875.

  15. [Auguste Lumière, pioneer of the modern cicatrization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Casanova, D; Zuleta, J; Desouches, C; Magalon, G

    2003-06-01

    At the "Grand Café" in Paris, on december 28, 1895 Louis and Auguste Lumiere displayed the cinematograph, a technical innovation that revolutionized the nascent motion picture. It was the first public projection of a film. While Louis continues his work on pictures and invents autochrome plates for colour photography, Auguste focused his interests on biology and medicine. Since Ambroise Paré, few doctors have been interested in the healing process. Although Carrel and Lecomte Du Nouy published the first studies in the early twentieth century, Auguste Lumière was a pioneer in the modern research and treatment of wounds. He applied the principles of experimental medicine. In his research he used 44 dogs to study the healing speed and the scar quality in certain areas and under general conditions. In the winter of 1914-1915 he studied in Lyon several hundred wounds of war casualties. In 1922 he established and published in a marvellous book the principles of normal healing. In the department of Pr Leon Bérard he was shocked by the fetidness of the wards where the dried bandages were changed once a week. In 1915 he perfected a revolutionary sterilized "treatment-bandage" consisting of 2 mm stitched gauze saturated with Vaseline and Perou's balsam: the "Tulle Gras. In order to disinfect wounds, he used an iodized solution, sprayed in little droplets. The lives of Auguste and Louis Lumière were full of projects and inventions. When Auguste died in 1954 he had registered more than one hundred patents.

  16. Sophus Peter Tromholt: an outstanding pioneer in auroral research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Moss

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Danish school teacher Sophus Peter Tromholt (1851–1896 was self-taught in physics, astronomy, and auroral sciences. Still, he was one of the brightest auroral researchers of the 19th century. He was the first scientist ever to organize and analyse correlated auroral observations over a wide area (entire Scandinavia moving away from incomplete localized observations. Tromholt documented the relation between auroras and sunspots and demonstrated the daily, seasonal and solar cycle-related variations in high-latitude auroral occurrence frequencies. Thus, Tromholt was the first ever to deduce from auroral observations the variations associated with what is now known as the auroral oval termed so by Khorosheva (1962 and Feldstein (1963 more than 80 yr later. He made reliable and accurate estimates of the heights of auroras several decades before this important issue was finally settled through Størmer's brilliant photographic technique. In addition to his three major scientific works (Tromholt, 1880a, 1882a, and 1885a, he wrote numerous short science notes and made huge efforts to collect historical auroral observations (Tromholt, 1898. Furthermore, Tromholt wrote a large number of popular science articles in newspapers and journals and made lecture tours all over Scandinavia and Germany, contributing to enhance the public educational level and awareness. He devoted most of his life to auroral research but as a self-taught scientist, he received little acclaim within the contemporary academic scientific society. With his non-academic background, trained at a college of education – not a university – he was never offered a position at a university or a research institution. However, Sophus Tromholt was an outstanding pioneer in auroral research.

  17. [Otto Ulmgren--a distinguished pioneer in oral surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenram, Ake

    2006-01-01

    Otto Ulmgren (1844-1932) was graduated in 1874 as medical doctor. During sex months in 1875-76 he studied the diseases of teeth, mouth and neck at "Erste Wiener Zahntechnische Schule" in Wien. Then he auscultated at some prominent dental practitionars in Berlin. After that he practised further as dental surgeon in Stockholm. He was strongly engaged to improve dental education and contributed actively for starting the School of Dentistry in Stockholm in 1898. He appointed director of the school and chief of the Department of oral surgery. Otto Ulmgren's doctor's thesis was "Ofversigt af tandläkarekonstens historia" (Survey of the History of Dentistry) in 1877. He also published about 60 scientific articles especially dealing with dental education and oral surgery. Otto Ulmgren was one of the founders of Odontologiska Sällskapet i Stockholm (Dental Society in Stockholm) in 1901 and was its president during the period 1901-21. He was also one of the founders of Sveriges Tandläkareförbund (Dental Association of Sweden) in 1908. He was honorary member of many dental associations. Otto Ulmgren was regarded as a man of principle, an eminent teacher, a skilful clinician and scientist and a strong pioneer of dentistry, particularly in oral surgery. In leisure hours Otto Ulmgren devoted himself to singing and he was a member of the famous men's choir "Orphei drängar". He was also very interested in hunting and had a kennel with hunting dogs. He was appointed honorary member of the Swedish Kennel Club.

  18. Remedial measures for the PCB spill at federal Pioneer Limited in Regina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1980-01-01

    In August, 1976, a rupture occurred in a buried pipeline carrying transformer oil containing PCBs, from an outdoor buld storage area to the indoor manufacturing facilities of the federal Pioneer Limited (FPL...

  19. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Pioneer Bank, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Pioneer Bank, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 20 and 1000 meters. The netCDF...

  20. San Francisco's Pioneer Mother Monument: maternalism, racial order, and the politics of memorialization, 1907–1915.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Brenda D

    2012-01-01

    The 1907–1915 campaign to create San Francisco's Pioneer Mother Monument provides both a case study of conservative uses of maternalism and a window into the political mutability of maternalist rhetoric. Ella Sterling Mighels, a pioneer descendant, utilized the monument campaign to promote white women's moral influence over middle-class men, to argue against Asian immigration and labor unrest, and to inculcate old-fashioned moral values among urban children. Although some of Mighels's contemporaries cited pioneer mothers as proof of women's fitness for suffrage, Mighels herself used the pioneer mother to argue against suffrage. The final statue, created by the sculptor Charles Grafly, failed to encapsulate Mighels's multivalent political message and to express her ideals about gender, race, class, and morality.

  1. Communication: Probing anomalous diffusion in frequency space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachura, Sławomir [Centre de Biophys. Moléculaire, CNRS, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orléans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme de Merisiers, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kneller, Gerald R., E-mail: gerald.kneller@cnrs-orleans.fr [Centre de Biophys. Moléculaire, CNRS, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orléans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme de Merisiers, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Université d’Orléans, Chateau de la Source-Av. du Parc Floral, 45067 Orléans (France)

    2015-11-21

    Anomalous diffusion processes are usually detected by analyzing the time-dependent mean square displacement of the diffusing particles. The latter evolves asymptotically as W(t) ∼ 2D{sub α}t{sup α}, where D{sub α} is the fractional diffusion constant and 0 < α < 2. In this article we show that both D{sub α} and α can also be extracted from the low-frequency Fourier spectrum of the corresponding velocity autocorrelation function. This offers a simple method for the interpretation of quasielastic neutron scattering spectra from complex (bio)molecular systems, in which subdiffusive transport is frequently encountered. The approach is illustrated and validated by analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of molecular diffusion in a lipid POPC bilayer.

  2. Subpallial origin of a population of projecting pioneer neurons during corticogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Morante-Oria, Javier; Carleton, Alan; Ortino, Barbara; Eric J. Kremer; Fairén, Alfonso; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex are generated in the ventricular zone of the pallium whereas the subpallium provides the cortex with inhibitory interneurons. The marginal zone contains a subpial stream of migratory interneurons and two different classes of transient neurons, the pioneer neurons provided with corticofugal axons, and the reelin-expressing Cajal–Retzius cells. We found in cultured slices that the medial ganglionic eminence provides the reelin-negative pioneer ...

  3. "Festival of Flight Special": Opening Space for Next Generation Explorers. NASA CONNECT[TM]. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Program will ultimately move from the explorations of the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle missions to a new period of pioneering in which people and businesses are more routinely traveling, working, and living in space. (Author/NB)

  4. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  5. Pioneering New Filters for X-ray Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We plan to produce filters with holes so small that longer wavelength photons are unable to propagate through, whereas the shorter wavelength x-ray photons simply...

  6. Pioneering Spacecraft Landing Safely(高二适用)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈绍璋

    2000-01-01

    The first test flight of China's manned space programme went perfectly as the country's unmanned spacecrafi(飞船) fell safely down in Inner Mongolia on November 21, 1999 after the first 21-hour travel.

  7. Properties of Ultrasound Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Rusina, M.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement properties of ultrasound probes. Ultrasound probes and their parameters significantly affect the quality of the final image. In this work there are described the possibility of measuring the spatial resolution, sensitivity of the probe and measuring the length of the dead zone. Ultrasound phantom ATS Multi Purpose Phantom Type 539 was used for measurements.

  8. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  9. Young (media) pioneers / Mare Tralla ; interv. Iliyana Nedkova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tralla, Mare, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    Autori CD-ROM'ist "her.space" (1996-1998), mis vahendab eesti naise identiteeti kujundanud sotsiokultuurilisi kogemusi läbi lapsepõlve, pioneeriea ja noorusaja, räägitakse riigisotsialistlikus süsteemis üleskasvamise kogemusest, küberfeministlikust liikumisest, võrreldakse bulgaaria ja eesti rahvuslikku ideoloogiat

  10. Young (media) pioneers / Mare Tralla ; interv. Iliyana Nedkova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tralla, Mare, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    Autori CD-ROM'ist "her.space" (1996-1998), mis vahendab eesti naise identiteeti kujundanud sotsiokultuurilisi kogemusi läbi lapsepõlve, pioneeriea ja noorusaja, räägitakse riigisotsialistlikus süsteemis üleskasvamise kogemusest, küberfeministlikust liikumisest, võrreldakse bulgaaria ja eesti rahvuslikku ideoloogiat

  11. Contrasting the morphology, anatomy and fungal colonization of new pioneer and fibrous roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadworny, Marcin; Eissenstat, David M

    2011-04-01

    Not all roots born as first-order branches are the same and this has important consequences for overall function. We hypothesized that, compared with fibrous roots, pioneer roots are built to live longer at the expense of absorptive capacity. We tested this hypothesis by investigating pioneer and fibrous roots in their first 14 d of life in the arbuscular mycorrhizal tree species: Acer negundo, Acer saccharum, Juglans nigra, Liriodendron tulipifera and Populus tremuloides. Root observations were made with root-access boxes that allowed roots to be sampled at known ages in field-grown trees. Compared to fibrous roots, pioneer roots had larger diameter, lower specific root length, greater average length and a lack of mycorrhizal or nonmycorrhizal fungal colonization. Pioneer roots < 14 d old had more layers of hypodermis with a lower percentage of putative passage cells and more protoxylem groups than similar age fibrous roots. Our results suggest that pioneer roots are constructed for defense against biotic and abiotic challenges, exploration of soil distal to the stem, high fibrous root branching and secondary development with high axial hydraulic conductivity at the expense of mycorrhizal colonization and high absorptive capacity for water and nutrients.

  12. The Interstellar Ethics of Self-Replicating Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K.

    Robotic spacecraft have been our primary means of exploring the Universe for over 50 years. Should interstellar travel become reality it seems unlikely that humankind will stop using robotic probes. These probes will be able to replicate themselves ad infinitum by extracting raw materials from the space resources around them and reconfiguring them into replicas of themselves, using technology such as 3D printing. This will create a colonising wave of probes across the Galaxy. However, such probes could have negative as well as positive consequences and it is incumbent upon us to factor self-replicating probes into our interstellar philosophies and to take responsibility for their actions.

  13. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  14. High precision thermal modeling of complex systems with application to the flyby and Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Rievers, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Thermal modeling of complex systems faces the problems of an effective digitalization of the detailed geometry and properties of the system, calculation of the thermal flows and temperature maps, treatment of the thermal radiation including possible multiple reflections, inclusion of additional external influences, extraction of the radiation pressure from calculated surface data, and computational effectiveness. In previous publications the solution to these problems have been outlined and a first application to the Pioneer spacecraft have been shown. Here we like to present the application of our thermal modeling to the Rosetta flyby anomaly as well as to the Pioneer anomaly. The analysis outlines that thermal recoil pressure is not the cause of the Rosetta flyby anomaly but likely resolves the anomalous acceleration observed for Pioneer 10.

  15. Discovery of directional and nondirectional pioneer transcription factors by modeling DNase profile magnitude and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Richard I; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; O'Donnell, Charles W; Lewis, Sophia; Barkal, Amira A; van Hoff, John Peter; Karun, Vivek; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K

    2014-02-01

    We describe protein interaction quantitation (PIQ), a computational method for modeling the magnitude and shape of genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity profiles to identify transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Through the use of machine-learning techniques, PIQ identified binding sites for >700 TFs from one DNase I hypersensitivity analysis followed by sequencing (DNase-seq) experiment with accuracy comparable to that of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq). We applied PIQ to analyze DNase-seq data from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiating into prepancreatic and intestinal endoderm. We identified 120 and experimentally validated eight 'pioneer' TF families that dynamically open chromatin. Four pioneer TF families only opened chromatin in one direction from their motifs. Furthermore, we identified 'settler' TFs whose genomic binding is principally governed by proximity to open chromatin. Our results support a model of hierarchical TF binding in which directional and nondirectional pioneer activity shapes the chromatin landscape for population by settler TFs.

  16. Exact probes of orientifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Torrents, Genis

    2014-01-01

    We compute the exact vacuum expectation value of circular Wilson loops for Euclidean ${\\cal N}=4$ super Yang-Mills with $G=SO(N),Sp(N)$, in the fundamental and spinor representations. These field theories are dual to type IIB string theory compactified on $AdS_5\\times {\\mathbb R} {\\mathbb P}^5$ plus certain choices of discrete torsion, and we use our results to probe this holographic duality. We first revisit the LLM-type geometries having $AdS_5\\times {\\mathbb R} {\\mathbb P}^5$ as ground state. Our results clarify and refine the identification of these LLM-type geometries as bubbling geometries arising from fermions on a half harmonic oscillator. We furthermore identify the presence of discrete torsion with the one-fermion Wigner distribution becoming negative at the origin of phase space. We then turn to the string world-sheet interpretation of our results and argue that for the quantities considered they imply two features: first, the contribution coming from world-sheets with a single crosscap is closely ...

  17. Tracking and data system support for the Pioneer project. Volume 3: Pioneer 10 from 1 April 1972 through the Jupiter encounter period, January 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Systems support of the Pioneer 10 mission from April 1, 1972 through the Jupiter encounter period which ended January 5, 1974 is described. The period covered involves operations in the interplanetary environment from the time of completion of the second trajectory correction to the start of Jupiter encounter; the implementation, planning, and testing that lead to the Jupiter encounter; and the operations during the 60 day encounter period.

  18. Can conventional forces really explain the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10/11 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Mbelek, J P

    2003-01-01

    A conventional explanation of the correlation between the Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration and spin-rate change is given. First, the rotational Doppler shift analysis is improved. Finally, a relation between the radio beam reaction force and the spin-rate change is established. Computations are found in good agreement with observational data. The relevance of our result to the main Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration is emphasized. Our analysis leads us to conclude that the latter may not be merely artificial.

  19. Sliding-mode adaptive control of Pioneer 3-DX wheeled mobile robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian FILIPESCU

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Parameter identification scheme and discrete-time adaptive sliding-mode controller applied to Pioneer 3-DX wheeled mobile robot (WMR are presented in this paper. The dynamical model for mobile robot with one pair of active wheels, time–varying mass and moment of inertia have been used in sliding-mode control. Two closed-loop, on-line parameter estimators have been used in order to achieve robustness against parameter uncertainties (robot mass and moment of inertia. Two sliding-mode adaptive controllers corresponding to angular and position motion have been designed. Closed-loop circular trajectory tracking Pioneer 3-DX real-time control is presented.

  20. A question of strategy: To be a pioneer or a follower?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaličanin Đorđe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important questions faced by business leaders in the strategic management process is a choice of timing to launch new product/technologies and enter new markets. There are two options: to be a pioneer or to be a follower. Both have advantages and risks. Pioneers often have higher profitability, greater market share, and a longer business life, but the relative success of each strategy depends on several factors, both internal and external (pace of evolution of technology and markets.

