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Sample records for phytoplankton community responses

  1. Rapid eco-evolutionary responses in perturbed phytoplankton communities.

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    Thibodeau, Geneviève; Walsh, David A; Beisner, Beatrix E

    2015-09-07

    Biodiversity currently faces unprecedented threats owing to species extinctions. Ecologically, compensatory dynamics can ensure stable community biomass following perturbation. However, whether there is a contribution of genetic diversity to community responses is an outstanding question. To date, the contribution of evolutionary processes through genotype shifts has not been assessed in naturally co-occurring multi-species communities in the field. We examined the mechanisms contributing to the response of a lake phytoplankton community exposed to either a press or pulse acidification perturbation in lake mesocosms. To assess community shifts in the ecological response of morphospecies, we identified taxa microscopically. We also assessed genotype shifts by sequencing the ITS2 region of ribosomal DNA. We observed ecological and genetic contributions to community responses. The ecological response was attributed to compensatory morphospecies dynamics and occurred primarily in the Pulse perturbation treatment. In the Press treatments, in addition to compensatory dynamics, we observed evidence for genotype selection in two species of chlorophytes, Desmodesmus cuneatus and an unidentified Chlamydomonas. Our study demonstrates that while genotype selection may be rare, it is detectable and occurs especially when new environmental conditions are maintained for long enough to force selection processes on standing variation.

  2. Initial size structure of natural phytoplankton communities determines the response to Daphnia diel vertical migration

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    Maarten Boersma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diel vertical migration (DVM is a common behavior of many pelagic herbivorous zooplankton species in response to predation pressure. It is characterized by a twice daily habitat shift of the zooplankton species: staying in the epilimnion only during night time and migrating down in the crack of dawn in deeper water layers, staying there during the day time. This causes a discontinuous grazing regime and previous studies have shown that the direction and strength of phytoplankton community responses to zooplankton DVM most probably depends on the size of phytoplankton species. To examine the influence of zooplankton DVM on different sized phytoplankton communities, we designed an experiment where we manipulated the size distribution of a natural phytoplankton community a priori in field mesocosms. We investigated the influence of DVM of the cladoceran Daphnia hyalina on two different phytoplankton communities, by the use of deep (10 m field enclosures. Epilimnetic lake water, containing a summer phytoplankton community, was filtered with two different mesh sizes (11 mm and 64 mm. The 11 mm phytoplankton community (“small” contained mainly small algal species, while the 64 mm community (“large” had a wider range of phytoplankton sizes. To simulate zooplankton DVM, D. hyalina were placed in mesh cages that were lowered or raised (“migration” as dictated by the study design; a “no migration” (representing absence of DVM treatment was also tested. Phytoplankton abundance was measured using chlorophyll-a and biovolume; size distribution of the algae and nutrient availability was also determined in each treatment. The results indicated that DVM had contrasting effects on the two evaluated phytoplankton communities. Comparison of “migration” and “no migration” zooplankton treatments showed that nutrient availability and total phytoplankton biovolume was higher in (1 “no migration” treatments with phytoplankton communities

  3. Response of polar front phytoplankton and bacterial community to micronutrient amendments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, R.K.; Gomes, J.; Bandekar, M.; Bhat, M.; Mesquita, A.; Ramaiah, N.

    , to examine the responses of phytoplankton as well as bacterial community (BC) to these micronutrient amendments. Total chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration increased significantly (P<0.01) in all micronutrient-enriched microcosms (MEM), with the incubation...

  4. Species- and community-level responses combine to drive phenology of lake phytoplankton

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    Walters, Annika; Sagrario, María de los Ángeles González; Schindler, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Global change is leading to shifts in the seasonal timing of growth and maturation for primary producers. Remote sensing is increasingly used to measure the timing of primary production in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, but there is often a poor correlation between these results and direct observations of life-history responses of individual species. One explanation may be that in addition to phenological shifts, global change is also causing shifts in community composition among species with different seasonal timing of growth and maturation. We quantified how shifts in species phenology and in community composition translated into phenological change in a diverse phytoplankton community from 1962-2000. During this time the aggregate community spring-summer phytoplankton peak has shifted 63 days earlier. The mean taxon shift was only 3 days earlier and shifts in taxa phenology explained only 40% of the observed community phenological shift. The remaining community shift was attributed to dominant early season taxa increasing in abundance while a dominant late season taxon decreased in abundance. In diverse producer communities experiencing multiple stressors, changes in species composition must be considered to fully understand and predict shifts in the seasonal timing of primary production.

  5. Temporal dynamics of phytoplankton communities in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and their responses to environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒龙; MIN; Gi-Sik; CHOI; Joong-Ki; AL-RASHEID; Khaled; A.; S.; 林晓凤; 朱明壮

    2010-01-01

    Variations in physical-chemical factors, species composition, abundance and biomass of nano-and micro-phytoplankton assemblages, as well as their responses to environmental factors, were investigated over a complete cycle (6 months) in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao, northern China. The aim was to establish the temporal patterns of phytoplankton communities and to evaluate protists as suitable bioindicators to water quality in mariculture systems. A total of 34 taxa with nine dominant spec...

  6. Temporal dynamics of phytoplankton communities in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and their responses to environmental factors

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    Xu, Henglong; Min, Gi-Sik; Choi, Joong-Ki; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Mingzhuang

    2010-03-01

    Variations in physical-chemical factors, species composition, abundance and biomass of nano- and micro-phytoplankton assemblages, as well as their responses to environmental factors, were investigated over a complete cycle (6 months) in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao, northern China. The aim was to establish the temporal patterns of phytoplankton communities and to evaluate protists as suitable bioindicators to water quality in mariculture systems. A total of 34 taxa with nine dominant species were identified, belonging to six taxonomic groups (dinoflagellates, diatoms, cryptophyceans, chlorophyceans, euglenophyceans and chrysophyceans). A single peak of protist abundance occurred in October, mainly due to chlorophyceans, diatoms and chrysophyceans. Two biomass peaks in July and October were primarily due to dinoflagellates and diatoms. Temporal patterns of the phytoplankton communities significantly correlated with the changes in nutrients, temperature and pH, especially phosphate, either alone or in combination with NO3-N and NH3-N. Species diversity, evenness and richness indices were clearly correlated with water temperature and/or salinity, whereas the biomass/abundance ratio showed a significant correlation with NO3-N. The results suggest that phytoplankton are potentially useful bioindicators to water quality in semi-enclosed mariculture systems.

  7. Responses of phytoplankton community to the input of different aerosols in the East China Sea

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    Meng, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, B.; Ma, Q. W.; Wang, F. J.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric deposition can affect marine phytoplankton by supplying macronutrients and trace elements. We conducted mesocosm experiments by adding aerosols with different composition (dominated by mineral dust, biomass burning and high Cu, and secondary aerosol, respectively) to the surface seawater of the East China Sea. Chlorophyll a concentrations were found to be the highest and lowest after adding aerosols containing the highest Fe and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), respectively. The relative abundance of Haptophyceae increased significantly after adding mineral dust, whereas diatom, Dinophyceae and Cryptophyceae reached the maximum accompanied with the highest DIN. Our results suggest that Fe may be more important than DIN in promoting primary productivity in the sampled seawater. The input of mineral dust and anthropogenic aerosols may result in distinct changes of phytoplankton community structure.

  8. North-South asymmetry in the modeled phytoplankton community response to climate change over the 21st century

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    Marinov, Irina; Doney, Scott C.; Lima, Ivan D.; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N.

    2013-12-01

    we analyze the impact of projected climate change on plankton ecology in all major ocean biomes over the 21st century, using a multidecade (1880-2090) experiment conducted with the Community Climate System Model (CCSM-3.1) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land-sea ice model. The climate response differs fundamentally in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for diatom and small phytoplankton biomass and consequently for total biomass, primary, and export production. Increasing vertical stratification in the Northern Hemisphere oceans decreases the nutrient supply to the ocean surface. Resulting decreases in diatom and small phytoplankton biomass together with a relative shift from diatoms to small phytoplankton in the Northern Hemisphere result in decreases in the total primary and export production and export ratio, and a shift to a more oligotrophic, more efficiently recycled, lower biomass euphotic layer. By contrast, temperature and stratification increases are smaller in the Southern compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Additionally, a southward shift and increase in strength of the Southern Ocean westerlies act against increasing temperature and freshwater fluxes to destratify the water-column. The wind-driven, poleward shift in the Southern Ocean subpolar-subtropical boundary results in a poleward shift and increase in the frontal diatom bloom. This boundary shift, localized increases in iron supply, and the direct impact of warming temperatures on phytoplankton growth result in diatom increases in the Southern Hemisphere. An increase in diatoms and decrease in small phytoplankton partly compensate such that while total production and the efficiency of organic matter export to the deep ocean increase, total Southern Hemisphere biomass does not change substantially. The impact of ecological shifts on the global carbon cycle is complex and varies across ecological biomes, with Northern and Southern Hemisphere effects on the biological production and export partially

  9. Marine phytoplankton temperature versus growth responses from polar to tropical waters--outcome of a scientific community-wide study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W Boyd

    Full Text Available "It takes a village to finish (marine science these days" Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into

  10. Spatio-temporal distribution of net-collected phytoplankton community and its response to marine exploitation in Xiangshan Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhibing; ZHU Xuyu; GAO Yu; CHEN Quanzhen; ZENG Jiangning; ZHU Genhai

    2013-01-01

    To explore the spatial-temporal distribution of the phytoplankton community and evaluate the combined effects of marine resource exploitation,net-collected phytoplankton and physical-chemical parameters were investigated in the Xiangshan Bay during the four seasons of 2010.A total of eight phyla,97 genera,and 310 species were found,including 232 diatom species,45 dinoflagellate species and 33 other taxa.The phytoplankton abundances presented a significant (P<0.001) seasonal difference with the average of 60.66×104 cells/m3.Diatoms (mainly consisting of Coscinodiscus jonesianus,Cerataulina pelagica,Skeletonema costatum,and genus Chaetoceros) dominated the phytoplankton assemblage in all seasons.We found great spatio-temporal variation in community composition based on the multidimensional scaling and similarity analysis.Canonical correspondence analysis show that temperature,nutrition,illumination,and salinity were the main variables associated with microalgal assemblage.Compared with the previous studies,an increase in phytoplankton abundance and change in the dominant species coincided with increased exploitation activities in this bay (e.g.operation of coastal power plants,intensive mariculture,tidal flat reclamation,and industrial and agricultural development).The present findings suggest that the government should exercise caution when deciding upon developmental patterns in the sea-related economy.

  11. Physical-Biological Coupling in the Western South China Sea: The Response of Phytoplankton Community to a Mesoscale Cyclonic Eddy.

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    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that the mesoscale eddies play an important part in the biogeochemical cycle in ocean ecosystem, especially in the oligotrophic tropical zones. So here a heterogeneous cyclonic eddy in its flourishing stage was detected using remote sensing and in situ biogeochemical observation in the western South China Sea (SCS in early September, 2007. The high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to identify the photosynthetic pigments. And the CHEMical TAXonomy (CHEMTAX was applied to calculate the contribution of nine phytoplankton groups to the total chlorophyll a (TChl a biomass. The deep chlorophyll a maximum layer (DCML was raised to form a dome structure in the eddy center while there was no distinct enhancement for TChl a biomass. The integrated TChl a concentration in the upper 100 m water column was also constant from the eddy center to the surrounding water outside the eddy. However the TChl a biomass in the surface layer (at 5 m in the eddy center was promoted 2.6-fold compared to the biomass outside the eddy (p < 0.001. Thus, the slight enhancement of TChl a biomass of euphotic zone integration within the eddy was mainly from the phytoplankton in the upper mixed zone rather than the DCML. The phytoplankton community was primarily contributed by diatoms, prasinophytes, and Synechococcus at the DCML within the eddy, while less was contributed by haptophytes_8 and Prochlorococcus. The TChl a biomass for most of the phytoplankton groups increased at the surface layer in the eddy center under the effect of nutrient pumping. The doming isopycnal within the eddy supplied nutrients gently into the upper mixing layer, and there was remarkable enhancement in phytoplankton biomass at the surface layer with 10.5% TChl a biomass of water column in eddy center and 3.7% at reference stations. So the slight increasing in the water column integrated phytoplankton biomass might be attributed to the stimulated phytoplankton

  12. Short-term variations of phytoplankton communities in response to anthropogenic stressors in a highly altered temperate estuary

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    Sin, Yongsik; Jeong, Byungkwan

    2015-04-01

    Data for phytoplankton size classes, taxonomy, and water properties were collected through an episodic freshwater discharge event (4 days) in the temperate Youngsan River estuary, which is highly disturbed by manually regulated inputs of freshwater from a sea dike, to investigate the effects of an acute change in anthropogenic stressors on the short-term dynamics of phytoplankton and their surrounding environments. The salinity of the well-mixed saline water (33.2-33.5) decreased to as low as 4.0 and water temperature increased to 24.0 °C during the freshwater discharge, resulting in a stratified water column in the upper region of the estuary. During the discharge, chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations increased to as much as 15.66 μg L-1 with micro-sized phytoplankton being dominant due to the presence of micro-sized freshwater phytoplankton, mostly Aulacoseira ambigua (98% in cell abundance), transported from the reservoir. Primary production decreased to as little as 87.9 mg C m-2 d-1, although nutrients such as NO2- + NO3- were supplied by the freshwater inputs of the discharge. Following the discharge, dinoflagellate blooms, dominated by Heterocapsa sp. (>88%), a nano-sized red tide species, developed in the upper regions of the estuary with peaks in chl a concentrations reaching as high as 30.33 μg L-1. Another red tide species, Prorocentrum micans, was also dominant in the estuary, suggesting that harmful algal blooms (HABs) are associated with anthropogenic stressors related to the freshwater inputs. The Shannon diversity index decreased to 0.18 while the Simpson dominance index increased to 0.94 during the discharge, but the diversity increased again following the discharge. The phytoplankton communities and diversity changed along the salinity gradient, corresponding to an "ecocline" pattern. The results of multivariate statistical analysis suggested that phytoplankton species and size structure were controlled mainly by salinity, water temperature

  13. Response of phytoplankton community structure and size-fractionated Chlorophyll a in an upwelling simulation experiment in the western South China Sea

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    Cui, Dongyang; Wang, Jiangtao; Tan, Liju

    2016-10-01

    The South China Sea (SCS), which is the largest marginal sea in the western tropical Pacific, plays an important role in regional climate change. However, the research on the phytoplankton community structure (PCS) response to the upwelling remains inadequate. In January 2014, the upwelling simulation experiment was performed in the western SCS. Results indicate that the nutrient-rich bottom water not only increased the total Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations, but would potentially altered the PCS. Due to new nutrients added, microphytoplankton had more sensitivity response to nutrient uptake than other phytoplankton groups. The variation of nutrients induced by formation, weakening and disappearance of upwelling resulted in phytoplankton species succession from cyanophyta to bacillariophyta. It may be the leading factor of the changes in PCS and size-fractionated Chl a. The initial concentration of DIP less than 0.1 μmolL-1 could not sustain the phytoplankton growth. This indicates that phosphorus may be the limiting factor in the western SCS.

  14. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

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    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  15. Community composition has greater impact on the functioning of marine phytoplankton communities than ocean acidification.

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    Eggers, Sarah L; Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Barcelos E Ramos, Joana; Blanco-Ameijeiras, Sonia; Gallo, Francesca; Matthiessen, Birte

    2014-03-01

    Ecosystem functioning is simultaneously affected by changes in community composition and environmental change such as increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and subsequent ocean acidification. However, it largely remains uncertain how the effects of these factors compare to each other. Addressing this question, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that initial community composition and elevated CO2 are equally important to the regulation of phytoplankton biomass. We full-factorially exposed three compositionally different marine phytoplankton communities to two different CO2 levels and examined the effects and relative importance (ω(2) ) of the two factors and their interaction on phytoplankton biomass at bloom peak. The results showed that initial community composition had a significantly greater impact than elevated CO2 on phytoplankton biomass, which varied largely among communities. We suggest that the different initial ratios between cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates might be the key for the varying competitive and thus functional outcome among communities. Furthermore, the results showed that depending on initial community composition elevated CO2 selected for larger sized diatoms, which led to increased total phytoplankton biomass. This study highlights the relevance of initial community composition, which strongly drives the functional outcome, when assessing impacts of climate change on ecosystem functioning. In particular, the increase in phytoplankton biomass driven by the gain of larger sized diatoms in response to elevated CO2 potentially has strong implications for nutrient cycling and carbon export in future oceans.

  16. Response of a natural Phytoplankton community from the Qingdao coast (Yellow Sea, China) to variable CO2 levels over a short-term incubation experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biswas, H.; Jie, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, G.; Zhu, Z.-Y.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, G.-L.; Li, Y.-W.; Liu, S.M.; Zhang, J.

    phytoplankton community from the Qingdao coast (NW Yellow Sea, China) was studied under different CO2 levels in microcosms. HPLC pigment analysis revealed the presence of diatoms as a dominant microalgal group; however, members of chlorophytes...

  17. Title: Freshwater phytoplankton responses to global warming.

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    Wagner, Heiko; Fanesi, Andrea; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-09-20

    Global warming alters species composition and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, the impact of temperature on primary productivity is not sufficiently understood and water quality models need to be improved in order to assess the quantitative and qualitative changes of aquatic communities. On the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that the commonly used photosynthetic and water chemistry parameters alone are not sufficient for modeling phytoplankton growth under changing temperature regimes. We present some new aspects of the acclimation process with respect to temperature and how contrasting responses may be explained by a more complete physiological knowledge of the energy flow from photons to new biomass. We further suggest including additional bio-markers/traits for algal growth such as carbon allocation patterns to increase the explanatory power of such models. Although carbon allocation patterns are promising and functional cellular traits for growth prediction under different nutrient and light conditions, their predictive power still waits to be tested with respect to temperature. A great challenge for the near future will be the prediction of primary production efficiencies under the global change scenario using a uniform model for phytoplankton assemblages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The response of San Francisco Bay Delta phytoplankton communities to experimental ammonium, nitrate, and wastewater effluent additions and changes in irradiance

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    Strong, A. L.; van Dijken, G.; Mills, M. M.; Huang, I. B.; Francis, C.; Monismith, S. G.; Arrigo, K. R.

    2016-02-01

    The Bay Delta ecosystem exhibits unusually low levels of productivity, given the high levels of inorganic nutrient loading to the system. It has been suggested that anthropogenic ammonium (NH4+) loading inhibits diatom nitrate (NO3-) uptake and ultimately prevents blooms from occurring. From May 5-May 9, 2015, we conducted experimental manipulations and water column profiling research in the Bay Delta, in order to assess the ecological effects of anthropogenic nitrogen loading in the lower Sacramento River on phytoplankton growth, community structure, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) uptake rates. We collected surface water at three locations, two located above and one below the Sacramento Regional wastewater treatment plant's diffuser pipe and incubated water for 48 hours. Experimental treatments included control, +NH4+ to 60 µM, +NO3- to 7.5 µM, and added whole wastewater effluent containing 60 µM NH4+. The water was incubated at ambient water temperature in 10-L cubitainers at two light levels: 50% and 5% of surface irradiance. Over two days, chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations increased seven-fold in response to both the +NH4+ and effluent additions at the upstream stations in the 50% light treatment, suggesting strong phytoplankton growth in response to added NH4+. Organic carbon accumulation showed similar patterns, and inorganic nutrients, including dissolved silica were all significantly drawn down. At all stations, Chl a accumulation was strongly affected by light limitation in the 5% light treatment. We also report changes in phytoplankton community structure, based on microscopy enumeration and HPLC pigment analysis. among treatments over the 48 hours. Additionally, we assessed variations in NO3- and NH4+ uptake and CO2 fixation across treatments over the course of the incubation. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that NH4+ from wastewater effluent does not inhibit phytoplankton growth in the Bay Delta, contrary to what has been previously

  19. The response of a natural phytoplankton community from the Godavari River Estuary to increasing CO2 concentration during the pre-monsoon period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biswas, H.; Cros, A.; Yadav, K.; Ramana, V.V.; Prasad, V.R.; Acharyya, T.; Babu, P.V.R.

    also been reported by many authors (Trond et al., 2007; Currie and Kalff, 1984). Even diatoms can be out-done by bacteria during such conditions (Brussard and Riegman, 1998). However, the efficiency of bacteria in competing with phytoplankton..., cyanobacteria can easily compete with diatoms in a mixed population under high CO 2 supply and low silicate concentrations. 19 Conclusion: A natural phytoplankton community in the Godavari River Estuary was found to be quite sensitive to increasing CO...

  20. Observing and modelling phytoplankton community structure in the North Sea

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    Ford, David A.; van der Molen, Johan; Hyder, Kieran; Bacon, John; Barciela, Rosa; Creach, Veronique; McEwan, Robert; Ruardij, Piet; Forster, Rodney

    2017-03-01

    Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain, and knowledge of phytoplankton community structure is fundamental when assessing marine biodiversity. Policy makers and other users require information on marine biodiversity and other aspects of the marine environment for the North Sea, a highly productive European shelf sea. This information must come from a combination of observations and models, but currently the coastal ocean is greatly under-sampled for phytoplankton data, and outputs of phytoplankton community structure from models are therefore not yet frequently validated. This study presents a novel set of in situ observations of phytoplankton community structure for the North Sea using accessory pigment analysis. The observations allow a good understanding of the patterns of surface phytoplankton biomass and community structure in the North Sea for the observed months of August 2010 and 2011. Two physical-biogeochemical ocean models, the biogeochemical components of which are different variants of the widely used European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM), were then validated against these and other observations. Both models were a good match for sea surface temperature observations, and a reasonable match for remotely sensed ocean colour observations. However, the two models displayed very different phytoplankton community structures, with one better matching the in situ observations than the other. Nonetheless, both models shared some similarities with the observations in terms of spatial features and inter-annual variability. An initial comparison of the formulations and parameterizations of the two models suggests that diversity between the parameter settings of model phytoplankton functional types, along with formulations which promote a greater sensitivity to changes in light and nutrients, is key to capturing the observed phytoplankton community structure. These findings will help inform future model development, which should be coupled

  1. Phytoplankton response to whole lake inorganic N fertilization along a gradient in dissolved organic carbon.

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    Deininger, A; Faithfull, C-L; Bergström, A-K

    2017-01-31

    Global change has increased inorganic nitrogen (N) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC; i.e. 'browning') inputs to northern hemisphere boreal lakes. However, we do not know how phytoplankton in nutrient poor lake ecosystems of different DOC concentration respond to increased N availability. Here, we monitored changes in phytoplankton production, biomass and community composition in response to whole lake inorganic N fertilization in six boreal unproductive Swedish lakes divided into three lake pairs (control, N enriched) at three DOC levels (low, medium, high), with one reference year (2011) and two impact years (2012, 2013). We found that phytoplankton biomass and production decreased with DOC concentration before N fertilization. Further, phytoplankton community composition also differed with respect to DOC, with a dominance of non-flagellated autotrophs at low DOC towards an increasing dominance of flagellated autotrophs with increased lake DOC concentration. The N fertilization increased phytoplankton biomass and production in all lakes, but did not affect phytoplankton community composition. However, the net response in biomass and production to N fertilization declined with increasing DOC, implying that the lake DOC concentration is critical in order to infer phytoplankton responses to N fertilization, and that the system switches from being primarily nutrient limited to becoming increasingly light limited with increased DOC concentration. In conclusion, our results show that browning will reduce phytoplankton production and biomass and influence phytoplankton community composition, whereas increased inorganic N loadings from deposition, forestry or other land use will primarily enhance phytoplankton biomass and production. Together, any change in the landscape that enhances inorganic N availability will increase phytoplankton production and biomass, but the positive effects of N will be much weaker or even neutralized in browner lakes as caused by light

  2. Biodiversity increases the productivity and stability of phytoplankton communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina A Corcoran

    Full Text Available Global biodiversity losses provide an immediate impetus to elucidate the relationships between biodiversity, productivity and stability. In this study, we quantified the effects of species richness and species combination on the productivity and stability of phytoplankton communities subject to predation by a single rotifer species. We also tested one mechanism of the insurance hypothesis: whether large, slow-growing, potentially-defended cells would compensate for the loss of small, fast-growing, poorly-defended cells after predation. There were significant effects of species richness and species combination on the productivity, relative yield, and stability of phytoplankton cultures, but the relative importance of species richness and combination varied with the response variables. Species combination drove patterns of productivity, whereas species richness was more important for stability. Polycultures containing the most productive single species, Dunaliella, were consistently the most productive. Yet, the most species rich cultures were the most stable, having low temporal variability in measures of biomass. Polycultures recovered from short-term negative grazing effects, but this recovery was not due to the compensation of large, slow-growing cells for the loss of small, fast-growing cells. Instead, polyculture recovery was the result of reduced rotifer grazing rates and persisting small species within the polycultures. Therefore, although an insurance effect in polycultures was found, this effect was indirect and unrelated to grazing tolerance. We hypothesize that diverse phytoplankton assemblages interfered with efficient rotifer grazing and that this "interference effect" facilitated the recovery of the most productive species, Dunaliella. In summary, we demonstrate that both species composition and species richness are important in driving patterns of productivity and stability, respectively, and that stability in biodiverse

  3. Phytoplankton response to winter warming modified by large-bodied zooplankton: an experimental microcosm study

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    Hu He

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While several field investigations have demonstrated significant effects of cool season (winter or spring warming on phytoplankton development, the role played by large-bodied zooplankton grazers for the responses of phytoplankton to winter warming is ambiguous. We conducted an outdoor experiment to compare the effect of winter warming (heating by 3°C in combination with presence and absence of Daphnia grazing (D. similis on phytoplankton standing crops and community structure under eutrophic conditions. When Daphnia were absent, warming was associated with significant increases in phytoplankton biomass and cyanobacterial dominance. In contrast, when Daphnia were present, warming effects on phytoplankton dynamics were offset by warming-enhanced grazing, resulting in no significant change in biomass or taxonomic dominance. These results emphasize that large-bodied zooplankton like Daphnia spp. may play an important role in modulating the interactions between climate warming and phytoplankton dynamics in nutrient rich lake ecosystems.

  4. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

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    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  5. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta. Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine

  6. Pigment signatures of phytoplankton communities in the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupel, P.; Matsuoka, A.; Ruiz-Pino, D.; Gosselin, M.; Marie, D.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2015-02-01

    Phytoplankton are expected to respond to recent environmental changes of the Arctic Ocean. In terms of bottom-up control, modifying the phytoplankton distribution will ultimately affect the entire food web and carbon export. However, detecting and quantifying changes in phytoplankton communities in the Arctic Ocean remains difficult because of the lack of data and the inconsistent identification methods used. Based on pigment and microscopy data sampled in the Beaufort Sea during summer 2009, we optimized the chemotaxonomic tool CHEMTAX (CHEMical TAXonomy) for the assessment of phytoplankton community composition in an Arctic setting. The geographical distribution of the main phytoplankton groups was determined with clustering methods. Four phytoplankton assemblages were determined and related to bathymetry, nutrients and light availability. Surface waters across the whole survey region were dominated by prasinophytes and chlorophytes, whereas the subsurface chlorophyll maximum was dominated by the centric diatoms Chaetoceros socialis on the shelf and by two populations of nanoflagellates in the deep basin. Microscopic counts showed a high contribution of the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Gymnodinium and Gyrodinium spp. to total carbon biomass, suggesting high grazing activity at this time of the year. However, CHEMTAX was unable to detect these dinoflagellates because they lack peridinin. In heterotrophic dinoflagellates, the inclusion of the pigments of their prey potentially leads to incorrect group assignments and some misinterpretation of CHEMTAX. Thanks to the high reproducibility of pigment analysis, our results can serve as a baseline to assess change and spatial or temporal variability in several phytoplankton populations that are not affected by these misinterpretations.

  7. Growth response of natural phytoplankton to enrichment of urea and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    community in the Neuse River estuary showed preference for ... 2) Over what time frame do phytoplankton taxa respond to nutrient .... different dissolved N forms did not show any significant ..... Can plankton communities be considered as.

  8. Response of the phytoplankton community to water quality in a local alpine glacial lake of Xinjiang Tianchi, China: potential drivers and management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaotian; Song, Shuai; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Liu, Zhaoyang; Li, Qifeng; Zhang, Meng; Suriyanarayanan, Sarvajayakesavalu; Jenkins, Alan

    2017-08-31

    Eutrophication has become one of the most serious threats to aquatic ecosystems in the world. With the combined drivers of climate change and human activities, eutrophication has expanded from warm shallow lakes to cold-water lakes in relatively high latitude regions and has raised greater concerns over lake aquatic ecosystem health. A two-year field study was carried out to investigate water quality, phytoplankton characteristics and eutrophication status in a typical alpine glacial lake of Tianchi, a scenic area and an important drinking water source in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of China, in 2014 and 2015. Clear seasonal and annual variations of nutrients and organic pollutants were found especially during rainy seasons. For the phytoplankton community, Bacillariophyta held the dominant position in terms of both species and biomass throughout the year, suggesting the dominant characteristics of diatoms in the phytoplankton structure in such a high-altitude cold-water lake. This was quite different from plain and warm lakes troubled with cyanobacterial blooming. Moreover, the dominant abundance of Cyclotella sp. in Tianchi might suggest regional warming caused by climate change, which might have profound effects on the local ecosystems and hydrological cycle. Based on water quality parameters, a comprehensive trophic level index TLI (Σ) was calculated to estimate the current status of eutrophication, and the results inferred emerging eutrophication in Tianchi. Results from Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and correlation analysis of phytoplankton genera and physico-chemical variables of water indicated that abiotic factors significantly influenced the phytoplankton community and its succession in Tianchi Lake. These abiotic factors could explain 77.82% of the total variance, and ammonium was identified as the most discriminant variable, which could explain 41% of the total variance followed by TP (29%). An estimation of annual nutrient loadings to

  9. First steps of ecological restoration in Mediterranean lagoons: Shifts in phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leruste, A.; Malet, N.; Munaron, D.; Derolez, V.; Hatey, E.; Collos, Y.; De Wit, R.; Bec, B.

    2016-10-01

    Along the French Mediterranean coast, a complex of eight lagoons underwent intensive eutrophication over four decades, mainly related to nutrient over-enrichment from continuous sewage discharges. The lagoon complex displayed a wide trophic gradient from mesotrophy to hypertrophy and primary production was dominated by phytoplankton communities. In 2005, the implementation of an 11 km offshore outfall system diverted the treated sewage effluents leading to a drastic reduction of anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus into the lagoons. Time series data have been examined from 2000 to 2013 for physical, chemical and biological (phytoplankton) variables of the water column during the summer period. Since 2006, total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations as well as chlorophyll biomass strongly decreased revealing an improvement in lagoon water quality. In summertime, the decline in phytoplankton biomass was accompanied by shifts in community structure and composition that could be explained by adopting a functional approach by considering the common functional traits of the main algal groups. These phytoplankton communities were dominated by functional groups of small-sized and fast-growing algae (diatoms, cryptophytes and green algae). The trajectories of summer phytoplankton communities displayed a complex response to changing nutrient loads over time. While diatoms were the major group in 2006 in all the lagoons, the summer phytoplankton composition in hypertrophic lagoons has shifted towards green algae, which are particularly well adapted to summertime conditions. All lagoons showed increasing proportion and occurrence of peridinin-rich dinophytes over time, probably related to their capacity for mixotrophy. The diversity patterns were marked by a strong variability in eutrophic and hypertrophic lagoons whereas phytoplankton community structure reached the highest diversity and stability in mesotrophic lagoons. We observe that during the re

  10. Phytoplankton community and limnochemistry of Piburger See (Tyrol, Austria 28 years after lake restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjörg THIES

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton community and limnochemistry of Piburger See, a small soft-water, meromictic lake situated at 913 m a.s.l. in a crystalline area of the Central Eastern Alps of Tyrol (Austria, were investigated 28 years after the beginning of lake restoration. Although long-term data of the lake show a declining trend in total phosphorus concentrations and phytoplankton biovolume, the response of Piburger See to the restoration measures carried out in 1970 was delayed by about 20 years. At present the lake is approaching its former oligotrophic level. The most evident difference between the past and present phytoplankton species composition of Piburger See is the actual absence of the Cyanophycean Oscillatoria limosa C. A. Agardh, which markedly increased during the first two decades after the lake restoration (1970-1987. The phytoplankton biovolume recorded in 1998 was lower than in the 1970s and 1980s, while seasonal patterns were similar to those recorded before and later on in the lake restoration. The lowest annual phytoplankton biovolume in 1998 occurred in early winter, while the absolute maximum was observed in metalimnetic water layers in late spring. In 1998 the intra-annual patterns of phytoplankton biovolume and chlorophyll-a compare well. Phytoplankton succession started in early 1998 under ice with coccal green algae followed by flagellated Chrysophyceae during spring. The mid-summer phytoplankton community was dominated by centric Bacillariophyceae, which were later replaced by coccal Cyanophyceae. During autumn, Dinophyceae and Chrysophyceae prevailed. Epilimnetic dominance of centric diatoms during mid summer appears to be a new feature, which in 1998 was related to a strong depletion of dissolved silica and nitrate. Long-term water chemistry and phytoplankton data were checked against local weather data in order to explain the delay in the re-oligotrophication process of Piburger See. However, no clear relationship could be

  11. Latitudinal variation of phytoplankton communities in the western Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Joo, Hyoung; Lee, Sang H.; Won Jung, Seung; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Hwan Lee, Jin

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that photosynthetic eukaryotes are an active and often dominant component of Arctic phytoplankton assemblages. In order to explore this notion at a large scale, samples were collected to investigate the community structure and biovolume of phytoplankton along a transect in the western Arctic Ocean. The transect included 37 stations at the surface and subsurface chlorophyll a maximum (SCM) depths in the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Canadian Basin from July 19 to September 5, 2008. Phytoplankton (>2 μm) were identified and counted. A cluster analysis of abundance and biovolume data revealed different assemblages over the shelf, slope, and basin regions. Phytoplankton communities were composed of 71 taxa representing Dinophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Dictyochophyceae, Prasinophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae. The most abundant species were of pico- to nano-size at the surface and SCM depths at most stations. Nano- and pico-sized phytoplankton appeared to be dominant in the Bering Sea, whereas diatoms and nano-sized plankton provided the majority of taxon diversity in the Bering Strait and in the Chukchi Sea. From the western Bering Sea to the Bering Strait, the abundance, biovolume, and species diversity of phytoplankton provided a marked latitudinal gradient towards the central Arctic. Although pico- and nano-sized phytoplankton contributed most to cell abundance, their chlorophyll a contents and biovolumes were less than those of the larger micro-sized taxa. Micro-sized phytoplankton contributed most to the biovolume in the largely ice-free waters of the western Arctic Ocean during summer 2008.

  12. A glimpse into the future composition of marine phytoplankton communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban eAcevedo-Trejos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that climate change will have significant impacts on ecosystems. Most model projections agree that the ocean will experience stronger stratification and less nutrient supply from deep waters. These changes will likely affect marine phytoplankton communities and will thus impact on the higher trophic levels of the oceanic food web. The potential consequences of future climate change on marine microbial communities can be investigated and predicted only with the help of mathematical models. Here we present the application of a model that describes aggregate properties of marine phytoplankton communities and captures the effects of a changing environment on their composition and adaptive capacity. Specifically, the model describes the phytoplankton community in terms of total biomass, mean cell size, and functional diversity. The model is applied to two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean (tropical and temperate and is tested under two emission scenarios: SRES A2 or ``business as usual'' and SRES B1 or ``local utopia''. We find that all three macroecological properties will decline during the next century in both regions, although this effect will be more pronounced in the temperate region. Being consistent with previous model predictions, our results show that a simple trait-based modelling framework represents a valuable tool for investigating how phytoplankton communities may reorganize under a changing climate.

  13. Photoinhibition and the assembly of light-limited phytoplankton communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.; Mooij, W.M.; Huisman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Photoinhibition is characterised by a decreasing rate of photosynthesis with increasing light. It occurs in many photosynthetic organisms and is especially apparent in phytoplankton species sensitive to high light. Yet, the population and community level consequences of photoinhibition are not well

  14. Development of phytoplankton communities: Implications of nutrient injections on phytoplankton composition, pH and ecosystem production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans; Blanda, Elisa; Stæhr, Peter Anton

    2015-01-01

    The development of a marine phytoplankton community was studied in a series of mesocosm tanks exposed to different levels of nutrient inputs. Key ecosystem variables such as phytoplankton species development, ecosystem net production (NEP), pH and bacteria production were measured. The overall ai...... ultimately uncoupling high bacterial production from primary production, leading to severe oxygen consumption following ephemeral blooms...

  15. Physicochemical conditions in affecting the distribution of spring phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuqiu; Liu, Haijiao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xue, Bing; Munir, Sonia; Sun, Jun

    2017-03-01

    To better understand the physicochemical conditions in affecting regional distribution of phytoplankton community, one research cruise was carried out in the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea during 3rd and 23th May, 2010. The phytoplankton community, including Bacillariophyta (105 taxa), Pyrrophyta (54 taxa), Chrysophyta (1 taxon) and Chlorophyta (2 taxa), had been identified and clearly described from six ecological provinces. And, the six ecological provinces were partitioned based on the top twenty dominant species related with notable physicochemical parameters. In general, the regional distributions of phytoplankton ecological provinces were predominantly influenced by the physicochemical properties induced by the variable water masses and circulations. The predominant diatoms in most of water samples showed well adaptability in turbulent and eutrophic conditions. However, several species of dinoflagellates e.g., Protoperidinium conicum, Protoperidinium triestinum, Protoperidinium sp. and Gymnodinium lohmanni preferred warmer, saltier and nutrient-poor environment. Moreover, the dinoflagellates with high frequency in the Yellow Sea might be transported from the Yellow Sea Warm Current. The horizontal distribution of phytoplankton was depicted by diatoms and controlled by phosphate concentration, while the vertical distribution was mainly supported by light and nutrients availability in the subsurface and bottom layers, respectively.

  16. [The phytoplankton community of Punta Morales, Nicoya Gulf, Costa Rica ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoli Olivera, E; Morales Ramirez, A

    2001-12-01

    Three daily samplings of the phytoplankton community were made at two consecutive days in March, April, May, September, October, November and December 1997, at Punta Morales, Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica. Samples were collected during each tide at depths of 50% and 10% of light penetration using a Niskin bottle. A total of 43 taxa were identified. Centric diatoms, pennates and flagellates represented 90% of total phytoplankton abundance. In the phytoplankton fraction (cells > 30 microm), diatoms were the most abundant group, and Skeletonema costatum (32%) dominated. In nannophytoplankton (cells < 30 microm), Chaetoceros (23.7%) was the most abundant taxon, followed by flagellates (23%) and Cylindrotheca closterium (13.1%). These results agree with previous surveys and suggest that a typical net phytoplankton community persist through time in the Punta Morales zone. The number of nannophytoplankton fraction cells varied seasonally and suggests quantitative changes in species abundance, with possible modifications of cellular size or chain length in filamentous species. The codominance between S. costatum and Chaetoceros spp. during the rainy season suggested the ocurrence of an early ecological sucession, and nutrients could be the factor generating such population changes.

  17. Size-selective toxicity effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on estuarine phytoplankton communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Allison; Pinckney, James L

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on natural estuarine phytoplankton communities. Bioassays were used in experimental treatments with final concentrations of 5 to 1000 μg tylosin l(-1). Maximum percent inhibition ranged from 57 to 85% at concentrations of 200-400 μg tylosin l(-1). Half maximum inhibition concentrations of tylosin were ca. 5x lower for small phytoplankton (20 μm) and suggests that small phytoplankton are more sensitive to tylosin exposure. Sublethal effects occurred at concentrations as low as 5 μg tylosin l(-1). Environmental concentrations of tylosin (e.g., 0.2-3 μg l(-1)) may have a significant sublethal effect that alters the size structure and composition of phytoplankton communities. The results of this study highlight the potential importance of cell size on toxicity responses of estuarine phytoplankton. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial and protist community changes during a phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to characterize the change in the composition and structure of the bacterial and microzooplankton planktonic communities in relation to the phytoplankton community composition during a bloom. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of regions of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene was undertaken on samples collected during a 20 day (d) mesocosm experiment incorporating two different nutrient addition treatments [Nitrate and Phosphate (NPc) and Nitrate, Phosphate and Silicate (NPSc)] as well as a control. This approach allowed us to discriminate the changes in species composition across a broad range of phylogenetic groups using a common taxonomic level. Diatoms dominated the bloom in the NPSc treatment while dinoflagellates were the dominant phytoplankton in the control and NPc treatment. Network correlations highlighted significant interactions between OTUs within each treatment including changes in the composition of Paraphysomonas OTUs when the dominant Chaetoceros OTU switched. The microzooplankton community composition responded to changes in the phytoplankton composition while the prokaryotic community responded more to changes in ammonia concentration.

  19. Phytoplankton community structure is influenced by seabird guano enrichment in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatova, O. A.; Wing, S. R.; Hoffmann, L. J.; Wing, L. C.; Gault-Ringold, M.

    2017-05-01

    Phytoplankton biomass, productivity and community structure are strongly influenced by differences in nutrient concentrations among oceanographic water masses. Changes in community composition, particularly in the distribution of cell sizes, can result in dramatic changes in the energetics of pelagic food webs and ecosystem function in terms of biogeochemical cycling and carbon sequestration. Here we examine responses of natural phytoplankton communities from four major water masses in the Southern Ocean to enrichment from seabird guano, a concentrated source of bioactive metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and macronutrients (N, P), in a series of incubation experiments. Phytoplankton communities from sub-tropical water, modified sub-tropical water from the Snares Island wake, sub-Antarctic water and Antarctic water from the Ross Sea, each showed dramatic changes in community structure following additions of seabird guano. We observed particularly high growth of prymnesiophytes in response to the guano-derived nutrients within sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical frontal zones, resulting in communities dominated by larger cell sizes than in control incubations. Community changes within treatments enriched with guano were distinct, and in most cases more extensive, than those observed for treatments with additions of macronutrients (N, P) or iron (Fe) alone. These results provide the first empirical evidence that seabird guano enrichment can drive significant changes in the structure and composition of natural phytoplankton communities. Our findings have important implications for understanding the consequences of accumulation of bioactive metals and macronutrients within food webs and the role of seabirds as nutrient vectors within the Southern Ocean ecosystem.

  20. Spatial pattern of spring phytoplankton community in the coastal waters of northern Zhejiang, East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ran; Cai, Yanhong; Wei, Yongjie; Li, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    The spatial pattern of phytoplankton community can indicate potential environmental variation in different water bodies. In this context, spatial pattern of phytoplankton community and its response to environmental and spatial factors were studied in the coastal waters of northern Zhejiang, East China Sea using multivariate statistical techniques. Results showed that 94 species belonging to 40 genera, 5 phyla were recorded (the remaining 9 were identified to genus level) with diatoms being the most dominant followed by dinoflagellates. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), nonmetric multidimentional scaling (NMDS), and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) all demomstrated that the whole study area could be divided into 3 subareas with significant differences. Indicator species analysis (ISA) further confirmed that the indicator species of each subarea correlated significantly with specific environmental factors. Distance-based linear model (Distlm) and Mantel test revealed that silicate (SiO32-), phosphate (PO43-), pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) were the most important environmental factors influencing phytoplankton community. Variation portioning (VP) finally concluded that the shared fractions of environmental and spatial factors were higher than either the pure environmental effects or the pure spatial effects, suggesting phytoplankton biogeography were mainly affected by both the environmental variability and dispersal limitation. Additionally, other factors (eg., trace metals, biological grazing, climate change, and time-scale variation) may also be the sources of the unexplained variation which need further study.

  1. Sustaining diversity in trait-based models of phytoplankton communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino eMerico

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established that when equilibrium is attained for two species competing for the same limiting resource in a stable, uniform environment, one species will eliminate the other due to competitive exclusion. While competitive exclusion is observed in laboratory experiments and ecological models, the phenomenon seems less common in nature, where static equilibrium is prevented by the fluctuating physical environment and by other factors that constantly change species abundances and the nature of competitive interactions. Trait-based models of phytoplankton communities appear to be useful tools for describing the evolution of large assemblages of species with aggregate group properties such as total biomass, mean trait, and trait variance, the latter representing the functional diversity of the community. Such an approach, however, is limited by the tendency of the trait variance to unrealistically decline to zero over time. This tendency to lose diversity, and therefore adaptive capacity, is typically solved by fixing the variance or by considering exogenous processes such as immigration. Exogenous processes, however, cannot explain the maintenance of adaptive capacity often observed in the closed environment of chemostat experiments. Here we present a new method to sustain diversity in adaptive trait-based models of phytoplankton communities based on a mechanism of trait diffusion through subsequent generations. Our modeling approach can therefore account for endogenous processes such as rapid evolution or transgenerational trait plasticity.

  2. Effects of ocean acidification on primary production in a coastal North Sea phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Tim; Wohlrab, Sylke; Rost, Björn; John, Uwe; Bach, Lennart T.; Riebesell, Ulf; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effect of ocean acidification (OA) on a coastal North Sea plankton community in a long-term mesocosm CO2-enrichment experiment (BIOACID II long-term mesocosm study). From March to July 2013, 10 mesocosms of 19 m length with a volume of 47.5 to 55.9 m3 were deployed in the Gullmar Fjord, Sweden. CO2 concentrations were enriched in five mesocosms to reach average CO2 partial pressures (pCO2) of 760 μatm. The remaining five mesocosms were used as control at ambient pCO2 of 380 μatm. Our paper is part of a PLOS collection on this long-term mesocosm experiment. Here, we here tested the effect of OA on total primary production (PPT) by performing 14C-based bottle incubations for 24 h. Furthermore, photoacclimation was assessed by conducting 14C-based photosynthesis-irradiance response (P/I) curves. Changes in chlorophyll a concentrations over time were reflected in the development of PPT, and showed higher phytoplankton biomass build-up under OA. We observed two subsequent phytoplankton blooms in all mesocosms, with peaks in PPT around day 33 and day 56. OA had no significant effect on PPT, except for a marginal increase during the second phytoplankton bloom when inorganic nutrients were already depleted. Maximum light use efficiencies and light saturation indices calculated from the P/I curves changed simultaneously in all mesocosms, and suggest that OA did not alter phytoplankton photoacclimation. Despite large variability in time-integrated productivity estimates among replicates, our overall results indicate that coastal phytoplankton communities can be affected by OA at certain times of the seasonal succession with potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. PMID:28273107

  3. Preliminary study on seasonal succession and development pathway of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Phytoplankton species composition and species succession were determined in 1998~1999 based on 2 nestle investigation cruises in the Bohai Sea and two monthly monitoring stations at Penglai and Changdao for 15 months. The seasonal succession and pathway of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea were discussed complementarily with history data. The main process of phytoplankton community development in the Bohai Sea was controlled by temperature and nutrient replenishes. There were two cell abundance peaks in an annual variation, the main peak in April and the secondary peak in September. In winter, the cell abundance was low due to the low temperature, the phytoplankton community was mainly made up of small-crled diatoms. In spring, the phytoplankton community was developed very quickly by small-celled diatom in suitable conditions of temperature and nutrients. In summer, the cell abundance decreased and big-celled diatoms became predominated. In autumn, because of the replenish of nutrient, big-celled diatoms and dinoflagellates formed another cell abundance peak.During the annual variation of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea, species succession was the main process of community development, the species sequence just occur at special areas and special periods. The evolution of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea accords with the hypothesis of Margalef's phytoplankton community of four stages. But the size feature is contrary to the hypothesis,which may be caused by nutrient replenish in autumn in Bohai Sea and the top to down control.

  4. Analysis of phytoplankton distribution and community structure in the German Bight with respect to the different size classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschläger, Jochen; Wiltshire, Karen Helen; Petersen, Wilhelm; Metfies, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of phytoplankton biodiversity, ecology, and biogeography is crucial for understanding marine ecosystems. Research is often carried out on the basis of microscopic observations, but due to the limitations of this approach regarding detection and identification of picophytoplankton (0.2-2 μm) and nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm), these investigations are mainly focused on the microphytoplankton (20-200 μm). In the last decades, various methods based on optical and molecular biological approaches have evolved which enable a more rapid and convenient analysis of phytoplankton samples and a more detailed assessment of small phytoplankton. In this study, a selection of these methods (in situ fluorescence, flow cytometry, genetic fingerprinting, and DNA microarray) was placed in complement to light microscopy and HPLC-based pigment analysis to investigate both biomass distribution and community structure of phytoplankton. As far as possible, the size classes were analyzed separately. Investigations were carried out on six cruises in the German Bight in 2010 and 2011 to analyze both spatial and seasonal variability. Microphytoplankton was identified as the major contributor to biomass in all seasons, followed by the nanophytoplankton. Generally, biomass distribution was patchy, but the overall contribution of small phytoplankton was higher in offshore areas and also in areas exhibiting higher turbidity. Regarding temporal development of the community, differences between the small phytoplankton community and the microphytoplankton were found. The latter exhibited a seasonal pattern regarding number of taxa present, alpha- and beta-diversity, and community structure, while for the nano- and especially the picophytoplankton, a general shift in the community between both years was observable without seasonality. Although the reason for this shift remains unclear, the results imply a different response of large and small phytoplankton to environmental influences.

  5. Phytoplankton Diversity Effects on Community Biomass and Stability along Nutrient Gradients in a Eutrophic Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wang; Zhang, Huayong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Feifan; Huang, Hai

    2017-01-20

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is a central issue in ecology, but how this relationship is affected by nutrient stress is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the phytoplankton diversity effects on community biomass and stability along nutrient gradients in an artificial eutrophic lake. Four nutrient gradients, varying from slightly eutrophic to highly eutrophic states, were designed by adjusting the amount of polluted water that flowed into the lake. Mean phytoplankton biomass, species richness, and Shannon diversity index all showed significant differences among the four nutrient gradients. Phytoplankton community biomass was correlated with diversity (both species richness and Shannon diversity index), varying from positive to negative along the nutrient gradients. The influence of phytoplankton species richness on resource use efficiency (RUE) also changed from positive to negative along the nutrient gradients. However, the influence of phytoplankton Shannon diversity on RUE was not significant. Both phytoplankton species richness and Shannon diversity had a negative influence on community turnover (measured as community dissimilarity), i.e., a positive diversity-stability relationship. Furthermore, phytoplankton spatial stability decreased along the nutrient gradients in the lake. With increasing nutrient concentrations, the variability (standard deviation) of phytoplankton community biomass increased more rapidly than the average total biomass. Results in this study will be helpful in understanding the phytoplankton diversity effects on ecosystem functioning and how these effects are influenced by nutrient conditions in aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Phytoplankton Diversity Effects on Community Biomass and Stability along Nutrient Gradients in a Eutrophic Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wang; Zhang, Huayong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Feifan; Huang, Hai

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is a central issue in ecology, but how this relationship is affected by nutrient stress is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the phytoplankton diversity effects on community biomass and stability along nutrient gradients in an artificial eutrophic lake. Four nutrient gradients, varying from slightly eutrophic to highly eutrophic states, were designed by adjusting the amount of polluted water that flowed into the lake. Mean phytoplankton biomass, species richness, and Shannon diversity index all showed significant differences among the four nutrient gradients. Phytoplankton community biomass was correlated with diversity (both species richness and Shannon diversity index), varying from positive to negative along the nutrient gradients. The influence of phytoplankton species richness on resource use efficiency (RUE) also changed from positive to negative along the nutrient gradients. However, the influence of phytoplankton Shannon diversity on RUE was not significant. Both phytoplankton species richness and Shannon diversity had a negative influence on community turnover (measured as community dissimilarity), i.e., a positive diversity–stability relationship. Furthermore, phytoplankton spatial stability decreased along the nutrient gradients in the lake. With increasing nutrient concentrations, the variability (standard deviation) of phytoplankton community biomass increased more rapidly than the average total biomass. Results in this study will be helpful in understanding the phytoplankton diversity effects on ecosystem functioning and how these effects are influenced by nutrient conditions in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:28117684

  7. Phytoplankton community structure defined by key environmental variables in Tagus estuary, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogueira, Maria José; Oliveira, Maria do Rosário; Cabeçadas, Graça

    2007-12-01

    In this work, we analyze environmental (physical and chemical) and biological (phytoplankton) data obtained along Tagus estuary during three surveys, carried out in productive period (May/June/July) at ebb tide. The main objective of this study was to identify the key environmental factors affecting phytoplankton structure in the estuary. BIOENV analysis revealed that, in study period, temperature, salinity, silicate and total phosphorus were the variables that best explained the phytoplankton spatial pattern in the estuary (Spearman correlation, rho=0.803). A generalized linear model (GLM) also identified salinity, silicate and phosphate as having a high explanatory power (63%) of phytoplankton abundance. These selected nutrients appear to be consistent with the requirements of the dominant phytoplankton group, Baccilariophyceae. Apparently, phytoplankton community is adapted to fluctuations in light intensity, as suspended particulate matter did not come out as a key factor in shaping phytoplankton structure along Tagus estuary.

  8. Phytoplankton community and limnology of Chatla floodplain wetland of Barak valley, Assam, North-East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Laskar H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton diversity was investigated over a period of two years (2006 to 2008 in Chatla floodplain wetland in Barak valley, Assam, North-East India. Site 1 and site 2 are two inlets and site 3 is a lentic system associated with vegetation cover of Calamus tenuis and Baringtonia acutangula. The floodplain has a unique hydrology because of the presence of different types of habitats (inlets, fisheries, beels and outlets which maintains a network among the floodplains, rivers and streams. Phytoplankton community composition, density and diversity were studied in relation to environmental variables. All the variables were estimated by following standard methods. Phytoplankton was collected by plankton net and quantitative estimation was made by using Sedgwick Rafter counting cell. Phytoplankton community comprised 53 taxa represented by Chlorophyceae (31, Cyanophyceae (11, Bacillariophyceae (7, Euglenophyceae (1 and Dinophyceae (3. Phytoplankton taxa was dominated by Volvox sp., Nostoc sp., Eunotia sp., Navicula sp., Euglena spp. and density was found highest in site 3 and lowest in site 1. Shannon diversity index (H′ for phytoplankton community varied between 2.4 to 2.65 indicating fairly high species diversity. The varying magnitude of correlationship among environmental variables and phytoplankton species density as shown by Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that some of the environmental variables (water temperature, transparency, rainfall, nitrate and ammonia are the driving factors for governing the phytoplankton species assemblages in Chatla floodplain wetland. Fluctuation of phytoplankton density and community composition in different habitats indicated various niche apportionment as well as anthropogenic influences.

  9. Phytoplankton community of Reis lake in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISE G. SILVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reis Lake is located in the municipality of Caracaraí, state of Roraima (Brazil and is subject to fluctuations in water level. The aim of this study was to analyze the structure of the phytoplankton community on the nictemeral and seasonal scales and determined the influence of limnological variables. Sampling was performed in the rainy season (June/2006 and dry season (November/2006, considering two nictemeral cycles. The phytoplankton community was assessed with regard to composition and density, abiotic variables were analyzed simultaneously. The lake had low concentrations of oxygen, clinograde profile and water stratified during the day and homogenous at night, with low concentrations of nutrients and waters ranging from slightly acidic to alkaline. The phytoplankton was represented by 43 taxa, 35 species in the dry season and 29 species in the rainy season. Low densities of phytoplankton occurred in both nictemeral cycles, with accentuated vertical gradient. The highest densities were recorded in the dry season. Reis Lake exhibits characteristics that classify it as a polymythic and oligotrophic environment. The variability in the data was more important seasonally than on the nictemeral scale, supporting the hypothesis of the influence of the hydrological cycle on the dynamics of phytoplankton communities in floodplain lakes.O lago dos Reis está localizado no município de Caracaraí, no estado de Roraima (Brasil e está sujeito a flutuações no nível da água. O objetivo do estudo foi analisar a estrutura da comunidade fitoplanctônica nas escalas nictemeral e sazonal e determinar a influência de variáveis limnológicas nesta comunidade. As amostragens foram realizadas nos periodos chuvoso e seco, considerando dois ciclos nictemeral. A comunidade fitoplanctônica foi avaliada no que diz respeito à composição e densidade, simultaneamente, variáveis abióticas foram analisadas. O lago apresentou baixas concentrações de oxig

  10. Effects of mixing-induced irradiance fluctuations on nitrogen uptake in size-fractionated coastal phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguer, Jean-François; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Waeles, Matthieu

    2015-03-01

    In coastal waters subjected to strong tidal forcing, phytoplankton populations are exposed to highly variable light regimes. To grow under such fluctuating light environments, phytoplankton adjust their physiological properties. Here, we investigated nitrogen (N) uptake patterns in the western English Channel to determine whether phytoplankton modify their physiological processes involved in N uptake in response to changing irradiance conditions induced by spring-neap tidal cycles. Nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) uptake kinetics as a function of irradiance (VN-E curves) were assessed using 15N tracer techniques on two size fractions (10 μm) of phytoplankton collected at 50% and 1% of surface irradiance during two spring-neap tidal cycles. Overall, the results showed that both small and large phytoplankton, whatever their vertical position in the water column, increased their maximum uptake capacity and their light utilization efficiency for the two N substrates following the decrease in vertical mixing intensity. Moreover, the improvement of irradiance conditions at neap tides was of greater benefit for the larger cells than for the smaller ones and was more favorable for NO3- uptake than for NH4+ uptake. These findings show that the light regime fluctuation resulting from the relaxation of tidal mixing during spring-neap tidal cycle leads to profound physiological adjustments of N uptake processes in phytoplankton communities. They suggest that the changes in NO3- uptake by large phytoplankton associated with the fortnightly spring-neap tidal cycle can account for most of the deviation in background productivity in the western English Channel which is based on NH4+ and is dominated by small cells. The dynamic light regime inherent to macrotidal coastal ecosystems could therefore determine, to a large extent, the importance of new vs. regenerated production as well as the size structure of the phytoplankton community.

  11. Experimental evaluation of nutrient limitation of phytoplankton communities in the Gulf of Riga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, J.; Tamminen, T.; Kaitala, S.

    1999-12-01

    Phytoplankton nutrient limitation was studied in the Gulf of Riga during spring bloom (April 1995), early summer stage (June 1994), cyanobacterial bloom (July 1994) and post cyanobacterial bloom (August 1993). Each year six factorial nutrient enrichment experiments were carried out in various locations in the Gulf; including outer Irbe Strait, northern Gulf and southern Gulf. The responses of natural phytoplankton communities to the nutrient additions (80 μg NH 4-N l -1, 20 μg PO 4-P l -1 and two levels of combined additions) were followed for 3 days using 6 l experimental units. To evaluate the nutrient limitation patterns, time series of chlorophyll a were analysed using polynomial regression models and ranking method, taking advantage of the relatively constant experimental error. Apparent nutrient depletion rates and ratios were estimated, and compared with the changes in particulate nutrient ratios. During the spring diatom bloom in 1995, ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations were still high, and thus phytoplankton biomass did not respond to additions of nutrients. Chlorophyll a specific nutrient depletion rates were low (0.01-0.12 μg N (μg chl a) -1 h -1 and 0.002-0.016 μg P (μg chl a) -1 h -1) and linear over time, thus also revealing that phytoplankton was not limited by these nutrients in that time. In June 1994, there was an areal shift from N limitation in the outer Irbe Strait towards co-limitation in the southern Gulf. Later in July 1994, during the bloom of N-fixing Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, the N limitation was obvious for the whole study area. For this period chlorophyll a specific nutrient depletion rates were high (0.36-0.67 μg N (μg chl a) -1 h -1 and 0.089-0.135 μg P (μg chl a) -1 h -1), and added nutrients were almost totally depleted during the first light period. After the collapse of cyanobacterial bloom in August 1993, the experiment carried out in the southern Gulf indicated P limitation of phytoplankton. The central Gulf was

  12. Phytoplankton community structure and dynamics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Carlos; Rivera, Antonella; González, Sonia; Anadón, Ricardo

    2017-02-01

    Phytoplankton fuel epipelagic ecosystems and affect global biogeochemical cycles. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of quantitative information about the factors that determine both phytoplankton community structure and dynamics, particularly in subtropical gyres. Here, we estimated size fractionated phytoplankton growth (μ) and microzooplankton grazing rates (m) along a transect in the subtropical North Atlantic, from the island of Hispaniola to the Iberian Peninsula, by conducting dilution experiments and fitting mixed models. We also examined the relationship between nutrient availability and the differences in both phytoplankton community structure and size fractionated phytoplankton growth rates at two spatial scales (i.e. subtropical gyre and within-province spatial scale). Our results revealed high values for both phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates. Phytoplankton growth (0.00-1.19 d-1) displayed higher variability among stations, biogeochemical provinces and size fractions than the microzooplankton grazing rate (0.32-0.74 d-1). Differences in phytoplankton community structure were associated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (0.72-5.85 μM; R2 = 0.19) and squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency (R2 = 0.21) at the whole gyre scale. Conversely, the differences in phytoplankton growth rate showed a weak relationship with those properties (R2 ⩽ 0.05) at that scale, but a stronger relationship at the within province scale (R2 ⩾ 0.07). These results support the idea that phytoplankton grow at high rates in oligotrophic subtropical gyres, this is likely due to the selection of phytoplankton groups with functional traits suited to exploit low nutrient availability. Thus, shedding new, multi-scale knowledge on the commonly misunderstood "ocean deserts".

  13. Variation of summer phytoplankton community composition and its relationship to nitrate and regenerated nitrogen assimilation across the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oostende, N.; Fawcett, S. E.; Marconi, D.; Lueders-Dumont, J.; Sabadel, A. J. M.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Jönsson, B. F.; Sigman, D. M.; Ward, B. B.

    2017-03-01

    The North Atlantic Ocean is considered a nitrogen (N) limited system once vernal stabilisation of the water column alleviates light limitation and allows phytoplankton growth to deplete surface nutrients to virtually undetectable levels. Ammonium and other regenerated N forms are then the main surface N source for phytoplankton production. The effort to determine which phytoplankton groups contribute to long-term biological export production would be greatly aided by information on which phytoplankton groups are responsible for the assimilation of nitrate, as opposed to those assimilating predominantly regenerated N. In this study, we used the natural abundance N isotopes to examine basin-scale patterns of nitrate and regenerated N assimilation and evaluated the relationships between these trends and phytoplankton community composition. Samples were collected during a summertime cruise transect (August-September 2013) from the subtropical (36°N 73°W) to the subarctic (54°N 20°W) North Atlantic and analysed for the N isotopic composition (δ15N vs. N2 in air) of particulate nitrogen (PN) and nitrate, size-fractionated chlorophyll a, and phytoplankton group biomass using flow cytometry. The depth of the 300 nmol l-1 nitrate isopleth shoaled from the subtropics (79 m), where phytoplankton stripped surface waters of nitrate, to the subarctic, where it intersected with the surface and the upward nutrient supply drove a summer phytoplankton bloom. The δ15N of PN above the nitracline increased from the subtropics (-0.3‰) to the subarctic (4.2‰), reflecting both a change in the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate source (from 2.4‰ to 5.1‰) and increased reliance by phytoplankton on nitrate relative to regenerated N. Throughout the transect, the phytoplankton community was mainly composed of pico- and nano-sized cells (>88% of chlorophyll a in the <20 μm size fraction). In the part of the transect southwest of the Grand Banks, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus

  14. Variations in phytoplankton community in a monsoon-influenced tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    . The break period in monsoon altered the phytoplankton community leading to mixed species bloom of large-sized diatoms and harmful dinoflagellates (Gymnodinium catenatum and Cochlodinium polykrikoides) under high-saline, nutrient-poor, non...

  15. [Community structure characteristics of phytoplankton and related affecting factors in Hengshan Reservoir, Zhejiang, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang-Jie; Yu, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Jun-Quan; Xu, Zhen; Lü, Guang-Han; Jin, Chun-Hua

    2014-02-01

    In order to reveal the community structure characteristics of phytoplankton and the relationships with environmental factors in Hengshan Reservoir, the phytoplankton species composition, abundance, biomass and 12 environmental factors at 4 sampling sites were analyzed from March 2011 to February 2012. A total of 246 phytoplankton species were identified, which belong to 78 genera and 7 phyla. The dominant species were Melosira varians, M. granulate, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Asterianella formosa, Synedra acus, Achnanthes exigua, Ankistrodesmus falcatus, Oscillatoria lacustris, Cryptomonas erosa, Chroomonas acuta, Phormidium tenue and Microcystis aeruginosa, etc. Seasonal variations of species were obvious. The annual abundance and biomass of the phytoplankton were 0.51 x 10(5)-14.22 x 10(5) ind x L(-1) and 0.07-1.27 mg x L(-1), respectively. The values of the Margelef index, Pielou index and Shannon index of the phytoplankton community were 1.10-3.33, 0.26-0.81 and 0.51-2.38, respectively. The phytoplankton community structure was of Bacillariophyta-Cryptophyta type in spring and winter, of Chlorophyta-Cyanophyta type in summer, and of Bacillariophyta type in autumn. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) showed that temperature, transparency, chemical oxygen demand and pH had the closest relationships with the phytoplankton community structure in the reservoir. Water quality evaluation showed that Hengshan Reservoir was in a secondary pollution with a meso-trophic level.

