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  1. Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Quantify the Impact of Human Age and Interindividual Differences in Physiology and Biochemistry Pertinent to Risk Final Report for Cooperative Agreement. This report describes and demonstrates techniques necessary to extrapolate and incorporate in vitro derived metabolic rate constants in PBPK models. It also includes two case study examples designed to demonstrate the applicability of such data for health risk assessment and addresses the quantification, extrapolation and interpretation of advanced biochemical information on human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism for risk assessment application. It comprises five chapters; topics and results covered in the first four chapters have been published in the peer reviewed scientific literature. Topics covered include: Data Quality ObjectivesExperimental FrameworkRequired DataTwo example case studies that develop and incorporate in vitro metabolic rate constants in PBPK models designed to quantify human interindividual variability to better direct the choice of uncertainty factors for health risk assessment. This report is intended to serve as a reference document for risk assors to use when quantifying, extrapolating, and interpretating advanced biochemical information about human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism.

  2. Dose selection based on physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Mayawala, Kapil; Poulin, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are built using differential equations to describe the physiology/anatomy of different biological systems. Readily available in vitro and in vivo preclinical data can be incorporated into these models to not only estimate pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. They provide a mechanistic framework to understand and extrapolate PK and dose across in vitro and in vivo systems and across different species, populations and disease states. Using small molecule and large molecule examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilised for human PK and dose prediction. Such approaches have the potential to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however some limitations need to be addressed to realise its application and utility more broadly.

  3. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide : relevance of extrahepatic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A.M.; Wormhoudt, L.W.; Sherratt, P.J.; Hayes, J.D.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new

  4. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK Toolkit for Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ruiz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK models can be used to determine the internal dose and strengthen exposure assessment. Many PBPK models are available, but they are not easily accessible for field use. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR has conducted translational research to develop a human PBPK model toolkit by recoding published PBPK models. This toolkit, when fully developed, will provide a platform that consists of a series of priority PBPK models of environmental pollutants. Presented here is work on recoded PBPK models for volatile organic compounds (VOCs and metals. Good agreement was generally obtained between the original and the recoded models. This toolkit will be available for ATSDR scientists and public health assessors to perform simulations of exposures from contaminated environmental media at sites of concern and to help interpret biomonitoring data. It can be used as screening tools that can provide useful information for the protection of the public.

  5. Evaluation of the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) modeling of drugs.

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    Munir, Anum; Azam, Shumaila; Fazal, Sahar; Bhatti, A I

    2018-08-14

    The Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a supporting tool in drug discovery and improvement. Simulations produced by these models help to save time and aids in examining the effects of different variables on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. For this purpose, Sheila and Peters suggested a PBPK model capable of performing simulations to study a given drug absorption. There is a need to extend this model to the whole body entailing all another process like distribution, metabolism, and elimination, besides absorption. The aim of this scientific study is to hypothesize a WB-PBPK model through integrating absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination processes with the existing PBPK model.Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination models are designed, integrated with PBPK model and validated. For validation purposes, clinical records of few drugs are collected from the literature. The developed WB-PBPK model is affirmed by comparing the simulations produced by the model against the searched clinical data. . It is proposed that the WB-PBPK model may be used in pharmaceutical industries to create of the pharmacokinetic profiles of drug candidates for better outcomes, as it is advance PBPK model and creates comprehensive PK profiles for drug ADME in concentration-time plots. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Life-Stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation discusses methods used to extrapolate from in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) toxicity data for an endocrine pathway to in vivo for early life stages in humans, and the use of a life stage PBPK model to address rapidly changing physiological parameters. Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), in this case endocrine disruption during development, provide a biologically-based framework for linking molecular initiating events triggered by chemical exposures to key events leading to adverse outcomes. The application of AOPs to human health risk assessment requires extrapolation of in vitro HTS toxicity data to in vivo exposures (IVIVE) in humans, which can be achieved through the use of a PBPK/PD model. Exposure scenarios for chemicals in the PBPK/PD model will consider both placental and lactational transfer of chemicals, with a focus on age dependent dosimetry during fetal development and after birth for a nursing infant. This talk proposes a universal life-stage computational model that incorporates changing physiological parameters to link environmental exposures to in vitro levels of HTS assays related to a developmental toxicological AOP for vascular disruption. In vitro toxicity endpoints discussed are based on two mechanisms: 1) Fetal vascular disruption, and 2) Neurodevelopmental toxicity induced by altering thyroid hormone levels in neonates via inhibition of thyroperoxidase in the thyroid gland. Application of our Life-stage computati