  1. The pioneer cohort of curriculum reform: Guinea pigs or trail-blazers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Michelle

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With curriculum reform, whether we admit it or not, the first cohort of students will be 'test-driving' the new programme. Not only are they the pioneers of a new curriculum, but as they progress through their studies, they experience each year of the innovation for the first time. As curriculum designers, we learn from their experiences and their feedback to improve the programme content and delivery, invariably for subsequent cohorts. A considerable onus therefore rests with this pioneer group, and their contribution to curriculum design, evaluation and programme revision should be valued.

  2. Pioneer and Voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from the electrostatic analyzers aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft and from the Faraday cup aboard Voyager 2 were used to study spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Prior to mid-1985, both spacecraft observed nearly identical solar wind structures. After day 150 of 1985, the velocity structure at Voyager 2 became flatter, and the Voyager 2 velocities were smaller than those observed by Pioneer 11. It is suggested that these changes in the solar wind at low latitudes may be related to a change which occurred in the coronal hole structure in early 1985.

  3. Lessons learned from planetary entry probe missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kasprzak, Wayne

    technology will also play an important role. The emergence over the past twenty years of Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS), utilizing lithographic semiconductor fabrication techniques to produce instrument systems in miniature, holds great promise for application to spaceflight. For example, a highly miniaturized, high performance and low-power gas chromatograph mass spectrometer would enormously benefit entry probe missions, allowing, for example, parallel measurements (e.g., multiple simultaneous gas chromatographic and direct atmospheric measurements). Such an instrument would also enable mass spectrometry on board small multiple entry probes. The challenge facing us in the development of MEMS based instruments is to move beyond the proof-of-concept, where research dollars tend to focus, and carry out the detailed work of developing high performance flight instrument systems on a chip which reach the required high technical readiness level for space flight.

  4. Conductivity Probe after Trench-Bottom Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Needles of the thermal and conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander were positioned into the bottom of a trench called 'Upper Cupboard' during Sol 86 (Aug. 21, 2008), or 86th Martian day after landing. This image of the conductivity probe after it was raised back out of the trench was taken by Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera. The conductivity probe is at the wrist of the robotic arm's scoop. The probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Phoenix Conductivity Probe Inserted into Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander inserted the four needles of its thermal and conductivity probe into Martian soil during the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and left it in place until Sol 99 (Sept. 4, 2008). The Robotic Arm Camera on Phoenix took this image on the morning of Sol 99 while the probe's needles were in the ground. The science team informally named this soil target 'Gandalf.' The thermal and conductivity probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water. The probe is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Gravity and On-Shell Probe Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In any gravitational theory and in a wide class of background space-times, we argue that there exists a simple, yet profound, relation between the on-shell Euclidean gravitational action and the on-shell Euclidean action of probes. The probes can be, for instance, charged particles or branes. The relation is tightly related to the thermodynamic nature of gravity. We provide precise checks of the relation in several examples, which include both asymptotically flat and asymptotically AdS space-times, with particle, D-brane and M-brane probes. Perfect consistency is found in all cases, including in a highly non-trivial example including \\alpha'-corrections.

  7. Gravity and on-shell probe actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Frank [Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and International Solvay Institutes,Service de Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Campus de la Plaine, CP 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Rovai, Antonin [Département de Physique Théorique, Université de Genève,24, quai Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and International Solvay Institutes,Service de Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Campus de la Plaine, CP 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,Theresienstrasse 37, D-80333 München (Germany)

    2016-08-08

    In any gravitational theory and in a wide class of background space-times, we argue that there exists a simple, yet profound, relation between the on-shell Euclidean gravitational action and the on-shell Euclidean action of probes. The probes can be, for instance, charged particles or branes. The relation is tightly related to the thermodynamic nature of gravity. We provide precise checks of the relation in several examples, which include both asymptotically flat and asymptotically AdS space-times, with particle, D-brane and M-brane probes. Perfect consistency is found in all cases, including in a highly non-trivial example including α{sup ′}-corrections.

  8. Deep space propulsion a roadmap to interstellar flight

    CERN Document Server

    Long, K F

    2012-01-01

    As humans take their first tentative steps off our home planet, and debate the costs/benefits of sending people back to the Moon and perhaps on to Mars, we must also start to make plans for the day when we will venture forth as pioneers farther out into the Solar System and beyond - perhaps far, far beyond - to explore and settle new worlds around other stars. It is vital that we develop the deep space propulsion technologies that will take us there, first to explore with robotic probes, then to follow ourselves. This is necessary so that if anything catastrophic happened to Earth, our species would survive. And the possibilities for catastrophe are great. An impacting asteroid ended the reign of the dinosaurs, and today we have many other threats such as global war, climate change, pollution, resource limitations and overpopulation. In this book, Kelvin F. Long takes us on all the possible journeys - the mission targets, the technologies we might use to power such journeys, and what scientific knowledge we a...

  9. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  10. On the Cell Probe Complexity of Membership and Perfect Hashing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus

    2001-01-01

    We study two fundamental static data structure problems, membership and perfect hashing, in Yao's cell probe model. The first space and bit probe optimal worst case upper bound is given for the membership problem. We also give a new efficient membership scheme where the query algorithm makes just...

  11. The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design. By Anthony Denzer. New York: Rizzoli, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Koehler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This review of The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design, by Anthony Denzer, discusses the important contributions of this book to the history of midcentury modern architecture, and considers the role of solar houses in the context of current debates over sustainability.

  12. A Comparative Study of Pioneer Entry Decisions in the United States and China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y. Lisa; Song, Michael; Parry, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    According to the resource-based view of the firm, competitive advantages arise from control and deployment of productive resources that are rare and difficult to imitate. Through early entry, pioneers can gain preferential access to key resources. However, the value of that access depends on the pre

  13. Results of Pioneer 10 and 11 meteoroid experiments - Interplanetary and near-Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The meteoroid penetration detectors on Pioneer 10 (channel 0) recorded 95 penetrations through the 25-micron stainless steel test material while the spacecraft was between 1 and 18 AU. The spatial density of 10 to the -9 g meteoroids is found to be essentially constant between 1 and 18 AU. The meteoroid penetration detectors on Pioneer 11 recorded 87 penetrations (55 on channel 0 and 32 on channel 1) through the 50-micron stainless steel test material while the spacecraft was between 1 and 9 AU. It is found that the meteoroids between 4 and 5 AU are not in direct circular or near-circular orbits near the ecliptic plane. The Pioneer 11 data obtained between 4 and 5 AU are best explained by the meteoroids being in randomly inclined orbits of high eccentricity. If meteoroids are in these cometlike orbits, the great increase in penetration flux previously measured near Jupiter with the Pioneer 10 experiment cannot be attributed to gravitational focusing unless the size distribution of meteoroids changes substantially between 1 and 5 AU. At Saturn encounter, the penetration flux increased by about three orders of magnitude, probably as the result of impacts from ring particles. Saturn's ring E is estimated to be 1800 km thick with an optical thickness greater than 10 to the -8.

  14. An Interview with Sunny Hansen: Pioneer and Innovator in Counseling and Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovholt, Thomas S.; Hage, Sally M.; Kachgal, Mera M.; Gama, Elizabeth Pinheiro

    2007-01-01

    During her 45-year career, Sunny Hansen was a pioneer and innovator in counseling and career development. She has lived the holistic life about which she writes and teaches. In this interview, she discussed the major influences on her life, the evolution of her professional career from English and journalism teacher to counselor and counselor…

  15. A Tribute to Professor Rene H. Miller - A Pioneer in Aeromechanics and Rotary Wing Flight Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.; Johnson, Wayne; Scully, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Rene H. Miller (May 19, 1916 January 28, 2003), Emeritus H. N. Slater Professor of Flight Transportation, was one of the most influential pioneers in rotary wing aeromechanics as well as a visionary whose dream was the development of a tilt-rotor based short haul air transportation system. This paper pays a long overdue tribute to his memory and to his extraordinary contributions.

  16. De Vries & Mul, A.M. Cooper, Pioneer of Puppet Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, Paul

    2012-01-01

    abstractReview of Tjitte de Vries and Ati Mul, ‘They Thought it was a Marvel’. Arthur Melbourne Cooper (1874-1961) Pioneer of Puppet Animation. Amsterdam (Pallas Publications/AmsterdamUniversity Press) 2009, 576 p., 105 ill.; includesdvd of 6 films, isbn 978 908 555016 7

  17. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near Lisianski Island and Pioneer Bank (100-002), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-002b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Lisianski Island and Pioneer Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has...

  18. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near South Pioneer Bank (100-003), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-003b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near south Pioneer Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been produced...

  19. Giuseppe Pasta (1742-1823): protophysician and pioneer of psychological studies in the medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Veneroni, Laura; Poli, Marco

    2009-11-01

    Giuseppe Pasta was a pioneer of psychological support in physical disease. Born in Bergamo, Italy, he was a cousin of the physician Andrea Pasta who was a pupil of Giovanni Battista Morgagni. Giuseppe's cultural and clinical resources were the teachings of Francesco Redi's medical school in Tuscany. This paper discusses the courage and philosophical tolerance of disease and the etiquette of the physician.

  20. Turning Points in the Lives of Two Pioneer Arab Women Principals in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid Husny; Abu-Rabia-Queder, Sarab

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the managerial career development of two Arab women, pioneer principals within the Arab education system in Israel. Using in-depth interviews relating to the characteristics of the different stages leading up to and within their careers as school principals (childhood and academic studies; the struggle to achieve the…

  1. The effects of inter-industry and country difference in supplier relationships on pioneering innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    2009-01-01

    and their suppliers in Canada are likely to result in pioneering innovations. The knowledge difference is decomposed into two dimensions: the inter-industrial dimension and the geographic dimension in national context. Using the Canadian Innovation database, we found the inter-industry difference has a positive...

  2. Pioneering the human development revolution: Analysing the trajectory of Mahbub ul Haq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMahbub ul Haq's work to coordinate, establish and propagate the human development approach offers an example of effective leadership in promoting more ethical socio-economic development. This article reviews Pioneering the Human Development Revolution-An Intellectual Biography of Mahbub

  3. Age-dependent radial increases in wood specific gravity of tropical pioneers in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce G. Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2010-01-01

    Wood specific gravity is the single best descriptor of wood functional properties and tree life-history traits, and it is the most important variable in estimating carbon stocks in forests. Tropical pioneer trees produce wood of increasing specific gravity across the trunk radius as they grow in stature. Here, we tested whether radial increases in wood specific gravity...

  4. Pioneer CESA Guidance Project: A Staff Development Program for School Counselors. Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Wallace S., Sr.

    This document on consultation is one of seven staff development programs which target performance skills of school counselors. The staff development programs are one component of a comprehensive student-needs-based guidance system developed by the Pioneer Cooperative Educational Service Agency Guidance Project. The staff development programs are…

  5. Pioneer CESA Guidance Project: A Staff Development Program for School Counselors. Legal and Ethical Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Carl; Van Hoose, William

    This document on legal and ethical concerns is one of seven staff development programs which target performance skills of school counselors. The staff development programs are one component of a comprehensive student-needs-based guidance system developed by the Pioneer Cooperative Educational Service Agency Guidance Project. The staff development…

  6. Bronislawa and Mieczyslaw Konopacki - pioneers of the application of histochemistry to embryology in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielanska-Osuchowska, Zofia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we review the life and work of Mieczyslaw Konopacki and his wife Bronislawa Konopacka. These Polish scientists introduced histochemical methods to embryological studies at the beginning of the XXth century; they were pioneers in this regard in Poland and among the first in the world to implement such methods in this way.

  7. Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with Earth's Smallest Settlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie; Milroy, Scott; Reider, David; Skelton, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with the Earth's Smallest Settlers (http://pioneeringmars.org) provides a partnership model for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) learning that brings university scientists together with high school students to investigate whether cyanobacteria from Antarctica could survive on…

  8. De Vries & Mul, A.M. Cooper, Pioneer of Puppet Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, Paul

    2012-01-01

    abstractReview of Tjitte de Vries and Ati Mul, ‘They Thought it was a Marvel’. Arthur Melbourne Cooper (1874-1961) Pioneer of Puppet Animation. Amsterdam (Pallas Publications/AmsterdamUniversity Press) 2009, 576 p., 105 ill.; includesdvd of 6 films, isbn 978 908 555016 7

  9. Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with Earth's Smallest Settlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie; Milroy, Scott; Reider, David; Skelton, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with the Earth's Smallest Settlers (http://pioneeringmars.org) provides a partnership model for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) learning that brings university scientists together with high school students to investigate whether cyanobacteria from Antarctica could survive…

  10. Huang Kun (1919-2005)A Pioneer of Solid-state and Semiconductor Physics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Huang Kun made many pioneering contributions in solid-state physics. In the late 1940s, for example, he theoretically predicted diffuse X-ray reflection due to point defects in crystal lattices, which was experimentally confirmed in the 1960s. Known as "Huang Scattering," the theory has already developed into a method for studying micro-defects in solids.

  11. Robert Owen: A Historiographic Study of a Pioneer of Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ideals and activities of the nineteenth century Welsh industrialist and reformer Robert Owen (1771-1858), and how they informed modern human resource development (HRD) concepts and practices and provided evidence of Owen as a HRD pioneer. Design/methodology/approach: Historiography provided…

  12. Advanced Technology Cloud Particle Probe for UAS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II SPEC will design, fabricate and flight test a state-of-the-art combined cloud particle probe called the Hawkeye. Hawkeye is the culmination of two...

  13. Pioneer organisms after F-F mass extinction in Dushan region, Guizhou Province, and their significance in establishing new ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yue; WANG; Xunlian; SHI; Xiaoying

    2006-01-01

    After mass extinctions, most areas became "ecologically barren areas" lacking or even without ecosystem over an extensive region. Studying the pioneer organisms and the reconstruction process of a new ecosystem in the "ecologically barren area" is very important for revealing the evolution after bio-mass extinctions. In the Dushan region, Guizhou Province, China, the trace fossils appeared and flourished evidently earlier than body fossils after Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) mass extinction. The pioneer organisms and pathfinders in the "ecologically barren areas" are the trace-makers that are deposit-feeders with relatively simple structure and conformation on or near the deposit surface. The trace-makers have undergone an evolutionary process that their trace structures changed from simple to complex, and their living and moving areas and spaces enlarged from linear to planar and then to three-dimension spaces. Those characters show that the ability of the trace-makers to deposits and their efficiency of looking for food have been enhanced gradually and that those trace-makers constructed gradually a base for the new ecosystem. This process is similar to that of the trace fossils near the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary.In the Dushan area, only the recovery intervals have been identified for the Famennian body fossils, with no eminent radiation interval recognizable due to the Devonian-Carboniferous (C-D) mass extinction. However, both the recovery and radiation intervals may be clearly recognized in the Famennian trace fossils based on their conformation and diversity. The evolution and diversification of the trace fossils in the "ecologically barren area" is considered to have played a role of necessary foundation for the recovery of body fossils in the ecological chain.With the gradual disappearance of the unfavourable environment factors resulting in the F-F mass extinction, a new ecosystem was reconstructed in the "ecologically barren area" through a three

  14. Darwinian hydrology: can the methodology Charles Darwin pioneered help hydrologic science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C.; Troch, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    There have been repeated calls for a Darwinian approach to hydrologic science or for a synthesis of Darwinian and Newtonian approaches, to deepen understanding the hydrologic system in the larger landscape context, and so develop a better basis for predictions now and in an uncertain future. But what exactly makes a Darwinian approach to hydrology "Darwinian"? While there have now been a number of discussions of Darwinian approaches, many referencing Harte (2002), the term is potentially a source of confusion while its connections to Darwin remain allusive rather than explicit. Here we discuss the methods that Charles Darwin pioneered to understand a variety of complex systems in terms of their historical processes of change. We suggest that the Darwinian approach to hydrology follows his lead by focusing attention on the patterns of variation in populations, seeking hypotheses that explain these patterns in terms of the mechanisms and conditions that determine their historical development, using deduction and modeling to derive consequent hypotheses that follow from a proposed explanation, and critically testing these hypotheses against new observations. It is not sufficient to catalogue the patterns or predict them statistically. Nor is it sufficient for the explanations to amount to a "just-so" story not subject to critical analysis. Darwin's theories linked present-day variation to mechanisms that operated over history, and could be independently test and falsified by comparing new observations to the predictions of corollary hypotheses they generated. With a Darwinian framework in mind it is easy to see that a great deal of hydrologic research has already been done that contributes to a Darwinian hydrology - whether deliberately or not. The various heuristic methods that Darwin used to develop explanatory theories - extrapolating mechanisms, space for time substitution, and looking for signatures of history - have direct application in hydrologic science. Some

  15. Maverick genius the pioneering odyssey of Freeman Dyson

    CERN Document Server

    Schewe, Phillip F

    2013-01-01

    Scientist. Innovator. Rebel. For decades, Freeman Dyson has been regarded as one of the world’s most important thinkers. The Atlantic wrote, “In the range of his genius, Freeman Dyson is heir to Einstein – a visionary who has reshaped thinking in fields from math to astrophysics to medicine, and who has conceived nuclear-propelled spaceships designed to transport human colonists to distance planets.” Salon.com says that, “what sets Dyson apart among an elite group of scientists is the conscience and compassion he brings to his work.” Now, in this first complete biography of Dyson, author Phillip F. Schewe examines the life of a man whose accomplishments have shaped our world in many ways. From quantum physics to national defense, from space to biotechnology, Dyson’s work has cemented his position as a man whose influence goes far beyond the field of theoretical physics. It even won him the million dollar Templeton prize for his writing about science and religion. Recently, Dyson has made head...