  16. Phytoplankton abundance and community structure in the Antarctic polar frontal region during austral summer of 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHRAMIK Patil; RAHUL Mohan; SUHAS Shetye; SAHINA Gazi

    2013-01-01

    The Antarctic polar front region in the Southern Ocean is known to be most productive.We studied the phytoplankton community structure in the Indian sector at this frontal location during late austral summer (February,2009) onboard R/V Akademic Boris Petrov.We used the phytoplankton and microheterotrophs abundance,as also the associated physico-chemical parameters to explain the low phytoplankton abundance in the study region.This study emphasizes the shift of phytoplankton,from large (>10 μm) to small (<10 μm) size.The phytoplankton abundance appears to be controlled by physical parameters and by nutrient concentrations and also by the microheterotrophs (ciliates and dinoflagellates) which exert a strong grazing pressure.This probably reduces small (<10 μm) and large (>10 μm)phytoplankton abundance during the late austral summer.This study highlights the highly productive polar front nevertheless becomes a region of low phytoplankton abundance,due to community shifts towards pico-phytoplankton (<10 μm) during late austral summer.

  17. Phytoplankton community structure in the VAHINE mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Karine; Cornet, Véronique; Caffin, Mathieu; Rodier, Martine; Desnues, Anne; Berthelot, Hugo; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Heliou, Jules

    2016-09-01

    The VAHINE mesocosm experiment was designed to trigger a diazotroph bloom and to follow the subsequent transfer of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in the rest of the food web. Three mesocosms (50 m3) located inside the Nouméa lagoon (New Caledonia, southwestern Pacific) were enriched with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in order to promote N2 fixation in these low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (LNLC) waters. Initially, the diazotrophic community was dominated by diatom diazotroph associations (DDAs), mainly by Rhizosolenia/Richelia intracellularis, and by Trichodesmium, which fueled enough DDN to sustain the growth of other diverse diatom species and Synechococcus populations that were well adapted to limiting DIP levels. After DIP fertilization (1 µM) on day 4, an initial lag time of 10 days was necessary for the mesocosm ecosystems to start building up biomass. However, changes in community structure were already observed during this first period, with a significant drop of both Synechococcus and diatom populations, while Prochlorococcus benefited from DIP addition. At the end of this first period, corresponding to when most added DIP was consumed, the diazotroph community changed drastically and became dominated by Cyanothece-like (UCYN-C) populations, which were accompanied by a monospecific bloom of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. During the second period, biomass increased sharply together with primary production and N2-fixation fluxes near tripled. Diatom populations, as well as Synechococcus and nanophytoeukaryotes, showed a re-increase towards the end of the experiment, showing efficient transfer of DDN to non-diazotrophic phytoplankton.

  18. Phytoplanktonic desmids community in Donghu Lake, Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yinxin; Yu, Minjuan

    2005-03-01

    For compilation and comparison of desmids flora, the authors restudied the species composition, cell density and biomass of phytoplankton desmids collected at six stations in Donghu Lake at intervals of three months monitored from March of 1956 to February of 1957. A total of 122 taxa belonging to 16 genera were identified from qualitative and quantitative samples. Species of Cosmarium were the most popular ones occupying about 41% of the total species. Based on the observations, the annual mean values of the cell density and biomass were 132.11×102 cells/L and 0.09 mg/L. Cosmarium, Staurastrum, Staurodesmus and Closterium dominated and contributed more than 70% of the total cell density and biomass at six stations in four seasons. The maximum species number, cell density and biomass in autumn revealed that the highest variety (64 taxa, 1296×102 cells/L and 0.889 mg/L respectively) occurred at Station 3 located in the southern part of Donghu Lake. From then on to the mid 1990s the desmids community decreased sharply in Donghu Lake, resulted clearly from eutrophication in the lake.

  19. Phytoplanktonic desmids community in Donghu Lake, Wuhan,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yinxin; YU Minjuan

    2005-01-01

    For compilation and comparison of desmids flora, the authors restudied the species composition,cell density and biomass of phytoplankton desmids collected at six stations in Donghu Lake at intervals of three months monitored from March of 1956 to February of 1957. A total of 122 taxa belonging to 16 genera were identified from qualitative and quantitative samples. Species of Cosmarium were the most popular ones occupying about 41% of the total species. Based on the observations, the annual mean values of the cell density and biomass were 132.11 × 102 cells/L and 0.09 mg/L. Cosmarium, Staurastrum, Staurodesmus and Closterium dominated and contributed more than 70 % of the total cell density and biomass at six stations in four seasons.The maximum species number, cell density and biomass in autumn revealed that the highest variety (64 taxa,1296× 102 cells/L and 0.889 mg/L respectively) occurred at Station 3 located in the southern part of Donghu Lake. From then on to the mid 1990s the desmids community decreased sharply in Donghu Lake, resulted clearly from eutrophication in the lake.

  20. The effect of seasonality in phytoplankton community composition on CO2 uptake on the Scotian Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Susanne E.; Thomas, Helmuth; Jones, Chris T.; Li, William K. W.; Greenan, Blair J. W.; Shadwick, Elizabeth H.; Burt, William J.

    2015-07-01

    We characterise seasonal patterns in phytoplankton community composition on the Scotian Shelf, northwest Atlantic Ocean, through a study of the numerical abundance of different cell sizes - pico-, nano- and microphytoplankton. Cell abundances of each size class were converted to cellular carbon and their seasonal patterns compared with the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) also measured at the study site. We observed a persistent drawdown of CO2 throughout the summer months, despite nutrient depleted conditions and apparent low biomass suggested by the chlorophyll record. This drawdown was associated with a summertime phytoplankton assemblage numerically dominated by small phytoplankton that reach their peak abundance during this period. It was found that phytoplankton carbon during this period accounted for approximately 10% of spring bloom phytoplankton carbon and pointed to the importance role that small cells play in annual CO2 uptake.

  1. Seasonal variation in the biochemical compositions of phytoplankton and zooplankton communities in the southwestern East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Naeun; Kang, Jae Joong; Park, Won Gyu; Lee, Bo Ram; Yun, Mi Sun; Lee, Jang Han; Kim, Su Min; Lee, Dasom; Joo, HuiTae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2017-09-01

    The macromolecular composition of phytoplankton communities and the proximate composition of zooplankton communities were measured monthly in the southwestern East/Japan Sea from April to November 2014 in order to identify seasonal changes in, and relationships among, the biochemical compositions in both phytoplankton and zooplankton. The carbohydrate content of phytoplankton was highest in June, whereas the protein content was highest in August and lipids were highest in April. Overall, carbohydrates were dominant (53.2 ± 12.5%) in the macromolecular composition of phytoplankton during the study period. This composition is believed to result from the dominance of diatoms and/or nutrient-depleted conditions. In comparison, the protein level of zooplankton was highest in November, whereas lipids were slightly higher in May than other months. Overall, proteins were the dominant organic compounds (47.9±8.6% DW) in zooplankton communities, whereas lipids were minor components (5.5±0.6% DW). The high protein content of zooplankton might be related to the abundance of copepods, whereas the low lipid content might be due to a relatively high primary production that could provide a sufficient food supply for zooplankton so that they do not require high lipid storage. A significant positive correlation (r=0.971, n=7, pJapan Sea ecosystem's response to the many environmental changes associated with global warming.

  2. Community structure and spatial-temporal variation of netz-phytoplankton in the Bering Sea in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu; XIANG Peng; YE Youyin; LIN Gengming; YANG Qingliang; LIN Heshan; LIN Mao

    2016-01-01

    Marine biodiversity is changing in response to altered physical environment, subsequent ecological changes as well as anthropogenic disturbances. In this study, phytoplankton samplesin situ collected in the Bering Sea in July of 1999 and 2010 were analyzed to obtain phytoplankton community structure and spatial-temporal variation between the beginning and end of this decade, and the correlation of phytoplankton community dynamics and environmental factors was investigated. A total of 5 divisions, 58 genera and 153 species of phytoplankton belonging to 3 ecological groups were identified. The vast majority of phytoplankton consisted of diatoms accounting for 66.7% of the total species and 95.2% of the total abundance. Considering differentiation in spatial extent and phytoplankton sample types, there were subtle changes in species composition, large altering in abundance and significant variation in spatial distribution between two surveys. The abundance peak area was located at the Bering Strait while sub peak was found at the Bering Sea Basin. The boreal-temperate diatom was the dominant flora, which was subsequently replaced by eurythermal and frigid-water diatom. Phytoplankton community in the Bering Sea was not a simplex uniform community but composed of deep-ocean assemblage and neritic assemblage. The deep-ocean assemblage was located in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea Basin, dominated by boreal-temperate species (Neodenticula seminae,Thalassiothrix longissima,Amphiprora hyperborean,Chaetoceros atlanticus,Thalassiosira trifulta, etc.) and eurychoric species (Thalassionema nitzschioides,Ch. compressus,Rhizosolenia styliformis, etc.), and characterized by low abundance, even inter-species abundance allocations, diverse dominant species and high species diversity. The neritic assemblage was distributed on the continental shelf and slope of Bering Sea and was mainly composed of frigid-water species (Th. nordenskiöldii,Ch. furcellatus,Ch. socialis

  3. Scenarios of nutrient alterations and responses of phytoplankton in a changing Daya Bay, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei-Lin; Wang, You-Shao; Wang, Yu-Tu; Yin, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jun-De; Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Sun, Fu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    The coastal ecosystem in the Daya Bay is sensitive to the environmental changes induced by highly intensive human activities. We obtained and compiled the recent 30 years' field observational data on nutrients and phytoplankton communities to explore the changing ecosystem. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentration (DIN) has significantly increased, while phosphate concentration (DIP) dramatically decreased because of costal anthropogenic influence. The limited factors for phytoplankton have changed from nitrogen in the 1980s to phosphate in the mid-1990s. The net-collected phytoplankton communities has the miniaturized trend, while there is drastic increase of Chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentration. Even though the diatoms still dominate in phytoplankton community, the dominant species have slightly changed. The alga bloom greatly changed from diatoms dominated to dinoflagellates due to changes of nutrient structure. All these changes on nutrients and phytoplankton communities appear to be closely associated with human activities along the coast of the Daya Bay.

  4. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMARI

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... Phytoplankton is usually at the base of aquatic food web and is the most ... brates and fish possessing size-selective feeding habits on zooplankton ..... been found to produce toxic secondary compounds, other cyanobacteria ...

  5. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Buck, Kristen N; Casey, John R; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu(2+) concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity.

  6. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese and nickel in the incubation water. Over the three-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon (POC increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived cobalt (Co, manganese, and nickel were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Copper (Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu2+ concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1 atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2 these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3 growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic

  7. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, James S.; Cody, Rosie D.; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R.

    2016-06-01

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate “baseline” variability on glacial-interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations.

  8. Changes in phytoplankton communities along nutrient gradients in Lake Taihu: evidence for nutrient reduction strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ying; Bi, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyu

    2015-03-01

    An annual investigation on phytoplankton communities was conducted to reveal the effects of nutrients on phytoplankton assemblages in Lake Taihu, East China. A total of 78 phytoplankton taxa were identified. Phytoplankton biomass was higher in the northern part of the lake than in the southern part. Cyanobacteria and Bacillariophyta alternated dominance in the northern area, where algal blooms often appear, and co-dominated in the southern area. In the northern part, the proportions of cyanobacteria and Bacillariophyta varied significantly in total biovolume, both along the phosphorus (P) gradient, and between total nitrogen levels (≤3 mg/L and >3 mg/L TN). The proportions of cyanobacteria and Bacillariophyta had no significant variations in total biovolume along P and N (nitrogen) gradients in the southern part. Correlation analysis and CCA results revealed that P was the key factor regulating phytoplankton community structure. Nitrogen was also important for the phytoplankton distribution pattern. It was concluded that nutrient structure was heterogeneous in space and shaped the distribution pattern of phytoplankton in the lake. Both exogenous P and internally sourced P release needs to be considered. N reduction should be considered simultaneously with P control to efficiently reduce eutrophication and algal blooms.

  9. Mechanisms shaping size structure and functional diversity of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Bruggeman, Jorn; Merico, Agostino

    2015-03-01

    The factors regulating phytoplankton community composition play a crucial role in structuring aquatic food webs. However, consensus is still lacking about the mechanisms underlying the observed biogeographical differences in cell size composition of phytoplankton communities. Here we use a trait-based model to disentangle these mechanisms in two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean. In our model, the phytoplankton community can self-assemble based on a trade-off emerging from relationships between cell size and (1) nutrient uptake, (2) zooplankton grazing, and (3) phytoplankton sinking. Grazing `pushes' the community towards larger cell sizes, whereas nutrient uptake and sinking `pull' the community towards smaller cell sizes. We find that the stable environmental conditions of the tropics strongly balance these forces leading to persistently small cell sizes and reduced size diversity. In contrast, the seasonality of the temperate region causes the community to regularly reorganize via shifts in species composition and to exhibit, on average, bigger cell sizes and higher size diversity than in the tropics. Our results raise the importance of environmental variability as a key structuring mechanism of plankton communities in the ocean and call for a reassessment of the current understanding of phytoplankton diversity patterns across latitudinal gradients.

  10. Algae/bacteria consortium in high rate ponds : influence of solar radiation on the phytoplankton community.

    OpenAIRE

    Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Calijuri, Maria Lúcia; Couto, Eduardo de Aguiar do; Souza, Mauro Henrique Batalha de; Silva, Nirlane Cristiane; Santiago, Aníbal da Fonseca; Castro, Jackeline de Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Using multivariate statistical tools, the composition of the phytoplankton community was related to the characteristics of the domestic sewage used as culture medium in three high rate ponds (HRPs) submitted to different solar radiation levels. A total of 32 genera of phytoplankton were identified in the ponds; the class Chlorophyceae was the most abundant during the entire sampling period, with a larger number of individuals of the genus Desmodesmus in the summer and fall, and of the genu...

  11. Phytoplankton community structure and environmental parameters in aquaculture areas of Daya Bay, South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Jiangang; Zhang, Yujuan; Cao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental characteristics and phytoplankton community structure were investigated in two aquaculture areas in Dapeng Cove of Daya Bay, South China Sea, between April 2005 and June 2006. Phytoplankton abundance ranged between 5.0 and 8877.5 cells/mL, with an average of 751.8 cells/mL. The seasonal cycle of phytoplankton were demonstrated by frequent oscillations, with recurrent high abundances from late spring to autumn and a peak stage in late winter. Diatoms were the predominant phytoplankton group, accounting for 93.21% of the total abundance. The next most abundant group was the dinoflagellates, which made up only 1.24% of total abundance. High concentrations of Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech with a maximum of 603.0 cells/mL were firstly recorded in this area known for high rates of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) contamination. Temperatures and salinities were within the suitable values for the growth of phytoplankton, and were important in phytoplankton seasonal fluctuations. The operation of the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (DNPS) exerts influences on the phytoplankton community and resulted in the high abundances of toxic dinoflagellate species during the winter months. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved silicate (DSi) were sufficient, and rarely limited for the growth of phytoplankton. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) was the most necessary element for phytoplankton growth. The enriched environments accelerated the growth of small diatoms, and made for the shift in predominant species from large diatom Rhizosolenia spp. to chain-forming diatoms such as Skeletonema costatum, Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and Thalassiosira subtilis.

  12. Fluctuations of Phytoplankton Community in the Coastal Waters of Caspian Sea in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Bagheri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Caspian Sea ecosystem has been suffered with many problems since 1980s. Aanthropogenic pollution from heavy metals, hydrocarbons, pesticides, changes in the quantity of nutrient inputs by rivers, are significant threats to biodiversity and biological resources such as plankton structure in the Caspian Sea. According to the significant of phytoplankton community in marine system. The state of the fluctuations of phytoplankton communities of the southwestern Caspian Sea was investigated and compared with the findings of before 2006. Approach: Phytoplankton abundance and species composition of the Caspian Sea were evaluated by using samples collected at 12 stations along three transects. Samplings were conducted seasonal in 2006 at 5, 10, 20 and 50 m depth were fixed for each transect in the southwestern Caspian Sea. Results: A total of 39 species phytoplankton species were distinguished during 2006, the annual phytoplankton abundance were calculated as 57, 300±15,550 cells.l-1, which ranged from 89, 250±35, 062 cells.l-1 in September to 16, 200±6,664 cells.l-1 in February. The diatoms formed more than half of the total abundance (61% while cyanophytes were the second important group in view of contribution to total phytoplankton (26% in 2006. The study showed that diatoms Thalassionema nitzschioides, Cyclotella meneghiniana and cyanophyte Osillatoria sp. numerically dominated in this area. Conclusion: The study revealed that diatoms were higher than other groups of phytoplankton in 2006. The hydrology variation, increased fresh water inflow via rivers and a rise in nutrients concentrations have played important roles in blooming of phytoplankton species, e.g., the diatoms in this study, which is also known from other marines. Similar studies on determination of the effects of environmental degradation on phytoplankton and hydrological processes should be taken into account in near future.

  13. Ecological relationships between phytoplankton communities at different spatial scales in European reservoirs: implications at catchment level monitoring programmes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabecinha, E.; Brink, van den P.J.; Cabral, J.A.; Cortes, R.

    2009-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities are structured by factors acting over temporal and spatial scales. Identifying which factors are driving spatial patterns in aquatic communities is the central aim of ecology. In this study, data sets of phytoplankton communities and environmental data of two Portuguese

  14. Ecological relationships between phytoplankton communities at different spatial scales in European reservoirs: implications at catchment level monitoring programmes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabecinha, E.; Brink, van den P.J.; Cabral, J.A.; Cortes, R.

    2009-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities are structured by factors acting over temporal and spatial scales. Identifying which factors are driving spatial patterns in aquatic communities is the central aim of ecology. In this study, data sets of phytoplankton communities and environmental data of two Portuguese res

  15. Phytoplankton Community of Elechi Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria-A Nutrient-Polluted Tropical Creek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Davies

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Elechi Creek of the Upper Bonny Estuary in the Niger Delta contributes to the Rivers State Fish resources. It is a sink receiving organic anthropogenic wastes from Diobu, Eagle Island and waterfront dwellers of Diobu areas. Fishing, car washing, bathing, swimming and other human activities are constantly going on within and around this creek. Based on these activities, there is urgent need to study the phytoplankton community that supports its fisheries. Approach: The study investigated the phytoplankton composition, diversity, abundance and distribution as well as surface water physico-chemical parameters. Phytoplankton and surface water samples were collected bi-monthly from October 2007-March 2008 at high tide from five stations according to APHA methods. These were analyzed for temperature, transparency, dissolved oxygen, salinity, alkalinity, chloride and nutrients. Phytoplankton was identified microscopically. Species diversity was calculated using standard indices. Results: A total of 169 species of phytoplankton, based on cell counts, was dominated by diatoms, 33255 counts mL-1 (36% and blue-green algae, 32909 counts mL-1 (35.7% were identified. The abundance of phytoplankton decreased downstream of this creek (1>2>3>4 except in station 5 with the highest phytoplankton abundance (23938 counts mL-1. There was slight fluctuation in the measured physico-chemical parameters. The results of this study indicated the characteristic species and distribution of phytoplankton in Elechi Creek during the dry months. Conclusion/Recommendation: The high level of phosphate above the permissive limit showed that this creek is hypereutrophic and organic polluted. The high nutrients status favors the high abundance of phytoplankton. The municipal effluents (especially raw human and animal faces discharges must be discontinued. Detergents with low concentration of phosphate are recommended for manufacturing and use. Municipal wastes must

  16. Effects of iron stress on chromatic adaptation by natural phytoplankton communities in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwe, M.A.; Timmermans, K.R.; Witte, H.J.; Kraay, G.W.; Veldhuis, M.J.W.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of iron stress on chromatic adaptation were studied in natural phytoplankton communities collected in the Pacific region of the Southern Ocean. Iron enrichment experiments (48 to 72 h) were performed, incubating plankton communities under white, green and blue light respectively, with and wi

  17. Changes in Phytoplankton Community Structure in Western South China Sea Over the Past 450 Kyrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Wang, H.; Li, J.; Zhao, M.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular biomarkers (brassicasterol, dinosterol, alkenones, C30 1,15-diol/keto-ol and cholesterol) were measured in an IMAGES core MD05-2901 (14°22.50'N, 110°44.60'E, w.d. 1454 m), to reconstruct the phytoplankton community structure over the past 450 kyrs in the western South China Sea on the eastern slope off Vietnam. Our results showed that diatoms, which are most sensitive to nutrition supply, exhibited relatively high productivity in interglacial period and lower productivity in glacial period, possibly caused by summer monsoon-induced upwelling. Dinoflagellates exhibited simillar phenomena as diatoms. But, coccolithphorids did not show clear glacial/intergalcial patterns and had a gradual increasing trend from 450 kyrs to 200 kyrs followed by a gradual decreasing trend until the present. Eustigmatophytes exhibited higher contents in glacial than interglacial periods and almost the same variations with terrestrial n- alkanes. Relationships among the major biomarker groups indicated complex responses of different phytoplanktons to changes in paleoclimate and paleoenvironment in the past 450 kyrs in western South China Sea.

  18. Relationship between N : P : Si ratio and phytoplankton community composition in a tropical estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Choudhury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims at understanding the importance of Brzezinski–Redfield ratio (modified Redfield ratio as a determinant of natural phytoplankton community composition in a mangrove ecosystem. Even though this ecoregion has been reported to be mostly eutrophic, localised and anthropogenic influences often result in habitat variability especially with regard to nutrient concentrations at different parts of this ecosystem. Phytoplankton, an important sentinel in aquatic ecosystems may respond differently to such alterations in habitat thereby bringing about significant changes in the community composition. Results show that even though habitat variability does exist at our study area and varied on a spatial and temporal scale, the nutrient concentrations were intricately balanced that never became limited and complemented well with the concept of modified Redfield ratio. However, an integrative approach to study phytoplankton community involving microscopy and rbcL clone library and sequencing approach revealed that it was the functional traits of individual phytoplankton taxa that determined the phytoplankton community composition rather than the nutrient concentrations of the study area. Hence we conclude that the recent concept of functional traits and elemental stoichiometry does not remain restricted to controlled environment of experimental studies only but occur in natural mangrove habitat.

  19. Relationship between N : P : Si ratio and phytoplankton community composition in a tropical estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, A. K.; Bhadury, P.

    2015-02-01

    The present work aims at understanding the importance of Brzezinski-Redfield ratio (modified Redfield ratio) as a determinant of natural phytoplankton community composition in a mangrove ecosystem. Even though this ecoregion has been reported to be mostly eutrophic, localised and anthropogenic influences often result in habitat variability especially with regard to nutrient concentrations at different parts of this ecosystem. Phytoplankton, an important sentinel in aquatic ecosystems may respond differently to such alterations in habitat thereby bringing about significant changes in the community composition. Results show that even though habitat variability does exist at our study area and varied on a spatial and temporal scale, the nutrient concentrations were intricately balanced that never became limited and complemented well with the concept of modified Redfield ratio. However, an integrative approach to study phytoplankton community involving microscopy and rbcL clone library and sequencing approach revealed that it was the functional traits of individual phytoplankton taxa that determined the phytoplankton community composition rather than the nutrient concentrations of the study area. Hence we conclude that the recent concept of functional traits and elemental stoichiometry does not remain restricted to controlled environment of experimental studies only but occur in natural mangrove habitat.

  20. Nutrient limitation in Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM: phytoplankton communities and photosynthesis respond to nutrient pulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available Although the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system exports large amounts of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, nutrient limitation of primary productivity still occurs offshore, acting as one of the major factors controlling local phytoplankton biomass and community structure. Bioassays were conducted for 48 hrs at two stations adjacent to the river plumes in April and August 2012. High Performance of Liquid Chromatography (HPLC combined with ChemTax and a Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation (FIRe system were combined to observe changes in the phytoplankton community structure and photosynthetic activity. Major fluorescence parameters (Fo, Fv/Fm performed well to reveal the stimulating effect of the treatments with nitrogen (N-nitrate and with nitrogen plus phosphate (+NPi. HPLC/ChemTax results showed that phytoplankton community structure shifted with nitrate addition: we observed an increase in the proportion of diatoms and prasinophytes and a decrease in cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes. These findings are consistent with predictions from trait-based analysis which predict that phytoplankton groups with high maximum growth rates (μmax and high nutrient uptake rates (Vmax readily take advantage of the addition of limiting nutrients. Changes in phytoplankton community structure, if persistent, could trigger changes of particular organic matter fluxes and alter the micro-food web cycles and bottom oxygen consumption.

  1. Composition, abundance and ecology of phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake, Manipur, India

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    B.K. Sharma

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake (a Ramsar site, studied during November 2002-October 2004, reveal the occurrence of 75 and 71 species, indicate monthly richness ranging between 47� plus or minus 6 and 49� plus or minus 3 species and record 50.0-83.2 and 64.5-84.0 % community similarities during two annual cycles respectively. Chlorophyta (33� plus or minus 5 and 35� plus or minus 5 species show qualitative dominance and importance of Closterium > Cosmarium > Staurastrum > Micrasterias > Gonatozygon species. Phytoplankton (206� plus or minus 58 and 220� plus or minus 53 n/l comprise between 45.1� plus or minus 6.5 and 42.9� plus or minus 5.8 % of net plankton abundance, indicate trimodal annual patterns and record peak abundance during winter. Chlorophyta (111� plus or minus 20 and 119� plus or minus 15 n/l, the dominant quantitative component, indicate winter peaks; Closterium > Staurastrum > Gonatozygon > Micrasterias species contribute significantly to their abundance. Ceratium hirudinella (43� plus or minus 52 and 39� plus or minus 37 n/l is the sole important individual species of phytoplankton. Dinophyta > Bacillariophyta are sub-dominant groups and Euglenophyta > Cyanophyta > Chrysophyta show very low densities. Phytoplankton communities are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance. Abiotic factors register limited influence on richness and abundance of phytoplankton and on abundance of constituent groups. Multiple regression indicates relatively lower influence of fifteen abiotic factors on richness of phytoplankton and higher cumulative influence on abundance of phytoplankton, Chlorophyta, Dinophyta and Bacillariophyta.

  2. Effects of nutrients and zooplankton on the phytoplankton community structure in Marudu Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kar Soon; Ransangan, Julian

    2017-07-01

    Current study was carried out to provide a better understanding on spatial and temporal variations in the phytoplankton community structure in Marudu Bay, an important nursery ground for fishery resources within the Tun Mustapha Marine Park and Coral Triangle Initiative, and their relationship with environmental variables. Samplings were conducted monthly from April 2014 to April 2015 in Marudu Bay, Malaysia. Water samples were collected for nutrients analysis, zooplankton and phytoplankton counting. Moreover, the in situ environmental parameters were also examined. The field study showed a total of forty seven phytoplankton genera, representative of 33 families were identified. The nutrient concentrations in Marudu Bay was low (mesotrophic) throughout the year, where the phytoplankton community was often dominated by Chaetoceros spp. and Bacteriastrum spp. In general, increase in nitrate concentration triggered the bloom of centric diatom, Chaetoceros spp. and Bacteriastrum spp. in Marudu Bay. However, the bloom of these phytoplankton taxa did not occur in the presence of high ammonia concentration. In addition, high abundance of zooplankton also a limiting factor of the phytoplankton blooms particularly at end of southwest monsoon. High silica concentration promoted the growth of pennate diatoms, Proboscia spp. and Thallassionema spp., but the depletion of silica quickly terminated the bloom. Interestingly, our study showed that Chaetoceros spp., tolerated silica depletion condition, but the average cell size of this taxon reduced significantly. In summary, the phytoplankton community structure in mesotrophic environment is more sensitive to the changes in zooplankton abundance, nutrient concentration and its ratio than that in nutrient rich environments. This study also recommends that bivalve farming at industrial scale is not recommended in Marudu Bay because it potentially depletes the primary productivity hence jeopardizing the availability of live food for

  3. Morphofunctional changes of phytoplankton community during pluvial anomaly in a tropical reservoir

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    FRA Câmara

    Full Text Available AbstractThe present study focuses on the structure and function of phytoplankton community during periods of marked changes in hydrological traits, influenced by an atypical climatic event (La Niña and its impact on Armando Ribeiro Gonçalves Reservoir of Rio Grande do Norte, situated in the Caatinga biome of northeastern Brazil. The main questions addressed were: What are the effects of environmental factors on the temporal variation of Morphologically Based Functional Group (MBFG of phytoplankton community? How does the composition of cyanobacterial species shift in relation to high and low trends of phytoplankton diversity? The samples were collected monthly during 2008-2009 and analyzed for pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen content and the nutrients, such as, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, total nitrogen and orthophosphate. Phytoplankton samples were collected for both qualitative and quantitative analyses to evaluate species richness index and species diversity index. The data was divided into two distinct hydrodynamic periods of instability and stability. The results demonstrate considerable changes in dissolved oxygen content, water transparency and nitrogen nutrients, which directly influenced the MBFG of phytoplankton community in space and time. The instability of reservoir water was caused by heavy rainfall, which exerts atypical external disturbances. The seasonal variation of MBFG demonstrates a change in cyanobacterial composition and their diversity during instability and stability periods. MBFG VII, composed by colonial cyanobacteria with mucilage, was associated with reduced values of electrical conductance and alterations in pH. The predominance of filamentous species with heterocyst (MBFG III occurs only during the hydrodynamic stability period and did not show significant association with analyzed parameters. The co-dominance of MBGFs III, V and VII along with high species diversity of

  4. Morphofunctional changes of phytoplankton community during pluvial anomaly in a tropical reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, F R A; Rocha, O; Pessoa, E K R; Chellappa, S; Chellappa, N T

    2015-08-01

    The present study focuses on the structure and function of phytoplankton community during periods of marked changes in hydrological traits, influenced by an atypical climatic event (La Niña) and its impact on Armando Ribeiro Gonçalves Reservoir of Rio Grande do Norte, situated in the Caatinga biome of northeastern Brazil. The main questions addressed were: What are the effects of environmental factors on the temporal variation of Morphologically Based Functional Group (MBFG) of phytoplankton community? How does the composition of cyanobacterial species shift in relation to high and low trends of phytoplankton diversity? The samples were collected monthly during 2008-2009 and analyzed for pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen content and the nutrients, such as, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, total nitrogen and orthophosphate. Phytoplankton samples were collected for both qualitative and quantitative analyses to evaluate species richness index and species diversity index. The data was divided into two distinct hydrodynamic periods of instability and stability. The results demonstrate considerable changes in dissolved oxygen content, water transparency and nitrogen nutrients, which directly influenced the MBFG of phytoplankton community in space and time. The instability of reservoir water was caused by heavy rainfall, which exerts atypical external disturbances. The seasonal variation of MBFG demonstrates a change in cyanobacterial composition and their diversity during instability and stability periods. MBFG VII, composed by colonial cyanobacteria with mucilage, was associated with reduced values of electrical conductance and alterations in pH. The predominance of filamentous species with heterocyst (MBFG III) occurs only during the hydrodynamic stability period and did not show significant association with analyzed parameters. The co-dominance of MBGFs III, V and VII along with high species diversity of phytoplankton community

  5. Phytoplankton community dynamics in an intermittently open hypereutrophic coastal lagoon in southern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Susana; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Gamito, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    Phytoplankton community' dynamics were studied in Salgados coastal lagoon in order to evaluate the effects of excessive organic loads and also physical stress caused by the irregular opening of the lagoon. Salgados is a hypereutrophic intermittently open coastal lagoon, which received freshwater inputs from small rivers and from a wastewater treatment plant. Cyanophyceae dominated the phytoplankton communities most of the time; Bacillariophyceae became the main taxonomic group in winter when the lagoon was closed; Chlorophyceae was the major class in early summer; pico-nano flagellate algae accounted for a high percentage of total phytoplankton during spring. Potentially harmful taxa were observed during most of the sampling periods, forming blooms and accounting for a considerable percentage of total phytoplankton abundance. A strong differentiation among dry and wet seasons could be noticed. The dry season was dominated by Microsystis aeruginosa, Rhodomonas sp., pico-nano flagellate algae, Cyclotella spp. and Planktothrix sp., while the wet season, although still with the presence of Microsystis aeruginosa, was dominated by Dolichospermum spiroides. The best environmental variables explaining stations patterns and based on phytoplankton taxa were days of isolation, pH, and salinity. Temperature, cumulative rain and total phosphorus were also related with species and stations patterns. The high nutrient load in Salgados lagoon promoted the development and persistence of harmful algae blooms. Proper management of coastal lagoons involves not only the control of direct discharges of nutrients, but also of other factors, including water level and communication with the sea.

  6. Mesoscale and Sub-mesoscale Variability in Phytoplankton Community Composition in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, B.; Richardson, T. L.; Lomas, M. W.

    2016-02-01

    The Sargasso Sea is a highly dynamic physical environment in which strong seasonal variability combines with forcing by mesoscale ( 100 km) eddies. Over four cruises (2011 and 2012), we investigated links between water column structure, nutrient regimes, and phytoplankton community composition at a range of time and space scales in the Sargasso Sea. On all cruises, cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus) dominated the phytoplankton numerically and haptophytes were the dominant eukaryotes (up to 60% total chl-a). We demonstrated significant effects of mesoscale and inferred sub-mesoscale forcing on phytoplankton community composition. Downwelling (in anticyclones) was coincident with Prochlorococcus abundances 22-66% higher compared to outside stations. We observed a shift in the taxonomic composition of haptophytes between a coccolithophores dominated community in a cyclone in spring 2012 (C2) and a non-coccolithophore community at BATS. At the center of cyclone C1 (summer 2011), we observed significantly higher haptophyte chl-a (non-coccolithophores) and lower cyanobacteria chl-a biomass at the center and edge as compared to BATS. In summer 2012, downwelling associated with anticyclone AC2 occurred at the edge of the eddy and we found significantly lower Synechococcus abundances and higher eukaryote chl-a compared to the center of AC2 and BATS. These along-transect nuances demonstrate the significance of small-scale perturbations that significantly alter phytoplankton community structure. Therefore, while seasonality in the North Atlantic is the primary driver of broad-scale trends in phytoplankton community composition, the effect of transient events must be considered when studying planktonic food webs in the Sargasso Sea.

  7. Structure of the Phytoplankton Community and Its Relationship to Water Quality in Donghu Lake, Wuhan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Ping LEI; Zhang-Li HU; Jian WANG; Zhi-Xin SHI; Fung-Yee Nora TAM

    2005-01-01

    The phytoplankton community structure, in terms of species composition, total standing crop,and abundance of the dominant algal species, at four stations in Donghu Lake, Wuhan, China, was investigated monthly from January 1994 to December 1996. A total of 260 taxa was observed, of which Chlorophyta (106 taxa) contributed the highest portion of the total number of taxa, followed by Bacillariophyta (82 taxa)and Cyanophyta (32 taxa). The total standing crop measured by means of chlorophyll a content, cell density,and cell biovolume, as well as the abundance of the dominant species, declined in the order of Station I to Station Ⅳ. Seasonal changes of the standing crop varied greatly among the four stations. Although the cell density at the four stations showed a single peak within a year, the peak density varied from July to November, dependent on the sampling year and the station. For chlorophyll a content and cell biovolume,multiple peaks were observed at Stations Ⅰ and Ⅱ, but a single peak was found at Stations Ⅲ and Ⅳ. The phytoplankton community structure indicated that the trophic status was the highest at Station Ⅰ (most eutrophic), followed by Station Ⅱ; Stations Ⅲ and Ⅳ were the least trophic areas. The long-term changes in phytoplankton community structure further suggested that changes in phytoplankton community structure were correlated with water quality, and eutrophication of Donghu Lake had been aggravated since the 1950s.

  8. Phytoplankton community and environmental correlates in a coastal upwelling zone along western Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Jian-hua; Ye, You-yin; Lin, Geng-ming; Yang, Qing-liang; Lin, Mao

    2016-02-01

    Upwelling system in western Taiwan Strait is important for facilitating the fishery production. This study investigated hydro-chemical properties, phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton species composition, three-dimensional (horizontal, vertical and transect) distribution of phytoplankton abundance, as well as phytoplankton annual variation and the correlation of phytoplankton community with the upwelling of underlying current and nutrients according to samples of Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling zone in western Taiwan Strait from August 27 to September 8, 2009. The results manifest that the nutrient-rich cold and high salinity current on the continental shelf of South China Sea upwells to the Fujian-Guangdong coastal waters through Taiwan Bank and the surging strength to surface is weak while strong at 30-m layer. The thermohaline center of coastal upwelling shifts to the east of Dongshan Island and expanded to offshore waters in comparison with previous records. A total of 137 phytoplankton species belonging to 59 genera in 4 phyla are identified excluding the unidentified species. Diatom is the first major group and followed by dinoflagellate. Cyanobacteria mainly composed by three Trichodesmium species account for a certain proportions, while Chrysophyta are only found in offshore waters. The dominant species include Thalassionema nitzschioides, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Thalassionema frauenfeldii, Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima, Rhizosolenia styliformis, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Diplopsalis lenticula and Trichodesmium thiebautii. Phytoplankton community mainly consists of eurythermal and eurytopic species, followed by warm-water species, tropic high-salinity species and oceanic eurythermic species in order. Phytoplankton abundance ranges from 1.00 × 102 ind./L ~ 437.22 × 102 ind./L with an average of 47.36 × 102 ind./L. For vertical distribution, maximum abundance is found at 30 m-depth and the surface comes second. Besides, the abundance below 30 m

  9. Mesoscale and sub-mesoscale variability in phytoplankton community composition in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti-Rausch, Bridget E.; Lomas, Michael W.; Lachenmyer, Eric M.; Goldman, Emily A.; Bell, Douglas W.; Goldberg, Stacey R.; Richardson, Tammi L.

    2016-04-01

    The Sargasso Sea is a dynamic physical environment in which strong seasonal variability combines with forcing by mesoscale (~100 km) eddies. These drivers determine nutrient, light, and temperature regimes and, ultimately, the composition and productivity of the phytoplankton community. On four cruises (2011 and 2012; one eddy per cruise), we investigated links between water column structure and phytoplankton community composition in the Sargasso at a range of time and space scales. On all cruises, cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus) dominated the phytoplankton numerically, while haptophytes were the dominant eukaryotes (up to 60% of total chl-a). There were substantial effects of mesoscale and sub-mesoscale forcing on phytoplankton community composition in both spring and summer. Downwelling (in anticyclones) resulted in Prochlorococcus abundances that were 22-66% higher than at 'outside' stations. Upwelling (in cyclones) was associated with significantly higher abundances and POC biomass of nanoeukaryotes. In general, however, each eddy had its own unique characteristics. The center of anticyclone AC1 (spring 2011) had the lowest phytoplankton biomass (chl-a) of any eddy we studied and had lower nitrate+nitrite (N+N deep mixed layer, yet had relatively low nutrient concentrations. We observed a shift in the taxonomic composition of haptophytes between a coccolithophore-dominated community in C2 (98% of total haptophyte chl-a) and a non-coccolithophore community at BATS. In summer 2012, downwelling associated with anticyclone AC2 occurred at the edge of the eddy (not at the center), where AC2 interacted with a nearby cyclone. At the edge, we found significantly lower Synechococcus abundances and higher eukaryote chl-a compared to the center of AC2 and BATS. These along-transect nuances demonstrate the significance of small-scale perturbations that substantially alter phytoplankton community structure. Therefore, while seasonality in the North

  10. Maixi River estuary to the Baihua Reservoir in the Maotiao River catchment: phytoplankton community and environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiuhua; CHEN Lili; CHEN Fengfeng; GAO Tingjin; LI Xiaofeng; LIU Songping; LI Cunxiong

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton and environmental variables were measured monthly from July 2009 to August 2011 in the Maixi River from the estuary to Baihua Reservoir in the Maotiao River catchment,southwestern China,to understand phytoplankton community structure and environmental factors.The relationship between phytoplankton community structure and environmental factors including hydrological,meteorological,physical,and chemical variables were explored using multivariate analysis.A total of 81taxa of phytoplankton were identified,which were mainly composed of chlorophyta,bacillariophyta,and cyanobacteria.The phytoplankton community was dominated by Pseudanabaena limnetica during summer and fall and by Cyclotella meneghiniana during winter and spring.The abundance of phytoplankton ranged from 0.24×104 cells/L to 33.45×i06 cells/L,with the minimum occurring during February 2010 and the maximum during July 2009.The phytoplankton community was dominated mainly by cyanobacteria from April to September,and by bacillariophyta and pyrrophyta from October to March.Canonical correspondence analysis showed that temperature,pH values,and orthophosphate were the most important driving factors regulating the composition and dynamics of the phytoplankton community in the estuary.Cyanobacteria and euglenophyta abundance and biomass were affected mainly by temperature and pH values,while most chlorophyta and bacillariophyta were influenced by the concentrations of nutrients.

  11. Seasonal stages of phytoplankton community structure and sinking loss in the Gulf of Riga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olli, Kalle; Heiskanen, Anna-Stiina

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, we present the biomass, species composition and sinking losses of phytoplankton and heterotrophic flagellates obtained during three seasonal stages (May 1995; June-July 1994; August 1993) from the Gulf of Riga — a eutrophied, semi-enclosed area in the Baltic Sea. The Gulf was characterised by intensive dinoflagellate (mainly Peridiniella catenata) dominated spring bloom (2700-7600 μg l -1 wet weight) while the diatom Thalassiosira baltica contributed most (80-90%) to the settling phytoplankton biomass (up to 6.5 g m -2 day -1). The mineral nutrients were abundant during the bloom and it is suggested that the differential sedimentation of species was caused by physical factors (thermal stratification of the water column). The phytoplankton biomass in summer (780-2600 μg l -1) was dominated by high abundance of filamentous cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, autotrophic nanoflagellates and picoplankton. The primary vertical flux of phytoplankton (flos-aquae. Below the pycnocline, resuspended dormant diatom populations caused a significant (up to 1 g m -2 day -1) secondary flux. Large heterotrophic dinoflagellates ( Gyrodinium/Gymnodinium) were abundant (up to 500 μg l -1) in the middle layers and associated to ammonium regeneration. The early autumn stage was a post cyanobacterial bloom situation with relatively low phytoplankton abundance (330-860 μg l -1) dominated by A. flos-aquae and nanoflagellates. Also, the sedimentation of phytoplankton was lowest (up to 340 mg m -2 day -1). Our results indicate high seasonal differences in the phytoplankton community structure and sedimentation. However, the high within-season temporal variability overrules the variability between different areas of the southern part of the Gulf.

  12. Assessing Pigment-Based Phytoplankton Community Distributions in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Kheireddine, Malika

    2017-05-10

    Pigment-based phytoplankton community composition and primary production were investigated for the first time in the Red Sea in February-April 2015 to demonstrate how the strong south to north environmental gradients determine phytoplankton community structure in Red Sea offshore regions (along the central axis). Taxonomic pigments were used as size group markers of pico, nano-, and microphytoplankton. Phytoplankton primary production rates associated with the three phytoplankton groups (pico-, nano-, and microphytoplankton) were estimated using a bio-optical model. Pico- (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus sp.) and Nanophytoplankton (Prymnesiophytes and Pelagophytes) were the dominant size groups and contributed to 49 and 38%, respectively, of the phytoplankton biomass. Microphytoplankton (diatoms) contributed to 13% of the phytoplankton biomass within the productive layer (1.5 Zeu). Sub-basin and mesoscale structures (cyclonic eddy and mixing) were exceptions to this general trend. In the southern Red Sea, diatoms and picophytoplankton contributed to 27 and 31% of the phytoplankton biomass, respectively. This result induced higher primary production rates (430 ± 50 mgC m−2 d−1) in this region (opposed to CRS and NRS). The cyclonic eddy contained the highest microphytoplankton proportion (45% of TChla) and the lowest picophytoplankton contribution (17% of TChla) while adjacent areas were dominated by pico- and nano-phytoplankton. We estimated that the cyclonic eddy is an area of enhanced primary production, which is up to twice those of the central part of the basin. During the mixing of the water column in the extreme north of the basin, we observed the highest TChla integrated (40 mg m−2) and total primary production rate (640 mgC m−2 d−1) associated with the highest nanophytoplankton contribution (57% of TChla). Microphytoplankton were a major contributor to total primary production (54%) in the cyclonic eddy. The contribution of picophytoplankton

  13. Phytoplankton community of Lake Baskandi anua, Cachar District, Assam, North East India – An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity, relative abundance and dominance of phytoplankton community of the Lake Baskandi anua, an oxbow lake of Assam, North east India were studied during December 2009 to November 2010. Chlorophyll content and biomass of phytoplankton along with physico-chemical properties of water of the lake were also estimated. The lake is covered with Hydrilla and other macrophytes like Eichhornia, Trapa, Altrnenthera, Polygonum, Ludwizia sp., etc. Seasonal fluctuations of 41 genera of phytoplankton, belonging to 5 groups (Chlorophyceae, Cyanobacteria, Bacillariophyceae, Euglenophyceae and Dinophyceae were encountered in the lake. Chlorophyceae was found to be highest in winter, Cyanobacteria and Euglena in monsoon and Bacillariophyceae in pre monsoon. According to Engelmann’s scale, Spirogyra indica was found eudominant followed by 10 dominant, 24 subdominant and 20 recedent species. Chlorophyll- a content of phytoplankton varied from 14.18 to 33.89 μg·L-1, during the study period. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed significant seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties of water like Water temperature, pH, Conductivity, Dissolved oxygen, Free CO2, Total alkalinity, Calcium, Chloride, Nitrate and Ammonia. Relationship between phytoplankton group assemblage and environmental variables were explored by the ordination method CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis.

  14. Abundance, biomass and composition of spring ice algal and phytoplankton communities of the Laptev Sea (Arctic)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Abundance, biomass and composition of the ice algal and phytoplankton communities were investigated in the southeastern Laptev Sea in spring 1999.Diatoms dominated the algal communities and pennate diatoms dominated the diatom population. 12 dominant algal species occurred within sea ice and underlying water column, including Fragilariopsis oceanica, F. cylindrus, Nitzschia frigida , N. promare, Achnanthes taeniata , Nitzschia neofrigida , Navicula pelagica , N. vanhoef fenii, N. septentrionalis, Melosira arctica , Clindrotheca closterium and Pyramimonas sp. The algal abundance of bottom 10 cm sea ice varied between 14.6 and 1562.2 × 104 cells l-1 with an average of 639.0 × 104cells l-1 , and the algal biomass ranged from 7.89 to 2093.5 μg C l-1 with an average of 886.9 μg C l-1 , which were generally one order of magnitude higher than those of sub-bottom ice and two orders of magnitude higher than those of underlying surface water. The integrated algal abundance and biomass of lowermost 20 cm ice column were averagely 7.7 and 12.2 times as those of upper 20 m water column, respectively, suggesting that the ice algae might play an important role in maintaining the coastal marine ecosystem before the thawing of sea ice. Ice algae influenced the phytoplankton community of the underlying water column.However, the "seeding" of ice algae for phytoplankton bloom was negligible because of the low phytoplankton biomass within the underlying water column.

  15. Phytoplankton niches, traits and eco-evolutionary responses to global environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litchman, Elena; Edwards, Kyle F.; Klausmeier, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton are major primary producers in aquatic ecosystems and are sensitive to various aspects of global environmental change. They can respond through phenotypic plasticity, species sorting, genetic adaptation, or a combination of these processes. Here we present conceptual, experimental...... and theoretical ways to predict different phytoplankton responses to global change. Using phytoplankton ecological niches to predict their responses to multiple environmental stressors is a promising new approach. Functional traits of phytoplankton, such as resource utilization traits and tolerance curves...... for various environmental factors like temperature, can be used to define niches along major axes. Characterization of pairwise and higher dimension trade-offs among traits should help predict possible niche changes along multiple dimensions simultaneously. The potential for evolutionary responses to global...

  16. A 150-year record of phytoplankton community succession controlled by hydroclimatic variability in a tropical lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifa Yamoah, Kweku; Callac, Nolwenn; Fru, Ernest Chi; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Wiech, Alan; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Smittenberg, Rienk H.

    2016-07-01

    Climate and human-induced environmental change promote biological regime shifts between alternate stable states, with implications for ecosystem resilience, function, and services. While these effects have been shown for present-day ecosystems, the long-term response of microbial communities has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the decadal variations in phytoplankton communities in a ca. 150 year long sedimentary archive of Lake Nong Thale Prong (NTP), southern Thailand using a combination of bulk geochemical analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and lipid biomarkers techniques including compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis as a proxy for precipitation. Relatively drier and by inference warmer conditions from ca. 1857 to 1916 Common Era (CE) coincided with a dominance of the green algae Botryococcus braunii, indicating lower nutrient levels in the oxic lake surface waters, possibly related to lake water stratification. A change to higher silica (Si) input around 1916 CE was linked to increased rainfall and concurs with an abrupt takeover by diatom blooms lasting for 50 years. These were increasingly outcompeted by cyanobacteria from the 1970s onwards, most likely because of increased levels of anthropogenic phosphate and a reduction in rainfall. Our results showcase that the multi-proxy approach applied here provides an efficient way to track centennial-scale limnological, geochemical and microbial change, as influenced by hydroclimatic and anthropogenic forcing.

  17. Spectral fluorometric characterization of phytoplankton community composition using the Algae Online Analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tammi L; Lawrenz, Evelyn; Pinckney, James L; Guajardo, Rodney C; Walker, Elyse A; Paerl, Hans W; MacIntyre, Hugh L

    2010-04-01

    The utility of a multiple-fixed-wavelength spectral fluorometer, the Algae Online Analyser (AOA), as a means of quantifying phytoplankton biomass and community composition was tested using natural communities from two southeastern United States estuaries, North Inlet, South Carolina, and the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina. Estimates of biomass (as chlorophyll a) were correlated with HPLC values and variations (usually over-estimates) were consistent with effects of light intensity and nutrient availability on fluorescence quenching. AOA estimates of taxonomic structure were consistent with those from HPLC-derived marker pigments by ChemTax, with both methods indicating domination by chromophytes and green algae in North Inlet and chromophytes and cyanobacteria in the Neuse. We recommend frequent calibration by discrete sample collection, and calibration with species representative of the region of interest. Overall, the AOA appears to be a useful tool for monitoring of phytoplankton community composition, especially as an early warning system for the detection of harmful algal blooms.

  18. Phytoplankton community structure in reservoirs of different trophic status, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chengxue; YU Hongxian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the phytoplankton community structures of reservoirs of different trophic status,located in a cold region.Physical and chemical variables and the phytoplankton communities were investigated in two reservoirs (Xiquanyan Reservoir and Taoshan Reservoir) in Northeast China in 2009.The two reservoirs showed strong seasonal fluctuations in their physical and chemical composition.Results of the trophic status index indicated that Xiaquanyan Reservoir was mesotrophic,whilst Taoshan Reservoir was eutrophic.Diatoms were the dominant phytoplankton group in Xiquanyan Reservoir throughout all seasons of the study,while in Taoshan Reservoir,diatoms dominated in spring,and cyanobacteria dominated in summer and autumn.This difference was resulted from differences in local environmental factors,including nutrients and hydrology.This study suggests that in mesotrophic reservoirs,nutrients played a key role in controlling seasonal phytoplankton successions,whereas in eutrophic reservoirs water temperature was the key factor in a cold region.Notably,the dominant species in summer in the Taoshan Reservoir was Microcystis,which may produce toxins depending on the ambient conditions,and presenting a risk of local toxin contamination.

  19. Size-dependent photoacclimation of the phytoplankton community in temperate shelf waters (southern Bay of Biscay)

    KAUST Repository

    Álvarez, E

    2015-12-09

    © Inter-Research 2016. Shelf waters of the Cantabrian Sea (southern Bay of Biscay) are productive ecosystems with a marked seasonality. We present the results from 1 yr of monthly monitoring of the phytoplankton community together with an intensive sampling carried out in 2 contrasting scenarios during the summer and autumn in a mid-shelf area. Stratification was apparent on the shelf in summer, while the water column was comparatively well mixed in autumn. The size structure of the photoautotrophic community, from pico-to micro-phytoplankton, was tightly coupled with the meteo-climatic and hydrographical conditions. Over the short term, variations in the size structure and chlorophyll content of phytoplankton cells were related to changes in the physico-chemical environment, through changes in the availability of nutrients and light. Uncoupling between the dynamics of carbon biomass and chlorophyll resulted in chlorophyll to carbon ratios dependent on body size. The slope of the size dependence of chlorophyll content increased with increasing irradiance, reflecting different photoacclimation plasticity from pico-to micro-phytoplankton. The results have important implications for the productivity and the fate of biogenic carbon in this region, since the size dependence of photosynthetic rates is directly related to the size scaling of chlorophyll content.

  20. Temperature affects the size-structure of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    KAUST Repository

    López-Urrutia, Ángel

    2015-03-05

    The strong inverse correlation between resource availability and temperature in the ocean poses a challenge to determine the relative effect of these two variables on the size-structure of natural phytoplankton communities. Maranon et al (2012) compiled a dataset of concurrent temperature and resource level proxies that they claim disentangled the effect of temperature from that of resource supply. They concluded that the hypothesis that temperature per se plays a direct role in controlling phytoplankton size structure should be rejected. But our reanalysis of their data reaches a very different conclusion and suggests that they failed to separate the effects of temperature from the effects of resources. Although we obviously concur with Maranon et al (2012) in the long-known predominance of small phytoplankton cells under oligotrophic conditions, from our point of view this should not deter us from considering temperature as an important explanatory variable at a global scale since we show that, for the vast oligotrophic areas of the world\\'s oceans where chlorophyll concentrations are below <1 g L-1 temperature explains a high proportion of the variability in the size distribution of phytoplankton communities, a variability that can not be explained on the basis of the resource level proxies advocated by Maranon et al. (2012).

  1. Photophysiological and light absorption properties of phytoplankton communities in the river-dominated margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Lohrenz, Steven E.; Gundersen, Kjell

    2017-06-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in photophysiological properties of phytoplankton were examined in relationship to phytoplankton community composition in the river-dominated continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM). Observations made during five research cruises in the NGOM included phytoplankton photosynthetic and optical properties and associated environmental conditions and phytoplankton community structure. Distinct patterns of spatial and temporal variability in photophysiological parameters were found for waters dominated by different phytoplankton groups. Photophysiological properties for locations associated with dominance by a particular group of phytoplankton showed evidence of photoacclimation as reflected by differences in light absorption and pigment characteristics in relationship to different light environments. The maximum rate of photosynthesis normalized to chlorophyll (PmaxB) was significantly higher for communities dominated (>60% biomass) by cyanobacteria + prochlorophyte (cyano + prochl). The initial slope of the photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) curve normalized to chlorophyll (αB) was not clearly related to phytoplankton community structure and no significant differences were found in PmaxB and αB between different geographic regions. In contrast, maximum quantum yield of carbon fixation in photosynthesis (Φcmax) differed significantly between regions and was higher for diatom-dominated communities. Multiple linear regression models, specific for the different phytoplankton communities, using a combination of environmental and bio-optical proxies as predictor variables showed considerable promise for estimation of the photophysiological parameters on a regional scale. Such an approach may be utilized to develop size class-specific or phytoplankton group-specific primary productivity models for the NGOM.Plain Language SummaryThis study examined the relationships between phytoplankton community composition and associated

  2. pCO2 effects on species composition and growth of an estuarine phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grear, Jason S.; Rynearson, Tatiana A.; Montalbano, Amanda L.; Govenar, Breea; Menden-Deuer, Susanne

    2017-05-01

    The effects of ongoing changes in ocean carbonate chemistry on plankton ecology have important implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling. However, conflicting results have emerged regarding species-specific responses to pCO2 enrichment and thus community responses have been difficult to predict. To assess community level effects (e.g., production) of altered carbonate chemistry, studies are needed that capitalize on the benefits of controlled experiments but also retain features of intact ecosystems that may exacerbate or ameliorate the effects observed in single-species or single cohort experiments. We performed incubations of natural plankton communities from Narragansett Bay, RI, USA in winter at ambient bay temperatures (5-13 °C), light and nutrient concentrations. Three levels of controlled and constant CO2 concentrations were imposed, simulating past, present and future conditions at mean pCO2 levels of 224, 361, and 724 μatm respectively. Samples for carbonate analysis, chlorophyll a, plankton size-abundance, and plankton species composition were collected daily and phytoplankton growth rates in three different size fractions (20 μm) were measured at the end of the 7-day incubation period. Community composition changed during the incubation period with major increases in relative diatom abundance, which were similar across pCO2 treatments. At the end of the experiment, 24-hr growth responses to pCO2 levels varied as a function of cell size. The smallest size fraction (20 μm size fraction. Cell size distribution shifted toward smaller cells in both the Past and Future treatments but remained unchanged in the Present treatment. Similarity in Past and Future treatments for cell size distribution and growth rate (5-20 μm size fraction) illustrate non-monotonic effects of altered pCO2 on ecological indicators and may be related to opposing physiological effects of high CO2 and low pH both within and among species. Interaction of these effects

  3. Phytoplankton variability in Lake Fraijanes, Costa Rica, in response to local weather variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Umaña-Villalobos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton species show a variety in morphology which is the result of adaptations to pelagic life including responses to fluctuations in water column dynamics driven by weather conditions. This has been reported in the oceans and in Northern temperate lakes. In order to observe whether tropical freshwater phytoplankton responds to seasonal variation in weather, the weekly variation in temperature of the water column and phytoplankton composition was studied in Lake Fraijanes, Costa Rica, a shallow (6.2m lake at 1 640m above sea level. A chain of data loggers for temperature was placed in the deepest point in the lake to register temperature every hour at four different depths, and phytoplankton samples were retrieved every week for a year. Additional monthly samples for nutrients were taken at two depths. Notwithstanding its shallowness, the lake developed a thermal gradient which kept the water column stratified for several months during dry season. Whole lake overturns occurred during cold spells with intense precipitation. Phytoplankton changed throughout the year mainly through a shift in dominant taxa. From September to February the lake was frequently mixed by rain storms and windy weather. At this time, phytoplankton was dominated by Chlorococcal green algae. From March to June, the lake was stratified and warmer. Phytoplankton became dominated by Cyanobateria, mainly colonial Chroococcales. The rainy season started again in May 2009. During June and July the lake started to mix intermittently during rain events and phytoplankton showed a brief increase in the contribution of Chlorococcales. These changes fitted well to a general model of phytoplankton succession based on functional groups identified according to their morphology and adaptations.

  4. Using bio-optical parameters as a tool for detecting changes in the phytoplankton community (SW Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Priscila C.; Icely, John; Cristina, Sónia; Danchenko, Sergei; Angel DelValls, T.; Newton, Alice

    2015-12-01

    Upwelling events off the Southwest coast of Portugal can trigger phytoplankton blooms that are important for the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in this region. However, climate change scenarios forecast fluctuations in the intensity and frequency of upwelling events, thereby potentially impacting these sectors. Shifts in the phytoplankton community were analysed from the end of 2008 until the beginning of 2012 by examining the bio-optical properties of the water column, namely the absorption coefficients for phytoplankton, non-algal particles and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The phytoplankton community was assessed by microscopy, with counts from an inverted microscope, and by chemotaxonomic methodologies, using pigment concentrations determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Results both from microscopy and from chemotaxonomic methods showed a shift from diatom dominance related to bloom conditions matching upwelling events, to small flagellate dominance related to no-bloom conditions matching relaxation of upwelling. During bloom conditions, light absorption from phytoplankton increased markedly, while non-algal particles and CDOM absorption remained relatively constant. The dynamics of CDOM in the study area was attributed to coastal influences rather than from phytoplankton origin. Changes in phytoplankton biomass and consequent alterations in phytoplankton absorption coefficients were attributed to upwelling regimes in the area. Bio-optical parameters can contribute to environmental monitoring of coastal and oceanic waters, which in the case of the European Union, involves the implementation of the Water Framework, Marine Strategy Framework and Marine Spatial Planning Directives.

  5. Phytoplankton distribution and community structure in estuary and fishpond at Subang, Blanakan, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadea, E.; Takarina, N. D.; Wardhana, W.

    2017-07-01

    Phytoplankton plays an important role as primary producer and denotes the fertility of territorial waters. Samples were taken from a fishpond and estuary on August 27th, 2016 at Subang, West Java. The purpose of this research was to understand how the distribution and community structure of phytoplankton on fishpond and estuary differ. The result showed that phytoplankton found were composed by 6 classes: Cyanophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, Dinophyceae, and Xanthophyceae. Dinophyceae was found only in estuary, and Xanthophyceae was found only in the fishpond. Index of diversity (H') in the estuary was 2.41 and value of evenness (E) was 0.73. In fishpond, the value of H' was 1.63 and the value of E was 0.59, which shows no significance difference between the two locations. However, there was a difference between the number of Bacillariophyceae and Euglenophyceae found in both locations, and the difference between classes of phytoplankton found shows there might be some relations to the environmental parameters.

  6. Climate change impacts on net primary production (NPP) and export production (EP) regulated by increasing stratification and phytoplankton community structure in the CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weiwei; Randerson, James T.; Moore, J. Keith

    2016-09-01

    We examine climate change impacts on net primary production (NPP) and export production (sinking particulate flux; EP) with simulations from nine Earth system models (ESMs) performed in the framework of the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Global NPP and EP are reduced by the end of the century for the intense warming scenario of Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5. Relative to the 1990s, NPP in the 2090s is reduced by 2-16 % and EP by 7-18 %. The models with the largest increases in stratification (and largest relative declines in NPP and EP) also show the largest positive biases in stratification for the contemporary period, suggesting overestimation of climate change impacts on NPP and EP. All of the CMIP5 models show an increase in stratification in response to surface-ocean warming and freshening, which is accompanied by decreases in surface nutrients, NPP and EP. There is considerable variability across the models in the magnitudes of NPP, EP, surface nutrient concentrations and their perturbations by climate change. The negative response of NPP and EP to increasing stratification reflects primarily a bottom-up control, as upward nutrient flux declines at the global scale. Models with dynamic phytoplankton community structure show larger declines in EP than in NPP. This pattern is driven by phytoplankton community composition shifts, with reductions in productivity by large phytoplankton as smaller phytoplankton (which export less efficiently) are favored under the increasing nutrient stress. Thus, the projections of the NPP response to climate change are critically dependent on the simulated phytoplankton community structure, the efficiency of the biological pump and the resulting levels of regenerated production, which vary widely across the models. Community structure is represented simply in the CMIP5 models, and should be expanded to better capture the spatial patterns and climate-driven changes in export

  7. Phytoplankton community structure in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia) in relation to hydrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraberg, A. C.; Druzhkova, E.; Heim, B.; Loeder, M. J. G.; Wiltshire, K. H.

    2013-02-01

    The Lena Delta in Northern Siberia is one of the largest river deltas in the world. During peak discharge, after the ice melt in spring, it delivers between 60-8000 m3s-1 of water and sediment into the Arctic Ocean. The Lena Delta and the Laptev Sea coast also constitute a~continuous permafrost region. Ongoing climate change, which is particularly pronounced in the Arctic, is leading to increased rates of permafrost thaw. This is likely to profoundly change the discharge rates of the Lena River and the chemistry of the river waters which are discharged into the coastal Laptev Sea, e.g. by increasing concentrations of inorganic nutrients, DOC and importantly methane. These physical and chemical changes will also affect the composition of and interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton communities, forming the basis of the food web. However, before potential consequences of climate change for coastal arctic plankton communities can be judged, the inherent status of the diversity and linked foodweb interactions within the delta need to be established. As part of the AWI Lena Delta Programme in 2010 the phyto- and microzooplankton community in three river channels as well as four coastal transects were investigated to capture the typical river phytoplankton communities and the transitional zone of brackish/marine conditions. Most CTD profiles from 23 coastal stations showed very strong stratification. The only exception to this was a small a shallow and mixed area running from the outflow of Bykovskaya channel in a northerly direction parallel to the shore (transect 3). Of the five stations in this area three had a salinity of close to zero. Two further stations had salinities of around 2 and 5 throughout the water column. In the remaining transects on the other hand salinities varied between 5-30 with depth. Phytoplankton counts from the outflow from the Lena were dominated by diatoms (Aulacoseira species) cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon, Pseudanabaena) and

  8. Eutrophication influence on phytoplankton community composition in three bays on the eastern Adriatic coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Bužančić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the influence of eutrophication pressure on the phytoplankton community structure, abundance and biodiversity in the investigated bays with different hydromorphological features. Šibenik Bay is a highly stratified estuary of the karstic river Krka; Kaštela Bay is a semi-enclosed coastal bay, which is influenced by the relatively small river Jadro; and Mali Ston Bay is located at the Neretva River estuary, the largest river on the eastern part of the Adriatic Sea. All of the areas are affected by urban pressure, which is reflected in the trophic status of the waters. The greatest anthropogenic influence was found in Kaštela Bay while the lowest influence was found in Mali Ston Bay. In this study, the highest biomass concentration and maximum abundance of phytoplankton were recorded at the stations under the strongest anthropogenic influence. Those stations show a dominance of abundance compared to the biomass and a dominance of opportunistic species, which is reflected in the lower biodiversity of phytoplankton community. Diatoms were the most represented group of the phytoplankton community in all three bays, followed by the dinoflagellates. Diatoms that were highlighted as significant for the difference between the bays were Skeletonema marinoi in Šibenik Bay, Leptocylindrus minimus in Kaštela Bay and the genus Chaetoceros spp. in Mali Ston Bay. Dinoflagellates were more abundant at the stations under the strongest anthropogenic influence, and most significant were Prorocentrum triestinum in Kaštela Bay and Gymnodinium spp. in Šibenik Bay and Mali Ston Bay.