  7. Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies. This report summarizes some of the recent progress in characterizing uncertainty and variability in physi...

  8. Evaluation of three physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling tools for emergency risk assessment after acute dichloromethane exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerleider, R. Z.; Olie, J. D N; van Eijkeren, J. C H; Bos, P. M J; Hof, B. G H; de Vries, I.; Bessems, J. G M; Meulenbelt, J.; Hunault, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models may be useful in emergency risk assessment, after acute exposure to chemicals, such as dichloromethane (DCM). We evaluated the applicability of three PBPK models for human risk assessment following a single exposure to DCM: one model

  9. Coupled in silico platform: Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulović, Aleksandra; Šušteršič, Tijana; Cvijić, Sandra; Ibrić, Svetlana; Filipović, Nenad

    2018-02-15

    One of the critical components of the respiratory drug delivery is the manner in which the inhaled aerosol is deposited in respiratory tract compartments. Depending on formulation properties, device characteristics and breathing pattern, only a certain fraction of the dose will reach the target site in the lungs, while the rest of the drug will deposit in the inhalation device or in the mouth-throat region. The aim of this study was to link the Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling in order to predict aerolisolization of different dry powder formulations, and estimate concomitant in vivo deposition and absorption of amiloride hydrochloride. Drug physicochemical properties were experimentally determined and used as inputs for the CFD simulations of particle flow in the generated 3D geometric model of Aerolizer® dry powder inhaler (DPI). CFD simulations were used to simulate air flow through Aerolizer® inhaler and Discrete Phase Method (DPM) was used to simulate aerosol particles deposition within the fluid domain. The simulated values for the percent emitted dose were comparable to the values obtained using Andersen cascade impactor (ACI). However, CFD predictions indicated that aerosolized DPI have smaller particle size and narrower size distribution than assumed based on ACI measurements. Comparison with the literature in vivo data revealed that the constructed drug-specific PBPK model was able to capture amiloride absorption pattern following oral and inhalation administration. The PBPK simulation results, based on the CFD generated particle distribution data as input, illustrated the influence of formulation properties on the expected drug plasma concentration profiles. The model also predicted the influence of potential changes in physiological parameters on the extent of inhaled amiloride absorption. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of the combined CFD-PBPK approach to model inhaled drug

  10. The use of in vitro metabolic parameters and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to explore the risk assessment of trichloroethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, E.M.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Freidig, A.P.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2002-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed for trichloroethylene (1,1,2-trichloroethene, TRI) for rat and humans, based on in vitro metabolic parameters. These were obtained using individual cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase enzymes. The main enzymes involved

  11. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model for multiple exposure routes for soman in multiple species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeney, R.E.; Langenberg, J.P.; Maxwell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model has been developed in advanced computer simulation language (ACSL) to describe blood and tissue concentration-time profiles of the C(±)P(-) stereoisomers of soman after inhalation, subcutaneous and intravenous exposures at low (0.8-1.0 × LD50),

  12. An alternate metabolic hypothesis for a binary mixture of trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride: application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon tetrachloride (CC4) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are hepatotoxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and environmental contaminants. Previous physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describe the kinetics ofindividual chemical disposition and metabolic clearance fo...