  16. Personifying space: how the public learned to care for Rosetta and Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Claudia; Baldwin, Emily; O'Flaherty, Karen; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark

    2015-04-01

    One of the aspects in the communications campaign promoted by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its partner institutions throughout 2014 to raise awareness about the comet-chasing mission, Rosetta, was the development of two anthropomorphic characters depicting the Rosetta probe and the lander Philae. The two characters were featured in a series of short cartoons with a fairy-tale flair that were distributed on the internet with the aim of breaking into new audience groups. The cartoon series, named "Once upon a time", tells the adventures of Rosetta and Philae, depicted as two bold and friendly explorers on a pioneering journey across the Solar System. The episodes cover the mission milestones, from Rosetta's wake-up from deep-space hibernation to its rendezvous with the comet and Philae's landing. They were promoted through the mission's dedicated social media accounts (mainly Twitter and Facebook) and through ESA's existing social media channels as part of the broader Rosetta communications campaign. We discuss how visual storytelling was used to make the mission's scientific goals more accessible, allowing the audience to share both its excitement and risks. We describe the development of the cartoon series and the level of engagement it generated, using estimates based on the response received through our social media channels. Other tools were also used to help the public identify with the two space probes. In particular, the Twitter accounts @ESA_Rosetta (managed by ESA) and @philae2014 (managed by DLR) were run in first person, as to give the impression that the probes were writing the tweets themselves, and even interacting with one another - as is often done in the case of spacecraft Twitter accounts. All these elements added a personal feel to the comet landing, with members of the public empathising with the two space probes and caring for their well-being. This wave of interest culminated in the last few hours of Philae's operations on the comet

  17. Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. This photograph is a close up of a niobium-coated gyroscope motor and its housing halves. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Don Harley.)

  18. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L

    2012-12-18

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145-65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130-125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian-Albian (ca. 125-100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian-Campanian (ca. 100-84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches.

  19. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145–65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130–125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian–Albian (ca. 125–100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian–Campanian (ca. 100–84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches. PMID:23213256

  20. Spaceborne Double-probe Electric Field Sensor for Space Electromagnetic Environment Monitoring%空间电磁环境监测用双探针式星载电场探测仪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任仁; 陈贤祥; 夏善红; 吕元生

    2012-01-01

    针对空间电磁环境监测需求,该文介绍了双探针式在轨电场探测方法.概述了双探针式、天线式和电子漂移式3种检测方法的异同,重点探讨了双探针式电场测量方法的原理、系统组成及测试标定方法.设计实现了敏感探头和数据采集处理单元,通过阻容耦合方式模拟电场仪在轨工作环境对系统进行了测试.测试结果显示SLF,VLF和HF频段的噪声本底分别小于4μVm-1Hz-1/2,1μVm-1Hz-1/2和0.5μVm-1Hz-1/2.%This paper presents a method of double-probe electric field in-orbit detection. Differences of three kinds of instrument including double-probe type, antenna type and electron drift type are briefly introduced. The principle, architecture and calibration method of double-probe spaceborne electric field sensor are described in detail. Sensitive probe and signal acquisition & processing units are implemented and tested with sensor in-orbit environment simulation through resistive coupling. Experiment results indicate that noise amplitude spectrum intensity of band SLF, VLF, HF are less than 4 μVm-1Hz-1/2, 1 μVm-1Hz-1/2 , 0.5 μVm-1Hz-11/2 separately.

  1. Functional Analysis: Entering Hilbert Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    In the second edition, I have expanded the material on normed vector spaces and their operators presented in Chapter 1 to include proofs of the Open Map-ping Theorem, the Closed Graph Theorem and the Hahn-Banach The orem. The material on operators between normed vector spaces is further expanded...... of the new material on normed vector spaces and their operators, the book can hopefully serve as a general introduction to functional analysis viewed as a theory of infinite dimensional linear spaces and linear operators acting on them....... in a new chapter on Fredholm theory (Chapter 6). Fredholm theory originates in pioneering work of the Swedish mathematician Erik Ivar Fred-holm on integral equations, which inspired the study of a new class of bounded linear operators, known as Fredholm operators. Chapter 6 presents the basic elements...

  2. Phoenix Conductivity Probe with Shadow and Toothmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander inserted the four needles of its thermal and conductivity probe into Martian soil during the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and left it in place until Sol 99 (Sept. 4, 2008). The Robotic Arm Camera on Phoenix took this image on the morning of Sol 99 after the probe was lifted away from the soil. The imprint left by the insertion is visible below the probe, and a shadow showing the probe's four needles is cast on a rock to the left. The thermal and conductivity probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water. The probe is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Isotropic Broadband E-Field Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Szentpáli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An E-field probe has been developed for EMC immunity tests performed in closed space. The leads are flexible resistive transmission lines. Their influence on the field distribution is negligible. The probe has an isotropic reception from 100 MHz to 18 GHz; the sensitivity is in the 3 V/m–10 V/m range. The device is an accessory of the EMC test chamber. The readout of the field magnitude is carried out by personal computer, which fulfils also the required corrections of the raw data.

  4. Loops in Twistor Space

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, I; Kosower, D A; Roiban, R; Bena, Iosif; Bern, Zvi; Kosower, David A.; Roiban, Radu

    2004-01-01

    We elucidate the one-loop twistor-space structure corresponding to momentum-space MHV diagrams. We also discuss the infrared divergences, and argue that only a limited set of MHV diagrams contain them. We show how to introduce a twistor-space regulator corresponding to dimensional regularization for the infrared-divergent diagrams. We also evaluate explicitly the `holomorphic anomaly' pointed out by Cachazo, Svrcek, and Witten, and use the result to define modified differential operators which can be used to probe the twistor-space structure of one-loop amplitudes.

  5. A heuristic solution for the Pioneer anomaly employing an ELA metric with dark matter in the outskirts of the Solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P Castelo

    2011-01-01

    Considering an expanding locally anisotropic (ELA) metric with the Sun as central mass and the heuristic ansatz for the dimensionless functional exponent parameter 'alpha=3+alpha_2(r_1)(1-U_Sun)^2' with a linear ansatz 'alpha_2(r_1)=alpha_2^(2.0)+alpha_2^(2.1) r_1' above 20 AU the pioneer anomaly is fully accounted for as due to the blue-shift of the background space-time. For compatibility with orbital motion within the Solar system it is further considered a branch ansatz for which \\alpha_2(r_1)=0 below 19 AU. This construction reduces the physical acceleration correction above 20 AU down to ~10^(-14) m/s^2 outwards from the Sun such that orbital corrections to Uranus, Neptune and Pluto are less notorious than when the full Pioneer acceleration is considered to be a gravitational acceleration. It is also discussed the effective mass-energy density distribution above 20 AU due to the background corrections and the respective finite non-null total mass is computed by considering an upper cut-off for the funct...

  6. The Fate of Mathematical Place: Objectivity and the Theory of Lived-Space from Husserl to Casey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Edward

    This essay explores continental/postmodern theories ofplace, or lived-space, as regards the role of mathematics,objectivity, and the relativist dilemma that afflicts thelived-space movement. By employing a geometric approach, such asMinkowski pioneered, it is argued that the lived-space theoristscan gain a better insight into objectivity of spatialrelationships.

  7. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  8. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  9. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  10. Direct measurement of surface-state conductance by microscopic four-point probe method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Shiraki, I.; Tanikawa, T.

    2002-01-01

    For in situ measurements of local electrical conductivity of well defined crystal surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum, we have developed microscopic four-point probes with a probe spacing of several micrometres, installed in a scanning-electron - microscope/electron-diffraction chamber. The probe...

  11. Surface-sensitive conductivity measurement using a micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkins, Edward; Barreto, Lucas; Wells, Justin

    2013-01-01

    An instrument for microscale electrical transport measurements in ultra-high vacuum is presented. The setup is constructed around collinear lithographically-created multi-point probes with a contact spacing down to 500 nm. Most commonly, twelve-point probes are used. These probes are approached t...... for epitaxial graphene on SiC and degenerately doped Bi2Se3....

  12. W. Grey Walter, pioneer in the electroencephalogram, robotics, cybernetics, artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, Peter F

    2006-02-01

    With the announcement by William Lennox at the 1935 London International Neurology Congress of the use of electroencephalography in the study of epilepsy, it became evident that a new and powerful technique for the investigation of seizures had been discovered. William Grey Walter, a young researcher finishing his post-graduate studies at Cambridge, was selected to construct and study the EEG in clinical neurology at the Maudsley Hospital, London. His hugely productive pioneering career in the use of EEG would eventually lead to groundbreaking work in other fields --the emerging sciences of robotics, cybernetics, and early work in artificial intelligence. In this historical note his pioneering work in the fields of clinical neurophysiology is documented, both in the areas of epileptology and tumour detection. His landmark contributions to clinical neurophysiology are worthy of documentation.

  13. A pioneer in the development of modern ultrasound: Robert William Boyle (1883-1955).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Roozbeh; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2007-01-01

    Robert William Boyle was one of the pioneers in the development and application of ultrasound. His remarkable career has not been previously traced in any depth, nor have his contributions, especially those during WWI, been carefully described. In collaboration with Lord Rutherford, his work on the development of ultrasound methods for submarine detection paralleled those in France under Paul Langevin (1872-1946), who many consider to be the father of modern ultrasound. This biographic account of Boyle's life focuses on his ultrasound research contributions, particularly the developments during WWI and those in the 10 years after. Evidence is presented that his pioneering research, along with that of Langevin, provided much of the foundation for modern ultrasound developments. Although this paper is partially based on somewhat dispersed biographic information performed by others, original letters and research papers, in addition to records and verbal accounts provided by relatives, have been used and consulted.

  14. PIONEER PLANTS FOR ECOSYSTEM RECOVERY IN DRAINAGE BASIN OF ERLONGSHAN RESERVOIR IN HEILONGJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-ping; ZHANG Yi; CAO Hui-cong

    2004-01-01

    This article reveals the ecological features and the theories and methods of introducing pioneer plants in the process of eco-restoring in different degenerative ecosystems in the drainage basin of Erlongshan Reservoir in Heilongjiang Province by systemically studying the deteriorative ecosystems and using recovery theory. The study shows that with the rise in degenerative degrees of the ecosystems, bio-species and bio-diversity sharply decrease in the study area and microclimate becomes warmer and drier in natural ecosystem. Therefore, we must attach importance to the construction of plants and biodiversity. In the study, different pioneer plants are selected for different degenerative ecosystems to restore and maintain the service functions of the ecosystems.

  15. Identification of pioneer viridans streptococci in the oral cavity of human neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C; Bowden, G H; Evans, M; Fitzsimmons, S P; Johnson, J; Sheridan, M J; Wientzen, R; Cole, M F

    1995-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-seven strains of pioneer streptococci isolated from the mouths of 40 healthy, full-term infants during the first month of life were examined by two taxonomic schemes that incorporated biochemical and physiological characteristics, IgA1 protease production and glycosidase activities. Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 and S. oralis comprised 55.0% of the pioneer streptococci isolated from neonates. S. salivarius constituted 25.3% of the isolates, while S. anginosus, S. mitis biovar 2, S. sanguis and S. gordonii accounted collectively for 11.4%. Difficulties in identifying streptococci were encountered and 8.4% of the 367 isolates could not be assigned to a recognised species.

  16. Study on Vegetation Root Strength of Pioneer Plants for Forest Areas in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-bin; LIANG Da-qing; YE Xu-rong

    2005-01-01

    Forest plant roots may restrain the occurrence of shallow landslides for forest land and pioneer tree species can also reduce runoff and soil erosion;thus they are useful practical ecological materials for landslide control and erosion control.In this study,two important pioneer plant species;Formosan Alder (Alnus formosana Makino) and Roxburgh Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill.Var.roxburghi i(DC.) Rehd.) were selected at landslide areas under vegetation treatments for soil and water conservation.In order to obtain the root strength model for the factors affecting pulling resistance and root tensile strength,experimental materials were tested and the data were analyzed using regression techniques.These models could be used to provide the index of slope stability and to quantify the root-strength using non-destructive methods.

  17. Electrotherapy for melancholia: the pioneering contributions of Benjamin Franklin and Giovanni Aldini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwig, Tom G; Fink, Max

    2009-03-01

    The electrical induction of seizures with a therapeutic aim began in 1938, but the history of electric currents to relieve mental illness began 2 centuries earlier with the pioneering work of the Italian Giovanni Aldini and the American Benjamin Franklin.These early experiments are described demonstrating that the electrical force encouraged hopeful applications. This history emphasizes the unique contribution in the induction of grand mal seizures as the therapeutic basis rather than the role of electricity alone.

  18. Ultrastructural observations on five pioneer soil algae from ice denuded areas (King George Island, West Antarctica)

    OpenAIRE

    MASSALSKI, ANDRZEJ; Mrozinska ,Teresa; Olech, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Morphological observations were made using transmission electron microscopy on five species of green soil algae, including Chlorosarcinopsis cf. gelatinosa Chantanachat & Bold, Muriella decolor visher, Tetracystis aeria Brown & Bold, Tetracystis pampae Brown & bold, and Stichococcus bacillaris Nageli. With an exception of the latter species, they are all new records in Antarctica. These species were the important pioneers in the colonization process of the areas recently denuded of ice. Colle...

  19. Pioneer:等离子电视风头仍劲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg Tarr

    2008-01-01

    尽管今天宣布其将停止生产等离子面板模块组件,但是Pioneer Electronics的美国销售和产品开发高级副总裁Russ Johnston说,该公司并没有改变其对于等离子技术的热衷态度。

  20. Xinxing Cathay Group and Weiqiao Pioneering Group entered Global Fortune500Companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Beijing time on 9th July 2012, United States Fortune- global officially released the 2012 Global Fortune 500 Companies list. Xinxing Cathay Group and Weiqiao Pioneering Group entered Global Fortune 500 Companies. In 2011, Xinxing Cathay Group topped the ranking of Global Fortune 500 Companies, ranked No. 484 by operating income of CNY 147.6 billion (equivalent to USD 22.832 billion). Xinxing Cathay Group is the country’s largest military supplier,

  1. Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb: Highlights from a pioneer of biomedical research, physician and scientist

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The article highlights the career of Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb (1910 – 1973; DKSM, Dip Bact, FRCPath, FRCP [Lond]), a pioneer worker in health, medical services, biomedical research and medical education in the Sudan. After his graduation from the Kitchener School of Medicine (renamed, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum [U of K]) in 1934, he devoted his life for the development of laboratory medicine. He became the first Sudanese Director of Stack Medical Research Laboratories (19...