  9. Structure of the phytoplankton community in the Cachoeira Dourada reservoir (GO/MG), Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Oliveira, M; Rocha, O; Peret, A C

    2011-08-01

    The limnological features and the phytoplankton community of the Cachoeira Dourada reservoir were analyzed in December 2006, May 2007 and November 2007. Temporal changes in the taxonomic composition, density, diversity and dominance of species were analyzed in relation to climatic factors and the physical and chemical characteristics of the water. A positive correlation was found between some of the physical and chemical variables and the phytoplankton community. According to the CCA, variables such as the extent of the euphotic zone, temperature, pH, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations directly affected the phytoplankton dynamics. Organisms belonging to the class Cyanophyceae were the most representative in all the sampling periods, comprising the functional groups K, S1, M and H. Hydrodynamics and seasonal fluctuations of environmental factors were the driving forces determining the composition and abundance of the algal assemblages. Despite the prevalence of Cyanobacteria, the reservoir is still oligotrophic. The absence of blooms and the relatively low population abundances indicated that the quality of the reservoir's water still lies within the limits required for its multiples uses.

  10. Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community composition in the northern South China Sea during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hongchang; Ning, Xiuren; Tang, Xuexi; Hao, Qiang; Le, Fengfeng; Qiao, Jing

    2011-03-01

    Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community composition were investigated in the northern South China Sea using high-performance liquid chromatography and the CHEMTAX software from February 11 to 23, 2009. We recognized four different vertical distribution patterns of pigments: chlorophyll a (Chi a)-like type, divinyl chlorophyll a (DV Chi a) type, even distribution type, and surface type. The average value of ratios of accessory photo-protective pigments (APP) to accessory photo-synthetic pigments was 0.89±0.63 in the upper 50 m and 0.16±0.06 below 50 m depth. With increasing depth, APP decreased and photo-synthetically active radiation was attenuated. There was an obvious succession in the phytoplankton community from inshore to the open sea. Diatoms were dominant in the inshore region, while pelagophytes, Prochlorococcus, cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes were dominant in the open sea. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton also differed greatly from inshore to the open sea. In the coastal and shelf region, diatoms were important components in the whole water column. Cyanobacteria also had a high abundance at the Subsurface Chlorophyll a Maxima (SCM) in the shelf region. In the slope and open sea, Prochlorococcus and cyanobacteria were important groups above the SCM, while pelagophytes dominated below the SCM.

  11. Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community composition in the northern South China Sea during winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Hongchang; NING Xiuren; TANG Xuexi; HAO Qiang; LE Fengfeng; QIAO Jing

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community composition were investigated in the northern South China Sea using high-performance liquid chromatography and the CHEMTAX software from February 11 to 23, 2009. We recognized four different vertical distribution patterns of pigments: chlorophyll a (Chl a)-like type, divinyl chlorophyll a (DV Chl a) type, even distribution type, and surface type. The average value of ratios of accessory photo-protective pigments (APP) to accessory photo-synthetic pigments was 0.89±0.63 in the upper 50 m and 0.16±0.06 below 50 m depth. With increasing depth, APP decreased and photo-synthetically active radiation was attenuated. There was an obvious succession in the phytoplankton community from inshore to the open sea. Diatoms were dominant in the inshore region, while pelagophytes, Prochlorococcus,cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes were dominant in the open sea. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton also differed greatly from inshore to the open sea. In the coastal and shelf region,diatoms were important components in the whole water column. Cyanobacteria also had a high abundance at the Subsurface Chlorophyll a Maxima (SCM) in the shelf region. In the slope and open sea, Prochlorococcus and cyanobacteria were important groups above the SCM, while pelagophytes dominated below the SCM.

  12. Seasonal Variability in Phytoplankton Responses to Water Accommodated Petroleum Hydrocarbons in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, L. K.; Krause, J. W.; Thamatrakoln, K.

    2016-02-01

    Seasonality in the relative abundance of phytoplankton groups is primarily due to environmental variables such as light availability, nutrient availability and flux as well as shifts in higher trophic level abundance. This variation is amplified in shallow coastal waters, where the biology and physical characteristics are influenced by dynamic temporal variation in freshwater plume influx. The flooding of the Gulf of Mexico with organic matter from the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill in April 2010 highlighted the lack of regional baseline knowledge regarding phytoplankton succession and the effect of petrocarbon loading on different phytoplankton groups. To understand the effect of perturbations on seasonal succession, we are conducting monthly multi-day grow out experiments using water from the Alabama Coast, in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These assessments are conducted using treatments of water accommodated fraction of crude oil (WAF, MC252 Surrogate Crude Oil) and chemically enhanced WAF (CEWAF, Crude + Dasic International Slickgone NS®) relative to controls. We are examining changes in photophysiology, productivity, biomass accumulation and community composition. Preliminary results show significant photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence after one day of exposure to 10% WAF. In addition, significant divergences in chlorophyll concentration were observed among oil exposure treatments. These results imply strong sublethal effects for the aggregate phytoplankton community. Ongoing time-series results will be presented to examine whether similar sublethal effects are observed throughout the year and whether the magnitude of this variation is affected by the encountered community composition and hydrographic conditions. Given that phytoplankton mediate the transfer of carbon to higher trophic levels, understanding the effect of perturbations on seasonal relative phytoplankton abundance has implications for ecosystem resilience as a whole.

  13. Phytoplanktonic Community of Organically Polluted Tropical Reservoirs in Eastern India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANJIB; Kumar; Das; DIBYENDU; Biswas; SUDIPTO; Roy

    2007-01-01

    Plankton communities of three reservoirs of India reflect the direct relationship with organic pollution. The assessment of water quality as highly or lowly organically polluted for the three water bodies has been achieved with help of algal community, which can be used as an indicator of organic pollution. Algal pollution indices according to Palmer[1] and Watanabe[2]and based on genus and species were used in rating water samples for high or low organic pollution. Among 26 genera of algae found in India, 20 most frequent and common genera were taken into account for indexing pollution status. Water quality index (WQI) on the basis of weighting and rating of the chemical parameter was also used to correlate the Palmer index with physicochemical parameters of the three reservoirs. Fig 5, Tab 3, Ref 29

  14. Structure and composition of the phytoplanktonic community in TRanca Grande Lagoo (Junín, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mariano-Astocóndor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Tranca Grande lagoon is one of the systems where the truchiculture is realized, a productive activity which supports the lake since 1995. It is located in the Paramo floor or Tropical Montano in the Department of Junin, Province of Jauja to 4320 m of altitude (11º43’57?S and (75º13’18? W. The structure and composition of the superficial phytoplanktonic community was studied from monthly samples collected from January to December on 1996 in relation to 21 physical-chemical variables of water. The community showed 51 species belonging to Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta, Euglenophyta, Chrysophyta and Pyrrophyta. The highest average values of density were from Gloeocystis gigas and Ulothrix sp. On the rainy months, the rain fall had a considerable influence on the dilution and sedimentation of the macronutrients responsible for the conductivity, alkalinity, hardness, calcium and magnesium which decrease their values, and likewise the values of the diversity and density decrease. In the period of low-water mark, the characteristics mentioned about rainy period appear on the inverse way. The quantity of species and their density on the phytoplankton were found with the Multiple Regression Analysis. a Species = 7,32+10,59 (The clearness of water - 0,1614 (hardness of calcium + 4,90 (nitrates. b Density = -1,00 + 4397,18 (pH - 223,6 (total alkalinity - 1,4 (phosphates

  15. Silicate:nitrate ratios of upwelled waters control the phytoplankton community sustained by mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bibby

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical gyres physically perturb the water column and can introduce macronutrients to the euphotic zone, stimulating a biological response by which phytoplankton communities can become dominated by large phytoplankton. Mesoscale eddies are therefore important in driving export in oligotrophic regions of the modern ocean. The character and magnitude of the biological response sustained by eddies are, however, variable. Here we present data from mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea (Atlantic and the waters off Hawai'i (Pacific, alongside mesoscale events that affected the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS over the past decade. From this analysis, we suggest that the phytoplankton community structure sustained by mesoscale eddies is predetermined by the relative abundance of silicate over nitrate (Si* in the upwelled waters. We present data that demonstrate that mode-water eddies (MWE in the Sargasso Sea upwell locally formed waters with high Si* to the euphotic zone, and that cyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea introduce waters with low Si*, a signature that originated in the iron-limited Southern Ocean. We propose that this phenomenon can explain the observed abundance of large-diatom species in MWE and small prokaryotic phytoplankton in cyclonic features. In contrast to the Atlantic, cyclonic eddies in waters off Hawai'i induce North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW that has high Si* and therefore also appears capable of establishing diatom populations. These observations suggest that the structure of phytoplankton communities sustained by eddies may not be directly related to the physical nature of the eddy but rather to the chemical composition of the upwelled waters. This paper links the biological production and export efficiency of mesoscale eddies to events in spatially and temporally disparate locations.

  16. Phytoplankton can actively diversify their migration strategy in response to turbulent cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anupam; Carrara, Francesco; Stocker, Roman

    2017-03-01

    Marine phytoplankton inhabit a dynamic environment where turbulence, together with nutrient and light availability, shapes species fitness, succession and selection. Many species of phytoplankton are motile and undertake diel vertical migrations to gain access to nutrient-rich deeper layers at night and well-lit surface waters during the day. Disruption of this migratory strategy by turbulence is considered to be an important cause of the succession between motile and non-motile species when conditions turn turbulent. However, this classical view neglects the possibility that motile species may actively respond to turbulent cues to avoid layers of strong turbulence. Here we report that phytoplankton, including raphidophytes and dinoflagellates, can actively diversify their migratory strategy in response to hydrodynamic cues characteristic of overturning by Kolmogorov-scale eddies. Upon experiencing repeated overturning with timescales and statistics representative of ocean turbulence, an upward-swimming population rapidly (5-60 min) splits into two subpopulations, one swimming upward and one swimming downward. Quantitative morphological analysis of the harmful-algal-bloom-forming raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo together with a model of cell mechanics revealed that this behaviour was accompanied by a modulation of the cells’ fore-aft asymmetry. The minute magnitude of the required modulation, sufficient to invert the preferential swimming direction of the cells, highlights the advanced level of control that phytoplankton can exert on their migratory behaviour. Together with observations of enhanced cellular stress after overturning and the typically deleterious effects of strong turbulence on motile phytoplankton, these results point to an active adaptation of H. akashiwo to increase the chance of evading turbulent layers by diversifying the direction of migration within the population, in a manner suggestive of evolutionary bet-hedging. This migratory

  17. Seasonal changes in temperature and nutrient control of photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, P. A.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    1. To investigate the influence of elevated temperatures and nutrients on photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton assemblages, water was collected from a eutrophic lake in spring, summer, autumn, winter and the following spring and exposed to ambient temperature and ambient...... +2, +4 and +6 °C for 2 weeks with and without addition of extra inorganic nutrients. 2. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration and growth generally increased with temperature, but this effect was strongly enhanced by high nutrient availability, and therefore was most evident for nutrient amended....... 4. Although we found distinct responses to relatively small temperature increases, the interaction between nutrient availability, time of the year and, thus, ambient temperature was responsible for most of the observed variability in phytoplankton growth, photosynthesis and respiration. 5. Although...

  18. Development of a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy for analysis of the marine phytoplankton community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kang, Hye-Eun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang Heon; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy to analyze phytoplankton community structure using the Illumina MiSeq system. The amplicons (404-411 bp) obtained by end-pairing of two reads were sufficiently long to distinguish algal species and provided barcode data equivalent to those generated with the Roche 454 system, but at less than 1/20th of the cost. The original universal primer sequences targeting the 23S rDNA region and the PCR strategy were both modified, and this resulted in higher numbers of eukaryotic algal sequences by excluding non-photosynthetic proteobacterial sequences supporting effectiveness of this strategy. The novel strategy was used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure of six water samples from the East/Japan Sea: surface and 50 m depths at coastal and open-sea sites, with collections in May and July 2014. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified, which covered most of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal phyla, including Dinophyta, Rhodophyta, Ochrophyta, Chlorophyta, Streptophyta, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, and Cyanophyta. This highlights the importance of plastid 23S primers, which perform better than the currently used 16S primers for phytoplankton community surveys. The findings also revealed that more efforts should be made to update 23S rDNA sequences as well as those of 16S in the databases. Analysis of algal proportions in the six samples showed that community structure differed depending on location, depth and season. Across the six samples evaluated, the numbers of OTUs in each phylum were similar but their relative proportions varied. This novel strategy would allow laboratories to analyze large numbers of samples at reasonable expense, whereas this has not been possible to date due to cost and time. In addition, we expect that this strategy will generate a large amount of novel data that could potentially change established methods and tools that are currently used in the realms of

  19. Development of a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy for analysis of the marine phytoplankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Ho Yoon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy to analyze phytoplankton community structure using the Illumina MiSeq system. The amplicons (404–411 bp obtained by end-pairing of two reads were sufficiently long to distinguish algal species and provided barcode data equivalent to those generated with the Roche 454 system, but at less than 1/20th of the cost. The original universal primer sequences targeting the 23S rDNA region and the PCR strategy were both modified, and this resulted in higher numbers of eukaryotic algal sequences by excluding non-photosynthetic proteobacterial sequences supporting effectiveness of this strategy. The novel strategy was used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure of six water samples from the East/Japan Sea: surface and 50 m depths at coastal and open-sea sites, with collections in May and July 2014. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified, which covered most of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal phyla, including Dinophyta, Rhodophyta, Ochrophyta, Chlorophyta, Streptophyta, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, and Cyanophyta. This highlights the importance of plastid 23S primers, which perform better than the currently used 16S primers for phytoplankton community surveys. The findings also revealed that more efforts should be made to update 23S rDNA sequences as well as those of 16S in the databases. Analysis of algal proportions in the six samples showed that community structure differed depending on location, depth and season. Across the six samples evaluated, the numbers of OTUs in each phylum were similar but their relative proportions varied. This novel strategy would allow laboratories to analyze large numbers of samples at reasonable expense, whereas this has not been possible to date due to cost and time. In addition, we expect that this strategy will generate a large amount of novel data that could potentially change established methods and tools that are currently used in

  20. Response of phytoplankton and bacterial biomass during a wastewater effluent diversion into nearshore coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, David A.; Gellene, Alyssa G.; Smith, Jayme; Seubert, Erica L.; Campbell, Victoria; Sukhatme, Gaurav S.; Seegers, Bridget; Jones, Burton H.; Lie, Alle A. Y.; Terrado, Ramon; Howard, Meredith D. A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Hayashi, Kendra; Ryan, John; Birch, James; Demir-Hilton, Elif; Yamahara, Kevan; Scholin, Chris; Mengel, Michael; Robertson, George

    2017-02-01

    A 3-week diversion of the Orange County Sanitation District effluent discharge into nearshore waters off Newport Beach, CA constituted a considerable injection of secondarily-treated effluent into the coastal ecosystem. The location ≈1.6 km from shore, shallow water depth (≈16 m), volume and nutrient content of the discharge (≈5.3 × 108 L day-1 of effluent with inorganic nitrogen concentration >2 mM) during the diversion raised concerns regarding the potential for stimulating phytoplankton blooms and, in particular, blooms of toxic species. Remarkably, phytoplankton standing stocks during the event and shortly thereafter did not reach values associated even with minor blooms historically observed in the region (generally algae increased mid-diversion, and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus) increased near the end of the diversion. Concentrations of domoic acid (a phycotoxin commonly present in the area) remained near or below detection throughout the diversion, and abundances of potentially-harmful algal species were unresponsive. Bacterial biomass increased during the diversion, and equaled or exceeded total phytoplankton biomass in most samples. Abundances of microbial grazers were also elevated during the diversion. We speculate that nutrient uptake by the bacterial biomass, acting in concert with or a response to a negative effect of disinfection byproducts associated with chlorination on phytoplankton physiology, played a significant role in muting the response of the phytoplankton to nutrients released in the effluent.

  1. The community composition and production of phytoplankton in fish pens of Cape Bolinao, Pangasinan: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Leni G; Azanza, Rhodora V; Talaue-McManus, Liana

    2004-11-01

    From 1995 up to the present, fish pens proliferated in the municipal waters of Bolinao, northern Philippines. Since then, fish kills and phytoplankton blooms have been recurrent. Have fishpens altered the phytoplankton community composition and production of these waters? The phytoplankton community in Cape Bolinao, Lingayen Gulf is typical of a tropical coastal area where diatoms alternate with dinoflagellates during the dry and wet seasons. In the nutrient-rich fish pens, phytoplankton in this study showed a lower diatom/dinoflagellate ratio and unusually high phytoplankton counts of 10(4) cells/l and even as high as 10(5) cells/l. Correlations between physico-chemical parameters, phytoplankton production and community composition were made in 2001. This paper tried to explain the occurrence of a Cylindrotheca closterium bloom (10(5) cells/l), during the dry season of the same year and a Prorocentrum minimum bloom (4.7 x 10(5) cells/l), which accompanied a massive fish kill during January 2002.

  2. The community composition and production of phytoplankton in fish pens of Cape Bolinao, Pangasinan: a field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Leni G. [University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Tacloban College, Tacloban City, Leyte 6500 (Philippines)]. E-mail: leni@upmsi.ph; Azanza, Rhodora V. [Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)]. E-mail: rhod@upmsi.ph; Talaue-McManus, Liana [Division of Marine Affairs, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States)]. E-mail: lmcmanus@rsmas.miami.edu

    2004-11-01

    From 1995 up to the present, fish pens proliferated in the municipal waters of Bolinao, northern Philippines. Since then, fish kills and phytoplankton blooms have been recurrent. Have fishpens altered the phytoplankton community composition and production of these waters? The phytoplankton community in Cape Bolinao, Lingayen Gulf is typical of a tropical coastal area where diatoms alternate with dinoflagellates during the dry and wet seasons. In the nutrient-rich fish pens, phytoplankton in this study showed a lower diatom/dinoflagellate ratio and unusually high phytoplankton counts of 10{sup 4} cells/l and even as high as 10{sup 5} cells/l. Correlations between physico-chemical parameters, phytoplankton production and community composition were made in 2001. This paper tried to explain the occurrence of a Cylindrotheca closterium bloom (10{sup 5} cells/l), during the dry season of the same year and a Prorocentrum minimum bloom (4.7 x 10{sup 5} cells/l), which accompanied a massive fish kill during January 2002.

  3. Phytoplankton biomass and pigment responses to Fe amendments in the Pine Island and Amundsen polynyas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew M.; Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Thuróczy, Charles-Edouard; van Dijken, Gert L.; Laan, Patrick; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2012-09-01

    Nutrient addition experiments were performed during the austral summer in the Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean) to investigate the availability of organically bound iron (Fe) to the phytoplankton communities, as well as assess their response to Fe amendment. Changes in autotrophic biomass, pigment concentration, maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, and nutrient concentration were recorded in response to the addition of dissolved free Fe (DFe) and Fe bound to different model ligands. Analysis of pigment concentrations indicated that the autotrophic community was dominated by the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis antarctica throughout most of the Amundsen Sea, although diatoms dominated in two experiments conducted in the marginal ice zone. Few significant differences in bulk community biomass (particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and chlorophyll a) were observed, relative to the controls, in treatments with Fe added alone or bound to the ligand phytic acid. In contrast, when Fe was bound to the ligand desferrioxamine B (DFB), decreases in the bulk biomass indices were observed. The concentration of the diatom accessory pigment fucoxanthin showed little response to Fe additions, while the concentration of the P. antarctica-specific pigment, 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin (19'-hex), decreased when Fe was added alone or bound to the model ligands. Lastly, differences in the nitrate:phosphate (NO3-:PO43-) utilization ratio were observed between the Fe-amended treatments, with Fe bound to DFB resulting in the lowest NO3-:PO43- uptake ratios (˜10) and the remaining Fe treatments having higher NO3-:PO43- uptake ratios (˜17). The data are discussed with respect to glacial inputs of Fe in the Amundsen Sea and the bioavailability of Fe. We suggest that the previously observed high NO3-:PO43- utilization ratio of P. antarctica is a consequence of its production of dissolved organic matter that acts as ligands and increases the bioavailability of Fe, thereby stimulating the

  4. Photophysiological state of natural phytoplankton communities in the South China Sea and Sulu Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Cheah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, an increasing number of studies on phytoplankton in the tropical South China Sea (SCS and Sulu Sea (SS have been conducted. However, still little is known about the photophysiological state of natural phytoplankton communities under varying environmental conditions. This study investigates the photophysiological state of natural phytoplankton communities in the southern SCS and SS based on high horizontal and vertical resolution field observations collected during the SHIVA (Stratosphere ozone: Halogens in a Varying Atmosphere cruise (SO 218 in November 2011 on board RV Sonne. At the surface, pigment results revealed that total chlorophyll a (TChl a concentrations at all offshore stations were low at the surface and were generally dominated by cyanobacteria. Enhanced concentrations of TChl a were only observed below the upper mixed layer and above the euphotic depth with haptophytes, prochlorophytes and prasinophytes contributing most of the biomass. At stations close to the coast and river outflows, surface phytoplankton blooms (between 1 to 2.2 mg m−3 dominated by diatoms were observed. Overall, the study region exhibited strong nitrate + nitrite (NOx, −1, and phosphate (PO4, −1 depletion from surface down to about 50–60 m. Silicate (Si exhibited similar trends with the exception of some near shore stations in which high Si concentrations (> 2 μmol L−1 were observed in conjunction with increased TChl a and diatoms concentrations. Surface NOx concentrations were observed to correlate positively with temperature (τ = 0.22, p n = 108, whereas negative correlations were reported between surface NOx (τ = −0.27, p n = 108, Si (τ = −0.68, p n = 108 and salinity indicating that the enhancement in nutrients at the surface was probably supplied through fresher and warmer river waters near the coast. In contrast, the opposite was observed between temperature, salinity and all nutrients in the water column suggesting

  5. The effects of spring-neap tide on the phytoplankton community development in the Jiaozhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dongyan; SUN Jun; LIU Zhe; CHEN Hongtao; WEI Hao; ZHANG Jing

    2004-01-01

    The development of the phytoplankton community was studied in the Jiaozhou Bay during the spring to neap tide in August 2001, through three cruises and a 15 d continuous observation. This investigation indicates that diatom cell abundance increased sharply following the end of a spring tide, from 9 cells/cm3 to a peak of 94 cells/cm3. The dominant species composition and abundance show a quick species sequence from spring to neap tide, and the dominant species at the start phase is Skeletomena costatum, then changes to Chaetoceros curvisetus, finally it changes to Eucampia zodiacus. Silicate concentration increases during spring tide, as a result of nutrient replenishment from the water-sediment interface, its initial average concentration in neap tide is 1.39 μmol/dm3 and reached the peak average concentration of 8.40 μmol/dm3 in spring tide. But the nitrogen concentration dropped due to dilution by the low nitrogen seawater from the Huanghai Sea, its initial average concentration in neap tide is 67 μmol/dm3 and decreased to the average concentration of 54 μmol/dm3 in spring tide. The degree of silicon limitation was decreased and phytoplankton, especially diatoms, responds immediately after nutrient replenishment in the water column. Skeletonmea costatum, as one of the dominant species in the Jiaozhou Bay, shows a quicker response to nutrient availability than Eucampia zodiacus and Chaetoceros curvisetus. It is proposed that dominant species composition and water column stability synchronously determine the development of phytoplankton summer blooms in the Jiaozhou bay.

  6. Long Term Effect of Cyprinid Fishes on Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Communities in a Shallow Water Protection Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mátyás, Kálmán; Korponai, János; Tátrai, István; Paulovits, Gábor

    2004-01-01

    The effects of fish kill and different fish stocks on the phytoplankton and zooplankton dynamics were studied in a shallow hypertrophic reservoir system. When fish stock was below 100 kg ha-1, nutrient availability was not the main limiting factor for growth of phytoplankton. Consequently top-down forces controlled phytoplankton. In the years with high fish stock (>100 kg ha-1) the bottom-up forces dominated as nutrient availability was the main limiting factor for growth of phytoplankton. We can conclude that significant water quality improvement can be achieved in the reservoir system by decreasing fish stock below 100 kg ha-1. Although clear-water phase could be stabilised temporary by macrophytes, stabilisation of good water quality requires continuous regulation of fish community. (

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community structure in the North Water Polynya, investigated using pigment biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidussi, F.; Roy, S.; Lovejoy, C.

    2004-01-01

    . Autotrophic flagellates dominated in April and May along the Canadian coast, where cold Arctic waters with relatively deep mixed layers were found. In contrast, diatoms dominated in May along the Greenland coast in warmer water masses of Atlantic origin and during June in the whole polynya, except......Phytoplankton taxonomic pigments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) during a 3-month survey (April-June 1998) in the North Water (NOW) Polynya (Canadian Arctic) to investigate changes in phytoplankton biomass and composition and the physical-chemical factors....... The contribution of the different phytoplankton groups to Chl a inferred using a factorization program (CHEMTAX) indicated that the bloom was diatom-dominated (maximum 94% diatoms). The phytoplankton community structure was influenced by the water mass characteristics and the surface circulation pattern...

  8. Spatiotemporal variations in phytoplankton biomass and community structure in a meridional transect of the East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, J. H.; Kang, C. K.; Kang, H.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the variations in phytoplankton biomass and community composition associated with water-column structure and environmental conditions in the East/Japan Sea (EJS), three cruses were carried out along a meridional transect in May 2007 (spring), July 2009 (summer), and October 2012 (fall). The subpolar front (SPF) was formed between warm and cold water mass (37-40 °N). Chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition were studied using HPLC pigment and CHEMTAX analysis and the results showed no significant differences between warm and cold water masses. These results reject our initial hypothesis that different water masses between southern and northern parts of the EJS may lead to different phytoplankton community structure. During the study periods, isotherm layers (≤ 12 °C) fluctuated over 50 m depth between warm and cold water masses on the basis of the SPF. In contrast, the nitracline (i.e. 2.5 μM nitrate isopleths) depth was recorded within the limited depths ranged 20-40 m, 30-50 m, and 40-60 m in spring, summer, and fall, respectively. The chlorophyll a concentrations at the subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCM) in spring and summer (356 ± 233 and 270 ± 182 ng L-1, respectively) were significantly higher than those in fall (117 ± 89 ng L-1). The relative contributions of phytoplankton groups to total chlorophyll a concentration reflected phytoplankton community composition in the SCM layer with showing a dominance of diatoms (58 ± 19, 48 ± 11, and 30 ± 20 % in spring, summer, and fall, respectively). High contribution of diatoms to total biomass may enhance the efficiency of biological pump in the EJS. In addition, canonical correspondence analysis revealed a clear distribution of phytoplankton groups associated with temperature and nutrient concentration which mean prevalence of vertical variation. Finally, our findings suggested that phytoplankton biomass and groups are regulated by surface mixed layer depth

  9. Phytoplankton community structure in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia in relation to hydrography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Kraberg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Lena Delta in Northern Siberia is one of the largest river deltas in the world. During peak discharge, after the ice melt in spring, it delivers between 60–8000 m3s−1 of water and sediment into the Arctic Ocean. The Lena Delta and the Laptev Sea coast also constitute a~continuous permafrost region. Ongoing climate change, which is particularly pronounced in the Arctic, is leading to increased rates of permafrost thaw. This is likely to profoundly change the discharge rates of the Lena River and the chemistry of the river waters which are discharged into the coastal Laptev Sea, e.g. by increasing concentrations of inorganic nutrients, DOC and importantly methane. These physical and chemical changes will also affect the composition of and interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton communities, forming the basis of the food web. However, before potential consequences of climate change for coastal arctic plankton communities can be judged, the inherent status of the diversity and linked foodweb interactions within the delta need to be established. As part of the AWI Lena Delta Programme in 2010 the phyto- and microzooplankton community in three river channels as well as four coastal transects were investigated to capture the typical river phytoplankton communities and the transitional zone of brackish/marine conditions. Most CTD profiles from 23 coastal stations showed very strong stratification. The only exception to this was a small a shallow and mixed area running from the outflow of Bykovskaya channel in a northerly direction parallel to the shore (transect 3. Of the five stations in this area three had a salinity of close to zero. Two further stations had salinities of around 2 and 5 throughout the water column. In the remaining transects on the other hand salinities varied between 5–30 with depth. Phytoplankton counts from the outflow from the Lena were dominated by diatoms (Aulacoseira species

  10. Phytoplankton community indicators of changes associated with dredging in the Tagus estuary (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa

    2014-08-01

    This work reports changes in suspended particulate matter, turbidity, dissolved Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Hg and Pb concentrations, and phytoplankton biomass and composition during a 5-month period dredging operation, in a trace element contaminated area of the Tagus estuary (Portugal). Phytoplankton biomass, diatom:other groups ratio, benthic:pelagic diatom ratio, Margalef's, Simpson's diversity, Shannon-Wiever's, and Warwick and Clarke's taxonomic diversity and distinctness indices, and individual taxa were investigated as indicators of dredging induced changes. Significant rise in sediment resuspension and trace element mobilisation caused by dredging influenced the community structure but not the overall biomass. Benthic diatom displacement into the water column maintained species diversity, and therefore, none of the indices highlighted community changes. Contrastingly, diatom:other groups ratio and benthic:pelagic diatom ratio were reliable indicators for the assessment of dredging induced changes. A shift in composition towards species less susceptible to trace elements was observed, disclosing some individual taxa as potential indicators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the relationship between environmental factors of the sea around Xiaoheishan Island in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Tang, Xuexi; Tang, Haitian; Song, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Qixiang

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the relationship between environmental factors of the sea area around Xiaoheishan Island are investigated in the present study. Xiaoheishan Island is located at 37°58'14″N and 120°38'46″E in Shandong Province, China. A total of 65 species of phytoplankton belonging to three phyla and 27 genera were identified, with Bacillariophyta having the largest number of species. The annual average chlorophyll a concentration for this area was 3.11 μg/L, and there occurs a Skeletonema costatum bloom in winter. The Shannon-Weaver indexes (log2) of the phytoplankton from all stations were higher than 1, and the Pielou indexes were all higher than 0.3. The results of the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that water temperature, PO 4 3- and Cu were the environmental factors that had the greatest influence on the distribution of the phytoplankton community throughout the entire year. Although the concentration of heavy metal is well up to the state standards of the first grade of China (GB 3097-1997), these metals still have an impact on the phytoplankton community from this area.

  12. Distribution of phytoplankton community in relation to environmental parameters in cage culture area of Sepanggar Bay, Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Madihah Jaffar; Rashed-Un-Nabi, Md.; Azharul Hoque, Md.

    2008-11-01

    This paper covers spatial and temporal variation in phytoplankton communities and physico-chemical water properties in the cage culture area of Sepanggar Bay, Sabah, Malaysia based on field measurement conducted during July 2005 to January 2006 to study the spatial and temporal variation in phytoplankton communities and physico-chemical water properties of the bay. Phytoplankton samples and water parameters data were collected from five different stations located inside the bay during Southwest, Interseasonal and Northeast monsoons. Forty phytoplankton genera, representatives of 23 families, were found in the study area with a mean abundance of 1.55 ± 1.19 × 10 6 cells L -1. Most of these genera belong to diatoms (82.17%), Dinoflagellates (17.55%) and cyanobacteria (0.29%). Three genera were found to be dominant (>10%) in phytoplankton abundance and these were Coscinodiscus spp. (36.38%), Chaetoceros spp (17.65%) and Bacteriastrum spp. (10.98%). The most dominant genus was Coscinodiscus spp. which showed high abundance during all monsoons and stations (except Station 3). Among the seven environmental parameters tested in this study, water temperature, pH and suspended sediment concentration were found to be significantly different between monsoons. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between stations for the studied physico-chemical parameters. A clear differences in phytoplankton densities were observed between monsoons and stations with higher mean abundances during interseasonal monsoon (2.40 ± 1.37 × 10 6 cells L -1) and at station five (2.05 ± 0.74 × 10 6 cells L -1), respectively. Conversely, the diversity indices, both Shannon-Wiener (H) and Pielou (J), showed no significant difference throughout stations and monsoons (except (H) for monsoons). Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) results demonstrated temporal differences in phytoplankton community structure with highly diverse phytoplankton assemblage. Through cluster analysis five

  13. The role of deep convection on the dynamics of the North Atlantic phytoplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, Christian

    In recent years observations of a significant winter phytoplankton stock and blooms in the absence of stratification have challenged the classical picture of phytoplankton dynamics in the North Atlantic. To explain phytoplankton winter survival, it has been suggested that deep convection can...... convective motion as such. Due to the coupling of deep convection and phytoplankton winter survival in the north Atlantic this can lead to an underestimation of winter phytoplankton biomass. As a first step to improve the winter phytoplankton representation, a simple parameterization assuming average mixed...

  14. Effect of Chemical and Physical Properties of River Water in Shatt Al-Hilla on Phytoplankton Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikrat M. Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the chemical and physical properties in the ecological system of Shatt Al-Hilla in Babylon Governorate in Iraq and its effect on phytoplankton population. In this context, several limnological parameters were evaluated during the period from December 2003 through November 2004 from four sampling stations sited along Shatt Al-Hilla. The physical parameters included: temperature, turbidity and electrical conductivity. The chemical parameters included: pH, alkalinity dissolved oxygen, total hardness and the concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. A total of 154 species were recorded. Ninety-seven species of the total belong to Bacillariophyceae, 37 species belong to Chlorophyceae, 13 species to Cyanophyceae, 5 species to Chrysophyceae, and 2 species to Euglenophyceae. Bimodal variation of phytoplankton was observed. Five genus of phytoplankton were the highest number of species ( Nitzschia, Navicula, Gomphonema, Cymbella and Scendesmus. Some species was occurred continuously during study period such as, Cyclotella ocellata, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Aulacoseria distans, and Gomphonema abbreviatum. The phytoplankton communities at all sampling sites showed a clear seasonal variation in phytoplankton cell number. However, no significant correlation between total cell number of phytoplankton and nutrient concentration was observed. The study was revealed the city sewage discharge, agriculture and urban run-off were affecting the water quality of Shatt Al-Hilla.

  15. Response of a phytoplanktonic assemblage to copper and zinc enrichment in microcosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Lalit K; Han, T; Gaur, J P

    2015-04-01

    The response of a laboratory-raised phytoplankton assemblage to copper and zinc enrichment was studied. Higher intracellular accumulation of both the test metals caused disappearance of metal sensitive species, loss of diversity and species richness, reduced growth rate, Chl a and biovolume; however, the community could recover after 14 days of incubation. Cyanobacteria showed marked sensitivity to both the test metals besides some diatoms, such as, Cyclotella meneghiniana and Melosira granulata. Metal enrichment enhanced the relative abundance of species like Scenedesmus quadricauda, Oocystis borgei, Achnanthes exigua, Fragilaria capucina and Nitzschia amphibia, and these were apparently metal tolerant. Cu and Zn stress induces formation of lipid bodies (bigger in size as well as in number) and morphological abnormalities in diatoms. Among these two metals, Cu impact was higher than Zn despite the fact that the intracellular accumulation of Zn was higher than Cu. Deformed raphe and mixed deformities in diatoms were exclusively found under heavy metal stress which was well supported by regression analysis. Finally the present study gives new insight for using diatoms as an effective tool for biomonitoring and biofuel production.

  16. Phytoplankton and bacterial community structures and their interaction during red-tide phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mona Mohamed; Ibrahim, Hassan Abd Allah

    2017-07-01

    Phytoplankton and bacteria diversity were studied before, during and after red tide phenomena during spring season 2015 in the Eastern Harbour (E.H.) of Alexandria, Egypt. Fifty five species of phytoplankton were identified and represented different distinct classes "Bacillariophyceae; Dinophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae and Eugelenophyceae". Also, Diatom formed the most dominant group. The average number of the phytoplankton density varied from 4.8 × 104 to 1.1 × 106 cell l-1 during the study period and Skeletonema costatum was the agent causing the red tide. The existence percentages of bacteria ranged from 2.6 to 17.9% on all media tested. The bacterial isolates on the nutrient agar medium represented the highest existence with a total percentage of 43.6%, followed by MSA medium (25.7%), while the lowest percentage was for the AA medium at 7.8%. However, twelve isolates were selected as representative for bacterial community during study interval. Based on the morphological, biochemical, physiological and enzymatic characteristics, the bacterial strains were described. Depending on the 16S rDNA gene sequence, three common antagonists were aligned as: Vibrio toranzoniae strain Vb 10.8, Ruegeria pelagia strain NBRC 102038 and Psychrobacter adeliensis strain DSM 15333. The interaction between these bacteria and S. costatum was studied. The growth of S. costatum was significantly lower whenever each bacterium was present as compared to axenic culture. More specifically, 30% (v/v) of the all tested bacteria showed the strongest algicidal activities, as all S. costatum cells were killed after two days. 10% of R. pelagia and P. adeliensis also showed significant algicidal activities within six days.

  17. Phytoplankton Community Dynamics in West Lake After Drawing Water from the Qiantang River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏印心; 李瑾; 虞左明

    2004-01-01

    Seventeen phytoplankton dominant species of 218 taxa were found to have contributed to more than 80% of the biomass after analysis of the January, 1955 to December, 1996 phytoplankton population at five stations in West Lake after Qiantang River water had been drawn into the lake for a decade. The seasonal fluctuations were obvious; the maximum cell density of 90.91×107-93.58×107 cells/L and biomass of 57.41-58.61 mg/L occurred mainly in summer of 1996,largely as a result of the development of Lyngbya contorta, Merismopedia tenuissima, Oscillatoria limnetica, Spirulina laxissima and Scenedesmus quadricauda, etc. at Stations 2 and 4. At Station 1 located near the inlet for drawing water from the Qiantang River, the species number, cell density, biomass, chlorophyll a concentration and physico-chemical parameters (except for total nitrogen) were obviously greater than those at the other four stations, also greater than the corresponding parameters before the drawing of water from the Qiantang River into the lake.Compared with the results of study on the phytoplankton community in 1980 before the drawing of Qiantang River into the lake, the species number and the total individual density were increased, the dominant species changed somewhat, the biomass was decreased. The water quality was improved (especially at Station 1) after the drawing of river water into the lake.Based on criteria for evaluating trophic status, the biological and chemical indicators such as species composition and dominant species, and other parameters such as annual mean value cell densities (36.06×107-51.27×107 cells/L), biomass (29.03-39.74 mg/L), chl a concentrations (41.29-67.67μg/L), total nitrigen (1.72-2.89 mg/L), total phosphorus (0.12-0.16 mg/L) obtained at Stations 2, 3, 4 and 5, showed that West Lake is still at eutrophic lake.

  18. Structure and dynamics of the phytoplankton community within a maturation pond in a semiarid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Pastich

    Full Text Available Abstract In northeastern Brazil, stabilization ponds are very suitable for wastewater treatment because of the relative great land availability and environmental conditions (e.g., high temperature favorable for microorganism optimal development. However, blooms of potentially toxic cyanobacteria may affect the use of these treatment ponds due to resulting effluent poor quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and the occurrence of cyanobacteria in a maturation pond located immediately after a series of two ponds. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, BOD, N, and P were measured during a period of four months when samples were collected from the surface and the bottom of 7 sampling points distributed inside the pond. The phytoplankton of collected samples was also identified and classified using a conventional optical microscopy. Analysis of variance and Tukey test were used to evaluate the results. The three phytoplankton divisions found (Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta did not change considerably through surface and bottom. However, they changed greatly over the sampled months; great dominance of Cyanophyta was found at April and October, while Chlorophyta dominated the lagoon in September. Low superficial organic loads (between 78 and 109 kg BOD.ha–1.d–1 and N:P ≤ 10 were the determinant factors that favored the predominance of Cyanophyta. The presence of two potentially toxic species of Cyanophyta, Oscillatoria sp. and Microcystis aeruginosa, indicates that caution is required when considering the final destination of treated effluent and suggests a need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the use of the treatment technology.

  19. Phytoplankton community characteristics in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea Phytoplankton community characteristics in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINU P; SHAJU S S; MUHAMED ASHRAF P; MEENAKUMARI B

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing applications are important in the fisheries sector and efforts were on to improve the predic-tions of potential fishing zones using ocean color. The present study was aimed to investigate the phyto-plankton dynamics and their absorption properties in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea in different seasons during the year 2010 to 2011. The region exhibited 73 genera of phytoplankton from 19 orders and 41 families. The numerical abundance of phytoplankton varied from 14.235×103 to 55.075×106 cells/L. Centric diatoms dominated in the region and the largest family identified was Thalassiosiraceae with main genera asSkeletonemaspp.,Planktionellaspp.andThalassiosiraspp. Annual variations in abun-dance of phytoplankton showed a typical one-peak cycle, with the highest recorded during premonsoon season and the lowest during monsoon season. The species diversity index of phytoplankton exhibited low diversity during monsoon season. Phytoplankton with pigments Chlorophylla, Chlorophyllb, Chlorophyll c, peridinin, diadinoxanthin, fucoxanthin,β-carotene and phycoerythrobilin dominated in these waters. The knowledge on phytoplankton dynamics in coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea forms a key parameter in bio-optical models of pigments and productivity and for the interpretation of remotely sensed ocean color data.

  20. Global response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton in a coupled climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patara, Lavinia [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR), Kiel (Germany); Vichi, Marcello; Masina, Simona [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Fogli, Pier Giuseppe [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Manzini, Elisa [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The global climate response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton is investigated by performing multi-century simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-biogeochemistry model. The absorption of solar radiation by phytoplankton increases radiative heating in the near-surface ocean and raises sea surface temperature (SST) by overall {approx}0.5 C. The resulting increase in evaporation enhances specific atmospheric humidity by 2-5%, thereby increasing the Earth's greenhouse effect and the atmospheric temperatures. The Hadley Cell exhibits a weakening and poleward expansion, therefore reducing cloudiness at subtropical-middle latitudes and increasing it at tropical latitudes except near the Equator. Higher SST at polar latitudes reduces sea ice cover and albedo, thereby increasing the high-latitude ocean absorption of solar radiation. Changes in the atmospheric baroclinicity cause a poleward intensification of mid-latitude westerly winds in both hemispheres. As a result, the North Atlantic Ocean meridional overturning circulation extends more northward, and the equatorward Ekman transport is enhanced in the Southern Ocean. The combination of local and dynamical processes decreases upper-ocean heat content in the Tropics and in the subpolar Southern Ocean, and increases it at middle latitudes. This study highlights the relevance of coupled ocean-atmosphere processes in the global climate response to phytoplankton solar absorption. Given that simulated impacts of phytoplankton on physical climate are within the range of natural climate variability, this study suggests the importance of phytoplankton as an internal constituent of the Earth's climate and its potential role in participating in its long-term climate adjustments. (orig.)

  1. Responses of phytoplankton to experimental fertilization with ammonium and phosphate in an African soda lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, John M; Kilham, Peter; Fisher, Thomas R

    1982-01-01

    Phytoplankton abundance in tropical lakes is more often judged to be limited by nitrogen than phosphorus, but seldom does the evidence include controlled enrichments of natural populations. In January 1980 we performed the first experimental fertilization in an equatorial African soda lake, Lake Sonachi, a small, meromictic volcanic crater lake in Kenya. During our study the natural phytoplankton abundance was ca. 80 μg chl a/l, and the euphotic zone PO4 and NH4 concentrations were less than 0.5 μM. In the monimolimnion PO4 reached 180 μM and NH4 reached 4,600 μM. Replicate polyethylene cylinders (5 m long, 1.2 m(3)) were enriched to attain 10 μM PO4 and 100 μM NH4. Phytoplankton responses were measured as chlorophyll, cell counts and particulate N, P and C. After two days, the chlorophyll increase in the P treatment was significantly higher than the control (PLake Sonachi sample was 21 and in samples from Lakes Bogoria and Elmenteita, two shallow soda lakes in Kenya, the ratios were 12 and 70 respectively. We conclude that limitation of phytoplankton abundance by phosphorus can occur even in some tropical African soda lakes.

  2. The influence of key environmental variables on phytoplankton community structure in the estuary of tidal rivers around Luoyuan Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenbin; Zheng, Peng; Liang, Yunyan; Cai, Yuanbin

    2017-10-01

    A total of 348 species belonging to 8 phyla and 125 genera were observed in seasonally sampled phytoplankton of tidal rivers from 13 sampling sites around Luoyuan Bay, and all field samplings were carried out in productive period (March/June/August/ December) at ebb tide. Bacillariophyta species were the most abundant species, followed by Chlorophyta, Cyanophytes, Euglenophyta, Cryptophyta, Dinophyta, Xanthophyta and Chrysophytas. Seasonal distribution index (SDI) value ranged from 0.63 to 0.86, which meant that species found at those sites in 4 seasons tended to be largely different. Phytoplankton individuals ranged from 5.939×104 ind L-1 in winter to 75.31×104 ind L-1 in autumn. Phytoplankton biomass ranged from 0.620 mg L-1 in summer to 2.373 mg L-1 in autumn. The grey correlation analysis (GCA) showed that the nutrient variables played an important role in the influence on phytoplankton community in every season. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed impact of environmental variables on the different species, most of Bacillariophyta species were negative correlation with nutrients (TP and NH3-N) in the four seasons, Chlorophyta species and Cyanophyta species did not show obvious correlation with environment variables in every season. The combination of GRA analysis and CCA analysis provided a method to quantitatively reveal the correlation between phytoplankton community and environmental variables in water body of tidal rivers at this region.

  3. Physical-biological coupling in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica: Influence of physical factors on phytoplankton community structure and biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngju; Yang, Eun Jin; Park, Jisoo; Jung, Jinyoung; Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-11-01

    To understand the spatial distribution of phytoplankton communities in various habitats in the Amundsen Sea, western Antarctica, a field survey was conducted at 15 stations during the austral summer, from December 2013 to January 2014. Water samples were analyzed by microscopy. We found high phytoplankton abundance and biomass in the Amundsen Sea polynya (ASP). Their strong positive correlation with water temperature suggests that phytoplankton biomass accumulated in the surface layer of the stratified polynya. In the ASP, the predominant phytoplankton species was Phaeocystis antarctica, while diatoms formed a major group in the sea ice zone, especially Fragilariopsis spp., Chaetoceros spp., and Proboscia spp. Although this large diatom abundance sharply decreased just off the marginal sea ice zone, weakly silicified diatoms, due to their high buoyancy, were distributed at almost all stations on the continental shelf. Dictyocha speculum appeared to favor the area between the marginal sea ice zone and the ASP in contrast to cryptophytes and picophytoplankton, whose abundance was higher in the area between the continental shelf and the open ocean of Amundsen Sea. Several environmental factors were found to affect the spatial variation of phytoplankton species, but the community structure appeared to be controlled mainly by the seawater density related to sea-ice melting and water circulation in the Amundsen Sea.

  4. Spatial variability in phytoplankton community structure along the eastern Arabian Sea during the onset of south-west monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Kurian, Siby; Gauns, Mangesh; Chndrasekhararao, A. V.; Mulla, Amara; Naik, Bhagyashri; Naik, Hema; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Arabian Sea experiences moderate to weak upwelling along the south-west coast of India, which subsequently propagates towards the north. This causes variation in plankton community composition, which is addressed in the present study. Here we report the spatial variations in distribution of phytoplankton groups along the north-south transect in the eastern Arabian Sea based on marker pigments supported with flow-cytometric and microscopic analyses. 15 phytoplankton pigments were identified using High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the chemotaxonomic software (CHEMTAX) analysis associated these to seven major group of phytoplankton. The phytoplankton biomass, chlorophyll a (Chl a) was higher in southern stations with dominance of fucoxanthin whereas, divinyl chlorophyll a (divinyl Chl a), marker pigment of Prochlorococcus was present only in the northern region. Microscopic observation revealed the dominance of larger forms; diatoms (Chaetoceros coarctatum and Nitzschia sp.) and dinoflagellates (Scrippsiella sp., Oxytoxum nanum and Oxytoxum sp.) in the southern region. Furthermore, a study of plankton size distribution showed dominance of picoplankton (fpico) followed by nanoplankton (fnano) along the northern stations with comparatively higher microplankton (fmicro) in the south. This study clearly showed the influence of different environmental conditions on the phytoplankton community as reflected in dominance of diatoms in the southern (south of 12 °N) and that of picoplankton in the northern (north of 12 °N) region.

  5. Micro-phytoplankton community structure in the coastal upwelling zone off Concepción (central Chile): Annual and inter-annual fluctuations in a highly dynamic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabalón, V.; Morales, C. E.; González, H. E.; Menschel, E.; Schneider, W.; Hormazabal, S.; Valencia, L.; Escribano, R.

    2016-12-01

    An intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in recent decades has been detected in some of the main eastern boundary current systems, especially at higher latitudes, but the response of coastal phytoplankton communities in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) remains unknown. At higher latitudes in the HCS (35-40°S), strong seasonality in wind-driven upwelling during spring-summer coincides with an annual increase in coastal chlorophyll-a and primary production, and a dominance of micro-phytoplankton. In order to understand the effects of potential upwelling intensification on the micro-phytoplankton community in this region, annual and inter-annual variability in its structure (total and taxa-specific abundance and biomass) and its association with oceanographic fluctuations were analyzed using in situ time series data (2002-2009) from a shelf station off Concepcion (36.5°S). At the annual scale, total mean abundance and biomass, attributed to a few dominant diatom taxa, were at least one order of magnitude greater during spring-summer than autumn-winter, in association with changes in upwelling and surface salinity and temperature, whereas macro-nutrient concentrations remained relatively high all the year. At the inter-annual scale, total abundance and biomass decreased during the upwelling season of the 2006-2009 period compared with the 2002-2006 period, notably due to lower abundances of Skeletonema and Leptocylindrus, but the relative dominance of a few taxa was maintained. The 2006-2009 period was characterized by higher upwelling intensity, colder and higher salinity waters, and changes in nutrient concentrations and ratios compared with the first period. The inter-annual changes in the micro-phytoplankton community were mostly associated with changes in surface salinity and temperature (changes in upwelling intensity) but also with changes in Si/N and N/P, which relate to other land-derived processes.

  6. 北冰洋中心区表层海水营养盐及浮游植物群落对快速融冰的响应%RESPONSE OF NUTRIENTS AND THE SURFACE PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITY TO ICE MELTING IN THE CENTRAL ARCTIC OCEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄燕培; 金海燕; 陈建芳; 王斌; 李宏亮; 陈法锦; 卢勇; 徐杰

    2012-01-01

    During the fourth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition cruise in summer 2010, a time-series observation was carried out to examine the response of nutrients and phytoplankton community in the ice-water interface to the ice melting in the central Arctic Ocean. Phosphate and silicate in the ice-water interface were rich relative to dissolved inorganic nitrogen ( DIN) , based on the Redfield ratio (16N: IP: 16Si) , suggesting that DIN was the potential limiting nutrient. DIN concentrations in the sea ice were about 3-4 times that in the surface seawater, indicating that melting ice delivered DIN to the surface water. Pigment analysis showed that fucoxanthin and chlorophyll a contribute to carotenoids and chlorophylls in particles. The mean concentrations of chlorophyll c, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and fucoxanthin from 15 August to 18 August were 6 μg o m-3 , 22 μg · m-3 , 73 μg o m-3 and 922 μg o m-3, respectively, suggesting that diatoms dominated in the phytoplankton community composition. Furthermore , a notable enhancement in fucoxanthin and chlorophyll a during a large-scale ice melting was likely attributed to senescent diatoms released from the bottom sea-ice as well as phytoplankton diatoms growth in the water column due to the input of nutrients (i. e. DIN) and reducing light limitation from melting ice. Temporal distribution patterns of prasinoxanthin and lutein differed from fucoxanthin, indicating that the response of green algae and diatoms to ice melting were different.%依托2010年夏季中国第四次北极科学考察,通过对高纬度极地冰下水和冰芯的营养盐的连续观测及表层水颗粒物的藻类色素分析,获取了夏季快速融冰下冰水界面营养盐和光合色素的分布信息.结果表明调查期问表层水磷酸盐和硅酸盐相对于无机氮更丰富(依据Redfield比值),表现为显著的氮限制.而冰芯无机氮浓度相对更高,融冰释放对水体无机氮有一定的补充.色

  7. Linking phytoplankton community size composition with temperature, plankton food web structure and sea–air CO2 flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Data collected at open water stations (depth>400m) in all major ocean basins in 2006–2008 are used to examine the relationship between the size structure of the phytoplankton community (determined by size fractionated chlorophyll filtration), temperature and inorganic nutrient availability. A sig...

  8. Linking phytoplankton community size composition with temperature, plankton food web structure and sea–air CO2 flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Data collected at open water stations (depth>400m) in all major ocean basins in 2006–2008 are used to examine the relationship between the size structure of the phytoplankton community (determined by size fractionated chlorophyll filtration), temperature and inorganic nutrient availability. A sig...

  9. Reversal in the relationship between species richness and turnover in a phytoplankton community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Blake; Pomati, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Negative relationships between species richness and the rate of compositional turnover are common, suggesting that diverse communities have greater stability than depauperate ones; however, the mechanistic basis for this pattern is still widely debated. Species richness and turnover can covary either because they are mechanistically linked or because they share common environmental drivers. Few empirical studies have combined long-term changes in community composition with multiple drivers of environmental change, and so little is known about how the underlying mechanisms of species coexistence interact with changes in the mean and variability of environmental conditions. Here, we use a 33 year long time series (1976-2008) of phytoplankton community composition from Lake Zurich, to examine how environmental variation influences the relationship between richness and annual turnover. We find that the relationship between richness and annual turnover reverses midway through the time series (1992-1993), leading to a hump-shaped relationship between species richness and annual turnover. Using structural equation modeling we show that annual turnover and diversity are independently associated with different drivers of environmental change. Furthermore, we find that the observed annual sequences of community assembly give rise to rates of species accumulation that are more heterogeneous through time than expected by chance, likely owing to a high proportion of species showing significant autocorrelation and to strong positive covariation in the occurrences of species.

  10. Seasonal dynamics of crustacean zooplankton community structure in Erhai Lake, a plateau lake, with reference to phytoplankton and environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Deng, Daogui; Zhang, Sai; Hu, Cuilin

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal dynamics of a crustacean zooplankton community in Erhai Lake was investigated from May 2010 to April 2011. In total, 11 species were recorded, including six (6 genera) cladoceran and five (5 genera) copepod species. The crustacean zooplankton densities ranged from 24.3 to 155.4 ind./L. In winter and spring, the large-bodied cladoceran Daphnia galeata dominated the crustacean plankton community. In summer and autumn, when the colonial or filamentous algae dominated the phytoplankton communities, the small-bodied species (e.g. B osmina fatalis, Ceriodaphnia quadrangular, and Mesocyclops leuckarti) replaced the large-bodied ones. One-way ANOVA and redundancy analysis revealed that community structure was dependent upon total nitrogen, total phosphorus, water temperature, transparency, and the biomass of small algae. The variation in both phytoplankton structure and environmental variables were important factors in the seasonal succession of crustacean zooplankton structure in Erhai Lake.

  11. Summer aspect of phytoplankton communities in some Montenegrin lakes: Are there changes after more than two decades?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakočević Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative and quantitative phytoplankton compositions of 10 Montenegrin lakes were investigated in the summer of 2007. The obtained results were compared with a previous study-period that was undertaken two decades ago. In the first period, diatoms numerically dominated the phytoplankton community in all studied lakes, while in the second period, the same was observed only in three of the ten lakes; in other studied lakes the relative contributions of green algae, dinoflagellates and/or cyanobacteria increased, while the contribution of diatoms decreased. The shift observed in phytoplankton composition and diversity in some of the studied lakes indicates an increase in the trophic level over the two decades. The sustainable management plan of the aquatic ecosystems in Montenegro should include the establishment of an environmental monitoring system in order to record any alterations that may take place in water quality.

  12. Characteristics of Phytoplankton Community Structure During and After a Bloom of the Dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea by HPLC Pigment Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG Chun-kwan; WONG Chong-kim

    2009-01-01

    A bloom of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea was detected for the first time in inner Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong in 2000. Water samples were collected at eight stations along a transect passing through a red tide patch for microscopic analysis of phytoplankton composition and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of phytoplankton pigments. During the bloom, the density of dinoflagellates was 1.1×106 cells L-1 within the patch and 8.6×105 cells L-1 outside the patch where the phyto-plankton community was dominated by diatoms. After the bloom the S. trochoidea began to decrease in density and was replaced by diatoms as the dominating bloom-causing organisms at all stations, and the density of dinoflagellates at most stations was less than 1.0×106 cells L-1. The status of S. trochoidea as the causative species of the bloom was indicated by the presence of peridinin, the marker pigment for dinoflagellates. The shift from dinoflagellates to diatoms was marked by the decline of peridinin and the preva-lence of fucoxanthin. Phytoplankton pigment markers also revealed the presence of other minor phytoplankton assemblages such as cryptomonads and blue-green algal.

  13. Phytoplankton responses and associated carbon cycling during shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; Dumousseaud, C.; Poulton, A. J.; Suggett, D. J.; Tyrrell, T.; Zubkov, M. V.; Moore, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, are highly variable, which may reflect community/environment-specific responses or inconsistencies in experimental approach. To investigate the potential for identification of more generic responses and greater experimentally reproducibility, we devised and implemented a series (n = 8) of short-term (2-4 days) multi-level (≥4 conditions) carbonate chemistry/nutrient manipulation experiments on a range of natural microbial communities sampled in Northwest European shelf seas. Carbonate chemistry manipulations and resulting biological responses were found to be highly reproducible within individual experiments and to a lesser extent between geographically separated experiments. Statistically robust reproducible physiological responses of phytoplankton to increasing pCO2, characterised by a suppression of net growth for small-sized cells (ocean.

  14. Potential sources of variability in mesocosm experiments on the response of phytoplankton to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de Castro, Maria; Schartau, Markus; Wirtz, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Mesocosm experiments on phytoplankton dynamics under high CO2 concentrations mimic the response of marine primary producers to future ocean acidification. However, potential acidification effects can be hindered by the high standard deviation typically found in the replicates of the same CO2 treatment level. In experiments with multiple unresolved factors and a sub-optimal number of replicates, post-processing statistical inference tools might fail to detect an effect that is present. We propose that in such cases, data-based model analyses might be suitable tools to unearth potential responses to the treatment and identify the uncertainties that could produce the observed variability. As test cases, we used data from two independent mesocosm experiments. Both experiments showed high standard deviations and, according to statistical inference tools, biomass appeared insensitive to changing CO2 conditions. Conversely, our simulations showed earlier and more intense phytoplankton blooms in modeled replicates at high CO2 concentrations and suggested that uncertainties in average cell size, phytoplankton biomass losses, and initial nutrient concentration potentially outweigh acidification effects by triggering strong variability during the bloom phase. We also estimated the thresholds below which uncertainties do not escalate to high variability. This information might help in designing future mesocosm experiments and interpreting controversial results on the effect of acidification or other pressures on ecosystem functions.

  15. Food Quality and Phytoplankton Community Composition in San Francisco Bay using Imaging Spectroscopy Data from the California HyspIRI Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, S. L.; Peacock, M. B.; Golini, A. N.; Cloern, J. E.; Senn, D. B.; Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay (SFB) is the largest estuary on the west coast of the United States. It is an important transition zone between marine, freshwater, and inland terrestrial watersheds. The SFB is an important region for the cycling of nutrients and pollutants and it supports nurseries of ecologically and commercially important fisheries, including some threatened species. Phytoplankton community structure influences food web dynamics, and the taxonomy of the phytoplankton may be more important in determining primary "food quality" than environmental factors. As such, estimating food quality from phytoplankton community composition can be a robust tool to understand trophic transfer of energy. Recent work explores phytoplankton "food quality" in SFB through the use of microscopy and phytoplankton chemotaxonomy to evaluate how changes in phytoplankton composition may have influenced the recent trophic collapse of pelagic fishes in the northern part of the SFB. The objective of this study is to determine if the approach can also be applied to imaging spectroscopy data in order to quantify phytoplankton "food quality" from space. Imaging spectroscopy data of SFB from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) was collected during the Hyperspectral Infrared (HyspIRI) Airborne Campaign in California (2013 - 2015) and used in this study. Estimates of ocean chlorophyll and phytoplankton community structure were determined using standard ocean chlorophyll algorithms and the PHYtoplankton Detection with Optics (PHYDOTax) algorithms. These were validated using in situ observations of phytoplankton composition using microscopic cell counts and phytoplankton chemotaxonomy from the US Geological Survey's ship surveys of the SFB. The findings from this study may inform the use of future high spectral resolution satellite sensors with the spatial resolution appropriate for coastal systems (e.g., HyspIRI) to assess "food quality" from space.

  16. Parameter constraints of grazing response functions. Implications for phytoplankton bloom initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Solé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are events of production and accumulation of phytoplankton biomass that influence ecosystem dynamics and may also have effects on socio-economic activities. Among the biological factors that affect bloom dynamics, prey selection by zooplankton may play an important role. Here we consider the initial state of development of an algal bloom and analyse how a reduced grazing pressure can allow an algal species with a lower intrinsic growth rate than a competitor to become dominant. We use a simple model with two microalgal species and one zooplankton grazer to derive general relationships between phytoplankton growth and zooplankton grazing. These relationships are applied to two common grazing response functions in order to deduce the mathematical constraints that the parameters of these functions must obey to allow the dominance of the lower growth rate competitor. To assess the usefulness of the deduced relationships in a more general framework, the results are applied in the context of a multispecies ecosystem model (ERSEM.

  17. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Iwan Setiabudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of this study was to determine  the plankton communities and its relationship with the chemical and physical condition in seagrass ecosystem at Pegametan Bay. The composition and abundance of plankton were observed in the sea water underneath the surface and were identified based on the guideline of Illustration of the Marine Plankton of Japan. The water quality was measured in situ using WQC HI 9829. The water sample was measured using closed reflux spectrometry for COD, TOC analyzer for DOC and APHA 2102 (4500 method for Nt and Pt. There are 27 species of plankton identified, which can be classified into three groups. Diatom group consists of 18 species with a 74.56% abundance. The non-litoral group consists of 6 species with a 23.35% abundance. Moreover, dinoflagellate group consist of 3 species with a 2.09% abundance. An abundance of plankton greater than 104 cell.L-1 was found in diatome group (Nitzschia sp., Thalassiosira sp., Chaetoceros sp., Flagillaria sp., Thalassiothrix sp., and Melosira sp. and non-litoral group (Oscillatoria sp. and Spirogyra sp.. The abundance of those species indicated the algae bloom phenomenon. Dinophysis sp. was also identified, which was harmful algal blooms.How to CiteSetiabudi, G. I., Bengen, D. G., Effendi, H., & Radjasa, O. K. (2016. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 257-269.

  18. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Iwan Setiabudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of this study was to determine  the plankton communities and its relationship with the chemical and physical condition in seagrass ecosystem at Pegametan Bay. The composition and abundance of plankton were observed in the sea water underneath the surface and were identified based on the guideline of Illustration of the Marine Plankton of Japan. The water quality was measured in situ using WQC HI 9829. The water sample was measured using closed reflux spectrometry for COD, TOC analyzer for DOC and APHA 2102 (4500 method for Nt and Pt. There are 27 species of plankton identified, which can be classified into three groups. Diatom group consists of 18 species with a 74.56% abundance. The non-litoral group consists of 6 species with a 23.35% abundance. Moreover, dinoflagellate group consist of 3 species with a 2.09% abundance. An abundance of plankton greater than 104 cell.L-1 was found in diatome group (Nitzschia sp., Thalassiosira sp., Chaetoceros sp., Flagillaria sp., Thalassiothrix sp., and Melosira sp. and non-litoral group (Oscillatoria sp. and Spirogyra sp.. The abundance of those species indicated the algae bloom phenomenon. Dinophysis sp. was also identified, which was harmful algal blooms.How to CiteSetiabudi, G. I., Bengen, D. G., Effendi, H., & Radjasa, O. K. (2016. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 257-269.

  19. Effects of a surfacing effluent plume on a coastal phytoplankton community

    KAUST Repository

    Reifel, Kristen M.