  13. A first-generation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of alpha-tocopherol in human influenza vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Alpha (α)-tocopherol is a component of a new generation of squalene-containing oil-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion adjuvants that have been licensed for use in certain influenza vaccines. Since regulatory pharmacokinetic studies are not routinely required for influenza vaccines, the in vivo fate of this vaccine constituent is largely unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for emulsified α-tocopherol in human adults and infants. An independent sheep PBPK model was also developed to inform the local preferential lymphatic transfer and for the purpose of model evaluation. The PBPK model predicts that α-tocopherol will be removed from the injection site within 24h and rapidly transfer predominantly into draining lymph nodes. A much lower concentration of α-tocopherol was estimated to peak in plasma within 8h. Any systemically absorbed α-tocopherol was predicted to accumulate slowly in adipose tissue, but not in other tissues. Model evaluation and uncertainty analyses indicated acceptable fit, with the fraction of dose taken up into the lymphatics as most influential on plasma concentration. In summary, this study estimates the in vivo fate of α-tocopherol in adjuvanted influenza vaccine, may be relevant in explaining its immunodynamics in humans, and informs current regulatory risk-benefit analyses. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling for dietary risk assessment of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachler, Gerald; von Goetz, Natalie; Hungerbuhler, Konrad

    2015-05-01

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2) can be found in a large number of foods and consumer products, such as cosmetics and toothpaste, thus, consumer exposure occurs via multiple sources, possibly involving different exposure routes. In order to determine the disposition of nano-TiO2 particles that are taken up, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed. High priority was placed on limiting the number of parameters to match the number of underlying data points (hence to avoid overparameterization), but still reflecting available mechanistic information on the toxicokinetics of nano-TiO2. To this end, the biodistribution of nano-TiO2 was modeled based on their ability to cross the capillary wall of the organs and to be phagocytosed in the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). The model's predictive power was evaluated by comparing simulated organ levels to experimentally assessed organ levels of independent in vivo studies. The results of our PBPK model indicate that: (1) within the application domain of the PBPK model from 15 to 150 nm, the size and crystalline structure of the particles had a minor influence on the biodistribution; and (2) at high internal exposure the particles agglomerate in vivo and are subsequently taken up by macrophages in the MPS. Furthermore, we also give an example on how the PBPK model may be used for risk assessment. For this purpose, the daily dietary intake of nano-TiO2 was calculated for the German population. The PBPK model was then used to convert this chronic external exposure into internal titanium levels for each organ.

  15. Bayesian Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK Approach for a Physiologically Realistic Characterization of Interindividual Variability in Clinically Relevant Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krauss

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in anatomical and physiological properties results in significant differences in drug pharmacokinetics. The consideration of such pharmacokinetic variability supports optimal drug efficacy and safety for each single individual, e.g. by identification of individual-specific dosings. One clear objective in clinical drug development is therefore a thorough characterization of the physiological sources of interindividual variability. In this work, we present a Bayesian population physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK approach for the mechanistically and physiologically realistic identification of interindividual variability. The consideration of a generic and highly detailed mechanistic PBPK model structure enables the integration of large amounts of prior physiological knowledge, which is then updated with new experimental data in a Bayesian framework. A covariate model integrates known relationships of physiological parameters to age, gender and body height. We further provide a framework for estimation of the a posteriori parameter dependency structure at the population level. The approach is demonstrated considering a cohort of healthy individuals and theophylline as an application example. The variability and co-variability of physiological parameters are specified within the population; respectively. Significant correlations are identified between population parameters and are applied for individual- and population-specific visual predictive checks of the pharmacokinetic behavior, which leads to improved results compared to present population approaches. In the future, the integration of a generic PBPK model into an hierarchical approach allows for extrapolations to other populations or drugs, while the Bayesian paradigm allows for an iterative application of the approach and thereby a continuous updating of physiological knowledge with new data. This will facilitate decision making e.g. from preclinical to

  16. Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.

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    Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.Evans, M.V., Sawyer, M.E., Isaacs, K.K, and Wambaugh, J.With the development of efficient high-throughput (HT) in ...