  2. Electrotherapy for melancholia: the pioneering contributions of Benjamin Franklin and Giovanni Aldini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G; Fink, Max

    2009-01-01

    The electrical induction of seizures with a therapeutic aim began in 1938, but the history of electric currents to relieve mental illness began 2 centuries earlier with the pioneering work of the Italian Giovanni Aldini and the American Benjamin Franklin.These early experiments are described...... demonstrating that the electrical force encouraged hopeful applications. This history emphasizes the unique contribution in the induction of grand mal seizures as the therapeutic basis rather than the role of electricity alone....

  3. Restoration potential of pioneer plants growing on lead-zinc mine tailings in Lanping, southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Dongmei; DUAN Changqun

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on the restoration potential of ten pioneer plants (Artemisia roxburghiana, Artemisia tangutica, Carex inanis,Cyperaceae hebecarpus, Plantago depresa, Cynoglossum lanceolatum, Potentilla saundesiana, Coriaria sinica, Oxyria sinensis, andMiscanthus nepalensis) during the early phase of Pb-Zn mine tailings phytostabilization, in Lanping, China. The concentrations ofheavy metals (Pb, Zn, and Cu) and soil fertility (the available N, P, K, and organic matter) in the rhizosphere of these species have been compared. The results showed a general improvement in the rhizosphere soil properties of pioneer plants. Of the ten species, theconcentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu in the rhizosphere of A. Roxburghiana have the greatest reduction of 56.23%, 83.00%, and 84.36%,respectively, compared to the bulk soil. The best improvement in soil fertility was found in the rhizosphere of P. Saundesiana, with anincrease of 241.83%, 170.76%, 49.09%, and 81.60%, respectively, in the available N, E K, and organic matter. Metals accumulated bythe plants have been mainly distributed in the root tissues, and only small amounts transferred m the aboveground tissues. The highestcontents of Pb and Zn have been recorded in C. Hebecarpus with 57.84 and 87.92 mg/kg dry weight (dw), respectively. The maximumCu content was observed in C. Inanis with 1.19 mg/kg dw. Overall, pioneer plants will be ideal species for the phytostabilization of minetailings, but the potential use varies in different pioneer plant species. Among these ten species, A. Roxburghiana has been identified tobe the most suitable for phytostabilization programs, due to its greatest improvement on physicai-chemical properties in the rhizospheresoil.

  4. George Ryerson Fowler: Brooklyn's surgical pioneer: a biographical sketch based on historical documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Mary E; Swan, Kenneth G; Kelleher, Denis P

    2011-06-01

    The Fowler position, widely used in surgery and obstetrics for patient placement, marks a fraction of 19th-century Brooklyn surgeon George Ryerson Fowler's prodigious accomplishments. Fowler was a pioneer who refined the appendectomy, performed the first lung decortication, advocated for sterile techniques, introduced first aid in the US Army, and helped start a precursor to Annals of Surgery. His publications include the first US textbook on appendicitis--ironically, the disease that killed him.

  5. Caroline B. Palmer: Pioneer Physician Anesthetist and First Chair of Anesthesia at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2015-12-01

    Caroline B. Palmer was appointed as Chief of Anesthesia at Cooper Medical College (soon renamed as Stanford Medical School) in 1909. For the next 28 years, she was an innovative leader, a clinical researcher, and a strong advocate for recognition of anesthesiology as a medical specialty. To honor her accomplishments, the operating room suite in the new Stanford Hospital will be named after this pioneering woman anesthesiologist.

  6. The History with Two Prehistories. On the design of the Moscow Palace of Young Pioneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Novikov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the history of design of the Moscow Palace of Young Pioneers architectural complex on Leninskie (now Vorobievy Gory viewed in the context of evolution of the national architecture. While speaking about how the project came into being and which way was chosen to find the architectural character, the author proves that the Palace was a pivotal point in the history of Russian architecture and became one of the symbols of Soviet Modernism.

  7. Prevention of Renal Stone Complications in Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AIM 1. Refine ultrasound probes to detect, reposition, and fragment kidney stones. Task 1.1. Select imaging probe for stone repositioning. Clinical trials are...

  8. Lasers in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  9. Exploration of pioneering as a major element of ethical leadership in nursing: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordari-Sharifabad, Maasoumeh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan

    2017-07-01

    Commitment to ethical behavior is considered as an essential part of occupational responsibilities of nursing, and leaders' pioneering in ethical growth and development has led to the emergence of the concept of ethical leadership. The purpose of this study was to explain the nursing leaders' perception and experiences of pioneering in the field of ethical leadership. In this qualitative study, data were collected through semi-structured individual interviews. A total of 14 nursing leaders at different levels who were selected by purposeful sampling method participated in the study. Latent content analysis was used to analyze the data. Of 14 participants of the study, 8 were male and 6 were female aged 38 to 56 years old with a mean managerial experience of 12 years. In the analysis of interviews, 4 subcategories of "Role Modeling", "Empowerment", "Knowledge and Skill", and "Recognition" were obtained which formed two main categories. These categories included "Leader as mentor" and "Professional insight". Pioneering leaders are an important part of ethical leadership, and nursing leaders should not only be moral people, but also go a step further and actively promote moral behavior with a role as a mentor and model as well as having professional insight. Nursing leaders with a better understanding of these aspects can develop their capacity of strong ethical leadership and consider the aspects in their activities.

  10. Information Gains from Cosmological Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Grandis, S; Refregier, A; Amara, A; Nicola, A

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the 'surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat $\\Lambda$CDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter $w$. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 ...

  11. Short biography of Louis Daniel Beauperthuy (1807-71): pioneer of microbiology and medical science in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Gerardo A; Tarradath, Ewart

    2010-02-01

    Louis Daniel Beauperthuy was a pioneer of microbiology in Venezuela where he developed microscopic and clinical research together with academic and scientific observation related to leprosy and the role of insects in the transmission of febrile illnesses.

  12. Curiosity, Hope, and Vision: The Role of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Pioneer Portfolio in Funding Early Health Game Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarini, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Games for Health Journal Editor Bill Ferguson recently discussed The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's important role in funding health game research with Paul Tarini, Senior Program Officer for the Foundation's Pioneer Portfolio.

  13. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  14. Holographic backgrounds from D-brane probes

    CERN Document Server

    Moskovic, Micha

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the derivation of holographic backgrounds from the field theory side, without using any supergravity equations of motion. Instead, we rely on the addition of probe D-branes to the stack of D-branes generating the background. From the field theory description of the probe branes, one can compute an effective action for the probes (in a suitable low-energy/near-horizon limit) by integrating out the background branes. Comparing this action with the generic probe D-brane action then allows to determine the holographic background dual to the considered field theory vacuum. In the first part, the required pre-requisites of field and string theory are recalled and this strategy to derive holographic backgrounds is explained in more detail on the basic case of D3-branes in flat space probed by a small number of D-instantons. The second part contains our original results, which have already appeared in arXiv:1301.3738, arXiv:1301.7062 and arXiv:1312.0621. We first derive the duals to three conti...

  15. Industrial pioneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2014-01-01

    With their knowledge of metallurgy, mechanics and thermodynamics, mechanical engineers had to give shape to the industrial revolution in the Netherlands 150 years ago. This revolution only slowly gathered momentum, however, especially in comparison with England.

  16. Probing space charge effect on electroluminescence of indium tin oxide (ITO)/N,N′-di-[(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl]-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4, 4′-diamine (α-NPD)/tris(8-hydroxy-quinolinato) aluminum (III) (Alq{sub 3})/Al diodes by time-resolved electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadakata, Atsuo; Osada, Kenshiro; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp

    2014-03-03

    By using time-resolved electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement, we studied the electroluminescence (EL) mechanism which is activated in double-layer organic light-emitting diodes (indium tin oxide/N,N′-di-[(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl]-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (α-NPD)/tris(8-hydroxy-quinolinato) aluminum (III) (Alq{sub 3})/Al) in the high frequency region with application of AC square voltages at various duty-ratios. Results showed that holes were accumulated at the α-NPD/Alq{sub 3} interface in proportion to the duty-ratio, and corresponded well to the increasing EL enhancement at the high frequency. Our previous proposed model on the EL enhancement assisted by electron injection from the Al electrode in the presence of the space charge field was well confirmed. - Highlights: • We studied space charge (SC) effects in double-layer organic light emitting diodes. • The second-harmonic generation measurement was used to directly probe the SC field. • Space charge fields due to interfacial accumulated charge were verified. • We showed that SC electric fields contribute to electroluminescence emissions.

  17. Collective electronic effects in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, Ali

    The surface plasmon dispersion relations are calculated for a metal coated dielectric probe above a dielectric half space with and without metal coating. Employing prolate spheroidal coordinate system this configuration was modeled as confocal single-sheeted hyperboloids of revolution superimposed on planar domains. The involved media are characterized by frequency dependent, spatially local dielectric functions. Due to subwavelength dimensions of the region of interest, nonretarded electrodynamics is utilized to derive exact analytical expressions describing the resonant surface modes. The dispersion relations are studied as functions of the parameter that defines the hyperboloidal boundaries of the tip and the corresponding coating, and as functions of the involved coating thicknesses. Both parallel and perpendicular polarizations are considered. The results are simulated numerically and limiting cases are discussed with comparison to the Cartesian thin foil case. Using this new type of probe-substrate configuration, the surface plasmon coupling mechanism is investigated experimentally utilizing a scanning probe microscope, and the signal strength acquired by the probe is measured as a function of the distance between the probe and the sample. This is repeated at three different wavelengths of the incident p-polarized photons used to stimulate surface plasmons in the thin metal foil. The results are compared with the theory. Utilizing the prolate spheroidal coordinate system, the related and relevant problem of the Coulomb interaction of a dielectric probe tip with a uniform field existing above a semiinfinite, homogeneous dielectric substrate was studied. This is of interest in atomic force microscopy when the sample surface is electrically charged. The induced polarization surface charge density and the field distribution at the bounding surface of the dielectric medium with the geometry of a single-sheeted hyperboloid of revolution located above the dielectric

  18. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  19. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  20. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  1. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  2. (SC)RMI: A (S)emi-(C)lassical (R)elativistic (M)otion (I)integrator, to model the orbits of space probes around the Earth and other planets

    CERN Document Server

    Pireaux, S; Rosenblatt, P

    2006-01-01

    Today, the motion of spacecrafts is still described according to the classical Newtonian equations plus the so-called "relativistic corrections", computed with the required precision using the Post-(Post-)Newtonian formalism. The current approach, with the increase of tracking precision (Ka-Band Doppler, interplanetary lasers) and clock stabilities (atomic fountains) is reaching its limits in terms of complexity, and is furthermore error prone. In the appropriate framework of General Relativity, we study a method to numerically integrate the native relativistic equations of motion for a weak gravitational field, also taking into account small non-gravitational forces. The latter are treated as perturbations, in the sense that we assume that both the local structure of space-time is not modified by these forces, and that the unperturbed satellite motion follows the geodesics of the local space-time. The use of a symplectic integrator to compute the unperturbed geodesic motion insures the constancy of the norm ...

  3. EFFECT OF INOCULANT PIONEER 1188 IN MAIZE SILAGE ON COW MILKING CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zimmer

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available First investigation part, started on 1 September 2001 by feeding 473 cows (401 dairy and 72 dry and finished on 13 November by feeding 474 cows (409 dairy and 65 dry, was characterized by the main ration consisting of maize silage without inoculant. This period was known for a maximum number of housed cows being 490 (423 dairy and 67 dry and minimum 469 (395 dairy and 74 dry. Daily average of stable milk production was 17.06 l with 3.48% of lactic fat on the average. Second part of the investigation, started on 14 November 2001 by feeding 474 cows (411 dairy and 63 dry and finished on 31 March 2002 by feeding 464 cows (395 dairy and 69 dry, was known for the basic ration contained maize silage enriched by inoculant Pioneer 1188.This period was characterized by a maximum number of housed cows being 482 (404 dairy and 57 dry. Daily average of stable milk production was 18.67 l and 3.58% of lactic fat. The main ration was composed of silage maize, highly wet maize, pearl barley, stock meal, sunflower cake, hay, salt and VAM. Inoculant Pioneer contained 6 strains of lactic-sour fermentation selected bacteria whose viability is basis of a successful product. In fact, it is a micro-granulated product added, by Gandy doser, to amount of 0.5 kg per green mass/t. Inoculant Pioneer 1188 was in this research added in a dose of 0.436 kg t-1 silage maize. Daily average of stable milk production increased by 1.61l i.e. 9.4% and lactic fat from 3.48% to 3.58% i.e. 2.9%.

  4. LipidPioneer : A Comprehensive User-Generated Exact Mass Template for Lipidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Candice Z.; Koelmel, Jeremy P.; Ragland, Jared M.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Bowden, John A.

    2017-03-01

    Lipidomics, the comprehensive measurement of lipid species in a biological system, has promising potential in biomarker discovery and disease etiology elucidation. Advances in chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric techniques, and novel substrate applications continue to expand the number of lipid species observed. The total number and type of lipid species detected in a given sample are generally indicative of the sample matrix examined (e.g., serum, plasma, cells, bacteria, tissue, etc.). Current exact mass lipid libraries are static and represent the most commonly analyzed matrices. It is common practice for users to manually curate their own lists of lipid species and adduct masses; however, this process is time-consuming. LipidPioneer, an interactive template, can be used to generate exact masses and molecular formulas of lipid species that may be encountered in the mass spectrometric analysis of lipid profiles. Over 60 lipid classes are present in the LipidPioneer template and include several unique lipid species, such as ether-linked lipids and lipid oxidation products. In the template, users can add any fatty acyl constituents without limitation in the number of carbons or degrees of unsaturation. LipidPioneer accepts naming using the lipid class level (sum composition) and the LIPID MAPS notation for fatty acyl structure level. In addition to lipid identification, user-generated lipid m/z values can be used to develop inclusion lists for targeted fragmentation experiments. Resulting lipid names and m/z values can be imported into software such as MZmine or Compound Discoverer to automate exact mass searching and isotopic pattern matching across experimental data.

  5. LipidPioneer : A Comprehensive User-Generated Exact Mass Template for Lipidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Candice Z.; Koelmel, Jeremy P.; Ragland, Jared M.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Bowden, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Lipidomics, the comprehensive measurement of lipid species in a biological system, has promising potential in biomarker discovery and disease etiology elucidation. Advances in chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric techniques, and novel substrate applications continue to expand the number of lipid species observed. The total number and type of lipid species detected in a given sample are generally indicative of the sample matrix examined (e.g., serum, plasma, cells, bacteria, tissue, etc.). Current exact mass lipid libraries are static and represent the most commonly analyzed matrices. It is common practice for users to manually curate their own lists of lipid species and adduct masses; however, this process is time-consuming. LipidPioneer, an interactive template, can be used to generate exact masses and molecular formulas of lipid species that may be encountered in the mass spectrometric analysis of lipid profiles. Over 60 lipid classes are present in the LipidPioneer template and include several unique lipid species, such as ether-linked lipids and lipid oxidation products. In the template, users can add any fatty acyl constituents without limitation in the number of carbons or degrees of unsaturation. LipidPioneer accepts naming using the lipid class level (sum composition) and the LIPID MAPS notation for fatty acyl structure level. In addition to lipid identification, user-generated lipid m/z values can be used to develop inclusion lists for targeted fragmentation experiments. Resulting lipid names and m/z values can be imported into software such as MZmine or Compound Discoverer to automate exact mass searching and isotopic pattern matching across experimental data.

  6. Frugivory and the effects of ingestion by bats on the seed germination of three pioneering plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho-Ricardo, Maria C.; Uieda, Wilson; Fonseca, Renata Cristina B.; Rossi, Marcelo N.