    2013-06-01

    Urban runoff and effluent discharge from heavily populated coastal areas can negatively impact water quality, beneficial uses, and coastal ecosystems. The planned release of treated wastewater (i.e. effluent) from the City of Los Angeles Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, located in Playa del Rey, California, provided an opportunity to study the effects of an effluent discharge plume from its initial release until it could no longer be detected in the coastal ocean. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of phytoplankton community structure revealed distinct community groups based on salinity, temperature, and CDOM concentration. Three dinoflagellates (Lingulodinium polyedrum, Cochlodinium sp., Akashiwo sanguinea) were dominant (together >50% abundance) prior to the diversion. Cochlodinium sp. became dominant (65-90% abundance) within newly surfaced wastewater, and A. sanguinea became dominant or co-dominant as the effluent plume aged and mixed with ambient coastal water. Localized blooms of Cochlodinium sp. and A. sanguinea (chlorophyll a up to 100mgm-3 and densities between 100 and 2000cellsmL-1) occurred 4-7 days after the diversion within the effluent plume. Although both Cochlodinium sp. and A. sanguinea have been occasionally reported from California waters, blooms of these species have only recently been observed along the California coast. Our work supports the hypothesis that effluent and urban runoff discharge can stimulate certain dinoflagellate blooms. All three dinoflagellates have similar ecophysiological characteristics; however, small differences in morphology, nutrient preferences, and environmental requirements may explain the shift in dinoflagellate composition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Seasonal variations of group-specific phytoplankton cell death in Xiamen Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xin; Chen, Jixin; Xiao, Wupeng; Cao, Zhen; Huang, Bangqin

    2017-03-01

    The importance of phytoplankton cell death is being increasingly recognized, however, there are still no published reports on this in Xiamen Bay. In this study, the proportion of dead phytoplankton cells associated with environmental factors was assessed at a station in Xiamen Bay from December 2012 to December 2013, using a cell digestion assay, which is an effective method to analyze dead/ living cells in complex natural phytoplankton communities. The percentages of dead cells (% DC) in the total phytoplankton in summer (16%±6%) were lower than those in winter (27%±16%). Six groups of phytoplankton (G1-G6) were categorized by flow cytometry. These phytoplankton communities with diverse seasonal variations in % DC had different responses to environmental constraints. The main factors affecting mortality were temperature and salinity, while nutrient concentration showed little influence on phytoplankton death. Additionally, our results provide evidence that chlorophyll a concentrations had an inverse relationship with total phytoplankton % DC and viable cell abundance was more meaningful than total cells to explain variations in environmental parameters (such as Chl a). Moreover, the lowest mean % DC in total phytoplankton was 16%±6% at our sample site, which is in a subtropical area with high water temperatures, full solar radiation, and rich nutrients. This indicates that phytoplankton cell death is a process that cannot be ignored. In summary, phytoplankton cell death is important in understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and the functioning of subtropical ecosystems.

  1. Effect of land use on water quality and phytoplankton community in the tropical Khami River in semi-arid southwest Zimbabwe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dzinomwa, T; Ndagurwa, HGT

    2017-01-01

    The water quality and phytoplankton community assemblage of the Khami River, a tropical river sub catchment in semi-arid southwest Zimbabwe impacted by agriculture and urban land use, were examined in March 2015...

  2. Community response to noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takashi; Gjestland, Truls; Lee, Soogab

    2012-01-01

    Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI) and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI) were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  3. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  4. Carbon cycling and phytoplankton responses within highly-replicated shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European Shelf Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; Dumousseaud, C.; Poulton, A. J.; Suggett, D. J.; Tyrrell, T.; Zubkov, M. V.; Moore, C. M.

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, are highly variable, which in part likely reflects inconsistencies in experimental approach. To investigate the potential for identification of more generic responses and greater experimentally reproducibility, we devised and implemented a series of highly replicated (n = 8), short term (2-4 days) multi-level (≥ 4 conditions) carbonate chemistry/nutrient manipulation experiments on a range of natural microbial communities sampled in Northwest European shelf seas. Carbonate chemistry manipulations and resulting biological responses were found to be highly reproducible within individual experiments and to a lesser extent between geographically different experiments. Statistically robust reproducible physiological responses of phytoplankton to increasing pCO2, characterized by a suppression of net growth for small sized cells (ocean.

  5. Phytoplankton-Associated Bacterial Community Composition and Succession during Toxic Diatom Bloom and Non-Bloom Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Jiang, Sunny; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mehic, Sanjin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia blooms often occur in coastal and open ocean environments, sometimes leading to the production of the neurotoxin domoic acid that can cause severe negative impacts to higher trophic levels. Increasing evidence suggests a close relationship between phytoplankton bloom and bacterial assemblages, however, the microbial composition and succession during a bloom process is unknown. Here, we investigate the bacterial assemblages before, during and after toxic and non-toxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms to determine the patterns of bacterial succession in a natural bloom setting. Opportunistic sampling of bacterial community profiles were determined weekly at Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf by 454 pyrosequencing and analyzed together with domoic acid levels, phytoplankton community and biomass, nutrients and temperature. We asked if the bacterial communities are similar between bloom and non-bloom events and if domoic acid or the presence of toxic algal species acts as a driving force that can significantly structure phytoplankton-associated bacterial communities. We found that bacterial diversity generally increases when Pseudo-nitzschia numbers decline. Furthermore, bacterial diversity is higher when the low-DA producing P. fraudulenta dominates the algal bloom while bacterial diversity is lower when high-DA producing P. australis dominates the algal bloom, suggesting that the presence of algal toxin can structure bacterial community. We also found bloom-related succession patterns among associated bacterial groups; Gamma-proteobacteria, were dominant during low toxic P. fraudulenta blooms comprising mostly of Vibrio spp., which increased in relative abundance (6–65%) as the bloom progresses. On the other hand, Firmicutes bacteria comprising mostly of Planococcus spp. (12–86%) dominate during high toxic P. australis blooms, with the bacterial assemblage showing the same bloom-related successional patterns in three independent bloom events. Other environmental

  6. The community of phytoplankton of the Dagestan area of Caspian Sea in the new ecological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Gasanova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The materials about the phytoplankton composition and distribution in the Daghestan region of the Caspian Sea in connection with changing hydrologicaly-hydrochemical regime in conditions of anthropological and biological environment are presented. It was shown, that the change of water regime brought to alterations in floristic composition of sea weeds and succession of phytoplankton change group. Water biocoenosises of different seacoast zone distinguished specific characterdynamics. Introduction of Mnemiopsis leidyi (A. Agassiz influences on phytoplankton association structure

  7. Iron limitation of a springtime bacterial and phytoplankton community in the Ross Sea: implications for vitamin B12 nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Bertrand

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ross Sea is home to some of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean. Primary production in this system has previously been shown to be iron limited in the summer and periodically iron and vitamin B12 colimited. In this study, we examined trace metal limitation of biological activity in the Ross Sea in the austral spring and considered possible implications for vitamin B12 nutrition. Bottle incubation experiments demonstrated that iron limited phytoplankton growth in the austral spring while B12, cobalt, and zinc did not. This is the first demonstration of iron limitation in a Phaeocystis antarctica-dominated, early season Ross Sea phytoplankton community. The lack of B12 limitation in this location is consistent with previous Ross Sea studies in the austral summer, wherein vitamin additions did not stimulate P. antarctica growth and B12 was limiting only when bacterial abundance was low. Bottle incubation experiments and a bacterial regrowth experiment also revealed that iron addition directly enhanced bacterial growth. B12 uptake measurements in natural water samples and in an iron fertilized bottle incubation demonstrated that bacteria serve not only as a source for vitamin B12, but also as a significant sink, and that iron additions enhanced B12 uptake rates in phytoplankton but not bacteria. Additionally, vitamin uptake rates did not become saturated upon the addition of up to 95 pM B12. A rapid B12 uptake rate was observed after 13 min, which then decreased to a slower constant uptake rate over the next 52 hours. Results from this study highlight the importance of iron availability in limiting early season Ross Sea phytoplankton growth and suggest that rates of vitamin B12 production and consumption may be impacted by iron availability.

  8. Fluorescence signatures of an iron-enriched phytoplankton community in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wayne Wright, C.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Berry, Richard E.; Mitchell, Richard

    Laser-induced fluorescence profiles of chlorophyll and phycoerythrin pigments and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence acquired over an iron-enriched phytoplankton patch are compared to profiles made over adjacent, naturally occurring phytoplankton patches. A total of four airborne missions were flown during an 8 day period following the release of the iron-rich fertilizer. Analyses of the airborne laser-induced fluorescence profiles from the upper-ocean layer reveal: (1) Ship-dispersed iron enhances localized phytoplankton production in high-nutrient/low-chlorophyll regions such as found in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. (2) The chlorophyll concentration within the iron-enriched phytoplankton patch exceeded levels of chlorophyll found in naturally occurring phytoplankton patches located outside the enriched region. (3) An increase in phycoerythrin fluorescence was observed within the enriched region in correspondence with the elevated chlorophyll fluorescence. However, the phycoerythrin/chlorophyll fluorescence ratio was lower within the enriched patch than in naturally occurring phytoplankton patches outside of the enriched region. (4) No above-background chromorophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence was observed in the enriched patch. Elevated CDOM fluorescence was associated with some of the naturally occurring phytoplankton patches outside the enriched region, while other such phytoplankton patches showed no measurable increase in CDOM over background levels. (5) The surface layer manifestation of the patch was observed to be transported to the north and west in close agreement with the drogue positions. No elevated surface layer chlorophyll fluorescence was seen in the vicinity of the ship as it sampled the submerged fraction at the time of the 30 October and 1 November overflights. The phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence emission was insensitive to ambient cloud-induced downwelling irradiance variability, while at the

  9. CHEMTAX-derived phytoplankton community structure associated with temperature fronts in the northeastern Arabian Sea..

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Roy, R.; Chitari, R.; Kulkarni, V.; Krishna, M.S.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Anil, A.C.

    and filaments) have chemical and biological manifestations (Brink et al., 1998; Belkin et al., 2009; Read et al., 2000) and are thought to be hotspots for phytoplankton blooms (Hesse et al., 1989, Franks et al., 1992). The Indian National Centre for Ocean...., Barton, E D., Pilling, I., 1993. Development, persistence, and variability of upwelling filaments off the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula. J. Geophys. Res. 98, 22681-22692. Hesse, KJ., Liu, Z L., Schaumann, K., 1989. Phytoplankton and fronts...

  10. [Seasonal variations of community structures phytoplankton in groundwater discharge areas along the Northern Yucatán Peninsula coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Góngora, Cynthia Catalina; Liceaga-Correa, Maria de los Angeles; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge Alfredo

    2012-03-01

    The highly touristic Yucatán Peninsula is principally constituted with coastal marine environments. Like other coastal areas, this has been affected by the increase of waste water discharge, hydrological modifications and land use changes in the area. The phytoplankton community structure is one of the main components of coastal ecosystems and the most affected in hydrological processes. In order to follow the seasonal variations, the phytoplankton was characterized to follow the hydrological variability in two sites (Dzilam and Progreso) of the Northern Yucatán Peninsula. For this, cruises were carried out monthly during one year, from April 2004 to March 2005, with two samplings per season (dry, rainy and "nortes"). Hydrological variability was associated with seasonality and directly linked to groundwater discharges in the Dzilam area, and waste water discharges in the Progreso area. The highest nutrient concentrations occurred mainly during the rainy season. The phytoplankton community changes observed throughout the year suggested that the hydrological and chemical variability associated with seasonality and anthropogenic impacts have a strong influence. The substitution of diatoms by dinoflagellates as the dominant group in Progreso was the result of seasonal variability itself, but also could have been caused by eutrophic processes; while in Dzilam, the major presence of diatoms could have been favored by groundwater discharges. The results of this study can be used to understand the linkages between stressors from the anthropogenic activities and coastal water quality and changes.

  11. Characterization of bacterial community associated with phytoplankton bloom in a eutrophic lake in South Norway using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parulekar, Niranjan Nitin; Kolekar, Pandurang; Jenkins, Andrew; Kleiven, Synne; Utkilen, Hans; Johansen, Anette; Sawant, Sangeeta; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Kale, Mohan; Sæbø, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between different phytoplankton taxa and heterotrophic bacterial communities within aquatic environments can differentially support growth of various heterotrophic bacterial species. In this study, phytoplankton diversity was studied using traditional microscopic techniques and the bacterial communities associated with phytoplankton bloom were studied using High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the V1-V3 and V3-V4 hypervariable regions. Samples were collected from Lake Akersvannet, a eutrophic lake in South Norway, during the growth season from June to August 2013. Microscopic examination revealed that the phytoplankton community was mostly represented by Cyanobacteria and the dinoflagellate Ceratium hirundinella. The HTS results revealed that Proteobacteria (Alpha, Beta, and Gamma), Bacteriodetes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia dominated the bacterial community, with varying relative abundances throughout the sampling season. Species level identification of Cyanobacteria showed a mixed population of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa and Woronichinia naegeliana. A significant proportion of the microbial community was composed of unclassified taxa which might represent locally adapted freshwater bacterial groups. Comparison of cyanobacterial species composition from HTS and microscopy revealed quantitative discrepancies, indicating a need for cross validation of results. To our knowledge, this is the first study that uses HTS methods for studying the bacterial community associated with phytoplankton blooms in a Norwegian lake. The study demonstrates the value of considering results from multiple methods when studying bacterial communities.

  12. Responses of phytoplankton and Hyalella azteca to agrichemical mixtures in a constructed wetland mesocosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Richard E; Testa, Sam; Locke, Martin A; Steinriede, R Wade

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the capability of a constructed wetland to mitigate toxicity of a variety of possible mixtures, such as nutrients only (NO) (nitrogen [N], phosphorus [P]), pesticides only (PO) (atrazine, S-metolachlor, permethrin), and nutrients + pesticides on phytoplankton chlorophyll-a, on 48-h aqueous Hyalella azteca survival and 10-day sediment H. azteca survival and growth. Water and sediment were collected at 10-, 20-, and 40-m distances from inflow and analyzed for nutrients, pesticides, chlorophyll-a, and H. azteca laboratory bioassays. Phytoplankton chlorophyll-a increased 4- to 10 -fold at 7 days after NO treatment. However, responses of chlorophyll-a to PO and nutrients + pesticides were more complex with associated decreases at only 20 m for pesticides only and 10 and 40 m for nutrients + pesticides treatments. H. azteca aqueous survival decreased within the first 48 h of dosing at 10- and 20-m distances during PO and nutrients + pesticides treatments in association with permethrin concentrations. H. azteca sediment survival was unaffected, whereas 10-day growth decreased within 1 day of dosing at all sites during nutrients + pesticides treatment. Constructed wetlands were shown to be an effective agricultural best-management tool for trapping pollutants and mitigating ecological impacts of run-off in agricultural watersheds.

  13. Phytoplankton pigments and functional community structure in relation to environmental factors in the Pearl River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cruises were undertaken in the Pearl River Estuary in November 2011 and March 2012 to analyze the distribution of phytoplankton pigments and to define the relationships of pigment indices and functional community structure with environmental factors. Among 22 pigments, 17 were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. Chlorophyll a was found in all samples, with a maximum of 7.712 μg L−1 in spring. Fucoxanthin was the most abundant accessory pigment, with mean concentrations of 2.914 μg L−1 and 0.207 μg L−1 in spring and autumn, respectively. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c2, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, and diatoxanthin were high in the northern or northwest estuary in spring and in the middle-eastern and northeast estuary in autumn. Chlorophyll b, chlorophyll c3, prasinoxanthin, and peridinin were similarly distributed during the two cruises. Chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin positively correlated with nutrients in spring, whereas 19′-hex-fucoxanthin and 19′-but-fucoxanthin negatively correlated. The biomass proportion of microphytoplankton (BPm was higher in spring, whereas that of picophytoplankton (BPp was higher in autumn. BPm in spring was high in areas with salinity 30. BPm increased but BPn reduced with the increase in nutrient contents. By comparison, BPp reduced with the increase in nutrient contents in spring, but no relationship was found between BPp and nutrient contents in autumn. The ratios of photosynthetic carotenoids to photoprotective carotenoids in the southern estuary approached unity linear relationship in spring and were under the unity line in autumn.

  14. Experimental evolution meets marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Thorsten B H; Boyd, Philip W

    2013-07-01

    Our perspective highlights potentially important links between disparate fields-biological oceanography, climate change research, and experimental evolutionary biology. We focus on one important functional group-photoautotrophic microbes (phytoplankton), which are responsible for ∼50% of global primary productivity. Global climate change currently results in the simultaneous change of several conditions such as warming, acidification, and nutrient supply. It thus has the potential to dramatically change phytoplankton physiology, community composition, and may result in adaptive evolution. Although their large population sizes, standing genetic variation, and rapid turnover time should promote swift evolutionary change, oceanographers have focussed on describing patterns of present day physiological differentiation rather than measure potential adaptation in evolution experiments, the only direct way to address whether and at which rate phytoplankton species will adapt to environmental change. Important open questions are (1) is adaptation limited by existing genetic variation or fundamental constraints? (2) Will complex ecological settings such as gradual versus abrupt environmental change influence adaptation processes? (3) How will increasing environmental variability affect the evolution of phenotypic plasticity patterns? Because marine phytoplankton species display rapid acclimation capacity (phenotypic buffering), a systematic study of reaction norms renders them particularly interesting to the evolutionary biology research community.

  15. Identification of ecological thresholds from variations in phytoplankton communities among lakes: contribution to the definition of environmental standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubeix, Vincent; Danis, Pierre-Alain; Feret, Thibaut; Baudoin, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, the identification of ecological thresholds may be useful for managers as it can help to diagnose ecosystem health and to identify key levers to enable the success of preservation and restoration measures. A recent statistical method, gradient forest, based on random forests, was used to detect thresholds of phytoplankton community change in lakes along different environmental gradients. It performs exploratory analyses of multivariate biological and environmental data to estimate the location and importance of community thresholds along gradients. The method was applied to a data set of 224 French lakes which were characterized by 29 environmental variables and the mean abundances of 196 phytoplankton species. Results showed the high importance of geographic variables for the prediction of species abundances at the scale of the study. A second analysis was performed on a subset of lakes defined by geographic thresholds and presenting a higher biological homogeneity. Community thresholds were identified for the most important physico-chemical variables including water transparency, total phosphorus, ammonia, nitrates, and dissolved organic carbon. Gradient forest appeared as a powerful method at a first exploratory step, to detect ecological thresholds at large spatial scale. The thresholds that were identified here must be reinforced by the separate analysis of other aquatic communities and may be used then to set protective environmental standards after consideration of natural variability among lakes.

  16. Effect of acidification on an Arctic phytoplankton community from Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoisen, Christina; Riisgaard, Karen; Lundholm, Nina

    2015-01-01

    . Our findings show that coastal phytoplankton from Disko Bay is naturally exposed to pH fluctuations exceeding the experimental pH range used in most ocean acidification studies. We emphasize that studies on ocean acidification should include in situ pH before assumptions on the effect of acidification...... on marine organisms can be made. KEY WORDS: Ocean acidification · Coastal · Arctic phytoplankton · Growth rate · pH · CO2 · DIC......ABSTRACT: Long-term measurements (i.e. months) of in situ pH have not previously been reported from the Arctic; this study shows fluctuations between pH 7.5 and 8.3 during the spring bloom 2012 in a coastal area of Disko Bay, West Greenland. The effect of acidification on phytoplankton from...

  17. Effect of acidification on an Arctic phytoplankton community from Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoisen, Christina; Riisgaard, Karen; Lundholm, Nina;

    2015-01-01

    . Our findings show that coastal phytoplankton from Disko Bay is naturally exposed to pH fluctuations exceeding the experimental pH range used in most ocean acidification studies. We emphasize that studies on ocean acidification should include in situ pH before assumptions on the effect of acidification...... on marine organisms can be made. KEY WORDS: Ocean acidification · Coastal · Arctic phytoplankton · Growth rate · pH · CO2 · DIC......ABSTRACT: Long-term measurements (i.e. months) of in situ pH have not previously been reported from the Arctic; this study shows fluctuations between pH 7.5 and 8.3 during the spring bloom 2012 in a coastal area of Disko Bay, West Greenland. The effect of acidification on phytoplankton from...

  18. Towards an Understanding of the Interactions between Freshwater Inflows and Phytoplankton Communities in a Subtropical Estuary in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Dorado

    Full Text Available Subtropical estuaries worldwide face increased pressure on their ecosystem health and services due to increasing human population growth and associated land use/land cover changes, expansion of ports, and climate change. We investigated freshwater inflows (river discharge and the physico-chemical characteristics of Galveston Bay (Texas, USA as mechanisms driving variability in phytoplankton biomass and community composition between February 2008 and December 2009. Results of multivariate analyses (hierarchical cluster analysis, PERMANOVA, Mantel test, and nMDS ordination coupled to environmental vector fitting revealed that temporal and spatial differences in phytoplankton community structure correlate to differences in hydrographic and water quality parameters. Spatially, phytoplankton biomass and community composition responded to nutrient loading from the San Jacinto River in the northwest region of the bay (consistent with nutrient limitation while hydraulic displacement (and perhaps other processes resulted in overall lower biomass in the Trinity River delta (northeast region. The influence of inflows on phytoplankton diminished along a north to south gradient in the bay. Temporally, temperature and variables associated with freshwater inflow (discharge volume, salinity, inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were major influences on phytoplankton dynamics. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen: phosphorus (DIN:DIP ratios suggest that phytoplankton communities will be predominately nitrogen limited. Diatoms dominated during periods of moderate to high freshwater inflows in winter/spring and were more abundant in the upper bay while cyanobacteria dominated during summer/fall when inflow was low. Given the differential influences of freshwater inflow on the phytoplankton communities of Galveston Bay, alterations upstream (magnitude, timing, frequency will likely have a profound effect on downstream ecological processes and corresponding

  19. Limited impact of ocean acidification on phytoplankton community structure and carbon export in an oligotrophic environment: Results from two short-term mesocosm studies in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, F.; Sallon, A.; Pitta, P.; Tsiola, A.; Maugendre, L.; Giani, M.; Celussi, M.; Pedrotti, M. L.; Marro, S.; Guieu, C.

    2017-02-01

    Modifications in the strength of the biological pump as a consequence of ocean acidification, whether positive or negative, have the potential to impact atmospheric CO2 and therefore climate. So far, most plankton community perturbation studies have been performed in nutrient-rich areas although there are some indications that CO2-dependent growth could differ in nutrient-replete vs. -limited regions and with different community compositions. Two in situ mesocosm experiments were performed in the NW Mediterranean Sea during two seasons with contrasted environmental conditions: summer oligotrophic stratified waters in the Bay of Calvi vs. winter mesotrophic well-mixed waters in the Bay of Villefranche. Nine mesocosms were deployed for 20 and 12 d, respectively, and subjected to seven CO2 levels (3 controls, 6 elevated levels). Both phytoplankton assemblages were dominated by pico- and nano-phytoplankton cells. Although haptophyceae and dinoflagellates benefited from short-term CO2 enrichment in summer, their response remained small with no consequences on organic matter export due to strong environmental constraints (nutrient availability). In winter, most of the plankton growth and associated nutrient consumption occurred during the 4-day acidification period (before the experimental phase). During the remaining experimental period, characterized by low nutrient availability, plankton growth was minimal and no clear CO2-dependency was found for any of the tested parameters. While there is a strong confidence on the absence of significant effect of short-term CO2 addition under oligotrophic conditions, more investigations are needed to assess the response of plankton communities in winter when vertical mixing and weather conditions are major factors controlling plankton dynamics.

  20. Biomarker reconstruction of phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes in the middle Okinawa Trough during the last 15 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Lei; ZHAO MeiXun; ZHANG HaiLong; LIU YanGuang; SHI XueFa

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers have been widely used to reconstruct phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes,and this method has been applied for the first time in the middle Okinawa Trough during the transition from the last deglaciation to the Holocene.The total content of all marine phytoplankton biomarkers,used as a total productivity indicator,reveals higher productivity during the deglaciation.The ratios of the biomarkers are used as community structure indicators which show that,compared with the Holocene,the contribution from haptophytes decreased while the contributions from diatoms and dinoflagellates increased during the deglaciation.The increased productivity during the deglacia-tion was likely caused by the stronger winter monsoon.Also increased nutrient supply from terrestrial sources contributes to the higher productivity due to lower sea-level,which is consistent with higher terrestrial biomarker (long-chain n-alkanols) content.These changes in the nutrient supply also con-tributed to the community structure changes in the Okinawa Trough.

  1. Phytoplankton response to intrusions of slope water on the West Florida Shelf: Models and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John J.; Weisberg, Robert H.; Dieterle, Dwight A.; He, Ruoying; Darrow, Brian P.; Jolliff, Jason K.; Lester, Kristen M.; Vargo, Gabriel A.; Kirkpatrick, Gary J.; Fanning, Kent A.; Sutton, Tracey T.; Jochens, Ann E.; Biggs, Douglas C.; Nababan, Bisman; Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2003-06-01

    Previous hypotheses had suggested that upwelled intrusions of nutrient-rich Gulf of Mexico slope water onto the West Florida Shelf (WFS) led to formation of red tides of Karenia brevis. However, coupled biophysical models of (1) wind- and buoyancy-driven circulation, (2) three phytoplankton groups (diatoms, K. brevis, and microflagellates), (3) these slope water supplies of nitrate and silicate, and (4) selective grazing stress by copepods and protozoans found that diatoms won in one 1998 case of no light limitation by colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The diatoms lost to K. brevis during another CDOM case of the models. In the real world, field data confirmed that diatoms were indeed the dominant phytoplankton after massive upwelling in 1998, when only a small red tide of K. brevis was observed. Over a 7-month period of the CDOM-free scenario the simulated total primary production of the phytoplankton community was ˜1.8 g C m-2 d-1 along the 40-m isobath of the northern WFS, with the largest accumulation of biomass on the Florida Middle Ground (FMG). Despite such photosynthesis, these models of the WFS yielded a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere during spring and summer and suggested a small sink in the fall. With diatom losses of 90% of their daily carbon fixation to herbivores the simulation supported earlier impressions of a short, diatom-based food web on the FMG, where organic carbon content of the surficial sediments is tenfold those of the surrounding seabeds. Farther south, the simulated near-bottom pools of ammonium were highest in summer, when silicon regeneration was minimal, leading to temporary Si limitation of the diatoms. Termination of these upwelled pulses of production by diatoms and nonsiliceous microflagellates mainly resulted from nitrate exhaustion in the model, however, mimicking most del15PON observations in the field. Yet, the CDOM-free case of the models failed to replicate the observed small red tide in December 1998, tagged

  2. Effects of chemical ecological adjustment and control experiment on phytoplankton community in the Aoshan Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈碧鹃; 赵俊; 辛福言; 崔毅; 过锋

    2002-01-01

    There is a low nutrient level in the Aoshan Bay. In June 1999, the chemical adjustment and control experiment was made in the Aoshan Bay. Following tracts investigation was carried out before the experiment and on the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 45th day/after the experiment. While the variance of amount of phytoplankton, the replacement of superior species and the species composition of phytoplankton were researched. The results show that the amount of phytoplankton in the Aoshan Bay rises gradually after the experiment. Ceratium macroceros Cleve of pyrophyta was the dominant species before the experiment, its dominant index was 37.7%. Six days after the experiment, its dominant index dropped to 17.6%. Meanwhile the dominant index of Asterionella japonics Cleve rose from 7.1% to 39.2%, it became the first dominant species. Forty-five days after the experiment, the amount of phytoplankton in the Aoshan Bay was 5.15 to 137.32 times more than that in 1997.

  3. Does temperature structure phytoplankton community composition in the Ross Sea, Antarctica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ross Sea polynya experiences one of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean. Energy flow potential within the Ross Sea food web is primarily set by diatoms and prymnesiophytes, the latter dominated by Phaeocystis antarctica. We investigated physical, chemical,...

  4. 太湖浮游植物群落结构及其与水质指标间的关系%Structure of Phytoplankton Community and Relationship between Phytoplankton Community and Water Quality in Taihu Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娣; 李旭文; 牛志春; 王霞; 师伟; 于红霞

    2014-01-01

    To research the structure of phytoplankton community and relationship between phytoplankton community and water quality in Taihu Lake, phytoplankton community structure and water quality indicators (temperature, transparency, pH value, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, ammonia, high manganese on permanganate index, chemical oxygen demand, fluoride, biological oxygen demand, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate solubility and chlorophyll a) were monthly investigated at seven sites in Taihu Lake between January and December of 2013 in our study. Meanwhile, Pearson’s correlations between phytoplankton communities and environmental variables were used to find the factors that influenced the distribution of phytoplankton community. The results found that there were 124 species of phytoplankton, including 30 taxa Cyanophyta, 47 kinds of Bacillariophyta, 34 species Chlorophyta, 3 Cryptophyta, 6 Euglenophyta, 4 Dinoflagellate; as an absolute dominant species, dominance of Microcystis spp. was 80.8 %. From space, phytoplankton density in Gonghu was highest among the seven sites. Diversity of phytoplankton community was lower than other sites. Meanwhile, density percentage of Microcystis spp. in Gonghu was 90.1%, far higher than other sites. From the time point of view, December was when the density of phytoplankton community in Taihu Lake was highest, followed by June. The principal pollutant was total nitrogen, secondly total phosphorus, thirdly chemical oxygen demand. Concentration of pollutants in West Taihu was highest in our study. Through correlation analysis of phytoplankton community and water quality, it showed that water temperature, transparency, total nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand and chlorophyll a were main factors that influenced phytoplankton community structure in Taihu Lake. Controlling water pollutant emissions and restoring ecological function should be an effective method to manage cyanobacteria bloom in Taihu Lake. Meanwhile

  5. Alternating Current-Dielectrophoresis Collection and Chaining of Phytoplankton on Chip: Comparison of Individual Species and Artificial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Siebman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of alternating current (AC dielectrophoresis (DEP for on-chip capture and chaining of the three species representative of freshwater phytoplankton was evaluated. The effects of the AC field intensity, frequency and duration on the chaining efficiency and chain lengths of green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. and diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana were characterized systematically. C. reinhardtii showed an increase of the chaining efficiency from 100 Hz to 500 kHz at all field intensities; C. meneghiniana presented a decrease of chaining efficiency from 100 Hz to 1 kHz followed by a significant increase from 1 kHz to 500 kHz, while Synechocystis sp. exhibited low chaining tendency at all frequencies and all field intensities. The experimentally-determined DEP response and cell alignment of each microorganism were in agreement with their effective polarizability. Mixtures of cells in equal proportion or 10-times excess of Synechocystis sp. showed important differences in terms of chaining efficiency and length of the chains compared with the results obtained when the cells were alone in suspension. While a constant degree of chaining was observed with the mixture of C. reinhardtii and C. meneghiniana, the presence of Synechocystis sp. in each mixture suppressed the formation of chains for the two other phytoplankton species. All of these results prove the potential of DEP to discriminate different phytoplankton species depending on their effective polarizability and to enable their manipulation, such as specific collection or separation in freshwater.

  6. Fluorescence, pigment and microscopic characterization of Bering Sea phytoplankton community structure and photosynthetic competency in the presence of a Cold Pool during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Joaquim I.; Gomes, Helga do Rosario; Haugen, Elin M.; McKee, Kali T.; D'Sa, Eurico J.; Chekalyuk, Alexander M.; Stoecker, Diane K.; Stabeno, Phyllis J.; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Sambrotto, Raymond N.

    2014-11-01

    Spectral fluorescence measurements of phytoplankton chlorophyll a (Chl a), phytoplankton phycobilipigments and variable fluorescence (Fv/Fm), are utilized with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) estimates of phytoplankton pigments and microscopic cells counts to construct a comprehensive picture of summer-time phytoplankton communities and their photosynthetic competency in the eastern Bering Sea shelf. Although the Bering Sea was ice-free during our study, the exceptionally cold winter that preceded the summer of 2008 when our cruise took place, facilitated the formation of a "Cold Pool" (<2 °C) and its entrapment at depth in the northern middle shelf. The presence of a strong pycnocline over the entire middle and outer shelves restricted inorganic nutrient fluxes into the surface waters resulting in phytoplankton populations that were photo-physiologically stressed due to nutrient limitation. Elevated Chl a concentrations recorded in the Green Belt along the shelf edge of the Bering Sea, were due to Phaeocystis pouchetii and nano-sized cryptophytes. Although inorganic nutrients were not limiting in the Green Belt, Fv/Fm values were low in all probability due to iron limitation. Phytoplankton communities in the low biomass surface waters of the middle shelf were comprised of prasinophytes, haptophytes, cryptophytes and diatoms. In the northern part of the middle shelf, a sinking bloom made up of the centric diatoms Chaeotoceros socialis, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii and Porosira glacialis was located above the Cold Pool. The high biomass associated with this senescent bloom and its accretion above the pycnocline, suggests that the Cold Pool acts as a barrier, preventing sinking phytoplankton from reaching the bottom where they can become available to benthic organisms. We further posit that if summer-time storms are not energetic enough and the Cold Pool is not eroded, its presence facilitates the transfer of the large spring phytoplankton bloom to

  7. The Effect of Atrazine on Louisiana Gulf Coast Estuarine Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Alexis V; Bargu, Sibel; Maiti, Kanchan; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2017-02-01

    Pesticides may enter water bodies in areas with a high proportion of agricultural land use through surface runoff, groundwater discharge, and erosion and thus negatively impact nontarget aquatic organisms. The herbicide atrazine is used extensively throughout the Midwest and enters the Mississippi River through surface runoff and groundwater discharge. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of atrazine contamination in Louisiana's estuaries from Mississippi River water under different flow and nutrient regimes (spring and summer) and its effect on the biomass and oxygen production of the local phytoplankton community. The results showed that atrazine was consistently present in these systems at low levels. Microcosm experiments exposed to an atrazine-dilution series under low and high nutrient conditions to determine the phytoplankton stress response showed that high atrazine levels greatly decreased phytoplankton biomass and oxygen production. Phytoplankton exposed to low and moderate atrazine levels under high nutrient conditions were able to recover after an extended acclimation period. Communities grown under high nutrient conditions grew more rapidly and produced greater levels of oxygen than the low nutrient treatment groups, thus indicating that atrazine exposure may induce a greater stress response in phytoplankton communities under low-nutrient conditions. The native community also experienced a shift from more sensitive species, such as chlorophytes, to potentially more resilient species such as diatoms. The phytoplankton response to atrazine exposure at various concentrations can be especially important to greater trophic levels because their growth and abundance can determine the potential productivity of the entire ecosystem.

  8. Responses of phyto- and zooplankton communities to Prymnesium polylepis (Prymnesiales bloom in the Baltic Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gorokhova

    Full Text Available A large bloom of Prymnesium polylepis occurred in the Baltic Sea during the winter 2007-spring 2008. Based on numerous reports of strong allelopathic effects on phytoplankton exerted by P. polylepis and its toxicity to grazers, we hypothesized that during this period negative correlations will be observed between P. polylepis and (1 main phytoplankton groups contributing to the spring bloom (i.e., diatoms and dinoflagellates, and (2 zooplankton growth and abundance. To test these hypotheses, we analyzed inter-annual variability in phytoplankton and zooplankton dynamics as well as growth indices (RNA:DNA ratio in dominant zooplankton in relation to the Prymnesium abundance and biomass. Contrary to the hypothesized relationships, no measurable negative responses to P. polylepis were observed for either the total phytoplankton stocks or the zooplankton community. The only negative response, possibly associated with P. polylepis occurrence, was significantly lower abundance of dinoflagellates both during and after the bloom in 2008. Moreover, contrary to the expected negative effects, there were significantly higher total phytoplankton abundance as well as significantly higher winter abundance and winter-spring RNA:DNA ratio in dominant zooplankton species in 2008, indicating that P. polylepis bloom coincided with favourable feeding conditions for zooplankton. Thus, primary consumers, and consequently also zooplanktivores (e.g., larval fish and mysids, may benefit from haptophyte blooms, particularly in winter, when phytoplankton is scarce.

  9. Effects of climatic variability on phytoplankton community structure and bloom development in the eutrophic, microtidal, New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nathan S.; Paerl, Hans W.; Peierls, Benjamin L.; Whipple, Anthony C.; Rossignol, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of climatically driven freshwater flow, nutrient loading, and temperature on phytoplankton community biomass and composition were examined along a downstream transect within the New River Estuary, North Carolina from 2007 to 2010. This microtidal system has a history of eutrophication symptoms, including harmful algal blooms. Riverine discharge strongly controlled nutrient loading to the estuary. Except during very high flow conditions, loads were generally assimilated near the head of the estuary and low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate, cyanobacteria to exploit low residual nutrient concentrations, and subsidies to the diatom population via sediment resuspension events. In addition to effects of flow, pico-cyanobacteria and harmful raphidophyte taxa demonstrated positive relationships with temperature. Overall, results demonstrate a strong linkage between the phytoplankton community and two important climatic drivers, flow and temperature. The observed sensitivity of phytoplankton biomass to nutrient loads suggests that load reductions (or increases) are likely to decrease (or increase) total phytoplankton biomass in this system. However, phytoplankton community composition appears to be largely determined by environmental factors other than nutrient loading, particularly temperature, stratification and sediment resuspension.

  10. Fine-scale responses of phytoplankton to freshwater influx in a tropical monsoonal estuary following the onset of southwest monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suraksha M Pednekar; S G Prabhu Matondkar; Helga Do R Gomes; Joaquim I Goes; Sushma Parab; Vijaya Kerkar

    2011-06-01

    In May of 2007, a study was initiated by the National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa, India, to investigate the influence of monsoonal rainfall on hydrographic conditions in the Mandovi River of India. The study was undertaken at a location ∼2 km upstream of the mouth of this estuary. During the premonsoon (PreM) in May, when circulation in the estuary was dominated by tidal activity, phytoplankton communities in the high saline (35–37 psu) waters at the study site were largely made up of the coastal neritic species Fragilaria oceanica, Ditylum brightwellii and Trichodesmium erythraeum. During the later part of the intermonsoon (InterM) phase, an abrupt decline in salinity led to a surge in phytoplankton biomass (Chlorophyll ∼14 mg m−3), of a population that was dominated by Thalassiosira eccentricus. As the southwest monsoon (SWM) progressed and the estuary freshened salinity and Chlorophyll (Chl ) concentrations decreased during the MoN, Skeletonema costatum established itself as the dominant form. Despite the low biomass (Chl > 2 mg m−3), the phytoplankton community of the MoN was the most diverse of the entire study. During the postmonsoon (PostM), the increase in salinity was marked by a surge in dinoflagellate populations comprising of Ceratium furca, Akashiwo sanguinea, and Pyrophacus horologium.

  11. Ice cover extent drives phytoplankton and bacterial community structure in a large north-temperate lake: implications for a warming climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, B F N; Twiss, M R; Smith, D E; Oyserman, B O; Rozmarynowycz, M J; Binding, C E; Bourbonniere, R A; Bullerjahn, G S; Palmer, M E; Reavie, E D; Waters, Lcdr M K; Woityra, Lcdr W C; McKay, R M L

    2016-06-01

    Mid-winter limnological surveys of Lake Erie captured extremes in ice extent ranging from expansive ice cover in 2010 and 2011 to nearly ice-free waters in 2012. Consistent with a warming climate, ice cover on the Great Lakes is in decline, thus the ice-free condition encountered may foreshadow the lakes future winter state. Here, we show that pronounced changes in annual ice cover are accompanied by equally important shifts in phytoplankton and bacterial community structure. Expansive ice cover supported phytoplankton blooms of filamentous diatoms. By comparison, ice free conditions promoted the growth of smaller sized cells that attained lower total biomass. We propose that isothermal mixing and elevated turbidity in the absence of ice cover resulted in light limitation of the phytoplankton during winter. Additional insights into microbial community dynamics were gleaned from short 16S rRNA tag (Itag) Illumina sequencing. UniFrac analysis of Itag sequences showed clear separation of microbial communities related to presence or absence of ice cover. Whereas the ecological implications of the changing bacterial community are unclear at this time, it is likely that the observed shift from a phytoplankton community dominated by filamentous diatoms to smaller cells will have far reaching ecosystem effects including food web disruptions.

  12. Studies on phytoplankton-bacterial interactions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.

    Given the sheer range of phytoplankton-bacterial interactions, some intriguing aspects have been addressed in this study. Firstly, the role of bacteria in influencing phytoplankton communities at the system level was examined. The seasonal changes...

  13. Responses of phytoplankton upon exposure to a mixture of acid mine drainage and high levels of nutrient pollution in Lake Loskop, South Africa.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available , a Received in revised form 7 July 2009 Accepted 17 August 2009 Keywords: Phytoplankton populations Cyanobacteria Chlorophyll concentrations Metal ions wate m high nutrient concentrations. The higher concentrations of metal ions... that the ecological consequences of water quality degradation are best examined at higher levels of biological organisation (e.g., at phytoplankton community level), the ideal is to identify links between the latter and the outcome of changes at the lowest...

  14. Impact of salinity and pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system: An investigation with pigment analysis by HPLC

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Acharyya, T.; Babu, P.V.R.; Bandyopadhyay, D.

    An in vitro study was carried out to understand the effects of salinity shock and variation in pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system of the Godavari River (a major peninsular river in India). The distributions of...

  15. Influence of river influx on phytoplankton community during fall inter–monsoon in the coastal waters off Kakinada, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sooria, P.M.; Reny, P.D.; Jagadeesan, L.; Nair, M.

    ) cells l sup(-1)). Phytoplankton community was formed by larger diatoms in October 2007, dominated by Hemidiscus hardmannianus and Ditylum brightwellii (300-500 mu m in diameter) whereas in October 2006 smaller diatoms such as Lioloma elongatum (2-4 mu m...

  16. Zooplankton excretion metabolites stimulate Southern Ocean phytoplankton growth

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, A.

    2017-04-24

    Warming over Antarctica is leading to changes in the zooplankton communities inhabiting the Southern Ocean. It has been observed that zooplankton not only regulates phytoplankton through grazing, but also through the recycling of nutrients that are essential for phytoplankton growth. In this way, the effects of warming on zooplankton populations will change the amount or proportion at which recycled nutrients are restored. To estimate how the recycled nutrients released by zooplankton populations, dominated by krill (Euphausia superba), amphipods or copepods, affect the phytoplankton uptake and communities, we performed four incubation experiments: two close to the Antarctic Peninsula and two at the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Our results showed a stimulating effect of the addition of metabolites on ammonia removal rates and on the net growth of phytoplankton communities, with different responses amongst the different phytoplankton groups. According to our results, phytoplankton net growth and community composition may be altered if this relevant source of nutrients is lost due to projected changes in the abundance or distribution of these zooplankton populations.

  17. Diel Cycle of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Fluorescence Characteristics in Natural Phytoplankton Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Z.; Klimov, D.

    2007-12-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthetic performance is strongly controlled by the daily irradiance cycle. The most pronounced effects are the photoinhibition of photosynthetic activity in the morning and noon hours, and the development of non-photochemical quenching throughout the day. These two effects are extensively investigated as they significantly diminish the daily production rates. Less obvious, but equally important are the daily changes in the kinetics of rate-limiting electron transport within Photosystem II and Photosystem I of the photosynthetic apparatus. Using a fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer operating in the continuous flow-through mode in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, we observed theses rates to decelerate by a factor of five during the night, but recovering to a full speed just before the dawn. We characterized the effects of these changes on the photosynthetic performance of phytoplankton by continuously recording the fast light curves (variable fluorescence versus irradiance relationship). Besides controlling photochemistry, these changes strongly affect the chlorophyll fluorescence yield, especially when measured with a multiple turnover excitation. We will discuss how the knowledge of these rate-limiting steps may improve the fluorescence-based estimates of photosynthesis and chlorophyll biomass.

  18. A consistent structure of phytoplankton communities across the warm-cold regions of the water mass on a meridional transect in the East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jung Hyun; Han, Eunah; Lee, Sang Heon; Park, Hyun Je; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2017-09-01

    Three cruises were undertaken along a meridional transect in the East/Japan Sea (EJS) in spring (May 2007), summer (July 2009), and fall (October 2012) to determine the geographic variations in phytoplankton biomass and community composition. This study revealed a gradient of surface temperature and a fluctuation of hydrographic conditions along the transect. Although a subpolar front (SPF) formed between the warm- and cold-water masses (37-40°N), no significant differences in phytoplankton biomass and community composition were detected between the southern and northern parts of the EJS. These results disprove our initial hypothesis that different water masses may contain differently structured phytoplankton communities. In the present study, isothermal layers (≤ 12 °C) fluctuated over a depth of 50 m in both warm- and cold-water masses, depending on the SPF. In contrast, the nitracline (i.e. 2.5 μM nitrate isopleth) depth was recorded within a limited range of 20-40 m in spring, 30-50 m in summer, and 40-60 m in fall. The chlorophyll a concentrations at the subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCM) were significantly higher in spring and summer (356 ± 233 and 270 ± 182 ng L-1, respectively) than in fall (117 ± 89 ng L-1). The relative contributions of individual phytoplankton groups to the depth-integrated chlorophyll a concentration conformed to the composition of the phytoplankton community in the SCM layer, showing a dominance of diatoms (58 ± 19% in spring, 48 ± 11% in summer, and 30 ± 20% in fall). Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the geographic structures of phytoplankton communities were strongly associated with the vertical structures of water temperature and nutrient concentration in the water column rather than with horizontal gradients of hydrographic conditions. Finally, our findings suggest that water column stability and light-nutrient availability in the euphotic zone play a key role in determining geographical consistency of

  19. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A. Egerton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days. Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s estuarine complex, during spring 2006. During this period two distinct algal blooms occurred; the first was a cryptomonad bloom and this was followed by a bloom of the mixotrophic dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium instriatum. Chlorophyll a, nutrient concentrations, and physical and chemical parameters were measured daily along with phytoplankton abundance and community composition. While 65 phytoplankton species from eight major taxonomic groups were identified in samples and total micro- and nano-phytoplankton cell densities ranged from 5.8 × 106 to 7.8 × 107 cells L−1, during blooms, cryptomonads and G. instriatum were 91.6% and 99.0%, respectively, of the total phytoplankton biomass during blooms. The cryptomonad bloom developed following a period of rainfall and concomitant increases in inorganic nitrogen concentrations. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations 0 to 5 days prior were positively lag-correlated with cryptomonad abundance. In contrast, the G. insriatum bloom developed during periods of low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and their abundance was negatively correlated with inorganic nitrogen concentrations.

  20. Heterotrophic bacterial responses to the winter–spring phytoplankton bloom in open waters of the NW Mediterranean

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Ana

    2014-12-03

    The response of planktonic heterotrophic prokaryotes to the NW Mediterranean winter–spring offshore phytoplankton bloom was assessed in 3 cruises conducted in March, April–May and September 2009. Bulk measurements of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass and production were complemented with an insight into bacterial physiological structure by single-cell analysis of nucleic acid content [low (LNA) vs. high (HNA)] and membrane integrity (“Live” vs. “Dead” cells). Bacterial production empirical conversion factors (0.82±0.25 SE kg C mol leucine−1) were almost always well below the theoretical value. Major differences in most microbial variables were found among the 3 periods, which varied from extremely high phytoplankton biomass and production during the bloom in March (>1 g C m−2 d−1 primary production) to typically oligotrophic conditions during September stratification (<200 mg C m−2 d−1). In both these periods bacterial production was ~30 mg C m−2 d−1 while very large bacterial production (mean 228, with some stations exceeding 500 mg C m−2 d−1) but low biomass was observed during the April–May post-bloom phase. The contribution of HNA (30–67%) and “Live” cells (47–97%) were temporally opposite in the study periods, with maxima in March and September, respectively. Different relationships were found between physiological structure and bottom-up variables, with HNA bacteria apparently more responsive to phytoplankton only during the bloom, coinciding with larger average cell sizes of LNA bacteria. Moderate phytoplankton–bacterioplankton coupling of biomass and activity was only observed in the bloom and post-bloom phases, while relationships between both compartments were not significant under stratification. With all data pooled, bacteria were only weakly bottom-up controlled. Our analyses show that the biomass and production of planktonic algae and bacteria followed opposite paths in the transition from bloom to

  1. The response of phytoplankton to iron enrichment in Sub-Antarctic HNLCLSi waters: Results from the SAGE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloquin, Jill; Hall, Julie; Safi, Karl; Smith, Walker O., Jr.; Wright, Simon; van den Enden, Rick

    2011-03-01

    Areas of high nutrients and low chlorophyll a comprise nearly a third of the world's oceans, including the equatorial Pacific, the Southern Ocean and the Sub-Arctic Pacific. The SOLAS Sea- Air Gas Exchange (SAGE) experiment was conducted in late summer, 2004, off the east coast of the South Island of New Zealand. The objective was to assess the response of phytoplankton in waters with low iron and silicic acid concentrations to iron enrichment. We monitored the quantum yield of photochemistry ( Fv/ Fm) with pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry, chlorophyll a, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition. Measurements of Fv/ Fm indicated that the phytoplankton within the amended patch were relieved from iron stress ( Fv/ Fm approached 0.65). Although there was no significant difference between IN and OUT stations at points during the experiment, the eventual enhancement in chlorophyll a and primary productivity was twofold by the end of the 15-day patch occupation. However, no change in particulate carbon or nitrogen pools was detected. Enhancement in primary productivity and chlorophyll a were approximately equal for all phytoplankton size classes, resulting in a stable phytoplankton size distribution. Initial seed stocks of diatoms were extremely low, <1% of the assemblage based on HPLC pigment analysis, and did not respond to iron enrichment. The most dominant groups before and after iron enrichment were type 8 haptophytes and prasinophytes that were associated with ˜75% of chlorophyll a. Twofold enhancement of biomass estimated by flow cytometry was detected only in eukaryotic picoplankton, likely prasinophytes, type 8 haptophytes and/or pelagophytes. These results suggest that factors other than iron, such as silicic acid, light or physical disturbance limited the phytoplankton assemblage during the SAGE experiment. Furthermore, these results suggest that additional iron supply to the Sub-Antarctic under similar seasonal conditions and seed stock will most

  2. Remote sensing of bacterial response to degrading phytoplankton in the Arabian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyaja, P; Dwivedi, R; Sini, S; Hatha, M; Saravanane, N; Sudhakar, M

    2016-12-01

    A remote sensing technique has been developed to detect physiological condition of phytoplankton using in situ and moderate imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data. The recurring massive mixed algal bloom of diatom and Noctiluca scintillans in the Northern Arabian Sea during winter-spring was used as test bed to study formation, growth and degradation of phytoplankton. The ratio of chlorophyll (chl) to particulate organic carbon (POC) was considered as an indicator of phytoplankton physiological condition and used for the approach development. Algal blooms represent the areas of new production, and therefore, knowledge of their degradation is important to the study microbial loop and export carbon flux. Relation of chl/POC ratio with bacterial abundance revealed Gaussian distribution. Bacteria were strongly correlated with POC, and hence, the latter which is available from satellite data could be used as a proxy for remote assessment of bacteria. Thresholds for active and degrading phytoplankton were determined using the ratio computed from the satellite data. The criteria were implemented on MODIS data to generate an image representing distribution of degrading algal bloom. Bacteria abundance data from two validation cruises during dinoflagellate and cyanobacteria bloom confirmed well match up of phytoplankton degradation information from the satellite. Comparison of environmental parameters during decay phase of dinoflagellate (N. scintillans bloom (winter) and Trichodesmium bloom (summer) revealed that degradation after active Trichodesmium bloom was more severe as compared to the N. scintillans. The present study also highlights the prediction capability of phytoplankton degradation using a time series of satellite retrieved chlorophyll/POC images.

  3. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, Michael G.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2016-06-01

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998-1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change.

  4. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, Michael G; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J

    2016-06-09

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998-1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change.

  5. Research on Phytoplankton Community of Dianchi Lake%滇池浮游藻类群落构成调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施择; 李爱军; 张榆霞; 铁程; 赵琦林; 李颖; 金玉

    2014-01-01

    The species composition and temporal distribution of Dianchi phytoplankton was studied in May 2012 and December. A total of 159 algae species belonging to 66 genera, 8 phyla were identified. The dominant taxa were Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta, with the species number in the order of Chlorophyta > Cyanophyta. The average density of phytoplankton community reached 1�398 × 108 cell/L and 2�180 × 108 cell /L in May and December separately. Microcystis Kutz, Cyanophyta, was the highest cell proportion. The average density of phytoplankton community was higher in northern lake than that in southern lake in May, but this density was lower in northern lake than that in southern and middle lake in December. Algal biomass was significantly higher in outer lake than inner lake, but there was higher cell proportion of Chlorophyta in inner lake than outer lake. Algal biomass was significantly higher in December than in May. Compared with the phytoplankton investigation in Dianchi Lake from April 2006 to May 2007, few difference was found about the number of algae species, common species, dominant species and biomass levels in Dianchi Lake ( mostly outer lake of Dianchi) .%对滇池浮游藻类群落组成和空间分布开展了2次调查,鉴定出藻类8门66属159种及变种,绿藻种类最多,蓝藻次之。5、12月滇池全湖平均藻类密度分别为1�398×108、2�180×108个/升,蓝藻门微囊藻属为优势藻类。5月的调查中滇池外海藻类生物量呈北高南低的格局,而12月则呈现南部和中部高,北部低。外海的藻类生物量明显高于草海,草海藻类群落构成与外海明显不同,主要表现为绿藻门藻类所占比例较高。12月滇池外海及全湖藻类生物量都显著高于5月。与上一次(2006-2007年)滇池浮游藻类的系统调查相比,滇池(主要是外海)浮游藻类在物种数量、常见藻类、优势藻类及生物量水平方面与之接近。

  6. Seasonal succession of phytoplankton in response to the variation of environmental factors in the Gaolan River, Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chengrong; Zhang, Lang; Zheng, Yangzhong; Li, Dunhai

    2013-07-01

    To understand the responses of a freshwater ecosystem to the impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), phytoplankton was monitored in the tributaries of the TGR area. From August 2010 to July 2011, algal species composition, abundance, chlorophyll a and other environmental parameters were investigated in the Gaolan River, which is a tributary of Xiangxi River. Thirty-one algal genera from seven phyla were identified. Results show that the lowest concentrations of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were 0.06 mg/L and 1.08 mg/L, respectively. The values of TP and TN exceeded the threshold concentration of the eutrophic state suggested for freshwater bodies. In the Gaolan River, the succession of phytoplankton showed clear seasonal characteristics. Different dominant species were observed among seasons under the control of environment factors. In spring and summer, the dominant species were Nitzschia sp. and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (L.) Ralfs, the limiting nutrient was NO{3/-}-N, and the key environmental factor for phytoplankton population succession was water temperature (WT). In autumn and winter, the dominant species were A. flos-aquae and Chlorella sp., the limiting nutrient was PO{4/3-}-P, and the key environmental factors were transparency and WT. This study illustrates the influence of physical and chemical factors on phytoplankton seasonal succession in a tributary of TGR since the downstream regions of Xiangxi River and Gaolan River became reservoirs after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam. We suggest that this activity has significantly affected water quality in the dam area.

  7. Phytoplankton-specific response to enrichment of phosphorus-rich surface waters with ammonium, nitrate, and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Derek B; Bogard, Matthew J; Finlay, Kerri; Bunting, Lynda; Leavitt, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Supply of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) to the biosphere has tripled since 1960; however, little is known of how in situ response to N fertilisation differs among phytoplankton, whether species response varies with the chemical form of N, or how interpretation of N effects is influenced by the method of analysis (microscopy, pigment biomarkers). To address these issues, we conducted two 21-day in situ mesocosm (3140 L) experiments to quantify the species- and genus-specific responses of phytoplankton to fertilisation of P-rich lake waters with ammonium (NH(4)(+)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)), and urea ([NH(2)](2)CO). Phytoplankton abundance was estimated using both microscopic enumeration of cell densities and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of algal pigments. We found that total algal biomass increased 200% and 350% following fertilisation with NO(3)(-) and chemically-reduced N (NH(4)(+), urea), respectively, although 144 individual taxa exhibited distinctive responses to N, including compound-specific stimulation (Planktothrix agardhii and NH(4)(+)), increased biomass with chemically-reduced N alone (Scenedesmus spp., Coelastrum astroideum) and no response (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Ceratium hirundinella). Principle components analyses (PCA) captured 53.2-69.9% of variation in experimental assemblages irrespective of the degree of taxonomic resolution of analysis. PCA of species-level data revealed that congeneric taxa exhibited common responses to fertilisation regimes (e.g., Microcystis aeruginosa, M. flos-aquae, M. botrys), whereas genera within the same division had widely divergent responses to added N (e.g., Anabaena, Planktothrix, Microcystis). Least-squares regression analysis demonstrated that changes in phytoplankton biomass determined by microscopy were correlated significantly (p<0.005) with variations in HPLC-derived concentrations of biomarker pigments (r(2) = 0.13-0.64) from all major algal groups, although HPLC tended to

  8. Phytoplankton-specific response to enrichment of phosphorus-rich surface waters with ammonium, nitrate, and urea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B Donald

    Full Text Available Supply of anthropogenic nitrogen (N to the biosphere has tripled since 1960; however, little is known of how in situ response to N fertilisation differs among phytoplankton, whether species response varies with the chemical form of N, or how interpretation of N effects is influenced by the method of analysis (microscopy, pigment biomarkers. To address these issues, we conducted two 21-day in situ mesocosm (3140 L experiments to quantify the species- and genus-specific responses of phytoplankton to fertilisation of P-rich lake waters with ammonium (NH(4(+, nitrate (NO(3(-, and urea ([NH(2](2CO. Phytoplankton abundance was estimated using both microscopic enumeration of cell densities and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC analysis of algal pigments. We found that total algal biomass increased 200% and 350% following fertilisation with NO(3(- and chemically-reduced N (NH(4(+, urea, respectively, although 144 individual taxa exhibited distinctive responses to N, including compound-specific stimulation (Planktothrix agardhii and NH(4(+, increased biomass with chemically-reduced N alone (Scenedesmus spp., Coelastrum astroideum and no response (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Ceratium hirundinella. Principle components analyses (PCA captured 53.2-69.9% of variation in experimental assemblages irrespective of the degree of taxonomic resolution of analysis. PCA of species-level data revealed that congeneric taxa exhibited common responses to fertilisation regimes (e.g., Microcystis aeruginosa, M. flos-aquae, M. botrys, whereas genera within the same division had widely divergent responses to added N (e.g., Anabaena, Planktothrix, Microcystis. Least-squares regression analysis demonstrated that changes in phytoplankton biomass determined by microscopy were correlated significantly (p<0.005 with variations in HPLC-derived concentrations of biomarker pigments (r(2 = 0.13-0.64 from all major algal groups, although HPLC tended to underestimate the

  9. Responses of phytoplankton and Hyalella azteca to agrichemical mixtures in a constructed wetland mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed the capability of a constructed wetland to mitigate toxicity of a variety of possible mixtures such as nutrients only (N, P), pesticides only (atrazine, S-metolachlor, permethrin), and nutrients+pesticides on phytoplankton chlorophyll a, 48 h aqueous Hyalella azteca survival, and 10 d se...

  10. Do varying aquatic plant species affect phytoplankton and crustacean responses to a nitrogen-permethrin mixture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulically connected wetland microcosms vegetated with either Typha latifolia or Myriophyllum aquaticum were amended with an NH4NO3 and permethrin mixture to assess the effectiveness of both plant species in mitigating ecological effects of the pollutant mixture on phytoplankton (as chlorophyll a...

  11. Enhanced carbohydrate production by Southern Ocean phytoplankton in response to in situ iron fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oijen, T; Veldhuis, MJW; Gorbunov, MY; Nishioka, J; van Leeuwe, MA; de Baara, HJW; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Storage carbohydrates (e.g., water-extractable beta-1,3-D-glucan in diatoms) are of key importance for phytoplankton growth in a variable light climate, because they facilitate continued growth of the cells in darkness by providing energy and carbon skeletons for protein synthesis. Here, we tested t

  12. Structure and dynamics of phytoplankton community in the Botafogo reservoir-Pernambuco-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulliari Alan da Silva Tavares de Lira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the structure and dynamics of the phytoplankton in the Botafogo reservoir-PE-Brazil. Phytoplankton assemblages were identified from current literature and density was estimated using an inverted microscope. Concurrently to the sampling of biotic variables, measurements of abiotic parameters, such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH, were determined using field probes and transparency was determined with a Secchi disk. Total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations were determined in laboratory. A total of 24 taxa were identified. Chlorophyta presented the greatest number of species. Species diversity in the reservoir was low throughout the study period. Principal component analysis revealed that Trachelomonas volvocina, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena sp. and Peridinium gatunense were directly correlated with oxygen, turbidity and total nitrogen; Planktosphaeria gelatinosa, P. gatunense and Euglena sp. were directed correlated with total nitrogen; rainfall explained the occurrence of Monoraphidium arcuatum and Chlorella vulgaris.O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar a estrutura e dinâmica do fitoplâncton no reservatório de Botafogo-PE-Brasil. A comunidade fitoplanctônica foi identificada com literatura atualizada e a densidade estimada usando microscópio invertido. Concomitantemente as coletas das variáveis bióticas, foram medidos alguns parâmetros abióticos como temperatura da água, oxigênio dissolvido, condutividade e pH usando sondas de campo e transparência com disco de Secchi. Concentrações de fósforo total e nitrogênio total foram determinados em laboratório. Vinte e quatro táxons foram identificados tendo Chlorophyta apresentado maior número de espécie. A diversidade de espécie no reservatório foi baixa durante todo o período de estudo. A análise de componentes principais mostrou que Trachelomonas volvocina, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena sp. e

  13. The green impact: bacterioplankton response towards a phytoplankton spring bloom in the southern North Sea assessed by comparative metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eWemheuer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms exhibit a severe impact on bacterioplankton communities as they change nutrient availabilities and other environmental factors. In the current study, the response of a bacterioplankton community to a Phaeocystis globosa spring bloom was investigated in the southern North Sea. For this purpose, water samples were taken inside and reference samples outside of an algal spring bloom. Structural changes of the bacterioplankton community were assessed by amplicon-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts generated from environmental DNA and RNA, respectively. Several marine groups responded to bloom presence. The abundance of the Roseobacter RCA cluster and the SAR92 clade significantly increased in bloom presence in the total and active fraction of the bacterial community. Functional changes were investigated by direct sequencing of environmental DNA and mRNA. The corresponding datasets comprised more than 500 million sequences across all samples. Metatranscriptomic data sets were mapped on representative genomes of abundant marine groups present in the samples and on assembled metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets. Differences in gene expression profiles between non-bloom and bloom samples were recorded. The genome-wide gene expression level of Planktomarina temperata, an abundant member of the Roseobacter RCA cluster, was higher inside the bloom. Genes that were differently expressed

  14. A comprehensive insight into functional profiles of free-living microbial community responses to a toxic Akashiwo sanguinea bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Caiyun; Li, Yi; Zhou, Yanyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-10-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are a worldwide problem and can greatly affect ecological processes in aquatic systems, but its impacts on the functional potential of microbial communities are limited. In this study, a high-throughput microarray-based technology (GeoChip) was used to profile the functional potential of free-living microbes from the Xiamen Sea Area in response to a 2011 Akashiwo sanguinea bloom. The bloom altered the overall community functional structure. Genes that were significantly (p information on the relationship of algae to other microbes in aquatic systems, and provides new insights into our understanding of ecological impacts of phytoplankton blooms.

  15. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Aaron W E; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  16. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W E Galloway

    Full Text Available Essential fatty acids (EFA, which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting

  17. Studies on Antarctic phytoplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pant, A.

    Ice-edge data from a single polynya station at 70 degrees S 11 degrees E over a 2-month period is assessed in relation to previously published work in similar environments. The phytoplankton community seems to be composed of 2 quite different...

  18. Phytoplankton community structure and nitrogen nutrition in Leeuwin Current and coastal waters off the Gascoyne region of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Christine E.; Waite, Anya M.; Thompson, Peter A.; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B.