  17. USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY.CR Eklund, MV Evans, and JE Simmons. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD,PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC. Chloroform (CHCl3) is a disinfec...

  18. Life-Stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model Applications to Screen Environmental Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation discusses methods used to extrapolate from in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) toxicity data for an endocrine pathway to in vivo for early life stages in humans, and the use of a life stage PBPK model to address rapidly changing physiological parameters. A...

  19. Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model for the Thyroid Hormones in the Pregnant Rat and Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A developmental PBPK model is constructed to quantitatively describe the tissue economy of the thyroid hormones (THs), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), in the rat. The model is also used to link maternal (THs) to rat fetal tissues via placental transfer. THs are importan...

  20. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat for pediatric and adult patients and its application for dose specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moj, Daniel; Britz, Hannah; Burhenne, Jürgen; Stewart, Clinton F; Egerer, Gerlinde; Haefeli, Walter E; Lehr, Thorsten

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at recommending pediatric dosages of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat and potentially more effective adult dosing regimens than the approved standard dosing regimen of 400 mg/day, using a comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) modeling approach. A PBPK/PD model for vorinostat was developed for predictions in adults and children. It includes the maturation of relevant metabolizing enzymes. The PBPK model was expanded by (1) effect compartments to describe vorinostat concentration-time profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (2) an indirect response model to predict the HDAC inhibition, and (3) a thrombocyte model to predict the dose-limiting thrombocytopenia. Parameterization of drug and system-specific processes was based on published and unpublished in silico, in vivo, and in vitro data. The PBPK modeling software used was PK-Sim and MoBi. The PBPK/PD model suggests dosages of 80 and 230 mg/m 2 for children of 0-1 and 1-17 years of age, respectively. In comparison with the approved standard treatment, in silico trials reveal 11 dosing regimens (9 oral, and 2 intravenous infusion rates) increasing the HDAC inhibition by an average of 31%, prolonging the HDAC inhibition by 181%, while only decreasing the circulating thrombocytes to a tolerable 53%. The most promising dosing regimen prolongs the HDAC inhibition by 509%. Thoroughly developed PBPK models enable dosage recommendations in pediatric patients and integrated PBPK/PD models, considering PD biomarkers (e.g., HDAC activity and platelet count), are well suited to guide future efficacy trials by identifying dosing regimens potentially superior to standard dosing regimens.

  1. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  2. Mechanistic Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model of the Heart Accounting for Inter-Individual Variability: Development and Performance Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylutki, Zofia; Mendyk, Aleksander; Polak, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    Modern model-based approaches to cardiac safety and efficacy assessment require accurate drug concentration-effect relationship establishment. Thus, knowledge of the active concentration of drugs in heart tissue is desirable along with inter-subject variability influence estimation. To that end, we developed a mechanistic physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of the heart. The models were described with literature-derived parameters and written in R, v.3.4.0. Five parameters were estimated. The model was fitted to amitriptyline and nortriptyline concentrations after an intravenous infusion of amitriptyline. The cardiac model consisted of 5 compartments representing the pericardial fluid, heart extracellular water, and epicardial intracellular, midmyocardial intracellular, and endocardial intracellular fluids. Drug cardiac metabolism, passive diffusion, active efflux, and uptake were included in the model as mechanisms involved in the drug disposition within the heart. The model accounted for inter-individual variability. The estimates of optimized parameters were within physiological ranges. The model performance was verified by simulating 5 clinical studies of amitriptyline intravenous infusion, and the simulated pharmacokinetic profiles agreed with clinical data. The results support the model feasibility. The proposed structure can be tested with the goal of improving the patient-specific model-based cardiac safety assessment and offers a framework for predicting cardiac concentrations of various xenobiotics. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproductive performance in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) may be affected by organohalogen contaminants as shown by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Birkved, Morten; Letcher, Robert J; Bossi, Rossana; Vorkamp, Katrin; Born, Erik W; Petersen, Gitte