    2014-02-01

    The dispersion and seedling establishment of pioneering plants can be favoured by the presence of frugivorous bats because the bats usually improve seed germination after ingestion. Although seed germinability is known to vary greatly after ingestion by different bats, the relative contribution of each bat species to seed germination within plant communities is poorly understood. In this study, we first determined the fauna of frugivorous bats in a semideciduous seasonal forest remnant in southern Brazil and subsequently identified the plant species of the seeds passed through their guts. Second, the germination performance (i.e., germination percentage and speed) of the seeds of three pioneering plants (Piper aduncum, Piper hispidinervum and Solanum granuloso-leprosum) ingested by the most abundant bats was compared with that of the non-ingested seeds (seeds collected from fruits). Additionally, the effects on seed germination of different bat species were compared. During one year, five species of frugivorous bats were caught, and the seeds of eleven identifiable plant species (not counting those of undetermined species) were found in their faeces. We found that the germination performance of the seeds of Piper species was significantly enhanced after ingestion by bats, whereas S. granuloso-leprosum seeds had neutral or reduced germinability when seeds in faeces were compared with pulp-removed seeds. Our results revealed that the bat species that were captured exerted different effects upon seed germination; such a disparity is expected to result in different rates of early establishment of these pioneer plants in tropical forests, most likely affecting forest composition and structure, particularly during the initial stages of succession.

  7. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  8. Solar-Heliospheric-Interstellar Cosmic Ray Tour with the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory and the Space Physics Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Johnson, Rita C.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    NASA now has a large collection of solar, heliospheric, and local interstellar (Voyager 1) cosmic ray particle data sets that can be accessed through the data system services of the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) in collaboration with the NASA Space Physics Data Facility SPDF), respectively led by the first and last authors. The VEPO services were developed to enhance the long-existing OMNIWeb solar wind and energetic particle services of SPDF for on-line browse, correlative, and statistical analysis of NASA and ESA mission fields, plasma, and energetic particle data. In this presentation we take of tour through VEPO and SPDF of SEP reservoir events, the outer heliosphere earlier surveyed by the Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses spacecraft and now being probed by New Horizons, and the heliosheath-heliopause-interstellar regions now being explored by the Voyagers and IBEX. Implications of the latter measurements are also considered for the flux spectra of low to high energy cosmic rays in interstellar space.

  9. Definition of Saturn's magnetospheric model parameters for the Pioneer 11 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of a method for selection parameters for a global paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere. The model is based on the preexisting paraboloid terrestrial and Jovian models of the magnetospheric field. Interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere, i.e. the magnetotail current system, and the magnetopause currents screening all magnetospheric field sources, is taken into account. The input model parameters are determined from observations of the Pioneer 11 inbound flyby.

  10. William and Caroline Herschel pioneers in late 18th-century astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This beautifully structured book presents the essentials of William and Caroline Herschel's pioneering achievements in late 18th-century astronomy. Michael Hoskin shows that William Herschel was the first observational cosmologist and one of the first observers to attack the sidereal universe beyond the solar system:Herschel built instruments far better than any being used at the royal observatory. Aided by his sister Caroline, he commenced a great systematic survey that led to his discovery of Uranus in 1781.Unlike observers before him, whose telescopes did not reveal them as astronomical obj

  11. Robert Mandell: a pioneer and giant in the art and science of contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polse, Kenneth A

    2008-10-01

    Robert B. Mandell is the quintessential modern clinical scientist. Over his long academic career, he has pioneered many advances in contact lens practice, ranging from a more complete understanding of corneal shape to the effects of contact lenses on corneal health. His classic text, Contact Lens Practice, first published in 1965, was reprinted 14 times in four editions up to 1988. Mandell's contributions to the advancement of the profession of optometry have always been characterized by a genuine concern for the patient and a steadfast belief that his research must have relevance to the practice of optometry.

  12. XIA NAI, AN EARLY PIONEER IN THE FIELD OF EGYPTOLOGY IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Professor Xia Nai (1910-1985) was a prominent Chinese archaeologist of substantial scholarly achievement. He is generally regarded as the leader of archaeological matters of the People's Republic of China, and one of the important founders of modern Chinese archaeology. His great academic achievements gave him high prestige in academic circles both at home and abroad. Xia Nai was born on 7 February 1910, in Wenzhou, Zhejian province and died on 19 June 1985 in Beijing. In modern China, Xia Nai was a pioneer...

  13. Pioneer 10 observations of zodiacal light brightness near the ecliptic - Changes with heliocentric distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, M. S.; Weinberg, J. L.; Beeson, D. E.; Sparrow, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Sky maps made by the Pioneer 10 Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) at sun-spacecraft distances from 1 to 3 AU have been analyzed to derive the brightness of the zodiacal light near the ecliptic at elongations greater than 90 degrees. The change in zodiacal light brightness with heliocentric distance is compared with models of the spatial distribution of the dust. Use of background starlight brightnesses derived from IPP measurements beyond the asteroid belt, where the zodiacal light is not detected, and, especially, use of a corrected calibration lead to considerably lower values for zodiacal light than those reported by us previously.

  14. Charles Wilberforce Daniels, FRCP (1862-1927): underrated pioneer of tropical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G C

    2002-03-01

    Charles Wilberforce Daniels was a major pioneer in the early days of the newly-formed medical specialism--tropical medicine. At the London School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) of which he was a leading stalwart, he took an active part in research, teaching and administration. But like others in the new discipline he spent a great deal of time at various tropical locations: Fiji, British Guiana--where he made important observations on various forms of filariasis-- east Africa, and Malaya. However, his most important research contribution was arguably confirmation of Ronald Ross' 1898 discovery of the complete life-cycle of avian malaria, in Calcutta.

  15. Victor Kandinsky (1849-89): pioneer of modern Russian forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Margolin, Jacob; Witztum, Eliezer

    2012-06-01

    The paper describes Victor Kandinsky's professional achievements within nineteenth-century Russian forensic psychiatry. A thorough review of nineteenth-century Russian psychiatry is presented, followed by a short biographical account of Kandinsky's personal life. Within the backdrop of Russian forensic psychiatry toward the end of nineteenth century, Kandinsky's pioneer innovations in psychopathology and classification as well as his contributions to Russian forensic psychiatry are reviewed. These are exemplified by two of his forensic case studies relating to forensic responsibility and malingering, which are included in his famous book 'On Irresponsibility'.

  16. Breaking the mould: profiles of six pioneer trainee or beginning teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLay, Margaret

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been much recent attention on increasing the diversity of teachers in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS in order to provide a more representative workforce. This is seen as vital not only in engaging learners from minorities but also in increasing the experience of others in working with underrepresented groups. There has been less attention on how to support and sustain teachers from minorities once in post. This study profiles six pioneering teachers/trainees, looking at how they came into their chosen profession and subsequently into teaching, and what processes and attitudes help or hinder them in their work.

  17. Jewish Family and Children's Services: a pioneering human service organization (1850-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, and Sonoma Counties is a pioneering nonprofit human service organization that has delivered services for 157 years. Over the course of its history, the organization has transformed itself from an all-volunteer agency delivering aid to immigrant families during the Gold Rush era to a $30 million nonprofit human service organization offering a full-range of services to adults, children, and families. The history of Jewish Family and Children's Services sheds light on the importance of strong leadership, strategic planning, external relationships, and strong donor support.

  18. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  19. Quasilinear Inner Product Spaces and Hilbert Quasilinear Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aseev launched a new branch of functional analysis by introducing the theory of quasilinear spaces in the framework of the topics of norm, bounded quasilinear operators and functionals (Aseev (1986. Furthermore, some quasilinear counterparts of classical nonlinear analysis that lead to such result as Frechet derivative and its applications were examined deal with. This pioneering work causes a lot of results in such applications such as (Rojas-Medar et al. (2005, Talo and Başar (2010, and Nikol'skiĭ (1993. His work has motivated us to introduce the concept of quasilinear inner product spaces. Thanks to this new notion, we obtain some new theorems and definitions which are quasilinear counterparts of fundamental definitions and theorems in linear functional analysis. We claim that some new results related to this concept provide an important contribution to the improvement of quasilinear functional analysis.

  20. Space of Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Wheeler emphasized the study of Superspace - the space of 3-geometries on a spatial manifold of fixed topology. This is a configuration space for GR; knowledge of configuration spaces is useful as regards dynamics and QM.In this Article I consider furthmore generalized configuration spaces to all levels within the conventional `equipped sets' paradigm of mathematical structure used in fundamental Theoretical Physics. This covers A) the more familiar issue of topology change in the sense of topological manifolds (tied to cobordisms), including via pinched manifolds. B) The less familiar issue of not regarding as fixed the yet deeper levels of structure: topological spaces themselves (and their metric space subcase), collections of subsets and sets. Isham has previously presented quantization schemes for a number of these. I consider some classical preliminaries for this program, aside from the most obvious (classical dynamics for each). Rather, I provide I) to all levels Relational and Background Independence ...

  1. Optical Mach Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) proposes to advance NASA's nonintrusive spatially- and temporally-resolved Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering (IRS) technology...

  2. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  3. Mert Davies: Pioneer in the Use of Spacecraft to Map Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Augenstein, B.

    2002-12-01

    Mert Davies was one of the founding employees of the RAND Corporation in 1946, and continued that relationship until his death in 2001. He began his involvement in satellite imaging at Rand as one of about 100 researchers in Project Feedback in 1954, provided the basis for the initial US military space program. In 1957, in response to the Soviet launch of Sputnik, Mert and a small group of Rand cohorts proposed a family of recoverable reconnaissance satellites featuring spin stabilized cameras, for which he later received a patent. This work, now declassified, was for a short time considered as a basis for the Corona, America's first reconnaissance satellite Corona, although ultimately alternative technologies were employed. In addition he was looking beyond Earth quite early and in May, 1958 published an analysis of a lunar mapping satellite. The 1957 work at Rand spurred considerations of space-based geodesy and mapping. These and other early contributions were recognized in 1999 by the National Reconnaissance Office which honored him as one of the founders of national reconnaissance. He was so enthused by the opportunity developing in the mid 1960?s to explore photographically the planets that he changed careers and joined the Television Team of the Mariner probes being developed to flyby Mars in 1969 (Mariner's 6&7). His abilities and accomplishments there led directly to central roles later in the Mariner 9 Mars Orbiter mission (1971-72) as well as Mariner 10 to Mercury (1973-75) and Voyagers 1&2 (1979-89) These early flights to Mars represented unprecedented technical challenges, especially to radio communications. As a consequence, analog television systems, like that carried on the Ranger impact probe in 1964-65 or film readout technology like that used on Lunar Orbiter in 1965-66 to send back high-resolution images from the Moon were not feasible from planetary distances. In order to exploit the remarkable communication potential of the DSN, JPL

  4. Thermoelectric power conversion in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaya, Henry I.; Ewell, Richard; Nesmith, Bill; Vandersande, James

    1990-01-01

    A radiatively-heated multicouple for use in the next generation of radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) will employ 20 individual couples within a single cell, so that 40 n- and p-semiconductor legs will be interconnected in series. At the hot end of the RTG, the legs will be electrically interconnected using silicon molybdenum; on the cold side, the legs are interconnected by tungsten. The entire cell is then mechanically attached to a radiator, which conducts heat away and radiates it into space. Deep-space applications will use RTGs developed for vacuum operation; thermoelectric converter power systems using a unicouple configuration have flown on such missions as Pioneers 10 and 11, which used lead telluride thermoelectric converters, and Voyagers I and II, which used silicon germanium-based thermoelectrics.

  5. Biosensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Radiation-Induced Biologic Effects in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R., Jr.; Balogh, Lajos; Majoros, Istvan; Keszler, Balazs; Myc, Andrzej; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Norris, Theodore; delaIglesia, Felix; Beeson, Nicholas W. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This proposal seeks to develop cellular biosensors based on dendritic polymers. Nanoscale polymer structures less than 20 nm in diameter will be used as the basis of the sensor/actuators. The structures will be designed to target into specific cells of an astronaut and be able to monitor health issues such as the exposure to radiation or infectious agents. Multiple components can be assembled on the polymers including target directors, analytical devices (such as molecular probes), magnetic particles and metals, and imaging agents. The design and assembly of these devices has been pioneered at the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology in the University of Michigan. These molecules would also be able to administer therapeutics in response to the needs of the astronaut, and act as actuators to remotely manipulate an astronaut as necessary to ensure their safety. The reporting will be accomplished either through fluorescence signal monitoring, with the use of multispectral analysis for signal interpretation, or through functional MRI. These nanosensors coupled to NEMS devices could facilitate the success and increase the safety of extended space flight.

  6. Biosensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Radiation-Induced Biologic Effects in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R.; Balogh, Lajos; Majoros, Istvan; Keszler, Balazs; Myc, Andrzej; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Norris, Theodore; delaiglesia, Felix; Beeson, Nicholas W. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This work seeks to develop cellular biosensors based on dendritic polymers. Nanoscale polymer structures less than 20 nm in diameter will be used as the basis of the biosensors. The structures will be designed to target into specific cells of an astronaut and be able to monitor health issues such as exposure to radiation. Multiple components can be assembled on the polymers including target directors, analytical devices (such as molecular probes), and reporting agents. The reporting will be accomplished through fluorescence signal monitoring, with the use of multispectral analysis for signal interpretation. These nanosensors could facilitate the success and increase the safety of extended space flight. The design and assembly of these devices has been pioneered at the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology in the University of Michigan. This period, synthesis of the test-bed biosensors continued. Studies were performed on the candidate fluorescent dyes to determine which might be suitable for the biosensor under development. Development continued on producing an artificial capillary bed as a tool for the use in the production of the fluorescence signal monitor. Work was also done on the in vitro multispectral analysis system, which uses the robotic microscope.

  7. Pico Reentry Probes: Affordable Options for Reentry Measurements and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailor, William H.; Kapoor, Vinod B.; Allen, Gay A., Jr.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally very costly to perform in-space and atmospheric entry experiments. This paper presents a new platform - the Pico Reentry Probe (PREP) - that we believe will make targeted flight-tests and planetary atmospheric probe science missions considerably more affordable. Small, lightweight, self-contained, it is designed as a "launch and forget" system, suitable for experiments that require no ongoing communication with the ground. It contains a data recorder, battery, transmitter, and user-customized instrumentation. Data recorded during reentry or space operations is returned at end-of-mission via transmission to Iridium satellites (in the case of earth-based operations) or a similar orbiting communication system for planetary missions. This paper discusses possible applications of this concept for Earth and Martian atmospheric entry science. Two well-known heritage aerodynamic shapes are considered as candidates for PREP: the shape developed for the Planetary Atmospheric Experiment Test (PAET) and that for the Deep Space II Mars Probe.

  8. Phoenix Conductivity Probe Inserted in Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This series of six images from the Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander records the first time that the four spikes of the lander's thermal and electrical conductivity probe were inserted into Martian soil. The images were taken on July 8, 2008, during the Phoenix mission's 43rd Martian day, or sol, since landing. The insertion visible from the shadows cast on the ground on that sol was a validation test of the procedure. The spikes on the probe are about 1.5 centimeters or half an inch long. The science team will use the probe tool to assess how easily heat and electricity move through the soil from one spike to another. Such measurements can provide information about frozen or unfrozen water in the soil. The probe is mounted on the 'knuckle' of Phoenix's Robotic Arm. It has already been used for assessing water vapor in the atmosphere when it is held above the ground. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  10. Probing Properties of Cold Radiofrequency Plasma with Polymer Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward; Multanen, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows estimation of the Debye length of the cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  11. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  12. Nutrient capital sequestration in pioneer plant communities on surface-mine spoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Four pioneer plant communities on a surface-mine spoil were compared in terms of biomass production and nutrient capital sequestration. A chenopodium album-dominated community (Treatment 4) produced the greatest amount of biomass. Next were a community derived from a forest topsoil seed bank spread over mine spoil (Treatment 2), a seed bank community with common reclamation species seeded into it (Treatment 3), and a mix of grasses and Lespedeza commonly used in reclamation (Treatment 1). Amounts of nutrients sequestered in vegetation were not strictly proportional to biomass. Community nutrient contents were largely influenced by community biomass and the nutrient uptake characteristics of the species with most biomass. Significant changes in soil chemistry were found after one growing season. Addition of the reclamation mix of grasses and Lespedeza to the seed bank resulted in significantly fewer established native species. Native species lost their normal dominance and exhibited stunted growth and phenological delay in Treatment 3. Nutrient content niche, nutrient content niche share, and niche breadth (Levins; B) were calculated for important species in each community. Native species generally had reduced niche breadths and niche shares when reclamation species were added to the community. Community content niche, the sums of species content niches, varied between different types of pioneer communities.