    2007-04-01

    Within the coastal waters of the eastern Indian Ocean adjacent to Western Australia, we tested the hypothesis that regenerated production (and, by inference, the microbial food web) would predominate in oligotrophic Leeuwin Current (LC) and offshore (OS) surface waters. Conversely, we expected that new production would be more important within the ˜5 times more productive shelf countercurrents (Ningaloo and Capes Currents; NC&CC) and the LC&OS deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Phytoplankton species composition and abundance were assessed using both light microscopy and chemotaxonomic methods, and isotopic nitrogen uptake experiments ( 15NO 3-, 15NH 4+) were performed at trace (0.05 μM) and saturating (5.0 μM) levels. Phytoplankton community structure was statistically distinct between LC&OS and countercurrent regions. Picoplankton (unicellular cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes) accounted for a mean of 55-65% of pigment biomass in LC&OS waters, with haptophytes as the other primary contributor (21-32%). Conversely, within countercurrent and shelf regions, diatoms (up to 22%) and haptophytes (up to 57%) were more abundant, although cyanobacteria still played an important role (up to 40% of pigment biomass). Absolute NO 3- uptake rates for all samples ranged between 0.5 and 7.1 nmol L -1 h -1, and in countercurrent waters were not significantly different at the surface (3.0±2.1 nmol L -1 h -1; mean±SD) compared to the DCM (2.7±2.3 nmol L -1 h -1). However, in LC&OS waters, rates were significantly lower at the surface (1.2±0.7 nmol L -1 h -1) than the DCM (3.9±2.5 nmol L -1 h -1; p=0.05). These values represent conservative estimates for the region due to methodological difficulties encountered with nitrogen uptake experiments in these oligotrophic waters. In contrast with the distinct community composition between different water types, mean estimates of the f-ratio were similar across sampling depths and water types: 0.17±0.07 at the surface and 0.16±0.06 at

  19. Warming will affect phytoplankton differently: evidence through a mechanistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, I Emma; Rouco, Mónica; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2011-12-07

    Although the consequences of global warming in aquatic ecosystems are only beginning to be revealed, a key to forecasting the impact on aquatic communities is an understanding of individual species' vulnerability to increased temperature. Despite their microscopic size, phytoplankton support about half of the global primary production, drive essential biogeochemical cycles and represent the basis of the aquatic food web. At present, it is known that phytoplankton are important targets and, consequently, harbingers of climate change in aquatic systems. Therefore, investigating the capacity of phytoplankton to adapt to the predicted warming has become a relevant issue. However, considering the polyphyletic complexity of the phytoplankton community, different responses to increased temperature are expected. We experimentally tested the effects of warming on 12 species of phytoplankton isolated from a variety of environments by using a mechanistic approach able to assess evolutionary adaptation (the so-called ratchet technique). We found different degrees of tolerance to temperature rises and an interspecific capacity for genetic adaptation. The thermal resistance level reached by each species is discussed in relation to their respective original habitats. Our study additionally provides evidence on the most resistant phytoplankton groups in a future warming scenario.

  20. Interactive Effect of UVR and Phosphorus on the Coastal Phytoplankton Community of the Western Mediterranean Sea: Unravelling Eco-Physiological Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presentación Carrillo

    Full Text Available Some of the most important effects of global change on coastal marine systems include increasing nutrient inputs and higher levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm, which could affect primary producers, a key trophic link to the functioning of marine food webs. However, interactive effects of both factors on the phytoplankton community have not been assessed for the Mediterranean Sea. An in situ factorial experiment, with two levels of ultraviolet solar radiation (UVR+PAR vs. PAR and nutrients (control vs. P-enriched, was performed to evaluate single and UVR×P effects on metabolic, enzymatic, stoichiometric and structural phytoplanktonic variables. While most phytoplankton variables were not affected by UVR, dissolved phosphatase (APAEX and algal P content increased in the presence of UVR, which was interpreted as an acclimation mechanism of algae to oligotrophic marine waters. Synergistic UVR×P interactive effects were positive on photosynthetic variables (i.e., maximal electron transport rate, ETRmax, but negative on primary production and phytoplankton biomass because the pulse of P unmasked the inhibitory effect of UVR. This unmasking effect might be related to greater photodamage caused by an excess of electron flux after a P pulse (higher ETRmax without an efficient release of carbon as the mechanism to dissipate the reducing power of photosynthetic electron transport.

  1. PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITY VARIATION AND RELATIONSHIP WITH ENVIROMENTAL FACTORS IN QINGSHANHU RESERVOIR, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE%浙江青山水库浮游植物群落结构变化及与环境因子的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛海燕; 姚佳玫; 何剑波; 刘明亮; 韩轶才; 虞左明

    2015-01-01

    于2009年按季度对浙江省临安市内的青山水库进行调查,测定了水体环境因子、浮游植物群落,采用营养状态指数法对水库水质现状进行了分析和评价,并探讨了浮游植物与环境因子之间的关系.结果表明:青山水库处于轻度富营养化和中度富营养化之间,水库入库处营养状态综合指数高于库中和大坝处.调查期间共发现浮游植物7门40属89种.不同季节浮游植物主要优势种类不同,春季以硅藻、隐藻和甲藻为主,夏季以蓝藻和绿藻为主,秋季以蓝藻、硅藻和隐藻为主,冬季以硅藻和隐藻为主.相关分析表明,青山水库浮游植物密度与出入库流量和透明度呈显著负相关,与总磷呈显著正相关.典范对应分析(CCA)表明,出入库流量、水温、溶解氧和营养盐是影响水体浮游植物分布格局的重要环境因子.%Qingshan Reservoir is an important utilization large reservoir which was built in 1964.Its eco-environment and water management have a great significance on sustainable development of this area.With the fast economical development,the water quality has been declined as an amount of pollutants discharged.To explore the characteristics of the phytoplankton community structure and the response of water quality,a survey was carried out quarterly in Qingshan Reservoir in 2009.Based on the analysis of phytoplankton and water samples from inflow,center and dam in Qingshan Reservoir,the characteristics of community structure and abundance distribution were studied,and the water situation was evaluated.Cell number and species identification were performed by light microscope.The dominant population,species diversity and community structure of phytoplankton were determined as well.A total of 89 species in 40 genera and 7 divisions were identified,which the most abundant group was Chlorophyta,with 33 species that account for 37% of total species,followed by Bacillariophyta (27 species

  2. Hydrology and phytoplankton community structure at Itamaracá-Pernambuco (Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luise Koening

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Quali-quantitative studies and hydrologic parameters were carried out in the profiles 6 (Orange and 7 (Catuama during the Victor Hensen cruise, in accordance with the bilateral scientific cooperation agreement Brazil/Germany. Hydrologically a zone of thermic and saline stability characterizes the superficial layer. The nutrient concentrations were generally low on the surface and higher at levels surpassing 100m in depth. 102 taxa were identified including diatoms (49, dinoflagellates (49, bluegreen algae (3, and euglenophyceae (1. The diversity and evenness were high, surpassing the environmental equilibrium. The clustering of samples showed evidence of 2 main groups, one encompassing the stations 32 and 38, characterized predominantly by Oscillatoria erythraeum, and another encompassing the remaining stations, characterized by dinoflagellates and diatoms. The clustering of species involved 4 groups, the biggest being oceanic marine species (49 species and coastal and eurihaline marine species (31 species. The phytoplankton density varied from 50,000 cell.l-1 to 590,000 cell.l-1, characterizing an oligotrophic environment.Estudos hidrológicos e fitoplanctônicos foram realizados em dois perfis perpendiculares à costa, em frente à Ilha de Itamaracá-PE (perfis Orange e Catuama, durante a Expedição do Navio de Pesquisas Victor Hensen, dentro do acordo de cooperação bilateral celebrado entre o Departamento de Oceanografia da UFPE e o Centro de Ecologia Marinha Tropical (ZMT-Bremen-Alemanha. A camada superficial está caracterizada por uma zona de estabilidade térmica e salina. As concentrações de nutrientes foram geralmente mais baixas na superfície e mais elevadas em profundidades acima de 100m. Foram identificados 102 táxons, incluindo 49 diatomáceas, 49 dinoflagelados, 3 cianofíceas e 1 euglenofícea. A diversidade específica e equitabilidade foram elevadas, indicando um equilíbrio ambiental. A associação das amostras

  3. Protist community composition during early phytoplankton blooms in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, C.; Monchy, S.; Genitsaris, S.; Christaki, U.

    2014-10-01

    Microbial eukaryotic community composition was examined by 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing, during the early phase of spring phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization, off Kerguelen Island in the Southern Ocean (KEOPS2 cruise). A total of 999 operational taxonomical units (OTUs), affiliated to 30 known high-level taxonomic groups, were retrieved from 16 samples collected in the upper 300 m water column. The alveolata group was the most abundant in terms of sequence number and diversity (696 OTUs). The majority of alveolata sequences were affiliated to Dinophyceae and to two major groups of marine alveolates (MALV-I and MALV-II). In the upper 180 m, only 13% of the OTUs were shared between of the fertilized stations and the reference site characterized by high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters. Fungi and Cercozoa were present in iron-fertilized waters, but almost absent in the HNLC samples, while Haptophyta and Chlorophyta characterized the HNLC sample. Finally, the 300 m depth samples of all stations were differentiated by the presence of MALV-II and Radiolaria. Multivariate analysis, examining the level of similarity between different samples, showed that protistan assemblages differed significantly between the HNLC and iron-fertilized stations, but also between the diverse iron-fertilized blooms.

  4. Interaction among non-toxic phytoplankton, toxic phytoplankton and zooplankton: inferences from field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shovonlal; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Das, Partha; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2007-02-01

    We explore the mutual dependencies and interactions among different groups of species of the plankton population, based on an analysis of the long-term field observations carried out by our group in the North-West coast of the Bay of Bengal. The plankton community is structured into three groups of species, namely, non-toxic phytoplankton (NTP), toxic phytoplankton (TPP) and zooplankton. To find the pair-wise dependencies among the three groups of plankton, Pearson and partial correlation coefficients are calculated. To explore the simultaneous interaction among all the three groups, a time series analysis is performed. Following an Expectation Maximization (E-M) algorithm, those data points which are missing due to irregularities in sampling are estimated, and with the completed data set a Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) model is analyzed. The overall analysis demonstrates that toxin-producing phytoplankton play two distinct roles: the inhibition on consumption of toxic substances reduces the abundance of zooplankton, and the toxic materials released by TPP significantly compensate for the competitive disadvantages among phytoplankton species. Our study suggests that the presence of TPP might be a possible cause for the generation of a complex interaction among the large number of phytoplankton and zooplankton species that might be responsible for the prolonged coexistence of the plankton species in a fluctuating biomass.

  5. Upwelling and anthropogenic forcing on phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes in the Zhejiang coastal area over the last 100 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanshan; XING Lei; ZHANG Hailong; FENG Xuwen; YANG Haili; ZHAO Meixun

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton productivity and community structure in marginal seas have been altered significantly dur-ing the past three decades, but it is still a challenge to distinguish the forcing mechanisms between climate change and anthropogenic activities. High time-resolution biomarker records of two 210Pb-dated sediment cores (#34:28.5°N, 122.272°E;CJ12-1269:28.861 9°N, 122.515 3°E) from the Min-Zhe coastal mud area were compared to reveal changes of phytoplankton productivity and community structure over the past 100 years. Phytoplankton productivity started to increase gradually from the 1970s and increased rapidly after the late 1990s at Site #34;and it started to increase gradually from the middle 1960s and increased rapidly after the late 1980s at Site CJ12-1269. Productivity of Core CJ12-1269 was higher than that of Core #34. Phy-toplankton community structure variations displayed opposite patterns in the two cores. The decreasing D/B (dinosterol/brassicasterol) ratio of Core #34 since the 1960s revealed increased diatom contribution to total productivity. In contrast, the increasing D/B ratio of Core CJ12-1269 since the 1950s indicated in-creased dinoflagellate contribution to total productivity. Both the productivity increase and the increased dinoflagellate contribution in Core CJ12-1269 since the 1950-1960s were mainly caused by anthropogenic activities, as the location was closer to the Changjiang River Estuary with higher nutrient concentration and decreasing Si/N ratios. However, increased diatom contribution in Core #34 is proposed to be caused by increased coastal upwelling, with higher nutrient concentration and higher Si/N ratios.

  6. 万峰湖浮游植物群落的时空分布%Temporal and spatial characteristics of phytoplankton community in Wanfeng Reservoir.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秋华; 商立海; 李广辉; 冯新斌; 闫海鱼

    2011-01-01

    于2009年9月(夏季)和2010年1月(冬季)对万峰湖(水库)的浮游植物群落结构时空分布特征进行研究.在万峰湖共监测到浮游植物49种,其中夏季水库表层(0-10 m)浮游植物优势种为蓝藻门中的拟柱孢藻(Cylindrospermopsis rackiborskii),底层为硅藻门中肘状针杆藻(Synedra ulna)和梅尼小环藻(Cyclotella meneghiniana);在冬季以硅藻门中的小环藻(Cyclotella sp.)和梅尼小环藻为主.夏季,浮游植物表层丰度为13.0×104~54.6×104 cells·L-1,野鸭滩(S2)最高,而以坝艾(S4)浮游植物丰度最低;浮游植物主要集中在表层(0~10 m),以蓝藻组成为主,蓝藻丰度百分数在大坝(S1)最高,达到90.3%,香浓多样性指数夏季高于冬季,夏季表层均匀度指数最低.冬季,浮游植物丰度为17.43×104~25.28×104 cells·L-1,浮游植物主要集中在表层(0~10 m)和中层(10~50 m),水体的各层硅藻所占比例均在90%以上.从浮游植物群落结构和丰度看,万峰湖处于中营养状态,冬季水质好于夏季.夏冬两季浮游植物丰度与水体的温度及水深都表现出了较强的相关关系.%To understand the temporal and spatial characteristics of phytoplankton community structure in Wanfeng, a deep altiplano reservoir, phytoplankton was measured in September, 2009 and January, 2010. Forty-nine species of algae were identified. In summer the community was dominated by Cylindrospermopsis rackiborskii at the surface (0-10 m) and at the bottom ( >60 m) Synedra ulna and Cyclotella meneghiniana became dominant, but in winter the community was dominated by Synedra ulna and Cyclotella meneghiniana. The phytoplankton abundance ranged from 13. 0×104 to 54. 6×104 cells · L-1 in summer and 17. 43 ×104 to 25. 28×104 cells · L-1 in winter. The maximum phytoplankton abundance was at Yeyatang ( S2) , but the minimum phytoplankton abundance was at Baai ( S4). In summer, phytoplankton collected at the surface ( 0-10 m) was primarily composed

  7. Estimation of Phytoplankton Responses to Hurricane Gonu over the Arabian Sea Based on Ocean Color Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study the authors investigated phytoplankton variations in the Arabian Sea associated with Hurricane Gonu using remote-sensing data of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a, sea surface temperature (SST and winds. Additional data sets used for the study included the hurricane and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth data. Hurricane Gonu, presenting extremely powerful wind intensity, originated over the central Arabian Sea (near 67.7ºE, 15.1ºN on June 2, 2007; it traveled along a northwestward direction and made landfall in Iran around June 7. Before Hurricane Gonu, Chl-a data indicated relatively low phytoplankton biomass (0.05-0.2 mg m-3, along with generally high SST (>28.5 ºC and weak wind (<10 m s-1 in the Arabian Sea. Shortly after Gonu’s passage, two phytoplankton blooms were observed northeast of Oman (Chl-a of 3.5 mg m-3 and in the eastern central Arabian Sea (Chl-a of 0.4 mg m-3, with up to 10-fold increase in surface Chl-a concentrations, respectively. The Chl-a in the two post-hurricane blooms were 46% and 42% larger than those in June of other years, respectively. The two blooms may be attributed to the storm-induced nutrient uptake, since hurricane can influence intensively both dynamical and biological processes through vertical mixing and Ekman Pumping.

  8. Phytobenthos and phytoplankton community changes upon exposure to a sunflower oil spill in a South African protected freshwater wetland

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available . At the intracellular level, phytoplankton chlorophyll a and b concentrations as physiological variables were more sensitive indicators of the adverse effects of sunflower oil than the 72 h Selenastrum capricornutum algal bioassay conducted....

  9. Spatial variability in phytoplankton community structure along the eastern Arabian Sea during the onset of south-west monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ahmed, A.; Kurian, S.; Gauns, M.; ChndrasekharaRao, A.V.; Mulla, A.; Naik, B.; Naik, H.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    .H., 2003. Phytoplankton photopigments as indicators of estuarine and coastal eutrophication. BioScience. 53(10), 953-964. Partensky, F., Hess, W.R., Vaulot, D., 1999. Prochlorococcus, a marine photosynthetic prokaryote of global significance. Microbiol...

  10. Community and ecosystem responses to a pulsed pesticide disturbance in freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Amy L; DeVanna, Kristen M; Rubeck-Schurtz, C Nichole; Tuhela, Laura; Grunkemeyer, Heather

    2008-08-01

    Pesticides have been shown to be detrimental to key groups of freshwater organisms including cladocerans, odonates, and amphibians. However, less is known about the response of freshwater communities and ecosystems to pesticide disturbances as they occur in nature. Using outdoor aquatic mesocosms, we assembled identical and diverse replicate freshwater plankton food webs obtained from an adjacent pond. We established three pesticide treatments consisting of pulses of a common pesticide Sevin with the active ingredient carbaryl, at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 20 microg carbaryl/ml, and a pesticide-free control treatment. We monitored the response of microbial, phytoplankton, and zooplankton communities in addition to oxygen concentrations. Carbaryl concentrations peaked shortly after Sevin application and degraded quickly and treatment differences were undetectable after 30 days. Zooplankton richness, diversity, abundance, and oxygen concentrations all decreased in pulsed treatments, while phytoplankton and microbial abundance increased. Zooplankton composition in the high pesticide treatment consisted primarily of rotifers as compared to dominance by copepods in the other three treatments. While many of the community and ecosystem properties showed signs of recovery within 40 days after the pulsed pesticide disturbance, important and significant differences remained in the microbial, phytoplankton and zooplankton communities after the pesticide degraded.

  11. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  12. Unravel the submesoscale dynamics of the phytoplanktonic community in the NW Mediterranean Sea by in situ observations: the 2015 OSCAHR cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrec, Pierre; Doglioli, Andrea M.; Grégori, Gérald; Della Penna, Alice; Wagener, Thibaut; Rougier, Gille; Bhairy, Nagib; Dugenne, Mathilde; Lahbib, Soumaya; Thyssen, Melilotus

    2017-04-01

    Submesoscale phenomena have been recently recognized as a key factor in physical-biological-biogeochemical interactions, even if it remains unclear how these processes affect the global state of the ocean. Significant large-scale impacts of submesoscale structures on primary production and influence on the phytoplankton community structure and diversity have also been reported. In the past decade submesoscale dynamics have been predominately studied through the analysis of numerical simulations. Observing the coupled physical and biogeochemical variability at this scale remains challenging due to the ephemeral nature of submesoscale structures. The in-situ study of such structures necessitates multidisciplinary approaches involving in situ observations, remote sensing and modeling. Last progresses in biogeochemical sensor development and advanced methodology including Lagrangian real-time adaptative strategies represent outstanding opportunities. The OSCAHR (Observing Submesoscale Coupling At High Resolution) campaign has been conducted thanks to a multidisciplinary approach in order to improve the understanding of submesoscale processes. An ephemeral submesoscale structure was first identified in the Ligurian Sea in fall 2015 using both satellite and numerical modeling data before the campaign. Afterwards, advanced observing systems for the physical, biological and biogeochemical characterization of the sea surface layer at a high spatial and temporal frequency were deployed during a 10-days cruise. A MVP (Moving Vessel Profiler) was used to obtain high resolution CTD profiles associated to a new pumping system with 1-m vertical resolution. Moreover, along the ship track, in addition to the standard measurements of seawater surface samples (Chl-a, nutrients, O2, SST, SSS …), we deployed an automated flow cytometer for near real-time characterization of phytoplankton functional groups (from micro-phytoplankton down to cyanobacteria). The observed submesoscale

  13. Biological production, export efficiency, and phytoplankton communities across 8000 km of the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E. M.; Durkin, C. A.; Hennon, G. M. M.; Ribalet, F.; Stanley, R. H. R.

    2017-07-01

    In situ oxygen tracers (triple oxygen isotope and oxygen/argon ratios) were used to evaluate meridional trends in surface biological production and export efficiency across 8000 km of the tropical and subtropical South Atlantic in March-May 2013. We used observations of picophytoplankton, nanophytoplankton, and microphytoplankton to evaluate community structure and diversity and assessed the relationships of these characteristics with production, export efficiency, and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes. Rates of productivity were relatively uniform along most of the transect with net community production (NCP) between 0 and 10 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, gross primary production (GPP) between 40 and 100 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, and NCP/GPP, a measure of export efficiency, ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 (0.05-0.1 in carbon units). However, notable exceptions to this basin-scale homogeneity included two locations with highly enhanced NCP and export efficiency compared to surrounding regions. Export of POC and particulate nitrogen, derived from sediment traps, correlated with GPP across the transect, over which the surface community was dominated numerically by picophytoplankton. NCP, however, did not correlate with POC flux; the mean difference between NCP and POC flux was similar to published estimates of dissolved organic carbon export from the surface ocean. The interrelated rates of production presented in this work contribute to the understanding, building on the framework of better-studied ocean basins, of how carbon is biologically transported between the atmosphere and the deep ocean.

  14. Biodiversity increases functional and compositional resistance, but decreases resilience in phytoplankton communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Jan M; De Laender, Frederik; Sabbe, Koen; Janssen, Colin R

    2016-12-01

    There is now ample evidence that biodiversity stabilizes aggregated ecosystem functions, such as primary production, in changing environments. In primary producer systems, this stabilizing effect is found to be driven by higher functional resistance (i.e., reduced changes in functions by environmental changes) rather than through higher functional resilience (i.e., rapid recovery following environmental changes) in more diverse systems. The stability of aggregated ecosystem functions directly depends on changes in species composition and by consequence their functional contributions to ecosystem functions. Still, it remains only theoretically explored how biodiversity can stabilize ecosystem functions by affecting compositional stability. Here, we demonstrate how biodiversity effects on compositional stability drive biodiversity effects on functional stability in diatom communities. In a microcosm experiment, we exposed 39 communities of five different levels of species richness (1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 species) to three concentrations of a chemical stressor (0, 25, and 250 μg/L atrazine) for four weeks, after which all communities were transferred to atrazine-free medium for three more weeks. Biodiversity simultaneously increased, increasing functional and compositional resistance, but decreased functional and compositional resilience. These results confirm the theoretically proposed link between biodiversity effects on functional and compositional stability in primary producer systems, and provide a mechanistic underpinning for observed biodiversity-stability relationships. Finally, we discuss how higher compositional stability can be expected to become increasingly important in stabilizing ecosystem functions under field conditions when multiple environmental stressors fluctuate simultaneously. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Cross-Diffusion Induced Turing Instability and Amplitude Equation for a Toxic-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton Model with Nonmonotonic Functional Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Renji; Dai, Binxiang

    2017-06-01

    The spatiotemporal pattern induced by cross-diffusion of a toxic-phytoplankton-zooplankton model with nonmonotonic functional response is investigated in this paper. The linear stability analysis shows that cross-diffusion is the key mechanism for the formation of spatial patterns. By taking cross-diffusion rate as bifurcation parameter, we derive amplitude equations near the Turing bifurcation point for the excited modes in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory, and the stability analysis of the amplitude equations interprets the structural transitions and stability of various forms of Turing patterns. Furthermore, we illustrate the theoretical results via numerical simulations. It is shown that the spatiotemporal distribution of the plankton is homogeneous in the absence of cross-diffusion. However, when the cross-diffusivity is greater than the critical value, the spatiotemporal distribution of all the plankton species becomes inhomogeneous in spaces and results in different kinds of patterns: spot, stripe, and the mixture of spot and stripe patterns depending on the cross-diffusivity. Simultaneously, the impact of toxin-producing rate of toxic-phytoplankton (TPP) species and natural death rate of zooplankton species on pattern selection is also explored.

  16. Seasonal changes of phytoplankton production in response to high nitrogen load in the Bay of Seine

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Helguen, S.; Maguer, J.-F.; Madec, C.

    2003-04-01

    Seasonal changes of uptake of nitrogenous nutrients and regeneration were investigated in nitrogen rich waters of the Bay of Seine. Uptake of nitrogen nutrients (NO_3-, NH_4^+ and urea), and NH_4^+ regeneration, were measured using the 15N isotope technique in three different water masses along a salinity gradient (salinity: 27-29, 31-32 and 34-35). The Seine river add very high quantities of inorganic nitrogen to the coastal waters mainly in the form of nitrate (up to 120 μmol l-1). In the plume, the nitrate concentration remained high (> 10 μmol l-1) during all the seasons. In these nitrate enrich waters, phytoplankton attained high biomass (20-25 μg chla l-1). Species succession was marked by blooms formation from the beginning of spring until the end of summer. The high biomass was represented by microplankton generally dominated by diatom species during all the seasons. However, nano- and picoplankton biomass increased significantly during the summer and represented up to 50% of the total biomass of phytoplankton. Nitrogen uptake rates were higher in the Seine Bay plume (0.5 μmol l-1 h-1) than the other coastal waters. Although, the N uptake was high, it was limited by light, which was due to the high turbidity and strong vertical mixing in these plume waters. The seasonal variations in nitrogen uptake demonstrated that during spring, up to 80% of nitrogen was utilized by microplancton whereas in summer, all the fractions utilized nitrogen significantly. In spring, nitrate was the major nitrogen nutrient taken up (˜ 80% of total nitrogen uptake). During other seasons, ammonium and urea were the highly utilized nitrogen compounds (up to 95% of total nitrogen uptake). Ammonium regeneration by microhétérotrophs increased significantly in the plume waters during the spring bloom and remained high (> 0.1 μmol l-1 h-1) until the end of summer. The high and prolonged use of NH_4^+ was due to high autochthonous production, fulfil 40 to 100% of NH_4^+ demand of

  17. A new approach to assess the effects of oil spills on phytoplankton community during the "Serious Game" experiment (MEDESS-4MS Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Emanuela; Servadei, Irene; Piermattei, Viviana; Bonamano, Simone; Madonia, Alice; Guerrini, Franca; Marcelli, Marco; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2016-11-01

    The "Serious Game" experiment was focused on the development of an integrated monitoring approach to oil spill events in the Mediterranean Sea; it was carried out in the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea, an area that is reported to have intense marine traffic often connected to operational oil discharges. Our experiment was designed in order to develop a rapid assessment of oil spill effects on phytoplankton community through the integration of satellite imagery, in situ sampling and new low-cost technologies. In particular, satellite images were frequently acquired to monitor the study area. When the oil slick was detected, a real time sampling survey was carried out with the support of the Italian Coast Guards, employed as Voluntary Observing Ships for the identification of the polluted area, as well as for sampling and measuring activities. During the experiment, numerous analyses were carried out on the controls (C1, C5, E1, E5) and oiled (M1, M2, M4) stations to assess the most useful methods to quantify the impact of oil slick on the phytoplankton community. Among the numerous methods used, phytoplankton qualitative and quantitative evaluation was indispensable to appreciate subtle changes among the different phytoplankton groups; it is therefore a crucial analysis to observe the short negative effects of oil exposure on microalgae. In addition, the C:N ratio was shown to be a reliable parameter to evaluate the presence of oil compounds in the particulate fraction. Also the new low-cost technology used (the vertical profiler T-FLaPpro) was proved to be an efficient support to the rapid assessment of the oil impact along the water column.

  18. Seasonal characteristics of size-fractionated phytoplankton community and fate of photosynthesized carbon in a sub-Antarctic area (Straits of Magellan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decembrini, Franco; Bergamasco, Alessandro; Mangoni, Olga

    2014-08-01

    Phytoplankton community size drives the rates of biogenic carbon and the overall structure and dynamics of the marine pelagic food web. The Straits of Magellan, an inland passage between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, can be separated into three main sub-basins: the western-Pacific, the V-shaped central zone, and the eastern-Atlantic. To provide insights into the food structure of the phytoplankton community, size-fractionated chlorophyll a concentration and primary production rates were measured across the three sectors of the Magellan Straits in four periods between 1989 and 1995 in the Straits. Phytoplanktonic biomass and production ratios provided ecological insights into the food web structure, including the relevance of grazing in its largest fraction. The micro-phytoplanktonic fraction (> 10 μm) in the Pacific sub-basin is significantly less abundant than in the Central and Atlantic ones. Conversely, the lowest abundance of the pico-fraction (partially spilling out into the Atlantic sector. The most active grazing activities occur in the Central sub-basin during the spring bloom and appear even stronger in summer. Our results pinpoint also that the basic levels of the planktonic food web rely on the nanophytoplankton (10-2 μm) fraction, which is the main contributor to the continuum multivorous food web. When external energy (e.g. nutrient pulses from land freshwater and water mixing) enters the system, the structure of the plankton in the Straits shifts towards the herbivorous food web and is characterized by the presence of large-size diatoms. This dynamics keeps the system in a persistent mesotrophic state, featuring a lower trophic status than the Antarctic ones but much higher than that of oligotrophic temperate areas.

  19. Revaluating ocean warming impacts on global phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; O'Malley, Robert T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Westberry, Toby K.; Graff, Jason R.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Milligan, Allen J.; Siegel, David A.; Brown, Matthew B.

    2016-03-01

    Global satellite observations document expansions of the low-chlorophyll central ocean gyres and an overall inverse relationship between anomalies in sea surface temperature and phytoplankton chlorophyll concentrations. These findings can provide an invaluable glimpse into potential future ocean changes, but only if the story they tell is accurately interpreted. Chlorophyll is not simply a measure of phytoplankton biomass, but also registers changes in intracellular pigmentation arising from light-driven (photoacclimation) and nutrient-driven physiological responses. Here, we show that the photoacclimation response is an important component of temporal chlorophyll variability across the global ocean. This attribution implies that contemporary relationships between chlorophyll changes and ocean warming are not indicative of proportional changes in productivity, as light-driven decreases in chlorophyll can be associated with constant or even increased photosynthesis. Extension of these results to future change, however, requires further evaluation of how the multifaceted stressors of a warmer, higher-CO2 world will impact plankton communities.

  20. Spatio-temporal interdependence of bacteria and phytoplankton during a Baltic Sea spring bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina eBunse

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In temperate systems, phytoplankton spring blooms deplete inorganic nutrients and are major sources of organic matter for the microbial loop. In response to phytoplankton exudates and environmental factors, heterotrophic microbial communities are highly dynamic and change their abundance and composition both on spatial and temporal scales. Yet, most of our understanding about these processes comes from laboratory model organism studies, mesocosm experiments or single temporal transects. Spatial-temporal studies examining interactions of phytoplankton blooms and bacterioplankton community composition and function, though being highly informative, are scarce. In this study, pelagic microbial community dynamics (bacteria and phytoplankton and environmental variables were monitored during a spring bloom across the Baltic Proper (two cruises between North Germany to Gulf of Finland. To test to what extent bacterioplankton community composition relates to the spring bloom, we used next generation amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, phytoplankton diversity analysis based on microscopy counts and population genotyping of the dominating diatom Skeletonema marinoi. Several phytoplankton bloom related and environmental variables were identified to influence bacterial community composition. Members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria dominated the bacterial community composition but the bacterial groups showed no apparent correlation with direct bloom related variables. The less abundant bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, on the other hand, were strongly associated with phytoplankton biomass, diatom:dinoflagellate ratio and colored dissolved organic matter (cDOM. Many bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs showed high niche specificities. For example, particular Bacteroidetes OTUs were associated with two distinct genetic clusters of S. marinoi. Our study revealed the complexity of interactions of bacterial

  1. Response of phytoplankton dynamics to 19-year (1991-2009) climate trends in Potter Cove (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Irene R.; Abele, Doris; Moreau, Sébastien; Demers, Serge; Bers, A. Valeria; González, Oscar; Ferreyra, Gustavo A.

    2012-04-01

    King George Island (KGI, Isla 25 de Mayo) is located within one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth at the north-western tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Since 1991 hydrographical characteristics and phytoplankton dynamics were monitored at two stations in Potter Cove, a fjord-like environment on the south-eastern KGI coastline. Seawater temperature and salinity, total suspended particulate matter (TSPM) and chlorophyll- a (Chl- a, a proxy for phytoplankton biomass) concentrations were measured in summer and winter over a 19-year period, together with local air temperature. Mean air temperatures rose by 0.39 and 0.48 °C per decade in summer and winter, respectively. Positive anomalies characterized wind speeds during the decade between the mid '90 and the mid 2000 years, whereas negative anomalies were observed from 2004 onwards. Day of sea ice formation and retreat, based on satellite data, did not change, although total sea ice cover diminished during the studied period. Surface water temperature increased during summer (0.36 °C per decade), whereas no trend was observed in salinity. Summer Chl- a concentrations were around 1 mg m - 3 Chl- a with no clear trend throughout the study period. TSPM increased in surface waters of the inner cove during the spring-summer months. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) climate signal was apparent in the fluctuating interannual pattern of the hydrographic variables in the outer Potter Cove and bottom waters whereas surface hydrography was strongly governed by the local forcing of glacier melt. The results show that global trends have significant effects on local hydrographical and biological conditions in the coastal marine environments of Western Antarctica.

  2. Community structure of phytoplankton in Baishi Reservoir%白石水库浮游植物的群落结构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李沂軒; 鞠哲; 赵文; 班艳丽; 郭凯; 蔡志龙; 张荣坤; 戴玉新

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure including species composition, dominant species, density, biomass, biodiversity , and spatial-temporal pattern of phytoplankton was monthly surveyed from August 2013 to July 2014 in order to provide scientific basis for sustainable water conservation and fisheries in Baishi Reservoir. Results showed that 239 phytoplankton species were found, including 138 species in Chlorophyta, 39 species in Bacillariophyta, 26 species in Euglenophyta, 19 species in Cyanophyta, 8 species in Pyrrophyta, 3 species in Chrysophyta, 3 species in Cryptophyta and 3 species in Xanthophyta, with dominant species Phormidium tenue, Cryptomonas erosa, and Synedra acus. There were phytoplankton density of 13. 44í106 cells/L, and the biomass of 11. 33 mg/L, with the dominant species in Bacillariophyta, Cryptophyta and Cyanobacteria. The phytoplankton had significant variation in spatial and temporal distribution in community structure, the order of density variation of phytoplankton as summer>autumn>spring>winter and as Linghe >Mangniu >upstream >downstream >midstream in spatial profile. Accord-ing to the criteria of the classification of phytoplankton biomass, Baishi Reservoir is within eutrophic, with evenness index of 0 . 24-0 . 48 , an average of 0 . 36 , diversity index of 1 . 73-3 . 44 , an average of 2 . 61 , indicating that the reservoir is moderately polluted due to nitrogen and phosphorus which have a significant impact on the growth of phytoplankton.%为给白石水库生态环境保护和渔业可持续发展提供科学依据和基础资料,于2013年8月—2014年7月对白石水库的浮游植物群落结构,包括浮游植物的种类组成、优势种、密度、生物量、生物多样性和时空格局进行了周年研究。结果表明:白石水库共发现浮游植物239种,其中绿藻138种,硅藻39种,裸藻26种,蓝藻19种,甲藻8种,金藻、隐藻、黄藻各3种;主要优势种为小席藻Phormidium tenue

  3. 石臼湖江苏段浮游植物群落结构特征及与环境因子的关系%Phytoplankton Community Structure and Its Relationship to Environmental Factors in Shijiu Lake (Jiangsu section)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国超旋; 王冬梅; 胡晓东; 吴沛沛

    2016-01-01

    Shijiu Lake is the only riparian shallow lake connecting with the lower Yangtze River.In recent years, human activities have severely disturbed the natural environment of Shijiu Lake and concern over water quality and the aquatic ecosystem is increasing.In this study,we completed the first investigation of the phytoplankton commu-nity and primary water quality parameters in the Jiangsu Section of Shijiu Lake.After gathering data,characteristics of the phytoplankton community were analyzed and phytoplankton dynamics,in response to environmental factors, were explored.The study provides data on the aquatic environment and biological resources of Shijiu Lake and will support environmental protection.In October of 201 2 and February,May and August of 201 3,the phytoplankton investigation was carried out at 1 2 sampling sites in Shijiu Lake.The environmental parameters measured in situ in-cluded pH,dissolved oxygen (DO),transparency (SD),depth,turbidity(Tur),total dissolved solids,water temperature (WT)and conductivity (Cond).Samples were also collected for laboratory analysis that included the 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5 ),total nitrogen (TN),total phosphorus (TP),permanganate chemical oxygen demand (CODMn )and ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N).A total of 79 phytoplankton species belonging to 8 phyla and 53 genera were identified.Chlorophyta (39 species),Cyanophyta (1 3 species)and Bacillariophyta (1 1 species)dominated the phytoplankton community,accounting for 50.65%,1 6.88% and 1 4.29% of the total species,respectively.During the investigation,1 0 dominant species were observed.Diatoms,adaptable to low wa-ter temperature and light intensity were the dominant phylum in winter.The dominant species were rich in spring, but the dominance values were low (0.03 -0.09).Filamentous blue-green algae dominated in summer and au-tumn.The cell density of phytoplankton ranged from 8.44 ×1 06 to 64.77 ×1 06 cells/L,with an average value of 28.93 ×1 06 cells

  4. Nitrogen and phosphorus intake by phytoplankton in the Xiamen Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林彩; 林辉; 贺青; 许焜灿; 吴省三; 张元标; 陈金民; 陈宝红; 林力斌; 卢美鸾; 陈维芬; 汤荣坤; 暨卫东

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a time series experiment examining the nitrogen and phosphorus intake of natural phytoplankton communities by a microcosms approach.Seawater samples containing natural phytoplankton communities were collected from waters around Baozhu Islet in inner Xiamen Bay and around Qingyu Islet in the outer bay.The goal was to elucidate the relationship between phytoplankton population enhancement,the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the seawater,and the phytoplankton nitrogen an...

  5. Responses of phytoplankton to fish predation and nutrient loading in shallow lakes: a pan-European mesocosm experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bund, W.; Romo, S.; Villena, M.J.; Valentín, M.; Van Donk, E.; Vicente, E.; Vakkilainen, K.; Svensson, M.; Stephen, D.; Ståhl-Delbanco, A.; Rueda, J.; Moss, B.; Rosa Miracle, M.; Kairesalo, T.; Hansson, L-A.; Hietala, J.; Gyllström, M.; Goma, J.; García, P.; Fernández-Aláez, M.; Fernández-Aláez, C.; Ferriol, C.; Collings, S.E.; Bécares, E.; Balayla, D.; Alfonso, T.

    2004-01-01

    1. The impacts of nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) and planktivorous fish on phytoplankton composition and biomass were studied in six shallow, macrophyte-dominated lakes across Europe using mesocosm experiments. 2. Phytoplankton biomass was more influenced by nutrients than by densities of plank

  6. Physiological responses of three species of marine pico-phytoplankton to ammonium, phosphate, iron and light limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, K.R.; Wagt, B. van der; Veldhuis, M.J.W.; Maatman, A.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with three species of marine pico-phytoplankton: Synechococcus sp. (CCMP 839), Pelagomonas calceolata (CCMP 1756) and Prasinomonas capsulatus (CCMP 1617) in order to collect physiological parameters for pico-phytoplankton to be utilised in Ocean Biogeochemical Climate Mode

  7. Responses of marine phytoplankton in iron enrichment experiments in the northern North Sea and northeast Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Klaas R.; Gledhill, Martha; Nolting, Rob F.; Veldhuis, Marcel J.W.; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Berg, Constant M.G. van den

    1998-01-01

    Short-term iron enrichment experiments were carried out with samples collected in areas with different phytoplankton activity in the northern North Sea and northeast Atlantic Ocean in the summer of 1993. The research area was dominated by high numbers of pico-phytoplankton, up to 70,000 ml−1. Maximu

  8. Noctiluca and copepods grazing on the phytoplankton community in a nutrient-enriched coastal environment along the southwest coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunpandi, N; Jyothibabu, R; Jagadeesan, L; Gireeshkumar, T R; Karnan, C; Naqvi, S W A

    2017-07-01

    The relative grazing impact of Noctiluca scintillans (hereafter referred only Noctiluca) and copepods (Acrocalanus gracilis, Paracalanus parvus, Acartia danae and Oithona similis) on the phytoplankton community in an upwelling-mudbank environment along the southwest coast India is presented here. This study was carried out during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (April-May) to the Late Southwest Monsoon (August) period in 2014. During the sampling period, large hydrographical transformation was evident in the study area (off Alappuzha, Southwest coast of India); warmer Pre-Southwest Monsoon water column condition got transformed into cooler and nitrate-rich hypoxic waters during the Southwest Monsoon (June-August) due to intense coastal upwelling. Copepods were present in the study area throughout the sampling period with a noticeable increase in their abundance during the Southwest Monsoon. On the other hand, the first appearance of Noctiluca in the sampling location was during the Early Southwest Monsoon (mid-June) and thereafter their abundance increased towards the Peak Southwest Monsoon. The grazing experiments carried out as per the food removal method showed noticeable differences in the feeding preferences of Noctiluca and copepods, especially on the different size fractions of phytoplankton. Noctiluca showed the highest positive electivity for the phytoplankton micro-fraction (av. 0.49 ± 0.04), followed by nano-fraction (av. 0.17 ± 0.04) and a negative electivity for the pico-fraction (av. -0.66 ± 0.06). In total ingestion of Noctiluca, micro-fraction contribution (83.7%) was significantly higher compared to the nano- (15.7%) and pico-fractions (0.58%). On the other hand, copepods showed the highest positive electivity for the phytoplankton nano-fraction (av. 0.38 ± 0.04) followed by micro- (av. -0.17 ± 0.05) and pico-fractions (av. -0.35 ± 0.05). Similarly, in total ingestion of copepods, nano-fraction (69.7%) was the highest followed by micro

  9. A numerical index for evaluating phytoplankton response to changes in nutrient levels in deep mediterranean reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola SECHI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new ecological index based on phytoplankton (MedPTI as suggested by the European Directive 2000/60/CE, Water Framework Directive (WFD. The index is a useful tool to verify the impacts of eutrophication in Mediterranean reservoirs belonging to different categories of the WFD. Multiple data sets were employed to develop the MedPTI index. The calibration data set included data collected from 30 Sardinian reservoirs in 1994. A list of 44 selected taxa was obtained and used for index calculation. A second dataset including 48 averaged annual values from 10 reservoirs was used. Results showed good correlation between MedPTI and concentration of total phosphorus, which was the limiting nutrient in these reservoirs. The trophic classifications determined using the index agreed with the results from the OECD probabilistic model on the same series of data. Finally, the index was included in an international exercise to compare the definition of reference conditions and quality class boundaries against indices used in other Mediterranean countries.

  10. Biophysical modelling of phytoplankton communities from first principles using two-layered spheres: Equivalent Algal Populations (EAP) model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Robertson Lain, L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available (PFT) analysis. To these ends, an initial validation of a new model of Equivalent Algal Populations (EAP) is presented here. This paper makes a first order comparison of two prominent phytoplankton Inherent Optical Property (IOP) models with the EAP...

  11. Structure of late summer phytoplankton community in the Firth of Lorn (Scotland) using microscopy and HPLC-CHEMTAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Ana C.; Sá, Carolina; Mendes, Carlos R.; Brand, Tim; Dias, Ana M.; Brotas, Vanda; Davidson, Keith

    2015-12-01

    The Firth of Lorn is at the mouth of one of Scotland's largest fjordic sea lochs, Loch Linnhe. This sea loch, which is fed by a number of other inner lochs, supplies a significant flow of freshwater, which frequently causes the stratification of the water column. To investigate how environmental conditions influence the spatial distribution of phytoplankton in this region water samples were collected for phytoplankton (pigments and microscopy), and other environmental variables including nutrients. Chemotaxonomy was used to estimate the contribution of different taxonomic groups to total chlorophyll a (phytoplankton biomass index). Good agreement was obtained between chemotaxonomy and microscopy data. The highest levels of chlorophyll a (˜2.6 mg m-3) were found in the vicinity of Oban Bay, where cryptophytes, the most abundant group, dinoflagellates and other flagellates thrived in the stratified water column. Centric diatoms, mainly Chaetoceros sp. and Skeletonema costatum, were associated with NH4 and SiO2 concentrations and stratification, while pennate diatoms, mainly Cylindrotheca sp. and Nitzchia sp., were found to be associated with NO3 + NO2 and high surface mixed layer depths. Four diatom groups were identified in accordance to their surface to volume ratios, as well as their affinity to environmental parameters (nutrients) and turbulence. This study used a combination of physico-chemical data, classical microscopy methods (appropriate for large cells > 20 μm) and HPLC-CHEMTAX approaches (for large and small cells) to evaluate the distribution of phytoplankton functional groups in a fjordic coastal area.

  12. Characteristics of Phytoplankton Community Structure in Hongfeng Lake%红枫湖浮游植物群落的结构特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁正其; 姚俊杰; 方贵镇; 王秀龙; 陆敬波; 吴艳

    2011-01-01

    为了解红枫湖水体状况及其浮游植物的多样性和群落结构,在红枫湖选择18个典型的采样点,于2010年10月和12月两次采样,对所采集植物进行定性、定量分析.结果表明,目前红枫湖有浮游植物8门13目1亚目23科37属55种,其中,绿藻门种类最多,共21种,占总数的38.2%;蓝藻门次之,共15种,占总数的27.3%;硅藻9种,占16.3%;甲藻和黄藻各3种,分别占5.5%;金藻门2种,占3.6%;裸藻和隐藻各1种,各占1.8%.红枫湖浮游植物平均数量和平均生物量分别为7.5×105个/L和1.79 mg/L.优势种为小环藻、色球藻和小球藻,优势度分别为0.407、0.048和0.077.与1996年相比,主要优势种发生了变化,但浮游植物群落结构仍以绿藻为主,蓝藻次之.红枫湖浮游植物多样性和均匀度分别在2.01~2.68和0.35~0.50,表明,红枫湖水体状况优于1996年.%The qualitative and quantitative analysis of phytoplankton in waters from 18 typical sampling points of Hongfeng Lake was conducted to know the water body status of Hongfeng Lake and the diversity and community structure of phytoplankton. The results showed that there were 55 species, belonging to 37 genera, 23 families, 1 suborder, 13 orders and 8 phyla in phytoplankton. 21 Chlorophta species, 15 Cyanophyta species, 9 Bacillariophyta species, 3 Pyrrophyceae species, 3 Xanthophyta species, 2 Chrysophyta species, 1 Euglenophyta species and Cryptophyceae species accounted for 38. 2%, 27. 3%, 16. 3% , 5. 5% , 5. 5% , 3. 6% , 1. 8% and 1. 8% respectively. The average quantity per litre and biomass of phytoplankton in Hongfeng Lake were 7. 5 X 105 and 1. 79mg/L. The dominance of Cyclotella sp. Chlorella vulgaris and Chroococcus sp. Was 0. 407, 0. 048 and 0. 077 separately. The main dominant species in phytoplankton were changed, but the community structure of phytoplankton still was dominated by green alga, followed by blue-green algae in Hongfeng Lake. The diversity and uniformity variation of

  13. 北京翠湖湿地浮游植物群落特征%Characterization of the Phytoplankton Community in Cuihu Wetland in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓星

    2013-01-01

      2012年4月至11月,对翠湖湿地浮游植物的群落结构和物种多样性进行了初步研究,并结合水体理化指标进行分析讨论。结果显示,在翠湖湿地共鉴定出浮游植物8门73属154种,以绿藻门、硅藻门和蓝藻门种类数量最多,且8月份种类达到高峰。翠湖湿地浮游植物的平均密度为14243.62×104 cells/L,以绿藻门、蓝藻门和硅藻门的藻类密度最大,黄藻门和甲藻门藻类密度最小;浮游植物Shannon-wiener指数平均值为1.50,且浮游植物群落中的优势种群随季节变化而不同。翠湖湿地浮游植物的变化与水温、总氮浓度和叶绿素a 浓度密切相关,多项指标表明翠湖湿地水体呈富营养化状态,污染程度为中污染,水体中有机质含量较高。%From April to November, 2012, structure and species diversity of phytoplankton community in the Cuihu Wetland were studied in combination with physiochemical indicators of the water. Results showed that the total amount of the phytoplankton were of 8 phyla, 73 genera and 154 species, the largest number of species were of Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyta and Cyanophyta, when reached a peak in August. The average density of phytoplankton in Cuihu Wetland was 14243.62 ×104 cells/L, the density of algae, for instance, Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta reached the maximum density, while such as Xanthophyta and Dinoflagellate reached the minimum density; the average value of Shannon-wiener index was 1.50, and the dominant species in phytoplankton varies among seasons. The changes of phytoplankton in the Cuihu wetland closely related to water temperature, total nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll-a concentration. A number of indicators showed that Cuihu Wetland was in a state of eutrophication, moderate level of pollution, and high content of organic matter in water.

  14. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  15. Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, Hans; Yin, Kedong; Cloern, James

    2011-03-01

    Scientific Committee on Ocean Research Working Group 137 Meeting; Hangzhou, China, 17-21 October 2010; Phytoplankton biomass and community structure have undergone dramatic changes in coastal ecosystems over the past several decades in response to climate variability and human disturbance. These changes have short- and long-term impacts on global carbon and nutrient cycling, food web structure and productivity, and coastal ecosystem services. There is a need to identify the underlying processes and measure the rates at which they alter coastal ecosystems on a global scale. Hence, the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) formed Working Group 137 (WG 137), “Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems: A Comparative Analysis of Time Series Observations” (http://wg137.net/). This group evolved from a 2007 AGU-sponsored Chapman Conference entitled “Long Time-Series Observations in Coastal Ecosystems: Comparative Analyses of Phytoplankton Dynamics on Regional to Global Scales.”

  16. PHYTOPLANKTON OF CASPIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysha Sharapatinovna Gasanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The composition of the species of the phytoplankton in the Russian sector of the Caspian Sea in conditions of transgression, anthropogenic and chemical contamination has been studied.Location.The Russian sector of the Caspian SeaMethods. The phytoplankton samples were collected at the depths of 8 – 50m by the use of the Nansen bathometer and subsequently were fixed in 4% formalin. The office processing was carried out in a box of Nozhotta type, which has the volume of 0.1 ml and the triplicate surface, under the light microscope of Biolam P15. The system of domestic diamotologists was used during the classification of Bacillariaphyta, as for the classification of Dinophyta, the Dodge scheme was applied. Cyanophyta algae were classified according to the system of A.A. Elenkina with the amendments adopted by A.I. Proshkin-Lavrenko and V.V. Makarova. The classification of the Chlorophyta division has been done according to the Smith system.Results, main conclusions. Presented the taxonomic structure and the lists of species of the phytoplankton community in the sea coastal shallow waters Russian sector of the Caspian Sea have been presented. A high floristic diversity and domination of small cell forms are characteristics of the modern structure of the coastal shoal waters of the Dagestan part of the Caspian Sea. The auttaclimatizant of 1934, Pseudosolenia calcaravis, has not been discovered in the plankton of the researched water area. The phytoplankton community has been represented by 58 species of six groups: Cyanophyta, Bacillariaphyta, Dinophyta, Euglenophyta, Chlorophyta and the small flagellate. Bacillariaphyta were the basis of both the taxonomic diversity and the biomass. Cyanophita prevailed in number.

  17. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, nutrients and ultraviolet radiation: in situ photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton from high mountain lakes of Southern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. W. Helbling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Global change, together with human activities had resulted in increasing amounts of organic material (including nutrients received by water bodies. This input further attenuates the penetration of solar radiation leading to the view that opaque lakes are more "protected" from solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR than clear ones. Vertical mixing, however, complicates this view as cells are exposed to fluctuating radiation regimes, which effects have in general been neglected. Even more, the combined impacts of mixing, together with those of UVR and nutrients input are virtually unknown. In this study, we carried out in situ experiments in three high mountain lakes of Spain (Lake Enol in Asturias, and lakes Las Yeguas and La Caldera in Granada to determine the combined effects of these three variables associated to global change on photosynthetic responses of natural phytoplankton communities. The experimentation consisted in all possible combinations of the following treatments: (a solar radiation: UVR + PAR (280–700 nm versus PAR alone (400–700 nm; (b nutrient addition (phosphorus (P and nitrogen (N: ambient versus addition (P to reach to a final concentration of 30 μg P l−1, and N to reach a N : P molar ratio of 31 and, (c mixing: mixed (one rotation from surface to 3 m depth (speed of 1 m every 4 min, total of 10 cycles versus static. Our findings suggest that under in situ nutrient conditions there is a synergistic effect between vertical mixing and UVR, increasing phytoplankton photosynthetic inhibition and EOC from opaque lakes as compared to algae that received constant mean irradiance within the epilimnion. The opposite occurs in clear lakes where antagonistic effects were determined, with mixing partially counteracting the negative effects of UVR. Nutrients input mimicking atmospheric pulses from Saharan dust, reversed this effect and clear lakes became more inhibited during mixing, while opaque lakes benefited from the

  18. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, nutrients and ultraviolet radiation: in situ photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton from high mountain lakes of Southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, E. W.; Carrillo, P.; Medina-Sanchez, J. M.; Durán, C.; Herrera, G.; Villar-Argaiz, M.; Villafañe, V. E.

    2012-07-01

    Global change, together with human activities had resulted in increasing amounts of organic material (including nutrients) received by water bodies. This input further attenuates the penetration of solar radiation leading to the view that opaque lakes are more "protected" from solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than clear ones. Vertical mixing, however, complicates this view as cells are exposed to fluctuating radiation regimes, which effects have in general been neglected. Even more, the combined impacts of mixing, together with those of UVR and nutrients input are virtually unknown. In this study, we carried out in situ experiments in three high mountain lakes of Spain (Lake Enol in Asturias, and lakes Las Yeguas and La Caldera in Granada) to determine the combined effects of these three variables associated to global change on photosynthetic responses of natural phytoplankton communities. The experimentation consisted in all possible combinations of the following treatments: (a) solar radiation: UVR + PAR (280-700 nm) versus PAR alone (400-700 nm); (b) nutrient addition (phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N)): ambient versus addition (P to reach to a final concentration of 30 μg P l-1, and N to reach a N : P molar ratio of 31) and, (c) mixing: mixed (one rotation from surface to 3 m depth (speed of 1 m every 4 min, total of 10 cycles) versus static. Our findings suggest that under in situ nutrient conditions there is a synergistic effect between vertical mixing and UVR, increasing phytoplankton photosynthetic inhibition and EOC from opaque lakes as compared to algae that received constant mean irradiance within the epilimnion. The opposite occurs in clear lakes where antagonistic effects were determined, with mixing partially counteracting the negative effects of UVR. Nutrients input mimicking atmospheric pulses from Saharan dust, reversed this effect and clear lakes became more inhibited during mixing, while opaque lakes benefited from the fluctuating irradiance

  19. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton and planktonic protozoan communities in a northern temperate humic lake: diversity in a dinoflagellate dominated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J M; Kent, A D; Lauster, G H; Yannarell, A C; Graham, L E; Triplett, E W

    2004-11-01

    Species diversity and richness, and seasonal population dynamics of phytoplankton, planktonic protozoa, and bacterioplankton sampled from the epilimnion of Crystal Bog in 2000, were examined in order to test the hypothesis that these groups' diversity and abundance patterns might be linked. Crystal Bog, a humic lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, is part of the North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research Site. Phytoplankton and planktonic protozoa were identified and enumerated in a settling chamber with an inverted microscope. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the use of fluorescence 4', 6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-staining procedures, and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to assess bacterioplankton diversity. Bacterial cell counts showed little seasonal variation and averaged 2.6 x 10(6) cells/mL over the ice-free season. Phytoplankton and planktonic protozoan numbers varied by up to two orders of magnitude and were most numerous in late spring and summer. Dinoflagellates largely dominated Crystal Bog throughout the ice-free period, specifically Peridiniopsis quadridens in the spring, Peridinium limbatum in summer, and Gymnodinium fuscum and P. quadridens in fall. Brief blooms of Cryptomonas, Dinobryon, and Synura occurred between periods of dinoflagellate domination. The dominant dinoflagellate, Peridinium limbatum, was calculated to have a growth rate of 0.065 day(-1) and a doubling time of 10.7 days. Heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs) were a consistent component of the planktonic protozoa; seasonal patterns were determined for three genera of HNFs (Monosiga, Bicosoeca, and Desmarella moniliformis). Three genera of ciliates (Coleps, Strobilidium, and Strombidium) comprised the greater part of the planktonic protozoa in Crystal Bog. The number of species of planktonic protozoa was too low to calculate a diversity index. Shannon-Weaver diversity indices for phytoplankton and bacterioplankton in the epilimnion

  20. Phytoplankton community structure in Lake Taiping of Anhui Province%安徽太平湖浮游植物群落结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊莲; 刘冬燕; 王俊莉; 吴明姝; 李东京

    2016-01-01

    安徽太平湖已被列入国家第二批生态环境保护专项.于2012年11月到2014年10月对太平湖浮游植物进行调查,共鉴定出浮游植物109属150种.其中绿藻门最多,共计46属80种,占总种数的53.33%.黄藻门未在镜检中出现,团藻在3个样品中出现;浮游植物丰度平均值为212.81×104 cells/L,生物量平均值为1.04 mg/L. Shannon-Wiener多样性指数和Pielou均匀度指数平均值分别为2.17和0.61.优势种共4门17种,其中O-寡污带指示藻1种,P-多污带指示藻4种,其余12种藻类均为β-中污带指示藻,啮蚀隐藻( Cryptomonas erosa)和尖尾蓝隐藻( Chroomonas acuta)未成为优势种,太平湖优势门类为硅藻和蓝藻;2013和2014年变化表明,太平湖浮游植物群落结构有变化但变幅不大,浮游植物群落结构处于比较稳定的状态;浮游植物聚类分析表明,夏、秋季太平湖浮游植物群落结构相似,H1、H2和H3采样点浮游植物群落结构相似,H4和H5采样点浮游植物群落结构相似;相关性分析表明,丰度、生物量与水温呈极显著正相关,丰度、生物量与透明度呈极显著负相关,水质指标的变化会直接影响到浮游植物的变动,并伴随太平湖水库生态系统的相关复杂变化和生态学过程.%Lake Taiping of Anhui Province has been listed in the second batch of national ecological environment protection. A pre-liminary study was conducted on the phytoplankton in Lake Taiping from November 2012 to October 2014. A total of 150 phyto-plankton species belonging to 109 genera were identified. The phytoplankton community was dominated by Chlorophyta which is comprised of 46 genera and 80 species, and the proportion of Chlorophyta is 53.33%. Xanthophyta didn’t appear in the microscopic examination, but Volvox appeared in 3 samples. The average phytoplankton abundance is 212.81×104 cells/L, the average phyto-plankton biomass is 1.04 mg

  1. Trends of phytoplankton characteristics and their communities in pre- and post-liming time in Lake Orta (1984-1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierisa PANZANI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an assessment of the changing properties of Lake Orta phytoplankton in the period 1984-1998, which includes the large-scale liming carried out in the lake in 1989 and 1990. The phytoplankton is analysed first in its general properties (abundance, biovolume, chlorophyll-a concentration, average cell size, diversity by means of time courses of the mentioned variables based on monthly data through the entire period, and by correlations between the same variables. Moreover, through clustering techniques, the evolution of the species composition has been studied, showing the gradual decrease of chlorophytes after the liming and the noticeable increase of the diatom population, both as biovolume and diversity. Although the assemblage of the dominant species still mirrors the presence of some residual toxic compounds into the lake water, in the most recent period the evolution of the algal populations showed a clear trend towards a species assemblage more similar to those observed in the other deep italian subalpine lakes. After the improving of the chemical environment, the main abiotic factor that in the next years could play a major role in modifying the species assemblage is probably the phosphorus supply, whose in-lake concentration is low, despite the high annual load from the basin. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phosphorus dynamics represent the basis to make reliable hypotheses about the future evolution of the phytoplankton assemblage.

  2. Differences in Rate and Direction of Shifts between Phytoplankton Size Structure and Sea Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisatomo Waga

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Species distributions are changing with various rates and directions in response to recent global warming. The velocity of sea surface temperature (SST has been used to predict species migration and persistence as an expectation of how species track their thermal niches; however, several studies have found that evidence for species shifts has deviated from the velocity of SST. This study investigated whether estimation of the velocity of shifts in phytoplankton size structure using remote sensing data could contribute to better prediction of species shifts. A chlorophyll-a (Chla size distribution (CSD model was developed by quantifying the relationships between the size structure of the phytoplankton community and the spectral features of the phytoplankton absorption coefficient (aph(λ, based on the principal component analysis approach. Model validation demonstrated that the exponent of CSD (hereafter, CSD slope, which can describe the synoptic size structure of a phytoplankton community, was derived successfully with a relative root mean square error of 18.5%. The median velocity of CSD slope across the ocean was 485.2 km·decade−1, broadly similar to Chla (531.5 km·decade−1. These values were twice the velocity of SST, and the directions of shifts in CSD slope and Chla were quite different from that of SST. Because Chla is generally covariant with the size structure of a phytoplankton community, we believe that spatiotemporal changes in Chla can explain the variations of phytoplankton size structure. Obvious differences in both rate and direction of shifts were found between the phytoplankton size structure and SST, implying that shifts of phytoplankton size structure could be a powerful tool for assessing the distributional shifts of marine species. Our results will contribute to generate global and regional maps of expected species shifts in response to environmental forcing.

  3. Phytoplankton communities from San Francisco Bay Delta respond differently to oxidized and reduced nitrogen substrates - even under conditions that would otherwise suggest nitrogen sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equivalent additions of nitrogen (N, 30-40 μM-N in different forms (ammonium, NH4+, and nitrate, NO3- under conditions of different light exposure on phytoplankton community composition was studied in a series of four, 5-day enclosure experiments on water collected from the nutrient-rich San Francisco Bay Delta over two years. Overall, proportionately more chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin (generally indicative of diatoms was produced per unit N taken up in enclosures enriched with NO3- and incubated at reduced (~15% of ambient light intensity than in treatments with NO3- with high (~60% of ambient light exposure or with NH4+ under either light condition. In contrast, proportionately more chlorophyll b (generally indicative of chlorophytes and zeaxanthin (generally indicative of cyanobacteria was produced in enclosures enriched with NH4+ and incubated under high light intensity than in treatments with low light or with added NO3- at either light level. Rates of maximal velocities (Vmax of uptake of N substrates, measured using 15N tracer techniques, in all enclosures enriched with NO3- were higher than those enriched with NH4+. Directionality of trends in enclosures were similar to phytoplankton community shifts observed in transects of the Sacramento River to Suisun Bay, a region in which large changes in total N quantity and form occur. These data substantiate the growing body of experimental evidence that dichotomous microbial communities develop when enriched with the same absolute concentration of oxidized vs. reduced N forms, even when sufficient N nutrient was available to the community prior to the N inoculations.

  4. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients. There...

  5. Thermal Thresholds of Phytoplankton Growth in Polar Waters and Their Consequences for a Warming Polar Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, Alexandra

    2017-06-02

    Polar areas are experiencing the steepest warming rates on Earth, a trend expected to continue in the future. In these habitats, phytoplankton communities constitute the basis of the food web and their thermal tolerance may dictate how warming affects these delicate environments. Here, we compiled available data on thermal responses of phytoplankton growth in polar waters. We assembled 53 growth-vs.-temperature curves (25 from the Arctic, 28 from the Southern oceans), indicating the limited information available for these ecosystems. Half of the data from Arctic phytoplankton came from natural communities where low ambient concentrations could limit growth rates. Phytoplankton from polar waters grew faster under small temperature increases until reaching an optimum (TOPT), and slowed when temperatures increased beyond this value. This left-skewed curves were characterized by higher activation energies (Ea) for phytoplankton growth above than below the TOPT. Combining these thermal responses we obtained a community TOPT of 6.5°C (±0.2) and 5.2°C (±0.1) for Arctic and Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, respectively. These threshold temperatures were already exceeded at 70°N during the first half of August 2013, evidenced by sea surface temperatures (SSTs, satellite data, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov). We forecasted SSTs for the end of the twenty-first century by assuming an overall 3°C increase, equivalent to a low emission scenario. Our forecasts show that SSTs at 70°N are expected to exceed TOPT during summer by 2100, and during the first half of August at 75°N. While recent Arctic spring temperatures average 0.5°C and −0.7°C at 70°N and 75°N, respectively, they could increase to 2.8°C at 70°N and 2.2°C at 75°N as we approach 2100. Such temperature increases could lead to intense phytoplankton blooms, shortened by fast nutrient consumption. As SSTs increase, thermal thresholds for phytoplankton growth would be eventually exceeded during bloom

  6. Comunidade fitoplanctônica de um pesqueiro na cidade de São Paulo Phytoplankton community in a recreational fishing lake, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayla Matsuzaki

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A avaliação da qualidade da água e da comunidade fitoplanctônica em ambientes destinados à recreação permite estabelecer formas de manejo desses sistemas, evitando possíveis problemas à saúde humana. Assim, realizou-se estudo com objetivo de analisar a variação sazonal do fitoplâncton de um sistema lacustre natural, e sua relação com a qualidade da água. MÉTODOS: O lago estudado faz parte de um pesqueiro localizado na zona sul da cidade de São Paulo. Foram realizadas quatro coletas no período de um ano, em três pontos de amostragem. As amostras foram analisadas quanto à composição florística e às variáveis físicas e químicas da água. RESULTADOS: A análise qualitativa do fitoplâncton revelou o total de 91 táxons distribuídos em oito classes: Chlorophyceae (52%, Cyanophyceae (16%, Euglenophyceae (12%, Zygnemaphyceae (10%, Bacillariophyceae (5%, Xantophyceae (3%, Dinophyceae (1% e Chrysophyceae (1%. Alguns dos parâmetros físicos e químicos parecem ter influenciado o comportamento do fitoplâncton; a classe Chlorophyceae foi a mais favorecida pelas condições ambientais. Dentre as espécies de cianofíceas identificadas, destacaram-se Microcystis paniformis, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii e espécies de Anabaena, que apresentaram maior importância do ponto de vista sanitário devido à produção de toxinas. CONCLUSÕES: Algumas variáveis físicas e químicas da água interferiram na estrutura da comunidade fitoplanctônica. A presença de Microcystis paniformis, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii e espécies de Anabaena indicam o potencial tóxico e os possíveis problemas que podem ocorrer à saúde pública, caso esse ambiente não seja continuamente monitorado. Estudos adicionais são recomendados, com a finalidade de se evitar efeitos deletérios ao ambiente e à saúde da população.OBJECTIVE: The assessment of water quality and phytoplankton community in recreational environments allows to setting

  7. Variation of climatic and physical co-determinants of phytoplankton community in four nictemeral sampling days in a shallow tropical reservoir, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. RAMÍREZ

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variation of climatic and physical characteristics in a shallow tropical reservoir in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, and their possible influence on the dynamics of the phytoplankton population. Samples were taken at 5 depths of the water column (subsurface: 1% Io, 10% Io, 2 m, and bottom and at 4 hour intervals (6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, 22:00, 2:00, and 6:00 h during summer (March 3-4, fall (June 13-14, winter (August 29-30, and spring (November 29-30 of 1994 at a single sampling station. Garças Reservoir (23º39'S, 46º37'W is a kinetic turbulent system, highly influenced by winds, with stratification that may last for days or weeks, and which undergoes mixing periods more than once in a year. A thermal pattern of this type is comparable to the warm discontinuous polymictic. Considering its optical properties, the water body was classified as an ecosystem with moderate turbidity, which decreases basically due to increased phaeopigment concentration during the spring. Also, the reservoir is an ecosystem whose phytoplanktonic community is subjected to stress, the degree of which depends on level of light penetration.