  13. Tijuca National Park: two pioneering restorationist initiatives in Atlantic forest in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the environmental history of the Tijuca National Park, we report on two pioneering restorationist initiatives and list its the mammal species now found in this urban park. The Tijuca National Park (TNP, a 3,200 ha urban park covered by secondary tropical forest, is located within Rio de Janeiro, in southeastern Brazil. The two restorationist initiatives were a pioneer tropical forest restoration project in the nineteenth century and a fauna management project in the 70' s. The mammal list presented here was based on specimens in the Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro and on publications. The mammal community of TNP is composed of 49 species, of which 11 are on regional red lists, and four are on the 2003 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Occurrence of these threatened species and the park history itself made the TNP a priority site for studying conservation, management, and monitoring. Besides maintaining fauna and flora (including threatened species diversity, the park benefits the population of Rio de Janeiro by providing water, green areas, and recreational and touristic opportunities.

  14. Orbital effects of the time-dependent component of the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    We work out the impact that the recently determined time-dependent component of the Pioneer anomalous acceleration may have on the orbital motions of some planets of the solar system in the hypothesis that it is a genuine phenomenon of gravitational origin. By assuming that it points towards the Sun, it turns out that both the semi-major axis a and the eccentricity e of the orbit of a test particle experience secular variations. For Saturn and Uranus, for which modern data records cover at least one full orbital revolution, such predicted anomalies are up to 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the present-day accuracies in empirically determining their orbital parameters from the usual orbit determination procedures in which the Pioneer anomaly was not modeled. Given the predicted huge sizes of such signatures, it is unlikely that their absence from the presently available processed data can be attributable to an "absorption" for them in the estimated parameters caused by the fact that they were not explicitl...

  15. Professor Peter Choyce: an early pioneer of intraocular lenses and corneal/refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suresh K; Apple, David J

    2005-06-01

    Professor Peter Choyce, FRCS, DOMS, MS, was one of the pioneers of intraocular lens implant surgery. He developed an interest in artificial lens implantation following cataract surgery, a procedure that was widely criticized by the ophthalmic establishment in the UK, Europe, North America and other countries. Owing to the opposition to the intraocular lenses, Peter Choyce together with Sir Harold Ridley co-founded the International Intraocular Implant Club in 1966, which was responsible for the gradual acceptance of artificial lens implantation. Peter Choyce developed several models of intraocular lens, but did not patent the majority of them. The Choyce Mark IX, manufactured by Rayner Intraocular Lenses, became the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved intraocular lens in 1981. A review of Peter Choyce's record confirms a significant number of original innovations in the field of anterior segment surgery, including many procedures taken for granted today, but not associated with his name. These include early work on both kerato- and intraocular lens-refractive procedures, keratoprosthesis, pioneering paediatric implant procedures and others. Unfortunately his tenacious adherence to anterior chamber lens technology, while in general clinically sound, caused many to question his influence and hence he remained poorly understood even until after his death. He passed away on 8 August 2001 after a long fight with colon cancer. In this article, we provide evidence and elaborate Peter Choyce's accomplishments, which places him as one of the most innovative ophthalmologist in his surgical field in the twentieth century.

  16. Long-term persistence of pioneer species in tropical forest soil seed banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalling, J W; Brown, T A

    2008-10-05

    In tropical forests, pioneer species regenerate from seeds dispersed directly into canopy gaps, and from seeds that persisted in soil seed banks before gap formation. However, life-history models suggest that selection for long-term persistence of seeds in soil should be weak, as persistence incurs a fitness cost resulting from prolonged generation time. We use a carbon dating technique to provide the first direct measurements of seed persistence in undisturbed tropical forest seed banks. We show that seeds germinate successfully from surface soil microsites up to 38 years after dispersal. Decades-long persistence may be common in pioneers with relatively large mass, and appears to be unrelated to specific regeneration requirements. In Croton billbergianus, a sub-canopy tree that recruits in abundant small gaps, long-term persistence is associated with short-distance ballistic seed dispersal. In Trema micrantha, a canopy tree with widespread dispersal, persistence is associated with a requirement for large gaps that form infrequently in old-growth forest.

  17. Bacterial Rhizosphere Biodiversity from Several Pioneer Desert Sand Plants Near Jizan, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Jorge R.

    2016-04-08

    Life in arid regions and, in particular, hot deserts is often limited due to their harsh environmental conditions, such as large temperature fluctuations and low amounts of water. These extreme environments can influence the microbial community present on the surface sands and any rhizosphere members surrounding desert plant roots. The Jizan desert area, located in Saudi Arabia, supports particular vegetation that grows in the large sandy flat terrain. We examined five different samples, four from the rhizosphere of pioneer plants plus a surface sand sample, and used pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified V1-V3 regions of 16S rDNA genes from total extracted DNA to reveal and compare the bacterial population diversity of the samples. The results showed a total of 3,530 OTUs in the five samples, calculated using ≥ 97% sequence similarity levels. The Chao1 estimation of the bacterial diversity fluctuated from 637 to 2,026 OTUs for a given sample. The most abundant members found in the samples belong to the Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla. This work shows that the Jizan desert area of Saudi Arabia can contain a diverse bacterial community on the sand and surrounding the roots of pioneer desert plants. It also shows that desert sand microbiomes can vary depending on conditions, with broad implications for sandstone monument bacterial communities

  18. Elevation, Not Deforestation, Promotes Genetic Differentiation in a Pioneer Tropical Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Antonio R.; Pope, Nathaniel; Jaffé, Rodolfo; Jha, Shalene

    2016-01-01

    The regeneration of disturbed forest is an essential part of tropical forest ecology, both with respect to natural disturbance regimes and large-scale human-mediated logging, grazing, and agriculture. Pioneer tree species are critical for facilitating the transition from deforested land to secondary forest because they stabilize terrain and enhance connectivity between forest fragments by increasing matrix permeability and initiating disperser community assembly. Despite the ecological importance of early successional species, little is known about their ability to maintain gene flow across deforested landscapes. Utilizing highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, we examined patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation for the pioneer understory tree Miconia affinis across the Isthmus of Panama. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of geographic distance, forest cover, and elevation on genetic differentiation among populations using circuit theory and regression modeling within a landscape genetics framework. We report marked differences in historical and contemporary migration rates and moderately high levels of genetic differentiation in M. affinis populations across the Isthmus of Panama. Genetic differentiation increased significantly with elevation and geographic distance among populations; however, we did not find that forest cover enhanced or reduced genetic differentiation in the study region. Overall, our results reveal strong dispersal for M. affinis across human-altered landscapes, highlighting the potential use of this species for reforestation in tropical regions. Additionally, this study demonstrates the importance of considering topography when designing programs aimed at conserving genetic diversity within degraded tropical landscapes. PMID:27280872

  19. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, Joshua L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  20. [Sir Geoffrey Keynes 1887-1982. Surgical pioneer, medical historian, humanist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergljung, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Sir Geoffrey Keynes (1887 - 1982), was a pioneer in the surgery of breast cancer and thymic deseases, n.b. in patients suffering from myastenia gravis. He strongly disapproved of the longstanding dogma of so called radical mastectomy in breast cancer, and advocated a more limited surgical approach, followed by radiation therapy. This was done more than fifty years before breastconserving surgery has become the therapy of choice and against considerable opposition from the surgical establishment of his days. He also became a pioneer in the surgical treatment of myastenia gravis by thymectomy, at a time when there was no real understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and when considerable controversy existed as to the importance or non importance of concomitant tumour formation in the thymus. Besides being a busy surgeon Sir Geoffrey was a medical historian, writing the biography of among others William Harvey, a bibliographer with a special interest in the poet and artist William Blake and a bibliophil with a large book collection of great value to medical history.

  1. Solar wind structure at large heliocentric distances - An interpretation of Pioneer 10 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Examination of hourly values of the solar wind speed observed by the Pioneer 10 spacecraft beyond a heliocentric distance of 4 AU reveals (1) a prevalent 'sawtoothlike' speed-time profile, most speed fluctuations displaying a rapid rise and a much slower decline, and (2) the nearly universal appearance of abrupt (on the 1-hour time resolution of these data) changes in the speed on the rising portions of the speed fluctuations. These previously unreported characteristics, as well as the rate of decay of stream amplitudes derived earlier by Collard and Wolfe, are in general agreement with the predictions of stream propagation models that neglect any conversion of kinetic energy to thermal energy outside of shock fronts. Thus the Pioneer 10 observations give the first confirmation of the general concept of solar wind stream evolution employed in these models, i.e., that solar wind speed inhomogeneities appear to steepen to form shock waves and that the 'wave amplitudes' decay slowly as the shock waves propagate outward from the sun.

  2. Cytogenetics and characterization of microsatellite loci for a South American pioneer tree species, Croton floribundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, Milene; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A F; Zucchi, Maria I; dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the recent advances in plant population genetic studies, the lack of information regarding pedigree, ploidy level, or mode of inheritance for many polyploids can compromise the analysis of the molecular data produced. The aim of this study was to examine both microsatellite and cytogenetic characteristics of the pioneer tree Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae) to test for the occurrence of polyploidy in the species and to evaluate its implications for the appropriate use of SSR markers. Seven microsatellite markers were developed and screened for 62 individuals from a semi-deciduous tropical forest in Brazil. Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were evaluated from male flower buds. All SSR loci were highly polymorphic. The number of bivalents observed in meiosis n = 56 (2n = 8× = 112) and the maximum number of alleles per individual (Ni = 8) demonstrated the occurrence of polyploidy in C. floribundus. The normal meiotic pairing and the high pollen viability suggested that C. floribundus is a regular and stable polyploid, most likely an allopolyploid. The combined SSR and cytogenetic data provided new evidence on the origin and evolution of the species as well as assured the accurate use of SSR loci for population genetic studies of the polyploid pioneer species.

  3. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: The orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramanandam eManavathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 17-beta estradiol (E2, a steroid hormone, which play critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERs. The activity of ERs depends on the coordinate activity of ligand binding, posttranslational modification, and importantly their interaction with their partner proteins called ‘coregulators’. Because majority of breast cancers are ERalpha positive and coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, in addition to these coregulators, the other ER partner proteins ‘pioneering factors’ also seems to contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator- and pioneering factor-mediated action on ER functions, particularly their role in mammary gland cell fate and development.

  4. Doomed pioneers: Gravity-flow deposition and bioturbation in marine oxygen-deficient environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föilmi, Karl B.; Grimm, Kurt A.

    1990-11-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows appear in exclusive association with gravity-flow deposits within sequences of nonbioturbated hernipelagic sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California. These burrowed levels are not associated with other ichnogenera such as Zoophycos and Chondrites. We infer a causal relation between gravity flow deposition and the presence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes and suggest that these gravity flows entrained thalassinidean crustacea. Upon deposition in oxygen-deficient environments, the surviving borrowers reworked substantial quantities of aminated, commonly organic-rich sediments in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of or the ecologically rapid return to oxygen-depleted conditions limited the survival time and ecological complexity of the transported infaunal dwellers and rendered them doomed pioneers. Ecological and physiological data support this hypothesis: thalassinidean crustacea have the capability to endure turbulent transport and survive up to 5-7 days of anoxia without being severely limited in their biological activities. The accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace-fossil assemblages as ephemeral ecological phenomena in otherwise laminated successions may contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  5. Readiness to adopt e-learning: pioneering a course in school librarianship education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Zinn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available E-learning has come of age in South African higher education but scepticism, caution and an inadequate reward system for innovative teaching methods have resulted in a slow uptake by academics. Within this milieu the author pioneered a course in the ACE School Librarianship programme. The study describes the e-learning experiences of the course participants gleaned from questionnaire responses to questions related to experiences of ICTs, the Internet and online learning, ability to navigate the e-learning environment, utilization of elements of the learning management system and implementation of course ideas in their respective schools and personal lives. The study also provides an opportunity for the author to reflect on her pioneering experiences with e-learning and how she would approach it differently next time. The main lessons learned were that 1 the e-learning environment is not necessarily intuitive and participants need opportunities to digest novel features such as the discussion forum; 2 several of the advantages and disadvantages of e-learning that appear in the research literature are identified in this study; and 3 setting up an e-learning course is best achieved incrementally.

  6. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  7. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  8. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  9. Gravity Probe B data system description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Norman R.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B data system, developed, integrated, and tested by Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, and later Lockheed Martin Corporation, included flight and ground command, control, and communications software. The development was greatly facilitated, conceptually and by the transfer of key personnel, through Lockheed’s earlier flight and ground test software development for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Key design challenges included the tight mission timeline (17 months, 9 days of on-orbit operation), the need to tune the system once on-orbit, and limited 2 Kbps real-time data rates and ground asset availability. The result was a completely integrated space vehicle and Stanford mission operations center, which successfully collected and archived 97% of the ‘guide star valid’ data to support the science analysis. Lessons learned and incorporated from the HST flight software development and on-orbit support experience, and Lockheed’s independent research and development effort, will be discussed.

  10. Surface-sensitive conductivity measurement using a micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkins, Edward; Barreto, Lucas; Wells, Justin

    2013-01-01

    An instrument for microscale electrical transport measurements in ultra-high vacuum is presented. The setup is constructed around collinear lithographically-created multi-point probes with a contact spacing down to 500 nm. Most commonly, twelve-point probes are used. These probes are approached...... measurements with an equidistant four-point probe for a wide range of contact spacings. In this way, it is possible to distinguish between bulk-like and surface-like conduction. The paper describes the design of the instrument and the approach to data and error analysis. Application examples are given...

  11. The Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA Maintains an Accessible Nucleosome Configuration at Enhancers for Tissue-Specific Gene Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Donahue, Greg; Kakumanu, Akshay; Watts, Jason A; Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin; Lee, Dolim; Kaestner, Klaus H; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear DNA wraps around core histones to form nucleosomes, which restricts the binding of transcription factors to gene regulatory sequences. Pioneer transcription factors can bind DNA sites on nucleosomes and initiate gene regulatory events, often leading to the local opening of chromatin. However, the nucleosomal configuration of open chromatin and the basis for its regulation is unclear. We combined low and high levels of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion along with core histone mapping to assess the nucleosomal configuration at enhancers and promoters in mouse liver. We find that MNase-accessible nucleosomes, bound by transcription factors, are retained more at liver-specific enhancers than at promoters and ubiquitous enhancers. The pioneer factor FoxA displaces linker histone H1, thereby keeping enhancer nucleosomes accessible in chromatin and allowing other liver-specific transcription factors to bind and stimulate transcription. Thus, nucleosomes are not exclusively repressive to gene regulation when they are retained with, and exposed by, pioneer factors.

  12. Space experiment TUS on board the Lomonosov satellite as pathfinder of JEM-EUSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Space-based detectors for the study of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECR) are being prepared as a promising new method for detecting highest energy cosmic rays. A pioneering space device - the "tracking ultraviolet set-up" (TUS) - is in the last stage of its construction and testing. The TUS detector will collect preliminary data on EECR in the conditions of a space environment, which will be extremely useful for planning the major JEM-EUSO detector operation.

  13. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  14. Probe-based data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Abelmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based data storage attracted many researchers from academia and industry, resulting in unprecendeted high data-density demonstrations. This topical review gives a comprehensive overview of the main contributions that led to the major accomplishments in probe-based data storage. The most investigated technologies are reviewed: topographic, phase-change, magnetic, ferroelectric and atomic and molecular storage. Also, the positioning of probes and recording media, the cantilever arrays and parallel readout of the arrays of cantilevers are discussed. This overview serves two purposes. First, it provides an overview for new researchers entering the field of probe storage, as probe storage seems to be the only way to achieve data storage at atomic densities. Secondly, there is an enormous wealth of invaluable findings that can also be applied to many other fields of nanoscale research such as probe-based nanolithography, 3D nanopatterning, solid-state memory technologies and ultrafast probe microscopy.

  15. High Rate Tellecommunications for Mars Planetary and Proximity Ranges and other Deep-Space Missions-A Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space vehicles for deep space exploration rely on microwave and millimeter wave links for communication with earth stations. As the mission of space probes expands,...

  16. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  17. Experimental probes of axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  18. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  19. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying......Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...

  20. Probe Drilling Ahead of Two TBMs in Difficult Ground Conditions in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Nuh; Ates, Ugur

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of probe drilling carried out ahead of TBMs in two difficult tunneling projects in Turkey. The tunnels have completely different geological characteristics which necessitated two different methods of data analysis. Melen Water Tunnel was excavated under Istanbul Bosphorus within sedimentary rocks which are cut frequently by andesitic dykes, fracturing the surrounding rocks and creating a potential risk for water ingress into the tunnel. At the beginning of Melen Project, pioneering probe drillings with petrographic analysis and strength tests were performed on samples collected from TBM muck. This analysis allowed identifying some critical normalized probe drilling rate values for predicting potential weak zones created by andesitic dykes. These studies gave a sound basis for further interpretation of TBM and geologic data for the same tunnel. The second set of probe drilling analysis was from Kargi Tunnel. The North Anatolian Fault highly affected the tunnel excavation by fractured rock formations. Although the change in normalized probe drilling data was a good indicator of fractured zones, the diversity of rock formations made it difficult to interpret the data.

  1. Development and certification of the innovative pioneer oil burner for residential heating appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, B. [Heat Wise Inc., Ridge, NY (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The Pioneer burner represents another important milestone for the oil heat industry. It is the first practical burner design that is designated for use in small capacity heating appliances matching the needs of modern energy efficient home designs. Firing in the range of 0.3 GPH to 0.65 GPH (40,000-90,000 Btu/hr) it allows for new oil heating appliance designs to compete with the other major fuel choices in the small design load residential market. This market includes energy efficient single family houses, town-houses, condominiums, modular units, and mobile homes. The firing range also is wide enough to cover a large percentage of more conventional heating equipment and home designs as well. Having recently passed Underwriters Laboratory certification tests the burner in now being field tested in several homes and samples are being made available to interested boiler and furnace manufacturers for product development and application testing.

  2. Breaking the glass ceiling: an interview with Dr. Shirley Graves, a pioneering woman in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Mai, Christine L; Elder, Badrea; Rodriguez, Samuel; Yaster, Myron

    2014-04-01

    Shirley Graves M.D., D.Sc. (honorary) (1936), Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics at the University of Florida, was one of the most influential women in medicine in the 1960 and 1970s, a time when the medical profession was overwhelmingly male-dominated. In today's society, it is hard to believe that only 50 years ago, women were scarce in the field of medicine. Yet Dr. Graves was a pioneer in the fields of pediatric anesthesia and pediatric critical care medicine. She identifies her development of the pediatric intensive care unit and her leadership in the Division of Pediatric Anesthesia at the University of Florida as her defining contributions. Through her journal articles, book chapters, national and international lectures, and leadership in the American Society of Anesthesiology and the Florida Society of Anesthesiology, she inspired a generation of men and women physicians to conquer the unthinkable and break through the glass ceiling.

  3. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  4. Alexis Carrel (1873-1944): visionary vascular surgeon and pioneer in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Lai

    2014-08-01

    Alexis Carrel was a French surgeon in the 20th century. He made significant contributions to many advances in the fields of vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery and organ transplantation. He demonstrated that blood vessels can be united end-to-end and pioneered the triangulation suturing technique in vascular anastomosis. The methods he developed are still in use to this day. He insisted on the importance of absolute asepsis in vascular surgery when such practices were almost unheard of. He was also considered the father of solid organ transplantation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in recognition of his work. Together with Charles Lindbergh, he developed the extracorporeal perfusion pump to keep organs alive outside the human body. His contribution to medicine also extended to tissue culture and wound management. He was one of the most controversial figures of his generation, believing in the idea of genetic superiority and eugenics and he was associated with fascism in the 1930s.

  5. Solar wind and coronal structure near sunspot minimum - Pioneer and SMM observations from 1985-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in solar wind speed and magnetic polarity observed at the Pioneer spacecraft are discussed here in terms of the changing magnetic geometry implied by SMM coronagraph observations over the period 1985-1987. The pattern of recurrent solar wind streams, the long-term average speed, and the sector polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field all changed in a manner suggesting both a temporal variation, and a changing dependence on heliographic latitude. Coronal observations during this epoch show a systematic variation in coronal structure and the magnetic structure imposed on the expanding solar wind. These observations suggest interpretation of the solar wind speed variations in terms of the familiar model where the speed increases with distance from a nearly flat interplanetary current sheet, and where this current sheet becomes aligned with the solar equatorial plane as sunspot minimum approaches, but deviates rapidly from that orientation after minimum.

  6. INFLUANCE OF TRAINING PROCESS ON DEVELOPMENT OF EXSPLOSIVE STRENGHT OF LEGS AT PIONEER BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašin Badža

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is trying to give an answer on a question whether the training process which lasted two years influenced on development of exsplosive strenght of legs (one of basic psysical abilities at pioneer basketball players. The sample in a research are basketball players from „Danubius - Vojvodina Srbijagas” team, from Novi Sad. The group counts 20 players who participated in training process and on who measuring was conducted. Data were collected per two years, and measuring were exert three times during this period. Tests that were used in this research are: long jump, high jump and running 20m. The obtained data will be processed statistically, using ANOVA for repeated measures and descriptive statistics. Research results will be represented in tables and discussed in text.

  7. Hooked on a New Technology: The Automation Pioneers in Post-War Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Kvaal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the initial activities in servo engineering in Norway originating in the early 1950s based on contacts at the Massachusets Institute of Technology. The activities were initiated by a small group of servo enthusiasts who, through the Feedback Control Committee in the research council, managed to coordinate national activities and establish strong research groups in Trondheim, Bergen and Oslo. After the initial phase of establishing the research groups, there was a continuous strong focus on connections with industry and industrial applications. In the mid-1960s the committee was strengthened and became the Automation and Data Processing Committee. The initial group of automation pioneers have left a lasting impact on the academic and industrial fields of servo engineering and automation in Norway.

  8. Professor Monastyrski N.D. (1847–1888): One of the Forgotten Pioneers of Biliary Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Kubachev, Kubach

    2017-01-01

    Today, the ingenious and untimely deceased surgeon Monastyrski’s name is almost lost in the history of medicine and means little, if anything, to young surgeons. Monastyrski Nestor Dmitrievich was born in 1847 in Czerniowce and graduated from the medical faculty of the University of Vienna. Deeply inspired by the stars of European medicine and surgery: Billroth, Kaposi, Mikulicz, he became a brilliant surgeon and teacher. Monastyrski performed the first gastroenterostomy in Russia and was one of the pioneers of the aseptic method in Russia. In May 1887 he performed the historical first cholecystojejunostomy in the world. In 1888, exhausted by a tumor of the right kidney, Monastyrski insisted on surgery which resulted in his death several hours later. The department of surgery which was founded by Monastyrski N.D. in the Clinical Institute of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (today – North-Western State Medical Academy named after I.I. Mechnikov) was named after him. PMID:28373287

  9. Professor Monastyrski N.D. (1847-1888): One of the Forgotten Pioneers of Biliary Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Kubachev, Kubach

    2017-06-01

    Today, the ingenious and untimely deceased surgeon Monastyrski's name is almost lost in the history of medicine and means little, if anything, to young surgeons. Monastyrski Nestor Dmitrievich was born in 1847 in Czerniowce and graduated from the medical faculty of the University of Vienna. Deeply inspired by the stars of European medicine and surgery: Billroth, Kaposi, Mikulicz, he became a brilliant surgeon and teacher. Monastyrski performed the first gastroenterostomy in Russia and was one of the pioneers of the aseptic method in Russia. In May 1887 he performed the historical first cholecystojejunostomy in the world. In 1888, exhausted by a tumor of the right kidney, Monastyrski insisted on surgery which resulted in his death several hours later. The department of surgery which was founded by Monastyrski N.D. in the Clinical Institute of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (today - North-Western State Medical Academy named after I.I. Mechnikov) was named after him. © 2017 Marshfield Clinic.

  10. Pioneer women in veterinary medicine, their history and where they studied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Howard H

    2012-05-01

    The women described in this paper were the early pioneers in veterinary medicine; they studied in some of the best veterinary colleges in the world at that time. They paved the way for other women who studied veterinary medicine in later years. According to Drum and Whitely,25 by 1936, there were only 30 female veterinarians in the United States; this was an era when admission to veterinary college for women was nearly impossible. In 1963, there were 277 female veterinarians in the United States, but by 1987 women made up 17% of the veterinary profession. The February 15, 2010 issue of the JAVMA reported that male enrollment in U.S. veterinary colleges decreased from 89% for the 1969-70 school year to 22.4% for 2008-09. During the same period female enrollment increased from 11.0% to 77.6%.

  11. The Awakening,One of the Pioneer Works in Feminist Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕灿

    2008-01-01

    Kate Chopin's The Awakening,is a portrayal of the life of the well-to-do but unhappy married woman Edna Pontellier.Edna enjoys all the advantaged provided by her husband and ahs two lovely children.She is unhappy because she is confined to her house and expected to be a dutiful wife and a loving mother.When she begins to change her way of living,to live for herself instead of her husband and children,she is opposed by her family,her friends and others.To finds her freedom,she drowns herself in the sea.The tragedy of Edna is the tragedy of most women in a patriarchal society,and the novel which caused a storm of criticism at its publication has been considered to be a pioneer work in feminist movement.

  12. Pioneering Metal-Free Oxidative Coupling Strategy of Aromatic Compounds Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yasuyuki; Dohi, Toshifumi

    2015-10-01

    We started our hypervalent iodine research about 30 years ago in the mid-1980s. We soon successfully developed the single-electron-transfer oxidation ability of a hypervalent iodine reagent, specifically, phenyliodine(III) bis(trifluoroacetate) (PIFA), toward aromatic rings of phenyl ethers for forming aromatic cation radicals. This was one of the exciting and unexpected events in our research studies so far, and the discovery was reported in 1991. It also led to the next challenge, developing the metal-free oxidative couplings for C-H functionalizations and direct couplings between the C-H bonds of valuable aromatic compounds in organic synthesis. In order to realize the effective oxidative coupling, pioneering new aromatic ring activations was essential and several useful methodologies have been found for oxidizable arenes. The achievements regarding this objective obtained in our continuous research are herein summarized with classification of the aromatic ring activation strategies.

  13. Are pioneer mangroves more vulnerable to oil pollution than later successional species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Gonasageran; Naidoo, Krishnaveni

    2017-08-15

    Propagules of Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Rhizophora mucronata were cultivated in rhizotrons (root observation chambers) and subjected to sediment oiling treatments for 409days to determine the effects of oil on root growth. Oiling reduced root length, specific root length, relative root growth rate and root diameter, while specific root volume increased. Oiling reduced root length by 96% in A. marina, 99% in B. gymnorrhiza and 80% in R. mucronata, while specific root volume increased by 34%, 29% and 23% respectively. Relative root growth rate decreased in the oiled treatments by 84%, 80% and 73% respectively. Avicennia exhibits typical root traits of a pioneer species compared to slower-growing later successional species like B. gymnorrhiza and R. mucronata. These traits of A. marina not only allow more rapid establishment of seedlings, but also expose a larger root surface area and therefore greater susceptibility to oil contamination than the other species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Coleman Advocates for Children And Youth: a pioneering child advocacy organization (1974-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnochan, Sarah; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Coleman Advocates for Youth and Children is a pioneering 30-year-old child advocacy organization founded by several affluent community members and children's service professionals to stop housing abused and neglected children in juvenile hall. Today, low-income youth and parents in families of color are now assuming leadership in developing a unique hybrid approach that integrates community organizing with more traditional child advocacy strategies and focuses on increasing affordable housing and improving the city's educational system. The strategies employed by Coleman have also evolved, shifting from insider advocacy with administrative officials to public campaigns targeting the city budget process, to local initiative campaigns, and most recently to electoral politics. This organizational history features the issues mission and structure, leadership, managing issues, advocacy strategies and community relations, and funding.

  15. A study on the vegetation succession of pioneer trees in landslide control areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Lin, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Located in subtropics, the steep terrain, concentrated rainy season, natural disaster, and artificial development have damaged the surface vegetation and resulted in soil loss and landslide in Taiwan. The control of landslide should stabilize the side slope as the priority. Furthermore, a proper engineering is applied to grow plants for the rapid forestation on landslide. Taking the location which has been done hydroseeding in the Shihmen Reservoir watershed as the example, the vegetation succession within the 8 years after the hydroseeding is investigated in this study. The growth and decline of pioneer trees like Rhus javanica is particularly discussed the vegetation recovery role and function on landslide. The research result could provide reference for the planning and design of vegetation recovery.

  16. Propulsion by light: a tribute to the German pioneer Eugen Saenger (Plenary Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Willy L.

    2004-09-01

    Although the laser was not yet invented Eugen Saenger, one of the most prominent German personalities in the early development of rocket science and technology suggested to use photons for the propulsion of spacecrafts in the fifties. In contrast to current schemes which are basically aimed at laser induced ablation processes, Eugen Saenger started with the idea of using the radiation pressure itself for propulsion purposes. A review of his pioneering work in that area will be supported by numerous historical documents and personal remembrance showing his effort to promote unconventional ideas. The paper also emphasizes how some of the original concepts are being revisited and partly implemented by using today"s laser technology.

  17. Young at Heart: Pioneering Approaches to Model Nonischaemic Cardiomyopathy with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowran, Aoife; Rasponi, Marco; Perrucci, Gianluca L.; Righetti, Stefano; Zanobini, Marco; Pompilio, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    A mere 9 years have passed since the revolutionary report describing the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human fibroblasts and the first in-patient translational use of cells obtained from these stem cells has already been achieved. From the perspectives of clinicians and researchers alike, the promise of induced pluripotent stem cells is alluring if somewhat beguiling. It is now evident that this technology is nascent and many areas for refinement have been identified and need to be considered before induced pluripotent stem cells can be routinely used to stratify, treat and cure patients, and to faithfully model diseases for drug screening purposes. This review specifically addresses the pioneering approaches to improve induced pluripotent stem cell based models of nonischaemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27110250

  18. Saturnian trapped radiation and its absorption by satellites and rings: the first results from pioneer 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J A; Bastian, T S; Chenette, D L; Lentz, G A; McKibben, R B; Pyle, K R; Tuzzolino, A J

    1980-01-25

    Electrons and protons accelerated and trapped in a Saturnian magnetic field have been found by the University of Chicago experiments on Pioneer 11 within 20 Saturn radii (Rs) of the planet. In the innermost regions, strong absorption effects due to satellites and ring material were observed, and from approximately 4 Rs inwards to the outer edge of the A ring at 2.30 Rs (where the radiation is absorbed), the intensity distributions of protons (>/= 0.5 million electron volts) and electrons (2 to 20 million electron volts) were axially symmetric, consistent with a centered dipole aligned with the planetary rotation axis. The maximum fluxes observed for protons (> 35 million electron volts and for electrons flux increases observed between absorption features raise new questions concerning the physics of charged particle transport and acceleration. An absorption feature near 2.5 Rs has led to the discovery of a previously unknown satellite with a diameter of approximately 200 kilometers, semimajor axis of 2.51 Rs, and eccentricity of 0.013. Radiation absorption features that suggest a nonuniform distribution of matter around Saturn have also been found from 2.34 to 2.36 Rs, near the position of the F ring discovered by the Pioneer imaging experiment. Beneath the A, B, and C rings we continued to observe a low flux of high-energy electrons. We conclude that the inner Saturn magnetosphere, because of its near-axial symmetry and the many discrete radiation absorption regions, offers a unique opportunity to study the acceleration and transport of charged particles in a planetary magnetic field.