  8. Small phytoplankton contribution to the total primary production in the highly productive Ulleung Basin in the East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, HuiTae; Son, SeungHyun; Park, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jae Joong; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Kwon, Jae-Il; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2017-09-01

    The Ulleung Basin in the southwestern East/Japan Sea (hereafter East Sea) is known as a biologically productive ;hot spot; but climate-associated changes in the physicochemical oceanographic conditions and some biological changes have been reported. In this study, our main objective was to determine the contribution of small phytoplankton to the total primary production, which is valuable information for detecting marine ecosystem changes in the Ulleung Basin. The small phytoplankton productivity contributions determined by Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived monthly productivities using a phytoplankton community-based productivity algorithm was significantly consistent with the field-measured productivity contributions of small phytoplankton in this study. The daily primary productivity of small phytoplankton ranged from 42.7 to 418.7 mg C m-2 d-1 with an average of 172.9 mg C m-2 d-1 (S.D. = ±61.4 mg C m-2 d-1, n = 120), and the annual contribution of small phytoplankton ranged from 19.6% to 28.4% with an average of 23.6% (S.D. = ±8.1%) in the Ulleung Basin from 2003 to 2012. Overall, large phytoplankton were a major contributor to the total primary production in the Ulleung Basin (76.4 ± 8.2%) from 2003 to 2012, which indicates that the Ulleung Basin is a highly productive region. A significantly negative relationship (p < 0.05) was found between the small phytoplankton primary productivity contribution and the annual primary production in this study. This finding revealed that the recent decreasing annual primary production in the Ulleung Basin could be a consequence of the increasing contribution of small phytoplankton. The response of phytoplankton to ongoing climate change depending on different-size phytoplankton compositions should be a subject for further investigation in the Ulleung Basin as a biologically highly productive region in the East Sea.

  9. Physicochemical Flux and Phytoplankton diversity in Shagari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2007-03-20

    Mar 20, 2007 ... environments for the development of phytoplankton communities, which may ... Gawon gulbe which originates partly from River Rima in the northern part of .... may not affect fish as reported by Ayodele and. Ajani (1999).

  10. Response patterns of phytoplankton growth to variations in resuspension in the German Bight revealed by daily MERIS data in 2003 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (chl a concentration in coastal seas exhibits variability on various spatial and temporal scales. Resuspension of particulate matter can somewhat limit algal growth, but can also enhance productivity because of the intrusion of nutrient-rich pore water from sediments or bottom water layers into the whole water column. This study investigates whether characteristic changes in net phytoplankton growth can be directly linked to resuspension events within the German Bight. Satellite-derived chl a were used to derive spatial patterns of net rates of chl a increase/decrease (NR in 2003 and 2004. Spatial correlations between NR and mean water column irradiance were analysed. High correlations in space and time were found in most areas of the German Bight (R2 > 0.4, suggesting a tight coupling between light availability and algal growth during spring. These correlations were reduced within a distinct zone in the transition between shallow coastal areas and deeper offshore waters. In summer and autumn, a mismatch was found between phytoplankton blooms (chl a > 6 mg m−3 and spring-tidal induced resuspension events as indicated by bottom velocity, suggesting that there is no phytoplankton resuspension during spring tides. It is instead proposed here that frequent and recurrent spring-tidal resuspension events enhance algal growth by supplying remineralized nutrients. This hypothesis is corroborated by a lag correlation analysis between resuspension events and in-situ measured nutrient concentrations. This study outlines seasonally different patterns in phytoplankton productivity in response to variations in resuspension, which can serve as a reference for modelling coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  11. Calcification response of a key phytoplankton family to millennial-scale environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H L O; Barbarin, N; Beaufort, L; Hermoso, M; Ferretti, P; Greaves, M; Rickaby, R E M

    2016-09-28

    Coccolithophores are single-celled photosynthesizing marine algae, responsible for half of the calcification in the surface ocean, and exert a strong influence on the distribution of carbon among global reservoirs, and thus Earth's climate. Calcification in the surface ocean decreases the buffering capacity of seawater for CO2, whilst photosynthetic carbon fixation has the opposite effect. Experiments in culture have suggested that coccolithophore calcification decreases under high CO2 concentrations ([CO2(aq)]) constituting a negative feedback. However, the extent to which these results are representative of natural populations, and of the response over more than a few hundred generations is unclear. Here we describe and apply a novel rationale for size-normalizing the mass of the calcite plates produced by the most abundant family of coccolithophores, the Noëlaerhabdaceae. On average, ancient populations subjected to coupled gradual increases in [CO2(aq)] and temperature over a few million generations in a natural environment become relatively more highly calcified, implying a positive climatic feedback. We hypothesize that this is the result of selection manifest in natural populations over millennial timescales, so has necessarily eluded laboratory experiments.

  12. Calcification response of a key phytoplankton family to millennial-scale environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Barbarin, N.; Beaufort, L.; Hermoso, M.; Ferretti, P.; Greaves, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2016-09-01

    Coccolithophores are single-celled photosynthesizing marine algae, responsible for half of the calcification in the surface ocean, and exert a strong influence on the distribution of carbon among global reservoirs, and thus Earth’s climate. Calcification in the surface ocean decreases the buffering capacity of seawater for CO2, whilst photosynthetic carbon fixation has the opposite effect. Experiments in culture have suggested that coccolithophore calcification decreases under high CO2 concentrations ([CO2(aq)]) constituting a negative feedback. However, the extent to which these results are representative of natural populations, and of the response over more than a few hundred generations is unclear. Here we describe and apply a novel rationale for size-normalizing the mass of the calcite plates produced by the most abundant family of coccolithophores, the Noëlaerhabdaceae. On average, ancient populations subjected to coupled gradual increases in [CO2(aq)] and temperature over a few million generations in a natural environment become relatively more highly calcified, implying a positive climatic feedback. We hypothesize that this is the result of selection manifest in natural populations over millennial timescales, so has necessarily eluded laboratory experiments.

  13. Calcification response of a key phytoplankton family to millennial-scale environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Barbarin, N.; Beaufort, L.; Hermoso, M.; Ferretti, P.; Greaves, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Coccolithophores are single-celled photosynthesizing marine algae, responsible for half of the calcification in the surface ocean, and exert a strong influence on the distribution of carbon among global reservoirs, and thus Earth’s climate. Calcification in the surface ocean decreases the buffering capacity of seawater for CO2, whilst photosynthetic carbon fixation has the opposite effect. Experiments in culture have suggested that coccolithophore calcification decreases under high CO2 concentrations ([CO2(aq)]) constituting a negative feedback. However, the extent to which these results are representative of natural populations, and of the response over more than a few hundred generations is unclear. Here we describe and apply a novel rationale for size-normalizing the mass of the calcite plates produced by the most abundant family of coccolithophores, the Noëlaerhabdaceae. On average, ancient populations subjected to coupled gradual increases in [CO2(aq)] and temperature over a few million generations in a natural environment become relatively more highly calcified, implying a positive climatic feedback. We hypothesize that this is the result of selection manifest in natural populations over millennial timescales, so has necessarily eluded laboratory experiments. PMID:27677230

  14. Comparative responses of two species of marine phytoplankton to metolachlor exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakkar, Megha; Randhawa, Varunpreet [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Wei Liping, E-mail: liping.wei@njit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Metolachlor, a chloroacetanilide herbicide, has been frequently detected in coastal waters. This study examined the growth, photosynthesis, and detoxification responses of chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta (DT) and brown tide alga Aureococcus anophagefferens (AA) upon 5-day exposure to 0.5-5 mg L{sup -1} metolachlor. Growth was assessed with exponential growth rate, and 5th day in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, chlorophyll a, b or c, cell density and cell size. The photosynthesis function was assessed with photochemical parameters of photosystem II (PSII) during the mid-exponential growth phase (i.e. 2-4 day metolachlor exposure). The biochemical detoxification was analyzed with glutathione production and metolachlor degradation. Results show that metolachlor caused up to {approx}9% inhibition in growth rate in both species and an expected {approx}35% and 25% inhibition in chlorophyll based endpoints in DT and AA respectively. DT had an up to 70% inhibition in cell density, but AA a 35% hormesis at 1 mg L{sup -1} metolachlor and no significant inhibition, as compared to the controls. Both DT and AA's cell sizes were enlarged by metolachlor exposure, but greater in DT (1.2% per mg L{sup -1}) than in AA (0.68% per mg L{sup -1}). On PSII photochemistry, maximum quantum yield was not affected in both species; PSII optical cross section and connectivity factor increased in DT but decreased in AA, suggesting species specific impact on PSII function. On detoxification responses, glutathione production, when normalized to total chlorophyll a, was not affected by metolachlor in both species; further, despite of heterotrophic capacity of A. anophagefferens metolachlor was not significantly degraded by this alga during the 5-day incubation. The species specific effects on algal growth have ecological implications of potential selective inhibition of chlorophytes by metolachlor herbicide.

  15. [Phytoplankton community structure and assessment of water quality in the middle and lower reaches of Fenhe River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Ai; Feng, Jia; Xie, Shu-Lian

    2014-03-01

    To understand the distribution of phytoplankton and the water quality in the middle and lower reaches of Fenhe River, 18 sampling sites were selected for specimen collection, species identification and data analysis. The results showed that: (1) There were 298 species of phytoplankton under the membership of 8 divisions and 96 genera, among which, Bacillariophyta was the dominant division, with a total of 127 species of 27 genera, followed by Chlorophyta, with 104 species of 41 genera, and Cyanophyta, with 45 species of 20 genera. Only 22 species of 8 genera belonged to Euglenophyta, Cryptophyta, Pyrrophyta, Chrysophyta and Xanthophyta. The number of species in wet season was higher than that in dry season at all sites. Dominant species included Cyclotella meneghiniana, Synedra acus, Navicula cryptocephala, Nitzschia palea of Bacillariophyta, Chlorella vulgaris of Chlorophyta, Oscillatoria tenuis, O. amphibia of Cyanophyta, most of which were indicator species of alpha- and beta-mesosaprobic type. Cell density was higher in wet season and lower in dry season. (2) Shannon-Wieaver species diversity index ranged from 1 to 3 basically. Margalef species richness index ranged from 0.5 to 2. Pielou evenness index ranged 0.3-0.8. (3) During the wet season, most dominant species of Chlorophyta and Euglenophyta had higher correlation with chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity and ammonia nitrogen. The dominant species of Cyanophyta were greatly influenced by the contents of water temperature and chromium (Cr). The distribution of dominant species of Bacillariophyta was complicatedly related with environmental factors. During the dry season, there was a higher correlation between the members of Cyanophyta and ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, COD. The species of Chlorophyta and Euglenophyta were mainly influenced by the dissolved oxygen and total phosphorus. The bacillariophytes were mainly related with total phosphorus, dissolved oxygen, pH and cadmium (Cd). In

  16. Effect of environmental forcing on the biomass, production and growth rate of size-fractionated phytoplankton in the central Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete-Ortega, María; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Graña, Rocío; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Marañón, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    To ascertain the response of phytoplankton size classes to changes in environmental forcing, we determined size-fractionated biomass, carbon fixation and growth (production/biomass) rates in surface waters along the central Atlantic Ocean (26°N-5°S). As a result of the enhanced input of nutrients into the euphotic layer and the higher water column stability found at the equatorial upwelling, we observed increases not only in phytoplankton biomass and primary production, but also in turnover rates, suggesting nutrient limitation of phytoplankton physiology in the oligotrophic central Atlantic. The phytoplankton groups analysed (pico-, small nano-, large nano- and micro-phytoplankton) showed different responses to the equatorial environmental forcing, in terms of carbon biomass, primary production and growth rate. Large nano- and micro-phytoplankton consistently showed higher growth rates and carbon fixation to chl a ratios than smaller phytoplankton. We observed a higher stimulating effect of increased nitrate supply on the small phytoplankton growth rates. This observation can be explained by the dynamics of the equatorial upwelling, where the continuous but small nutrient input into the euphotic layer provide a competitive advantage for smaller cells adapted to oligotrophic conditions. The size-fractionated approach shown here reveals important group-specific differences in the response to environmental forcing, which cannot be appreciated in bulk measurements of the whole community.

  17. Characterization of phytoplankton pigments and functional community structure in the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay using HPLC–CHEMTAX analysis.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Ullas, N.; Ashwini, R.; Meenu, P.; Rehitha, T.V.; Lallu, K.R.

    , zeaxanthin, and alloxanthin) are diagnostic of specific phytoplankton functional groups (diatoms,dinoflagellates,chlorophytes, cyanobacteria and cryptophytes, respectively) and in a few cases can determine phytoplankton composition at the species level...., 2012). The diagnostic pigment (DP) criteria derived from different combinations of marker pigments (Table 1), roughly corresponds to the biomass proportions of various size groups (pico-, nano- and micro-) of phytoplankton (Vidussi et al., 2001...

  18. Competing phytoplankton undermines allelopathy of a bloom-forming dinoflagellate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Emily K; Myers, Tracey L; Naar, Jerome; Kubanek, Julia

    2008-12-07

    Biotic interactions in the plankton can be both complex and dynamic. Competition among phytoplankton is often chemically mediated, but no studies have considered whether allelopathic compounds are modified by biotic interactions. Here, we show that compounds exuded during Karenia brevis blooms were allelopathic to the cosmopolitan diatom Skeletonema costatum, but that bloom allelopathy varied dramatically among collections and years. We investigated several possible causes of this variability and found that neither bloom density nor concentrations of water-borne brevetoxins correlated with allelopathic potency. However, when we directly tested whether the presence of competing phytoplankton influenced bloom allelopathy, we found that S. costatum reduced the growth-inhibiting effects of bloom exudates, suggesting that S. costatum has a mechanism for undermining K. brevis allelopathy. Additional laboratory experiments indicated that inducible changes to K. brevis allelopathy were restricted to two diatoms among five sensitive phytoplankton species, whereas five other species were constitutively resistant to K. brevis allelopathy. Our results suggest that competitors differ in their responses to phytoplankton allelopathy, with S. costatum exhibiting a previously undescribed method of resistance that may influence community structure and alter bloom dynamics.

  19. Temporal progression of photosynthetic-strategy in phytoplankton in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan-Keogh, Thomas J.; DeLizo, Liza M.; Smith, Walker O.; Sedwick, Peter N.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Moore, C. Mark; Bibby, Thomas S.

    2017-02-01

    The bioavailability of iron influences the distribution, biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the Ross Sea, one of the most productive regions in the Southern Ocean. We mapped the spatial and temporal extent and severity of iron-limitation of the native phytoplankton assemblage using long- (> 24 h) and short-term (24 h) iron-addition experiments along with physiological and molecular characterisations during a cruise to the Ross Sea in December-February 2012. Phytoplankton increased their photosynthetic efficiency in response to iron addition, suggesting proximal iron limitation throughout most of the Ross Sea during summer. Molecular and physiological data further indicate that as nitrate is removed from the surface ocean the phytoplankton community transitions to one displaying an iron-efficient photosynthetic strategy characterised by an increase in the size of photosystem II (PSII) photochemical cross section (σPSII) and a decrease in the chlorophyll-normalised PSII abundance. These results suggest that phytoplankton with the ability to reduce their photosynthetic iron requirements are selected as the growing season progresses, which may drive the well-documented progression from Phaeocystis antarctica- assemblages to diatom-dominated phytoplankton. Such a shift in the assemblage-level photosynthetic strategy potentially mediates further drawdown of nitrate following the development of iron deficient conditions in the Ross Sea.

  20. Storm-Based Fluvial Inputs: Nutrient, Phytoplankton, and Carbon Dioxide Responses in a Tropical Embayment, Kane'ohe Bay, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drupp, P. S.; de Carlo, E. H.; MacKenzie, F. T.; Bienfang, P.

    2010-12-01

    This work describes use of a buoy system to monitor, autonomously, pCO2 and water quality responses to land-derived nutrient inputs and the physical forcings associated with local storm events. These data represent 2.5 years of near-real time observations at a fixed station, collected concurrently with spatially distributed synoptic sampling over larger sections of Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. Nutrient loadings from direct rainfall and/or terrestrial runoff produce an immediate increase in the N:P ratio of bay waters up to 48, and drive phytoplankton biomass growth. Rapid uptake of nutrient input subsidies by phytoplankton causes a rapid decline of pCO2 and nitrogen, before a return to baseline levels with the subsequent decline of phytoplankton biomass over time scales ranging from a few days to several weeks, depending on the conditions and proximity to the sources of runoff. This work exemplifies the utility of combining synoptic sampling and real-time autonomous observations to elucidate the responses of coastal tropical coral reef systems to climatic perturbations over the array of time scales (hours to annual) on which they occur. Many subtropical and tropical systems throughout the Pacific Ocean are similar to Kaneohe Bay and our studies of how coral reef ecosystems respond under conditions of increased ocean acidification provides an important indication of the variability and range of CO2 dynamics that are likely to exist elsewhere. Such variability must be taken into account in any analysis of the direction and magnitude of the air-sea CO2 exchange for the integrated coastal ocean, both proximal and distal. Finally, it cannot be overemphasized that our work illustrates several examples of how high frequency sampling provided by a moored autonomous system can provide details about ecosystem responses to stochastic atmospheric forcing, which are commonly missed by traditional synoptic observational approaches. Figure 1: pCO2 levels and nitrate concentrations

  1. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  2. Warming and Ocean Acidification Effects on Phytoplankton--From Species Shifts to Size Shifts within Species in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ulrich; Paul, Carolin; Moustaka-Gouni, Maria

    2015-01-01

    While the isolated responses of marine phytoplankton to climate warming and to ocean acidification have been studied intensively, studies on the combined effect of both aspects of Global Change are still scarce. Therefore, we performed a mesocosm experiment with a factorial combination of temperature (9 and 15 °C) and pCO2 (means: 439 ppm and 1040 ppm) with a natural autumn plankton community from the western Baltic Sea. Temporal trajectories of total biomass and of the biomass of the most important higher taxa followed similar patterns in all treatments. When averaging over the entire time course, phytoplankton biomass decreased with warming and increased with CO2 under warm conditions. The contribution of the two dominant higher phytoplankton taxa (diatoms and cryptophytes) and of the 4 most important species (3 diatoms, 1 cryptophyte) did not respond to the experimental treatments. Taxonomic composition of phytoplankton showed only responses at the level of subdominant and rare species. Phytoplankton cell sizes increased with CO2 addition and decreased with warming. Both effects were stronger for larger species. Warming effects were stronger than CO2 effects and tended to counteract each other. Phytoplankton communities without calcifying species and exposed to short-term variation of CO2 seem to be rather resistant to ocean acidification.

  3. Warming and Ocean Acidification Effects on Phytoplankton--From Species Shifts to Size Shifts within Species in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Sommer

    Full Text Available While the isolated responses of marine phytoplankton to climate warming and to ocean acidification have been studied intensively, studies on the combined effect of both aspects of Global Change are still scarce. Therefore, we performed a mesocosm experiment with a factorial combination of temperature (9 and 15 °C and pCO2 (means: 439 ppm and 1040 ppm with a natural autumn plankton community from the western Baltic Sea. Temporal trajectories of total biomass and of the biomass of the most important higher taxa followed similar patterns in all treatments. When averaging over the entire time course, phytoplankton biomass decreased with warming and increased with CO2 under warm conditions. The contribution of the two dominant higher phytoplankton taxa (diatoms and cryptophytes and of the 4 most important species (3 diatoms, 1 cryptophyte did not respond to the experimental treatments. Taxonomic composition of phytoplankton showed only responses at the level of subdominant and rare species. Phytoplankton cell sizes increased with CO2 addition and decreased with warming. Both effects were stronger for larger species. Warming effects were stronger than CO2 effects and tended to counteract each other. Phytoplankton communities without calcifying species and exposed to short-term variation of CO2 seem to be rather resistant to ocean acidification.

  4. 新疆塘巴湖水库浮游植物群落组成特征%Ecological features of phytoplankton community of Tangbahu Reservoir in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛俊增; 边佳胤; 王琼; 蔡桢; 朱新英; 李周永; 李海峰; 吴惠仙

    2012-01-01

    line has flinched 500 meters.It will make an impact in aquatic ecosystem.The phytoplankton which have an important impact on the plankton community,are major component groups of aquatic plankton.Phytoplankton community structure of Tangbahu Reservoir was investigated and analyzed in July 2008(the flow period),October 2008(the dry period) and May 2009(the flood period).Results showed that a total of 97 phytoplankton species,belonging to 8 phyla were identified,of which 43 species were Bacillariophyta,28 species were Chlorophyta,12 species were Cyanophyta,5 species were Euglenophyta,3 species were Cryptophyta,3 species were Xanthophyta,2 species were Pyrrophyta and 1 species were Chrysophyta.The number of species for Bacillariophyta,Chlorophyta,Cyanophyta,Euglenophyta,Cryptophyta,Xanthophyta,Pyrrophyta Chrysophyta accounted for 45%,29%,12%,5%,3%,3%,2% and 1% of the total species respectively.The trends of species changing showed: the flood period(56 species) the flow period(39 species) the dry period(19 species),the flood period and the flow period was made up by 8 phyla,but the dry period was made up by 6 phylathe.The dominance analysis showed that the phytoplankton community structure was typical type of Chlorella-diatoms in this reservoir.A.oscillarioides,M.aeruginisa,C.minor,C.bodanica,S.bijuga,W.botryoides,C.vulgaris and T.oblonga were the dominant species in the normalwater season.In the dry season,dominant species were M.flos-marginata,C.minor,M.granulata,C.debaryana,S.bijuga,C.vulgaris and C.erosaerosa.But in the wet season M.incerta Lemm,M.granulate,A.formosa,S.armatus,C.vulgaris,C.minima,C.erosaovata and G.aeruginosum were the dominant species.The phytoplankton in Tangbahu Reservoir showed larger alternation of hydro-period with the highest density(9.42±2.20×106 ind/L) in dry period,followed by the flow period(7.80±1.41×106 ind/L),the flood period was the lowest for 1.11±2.32×106 ind/L,it also had a very significant

  5. Changes in phytoplankton composition in response to tides, wind-induced mixing conditions, and freshwater outflows in an urbanised estuarine complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Moser

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown an increase in potentially harmful phytoplankton in Santos bay (Southeastern Brazilian Coast, located in a highly urbanised estuarine complex. Prediction of blooms is, thus, essential but the phytoplankton community structure in very dynamic regions is difficult to determine. In the present work, we discriminate bloom forming microphytoplankton dominance and their relationship to physical and meteorological variables to look for patterns observed in different tides and seasons. Comparing 8 distinct situations, we found five scenarios of dominance that could be related to winds, tides and rainfall: i Surfers, diatoms occurring during high surf zone energies; ii Sinkers, represented by larger celled diatoms during spring tide, after periods of high precipitation rates; iii Opportunistic mixers, composed of chain forming diatoms with small or elongate cells occurring during neap tides; iv Local mixers, microplanktonic diatoms and dinoflagellates which occurred throughout the 298 sampling stations; and v Mixotrophic dinoflagellates, after intense estuarine discharges. Results suggest alterations in the temporal patterns for some bloom-forming species, while others appeared in abundances above safe limits for public health. This approach can also illustrate possible impacts of changes in freshwater discharge in highly urbanised estuaries.

  6. Assessing spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton communities' composition in the Iroise Sea ecosystem (Brittany, France): A 3D modeling approach. Part 1: Biophysical control over plankton functional types succession and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadier, Mathilde; Gorgues, Thomas; Sourisseau, Marc; Edwards, Christopher A.; Aumont, Olivier; Marié, Louis; Memery, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic interplay between physical, biogeochemical and biological processes represents a key challenge in oceanography, particularly in shelf seas where complex hydrodynamics are likely to drive nutrient distribution and niche partitioning of phytoplankton communities. The Iroise Sea includes a tidal front called the 'Ushant Front' that undergoes a pronounced seasonal cycle, with a marked signal during the summer. These characteristics as well as relatively good observational sampling make it a region of choice to study processes impacting phytoplankton dynamics. This innovative modeling study employs a phytoplankton-diversity model, coupled to a regional circulation model to explore mechanisms that alter biogeography of phytoplankton in this highly dynamic environment. Phytoplankton assemblages are mainly influenced by the depth of the mixed layer on a seasonal time scale. Indeed, solar incident irradiance is a limiting resource for phototrophic growth and small phytoplankton cells are advantaged over larger cells. This phenomenon is particularly relevant when vertical mixing is intense, such as during winter and early spring. Relaxation of wind-induced mixing in April causes an improvement of irradiance experienced by cells across the whole study area. This leads, in late spring, to a competitive advantage of larger functional groups such as diatoms as long as the nutrient supply is sufficient. This dominance of large, fast-growing autotrophic cells is also maintained during summer in the productive tidally-mixed shelf waters. In the oligotrophic surface layer of the western part of the Iroise Sea, small cells coexist in a greater proportion with large, nutrient limited cells. The productive Ushant tidal front's region (1800 mgC·m- 2·d- 1 between August and September) is also characterized by a high degree of coexistence between three functional groups (diatoms, micro/nano-flagellates and small eukaryotes/cyanobacteria). Consistent with

  7. 于桥水库秋季浮游植物群落结构与水质因子的关系%Relationship between structure of phytoplankton community and water quality factors in Yuqiao Reservoir in autumn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田志强; 田秉晖; 辛丽花; 贾大伟; 张磊

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at the problems of water security resulted of eutrophication caused by algae outbreaks in Yuqiao Reservoir in autumn, the relationship between structure of phytoplankton community and water quality factors was studied, at the same time, eutrophication main-control factors and principal water quality factors which influenced on structure of phytoplankton community were recognized. The results showed a total of 110 phytoplankton species was detected, which belonged to 52 genera, 7 phylum; phytoplankton average abundance was 3.46 × 105 cells/L, and dominant species consisted of Synedra acus Kutz, Synedra arnphicephala , Anabaena cylindricus , and Raphidiopsis curvata; The status of water quality was general mesotrophic; Changes of water quality had a greater impact on species number and abundance of the phytoplankton. DO, pH and transparency were primary water quality factors which influenced on structure of phytoplankton community, and phosphorus is the main controlling factor of eutrophication.Base on the current eutrophication in Yuqiao Reservoir, water security can be ensured by regulating water quality factors and community structure so as to avoid large scale of algae outbreak.%针对于桥水库秋季藻类大量爆发引发的富营养化所导致的供水安全问题,研究了浮游植物群落结构与水质因子的关系,找出影响浮游植物群落结构的主要水质因子和富营养化的主控因子.结果显示,2009年秋季于桥水库共有浮游植物110种,隶属于7门52属,平均丰度为3.46×105个/L,优势种为弯形尖头藻、圆柱鱼腥藻、双头针杆藻、尖针杆藻;于桥水库水质总体处于中营养状态;浮游植物物种丰富度、丰度受水质变化影响较大,DO、pH、透明度是影响浮游植物群落结构的主要水质因子,磷是富营养化的主控因子.在现有的富营养化状况下,通过调控主要水质因子,控制群落结构,可以防止水华大规模爆发,确保水质安全.

  8. 洋山港浮游植物群落特征研究%ECOLOGICAL FEATURES OF PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITY OF YANGSHAN PORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玲霜; 薛俊增; 庄骅; 王宝强; 吴惠仙

    2012-01-01

    洋山港是上海航运的枢纽港,2009年1月~12月对洋山港浮游植物群落进行了生态学研究,共鉴定浮游植物5门58属112种,合赤潮藻类5门21属34种,群落结构组成以硅藻为主.其中优势种由具槽帕拉藻(Paralia sulcata)、具翼漂流藻(Planktoniella blanda)、辐射圆筛藻(Coscinodiscus radiatus)、格氏圆筛藻(Coscinodiscus granii)、条纹小环藻(Cyclotella striata)、扭曲小环藻(Cyclotella comta)、菱形海线藻(Thalassionema nitzschioides)、尖刺伪菱形藻(Pseudo-nitzschia pungens)以及短柄曲壳藻(Achnanthes brevi pes)等构成.浮游植物细胞丰度变化范围是(6.15×104~1.39×104) ind/L,全年平均值为3.32×104 ind/L,11月细胞丰度达到最高值,其次为3月,呈现双峰型的周年变化规律.硅藻在全年的浮游植物细胞丰度组成中始终占据绝对优势地位.相关性分析发现,浮游植物细胞丰度、温度和溶解氧两两间呈现出极显著相关性(P<0.01),其中仅细胞丰度与溶解氧之间呈现正相关(r>0),其余两两间为负相关关系(r<0).%Yangshan port is a China's major port and is building into an international shipping center, and it affected by several water bodies. Phytoplankton community structure of Yangshan port was investigated and analyzed on January to December in 2009. A total of 112 phytoplankton species, belonging to 5 phylum 58 genus were identified, 34 species belonging to red tide phytoplankton, and diatom phylum played an important role in the community structure. Paralia sulcata, Planktoniella blanda, Coscinodiscus radiatus, Coscinodiscus granii, Cyclotella striata, Cyclotella comta, Thalassionema nitzschioides, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens as well as Achnanthes brevipes were the dominant species. The ranges of cell density were 6. 15 104ind/L to 1. 38 104ind/L, and the annual average was 3. 32 104ind/L. The cell density was greatest in November, and then was in March, two high peaks were found in the period of

  9. Response of phytoplankton to multispecies mariculture :a case study on the carrying capacity of shellfish in the Sanggou Bay in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Changzi; FANG Jianguang; SONG Xiefa; MAO Yuze; YE Naihao

    2008-01-01

    A multispecies model for shellfish polycuhure in the Sanggou Bay in China used for large-scale long-line cultivation of the Chinese scallop Chlamysfarreri,the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the kelp Laminariajaponica is presented.The model includes key physical processes which are the transports of matter at the system boundary,and the main biological process that is the primary production and nutrients release from the bottom.By the model,the seasonal fluctuations of phytoplankton biomass and dissolved inorganic nitrogen(DIN) in 1994 are simulated.Furthermore,if the kelp culture scale is kept constant and the Chinese scallop and the Pacific oyster culture scales are adjusted,virtual shellfish farms are funded and responses of phytoplankton to the large- scale shellfish culture are simulated.According to these simulated results,the room limitation,and the hypothesis that shellfish will not grow well if the phytoplankton biomass is less than 8.2 mg/m3,the expandable multiple of scallop culture k and that of oyster culture y are determined as k=-0.276 5y+4.690 5 and 0.133 3k+0.006 6y≤0.667 5,where,k (or y) is equal to 1, the culture scale of scallop (or oyster) is 8.8×109 individuals (or 66 ha,with a density of 59 ind./m2),and the kelp culture scale is 3 300 ha with a density of 12 ind./m2.

  10. Marine biogeochemistry: Phytoplankton in a witch's brew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenfeld, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Natural seafloor hydrocarbon seeps are responsible for roughly half of the oil released into the ocean. As these oils and gases rise to the surface, they transport nutrients upwards, benefiting phytoplankton in the upper sunlit layer.

  11. Phytoplankton community structure and stocks in the Southern Ocean (30-80°E) determined by CHEMTAX analysis of HPLC pigment signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Simon W.; van den Enden, Rick L.; Pearce, Imojen; Davidson, Andrew T.; Scott, Fiona J.; Westwood, Karen J.

    2010-05-01

    The geographic distribution, stocks and vertical profiles of phytoplankton of the seasonal ice zone off east Antarctica were determined during the 2005-2006 austral summer during the Baseline Research on Oceanography, Krill and the Environment-West (BROKE-West) survey. CHEMTAX analysis of HPLC pigment samples, coupled with microscopy, permitted a detailed survey along seven transects covering an extensive area between 30°E and 80°E, from 62°S to the coast. Significant differences were found in the composition and stocks of populations separated by the Southern Boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (SB), as well as a small influence of the Weddell Gyre in the western sector of the 'zone south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current' (SACCZ). Within the SACCZ, we identified a primary bloom under the ice, a secondary bloom near the ice edge, and an open-ocean deep population. The similarity of distribution patterns across all transects allowed us to generalise a hypothesized sequence for the season. The primary phytoplankton bloom, with stocks of Chl a up to 239 mg m -2, occurred about 35 days before complete disappearance of the sea ice, and contained both cells from the water column and those released from melting ice. These blooms were composed of haptophytes (in particular, colonies and gametes of Phaeocystis antarctica), diatoms and cryptophytes (or the cryptophyte symbiont-containing ciliate Myrionecta rubrum). Aggregates released by melting ice quickly sank from the upper water column and Chl a stocks declined to 56-92 mg m -2, but the bloom of diatoms and, to a lesser extent, cryptophytes continued until about 20 days after ice melt. The disappearance of sea ice coincided with a sharp increase in P. antarctica and grazing, as indicated by increasing phaeophytin a and phaeophorbide a. Chlorophyllide content suggests that the diatom bloom then senesced, probably due to iron exhaustion. Stocks rapidly declined, apparently due to grazing krill that moved

  12. Macroecological patterns in the distribution of marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Erik Askov

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for approximately half of the global total primary production. The photosynthesis they carry out sustains higher trophic levels in the marine ecosystem. Changes in phytoplankton community composition can have cascading effects on food web dynamics, total...... stratification limiting the flux of nutrients from the deep ocean). This affect has important implications for the global carbon cycle and should be included in future climate models. In manuscript II, changes in the mean cyst size of dinoflagellates are investigated in relation to temperature changes during...... in the 1970s. However, increasing silicate in the deep ocean over the same period has indicated that there is an overlooked source of silicate and has brought the paradigm of silica limitation into question. Here, it is shown that silicate-using protists became more diluted in the sediment after 1970...

  13. Macroecological patterns in the distribution of marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Erik Askov

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for approximately half of the global total primary production. The photosynthesis they carry out sustains higher trophic levels in the marine ecosystem. Changes in phytoplankton community composition can have cascading effects on food web dynamics, total...... stratification limiting the flux of nutrients from the deep ocean). This affect has important implications for the global carbon cycle and should be included in future climate models. In manuscript II, changes in the mean cyst size of dinoflagellates are investigated in relation to temperature changes during...... in the 1970s. However, increasing silicate in the deep ocean over the same period has indicated that there is an overlooked source of silicate and has brought the paradigm of silica limitation into question. Here, it is shown that silicate-using protists became more diluted in the sediment after 1970...

  14. Marine phytoplankton and the changing ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, D. A.; Boyd, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The availability of the micronutrient iron governs phytoplankton growth across much of the ocean, but the global iron cycle is changing rapidly due to accelerating acidification, stratification, warming and deoxygenation. These mechanisms of global change will cumulatively affect the aqueous chemistry, sources and sinks, recycling, particle dynamics and bioavailability of iron. Biological iron demand will vary as acclimation to environmental change modifies cellular requirements for photosynthesis and nitrogen acquisition and as adaptive evolution or community shifts occur. Warming, acidification and nutrient co-limitation interactions with iron biogeochemistry will all strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics. Predicting the shape of the future iron cycle will require understanding the responses of each component of the unique biogeochemistry of this trace element to many concurrent and interacting environmental changes.

  15. Assessing spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton communities' composition in the Iroise Sea ecosystem (Brittany, France): A 3D modeling approach. Part 2: Linking summer mesoscale distribution of phenotypic diversity to hydrodynamism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadier, Mathilde; Sourisseau, Marc; Gorgues, Thomas; Edwards, Christopher A.; Memery, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    Tidal front ecosystems are especially dynamic environments usually characterized by high phytoplankton biomass and high primary production. However, the description of functional microbial diversity occurring in these regions remains only partially documented. In this article, we use a numerical model, simulating a large number of phytoplankton phenotypes to explore the three-dimensional spatial patterns of phytoplankton abundance and diversity in the Iroise Sea (western Brittany). Our results suggest that, in boreal summer, a seasonally marked tidal front shapes the phytoplankton species richness. A diversity maximum is found in the surface mixed layer located slightly west of the tidal front (i.e., not strictly co-localized with high biomass concentrations) which separates tidally mixed from stratified waters. Differences in phenotypic composition between sub-regions with distinct hydrodynamic regimes (defined by vertical mixing, nutrients gradients and light penetration) are discussed. Local growth and/or physical transport of phytoplankton phenotypes are shown to explain our simulated diversity distribution. We find that a large fraction (64%) of phenotypes present during the considered period of September are ubiquitous, found in the frontal area and on both sides of the front (i.e., over the full simulated domain). The frontal area does not exhibit significant differences between its community composition and that of either the well-mixed region or an offshore Deep Chlorophyll Maximum (DCM). Only three phenotypes (out of 77) specifically grow locally and are found at substantial concentration only in the surface diversity maximum. Thus, this diversity maximum is composed of a combination of ubiquitous phenotypes with specific picoplankton deriving from offshore, stratified waters (including specific phenotypes from both the surface and the DCM) and imported through physical transport, completed by a few local phenotypes. These results are discussed in light

  16. Retrieving the vertical distribution of chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition from in situ fluorescence profiles: A method based on a neural network with potential for global-scale applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzède, R.; Claustre, H.; Jamet, C.; Uitz, J.; Ras, J.; Mignot, A.; D'Ortenzio, F.

    2015-01-01

    neural network-based method is developed to assess the vertical distribution of (1) chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl]) and (2) phytoplankton community size indices (i.e., microphytoplankton, nanophytoplankton, and picophytoplankton) from in situ vertical profiles of chlorophyll fluorescence. This method (FLAVOR for Fluorescence to Algal communities Vertical distribution in the Oceanic Realm) uses as input only the shape of the fluorescence profile associated with its acquisition date and geo-location. The neural network is trained and validated using a large database including 896 concomitant in situ vertical profiles of High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments and fluorescence. These profiles were collected during 22 oceanographic cruises representative of the global ocean in terms of trophic and oceanographic conditions, making our method applicable to most oceanic waters. FLAVOR is validated with respect to the retrieval of both [Chl] and phytoplankton size indices using an independent in situ data set and appears to be relatively robust spatially and temporally. To illustrate the potential of the method, we applied it to in situ measurements of the BATS (Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study) site and produce monthly climatologies of [Chl] and associated phytoplankton size indices. The resulting climatologies appear very promising compared to climatologies based on available in situ HPLC data. With the increasing availability of spatially and temporally well-resolved data sets of chlorophyll fluorescence, one possible global-scale application of FLAVOR could be to develop 3-D and even 4-D climatologies of [Chl] and associated composition of phytoplankton communities. The Matlab and R codes of the proposed algorithm are provided as supporting information.

  17. The influence of nitrogen and phosphorus on phytoplankton growth and assemblage composition in four coastal, southeastern USA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michelle L.; Pinckney, James L.; Keppler, Charles J.; Brock, Larissa M.; Hogan, Sarah B.; Greenfield, Dianne I.

    2016-08-01

    Human population density, and related urbanization, is predicted to increase along coastlines worldwide. Varied land uses will likely influence nutrient delivery, mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), to the coast and thereby phytoplankton assemblages. This study examined spatial and seasonal variability in phytoplankton community composition and growth responses to N (ammonium, nitrate, or urea) and/or P (orthophosphate) using in situ bioassays during 2011-2013. Study sites were in four southeastern US (South Carolina) coastal systems with distinct land uses: a forested tidal creek, a forested/agricultural tidal creek, an urbanized tidal creek, and a stormwater detention pond. Results showed that sites were primarily N-limited and diatoms typically contributed most to phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a). Phytoplankton communities at the more developed sites (urbanized creek and stormwater detention pond) not only exhibited higher biomass and growth rates with N, particularly urea, additions compared to the less-developed sites (forested and forested/agricultural tidal creeks), they often included harmful algal bloom species, particularly cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates, and raphidophytes. These findings suggest that phytoplankton community responses to N-form are site specific, influenced by surrounding land cover, and N inputs (e.g. fertilizers) may cause algal blooms. Results both underscore the role of development as a driver of coastal production and can be informative for water quality management.

  18. Phytoplankton biovolume is independent from the slope of the size spectrum in the oligotrophic atlantic ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique

    2015-08-06

    Modelling the size-abundance spectrum of phytoplankton has proven to be a very useful tool for the analysis of physical-biological coupling and the vertical flux of carbon in oceanic ecosystems at different scales. A frequent observation relates high phytoplankton biovolume in productive regions with flatter spectrum slope and the opposite in oligotrophic ecosystems. Rather than this, the relationship between high biovolume phytoplankton assemblages and flatter size-abundance spectra does not correspond with measurements of the phytoplankton community in the Atlantic Ocean open waters. As part of the Malaspina Circunnavegation Expedition, sixty seven sampling stations within the Atlantic Ocean covering six oceanographic provinces, at different seasons, produced a complete set of phytoplankton size-spectra whose slope and biovolume did not show any obvious interrelation. In these oligotrophic sites, small (procaryotes) and medium-size (nanoplankton) cells are responsible for the most part of biovolume, and their response to environmental conditions does not apply to changes in the size-abundance spectrum slope as expected in richer, large-cell dominated ecosystems.

  19. The impact of climate on the geographical distribution of phytoplankton species in boreal lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallstan, Simon; Trigal, Cristina; Johansson, Karin S L; Johnson, Richard K

    2013-12-01

    Here, we use a novel space-by-time approach to study large-scale changes in phytoplankton species distribution in Swedish boreal lakes in response to climate variability. Using phytoplankton samples from 27 lakes, evenly distributed across Sweden, all relatively unimpacted by anthropogenic disturbance and sampled annually between 1996 and 2010, we found significant shifts in the geographical distribution of 18 species. We also found significant changes in the prevalence of 45 species (33 became more common and 12 less common) over the study period. Using species distribution models and phytoplankton samples from 60 lakes sampled at least twice between 1992 and 2010, we evaluated the importance of climate variability and other environmental variables on species distribution. We found that temperature (e.g., extreme events and the duration of the growing season) was the most important predictor for species detections. Many cyanobacteria, chlorophytes, and, to a lesser extent, diatoms and zygnematophytes, showed congruent and positive responses to temperature. In contrast, precipitation explained little variation and was important only for a few taxa (e.g., Staurodesmus spp., Trachelomonas volvocina). At the community level, our results suggest a change in community composition at temperatures over 20 °C and growing seasons longer than 40 days. We conclude that climate is an important driver of the distributional patterns of individual phytoplankton species and may drive changes in community composition in minimally disturbed boreal lakes.

  20. The response and detoxification strategies of three freshwater phytoplankton species, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Pediastrum simplex, and Synedra acus, to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Xiaofei; Yue, Hong; Fu, Xiaoli; Kang, Yuanhao; Xu, Sha; Yang, Yanjun; Xu, Jinzhu; Shi, Junqiong; Wu, Zhongxing

    2015-12-01

    The response and detoxification mechanisms of three freshwater phytoplankton species (the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, the green alga Pediastrum simplex, and the diatom Synedra acus) to cadmium (Cd) were investigated. The cell growth of each species was measured over 10 days, and chlorophyll a fluorescence, Cd bioaccumulation (including surface-adsorbed and intracellular Cd), and phytochelatin (PC) synthesis were determined after 96-h exposures. The growth of the three phytoplankton species was significantly inhibited when Cd concentrations were ≥5 mg L(-1). Compared with P. simplex, greater growth inhibition in S. acus and A. flos-aquae occurred. The changes in chlorophyll fluorescence parameters including the maximal quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) and relative variable fluorescence of the J point (Vj) demonstrated that the increase in Cd concentration damaged PSII in all three species. After 96-h exposures, the accumulation of surface-adsorbed Cd and intracellular Cd increased significantly in all three species, with the increase of Cd concentrations in the media; total cadmium accumulation was 245, 658, and 1670 times greater than that of the control in A. flos-aquae, P. simplex, and S. acus, respectively, after exposure to 10 mg L(-1). Total thiols exhibited a similar trend to that of Cd accumulation. PC3 was found in A. flos-aquae and P. simplex in all Cd treatments. Glutathione (GSH) and PC2 were also produced in response to exposure to high concentrations of Cd. PC4 was only discovered at exposure concentrations of 10 mg L(-1) Cd and only in S. acus. The intracellular Cd/PCs ratio increased in all three phytoplankton with an increase in Cd concentrations, and a linear relationship between the ratio and the growth inhibition rates was observed with P. simplex and S. acus. Our results have demonstrated that metal detoxification mechanisms were dependent on the species. This study suggested that the variance of metal detoxification strategies, such

  1. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  2. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  3. Canonical correspondence analysis of phytoplankton community and environmental factors in Qinhuai River in autumn and winter%秦淮河秋冬季浮游植物群落与环境因子典范对应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严莹

    2013-01-01

    2012年10月和2013年1月对南京市内外秦淮河浮游植物群落进行调查和分析。共鉴定出浮游植物4门30属37种,秋季主要以蓝藻-硅藻为主,平均丰度和生物量分别为221.5万cells/L和4.41 mg/L,冬季以硅藻为主,平均丰度和生物量分别为153.4万cells/L和6.58 mg/L。典范对应分析显示,绿藻对氮磷营养盐浓度、高锰酸盐指数等含量较高的水体耐受能力较强,硅藻则对多变的环境适应能力较强;氮磷比对蓝藻、裸藻和部分绿藻的分布有较明显的影响;秋冬季节影响秦淮河浮游植物群落分布的主要环境因子为水温和溶解氧,其次为氮磷营养盐浓度和电导率。%The phytoplankton community in the internal and external Qinhuai River in Nanjing City was investigated and analyzed in October 2012 and January 2013 . A total of 37 species of phytoplankton belonging to four families and 30 genera were identified. Blue-green algae-diatoms were dominant phytoplankton in the autumn, with an average abundance and biomass of 221.5í104 cells/L and 4.41 mg/L, respectively. Diatoms were dominant phytoplankton in the winter, with an average abundance and biomass of 153.4í104 cells/L and 6.58 mg/L, respectively. Canonical correspondence analysis ( CCA) showed that green algae had a high tolerance to water that had high nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient concentrations and permanganate indices, and diatoms had a strong ability to adapt to a changeable environment; the ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus had a significant impact on the distributions of cyanobacteria, euglena, and part of the green algae; and water temperature and dissolved oxygen were the main environmental factors influencing the distribution of the phytoplankton community in the Qinhuai River in the autumn and winter, followed by nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient concentrations and electrical conductivity.

  4. EFFECTS OF COPPER SULFATE TREATMENT ON EUTROPHIC URBAN LAKE PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES%硫酸铜控藻对浮游植物群落的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵小丽; 宋立荣; 张小明

    2009-01-01

    硫酸铜广泛用于水华藻类的去除和控制.本文测定了不同藻类对Cu2+的敏感性,几种常见水华藻类对Cu2+的敏感性顺序为:铜绿微囊藻>水华鱼腥藻>小环藻>莱哈衣藻>斜生栅藻.在某城市的富营养化湖泊中用Cu-SO4·5H2O(102μg/L Cu2+)作为杀藻剂控制蓝藻水华的试验结果表明:在用硫酸铜控制蓝藻水华的过程中,水体透明度有明显改善;总氮总磷无显著变化;浮游植物总数在试验初期下降,但在试验后期则有所回升,在试验初期蓝藻门数量有所下降,绿藻门和硅藻门数量增加,这与不同藻类对Cu2+敏感性差异相关;试验后期,蓝藻门种类快速生长,并成为优势种;水柱中微囊藻毒素的浓度随藻类数量的减少在4d内大幅降低.%Copper sulphate treatment is widely used as a global and empirical method to remove or control phytoplankton blooms. We tested the acute toxicity of 5 species of familiar microalgae and gave an urban lake copper sulfate treat in order to illuminate how the water body response to copper treat, especially the change of phytoplankton species and density of microcystins. According to OECD Alga growth inhibition test, effect of copper on 5 species of familiar microalgae was tested, and species of Cyanophyta showed much higher sensitivity to copper than species of Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta. In a eutrophic urban lake,CuSO4·5H2O was used as algicide to control the water bloom caused by cyanobacterial.The copper concentration applied was 102μg/L (as copper). We investigated the lake response to copper sulfate, which showed that the transparence was substantially improved; TN and TP did not change a lot; total algal decreased just after the copper sulfate treatment, and later increased again; at the beginning of the experiment, species of Cyanophyta died and the amount sharply decreased, Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta turned to be the preponderant species, which could be related to species

  5. The chronic effects of oil pollution on marine phytoplankton in a subtropical bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jun; Jiang, Zhi-Bing; Zeng, Jiang-Ning; Chen, Quan-Zhen; Zhao, Yong-qiang; Liao, Yi-bo; Shou, Lu; Xu, Xiao-qun

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of crude oil water accommodated fraction (WAF) on marine phytoplankton community, natural phytoplankton collected seasonally from the Yueqing bay were exposed to eight groups of crude oil WAF for 15 days under laboratory conditions. Chlorophyll a and cell density were measured, and species of phytoplankton were identified every 24 h to reflect the change of phytoplankton community. The results showed that (1) High concentrations (≥ 2.28 mg l(-1)) of oil pollution would greatly restrain phytoplankton growth (poil WAF in all seasons (ppollutant concentrations in different seasons. Different species had different tolerances to the oil pollution, thus leading to abnormal succession.

  6. Responses of Hyalella azteca and phytoplankton to a simulated agricultural runoff event in a managed backwater wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Richard E; Shields, F Douglas; Murdock, Justin N; Knight, Scott S

    2012-05-01

    We assessed the aqueous toxicity mitigation capacity of a hydrologically managed floodplain wetland following a synthetic runoff event amended with a mixture of sediments, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), and pesticides (atrazine, S-metolachlor, and permethrin) using 48-h Hyalella azteca survival and phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll a. The runoff event simulated a 1h, 1.27 cm rainfall event from a 16 ha agricultural field. Water (1L) was collected every 30 min within the first 4h, every 4h until 48 h, and on days 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 post-amendment at distances of 0, 10, 40, 300 and 500 m from the amendment point for chlorophyll a, suspended sediment, nutrient, and pesticide analyses. H. azteca 48-h laboratory survival was assessed in water collected at each site at 0, 4, 24, 48 h, 5 d and 7 d. Greatest sediment, nutrient, and pesticide concentrations occurred within 3h of amendment at 0m, 10 m, 40 m, and 300 m downstream. Sediments and nutrients showed little variation at 500 m whereas pesticides peaked within 48 h but at azteca survival significantly decreased within 48 h of amendment up to 300 m in association with permethrin concentrations. Chlorophyll a decreased within the first 24h of amendment up to 40m primarily in conjunction with herbicide concentrations. Variations in chlorophyll a at 300 and 500 m were associated with nutrients. Managed floodplain wetlands can rapidly and effectively trap and process agricultural runoff during moderate rainfall events, mitigating impacts to aquatic invertebrates and algae in receiving aquatic systems.

  7. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Behrenfeld

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton photosynthesis links global ocean biology and climate-driven fluctuations in the physical environment. These interactions are largely expressed through changes in phytoplankton physiology, but physiological status has proven extremely challenging to characterize globally. Phytoplankton fluorescence does provide a rich source of physiological information long exploited in laboratory and field studies, and is now observed from space. Here we use satellite-based fluorescence measurements to evaluate light-absorption and energy-dissipation processes influencing phytoplankton light use efficiency and demonstrate its utility as a global physiological indicator of iron-limited growth conditions. This new tool provides a path for monitoring climate-phytoplankton physiology interactions, improving descriptions of light use efficiency in ocean productivity models, evaluating nutrient-stress predictions in ocean ecosystem models, and appraising phytoplankton responses to natural iron enrichments or purposeful iron fertilizations activities.

  8. Characteristics of community structures of phytoplankton in the salt lakes in Naqu region, Tibet%西藏那曲地区盐湖浮游植物群落结构的特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立婧; 杨菲; 吴淑贤; 刘喜方; 贾沁贤

    2013-01-01

    2009年4-5月对西藏那曲地区12个盐湖进行浮游植物采样调查,共检出浮游植物58种,隶属于6门39属,其中硅藻门种数最多(34种),占浮游植物总种数的58.62%,其次为绿藻门(11种)和蓝藻门(8种).主要优势种为舟形藻属未定种1种、菱形藻属未定种1种、湖泊鞘丝藻和小形卵囊藻.平均生物密度和生物量分别为9.70 × 104 cells/L和0.162 8 mg/L.分析了西藏盐湖浮游植物区系组成特点,及其与环境因子尤其是含盐量的关系,结果表明:浮游植物物种数、生物密度与生物量均与含盐量存在不显著的负相关关系(P>0.05),在盐湖生态系统中,盐度是决定浮游植物多样性及个体数量的关键因素之一,浮游植物群落结构受众多生态因子共同影响.研究亮点:西藏盐湖不同于内陆淡水湖泊,其盐度较高,地理、自然环境恶劣,尤其那曲地区处于西藏羌北无人区,进藏调查研究只有少数具备条件的单位能够完成,因此其盐湖浮游植物一直都缺乏全面详细的调查.本文对西藏那曲地区12个盐湖的浮游植物群落结构进行调查,以丰富西藏盐湖浮游生物资源、生态学资料,并为盐湖资源综合性开发利用提供一定参考.%The phytoplankton of 12 salt lakes in Naqu region,Tibet had been investigated during April to May in 2009.A total of 58 species of phytoplankton were identified,belonging to 39 genera of 6 phyla.Bacillariophyta (34 species) was dominant in species richness by 58.62 percentage,followed by Cyanophyta (11 species) and Chlorophyta (8 species).Navicula sp.,Nitzschia sp.,Lyngbya limnetica,Oocystis parva were the main dominant species.The average density and biomass of phytoplankton were 9.70 × 104 cells/L and 0.162 8 mg/L,respectively.This paper also discusses the phytoplankton community characteristics of Tibet salt lakes,and the relationship between floristic composition characteristics of phytoplankton and environmental factors

  9. Phytoplankton community composition and its relationships with the environment in Shanton Harbor of South China%汕头港浮游植物组成特征及其与环境的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜虹; 王亮根; 曹会彬; 陈伟洲

    2011-01-01

    于2009年3月-2010年3月对汕头港生态环境进行连续监测,研究了浮游植物组成及其对环境条件的敏感程度.结果表明:研究区共鉴定出322种浮游植物,包含了234种硅藻,141种淡水和半咸水种以及64种赤潮生物;浮游植物丰度、Shannon指数和均匀度指数分别是3127.6×104cells·m-3、2.53和0.57;中肋骨条藻(Skeletonema costatum)和颤藻( Oscillatoria sp.)是全年优势种,优势度分别是0.066和0.038;浮游生物数量组成结构与温度明显相关(r=0.699,P<0.01).浮游植物与环境因子之间的相关性分析显示,透明度是汕头港浮游植物生长主要限制因子.比较浮游植物数量组成与环境因子间的相关程度发现,上游输入是汕头港污染物的重要来源之一.多维尺度与Pearson相关性分析显示,汕头港浮游植物群落结构变化主要受温度、盐度与pH影响.%Based on the monitoring data of the eco-environment in Shantou Harbor from March 2009 to March 2010, this paper studied the composition of phytoplankton community and its sensitivity to the environment in the Harbor. A total of 322 phytoplankton species were identified, including 234 diatom species, 141 fresh-water and brackish water species, and 64 red tide species. The average abundance, Shannon index, and evenness index of the community were 3127. 6×104 cells · m-3 , 2. 53 , and 0. 57 , respectively , and Skeletonema costatum and Oscillatoria sp. were the dominant species throughout the year, with the dominance index being 0. 066 and 0. 038, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between phytoplankton community composition and water temperature ( r= -0. 699 , P<0. 01 ) , and the phytoplankton growth was mainly limited by water transparence. The relevance degree of phytoplankton composition and environmental factors showed that upstream input was an important source of Shantou Port pollutants, and the multi-scale and Pearson correlation analyses indicated

  10. Water quality of a coastal lagoon (ES, Brazil): abiotic aspects, cytogenetic damage, and phytoplankton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ian Drumond; Silva, Nayara Heloisa Vieira Fraga; da Costa Souza, Iara; de Oliveira, Larissa Bassani; Rocha, Lívia Dorsch; Morozesk, Mariana; Bonomo, Marina Marques; de Almeida Pereira, Thaís; Dias, Mauro Cesar; de Oliveira Fernandes, Valéria; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie

    2017-04-01

    Assessment of water resources requires interdisciplinary studies that include multiple ecosystem aspects. This study evaluated the water quality of Juara Lagoon (ES, Brazil) based on physical and chemical variables, cytogenetic responses in Allium cepa and phytoplankton dynamics. Three sampling sites were defined and water samples were collected during two sampling periods. Analyses such as determination of photic zone, conductivity, and concentrations of nutrients and metals were conducted as well as cytotoxic, mutagenic, and genotoxic potentials using A. cepa test. The main attributes of phytoplankton community, such as total richness, total density, density by class, dominance, and diversity, were also evaluated. Results have revealed that Juara Lagoon has signs of artificial eutrophication at two sampling sites due to high levels of total phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen. Cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic potentials were detected as well as high concentrations of Fe and Mn. Furthermore, 165 phytoplankton taxa were recorded, with highest richness in Chlorophyceae and Cyanophyceae classes. In addition, Cyanophyceae presented as the highest density class. A. cepa test and phytoplankton community evaluation indicated that the ecological quality of Juara Lagoon is compromised.

  11. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  12. Distribuição vertical da comunidade fitoplanctônica do lago dos Tigres (Goiás, Brasil = Vertical distribution of phytoplankton communities in Tigres Lake (Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Nabout

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O lago dos Tigres é um lago do tipo vale bloqueado, sendo que não foiregistrado estudo evidenciando a distribuição vertical fitoplanctônica para esse tipo de lago; dessa forma, esta pesquisa assume um caráter pioneiro. Objetivou-se, nesse trabalho, oreconhecimento temporal e espacial dos padrões verticais de atributos da comunidade fitoplanctônica, detectar os grupos funcionais fitoplanctônicos dominantes e descritivos do sistema e relacioná-los com características limnológicas. O lago estudado foi caracterizadocomo polimítico quente, sendo que ocorreram eventuais estratificações térmicas nas estações de maior profundidade. Os períodos de seca e início de chuva apresentaram-se tanto limnologicamente (evidenciado pela ACP quanto biologicamente (observado pela ACC distintos. Os meses de seca apresentaram maiores concentrações de nutrientes emaiores transparências. Nesses meses, também foi registrado predomínio dos grupos funcionais Lo, Y , N e W1. Os meses de chuvas apresentaram maiores temperaturas e menores transparências, sendo que os grupos funcionais predominantes foram S1, T e N. Avaliando conjuntamente as características limnológicas, o biovolume e os gruposfuncionais, pode-se concluir que o perfil vertical do lago dos Tigres é oligo-mesotrófico.Tigres Lake is a blocked valley lake, with no registered studies ofphytoplankton vertical distribution for that lake type; as such, our work assumes a pioneering nature. The aim of this study was to recognize temporally and spatially the vertical patterns of phytoplankton community attributes, to detect the dominant anddescriptive phytoplankton functional groups, and relate them to limnological characteristics. Tigres Lake was characterized as a warm polymictic lake, featuring occasional thermal stratification in deeper stations. The dry and early rainy seasons presented limnological (evidenced by PCA and biological (observed by CCA differences. The dry months presented

  13. Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) is a part of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). The PMN was created as an outreach program to connect...

  14. Blooms of phytoplankton along the west coast of India associated with nutrient enrichment and the response of zooplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.R.S.; Devassy, V.P.; Madhupratap, M.

    and dinoflagellates are also common Spectacular bloom formations of Trichodesmium is a regular phenomenon during the later part of the NE monsoon season At times, these blooms cover hundreds of kilometres Very often successions of phyto- and zooplankton communities...

  15. Imaging flow cytometry for phytoplankton analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashkova, Veronika; Malashenkov, Dmitry; Poulton, Nicole; Vorobjev, Ivan; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2017-01-01

    This review highlights the concepts and instrumentation of imaging flow cytometry technology and in particular its use for phytoplankton analysis. Imaging flow cytometry, a hybrid technology combining speed and statistical capabilities of flow cytometry with imaging features of microscopy, is rapidly advancing as a cell imaging platform that overcomes many of the limitations of current techniques and contributed significantly to the advancement of phytoplankton analysis in recent years. This review presents the various instrumentation relevant to the field and currently used for assessment of complex phytoplankton communities' composition and abundance, size structure determination, biovolume estimation, detection of harmful algal bloom species, evaluation of viability and metabolic activity and other applications. Also we present our data on viability and metabolic assessment of Aphanizomenon sp. cyanobacteria using Imagestream X Mark II imaging cytometer. Herein, we highlight the immense potential of imaging flow cytometry for microalgal research, but also discuss limitations and future developments.

  16. 太湖流域主要河道浮游植物类群对比研究%Comparison of the Phytoplankton Community in Major Rivers of the Taihu Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓建明; 徐彩平; 陈宇炜; 邵晓阳; 高俊峰

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton assemblages were sampled in spring (13th-22nd April) and summer (10th - 19th July), 2010, and were compared in order to obtain basic information of the community of phytoplankton and their relationships with environmental factors among different rivers in the Taihu basin. Samples for phytoplankton were both identified and counted under a microscope at 400×. The results of counting shown that Synedra sp., Cryptomonas sp., Aulacoseira sp., Fragilaria sp. and Navicula sp. were the dominant genus in the inflowing rivers and Aulacoseira sp.,Scenedesmu sp., Cryptomonas sp., Asterionella sp. and Closterium sp. in outflowing rivers in spring. And in summer, the major genus in inflowing rivers were Synedra sp., Crucigenia sp.,Cryptomonas sp., Euglena and Microcystis sp. and were Aulacoseira sp., Scenedesmus sp.,Cryptomonas sp., Synedra sp. in outflowing rivers. That is to say the phytoplankton community is different between both in temporal and spatial distribution in Taihu basin. Then several diversity indices were calculated and the indices shown that diversity of phytoplankton in spring were slightly higher than in summer, and it was also varied among rivers. Liner regressions between diversity indices and environmental factors indicated that Shannon-Wiener diversity index had strong relationships with conductivity, total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), total solid suspended (SS), chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) and nitrate (NO3--N) in spring and nitrate (NO3--N), chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) conductivity in summer. Further more, the most important environmental factors that regulated the phytoplankton community (basically analyzed according to predominated genus) were SS, TN, and conductivity in spring, and were CODMn,NO3--N and TN in summer as illuminated by the ordination of Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA).%2010年春季(4月13日-4月22日)和夏季(7月10日-7月19日)对太湖流域主要入湖河道进行了两次调查.对不同河

  17. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ana R; Richardson, Tammi L; Pinckney, James L

    2015-11-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC50s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L(-1), 240 mg L(-1) for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L(-1) for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC50 of 80 mg L(-1). Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria.

  18. 安徽菜子湖浮游植物群落结构的周年变化(2010年)%Annual dynamics of phytoplankton abundance and community structure (2010) in Lake Caizi, Anhui Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪花; 赵秀侠; 高攀; 韩飞园; 周非; 周忠泽; 徐慧琴

    2012-01-01

    The annual dynamics of phytoplankton community structure in Lake Caizi has been investigated in 2010. The results indicated that; ( 1) A total of 285 phytoplankton species from 110 genera of 8 phylum were identified. Phytoplankton species composition in different months showed significant difference. The maximal number of phytoplankton species (173) occurred in March while the minimum (105) in January. The dominant class of phytoplankton changed seasonally. Cyanophyta peaked all the year round; diatoms had an apparent dominance in January, May, September and November; Xanthophyta also played an important role in January, March and May; Chlorophyta dominated in November, Cryptophyta dominated in May while Chrysophyta dominated in January. The cell density and biomass of phytoplankton were higher in summer and autumn than that in winter and spring. The cell density of phytoplankton between different months had significant difference. The maximal density, with the value (66. 13 ?8. 58 ) x 105 cells/L occurred in July while the minimal value of (12.78 ?. 61 ) x 105 cells/L appeared in January. Whereas, the maximal biomass of phytoplankton(2. 80 ?. 17 mg/L) occurred in September and the minimal(0. 72 ?. 03 mg/L) appeared in May, and the biomass in different months was also significant different. (2) Temporal variations of three indices (including Margalef index, Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou evenness index) were obvious. All the indices were higher in winter and spring than those in summer and autumn. The maximal value occurred in March while the minimal one appeared in July. ( 3 ) The phytoplankton community structure was influenced by different factors in different months. As a result, the groups of sampling station changedseasonally according to cluster analysis. (4) The obvious variation of phytoplankton community structure was present in 2010 compared with that in 2007. The number of species decreased from 340 in 2007 to 285 in 2010, however, the cell density

  19. Annual variation of phytoplankton community in the north branch of the Yangtze River estuary%长江口北支浮游植物群落结构周年变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘笑; 薛俊增; 吴惠仙

    2014-01-01

    An annual survey was conducted on the community structure of phytoplankton from October 2010 to September 2011 at 5 sta-tions in the north branch of the Yangtze River estuary .A total of 183 phytoplankton species were identified , which belonged to 60 gene-ra of 7 phyla.Diatom was the major phytoplankton group which was 137 species of 35 genera and its species number accounted for 75%of all species .Melosira sulcata, Skeletonema costatum, Cyclotella striata, Oscillatoria amphibia, Pseudo-Nitzschia sicula v.Bicu-neata, Cyclotella sp.and Melosira granulata were the dominant species .Phytoplankton abundance difference was not significant among seasons ( p>0.05 ) , but monthly difference was significant ( p<0.05 ) .Phytoplankton density ranged from 2.83 ×10 3 to 6.18 ×10 4 cells/L with the nighest density in June and the lowest density in January .The annual average abundance was 1.73 10 4 cells/L.Corre-lation analysis found that the density of phytoplankton was significantly positively correlated to nitrate and ammonia .The impact of ni-trogenous nutrients for phytoplankton was significantly .%2010年10月至2011年9月对长江口北支水域的浮游植物进行周年调查,共采集到183种(包括变种和变型),隶属于7门60属,其中硅藻门种类最多,有35属137种,占浮游植物总种类数的75%。周年优势种为具槽直链藻、中肋骨条藻、条纹小环藻、两栖颤藻、小伪菱形藻双楔变种、颗粒直链藻和小环藻未定种。本次调查中,季节间浮游植物的丰度差异不显著(P>0.05),但各月间浮游植物丰度差异显著(P<0.05),全年丰度在2.83×103~6.18×104cells/L之间,其中6月的丰度最高,1月的丰度最低,全年的平均丰度为1.73×104cells/L。 Pearson相关性分析显示,浮游植物丰度与硝酸盐浓度显著正相关(P<0.05),与氨氮浓度极显著正相关(P<0.01),含氮营养盐对浮游植物的影响明显。

  20. Par Pond phytoplankton in association with refilling of the pond: Final Report for sampling from February 1995 -- September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Johnson, M.A.; Cody, W.C.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the results of phytoplankton analyses from Par Pond samples collected between February 1995 and September 1996. The principal objective of the study was to determine the effect of refilling of Par Pond following repair of the dam on the phytoplankton community. Algal blooms are often responsible for fish kills and other detrimental effects in ponds and lakes, and it was postulated that decaying vegetation from formerly exposed sediments might trigger algal blooms that could result in fish kills in Par Pond following the refill. Sporadic algal blooms involving blue-green algae were detected, especially during the summer of 1996. However, the data derived from the study demonstrates that overall, the refilling effort caused no significant negative impact to the pond attributable to phytoplankton dynamics.

  1. Present status and changes of the phytoplankton community after invasion of Neosalanx taihuensis since 1982 in a deep oligotrophic plateau lake, Lake Fuxian in the subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xia; XIE Ping; CHEN Fei-zhou; LI Yan-ling; LI Si-xin; GUO Ni-chun; QIN Jian-hui

    2005-01-01

    Phytoplankton assemblages in the subtrophical oligotrophic Lake Fuxian, the second deepest lake in China, were investigated monthly from September 2002 to August 2003. A total of 113 species belonging to seven phyla were identified, among them, a filamentous green alga, Mougeotia sp., dominated almost throughout the study period and comprised most of the total phytoplankton biomass.Mougeotia sp. has made a substantial development during the past decades: it was absent in 1957, only occasionally present in 1983,increased substantially in 1993, and became predominant in 2002-2003. It is likely that natural invasion of the Taihu Lake noodlefish (Neosalanx taihuensis) has led to a change of dominant herbivorous zooplankton from small to large calanoid, which has increased grazing pressure on small edible algae, and thus has indirectly favored the development of the inedible filamentous Mougeotia sp.

  2. Phytoplankton responses and associated carbon cycling during shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European shelf seas

    OpenAIRE

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; C. Dumousseaud; A. J. Poulton; Suggett, D.J.; T. Tyrrell; M. V. Zubkov; Moore, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, are highly variabl...

  3. Carbon cycling and phytoplankton responses within highly-replicated shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European Shelf Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; C. Dumousseaud; A. J. Poulton; Suggett, D.J.; T. Tyrrell; M. V. Zubkov; Moore, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, a...

  4. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, nutrients and ultraviolet radiation: in situ photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton from high mountain lakes in Southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, E. W.; Carrillo, P.; Medina-Sánchez, J. M.; Durán, C.; Herrera, G.; Villar-Argaiz, M.; Villafañe, V. E.

    2013-02-01

    Global change, together with human activities, has resulted in increasing amounts of organic material (including nutrients) that water bodies receive. This input further attenuates the penetration of solar radiation, leading to the view that opaque lakes are more "protected" from solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than clear ones. Vertical mixing, however, complicates this view as cells are exposed to fluctuating radiation regimes, for which the effects have, in general, been neglected. Furthermore, the combined impacts of mixing, together with those of UVR and nutrient inputs are virtually unknown. In this study, we carried out complex in situ experiments in three high mountain lakes of Spain (Lake Enol in the National Park Picos de Europa, Asturias, and lakes Las Yeguas and La Caldera in the National Park Sierra Nevada, Granada), used as model ecosystems to evaluate the joint impact of these climate change variables. The main goal of this study was to address the question of how short-term pulses of nutrient inputs, together with vertical mixing and increased UVR fluxes modify the photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton. The experimentation consisted in all possible combinations of the following treatments: (a) solar radiation: UVR + PAR (280-700 nm) versus PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) alone (400-700 nm); (b) nutrient addition (phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N)): ambient versus addition (P to reach to a final concentration of 30 μg P L-1, and N to reach N:P molar ratio of 31); and (c) mixing: mixed (one rotation from surface to 3 m depth (speed of 1 m 4 min-1, total of 10 cycles)) versus static. Our findings suggest that under ambient nutrient conditions there is a synergistic effect between vertical mixing and UVR, increasing phytoplankton photosynthetic inhibition and excretion of organic carbon (EOC) from opaque lakes as compared to algae that received constant mean irradiance within the epilimnion. The opposite occurs in clear lakes where

  5. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, nutrients and ultraviolet radiation: in situ photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton from high mountain lakes in Southern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. W. Helbling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Global change, together with human activities, has resulted in increasing amounts of organic material (including nutrients that water bodies receive. This input further attenuates the penetration of solar radiation, leading to the view that opaque lakes are more "protected" from solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR than clear ones. Vertical mixing, however, complicates this view as cells are exposed to fluctuating radiation regimes, for which the effects have, in general, been neglected. Furthermore, the combined impacts of mixing, together with those of UVR and nutrient inputs are virtually unknown. In this study, we carried out complex in situ experiments in three high mountain lakes of Spain (Lake Enol in the National Park Picos de Europa, Asturias, and lakes Las Yeguas and La Caldera in the National Park Sierra Nevada, Granada, used as model ecosystems to evaluate the joint impact of these climate change variables. The main goal of this study was to address the question of how short-term pulses of nutrient inputs, together with vertical mixing and increased UVR fluxes modify the photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton. The experimentation consisted in all possible combinations of the following treatments: (a solar radiation: UVR + PAR (280–700 nm versus PAR (photosynthetically active radiation alone (400–700 nm; (b nutrient addition (phosphorus (P and nitrogen (N: ambient versus addition (P to reach to a final concentration of 30 μg P L−1, and N to reach N:P molar ratio of 31; and (c mixing: mixed (one rotation from surface to 3 m depth (speed of 1 m 4 min−1, total of 10 cycles versus static. Our findings suggest that under ambient nutrient conditions there is a synergistic effect between vertical mixing and UVR, increasing phytoplankton photosynthetic inhibition and excretion of organic carbon (EOC from opaque lakes as compared to algae that received constant mean irradiance within the epilimnion. The

  6. The effect of nutrient supply ratios on organic matter dynamics, phytoplankton community composition and diazotrophy in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.; Lavik, G.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-12-01

    Upwelling of nutrient loaded water masses with low inorganic nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) ratios is thought to favor non-Redfield primary production by phytoplankton species adapted to exponential growth. Additionally, an excess of P (P*) in OMZ-influenced waters is also supposed to provide a niche for nitrogen fixing organisms. In order to assess the influence of low inorganic nutrient ratios on the stoichiometry and composition of primary producers, biogeochemical measurements were carried out in the eastern tropical South Pacific during R/V Meteor cruise M93. A succession of different functional types of phytoplankton was observed along onshore - offshore transects with diatoms dominating the productive upwelling region, while haptophytes, cryptophytes and crysophytes prevailed in the more oligotrophic open ocean. Simultaneously, particulate organic nitrogen to phosphorus ratios increased with increasing distance from shore. The stoichiometry of organic matter, however, always exceeded ratios of 16:1, although nutrient supply ratios were below Redfield proportions in the whole sampling area. A considerable amount of P* was detected in the surface ocean layer above the shelf, which decreased as water masses were advected beyond the shelf slope. Phytoplankton pigment analyses with HPLC revealed the existence of diazotrophic marker pigments in the study area, hinting towards a local replenishment of the N-deficit via nitrogen fixation.

  7. Analysis of Phytoplankton Community Composition in Culturing Pond of Litopenaeus vannamei%凡纳滨对虾养殖水体中浮游植物群落的组成分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李由明; 黄翔鹄; 李晓梅

    2012-01-01

    为了解凡纳滨对虾(Litopenaeus vannamei)池塘水体中浮游植物群落的组成及变化,本文对凡纳滨对虾养殖水体中浮游植物进行了分析.结果表明,养殖水体中的藻类共由21个种类组成,属于5大门类.浮游植物优势种群分别为绿藻门的小球藻(Chlorella sp)和波吉卵囊藻(Oocystis borgei),硅藻门的小环藻(Cyclostella sp.)、新月拟菱形藻(N.closterium sp.)、角毛藻(C.mueeleri sp.),蓝藻门的平裂藻(Merismopediasp.)和席藻(Phormidium sp.).在养殖早期和后期,浮游植物数量的变动范围分别为:0.5~2×107个/升和0.3~5×107个/升.%Phytoplankton community were analysed for the composition and variation of phytoplankton commu- nity of culturing pond of Litopenaeus vannamei in this paper. The results indicated that there were 21 species, be- longing to 5 Phylums in culturing pond. Dominant species of phytoplankton were Chlorella sp ,Oocystis, belonging to Chlorophyta and Cyclostella sp. ,N. closterium sp. ,C. mueeleri sp. , belonging to Bacillariophyta and Phormidium sp. ,Merismopedia sp. , belonging to Cyanophyta. In initial and final stage of culturing, the amount of phyto- plankton was 0.5 -2 × 107individuals/litre and 0.3 -5 × 107indiveduals/litre respectively.

  8. 新疆乌伦古湖浮游植物群落结构%Phytoplankton community structure in Lake Ulungur in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宇; 郝志才; 沈建忠; 李鸿; 赵永晶; 马徐发; 刘其根; 江敏; 董攸; 刘军

    2009-01-01

    于2006年11月至2007年7月按季度对乌伦古湖浮游植物进行了取样调查,共发现浮游藻类164种(包括若干未定名种),隶属于8门90属,其中Anabaena bergii为新疆新记录种,两种硅藻Chaetocerns sp.和Thalassionema sp.属于海产种类.各季种类组成均以绿藻门和硅藻门为主,蓝藻门和裸藻门次之,甲藻门、金藻门、黄藻门、隐藻门种类均比较少.秋季种类最多,有141种;其次是夏季和春季,分别为128种和121种;冬季种类最少,仅有95种.中华小尖头藻、微小四角藻、小形月牙藻、小球藻及尖针杆藻为全年可见优势种;肘状针杆藻在春季、夏季和秋季构成优势种群;扭曲蹄形藻和椭圆小球藻仅在夏季构成优势种群,而水溪绿球藻和粗刺四棘藻仅在冬季构成优势种群.藻类生物量周年变动模式为单峰型,生物量的峰值出现在夏季(6.77mg/L).最低值出现在冬季(1.45mg/L).结合历史资料分析发现,30年来,乌伦古湖浮游藻类不仅在种类组成上发生了明显的变化,在数量上也显著着一定的增长,并以绿藻和硅藻类群的增长最为显著.%The phytoplankton of Lake Uhmgur was investigated seasonally from November, 2006 to July, 2007. A total of 164 phytoplankton species (including a number of unconfirmed species) was detected, which belonged to 90 genera, 8 phylum. Among them, Anabaena bergii was a new record species of cyanophyta in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and two species of bacillariophyta, Chaetoceros sp. and Thalassionema sp., belonged to marine algal. In each season, the phytoplankton composition was dominated by Chlorophyta aad Bacillariophyta, secondly dominated by Cyanophyta, Euglenophyta, Xanthophyta, Chrysophyta, Cryptophyta and Pyrrophyta. The number of phytoplankton species was the highest in autumn (141 species), followed by the summer (128 species) aad spring (121 species), the lowest in winter (95 species). There was an obvious seasonal

  9. Succession of phytoplankton assemblages in response to large-scale reservoir operation: a case study in a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhe; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang; Smith, Val H

    2016-03-01

    The Three Gorges Dam (TGD) has greatly altered ecological and environmental conditions within the reservoir region, but it is not known how these changes affect phytoplankton structure and dynamics. Here, a bimonthly monitoring program was implemented from 2007 to 2009 to study the impact of damming on phytoplankton assemblages in the backwater area of the Pengxi River (PBA). By application of the phytoplankton functional group (C strategists, competitive species; S strategists, stress-tolerant species; R strategists, rapid propagation species), seasonal changes in phytoplankton relative to environmental variations were evaluated using ordination analysis. Seasonal patterns of phytoplankton dynamics were detected during this study, with CS/S strategists causing algal blooms from mid-spring to early summer, CS/CR strategists often observed during flood season, and CS strategists dominant during mid-autumn. CR/R groups dominated during winter and caused algal blooms in February. Our results indicated that phytoplankton assemblages were directly related to reservoir operation effects. Generally, the TGD had a low water level during flood season, resulting in a relatively short hydraulic retention time and intensive variability, which supported the cooccurrence of CS and CR species. During the winter drought season, water storage in the TGD increased the water level and the hydraulic retention time in the PBA, enabling R/CR strategists to overcome the sedimentation effect and to out-compete S/CS species in winter. As expected, these diversity patterns were significantly correlated with the hydraulic retention time and nutrient limitation pattern in the PBA. This study provides strategic insight for evaluating the impacts of reservoir operations on phytoplankton adaptation.

  10. Cellular partitioning of nanoparticulate versus dissolved metals in marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Lenihan, Hunter S; Miller, Robert J

    2014-11-18

    Discharges of metal oxide nanoparticles into aquatic environments are increasing with their use in society, thereby increasing exposure risk for aquatic organisms. Separating the impacts of nanoparticle from dissolved metal pollution is critical for assessing the environmental risks of the rapidly growing nanomaterial industry, especially in terms of ecosystem effects. Metal oxides negatively affect several species of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for most marine primary production. Whether such toxicity is generally due to nanoparticles or exposure to dissolved metals liberated from particles is uncertain. The type and severity of toxicity depends in part on whether phytoplankton cells take up and accumulate primarily nanoparticles or dissolved metal ions. We compared the responses of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii, exposed to ZnO, AgO, and CuO nanoparticles with the responses of T. weissflogii cells exposed to the dissolved metals ZnCl2, AgNO3, and CuCl2 for 7 d. Cellular metal accumulation, metal distribution, and algal population growth were measured to elucidate differences in exposure to the different forms of metal. Concentration-dependent metal accumulation and reduced population growth were observed in T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides, as well as dissolved metals. Significant effects on population growth were observed at the lowest concentrations tested for all metals, with similar toxicity for both dissolved and nanoparticulate metals. Cellular metal distribution, however, markedly differed between T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides versus those exposed to dissolved metals. Metal concentrations were highest in the algal cell wall when cells were exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles, whereas algae exposed to dissolved metals had higher proportions of metal in the organelle and endoplasmic reticulum fractions. These results have implications for marine plankton communities as well as higher trophic levels, since

  11. Studies on the phytoplankton of the deep subalpine Lake Iseo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario MOSELLO

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of investigations carried out on the chemical characteristics and phytoplankton community of Lake Iseo. Samplings were performed on a monthly basis from 1998 to 2000. At least three main algal groups dominated the community throughout the study period. The large Bacillariophyceae were dominant mainly during late winter and early spring (Aulacoseira spp., Melosira varians, Asterionella formosa, with few species able to maintain occasional positive growth also during mid summer and/or autumn (Fragilaria crotonensis and Diatoma elongatum. The thermal stability of the water column and silica depletion were the main factors responsible for the decline of the large spring diatoms. The subsequent growth of Mougeotia sp. (Conjugatophyceae was favoured by its lower sinking rate and resistance to increasing grazing pressure by the dominant copepods (Copidodiaptomus steueri and cladocerans (Daphnia hyalina × galeata. Among the cyanobacteria, the greater development of Planktothrix rubescens in the autumn months, with conditions of vertical homogenisation and decreasing Zeu/Zmix ratios, was favoured by its ability to survive at low light irradiances. The temporal replacement of these three groups constitutes the main sequence of the annual phytoplankton succession in Lake Iseo. A large development of other algal groups was recorded only in one or two of the three study years (e.g. Dinophyceae and Chlorococcales. The changes observed in the annual phytoplankton development are discussed in the light of differences in the spring fertilisation of the waters, caused by differences in the depth of the layer involved in the late winter and spring vertical mixing.

  12. Seasonal variations of phytoplankton phosphorus stress in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan; HUANG Bangqin; LIU Xin; LIU Guimei; WANG Hui

    2014-01-01

    The Yellow Sea is located between the China Mainland and the Korean Peninsula, representing a typical shallow epicontinental sea. The Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM) is one of the most important physical features in the Yellow Sea. The characteristics of vertical profiles and seasonal variations of biogenic ele-ments in the YSCWM may lead the variations of nutrient availability (e.g., phosphorus) and phosphorus stress of phytoplankton. In this study, the authors surveyed the seasonal variations of phytoplankton phos-phorus stress with emphasis on the effect of the YSCWM during the four cruises in April and October 2006, March and August 2007. Using both bulk and single-cell alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) assays, this study evaluated phosphorus status of phytoplankton community, succession of phytoplankton community and ecophysiological responses of phytoplankton to phosphorus in the typical region of the YSCWM. With the occurrence of the YSCWM, especially the variations of concentration of dissolved inorganic phospho-rus (DIP), the results of bulk APA appeared corresponding seasonal variations. Along Transects A and B, the mean APA in August was the highest, and that in March was the lowest. According to the ELF-labeled assay’s results, seasonal variations of the ELF-labeled percentages within dominant species indicated that diatoms were dominant in March, April and October, while dinoflagellates were dominant in August. During the four cruises, the ELF-labeled percentages of diatoms except Paralia sulcata showed that diatoms were not phosphorus deficient in April 2006 at all, but suffered from severe phosphorus stress in August 2007. In comparison, the ELF-labeled percentages of dinoflagellates were all above 50%during the four time series, which meant dinoflagellates such as Alexandrium and Scrippsiella, sustained perennial phosphorus stress.

  13. Response of bacteria and phytoplankton from a subtropical front location Southern Ocean to micronutrient amendments ex-situ

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Jain, A.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, R.K.; Verma, R.; Bhat, M.; Mesquita, A.; Nadkarni, A.; D`Souza, S.E.; Ahmed, T.; Bandekar, M.; Gomes, J.

    to that of the DC by day 15. It is quite likely that the micro fauna (cilitaes, heterotrophic dino- and/or nano- flagellates) could also affect the DOC. This needs experimental confirmation. 4.4 Effect on bacterial community composition The dominance... sink (Currie and Hunter, 1998; Metzl et al., 1999; Metzl, 2009; Ito et al., 2010; Currie et al., 2011; Shadwick et al., 2015). Despite high primary productivity in the STF transfer of biogenic carbon to depth via biological pump is reported to be very...

  14. Toxicity of natural mixtures of organic pollutants in temperate and polar marine phytoplankton

    KAUST Repository

    Echeveste, Pedro

    2016-07-26

    Semivolatile and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) undergo atmospheric transport before being deposited to the oceans, where they partition to phytoplankton organic matter. The goal of this study was to determine the toxicity of naturally occurring complex mixtures of organic pollutants to temperate and polar phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, the North East (NE) Atlantic, and Southern Oceans. The cell abundance of the different phytoplankton groups, chlorophyll a concentrations, viability of the cells, and growth and decay constants were monitored in response to addition of a range of concentrations of mixtures of organic pollutants obtained from seawater extracts. Almost all of the phytoplankton groups were significantly affected by the complex mixtures of non-polar and polar organic pollutants, with toxicity being greater for these mixtures than for single POPs or simple POP mixtures. Cocktails\\' toxicity arose at concentrations as low as tenfold the field oceanic levels, probably due to a higher chemical activity of the mixture than of simple POPs mixtures. Overall, smaller cells were the most affected, although Mediterranean picophytoplankton was significantly more tolerant to non-polar POPs than picophytoplankton from the Atlantic Ocean or the Bellingshausen Sea microphytoplankton. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Climate warming and interannual variability of phytoplankton phenology in the Northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Gittings, John

    2016-12-01

    In agreement with global patterns of climate change and increasing temperatures in the tropical oceans, the Northern Red Sea (NRS) has been warming over the last few decades. Using 18 years of remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a data (Chl-a, an index of phytoplankton biomass), we investigate the potential impacts of climate warming on phytoplankton abundance and phenology in the Northern Red Sea by exploring the mechanistic links with the regional physical environment. The results of the analysis reveal that, in accordance with other tropical ecosystems, phytoplankton biomass in the NRS will decrease in response to warmer climate scenarios. This is attributed to lower heat fluxes (heat loss to the atmosphere) during the bloom period, and enhanced vertical stratification, which prevents vertical mixing of nutrients into the euphotic layer. In addition, we show that during warmer conditions (when heat fluxes are weakened), the winter bloom initiates significantly later (by up to 10 weeks) and its duration is considerably reduced. The biological implications of alterations to phytoplankton phenology may include increased larval mortality of pelagic species, reduced recruitment, fisheries impacts and changes to community structure.

  16. 桂林市4个城中湖泊夏季浮游植物群落结构与水质评价%Characterization of Summer Phytoplankton Community and Water Quality Assessment of Four Guilin Lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈朝述; 李俊; 陈孟林; 于方明; 邓华; 周振明

    2015-01-01

    body and diversity of the algae community is an important index for evaluating its ecosystem function .In this study , spatial variation of the summer phytoplankton community including species composition , species number and density were investigated from July 11 to August 10 , 2013 in Sihu Lake of Guilin .The water quality was also evalu-ated using the Carlson trophic status index ( TSIm) and phytoplankton biodiversity to provide basic data for water pollution control and ecological management of Sihu Lake .Eight sampling sites were selected based on direction of water flow in the four lakes , distributed in the central area of each lake and the intersection of each two lakes .Phy-toplankton samples for qualitative analysis were collected using No .25 plankton net , preserved in white glass bottles and fixed with 5%formalin.1 L water samples for phytoplankton quantitative analysis were collected at 0.5 m be-low the surface using a glass water sampler and placed in polyethylene bottles and fixed with 15 mL of Lugol′s solu-tion.Then the samples were concentrated to 30 mL by settling in the laboratory .Counting and identification of all phytoplankton samples were accomplished with an algae intelligent identification counter (Algacount S300).Meas-urements of pH and DO were made in situ before sampling and water samples were collected for determination of water quality parameters including TN , TP, NH3-N, NO3-N, CODMn and Chl-a.Concentrations of TN and TP in the four lakes ranged from 0.78 mg/L to 0.93 mg/L and 0.074 mg/L to 0.105 mg/L, with mean values of 0.86 mg/L and 0.087 mg/L, respectively.In all sampling sites, TP concentrations were relatively high and all ex-ceeded grade Ⅲof the ground water quality standard in China .A total of 117 species from 58 genera of 7 phyla were identified in Sihu Lake , including 54 species of Chlorophyta , 37 species of Bacillariophyta , 12 species of Cya-nophyta , 9 species of Euglenophyta , 3 species of Pyrrophyta , 1 species of

  17. Response of rotifer functional groups to changing trophic state and crustacean community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina MANCA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Information based on taxon-based indices is species-specific while information gained from function-based research can give a comprehensive view of ecosystem processes. We applied the guild-ratio, an index based on the proportion of functional groups of rotifers (i.e. microphagous and raptorial species, on a long-term data set of Lago Maggiore. By applying seasonal trend decomposition based on smoothing techniques and non-metrical multidimensional scaling, we assessed the response of rotifer functional groups to changes in trophic state and climate. While the taxon-based indices showed smooth changes, the function-based index showed a dramatic shift from a raptorial to a microphagous dominance, with a back-shift to raptorial dominance starting in 2000. The seasonal peak of microphagous and raptorial dry weight was clearly separated in the pre-eutrophication period. When mesotrophic conditions prevailed both peaks overlapped, only to be separated again with re-oligotrophication. We attributed these alterations of rotifer functional groups to changes in competition with crustacean zooplankton and to decreased phytoplankton algal abundance and size while altered seasonality in functional groups could be related to inter-group competition for food. We hypothesise that the effects of trophic state (i.e. altered phytoplankton and climate (i.e. altered cladoceran community were transferred across trophic levels to rotifer functional groups. Our study highlights that functional groups are valid instruments for illustrating unifying principles in ecology through a better understanding of ecosystem processes and the interrelationship between trophic levels.

  18. Earth's Most Important Producers: Meet the Phytoplankton!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Meghan E.; Stevens, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The ocean is home to some of Earth's most important producers. Single-celled organisms in the ocean are responsible for more than half of Earth's productivity, as well as most of its oxygen. Phytoplankton are single-celled, plantlike organisms. That is, they have chloroplasts and perform photosynthesis, but are not true plants, which are typically…

  19. Effect of decreasing phosphorus in eutrophic water on the community structure of phytoplankton%富营养化水体降磷对浮游植物群落结构特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟顺龙; 瞿建宏; 裘丽萍; 胡庚东; 范立民; 宋超; 吴伟; 陈家长; 徐跑

    2013-01-01

    示出试验组浮游植物多样性和均匀度优于对照组。研究表明富营养化水体降磷对浮游植物群落结构产生了明显影响,使群落结构处于更加复杂、完整和稳定的状态。%Phytoplankton is the base of material recycle and energy flow in aquatic ecosystem. As the primary producer, the community structure of phytoplankton influences the structure and function of aquatic ecosystem directly. In aquaculture research field, how to cultivate fish needing phytoplankton, which can maintain the ecosystem balance of aquaculture water area and provide food for farming fish, has been always an important problem and research hotspot. The effect of phosphorus change on the growth of phytoplankton had been researched by the method of adding phosphorus to test water. However, the effect of decreasing phosphorus in eutrophic water on the community structure of phytoplankton has not been reported yet. The effect of decreasing phosphorus in eutrophic water on the community structure of phytoplankton was researched by adding phosphorus removing agent to test water sampling from eutrophication lake and by the method of Pielou uniformity index, Mcnaughton predominance index and Shannon diversity index. Results showed that there were 6 classes including 29 species of phytoplankton had been recorded in the test water sampling from Lake Wuli. Among them, Chlorophyta was the predominant species, which had 14 species, accounted for 48.28%of the total species. Cyanophyta, Bacillariophyta, Cryptophyta, Euglenophyta, Pyrrophyta were recorded 7, 4, 2, 1, 1 species and accounted for 24.13%, 13.79%, 6.90%, 3.45%, 3.45%respectively. There no difference in the number of phytoplankton species, but the community structure of phytoplankton changed significantly after the phosphorus in eutrophic water was decreased. And the quantity of phytoplankton decreased significantly from 13 238.8×104 cells· L-1 to 3 997.5×104 cells· L-1, and the decrease ratio was 69

  20. Phytoplankton diversity and their succession in water bodies of the Lednice park during 2002 season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Ramezanpoor

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton communities of three water bodies in the Lednice park were studied from 22nd April till 1st October 2002. These water bodies are the Zámecký pond, Růžový pond and the Dyje River, which is water source of both ponds.Phytoplankton samples were taken every two weeks between 8 - 9 am. Collected phytoplankton samples were preserved with 4% formalin solution and Lugol solution (JJK and transported to the laboratory. They were determined and counted using inverted microscope. Water temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen were measured in the field using digital portable instruments. Total of 317 phytoplankton species were determined in this study.Heavy algal bloom was observed in the Zámecký pond in mid-summer coinciding with increase in water temperature. Fish diseases and partial mortality occurred during the period of algal bloom and unpleasant smell was dominant feature. A light algal bloom was also observed in the Růžový pond and the Dyje River nearly by the end of summer.The main algae species responsible for blue-green algae bloom were Anabaena flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa, M. ichtyoblabe, M. flos-aquae and M. wesenbergii. Dissolved oxygen values varied between 3.4 - 19.5 mg l-1, pH ranged from 7.6 - 9.7. Secchi depth varied from 0- 65 cm in the Zámecký pond, 15-45 cm in the Růžový pond and 35-65 cm in the Dyje River. Concentration of total phosphate, nitrate and chlorophyll-a in the Dyje River before drainage into the Zámecký and Růžový pond verified heavy nutrient load (Total-P = 0.3, NO3- = 12 mg.l-1 of the river. Although the Dyje River is main water source for both ponds, presence of relatively different phytoplankton communities in these two ponds suggest that probably different nutrient sources might be responsible for differences in phytoplankton communities and eutrophication patterns in the Zámecký pond as compared to the Růžový pond.

  1. Preparing Special Educators for Culturally Responsive School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bridgie A.

    2004-01-01

    Today's increasingly multicultural student population requires that school-community partnerships operate from culturally responsive frameworks. Incorporating significant resources from multicultural communities is an essential component within school-community partnership. Although such a partnership is an essential strategy, it has not been…

  2. An automated platform for phytoplankton ecology and aquatic ecosystem monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomati, Francesco; Jokela, Jukka; Simona, Marco; Veronesi, Mauro; Ibelings, Bas W

    2011-11-15

    High quality monitoring data are vital for tracking and understanding the causes of ecosystem change. We present a potentially powerful approach for phytoplankton and aquatic ecosystem monitoring, based on integration of scanning flow-cytometry for the characterization and counting of algal cells with multiparametric vertical water profiling. This approach affords high-frequency data on phytoplankton abundance, functional traits and diversity, coupled with the characterization of environmental conditions for growth over the vertical structure of a deep water body. Data from a pilot study revealed effects of an environmental disturbance event on the phytoplankton community in Lake Lugano (Switzerland), characterized by a reduction in cytometry-based functional diversity and by a period of cyanobacterial dominance. These changes were missed by traditional limnological methods, employed in parallel to high-frequency monitoring. Modeling of phytoplankton functional diversity revealed the importance of integrated spatiotemporal data, including circadian time-lags and variability over the water column, to understand the drivers of diversity and dynamic processes. The approach described represents progress toward an automated and trait-based analysis of phytoplankton natural communities. Streamlining of high-frequency measurements may represent a resource for understanding, modeling and managing aquatic ecosystems under impact of environmental change, yielding insight into processes governing phytoplankton community resistance and resilience.

  3. Plant community responses to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongstad, J.

    2012-07-01

    ecosystem more resilient to the climatic treatments than expected. We also found that the amount of flowering culms of D. flexuosa increased in response to increased CO{sub 2}, whereas the seed germination success decreased. The bryophyte biomass and the nitrogen content decreased in response to nitrogen addition. Even such apparently minor changes might, given time, affect the plant composition and thereby possibly also the major ecosystem processes. Further, we observed changes in the aboveground plant composition in response to the climate manipulations at the Mols site, where C. vulgaris was regenerating after a disturbance. Here a decrease in biomass of the pioneer stage was seen, when subjected to the drought treatment compared to warmed and control treatments. I therefore conclude, that the stage of the C. vulgaris population as well as the magnitude and frequency of disturbances determine the effects of future climate change on the plant community in heathland ecosystems. (Author)

  4. Phytoplankton size impact on export flux in the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouw, Colleen B.; Barnett, Audrey; McKinley, Galen A.; Gloege, Lucas; Pilcher, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Efficiency of the biological pump of carbon to the deep ocean depends largely on biologically mediated export of carbon from the surface ocean and its remineralization with depth. Global satellite studies have primarily focused on chlorophyll concentration and net primary production (NPP) to understand the role of phytoplankton in these processes. Recent satellite retrievals of phytoplankton composition now allow for the size of phytoplankton cells to be considered. Here we improve understanding of phytoplankton size structure impacts on particle export, remineralization, and transfer. A global compilation of particulate organic carbon (POC) flux estimated from sediment traps and 234Th are utilized. Annual climatologies of NPP, percent microplankton, and POC flux at four time series locations and within biogeochemical provinces are constructed. Parameters that characterize POC flux versus depth (export flux ratio, labile fraction, and remineralization length scale) are fit for time series locations, biogeochemical provinces, and times of the year dominated by small and large phytoplankton cells where phytoplankton cell size show enough dynamic range over the annual cycle. Considering all data together, our findings support the idea of high export flux but low transfer efficiency in productive regions and vice versa for oligotrophic regions. However, when parsing by dominant size class, we find periods dominated by small cells to have both greater export flux efficiency and lower transfer efficiency than periods when large cells comprise a greater proportion of the phytoplankton community.

  5. 于桥水库浮游植物群落结构及与水质关系研究%Relationship of Phytoplankton Community Structure and Water Quality in Yuqiao Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武丹; 韩龙; 卞少伟; 梅鹏蔚

    2015-01-01

    Yuqiao Reservoir,a large diversion and storage reservoir for the Luanhe-Tianjin Water Diversion Pro-ject,supports industrial,agricultural and urban domestic water usage in Tianjin.In recent years,the eutrophica-tion of Yuqiao Reservoir has become increasingly serious.In May,July,August,September and November of 2012,we investigated the composition and distribution of the phytoplankton community and the associated environ-mental factors at five sites in Yuqiao Reservoir,aiming to understand the relationship between phytoplankton and water quality.The collection,qualitative and quantitative analysis of phytoplankton were carried out according to methods found in the literature.Sixteen water quality parameters were determined including water temperature (T),suspended solids (SS),fluoride (F -),pH,DO,SD,CODMn ,CODCr,BOD5 ,NO2-N,NO3-N,NH3-N, TN,TP,SO2 -4 and Chl-a.A water quality index,biological indexes and comprehensive nutritional status index (TLI(∑ ))were used to evaluate the trophic status in Yuqiao reservoir and the relationship between phytoplankton and water quality was analyzed by redundancy analysis (RDA).A total 123 phytoplankton species from 7 phyla were identified,with primary dominance by Chlorophyta (64 species)with 52.0% of the total species.Among them,Microcystis aeruginosa,Microcystis flos-aquae in Cyanophyta and Chlamydomonas sp.,Pediastrum simplex in Chlorophyta were the dominant species.The abundance of phytoplankton in Yuqiao Reservoir ranged from 369.75 ×104 cells/L to 4 636.64 ×104 cells/L,with the average value of 1 353.00 ×104 cells/L,and the biomass ranged from 1.12 mg/L to 13.58 mg/L,with an average value of 4.61mg/L.The phytoplankton community structure ex-hibited significant seasonal variation,and the variations in species number,abundance and biomass all followed the same trend:summer - autumn - spring.The assessment based on the water quality index,biological indexes and comprehensive nutritional status index (TLI

  6. Acting Responsibly: Linguists in American Indian Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Gregory; Linn, Mary S.

    1999-01-01

    Linguists working with endangered American Indian languages must realize that fieldwork is a cooperative venture, requiring that control be relinguished to the community. The relationship with the tribe must be negotiated, and linguists must return something concrete to the community in terms of language revival. Working in language teams that…

  7. Writing, Reader Response, and the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The community college stands as a beacon of democratic, inclusive ideals. Unlike the four year college--where research and advanced degrees are sought--the community college celebrates learning on a personal, heuristic level. And while such unconventional and even seditious practices have been questioned by those who seek to maintain "standards,"…

  8. In situ study on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in summer 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junlei; Sun, Xiaoxia; Zheng, Shan

    2016-08-01

    In situ studies on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton were important for the analysis of changes in community structure and for the prediction and control of algal blooms, but such studies of phytoplankton in offshore China were few. In this study, the detailed distribution of photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the summer of 2013 in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea was measured using Phyto-PAM (Pulse Amplitude Modulation). The phytoplankton community structure and the environmental parameters were also investigated to estimate the relationship between the distribution of the photochemical competence of phytoplankton and ecological factors. The total average Fv/Fm (the potential maximum quantum yield) value of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in summer 2013 was less than 0.5, reflecting that the photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton was relatively low. Fv/Fm of phytoplankton in summer was significantly positively associated with nitrate content (NO2-), which reflects relationship between metabolism and photosynthesis of phytoplankton: accompanied by NO2- metabolism, photosynthesis and photosynthetic capacity may be enhanced simultaneously, so the Fv/Fm value would increase with the NO2- released by phytoplankton. Through the in situ study on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea, we come to the conclusion that photosynthetic characteristics and activity of phytoplankton are influenced by its biological characteristics and surrounding ecological factors, such as irradiance, nutrients and phytoplankton community. Meanwhile, the thermally stratified structure and the movement of water masses, such as the Yangtze River diluted water, the Yellow Sea cold water mass and other different water system, also have an important impact on phytoplankton photosynthetic activity and characteristics. Greater understanding of the detailed photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton

  9. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  10. In Vivo Single-Cell Fluorescence and Size Scaling of Phytoplankton Chlorophyll Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Eva; Nogueira, Enrique; López-Urrutia, Ángel

    2017-04-01

    In unicellular phytoplankton, the size scaling exponent of chlorophyll content per cell decreases with increasing light limitation. Empirical studies have explored this allometry by combining data from several species, using average values of pigment content and cell size for each species. The resulting allometry thus includes phylogenetic and size scaling effects. The possibility of measuring single-cell fluorescence with imaging-in-flow cytometry devices allows the study of the size scaling of chlorophyll content at both the inter- and intraspecific levels. In this work, the changing allometry of chlorophyll content was estimated for the first time for single phytoplankton populations by using data from a series of incubations with monocultures exposed to different light levels. Interspecifically, our experiments confirm previous modeling and experimental results of increasing size scaling exponents with increasing irradiance. A similar pattern was observed intraspecifically but with a larger variability in size scaling exponents. Our results show that size-based processes and geometrical approaches explain variations in chlorophyll content. We also show that the single-cell fluorescence measurements provided by imaging-in-flow devices can be applied to field samples to understand the changes in the size dependence of chlorophyll content in response to environmental variables affecting primary production.IMPORTANCE The chlorophyll concentrations in phytoplankton register physiological adjustments in cellular pigmentation arising mainly from changes in light conditions. The extent of these adjustments is constrained by the size of the phytoplankton cells, even within single populations. Hence, variations in community chlorophyll derived from photoacclimation are also dependent on the phytoplankton size distribution.

  11. Environmental factors associated with phytoplankton succession in a Mediterranean reservoir with a highly fluctuating water level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Ali; Atoui, Ali; Lemaire, Bruno J; Vinçon-Leite, Brigitte; Slim, Kamal

    2015-10-01

    Eutrophication and harmful algal blooms have become a worldwide environmental problem. Understanding the mechanisms and processes that control algal blooms is of great concern. The phytoplankton community of Karaoun Reservoir, the largest water body in Lebanon, is poorly studied, as in many freshwater bodies around the Mediterranean Sea. Sampling campaigns were conducted semi-monthly between May 2012 and August 2013 to assess the dynamics of its phytoplankton community in response to changes in physical-chemical and hydrological conditions. Karaoun Reservoir is a monomictic waterbody and strongly stratifies between May and August. Changes in its phytoplankton community were found to be a result of the interplay between water temperature, stratification, irradiance, nutrient availability and water level. Thermal stratification established in spring reduced the growth of diatoms and resulted in their replacement by green algae species when nutrient availability was high and water temperatures lower than 22 °C. At water temperature higher than 25 °C and low nutrient concentrations in summer, blooms of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa occurred. Despite different growth conditions in other lakes and reservoir, cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon ovalisporum dominated at temperatures lower than 23 °C in weakly stratified conditions in early autumn and dinoflagellate Ceratium hirundinella dominated in mixed conditions, at low light intensity and a water temperature of 19 °C in late autumn. We believe that the information presented in this paper will increase the knowledge about phytoplankton dynamics in the Mediterranean region and contribute to a safer usage of reservoir waters.

  12. Bird community responses to the edge between suburbs and reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikin, Karen; Barton, Philip S; Knight, Emma; Lindenmayer, David B; Fischer, Joern; Manning, Adrian D

    2014-02-01

    New insights into community-level responses at the urban fringe, and the mechanisms underlying them, are needed. In our study, we investigated the compositional distinctiveness and variability of a breeding bird community at both sides of established edges between suburban residential areas and woodland reserves in Canberra, Australia. Our goals were to determine if: (1) community-level responses were direct (differed with distance from the edge, independent of vegetation) or indirect (differed in response to edge-related changes in vegetation), and (2) if guild-level responses provided the mechanism underpinning community-level responses. We found that suburbs and reserves supported significantly distinct bird communities. The suburban bird community, characterised by urban-adapted native and exotic species, had a weak direct edge response, with decreasing compositional variability with distance from the edge. In comparison, the reserve bird community, characterised by woodland-dependent species, was related to local tree and shrub cover. This was not an indirect response, however, as tree and shrub cover was not related to edge distance. We found that the relative richness of nesting, foraging and body size guilds also displayed similar edge responses, indicating that they underpinned the observed community-level responses. Our study illustrates how community-level responses provide valuable insights into how communities respond to differences in resources between two contrasting habitats. Further, the effects of the suburban matrix penetrate into reserves for greater distances than previously thought. Suburbs and adjacent reserves, however, provided important habitat resources for many native species and the conservation of these areas should not be discounted from continued management strategies.

  13. Community responses to extreme climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric JIGUET, Lluis BROTONS, Vincent DEVICTOR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Species assemblages and natural communities are increasingly impacted by changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events. Here we propose a brief overview of expected and demonstrated direct and indirect impacts of extreme events on animal communities. We show that differential impacts on basic biological parameters of individual species can lead to strong changes in community composition and structure with the potential to considerably modify the functional traits of the community. Sudden disequilibria have even been shown to induce irreversible shifts in marine ecosystems, while cascade effects on various taxonomic groups have been highlighted in Mediterranean forests. Indirect effects of extreme climatic events are expected when event-induced habitat changes (e.g. soil stability, vegetation composition, water flows altered by droughts, floods or hurricanes have differential consequences on species assembled within the communities. Moreover, in increasing the amplitude of trophic mismatches, extreme events are likely to turn many systems into ecological traps under climate change. Finally, we propose a focus on the potential impacts of an extreme heat wave on local assemblages as an empirical case study, analysing monitoring data on breeding birds collected in France. In this example, we show that despite specific populations were differently affected by local temperature anomalies, communities seem to be unaffected by a sudden heat wave. These results suggest that communities are tracking climate change at the highest possible rate [Current Zoology 57 (3: 406–413, 2011].

  14. Community responses to extreme climatic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédéric JIGUET; Lluis BROTONS; Vincent DEVICTOR

    2011-01-01

    Species assemblages and natural communities are increasingly impacted by changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events. Here we propose a brief overview of expected and demonstrated direct and indirect impacts of extreme events on animal communities. We show that differential impacts on basic biological parameters of individual species can lead to strong changes in community composition and structure with the potential to considerably modify the functional traits of the community. Sudden disequilibria have even been shown to induce irreversible shifts in marine ecosystems, while cascade effects on various taxonomic groups have been highlighted in Mediterranean forests. Indirect effects of extreme climatic events are expected when event-induced habitat changes (e.g. Soil stability, vegetation composition, water flows altered by droughts, floods or hurricanes) have differential consequences on species assembled within the communities. Moreover, in increasing the amplitude of trophic mismatches, extreme events are likely to turn many systems into ecological traps under climate change. Finally, we propose a focus on the potential impacts of an extreme heat wave on local assemblages as an empirical case study, analysing monitoring data on breeding birds collected in France. In this example, we show that despite specific populations were differently affected by local temperature anomalies, communities seem to be unaffected by a sudden heat wave. These results suggest that communities are tracking climate change at the highest possible rate.

  15. Do high concentrations of microcystin prevent Daphnia control of phytoplankton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chislock, Michael F; Sarnelle, Orlando; Jernigan, Lauren M; Wilson, Alan E

    2013-04-15

    Toxin-producing cyanobacteria have frequently been hypothesized to limit the ability of herbivorous zooplankton (such as Daphnia) to control phytoplankton biomass by inhibiting feeding, and in extreme cases, causing zooplankton mortality. Using limnocorral experiments in hyper-eutrophic ponds located in Alabama and Michigan (U.S.A.), we tested the hypothesis that high levels of cyanobacteria and microcystin, a class of hepatotoxins produced by several cyanobacterial genera, prevent Daphnia from strongly reducing phytoplankton abundance. At the start of the first experiment (Michigan), phytoplankton communities were dominated by toxic Microcystis and Anabaena (∼96% of total phytoplankton biomass), and concentrations of microcystin were ∼3 μg L⁻¹. Two weeks after adding Daphnia pulicaria from a nearby eutrophic lake, microcystin levels increased to ∼6.5 μg L⁻¹, yet Daphnia populations increased exponentially (r = 0.24 day⁻¹). By the third week, Daphnia had suppressed phytoplankton biomass by ∼74% relative to the no Daphnia controls and maintained reduced phytoplankton biomass until the conclusion of the five-week experiment. In the second experiment (Alabama), microcystin concentrations were greater than 100 μg L⁻¹, yet a mixture of three D. pulicaria clones from eutrophic lakes in southern MI increased and again reduced phytoplankton biomass, in this case by over 80%. The ability of Daphnia to increase in abundance and suppress phytoplankton biomass, despite high initial levels of cyanobacteria and microcystin, indicates that the latter does not prevent strong control of phytoplankton biomass by Daphnia genotypes that are adapted to environments with abundant cyanobacteria and associated cyanotoxins.

  16. 人工试验湖泊浮游藻类群落的生态学研究%ECOLOGICAL INFLUENCES OF PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITY IN AN EXPERIMENTAL MAN-MADE LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏爽; 张琪; 刘国祥; 胡征宇

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the possible ecological risks of transgenic (CAgcGH) common carp, an experimental man-made lake was set up in 2002. We investigated the phytoplankton community structure, seasonal dynamics, annual variations of phytoplankton, as well as its relationships with environmental factors. Samples of phytoplankton were collected sea-sonally from 2006 to 2010. Sixty-six species belonging to seven phyla and forty-seven genera were identified, among which Chlorophyta was the most. The results of two-way indicators species analysis (TWINSPAN) and detrended cor-respondence analysis (DCA) showed that the samples were congregated into four groups, which indicated obvious sea-sonal character. In winter, the community structure was simple.The biodiversity was the lowest. The community was mainly composed of Cyclotella sp. and Dinobryon divergens;in spring, several diatoms, such as Cyclotella sp., Synedra sp. and Melosira granulata became dominant species;in summer, community structure was the most complex, with the highest biodiversity, and Merismopedia glauca and Lyngbya contarta were dominant. In our five-year-experiment, the cell density rose by 33.1%, and mean annual cell density was (1.43±0.75) ×106 cells/L;the percentage of diatoms in the phytoplankton community dropped from 48.2% to 16.2%, while the percentage of Cyanobacteria in the phytoplankton community rose from 9.3% to 42.2%. The results of canonical correlation analysis (CCA) demonstrated that the com-munity structure was mainly influenced by temperature and dissolved oxygen. The influence of the density of total phosphorus and nitrogen was non-negligitible, and the influence of pH was small. Diatoms mainly appeared in samples from middle and low temperature sites, blue-green algae mainly appeared in samples from high temperature sites, Des-midiales mainly appeared in samples from sites with high transparency and total phosphorus, and Chrysomonadales mainly appeared in samples from sites with high

  17. 元荡水域浮游植物的群落结构及水质评价%Phytoplankton Community Structure and Water Quality Assessment in Yuandang Lake Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忆; 钟俊生; 郁蔚文; 胡景; 陈立婧

    2016-01-01

    A preliminary survey was carried on phytoplankton community and species diversity of Yuandang Lake in 2013.It found a total of 111 species of phytoplankton belonging to 7 phyla and 72 genera, among which there are 35 genera and 48 species.43.24% of the total spe-cies were Chlorophyta.Phytoplankton biomass and density were 2.13 mg/L and 842.80 ×104 cells/L.Merismopedia.tenuissima, Oscillato-ria.amphbia, Oscillatoria splendida, Coelastrum microporum, Tribonema minus, etc.are the main dominant species.The dominant species of Cyanophyta appeared in spring, summer and autumn.The dominant species of Chlorophyta appeared in winter, and the Xanthophyta appeared in autumn and winter.Based on the analysis of statistics, the annual average values of Shannon-Wiener index, Margalef index, and Algae in-dex were 1.70, 1.13, 6.00 respectively, so this survey indicated that Yuandang Lake suffered from eutrophication.%2013年对元荡湖的浮游植物群落和物种多样性进行了初步调查研究,共发现浮游植物111种,隶属7门,72属,其中绿藻门为主要类群,35属48种,占浮游植物总物种的43.24%。浮游植物生物量和密度分别为2.13 mg/L和842.80×104 cells/L,主要优势种有微小平列藻(Merismopedia tenuissima)、两栖颤藻(Oscillatoria amphbia)、灿烂颤藻(Oscillatoria splendida)、小空心藻(Coelastrum microporum)、小型黄丝藻(Tribonema minus)等。蓝藻门的优势种出现在春、夏、秋季,绿藻门的优势种出现在冬季,黄藻门的优势种出现在秋冬季。Shannon-Wiener多样性指数全年均值为1.70,Margalef 丰富度指数全年均值为1.13,藻类综合指数全年均值为6.00,元荡湖水体呈富营养型。

  18. Warming accelerates termination of a phytoplankton spring bloom by fungal parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenken, Thijs; Velthuis, Mandy; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette N; Stephan, Susanne; Aben, Ralf; Kosten, Sarian; van Donk, Ellen; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to favour infectious diseases across ecosystems worldwide. In freshwater and marine environments, parasites play a crucial role in controlling plankton population dynamics. Infection of phytoplankton populations will cause a transfer of carbon and nutrients into parasites, which may change the type of food available for higher trophic levels. Some phytoplankton species are inedible to zooplankton, and the termination of their population by parasites may liberate otherwise unavailable carbon and nutrients. Phytoplankton spring blooms often consist of large diatoms inedible for zooplankton, but the zoospores of their fungal parasites may serve as a food source for this higher trophic level. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on the fungal infection of a natural phytoplankton spring bloom and followed the response of a zooplankton community. Experiments were performed in ca. 1000 L indoor mesocosms exposed to a controlled seasonal temperature cycle and a warm (+4 °C) treatment in the period from March to June 2014. The spring bloom was dominated by the diatom Synedra. At the peak of infection over 40% of the Synedra population was infected by a fungal parasite (i.e. a chytrid) in both treatments. Warming did not affect the onset of the Synedra bloom, but accelerated its termination. Peak population density of Synedra tended to be lower in the warm treatments. Furthermore, Synedra carbon: phosphorus stoichiometry increased during the bloom, particularly in the control treatments. This indicates enhanced phosphorus limitation in the control treatments, which may have constrained chytrid development. Timing of the rotifer Keratella advanced in the warm treatments and closely followed chytrid infections. The chytrids' zoospores may thus have served as an alternative food source to Keratella. Our study thus emphasizes the importance of incorporating not only nutrient limitation and grazing, but also parasitism in understanding the

  19. Phytoplankton Identification Manual

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Desai, S.R.

    of Environment & Forests, New Delhi 3 FOREWORD Since its inception in 1966 the National Institute of Oceanography is involved in taxonomic classification of marine phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos and other flora and fauna under the Project ? Measurement... details of taxonomic classification and description of the concerned organisms / species. All the figures are well illustrated and detailed identification key is provided. This should surely guide even a beginner to understand the identification...

  20. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... composition of fungi, but the effects were generally limited to the litter layer and the uppermost humus layer (0-5 cm), which was unexpected considering the ecosystem had been manipulated for 18 years. Taken together the global change experiments altered the soil fungal communities and thereby highlight...... was therefore to investigate the impact of global environmental changes on soil fungal communities in a temperate and subartic heath ecosystem. The objective was further to determine global change effects on major functional groups of fungi and analyze the influence of fungal community changes on soil carbon...

  1. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... and nutrient availability and storage. By combining molecular methods such as 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of fungal ITS amplicons with analyses of soil enzymes, nutrient pools of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus we were able to characterize soil fungal communities as well as their impact on nutrient...... was therefore to investigate the impact of global environmental changes on soil fungal communities in a temperate and subartic heath ecosystem. The objective was further to determine global change effects on major functional groups of fungi and analyze the influence of fungal community changes on soil carbon...

  2. Coupled Response of Bacterial Production to a Wind-induced Fall Phytoplankton Bloom and Sediment Resuspension in the Chukchi Sea Shelf, Western Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Uchimiya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic bacterial abundance and production, dissolved free amino acid (DFAA and dissolved combined amino acid (DCAA concentrations, and other microbial parameters were determined for seawater samples collected at a fixed station (maximum water depth, 56 m deployed on the Chukchi Sea Shelf, in the western Arctic Ocean, during a 16-day period in September 2013. During the investigation period, the sampling station experienced strong winds and a subsequent phytoplankton bloom, which was thought to be triggered by enhanced vertical mixing and upward nutrient fluxes. In this study, we investigated whether bacterial and dissolved amino acid parameters changed in response to these physical and biogeochemical events. Bacterial abundance and production in the upper layer increased with increasing chlorophyll a concentration, despite a concomitant decrease in seawater temperature from 3.2°C to 1.5°C. The percentage of bacteria with high nucleic acid content during the bloom was significantly higher than that during the prebloom period. The ratio of the depth-integrated (0–20 m bacterial production to primary production differed little between the prebloom and bloom period, with an overall average value of 0.14 ± 0.03 (± standard deviation, n = 8. DFAA and DCAA concentrations varied over a limited range throughout the investigation, indicating that the supply and consumption of labile dissolved amino acids were balanced. These results indicate that there was a tightly coupled, large flow of organic carbon from primary producers to heterotrophic bacteria during the fall bloom. Our data also revealed that bacterial production and abundance were high in the bottom nepheloid (low transmittance layer during strong wind events, which was associated with sediment resuspension due to turbulence near the seafloor. The impacts of fall wind events, which are predicted to become more prominent with the extension of the ice-free period, on bacterial

  3. Response-Guided Community Detection: Application to Climate Index Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Gonzalo [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Angus, Michael [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Pedemane, Navya [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Harlalka, Jitendra [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Semazzi, Fredrick [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota; Samatova, Nagiza F [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Discovering climate indices-time series that summarize spatiotemporal climate patterns-is a key task in the climate science domain. In this work, we approach this task as a problem of response-guided community detection; that is, identifying communities in a graph associated with a response variable of interest. To this end, we propose a general strategy for response-guided community detection that explicitly incorporates information of the response variable during the community detection process, and introduce a graph representation of spatiotemporal data that leverages information from multiple variables. We apply our proposed methodology to the discovery of climate indices associated with seasonal rainfall variability. Our results suggest that our methodology is able to capture the underlying patterns known to be associated with the response variable of interest and to improve its predictability compared to existing methodologies for data-driven climate index discovery and official forecasts.

  4. Effects of Hyriopsis cumingii and Aristichthys nobilis on the enclosures phytoplankton community of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix pond%鲢、鳙对三角帆蚌池塘藻类影响的围隔实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小玉; 张根芳; 刘其根; 鄢灵兰; 李家乐

    2011-01-01

    以浙江金华汤溪威旺养殖基地的三角帆蚌养殖水体为研究对象,通过围隔实验比较研究了单养鲢、鳙和三角帆蚌的池塘浮游植物密度、生物量和优势种(属)组成等的差异,以及养蚌池混养鲢鳙对水体浮游植物密度、生物量以及优势种变化的影响.结果表明,养蚌(10#)围隔的浮游植物平均密度和生物量均显著高于高密度鲢(12#)围隔(P<0.05),其蓝藻数量及生物量显著高于高密度鲢(12#)和低密度鳙(13#)围隔(P<0.05),绿藻数量则显著低于低密度鲢单养(11#)围隔(P<0.05).在鱼蚌混养的情况下,单养蚌(10#)围隔浮游植物平均数量显著高于鲢-蚌混养(15#,16#)和鳙-蚌混养(17#,18#)围隔(P<0.05),其蓝藻数量及生物量极显著高于鲢-蚌混养(15#,16#)或鳙-蚌(17#,18#)围隔(P<0.01),其绿藻数量显著低于混养高密度鲢(16#)或低密度鳙(17#)的混养围隔(P<0.05).研究结果充分说明,鲢、鳙和三角帆蚌三者对水体藻类组成的影响有别,三角帆蚌养殖池中适当混养鲢或鳙可以有效控制蓝藻(铜绿微囊藻)的生长,促进绿藻(四尾栅藻)的生长,并最终有利于三角帆蚌的养殖,混养鲢密度的增加有利于控制藻类生长,而鳙密度的增加促进了裸藻等中大型藻类的生长.%Through the investigation on the enclosure phytoplankton community in pearl mussel ponds, we comparatively studied the different effects of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix ), bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis)and the pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii on quantity,biomass and dominant species of phytoplankton,and the effects of the two carps on the phytoplankton in mussel ponds. The results showed that the density and biomass of phytoplankton in mussel monocultured pond(10g) are significantly higher than those in high density of silver carp monocultured pond(12#) (P <0.05) ,the density and biomass of cyanobacteria in mussel pond is significantly higher than those

  5. 兴凯湖当壁镇湖区夏季浮游植物群落结构变化%Variations of Phytoplankton Community Structure in Dangbi Town of Xingkai Lake in Summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李喆; 刘伟; 唐富江; 王继隆; 徐慧东

    2012-01-01

    Variations of phytoplankton community structure in Dangbi Town of Xingkai Lake was investigated in July 2009.The results showed that the phytoplankton assemblage was composed of 41 species in total,belonging to seven taxonomic groups.Chlorophyta were represented by the highest percentage of taxa(39.0%) followed by Bacillariophyta(24.4%).The average cell density of phytoplankton was 192.97×104ind·L-1 and the average biomass was 2.4605mg·L-1.Bacillariophyta were represented by the highest cell density(147.47×104ind·L-1) and biomass(2.2818mg·L-1).Dominant species concluded Bacillariophyta,Chlorophyta,Cyanophyta,Xanthophyta.Dominant species were Cyclotella comta,Melosira granulate,Chlorella vulgaris,Ocystis lacustris,Chroococcus minor and Tribonemn sp...The diversity of phytoplankton in that lake was abundant(the value of H’ was 2.09;the value of J was 0.56).Over time,there was little change in dominant species and large change in species composition,cell density and biomass.The later time was the lower X index was.Compared with data between 2001 and 2009,species composition and cell density of phytoplankton in Xingkai Lake declined slightly.Dominant species of Bacillariophyta and Cryptophyta declined and dominant species of Chlorophyta increased.The percentage of filamentous algae in dominant species was increasing.In addition,the biomass of phytoplankton rose in Xingkai Lake.At the same time,fish production potential tended to increase in Dangbi Town of Xingkai Lake.There were two purposes of this study.One purpose was to accumulate basic data of phytoplankton resources in Dangbi Town of Xingkai Lake.The other purpose was to provide reference data for fish feeding habits that was studied by co-workers in Xingkai Lake.%2009年夏季对兴凯湖当壁镇湖区浮游植物群落结构进行研究。结果表明,兴凯湖当壁镇湖区浮游植物共计7门41种属,绿藻、硅藻的种类为主,分别占39.0%、24.4%;数量、生物量均值分别为192.97

  6. Long-term changes in phytoplankton in a humic lake in response to the water level rising: the effects of beaver engineering on a freshwater ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pęczuła W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although water level changes are supposed to be a key factor affecting the functioning of lake ecosystems, knowledge on this topic is scarce, particularly for humic lakes. This paper presents the results of 18 years’ research on a small humic lake exposed to hydrological change (rising of the water level, which was induced by spontaneous colonization of the lake by the European beaver (Castor fiber L.. We put forward a hypothesis that this change will be reflected in the quantity and structure of summer phytoplankton due to expected changes in the water chemistry. We noted a statistically significant decrease in total phosphorus and calcium concentrations, electrolytic conductivity, and Secchi disc transparency, and an increase in water color. The phytoplankton structure changed, with cyanoprocaryota and greens decreasing and flagellates increasing. The alteration was observed in a lake which had previously been drained by ditches, so beaver damming appeared to cause the return of the lake to its original endorheic conditions as well as to a water chemistry and phytoplankton structure more typical of undisturbed humic lakes.

  7. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    /change the microbial community towards a higher fungal dominance. That could lead to a change in the carbon and nutrient flow in soil. In Manuscript 2 the impact of climate change manipulations and the seasonal dynamics of soil fungi and bacterial communities are investigated. Our results show that the soil fungal......Soil bacteria and archaea are essential for ecosystem functioning and plant growth through their degradation of organic matter and turnover of nutrients. But since the majority of soil bacteria and archaea are unclassified and “nonculturable” the functionality of the microbial community and its...... overall importance for ecosystem function in soil is poorly understood. Global change factors may affect the diversity and functioning of soil prokaryotes and thereby ecosystem functioning. To gain a better understanding of the effects of global changes it is of fundamental importance to classify...