  19. Roots of pioneer trees in the lower sub-tropical area of Dinghushan, Guangdong, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Yan-ru; PENG Shao-lin; MO Jiang-ming; LIU Xin-wei; CHEN Zhuo-quan; ZHOU Kai; WU Jin-rong

    2006-01-01

    Representative pioneer tree root systems in the subtropical area of South China were examined with regard to their structure, underground stratification and biomass distribution. Excavation of skeleton roots and observation of fine roots of seven species including the Euphorbiaceae, Theaceae, Melastomataceae, Lauraceae and Fagaceae families was carried out. The results showed that: (1) Pioneer tree roots in the first stage of natural succession were of two types, one characterized by taproot system with bulky plagiotropic branches; the other characterized by flat root system with several tabular roots. The late mesophilous tree roots were characterized by one obvious taproot and tactic braches roots up and down. Shrub species roots were characterized by heart fibrous root type featured both by horizontally and transversally growing branches. Root shapes varied in different dominant species at different stages of succession. (2) Roots of the different species varied in the external features-color, periderm and structure of freshly cut slash. (3) In a set of successional stages the biomass of tree roots increased linearly with the age of growth. During monsoon, the total root biomass amounted to 115.70 t/ha in the evergreen broad-leaved forest; 50.61t/ha in needle and broad-leaved mixed forest dominated by coniferous forest; and 64.20 t/ha in broad-and needle-leaved mixed forest dominated by broad-leaved heliophytes, and are comparable to the underground biomass observed in similar tropical forests. Thisis the first report about roots characteristics of forest in the lower sub-tropical area of Dinghushan, Guangdong, China.

  20. A tribute to Charles David Kelman MD: ophthalmologist, inventor and pioneer of phacoemulsification surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suresh K; Milverton, E John; Maloof, Anthony J

    2004-10-01

    Charles David Kelman was born in Brooklyn, New York, USA, on 23 May 1930 and passed away in Boca Raton, Florida, USA, on 1 June 2004 at the age of 74 years after a long battle with cancer. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Tufts University in 1950 and completed medical studies at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in 1956. He was Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at New York Medical College and an Attending Surgeon at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital. Although a prolific inventor, he will be best remembered for developing phacoemulsification, following his realization while sitting in a dentist's chair, that ultrasonic vibrations could be used to emulsify the aged crystalline lens through a very small incision. His pioneering work revolutionized cataract surgery. He also pioneered cryo-extraction of cataracts, the use of freezing for the repair of retinal detachments and designed numerous ophthalmic instruments and intraocular lenses. Dr Kelman received numerous awards, including the American Academy of Ophthalmology Achievement Award (1970), the Ridley Medal from the International Congress of Ophthalmology (1990), and the Inventor of the Year Award from The New York Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law Association (1992). Most recently (2003), Dr Kelman was honoured by the American Academy of Ophthalmology with the Laureate Recognition award. Dr Kelman was also an accomplished Broadway producer, composer and jazz saxophonist. With his demise, the ophthalmic and medical community lost a famed inventor with multifaceted talents and one of the great ophthalmologists of the twentieth century.

  1. Relative Position Determination between Deep-space Probes Based on Same Beam Phase-referencing Imaging Technique%深空探测器同波束相位参考成图相对定位方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周欢; 童锋贤; 李海涛; 郑为民; 董光亮; 李培佳; 舒逢春

    2015-01-01

    针对我国后续深空探测任务中高精度相对定位需求,提出了采用天文同波束相位参考成图技术进行深空探测器相对定位的方法。首先建立适用于深空探测器信号特点的同波束相位参考成图相对定位模型,然后分析信号带宽和 UV 覆盖两个因素对测量精度的影响。最后利用我国 VLBI 观测网(CVN)在2013年15、20和21日接收的嫦娥三号着陆器和玉兔号巡视器下行同波束数据,处理得到了巡视器在5个环拍点相对着陆器的位置,验证了本文方法的可行性及其对探测器下行信号的强适应性。与视觉定位结果的对比表明,巡视器相对着陆器定位精度达到米级。%To meet the needs of high accuracy relative position determination in deep space explorations, a new method is proposed based on the same beam phase-referencing imaging technique that originates from the radio astronomy.Fi rstly,the same beam phase-referencing imaging measurement model for spacecraft positioning is bui lt.The very long basel ine interferometry (VLBI)imaging principle and the phase difference between two spacecrafts are derived.Then,two precision affecting factors are analyzed, including the signal bandwidth and the UV coverage.The di rty beams formed by different station numbers and different observation lengths with the Chinese interferometry network are simulated.Final ly,with the same beam observation data of the Chang’E-3 lander and rover from the Chinese VLBI network (CVN)on December 15,20 and 21,2013,the Yutu rover lunar surface positions are determined with accuracy of about 1 meter.The results show the feasibi l ity and high accuracy of this method,which is wel l-adapted to the spacecraft signals without special beacons.

  2. UNIGE in space... hunting astroparticles

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Switzerland has a long history of involvement in cosmic-ray physics and space research projects: some of the most notable examples are its pioneering research since the beginning of the 20th century; its co-founding of major European space organisations; its provision of state-of-the-art scientific equipment to major international space agencies and the missions of a Swiss astronaut in the 1990s.   The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) project, whose control centre is at CERN, has benefitted from the cutting-edge knowhow of the Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics Department (DNPC) of the University of Geneva (UNIGE). An extremely sensitive, high-resolution spectrometer was built for the project and was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011. The DNPC was responsible for designing the particle tracker – the device at the heart of both the AMS 01 prototype and the final model sent into space, AMS 02. The aim of this research project is to advance humankind’s kno...

  3. Probing leptoquark production at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, L A; Dumm, D G; Goldberg, H; Halzen, F; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Canal, Carlos A. Garcia; Dumm, Daniel Gomez; Goldberg, Haim; Halzen, Francis

    2006-01-01

    We emphasize the inelasticity distribution of events detected at the IceCube neutrino telescope as an important tool for revealing new physics. This is possible because the unique energy resolution at this facility allows to separately assign the energy fractions for emergent muons and taus in neutrino interactions. As a particular example, we explore the possibility of probing second and third generation leptoquark parameter space (coupling and mass). We show that production of leptoquarks with masses \\agt 250 GeV and diagonal generation couplings of O(1) can be directly tested if the cosmic neutrino flux is at the Waxman-Bahcall level.

  4. Probing CP violation systematically in differential distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Durieux, Gauthier

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the topic of triple-product asymmetries which probe CP violation through differential distributions. We construct distributions with well-defined discrete symmetry properties and characterize the asymmetries formed upon them. It is stressed that the simplest asymmetries may not be optimal. We explore systematic generalizations having limited reliance on the process dynamics and phase-space parametrization. They exploit larger fractions of the information contained in differential distributions and may lead to increased sensitivities to CP violation. Our detailed treatment of the case of spinless four-body decays paves the way for further experimental studies.

  5. Phoenix's Probe Inserted in Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars lander's robotic-arm camera took this image of the spacecraft's thermal and electrical-conductivity probe (TECP) inserted into Martian soil on day 149 of the mission. Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008, landing. The robotic-arm camera acquired this image at 16:02:41 local solar time. The camera pointing was elevation -72.6986 degrees and azimuth 2.1093 degrees. The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. When Friendship Is Used as a Weapon: Using Life Space Crisis Intervention Skills to Confront Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Signe

    2012-01-01

    Bullying has received international attention since the pioneering research over thirty years ago by Scandinavian psychologist Dan Olweus (1978). While prevention programs have proliferated, this article charts new ground by applying Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) to bullying in an example involving young girls. The author describes how…

  7. Modified electrical transport probe design for standard magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Assaf, Badih A; Wei, Peng; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Heiman, Don

    2012-01-01

    Making electrical transport measurements on a material is often a time consuming process that involves testing a large number of samples. It is thus inconvenient to wire up and rewire samples on to a sample probe. We therefore present a method of modifying Quantum Design's MPMS SQUID magnetometer transport probe that simplifies the process of sample mounting. One of the difficulties to overcome is the small diameter of the sample space. A small socket is designed and mounted on the probe so that various samples mounted on individual headers can be readily exchanged in the socket. We also present some test results on the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se using the modified probe.

  8. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. Health physics innovations developed during Cassini for future space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Rod; Rutherford, Theresa; Marmaro, George

    1999-01-01

    There has been a long history of space missions involving Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) devices starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), on through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All of these Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for bench-marking future MRS ground processing.

  10. Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices I (ASTROD I) - A class-M fundamental physics mission proposal for Cosmic Vision 2015-2025

    CERN Document Server

    Appourchaux, Thierry; Chen, Yanbei; Cruise, Michael; Dittus, Hansjoerg; Foulon, Bernard; Gill, Patrick; Gizon, Laurent; Klein, Hugh; Klioner, Sergei; Kopeikin, Sergei; Krueger, Hans; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Lobo, Alberto; Luo, Xinlian; Margolis, Helen; Ni, Wei-Tou; Paton, Antonio Pulido; Peng, Qiuhe; Peters, Achim; Rasel, Ernst; Ruediger, Albrecht; Samain, Etienne; Selig, Hanns; Shaul, Diana; Sumner, Timothy; Theil, Stephan; Touboul, Pierre; Turyshev, Slava; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Li; Wen, Linqing; Wicht, Andreas; Wu, Ji; Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhao, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    ASTROD I is a planned interplanetary space mission with multiple goals. The primary aims are: to test General Relativity with an improvement in sensitivity of over 3 orders of magnitude, improving our understanding of gravity and aiding the development of a new quantum gravity theory; to measure key solar system parameters with increased accuracy, advancing solar physics and our knowledge of the solar system and to measure the time rate of change of the gravitational constant with an order of magnitude improvement and the anomalous Pioneer acceleration, thereby probing dark matter and dark energy gravitationally. It is an international project, with major contributions from Europe and China and is envisaged as the first in a series of ASTROD missions. ASTROD I will consist of one spacecraft carrying a telescope, four lasers, two event timers and a clock. Two-way, two-wavelength laser pulse ranging will be used between the spacecraft in a solar orbit and deep space laser stations on Earth, to achieve the ASTRO...

  11. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  12. Gamma-ray burst arrival-time localizations: Simultaneous observations by Ulysses, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, SIGMA, WATCH, and PHEBUS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Laros, J.; Brandt, Søren Kristian

    2000-01-01

    Between the launch of the Ulysses spacecraft in 1990 October and the entry of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) into the atmosphere of Venus in 1992 October, concurrent coverage by Ulysses, PVO, the WATCH experiments aboard the Granat and Eureca spacecraft, and the SIGMA and PHEBUS experiments aboard...

  13. The Female Heroine and Her Natural Counterpart: An Ecofeminist Reading of Willa Cather’s O Pioneers!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Khalil Mostafa el Diwany

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Willa Sibert Cather is an American author famous for her representation of the struggles of the early pioneers. She is mainly concerned with underlining the role of these pioneers in the establishment of the Garden of the World and that is why she sets her stories in the American Midwest, especially the Nebraska prairies. What is special about Cather is her focusing on the female sector of these pioneers, and portraying her female heroines as shattering all common social stereotypes through their struggle with the natural environment in which they have been unwillingly planted. This line of thought adopted by Cather in dealing with her female heroines as well as the natural environment embracing them has been echoed several decades later by scientists and scholars who have sensed the abuse faced by nature and females alike. This feeling has led to the emergence of Ecofeminism. The paper under study adopts an ecofeminist approach in  studying Willa Cather’s O Pioneers! as a significant representation of the female struggle and success with the surrounding natural environment.

  14. Hydraulic architecture of two species differing in wood density: opposing strategies in co-occurring tropical pioneer trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. McCulloh; Daniel M. Johnson; Frederick C. Meinzer; Steven L. Voelker; Barbara Lachenbruch; Jean-Christophe. Domec

    2012-01-01

    Co-occurring species often have different strategies for tolerating daily cycles of water stress. One underlying parameter that can link together the suite of traits that enables a given strategy is wood density. Here we compare hydraulic traits of two pioneer species from a tropical forest in Panama that differ in wood density: Miconia argentea...

  15. Recovering a Forgotten Pioneer of Science Studies: C. E. Ayers' Deweyan Critique of Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, David I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper brings to light the ideas of a pioneering but largely forgotten social critic, C. E. Ayres. In his first book, "Science: The False Messiah" (1927), which was written in consultation with John Dewey, Ayres advanced a forceful and original critique of science and technology. He argued that technological change was occurring at a…

  16. The selector gene Pax7 dictates alternate pituitary cell fates through its pioneer action on chromatin remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budry, L.; Balsalobre, A.; Gauthier, Y.; Khetchoumian, K.; L'Honore, A.; Vallette-Kasic, S.; Brue, T; Figarella-Branger, D.; Meij, B.P.; Drouin, J.

    2012-01-01

    Genes Dev. 2012 Oct 15;26(20):2299-310. doi: 10.1101/gad.200436.112. The selector gene Pax7 dictates alternate pituitary cell fates through its pioneer action on chromatin remodeling. Budry L, Balsalobre A, Gauthier Y, Khetchoumian K, L'honoré A, Vallette S, Brue T, Figarella-Branger D, Meij B, Drou

  17. The influence of biosurfactants released by S-mitis BMS on the adhesion of pioneer strains and cariogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoogmoed, CG; Van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    The influence of Streptococcus mitis BMS biosurfactants on the adhesion of eight pioneer and four cariogenic oral bacterial strains was, for a first screening, examined in a microtiter plate assay. The adhesion to pellicle-coated wells of three cariogenic strains was inhibited >70% by the biosurfact

  18. The influence of biosurfactants released by S-mitis BMS on the adhesion of pioneer strains and cariogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoogmoed, CG; Van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    The influence of Streptococcus mitis BMS biosurfactants on the adhesion of eight pioneer and four cariogenic oral bacterial strains was, for a first screening, examined in a microtiter plate assay. The adhesion to pellicle-coated wells of three cariogenic strains was inhibited >70% by the

  19. Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer observations of the interplanetary glow at heliocentric distances from 2 to 14 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.; Suzuki, K.; Carlson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the observed Pioneer 10 interplanetary data from 1972 to 1977, taking into account the interplanetary glow intensity observed by the Pioneer 10 UV photometer at sun-spacecraft distances of 2-14 AU. On the basis of the obtained data, it was determined that the background intensity for the 200-1400 A band pass of the photometer channel is about 40 + or - 10 R, and that the nearby interstellar density is 0.04 + or - 0.91 per ccm for hydrogen and about 0.01 + or - 0.002 per ccm for helium. Accordingly, the He/H number density is about 0.25 at large distances from the sun. The Pioneer 10 spacecraft is leaving the solar system in the downwind direction, while both Pioneer 11 and Voyager will leave in the upwind direction. The combined UV observations of the interplanetary glow will provide accurate results on the physical status of the inflowing interstellar gas and the variability of background radiation as well.

  20. Angelo Sismonda (1807–1878), pioneer of geological mapping in the Alps of Savoy and the Piedmont: a bibliography

    CERN Document Server

    Hollier, John; Basaglia, Tullio; Hollier, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Angelo Sismonda (Ange Sismonda) was an Italian mineralogist and geologist based in Turin during the Risorgimento who produced pioneering maps of the Alps in the Kingdom of Sardinia. Well known during his lifetime, he is now mentioned only in passing by historians and no comprehensive bibliography of his work exists. To render his work more accessible, we present a short biography and a bibliography.