  8. Phytoplankton community and water quality in guilin city section of Lijiang River in summer, China%漓江桂林市区段夏季浮游植物群落特征与水质评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周振明; 陈朝述; 刘可慧; 李俊; 陈孟林; 蒋瑜; 于方明

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton plays a crucial role for primary productivity in aquatic ecosystems. The changes in community structure are related to the environmental conditions of water and directly affect the function of aquatic ecosystems; it is one of the important indicating factors of the quality of the water environment. In order to reveal the relationship between the structure of the phytoplankton community and the water quality of Lijiang River, the physical and chemical indicators and Phytoplankton community characteristics in the Guilin city section of Lijiang River (from Zhaojiaqiao village to Wangjia village) were investigated in August, 2012. The results showed that the contents of permanganate index (CODMn), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), ammonia (NH4+-N) were from 1.80 to 6.20, 1.12 to 2.68, 0.022 to 0.282 and 0.34 to 1.73 mg·L-1, respectively, which smoothly changed in the upstream and significantly increased in tributaries. A total of 128 species which belong to 60 genera of 7 phyla were identified in Lijiang River, including 50 species of Bacillariophyta (39.06%), 52 species of Chlorophyta (40.63%), 16 species of Cyanophyta (12.5%), 7 species of Euglenophyta (5.47%), 1 species of Pyrrophyta (0.78%), 1 species of Chrysophyta (0.78%) and 1 species of Xanthophyta (0.78%). The dominant species were S. tephanodiscus,C. pyrenoidosa, N.rhynchocephal, N.exigua,C.Bodanica,S.quadricandaandS. ulna. The cell abundance of phytoplankton ranged from 10.3×104 to 1047.0×104 ind.·L-1 and the average cell abundance was 474.7×104 ind.·L-1, which was the smallest in Zhaojiaqiao village and the largest in Nanxihe entrance; green algae was major on species and diatom was major on cell abundance and distribution of dominant species. Thus, Lijiang River could be classified as the diatom-green algae river. Shannon-Wiener and Simpson indexes of phytoplankton were from 1.60 to 4.27 and 2.24 to 12.74, indicating that the water quality of Lijiang River was cleaning

  9. 马颊河与徒骇浮游植物群落特征及水质初步评价%Phytoplankton community characterization and preliminary evaluation on water quality of Majia and Tuhai River in Haihe River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋芬; 王卫民; 单保庆; 阎里清; 黎洁; 周洁

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of phytoplankton community characterization including species composition,population size, dominant species and saprobic indicators was conducted in order to evaluate the water quality of Majia and Tuhai River in Haihe River basin. The results revealed that 126 species of phytoplankton belonging to 7 phyla and 67 genera existed in Majia River, while 114 species of phytoplankton belonging to 7 phyla and 63 genera were found in Tuhai River. Chlorophyta was the richest algae in both rivers, followed by Bacillariophyta and Cyanophyta. Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta were found in all the sampling sites (the frequency was 100%). Cyanophyta was absolute the majority in Majia River in population, which accounted for 53.59% ,while the Chlorophyta was predominant in Tuhai River,which accounted for 35. 73%. The average density of phytoplankton in Majia and Tuhai River were 22. 424 × 106 ind./L and 13. 950× 106 ind./L, respectively. The Shannon-Weaver index, Margalef index and Pielou index varied among 2. 48-4. 64,3. 62-9. 91 and 0. 47-0. 84 in Majia River, while 3.04-4.57,2. 94-10. 15 and 0. 63-0.82 in Tuhai River,respectively. The water quality of both rivers was preliminary evaluated based on above results. In conclusion water quality was good, can be labeled as mesotrophic, but had the potential to turn to eutrophication. So we should pay attention to protect the water quality and enhance the management of the both rivers.%对海河流域马颊河与徒骇河的浮游植物种类组成、种群数量、优势种、污染指示种等进行调查研究,结果表明马颊河浮游植物为126种,隶属7门67属;徒骇河浮游植物为114种,隶属7门63属.2条河流浮游植物种类组成均以绿藻为最多,其次是硅藻和蓝藻;各采样点蓝藻、绿藻和硅藻出现的频度均为100%.在种群数量上,马颊河蓝藻占绝对优势(占藻类数量的53.59%),而徒骇河绿藻占优势(占藻类数量的35.73%),马颊河

  10. 逊别拉河自然保护区浮游植物群落结构特征的初步研究%Study on Phytoplankton Community Structure in Xunbiela River Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李反修; 姜作发; 李喆; 霍堂斌

    2013-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on the community structure of phytoplankton in the Xunbiela River Nature Reserve from September to October in 2010, and the water quality of the Xunbiela River Nature Reserve was assessed with biotic indices. The results showed that the phytoplankton assemblage was composed of 50 species in total .belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Bacillar-iophyta were represented by the highest number of taxa (28) followed by Chlorophyta (15), Cyanophyta(2). The percentage of Crypto-phyta, Euglenophyta, Pyrrophyta, Chrysophyta and Xanthophyta was 14.0 %. Dominant species were Synedra acus, Fragilaria sp., Cy-clotella comta, Gomphonema constriction, Acicular sp., Newicula simples, Pinnularia sp., Cymbella sp., Cymbella cistula. The average cell density of phytoplankton was 183.47X 104ind.·L-1 and the average biomass was 4.3740 mg·L-1. Cell density and biomass of Bacil-lariophyta were the highest, 134.12x 104ind.·L-1 and 3.9354mg·L-1 respectively. The percentage of Bacillariophyta cell density and biomass were 61.82% and 89.9 % respectively. The diversity of phytoplankton in that river was abundant. In addition, combining of H' (3.01 )、J(0.88)diversity indices, the water quality was between os-clean type in Xunbiela River Nature Reserve. It provided a suitable habitat for fishes.%2010年9~10月,对逊别拉河自然保护区浮游植物群落结构进行了初步研究,并利用生物指数对逊别拉河自然保护区水质进行评价.结果表明,浮游植物共计8门50种,以硅藻为主,28种,占56.0%;绿藻次之,15种,占30.0%;蓝藻2种,占8.5%;隐藻、裸藻、甲藻、金藻、黄藻各1种,共占14.0%;优势种类及常见种全部为硅藻门种类:尖针杆藻Synedra acus、脆杆藻Fragilaria sp.、扭曲小环藻Cyclotella comta、缢缩异极藻Gomphonemaconstrictum、舟形藻Acicular sp.、简单舟形藻Navicula simples、羽文藻Pinnulariasp.、桥弯藻Cymbella sp.、箱形桥弯藻Cymbella cistula.

  11. 长湖圆心湖夏季浮游植物群落结构特征分析%Community Structure of Phytoplankton and Water Quality Assessment of Yuanxinhu Area of Lake Changhu in Summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂细荣; 周淼; 黄俊; 郭坤; 柴毅; 罗静波; 杨德国; 何勇凤; 邓义

    2016-01-01

    To study phytoplankton community structures and assess water quality in Yuanxinhu area, lake Changhu,a survey was carried out in this area in July of 2015. Biodiversity of phytoplankton in this area were measured by using Shannon index,Pielou index and Margalef index,water quality was assessed based on these indices. The results showed that,a total of 49 phytoplankton species were iden-tified,which belong to 6 phyla. Species number in Chlorophyta was 27,accounted for 55. 10% of the total,following by Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta,whose numbers were 12(accounted for 24. 49%) and 6(accounted for 12. 24%)respectively. Ratios between density of species in Cyanophyta and the total in each site were larger than 66 . 45%,highest data of 85 . 53% was obtained in sites YXH4 . Density of phytoplankton ranged from 20. 88 í 106 cell/L to 51. 15 í 106 cell/L ,with an average of 29. 19 í106 cell/L . Seven dominant species were recognized,density of which accounted for 83. 42%to 92 . 53% in each site;Oscillatoria amphibia possessed the highest dominant index( 0 . 50 ),and its density accounted for 44. 71% of the total. Based on algal index and biodiversity indices ,it was indi-cated that Yuanxinhu area was in moderate eutrophic state.%为了解长湖圆心湖浮游植物群落结构特征及水质现状,于2015年7月对该区域进行采样调查,获得了浮游植物种类的分布及丰度数据,使用Shannon指数、均匀度指数、Margalef指数对浮游植物的多样性进行了测度,并对该区域的水质进行评价.此次调查共鉴定浮游植物6门49种(含变型变种),以绿藻门的种类为主,多达27种,其次为蓝藻门和硅藻门(分别为12和6种);各样点蓝藻门种类的丰度占比超过66.45%,在YXH4高达85.53%.各样点浮游植物丰度变化范围为20.88×106~51.15×106 cell/L,平均丰度为29.19×106 cell/L.应用优势度指数共筛选出优势种7种,其在各站点的丰度占比为83.42%~92.53%;

  12. Children's role in the community response to HIV in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Skovdal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent debates on how to achieve an optimal HIV response are dominated by intervention strategies that fail to recognize children's role in the community response to HIV. Whilst formal responses are key to the HIV response, they must recognize and build on indigenous community resources. This study examines adult's perspectives on the role of children in the HIV response in the Matobo District of southern Zimbabwe. Methods: Through a mix of individual interviews (n=19 and focus group discussions (n=9, 90 community members who were active in social groups spoke about their community response to HIV. Transcripts were subjected to a thematic analysis and coding to generate key concepts and representations. Findings: In the wake of the HIV epidemic, traditional views of children's social value as domestic “helpers” have evolved into them being regarded as capable and competent actors in the care and support of people living with HIV or AIDS, and as integral to household survival. Yet concurrent representations of children with excessive caregiving responsibilities as potentially vulnerable and at risk suggest that there is a limit to the role of children in the HIV response. Conclusion: Community volunteers and health staff delivering HIV services need to recognize the “behind the scene” role of children in the HIV response and ensure that children are incorporated into their modus operandi – both as social actors and as individuals in need of support.

  13. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  14. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  15. Spatio-temporal patterns and predictions of phytoplankton assemblages in a subtropical river delta system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and seasonal sampling within a subtropical river delta system, the Pearl River Delta (China), provided data to determine seasonal phytoplankton patterns and develop prediction models. The high nutrient levels and frequent water exchanges resulted in a phytoplankton community with greatest...

  16. Functional analysis and classification of phytoplankton based on data from an automated flow cytometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malkassian, A.; Nerini, D.; Van Dijk, M.A.; Thyssen, M.; Mante, C.; Gregori, G.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical flow cytometry (FCM) is well suited for the analysis of phytoplankton communities in fresh and sea waters. The measurement of light scatter and autofluorescence properties of particles by FCM provides optical fingerprints, which enables different phytoplankton groups to be separated. A su

  17. Phytoplankton distribution in unusually low sea ice cover over the Pacific Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Coupel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the Pacific Arctic basin experiences ice-free conditions in summer as a result of sea ice cover steadily decreasing over the last decades. To evaluate the impact of sea ice retreat on the marine ecosystem, phytoplankton in situ observations were acquired over the Chukchi shelf and the Canadian basin in 2008, a year of high melting. Pigment analyses and taxonomy enumerations were used to characterise the distribution of main phytoplanktonic groups. Marked spatial variability of the phytoplankton distribution was observed in summer 2008. Comparison of eight phytoplankton functional groups and 3 size-classes (pico-, nano- and micro-phytoplankton also showed significant differences in abundance, biomass and distribution between summer of low ice cover (2008 and heavy ice summer (1994. Environmental parameters such as freshening, stratification, light and nutrient availability are discussed as possible causes to explain the observed differences in phytoplankton community structure between 1994 and 2008.

  18. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; D. Raingeard; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J.T.I.; P. A. Todd; T. C. Toh; McDougald, D.; Chou, L.M.; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  19. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Low, J.; Tun, K.; B. Wilson; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; K. E. Ulstrup; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P.A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D; Chou, L.M.; P. D. Steinberg

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  20. Community response grids: using information technology to help communities respond to bioterror emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T; Fleischmann, Kenneth R; Preece, Jennifer; Shneiderman, Ben; Wu, Philip Fei; Qu, Yan

    2007-12-01

    Access to accurate and trusted information is vital in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an emergency. To facilitate response in large-scale emergency situations, Community Response Grids (CRGs) integrate Internet and mobile technologies to enable residents to report information, professional emergency responders to disseminate instructions, and residents to assist one another. CRGs use technology to help residents and professional emergency responders to work together in community response to emergencies, including bioterrorism events. In a time of increased danger from bioterrorist threats, the application of advanced information and communication technologies to community response is vital in confronting such threats. This article describes CRGs, their underlying concepts, development efforts, their relevance to biosecurity and bioterrorism, and future research issues in the use of technology to facilitate community response.

  1. Latitudinal phytoplankton distribution and the neutral theory of biodiversity

    KAUST Repository

    Chust, Guillem

    2012-11-16

    Recent studies have suggested that global diatom distributions are not limited by dispersal, in the case of both extant species and fossil species, but rather that environmental filtering explains their spatial patterns. Hubbell\\'s neutral theory of biodiversity provides a framework in which to test these alternatives. Our aim is to test whether the structure of marine phytoplankton (diatoms, dinoflagellates and coccolithophores) assemblages across the Atlantic agrees with neutral theory predictions. We asked: (1) whether intersite variance in phytoplankton diversity is explained predominantly by dispersal limitation or by environmental conditions; and (2) whether species abundance distributions are consistent with those expected by the neutral model. Location: Meridional transect of the Atlantic (50° N-50° S). Methods: We estimated the relative contributions of environmental factors and geographic distance to phytoplankton composition using similarity matrices, Mantel tests and variation partitioning of the species composition based upon canonical ordination methods. We compared the species abundance distribution of phytoplankton with the neutral model using Etienne\\'s maximum-likelihood inference method. Results: Phytoplankton communities are slightly more determined by niche segregation (24%), than by dispersal limitation and ecological drift (17%). In 60% of communities, the assumption of neutrality in species\\' abundance distributions could not be rejected. In tropical zones, where oceanic gyres enclose large stable water masses, most communities showed low species immigration rates; in contrast, we infer that communities in temperate areas, out of oligotrophic gyres, have higher rates of species immigration. Conclusions: Phytoplankton community structure is consistent with partial niche assembly and partial dispersal and drift assembly (neutral processes). The role of dispersal limitation is almost as important as habitat filtering, a fact that has been

  2. Community-based oil spill response in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banta, J. [Prince William Sound Regional Citizen' s Advisory Council, Anchorage, AK (United States); Munger, M. [Cook Inlet Regional Citizen' s Advisory Council, Kenai, AK (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Prince William Sound Regional Citizen's Advisory Council and the Cook Inlet Regional Citizen's Advisory Council are independent, non profit organizations formed in 1989 following the Exxon Valdez oil spill to promote the concept of community-based oil spill response (COSR) in their respective regions. COSR involves local citizens in responding to oil spilled in waters they rely upon for income, recreation and subsistence. The 2 advisory councils recently held a Community Oil Spill Response Forum to review the status of existing COSR teams and to share information about past and future COSR-related efforts. The meeting served as an information exchange process about regulatory programs, COSR variations in communities and harbors, training, and personnel issues. Key groups attending the forum were harbor masters, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, United States Coast Guard, existing COSR teams, oil response organizations, local community governments, and volunteers from the advisory councils. This paper was based on the notes taken from the forum. It was agreed that the current system is inadequate in its response to small spills that are frequently associated with non-tank vessels. It was suggested that improved capacity for community-based response could address the situation. It was also suggested that work groups should meet on an annual or biannual basis to continue to educate responders and communities about oil spill response. 7 refs.

  3. The response of microalgal biomass and community composition to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... This study is the first to show successive ... Keywords: Sundays Estuary, phytoplankton, microphytobenthos, chlorophyll a, environmental factors. Introduction ... when semi-closed circulation increased the residence time.

  4. Estrutura e dinâmica da comunidade fitoplanctônica a jusante e montante do reservatório de Corumbá, Caldas Novas, Estado de Goiás, Brasil Structure and dynamics of the phytoplankton community downstream and upstream Corumbá reservoir, Caldas Novas, state of Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Train

    2001-05-01

    aims at characterizing the phytoplankton community in stations upstream and downstream Corumbá reservoir in the state of Goiás, and at identifying the main environmental variables that influence its structure. Samples of sub-surface water were collected monthly in 3 stations (2 upstream Corumbá reservoir and 1 downstream, from November 1996 to November 1997, and bimonthly from January 1998 to May 1999. The distribution pattern of phytoplankton was analyzed through the limnological factors of water temperature, flow, turbidity, electric conductivity, reactive soluble phosphorus, ammonium, nitrate, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen, using canonical correspondence analysis. Among the 162 taxa identified, Cyanophyceae and Bacillariophyceae were the most abundant and were responsible for density peaks. During the study period, the largest phytoplankton density (28.313 ind.ml-1 registered in the Corumbá river occurred in the station lying downstream the reservoir, with the dominance of the diatom Achnanthes minutissima. The heterocytous cyanoprokaryote Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii presented high abundance in the stations upstream the reservoir during the dry season. Variations showed a sharp seasonality related to the hydrological cycle, or rather, the lowest phytoplankton density occurred in the period of largest flow and maximum abundance was registered during reduced flow. Therefore, the dynamics of the phytoplankton community was strongly determined by the flow, temperature and nutrient concentrations of the Corumbá river

  5. Seasonal variability of the phytoplankton community of a lateral channel (Cortado of the Upper Paraná River Dinâmica sazonal da comunidade fitoplanctônica de um canal lateral (Canal Cortado do Alto Rio Paraná (PR, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Divina de Oliveira

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variability of the phytoplanktonic community was studied in one lateral channel of the Upper Paraná River. The extensive samplings (monthly were taken in three stations in the Cortado Channel (22º47‘30”S, 53º24‘37”W from March of 1993 to February of 1994. Temporal changes in taxonomic composition, density, biomass, diversity and dominance were analyzed in relation to regional climate and hydrology, and to the physical and chemical factors of the water column. The phytoplanktonic community was composed of 95 taxa. The classes Cyanophyceae (Anabaena circinalis and Bacillariophyceae (Aulacoseira granulata were the most abundant, being responsible for the biomass peaks that occurred. The temporal variation in density and biomass did not show a clear seasonality, however, the highest biomass occurred in the late low waters (limnophase, with dominance of microplankton. Nanoplanktonic species, C-strategists common in Paraná River, mainly Cryptomonas brasiliensis, were abundant throughout the study periodFoi estudada a variabilidade sazonal da comunidade fitoplanctônica de um canal lateral do Alto Rio Paraná. As amostragens extensivas (mensais foram efetuadas em três estações no canal Cortado (22º47‘30”S, 53º24‘37”W no período de março de 1993 a fevereiro de 1994. As flutuações temporais na composição taxonômica, densidade, biomassa, diversidade e dominância foram analisadas em relação aos fatores climáticos e hidrológicos regionais e aos fatores físicos e químicos da água. A comunidade fitoplanctônica esteve representada por 95 táxons. As classes Cyanophyceae (Anabaena circinalis e Bacillariophyceae (Aulacoseira granulata foram as mais abundantes, sendo responsáveis pelos picos de biomassa registrados. As variações temporais na densidade, diversidade e biomassa não apresentaram conspícua sazonalidade. A máxima biomassa, entretanto, ocorreu ao término do período de águas baixas (limnofase

  6. Penerapan Corporate Social Responsibility dengan Konsep Community Based Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Suriany

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Business is not only economic institution, but social institution too. As social institution, business has responsibility to help society in solving social problem. This responsibility called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. CSR pays attention about social problem and environment, so CSR support continuous development to help government role. Nowadays, our government has national development’s agenda. One of them is tourism sector (Visit Indonesia Year 2008 programmed. But tourism sector has challenge in human resources. In this case, business role in practice CSR is needed to help tourism sector. With CSR activities, the quality of local community will increase to participate in tourism activities. CSR activities include training that based on research. When the quality of local community increase, local community can practice the concept of community based tourism (CBT. In the future, Indonesia has a power to compete with other countries.

  7. Fluid dynamical niches of phytoplankton types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, Francesco; De Monte, Silvia; Alvain, Séverine; Dandonneau, Yves; Lévy, Marina

    2010-10-26

    The biogeochemical role of phytoplanktonic organisms strongly varies from one plankton type to another, and their relative abundance and distribution have fundamental consequences at the global and climatological scales. In situ observations find dominant types often associated to specific physical and chemical water properties. However, the mechanisms and spatiotemporal scales by which marine ecosystems are organized are largely not known. Here we investigate the spatiotemporal organization of phytoplankton communities by combining multisatellite data, notably high-resolution ocean-color maps of dominant types and altimetry-derived Lagrangian diagnostics of the surface transport. We find that the phytoplanktonic landscape is organized in (sub-)mesoscale patches (10-100 km) of dominant types separated by physical fronts induced by horizontal stirring. These physical fronts delimit niches supported by water masses of similar history and whose lifetimes are comparable with the timescale of the bloom onset (few weeks). The resonance between biological activity and physical processes suggest that the spatiotemporal (sub-)mesoscales associated to stirring are determinant in the observation and modeling of marine ecosystems.

  8. Contrasting patterns of free-living bacterioplankton diversity in macrophyte-dominated versus phytoplankton blooming regimes in Dianchi Lake, a shallow lake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujing; Li, Huabing; Xing, Peng; Wu, Qinglong

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater shallow lakes typically exhibit two alternative stable states under certain nutrient loadings: macrophyte-dominated and phytoplankton-dominated water regimes. An ecosystem regime shift from macrophytes to phytoplankton blooming typically reduces the number of species of invertebrates and fishes and results in the homogenization of communities in freshwater lakes. We investigated how microbial biodiversity has responded to a shift of the ecosystem regime in Dianchi Lake, which was previously fully covered with submerged macrophytes but currently harbors both ecological states. We observed marked divergence in the diversity and community composition of bacterioplankton between the two regimes. Although species richness, estimated as the number of operational taxonomic units and phylogenetic diversity (PD), was higher in the phytoplankton dominated ecosystem after this shift, the dissimilarity of bacterioplankton community across space decreased. This decrease in beta diversity was accompanied by loss of planktonic bacteria unique to the macrophyte-dominated ecosystem. Mantel tests between bacterioplankton community distances and Euclidian distance of environmental parameters indicated that this reduced bacterial community diff erentiation primarily reflected the loss of environmental niches, particularly in the macrophyte regime. The loss of this small-scale heterogeneity in bacterial communities should be considered when assessing long-term biodiversity changes in response to ecosystem regime conversions in freshwater lakes.

  9. Effect of ocean acidification and elevated fCO2 on trace gas production by a Baltic Sea summer phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alison L.; Leedham-Elvidge, Emma; Hughes, Claire; Hopkins, Frances E.; Malin, Gill; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai; Crawfurd, Kate; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf; Liss, Peter S.

    2016-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is a unique environment as the largest body of brackish water in the world. Acidification of the surface oceans due to absorption of anthropogenic CO2 emissions is an additional stressor facing the pelagic community of the already challenging Baltic Sea. To investigate its impact on trace gas biogeochemistry, a large-scale mesocosm experiment was performed off Tvärminne Research Station, Finland, in summer 2012. During the second half of the experiment, dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations in the highest-fCO2 mesocosms (1075-1333 µatm) were 34 % lower than at ambient CO2 (350 µatm). However, the net production (as measured by concentration change) of seven halocarbons analysed was not significantly affected by even the highest CO2 levels after 5 weeks' exposure. Methyl iodide (CH3I) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) showed 15 and 57 % increases in mean mesocosm concentration (3.8 ± 0.6 increasing to 4.3 ± 0.4 pmol L-1 and 87.4 ± 14.9 increasing to 134.4 ± 24.1 pmol L-1 respectively) during Phase II of the experiment, which were unrelated to CO2 and corresponded to 30 % lower Chl a concentrations compared to Phase I. No other iodocarbons increased or showed a peak, with mean chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI) concentrations measured at 5.3 (±0.9) pmol L-1 and iodoethane (C2H5I) at 0.5 (±0.1) pmol L-1. Of the concentrations of bromoform (CHBr3; mean 88.1 ± 13.2 pmol L-1), dibromomethane (CH2Br2; mean 5.3 ± 0.8 pmol L-1), and dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl, mean 3.0 ± 0.5 pmol L-1), only CH2Br2 showed a decrease of 17 % between Phases I and II, with CHBr3 and CHBr2Cl showing similar mean concentrations in both phases. Outside the mesocosms, an upwelling event was responsible for bringing colder, high-CO2, low-pH water to the surface starting on day t16 of the experiment; this variable CO2 system with frequent upwelling events implies that the community of the Baltic Sea is acclimated to regular significant declines in pH caused by up to 800 µatm fCO2. After

  10. Academic-community partnerships for sustainable preparedness and response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Alexander; O'Neal, Patrick; Prescott, John; Stanley, Joan; Herrmann, Jack; Dunlop, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academic institutions possess tremendous resources that could be important for community disaster response and preparedness activities. In-depth exploration of the role of academic institutions in community disaster response has elicited information about particular academic resources leveraged for and essential to community preparedness and response; factors that contribute to the decision-making process for partner engagement; and facilitators of and barriers to sustainable collaborations from the perspectives of academic institutions, public health and emergency management agencies, and national association and agency leaders. The Academic-Community Partnership Project of the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in collaboration with the Association of Schools of Public Health convened an invitational summit which included leadership from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Directors of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of Academic Health Centers, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and American Association of Poison Control Centers. From this convention, emerged recommendations for building and sustaining academic-public health-community collaborations for preparedness locally and regionally.

  11. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    ’ of climate change manipulations on soil microorganisms and nutrient availability in a Danish heathland, where the samples were taken shortly after a prolonged pre-summer drought. The major findings in the study are that warming increased measures of fungi and bacteria and drought might shift......Soil bacteria and archaea are essential for ecosystem functioning and plant growth through their degradation of organic matter and turnover of nutrients. But since the majority of soil bacteria and archaea are unclassified and “nonculturable” the functionality of the microbial community and its...... overall importance for ecosystem function in soil is poorly understood. Global change factors may affect the diversity and functioning of soil prokaryotes and thereby ecosystem functioning. To gain a better understanding of the effects of global changes it is of fundamental importance to classify...

  12. Phytoplankton assemblage of a solar saltern in Port Fouad, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedekar Fadel Madkour

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is the first investigation of the phytoplankton community inone of Egypt's saltworks. The phytoplankton composition and distribution infive ponds of increasing salinity were investigated in the solar saltern of Port Fouad.The phytoplankton community consisted of 42 species belonging to cyanobacteria(16, diatoms (12, dinoflagellates (11, Euglenophyceae (2 and Chlorophyceae (1.The number of species decreased significantly and rapidly with increasing salinity,varying between 33 species in the first pond (P1 and one species in the crystallizerpond (P5. Conversely, the total phytoplankton density, except that recordedin P1, increased significantly with rising salinity, fluctuating between 8.7 and56 × 105 individuals l-1 in P2 and P5 respectively. In spiteof the local variations in climate and nutrient availability, the phytoplankton composition, density and spatialvariations along the salinity gradient were, in many respects, very similar towhat has been observed in other solar saltworks. The pond with the lowest salinity(P1 - -1 was characterized by a significant diversity andblooming of diatoms and dinoflagellates. Intermediate salinity ponds (P2 andP3 with salinity ∼ 112-180 g l-1 exhibited a decline in bothspecies richness and density, but the stenohaline blue green algae (Synechocystis salina did flourish. The highly saline concentrating ponds andcrystallizers (P4 and P5 with salinity ∼ 223-340 g l-1 werecharacterized by few species, the disappearance of blue green algae and thethriving of the halotolerant green alga Dunaliella salina.

  13. The social responsibility commitment to the community and care environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elena López Regalado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of csr has evolved in recent years, currently the main objective of the Company cannot lie only meet the monetary needs of the shareholders, but to seek the participation of all stakeholders in the company, with the different stakeholders that interact with the environment either customers, suppliers, employees and society at large, impacting the community with socially responsible actions. Because the concept has acquired new shades as social, economic and environmental responsibility among others, being on the great responsibility of the actions of companies to make social or common good acts to achieve their objectives without harming their economies community, the next job is presented focusing especially on two major indicators of social responsibility such as environmental care, and welfare of the community.

  14. Phytoplankton diversity and productivity in a highly turbid, tropical coastal system (Bach Dang Estuary, Vietnam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle-Newall, E. J.; Chu, V. T.; Pringault, O.; Amouroux, D.; Arfi, R.; Bettarel, Y.; Bouvier, T.; Bouvier, C.; Got, P.; Nguyen, T. M. H.; Mari, X.; Navarro, P.; Duong, T. N.; Cao, T. T. T.; Pham, T. T.; Ouillon, S.; Torréton, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    The factors controlling estuarine phytoplankton diversity and production are relatively well known in temperate systems. Less however is known about the factors affecting phytoplankton community distribution in tropical estuaries. This is surprising given the economic and ecological importance of these large, deltaic ecosystems, such as are found in South East Asia. Here we present the results from an investigation into the factors controlling phytoplankton distribution and phytoplankton-bacterial coupling in the Bach Dang Estuary, a sub-estuary of the Red River system, in Northern Vietnam. Phytoplankton diversity and primary and bacterial production, nutrients and metallic contaminants (mercury and organotin) were measured during two seasons: wet (July 2008) and dry (March 2009). Phytoplankton community composition differed between the two seasons with only a 2% similarity between July and March. The large spatial extent and complexity of defining the freshwater sources meant that simple mixing diagrams could not be used in this system. We therefore employed multivariate analyses to determine the factors influencing phytoplankton community structure. Salinity and suspended particulate matter were important factors in determining phytoplankton distribution, particularly during the wet season. We also show that phytoplankton community structure is probably influenced by the concentrations of mercury species (inorganic mercury and methyl mercury in both the particulate and dissolved phases) and of tri-, di, and mono-butyl tin species found in this system. Freshwater phytoplankton community composition was associated with dissolved methyl mercury and particulate inorganic mercury concentrations during the wet season, whereas, during the dry season, dissolved methyl mercury and particulate butyl tin species were important factors for the discrimination of the phytoplankton community structure. Phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling was also investigated during both

  15. Phytoplankton diversity and productivity in a highly turbid, tropical coastal system (Bach Dang Estuary, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Rochelle-Newall

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The factors controlling estuarine phytoplankton diversity and production are relatively well known in temperate systems. Less however is known about the factors affecting phytoplankton community distribution in tropical estuaries. This is surprising given the economic and ecological importance of these large, deltaic ecosystems, such as are found in South East Asia. Here we present the results from an investigation into the factors controlling phytoplankton distribution and phytoplankton-bacterial coupling in the Bach Dang Estuary, a sub-estuary of the Red River system, in Northern Vietnam. Phytoplankton diversity and primary and bacterial production, nutrients and metallic contaminants (mercury and organotin were measured during two seasons: wet (July 2008 and dry (March 2009. Phytoplankton community composition differed between the two seasons with only a 2% similarity between July and March. The large spatial extent and complexity of defining the freshwater sources meant that simple mixing diagrams could not be used in this system. We therefore employed multivariate analyses to determine the factors influencing phytoplankton community structure. Salinity and suspended particulate matter were important factors in determining phytoplankton distribution, particularly during the wet season. We also show that phytoplankton community structure is probably influenced by the concentrations of mercury species (inorganic mercury and methyl mercury in both the particulate and dissolved phases and of tri-, di, and mono-butyl tin species found in this system. Freshwater phytoplankton community composition was associated with dissolved methyl mercury and particulate inorganic mercury concentrations during the wet season, whereas, during the dry season, dissolved methyl mercury and particulate butyl tin species were important factors for the discrimination of the phytoplankton community structure. Phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling was also

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Phytoplankton Community in the Rivers of Jiangyin City%江阴地区主要河道浮游藻类群落特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓兰; 吕伟民; 卞金良; 张洁; 黄振荣; 郑科; 奚海明

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton assemblages were sampled in September, 2010, November, April and July, 2011 in main rivers of Jiangyin city of Taihu basin. 141 species / genera belonging to 7 phyla were identified. The results indicated higher species richness and standing crop of phytoplankton during summer and autumn than during winter and spring. The dominant algal group during winter and spring were centric diatom (Cyclotella meneghini-ana, Aulacoseira granulata) , Cryptophyta (Cryptomonas erosa) , Euglenophyta (Euglena spp. ) and Chlorophy-ta ( Chlamydomonas spp. and Oocystis spp. ). The community during summer and autumn was dominated by Cya-nobacteria (Oscillatoria princes, Planktothrix agardhii) and diatom (C. meneghiniana). The seasonal variation among north-south rivers (Xicheng river, Baiqugang river and Zhangjiagang river) was much severer than that a-mong east-west rivers (Yingtian river, Xiheng river and Dongheng river). It indicated that main rivers were in a, (3 - type moderate pollution by saprobic indicator.%2010年9月和2011年1月、4月、7月共4次对江阴6条主要河道的浮游藻类群落特征开展调查分析.共发现浮游藻类7门141属种,种类丰富度和现存量夏秋季高于秋冬季.优势种属呈季节性演替,即冬季梅尼小环藻(Cyclotella meneghiniana)、颗粒直链硅藻(Aulacoseira granulata)-春季梅尼小环藻、啮蚀隐藻(Cryptomonas erosa)、裸藻属(Euglena spp.)、衣藻属(Chlamydomonas spp.)、卵囊藻属(Oocystis spp.)-夏季巨颤藻(Oscillatoria princeps)、阿氏浮丝藻(Planktothrix agardhii)-秋季巨颤藻、阿氏浮丝藻、梅尼小环藻.南北向河道(锡澄运河、白屈港河和张家港河)的浮游藻类季节波动性大于东西向河道(应天河、东横河和西横河).通过指示生物法,调查河道处于α,β-中污染状态.

  17. 山西宁武亚高山湖群浮游植物群落结构特征%Characteristics of phytoplankton community structures in Ningwu subalpine lakes, Shanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊芳; 冯佳; 谢树莲; 王石会

    2012-01-01

    通过对山西宁武亚高山湖群浮游植物群落结构的调查研究,共鉴定出浮游植物291个种、变种及变型,隶属于8门,45科,108属.各采样站点间种数相差较大,以马营海种类最多,干海最少.硅藻门、绿藻门和蓝藻门明显占优势,优势科、优势属和优势种也都较为明显.优势种有蓝藻门的细小隐球藻(Aphanocapsa elachista)、铜绿微囊藻(Microcystis aeruginisa)和小席藻(Phormidium tenue),硅藻门的库津小环藻(Cyclotella kuetzingii)、肘状脆杆藻(Fragilaria ulna)、尖针杆藻(Synedra acus),绿藻门的狭形纤维藻(Ankistrodesmus angustus)和小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris).浮游植物平均密度为3.49 × 106cells/L.水面下0.5m处比水表层的细胞密度高.综合4种生物多样性指数,宁武亚高山湖群水质总体为轻污染.%The phytoplankton community structures in Ningwu subalpine lakes have been studied and 291 taxa, belonging to 8 divisions, 45 families and 108 genera, have been identified. The species numbers of each sampling station are quite different. The most abundant species are occurred in Lake Mayinghai, and the least in Lake Ganhai. Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta and Cyanophy-ta dominate the area, in addition, dominant families, dominant genera and dominant species are also relatively clear. There are 8 dominant species and they are Aphanocapsa elachista, Micrvcystis aeruginosa, Phormidium tenue, Cyclotella kuelxingii, Fragilaria ulna, Synedra acus, Ankistrodesmus angustus and Chlorella vulgaris. The average phytoplankton cell density is 3.49 x 106cells/L in the lakes. The cell density in 0.5 m depth was higher than that on the surface. The initially assessment by four biodiversity indexes is that the water quality in Ningwu subalpine lakes is light-polluted.

  18. Studies on phytoplankton with reference to dinoflagellates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, R.K.

    in different regions 52 3.4. Discussion 54 Chapter 4 Micro-phytoplankton community structure at Mormugao and Visakhapatnam ports 4A.1. Introduction 58 4A.2. Materials and methods 60 4A.2.1. Study areas 60 4A.2...P��� QDQRSODQNWRQ� ��-��� ȝP�� DQG� SLFRSODQNWRQ� ����-�� ȝP�� �7DEOH� ����� Diatoms (Class Bacillariophyta) occur in all 3 size classes whereas dinoflagellates (Class Dinophyta) are represented in the micro- and nanoplankton groups (Jeffrey and Hallegraeff 1990...

  19. Phytoplankton Monitoring Network - Phytoplankton Analysis with Associated Collection Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A qualitative collection of data that includes salinity, temperature, phytoplankton counts and abundance ratios obtained from surface tows in the estuarine and...

  20. PhytoSFDM version 1.0.0: Phytoplankton Size and Functional Diversity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Smith, S. Lan; Merico, Agostino

    2016-11-01

    Biodiversity is one of the key mechanisms that facilitate the adaptive response of planktonic communities to a fluctuating environment. How to allow for such a flexible response in marine ecosystem models is, however, not entirely clear. One particular way is to resolve the natural complexity of phytoplankton communities by explicitly incorporating a large number of species or plankton functional types. Alternatively, models of aggregate community properties focus on macroecological quantities such as total biomass, mean trait, and trait variance (or functional trait diversity), thus reducing the observed natural complexity to a few mathematical expressions. We developed the PhytoSFDM modelling tool, which can resolve species discretely and can capture aggregate community properties. The tool also provides a set of methods for treating diversity under realistic oceanographic settings. This model is coded in Python and is distributed as open-source software. PhytoSFDM is implemented in a zero-dimensional physical scheme and can be applied to any location of the global ocean. We show that aggregate community models reduce computational complexity while preserving relevant macroecological features of phytoplankton communities. Compared to species-explicit models, aggregate models are more manageable in terms of number of equations and have faster computational times. Further developments of this tool should address the caveats associated with the assumptions of aggregate community models and about implementations into spatially resolved physical settings (one-dimensional and three-dimensional). With PhytoSFDM we embrace the idea of promoting open-source software and encourage scientists to build on this modelling tool to further improve our understanding of the role that biodiversity plays in shaping marine ecosystems.

  1. 三峡水库洪水调度对香溪河藻类群落结构的影响%Effects of flood regulation on phytoplankton community structure in the Xiangxi River, a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭成荣; 陈磊; 毕永红; 夏春香; 类咏梅; 杨毅; 简铁柱; 胡征宇

    2014-01-01

    Flood control is an important function for Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR). In July 2013 there was 3 flood peaks in TGR and flood regulation was used to block the deluge and reduce the impact on the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River. Anin situ investigation was conducted to screen the effects of flood regulation on phytoplankton community structure in the Xiangxi River. During the course of flood regulation, the water level in Xiangxi River ranged from 145.63m to 148.36m, the change of the average velocity in the estuary was higher than that in the midstream. There was a significant difference in average velocity between the estuary and midstream (P<0.05). Before the flood regulation, the dominant algal taxa were cyanophyta and bacillariophyta, cyanophyta had a higher proportion in both sampling sites. During the flood regulation period, hydrodynamic characteristics and algal community structure were significantly changed, Shannon-Weaver index decreased. After the flood regulation, diatoms were dominant in the midstream, while the proportion of cyanophyta increased gradually in the estuary. The flood regulation changed the environmental conditions. Hydrological and hydrodynamic characteristics in backwater caused by flooding regulation has been changed markedly, which influenced water quality of tributaries; consequently, followed by rapid changes in phytoplankton community. Results indicated the fluctuation of water level caused by flood regulation destroyed the habitat of algae strongly, and then leads to the changes of community structure. It could be deduced that such flood regulation would be helpful to inhibit and delay the formation of algal bloom in the tributaries of Three Gorges Reservoir.%以三峡大坝汛期洪水调度为契机,于2013年7月在香溪河开展原位监测,研究了洪水调度对藻类群落结构的影响.结果显示:在洪水调度期间香溪河水位变动范围是145.63~148.36m,河流中上游平均流速变化幅度

  2. 新疆阿克达拉水库浮游植物群落生态特征%Ecological characteristics of phytoplankton community of Akedala Reservoir in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴惠仙; 王琼; 蔡桢; 朱新英; 李周永; 薛俊增

    2011-01-01

    Akedala Reservoir locates in Altay Prefecture, Xinjiang. The water of the reservoir is supplemented from Ulungur River and Ulungur Lake. The reservoir is an important water resource for fishers. Phytoplankton community structure was investigated and analyzed to explain the ecological characters of Akedala Reservoir in July 2008, October 2008 and May 2009. A total of 101 phytoplankton species, belonging to 8 phylums was identified. There are 40 species of diatom, 38 species of green algae, 7 species of blue green algae, 6 species of euglenids, 4 species of yellow green algae, 3 species of chrysophyceae, 2 species of cryptomonads, 1 species of fire algae. Green algae and diatoms are dominance in the species composition. Phytoplankton species composition in different periods shows significant differences(P<0.01): the wet season's(57 species) > the normal-water season's(42 species) > the dry season's(31 species). Anabaena oscillarioides, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Ankistrodemus angustus, Ankistrodesmus acicularis, Chlorella vulgaris as well as Tribonema. Sp are the dominant species. Cell density for different categories of phytoplankton is significantly difference (P < 0. 01): Xanthophyta has the largest cell density, followed by Cyanophyta and Chlorophyta. The cell density in different periods is also significant difference (F =49. 58, P<0.001): the normal-water season's[ (7. 89 ±1.48) ×106ind/L] > the wet season's( (5.17 ±0. 59) × 106 ind/L] > the dry season's[ (0.49 ±0.09)× 106 ind/L]. Moreover.the phytoplankton composition, cell density and diversity are closely related to the water temperature and the water level of Akedala Reservoir.%为了解其水生生物生态现状,于2008年7月(平水期)、10月(枯水期)和次年5月(丰水期)对阿克达拉水库内浮游植物群落生态特征进行了研究.共采集到浮游植物8门101种,其中硅藻40种、绿藻38种、蓝藻7种、裸藻6种、黄藻4种、金藻3种、隐藻2种和甲藻1

  3. The plankton community on Sukkertop and Fylla Banks off West Greenland during a spring bloom and post-bloom period: Hydrography, phytoplankton and protozooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Reuss, N.

    2002-01-01

    The plankton community structure was investigated on Sukkertop and Fylla Banks off West Greenland during the spring bloom in May 2000 and the post-bloom period in June 1999. In May a small change in density, clearly illustrated by the profile of potential energy, was sufficient to support a spring...

  4. Temporal and spatial fluctuations of phytoplankton in a tropical coastal lagoon, southeast Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melo, S; Bozelli, RL; Esteves, FA

    2007-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community in the tropical coastal Imboassica lagoon, an environment naturally isolated from the ocean by a narrow sandbar, was analysed every two...

  5. Temporal variability of phytoplankton in a salt wedge estuary, the Swan-Canning Estuary, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Peter A.

    2001-09-01

    The temporal cycles of variation in salinity, temperature and river flow in the Swan-Canning Estuary plus rainfall in the vicinity are examined. A normal pattern is defined for rainfall and river flow based on long-term median monthly values from available historical data. Long-term monthly median rainfall and median monthly river flow were highly correlated. Deviations from the normal patterns of rainfall and river flow are documented. Three years of detailed data on the temporal distribution of the algal biomass and phytoplankton community composition from the Swan-Canning Estuary are presented and discussed. Significant interannual variability in the phytoplankton biomass was observed with 1996 having a significantly lower median chlorophyll a concentration than 1995 or 1997. Different years also had pronounced differences in the timing, persistence and occurrence of algal blooms. Links with, and between, rainfall, river flow, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton biomass are made by careful examination of the temporal patterns. Deviations from the proposed normal temporal pattern of physical and chemical environmental factors relevant to the growth of phytoplankton biomass are assessed. Deviations from normal rainfall and river flow, depending upon their timing and intensity, appear to be associated with occurrence of algal blooms. For example, the lack of a dinoflagellate bloom in December 1996 or January 1997 appears to be associated with a wetter than normal spring. Based upon the observed data, published reports and basic principles of algal ecology a set of predicted responses to variation in the major environmental variables (rainfall and river flow) are tabulated. The tabulated predictions are proposed as a useful tool for resource managers.

  6. Phytoplankton community structure at the juncture of the Agulhas return front and subtropical front in the Indian Ocean sector of Southern Ocean: Bottom-up and top-down control

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, R.K.; George, J.V.; Soares, M.A.; Devi, A.; Anilkumar, N.; Roy, R.; Bhaskar, P.V.; Murukesh, N.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    The juncture of the Agulhas Return Front (ARF) and Subtropical Front (STF) in the Indian Ocean sector of Southern Ocean (SO) is characterized by high mesoscale turbulence, which results in sporadic, short lived phytoplankton proliferation The biota...

  7. Bacterial survival governed by organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasternas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g. sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis involved in the transference of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here we show cell survival of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean to be determined by phytoplankton extracellular carbon release (PER. PER represents the fraction of primary production released as dissolved organic carbon, and changes in the PER variability was explained by phytoplankton cell death, with the communities experiencing the highest phytoplankton cell mortality showing a larger proportion of extracellular carbon release. Both PER and the percent of dead phytoplankton cells increased from eutrophic to oligotrophic waters, while heterotrophic bacteria communities, including 60 to 95% of living cells (%LC, increased from the productive to the most oligotrophic waters. The percentage of living heterotrophic bacterial cells increased with increasing phytoplankton extracellular carbon release, across oligotrophic to productive waters in the NE Atlantic, where lower PER have resulted in a decrease in the flux of phytoplankton DOC per bacterial cell. The results highlight phytoplankton cell death as a process influencing the flow of dissolved photosynthetic carbon in the NE Atlantic Ocean, and demonstrated a close coupling between the fraction of primary production released and heterotrophic bacteria survival.

  8. Impact of wastewater on phytoplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswar, M.J.R.

    A number of studies on phytoplankton were conducted by National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India at Thane Creek, Maharashtra, India, Ulhas River estuary, Versova Creek and Mahim Creek under Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (COMAPS...

  9. Phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing dynamics across vertical environmental gradients determined by transplant in situ dilution experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Andrés; Selph, Karen E; Landry, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    The Costa Rica Dome (CRD) represents a classic case of the bloom-forming capacity of small phytoplankton. Unlike other upwelling systems, autotrophic biomass in the CRD is dominated by picocyanobacteria and small eukaryotes that outcompete larger diatoms and reach extremely high biomass levels. We investigated responses of the subsurface phytoplankton community of the CRD to changes associated with vertical displacement of water masses, coupling in situ transplanted dilution experiments with flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy to assess group-specific dynamics. Growth rates of Synechococcus (SYN) and photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PEUK) were positively correlated with light (Rpearson_SYN = 0.602 and Rpearson_PEUK = 0.588, P chemistry, light also plays a significant role in controlling microphytoplankton populations in the CRD.

  10. Identifying Phytoplankton Classes In California Reservoirs Using HPLC Pigment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S.; Peacock, M. B.; Kudela, R. M.; Negrey, K.

    2014-12-01

    Few bodies of water are routinely monitored for phytoplankton composition due to monetary and time constraints, especially the less accessible bodies of water in central and southern California. These lakes and estuaries are important for economic reasons such as tourism and fishing. This project investigated the composition of phytoplankton present using pigment analysis to identify dominant phytoplankton groups. A total of 28 different sites with a wide range of salinity (0 - 60) in central and southern California were examined. These included 13 different bodies of water in central California: 6 in the Sierras, 7 in the San Francisco Bay Estuary, and 15 from southern California. The samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the pigments present (using retention time and the spectral thumbprint). Diagnostic pigments were used to indicate the phytoplankton class composition, focusing on diatoms, dinoflagellates, cryptophytes, and cyanobacteria - all key phytoplankton groups indicative of the health of the sampled reservoir. Our results indicated that cyanobacteria dominated four of the seven bodies of central California water (Mono Lake, Bridgeport Reservoir, Steamboat Slough, and Pinto Lake); cryptophytes and nannoflagellates dominated two of the central California bodies of water (Mare Island Strait and Topaz Lake); and diatoms and dinoflagellates dominated one central California body of water, Oakland Inner Harbor, comprising more than 70% of the phytoplankton present. We expect the bodies of water from Southern California to be as disparate. Though this data is only a snapshot, it has significant implications in comparing different ecosystems across California, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight into the composition of phytoplankton communities.

  11. Phosphorus physiological ecology and molecular mechanisms in marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Senjie; Litaker, Richard Wayne; Sunda, William G

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for marine phytoplankton and indeed all life forms. Current data show that P availability is growth-limiting in certain marine systems and can impact algal species composition. Available P occurs in marine waters as dissolved inorganic phosphate (primarily orthophosphate [Pi]) or as a myriad of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) compounds. Despite numerous studies on P physiology and ecology and increasing research on genomics in marine phytoplankton, there have been few attempts to synthesize information from these different disciplines. This paper is aimed to integrate the physiological and molecular information on the acquisition, utilization, and storage of P in marine phytoplankton and the strategies used by these organisms to acclimate and adapt to variations in P availability. Where applicable, we attempt to identify gaps in our current knowledge that warrant further research and examine possible metabolic pathways that might occur in phytoplankton from well-studied bacterial models. Physical and chemical limitations governing cellular P uptake are explored along with physiological and molecular mechanisms to adapt and acclimate to temporally and spatially varying P nutrient regimes. Topics covered include cellular Pi uptake and feedback regulation of uptake systems, enzymatic utilization of DOP, P acquisition by phagotrophy, P-limitation of phytoplankton growth in oceanic and coastal waters, and the role of P-limitation in regulating cell size and toxin levels in phytoplankton. Finally, we examine the role of P and other nutrients in the transition of phytoplankton communities from early succession species (diatoms) to late succession ones (e.g., dinoflagellates and haptophytes).

  12. Distribution of phytoplankton in a lowland river, Germany, in relation to environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Naicheng; Schmalz, Britta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In comparison to lentic systems, the species composition and community structure of phytoplankton in lotic habitats are still poorly understood. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton community in a German lowland river- the Kielstau catchment, and the relationships with environmental variables. Among the 125 taxa observed, Desmodesmus communis, Pediastrum duplex and Discostella steligera were dominant species at lentic sites while Tabellaria fl...

  13. 仿刺参养殖池塘中浮游和底栖藻类群落的变化%Variation in Phytoplankton and Benthic Alga Communities in Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Culture Ponds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冉; 迟爽; 程敬伟; 曾勇; 赵振军; 马家好; 崔龙波

    2013-01-01

    Composition ,density ,biomass ,Shannon-Weiner index ,Pielou’s evenness index ,Margalef’s richness index and McNaugton dominance index of the phytoplankton and benthic alga communities were determined in six 5000 ~ 6000 m2 ponds with depth of 1 .8 ~ 2 .0 m for sea cucumber A postichopus j aponicus culture in coastal Laizihou ,Shandong Province from October ,2011 to September ,2012 .A total of 40 species in 7 phyla of phytoplankon were found ,with the predominant Bacillariophyta ,and 18 benthic alga species in Bacillariophyta .The density was ranged from 7 .810 × 105 to 249 .662 × 105 cell/L ,with biomass of 1 .65~12 .07 mg/L in the phytoplankon and from 4 .124 × 105 to 14 .289 × 105 cell/cm2 ,with biomass of 2 .60~11 .27 mg/cm2 ,in the benthic algae in the ponds .There were Shannon-Weiner index of 2 .09~2 .93 in the phytoplankon and 1 .67~2 .73 in the benthic algae ,and Pielou’s evenness index of 0 .56~0 .78 in the phytoplankon and 0 .48~0 .73 in the benthic algae .The phytoplankon showed Margalef’s richness index from 1 .74 to 2 .42 and the benthic algae from 1 .41 to 1 .83 .The predominant phytoplankton species were found to be changed with time ,but almost no changes were observed in the predominant benthic algae in the year . There were very significant positive correlation between the density of phytoplankton and that of benthic algae in the ponds ,indicating that the species diversity in phytoplankton and benthic algae community is rich and the ecological environment is good in the culture ponds .%2011年10月至2012年9月对山东省莱州市仿刺参养殖区的6口面积为5000~6000 m2,水深1.8~2.0 m的养殖池塘中的浮游和底栖藻类进行了调查,分析其群落的组成、密度、生物量、Shannon-Weiner多样性指数、Pielou均匀度指数、Margalef丰富度指数和McNaugton优势度指数。研究结果表明,仿刺参池塘中共鉴定出浮游藻类7门40种,主要由硅藻组成;底栖藻类18种,均

  14. Corporate social responsibility along pipelines: communities and corporations working together

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Edison D.R.; Lopes, Luciano E.; Danciguer, Lucilene; Macarini, Samuel; Souza, Maira de [Grupo de Aplicacao Interdisciplinar a Aprendizagem (GAIA), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we present GAIA's findings in three corporate social responsibility projects along pipelines owned by three Brazilian companies in gas, oil and mining sectors. The projects had as the main goal to improve the relationship with communities in the companies' direct influence areas. Clearly, the relationship with communities along pipelines is essential to prevent and reduce industrial hazards. The damage in pipelines due to agriculture, buildings, intentional perforations and traffic of heavy vehicles may cause fatal accidents, environmental and material losses. Such accidents have negative consequences with regard to economy, image and relationship with communities and environmental agencies. From communities' perspective, pipelines deteriorate their life quality due to risk of industrial hazards nearby their houses. The lack of proper information about the pipelines remarkably increases insecurity feelings and discourses against the companies among community leaders. The methodology developed by GAIA comprises companies' and communities' interests and encompasses nine stages. 1. Socio-environmental appraisal or inventory, mapping main risks, communities' needs and their leaders. 2. Communication plan, defining strategies, languages and communication vehicles for each stakeholder group. 3. Inter-institutional meetings to include other institutions in the program. 4. Launching seminar in partnership with local authorities, divulging companies' actions in the cities with pipelines. 5. Multiplier agents formation, enabling teachers, local leaders and government representatives to disseminate correct information about the pipelines such as their functioning, hazard prevention, maintenance actions, and restrictions of activities over the pipelines. 6. Formation on project management, enabling teachers, local leaders and government representatives to elaborate, fund raise and manage socio environmental projects aimed at

  15. Phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing in the subtropical Northeast Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cáceres

    Full Text Available Dilution experiments were performed to estimate phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates during two Lagrangian surveys in inner and eastern locations of the Eastern North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre province (NAST-E. Our design included two phytoplankton size fractions (0.2-5 µm and >5 µm and five depths, allowing us to characterize differences in growth and grazing rates between size fractions and depths, as well as to estimate vertically integrated measurements. Phytoplankton growth rates were high (0.11-1.60 d(-1, especially in the case of the large fraction. Grazing rates were also high (0.15-1.29 d(-1, suggesting high turnover rates within the phytoplankton community. The integrated balances between phytoplankton growth and grazing losses were close to zero, although deviations were detected at several depths. Also, O2 supersaturation was observed up to 110 m depth during both Lagrangian surveys. These results add up to increased evidence indicating an autotrophic metabolic balance in oceanic subtropical gyres.

  16. Principal response curves: analysis of time-dependent multivariate responses of biological community to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a novel multivariate method is proposed for the analysis of community response data from designed experiments repeatedly sampled in time. The long-term effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos on the invertebrate community and the dissolved oxygen (DO)–pH–alkalinity–conductivity syndrom

  17. Short-term photoacclimation effects on photoinhibition of phytoplankton in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Garcon, Veronique; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    We assessed whether short-term photoacclimation responses of natural phytoplankton populations in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) were affecting protection from photodamage as cells are mixed up to the surface from depth. To this end, we measured phytoplankton fluorescence characteristics and

  18. Short-term photoacclimation effects on photoinhibition of phytoplankton in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, A.C.; Garcon, V.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Arrigo, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed whether short-term photoacclimation responses of natural phytoplankton populations in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) were affecting protection from photodamage as cells are mixed up to the surface from depth. To this end, we measured phytoplankton fluorescence characteristics and

  19. Short-term photoacclimation effects on photoinhibition of phytoplankton in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Garcon, Veronique; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed whether short-term photoacclimation responses of natural phytoplankton populations in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) were affecting protection from photodamage as cells are mixed up to the surface from depth. To this end, we measured phytoplankton fluorescence characteristics and the

  20. 2009年秋季长江安徽-江苏段浮游植物群落的种类组成与空间特征%Species Composition and Spatial Characteristics of the Phytoplankton Community in the Anhui-Jiangsu Reach of Yangtze River in Autumn, 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟顺龙; 陈家长; 胡庚东; 吴伟; 瞿建宏; 范立民; 裘丽萍

    2011-01-01

    and Mcnaughton dominance index, and the spatial distribution characteristic of phytoplankton was analyzed according to the clustering analytical method simultaneously. The results showed that there were 5 classes, including 27 species of phytoplankton had been recorded in the Anhui-Jiangsu reach of Yangtze river in autumn. Among them,Bacillariophyta was the predominant species, which had 16 species, accounted for 59.3% of the total species.Chlorophyta was recorded 6 species, accounted for 22.2%. Cyanophyta, Cryptophyta and Euglenophyta were recorded 2, 2, 1 species each and accounted for 7.4%, 7.4%, 3.7% respectively. The predominant species of phytoplankton in the Anhui-Jiangsu reach of Yangtze river in autumn were Fragilaria crotonensis, Melosira italica, Navicula cryptocephala, Cyclotella and Chroomonas acuta. The phytoplankton abundance in the Anhui-Jiangsu reach of Yangtze river in autumn ranged from 5.68× 104 cells/L to 7.08× 104 cells/L, with the average of 6.01 × l04 cells/L, and the phytoplankton biomass ranged from 30.43 μg/L to 34.73 μg/L, with the average of 32.46 μg/L. The number of phytoplankton species decreased and the phytoplankton abundance and biomass increased compared with the results of previous studies, which meant that the water quality in the jiangsu reach of Yangtze river had deteriorated. However, Bacillariophyta was still the main predominant species and the phytoplankton community structure had not changed significantly compared with the results of previous studies, which meant that the water quality in the Jiangsu reach of Yangtze river had not deteriorated seriously. The results of similarity clustering of phytoplankton community indicated that the phytoplankton community at Nanjing, Wuhu and Jiangyin were similar and the phytoplankton community at tongling was similar to that at anqing.

  1. Microbial community response during the iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thiele, S.; Fuchs, B.M.; Ramaiah, N.; Amanna, R.

    was enhanced within the fertilized area, a succession - like response of the microbial community upon the algal bloom was averted by highly effective grazing. Only small-celled members like the SAR11 and SAR86 clades could possibly escape the grazing pressure...

  2. Facilitating Student Engagement: Social Responsibility and Freshmen Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Lindsey N.; MacCartney, Danielle; Miller, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Human rights education is advanced as a method for promoting social responsibility, with an emphasis on promoting ideals of "global citizenship" among undergraduate students. At the same time, the practice of learning communities is widespread on college campuses for retaining freshmen and promoting student success. However, there is…

  3. Assessing the role of dust deposition on phytoplankton ecophysiology and succession in a low-nutrient low-chlorophyll ecosystem: a mesocosm experiment in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Giovagnetti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the phytoplankton community response, with emphasis on ecophysiology and succession, after two experimental additions of Saharan dust in the surface layer of a low-nutrient low-chlorophyll ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea. Three mesocosms were amended with evapocondensed dust to simulate realistic Saharan dust events while three additional mesocosms were kept unamended and served as controls. Experiments consisted in two consecutive dust additions and samples were daily collected at different depths (−0.1, −5 and −10 m during one week, starting before each addition occurred. Data concerning HPLC pigment analysis on two size classes (< 3 and > 3 µm, electron transport rate (ETR versus irradiance curves, non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ and phytoplankton cell abundance (measured by flow cytometry, are presented and discussed in this paper. Results show that picophytoplankton mainly respond to the first dust addition, while the second addition leads to an increase of both pico- and nano-/microphytoplankton. Ecophysiological changes in the phytoplankton community are revealed, and an increase in NPQ development, as well as in pigment concentration per cell, follows the dust additions. ETR does not show large variations between dust-amended and control conditions, while biomass increases in response to the dust additions. Furthermore, the biomass increase observed during this mesocosm experiment allows us to attempt a quantitative assessment and parameterization of the onset of a phytoplankton bloom in a nutrient-limited ecosystem.

    These results are discussed focusing on the adaptation of picophytoplankton to such a nutrient-limited mixed layer system, as well as on size-dependent competition ability in phytoplankton.

  4. Assessing the role of dust deposition on phytoplankton ecophysiology and succession in a low-nutrient low-chlorophyll ecosystem: a mesocosm experiment in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnetti, V.; Brunet, C.; Conversano, F.; Tramontano, F.; Obernosterer, I.; Ridame, C.; Guieu, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the phytoplankton community response, with emphasis on ecophysiology and succession, after two experimental additions of Saharan dust in the surface layer of a low-nutrient low-chlorophyll ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea. Three mesocosms were amended with evapocondensed dust to simulate realistic Saharan dust events while three additional mesocosms were kept unamended and served as controls. Experiments consisted in two consecutive dust additions and samples were daily collected at different depths (-0.1, -5 and -10 m) during one week, starting before each addition occurred. Data concerning HPLC pigment analysis on two size classes ( 3 µm), electron transport rate (ETR) versus irradiance curves, non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ) and phytoplankton cell abundance (measured by flow cytometry), are presented and discussed in this paper. Results show that picophytoplankton mainly respond to the first dust addition, while the second addition leads to an increase of both pico- and nano-/microphytoplankton. Ecophysiological changes in the phytoplankton community are revealed, and an increase in NPQ development, as well as in pigment concentration per cell, follows the dust additions. ETR does not show large variations between dust-amended and control conditions, while biomass increases in response to the dust additions. Furthermore, the biomass increase observed during this mesocosm experiment allows us to attempt a quantitative assessment and parameterization of the onset of a phytoplankton bloom in a nutrient-limited ecosystem. These results are discussed focusing on the adaptation of picophytoplankton to such a nutrient-limited mixed layer system, as well as on size-dependent competition ability in phytoplankton.

  5. Sensitivity of winter phytoplankton communities from Andean lakes to artificial ultraviolet-B radiation Sensibilidad de comunidades fitoplanctónicas invernales de lagos andinos a la radiación ultravioleta-B artificial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. WALTER HELBLING

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available During July of 1999 sampling was carried out in five Andean lakes to determine the sensitivity of winter phytoplankton communities to ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm. The studied lakes, Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi, Gutiérrez, and Morenito, located in the Patagonia region (41° S, 71° W, 800 m of altitude, had attenuation coefficients for UV-B that ranged from 0.36 m-1 (Lake Moreno to 2.8 m-1 (Lake Morenito. The samples were inoculated with labeled carbon (NaH14CO3 and incubated in an illuminated chamber (UV-B = 0.35 W m-2, UV-A [320-400 nm] = 1.1 W m-2, and PAR [400-700 nm] = 10.8 W m-2 at 10 °C. The phytoplankton cells were exposed to UV radiation (280-400 nm + PAR (quartz tubes, and to UV-A + PAR (quartz tubes covered with Mylar-D. The total duration of the experiments was 4 h and two samples were taken from each treatment every hour. In lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi and Gutiérrez, the photosynthetic inhibition increased linearly with UV-B doses, while in Lake Morenito just a slight relationship was observed. After receiving a dose of 1.25 kJ m-2 (UV-B, phytoplankton from Lake Morenito had the highest cumulative photosynthetic inhibition (44 %, whereas in Lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi and Gutiérrez the inhibition was of 22, 11, 5, and 1 %, respectively. However, at the end of incubation period and after receiving doses of 5 kJ m-2, the most inhibited phytoplankton cells were from Lake Moreno (70 % and the most resistant (27 % was that from Lake Gutiérrez. The kinetics of inhibition was different in each lake, and transparent lakes, with higher proportion of large cells, had higher inhibition rates. The results suggest that an increase in UV-B radiation (e.g., produced by a decrease in stratospheric ozone would have a greater impact on microplankton from clear lakes, while pico- and nanoplankton from less transparent lakes will be less affectedDurante julio de 1999 se realizaron muestreos en cinco lagos

  6. Diversity of Phytoplankton of a sub-tropical reservoir of Mizoram, northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar Sharma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton of Khawiva reservoir of Mizoram, northeast India (NEI revealed a total of 55 species; nearly concurrent mean monthly richness and high community similarities (vide Sørensen index during two years affirmed homogeneity in its species composition. Phytoplankton comprised dominant component (61.1±14.3% of net plankton and recorded wider density variations. Chlorophyta influenced phytoplankton abundance with quantitative importance of Staurastrum spp. >Xanthidium spp. >Cosmarium spp. in particular. Bacillariophyta formed subdominant group; Cryptophyta and Cyanophyta showed limited importance; and Euglenophyta and Dinophyta recorded poor densities. Phytoplankton is characterized by moderate species diversity, high evenness and low dominance but with wide variations. Richness, abundance and species diversity followed no definite patterns of monthly variations during two years. Insignificant influence of individual abiotic factors on phytoplankton assemblages coupled with low cumulative influence of fifteen abiotic parameters (vide CCA yielded little insight on overall role of abiotic parameters.

  7. Modeling the influence from ocean transport, mixing and grazing on phytoplankton diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjou, Mohamed; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Richardson, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton diversity, whether defined on the basis of functional groups or on the basis of numbers of individual species, is known to be heterogeneous throughout the global ocean. The factors regulating this diversity are generally poorly understood, although access to limiting nutrients...... and light is known to influence distributions for certain groups of phytoplankton. Here, we develop a simple box model of biomasses and a limiting nutrient to describe the composition of phytoplankton communities in the euphotic zone. In addition to analyzing the relative importance of nutrient availability...... in generating and maintaining diversity, we apply the model to quantify the potential role of zooplankton grazing and ocean transport for the coexistence of competing species and phytoplankton diversity. We analyze the sensitivity of phytoplankton biomass distributions to different types of grazing functional...

  8. Phytoplankton dynamics in contrasting early stage North Atlantic spring blooms: composition, succession, and potential drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniels, C.J.; Poulton, A. J.; Esposito, M.;

    2015-01-01

    The spring bloom is a key annual event in the phenology of pelagic ecosystems, making a major contribution to the oceanic biological carbon pump through the production and export of organic carbon. However, there is little consensus as to the main drivers of spring bloom formation, exacerbated...... by a lack of in situ observations of the phytoplankton community composition and its evolution during this critical period. We investigated the dynamics of the phytoplankton community structure at two contrasting sites in the Iceland and Norwegian Basins during the early stage (25 March–25 April...... a biomass. The ICB phytoplankton composition appeared primarily driven by the physicochemical environment, with periodic events of increased mixing restricting further increases in biomass. In contrast, the NWB phytoplankton community was potentially limited by physicochemical and/or biological factors...

  9. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeala eShaked

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically-bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as spectrum rather than an absolute all or nothing. We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe compounds and environments, and for gauging the contribution of various Fe substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  10. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO(2) drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute "all or nothing." We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  11. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-02-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  12. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  13. Responses of riparian reptile communities to damming and urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephanie D.; Guzy, Jacquelyn C.; Price, Steven J.; Halstead, Brian J.; Eskew, Evan A.; Dorcas, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Various anthropogenic pressures, including habitat loss, threaten reptile populations worldwide. Riparian zones are critical habitat for many reptile species, but these habitats are also frequently modified by anthropogenic activities. Our study investigated the effects of two riparian habitat modifications-damming and urbanization-on overall and species-specific repti