    2009-12-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feed mainly on ringed seal (Phoca hispida) and consume large quantities of blubber and consequently have one of the highest tissue concentrations of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) worldwide. In East Greenland, studies of OHC time trends and organ system health effects, including reproductive, were conducted during 1990-2006. However, it has been difficult to determine the nature of the effects induced by OHC exposures on wild caught polar bears using body burden data and associated changes in reproductive organs and systems. We therefore conducted a risk quotient (RQ) evaluation to more quantitatively evaluate the effect risk on reproduction (embryotoxicity and teratogenicity) based on the critical body residue (CBR) concept and using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. We applied modelling approaches to PCBs, p,p'-DDE, dieldrin, oxychlordane, HCHs, HCB, PBDEs and PFOS in East Greenland polar bears based on known OHC pharmacokinetics and dynamics in laboratory rats (Rattus rattus). The results showed that subcutaneous adipose tissue concentrations of dieldrin (range: 79-1271 ng g(-1) lw) and PCBs (range: 4128-53,923 ng g(-1) lw) reported in bears in the year 1990 were in the range to elicit possible adverse health effects on reproduction in polar bears in East Greenland (all RQs > or = 1). Similar results were found for PCBs (range: 1928-17,376 ng g(-1) lw) and PFOS (range: 104-2840 ng g(-1) ww) in the year 2000 and for dieldrin (range: 43-640 ng g(-1) lw), PCBs (range: 3491-13,243 ng g(-1) lw) and PFOS (range: 1332-6160 ng g(-1) ww) in the year 2006. The concentrations of oxychlordane, DDTs, HCB and HCHs in polar bears resulted in RQspolar bears correlated to OHC exposure are supported by the present study. This study also indicates that PBPK models may be a supportive tool in the evaluation of possible OHC-mediated health effects for Arctic wildlife.

  4. Associations of Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) with Lower Birth Weight: An Evaluation of Potential Confounding by Glomerular Filtration Rate Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model (PBPK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Marc-André; Loccisano, Anne E; Morken, Nils-Halvdan; Yoon, Miyoung; Wu, Huali; McDougall, Robin; Maisonet, Mildred; Marcus, Michele; Kishi, Reiko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Chen, Mei-Huei; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J; Longnecker, Matthew P

    2015-12-01

    Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) has been associated with lower birth weight in epidemiologic studies. This association could be attributable to glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which is related to PFAS concentration and birth weight. We used a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of pregnancy to assess how much of the PFAS-birth weight association observed in epidemiologic studies might be attributable to GFR. We modified a PBPK model to reflect the association of GFR with birth weight (estimated from three studies of GFR and birth weight) and used it to simulate PFAS concentrations in maternal and cord plasma. The model was run 250,000 times, with variation in parameters, to simulate a population. Simulated data were analyzed to evaluate the association between PFAS levels and birth weight due to GFR. We compared simulated estimates with those from a meta-analysis of epidemiologic data. The reduction in birth weight for each 1-ng/mL increase in simulated cord plasma for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was 2.72 g (95% CI: -3.40, -2.04), and for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was 7.13 g (95% CI: -8.46, -5.80); results based on maternal plasma at term were similar. Results were sensitive to variations in PFAS level distributions and the strength of the GFR-birth weight association. In comparison, our meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies suggested that each 1-ng/mL increase in prenatal PFOS and PFOA levels was associated with 5.00 g (95% CI: -21.66, -7.78) and 14.72 g (95% CI: -8.92, -1.09) reductions in birth weight, respectively. Results of our simulations suggest that a substantial proportion of the association between prenatal PFAS and birth weight may be attributable to confounding by GFR and that confounding by GFR may be more important in studies with sample collection later in pregnancy.

  5. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Therapeutic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Harvey; Chow, Timothy W

    2017-09-01

    Biologics or therapeutic proteins are becoming increasingly important as treatments for disease. The most common class of biologics are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Recently, there has been an increase in the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in the pharmaceutical industry in drug development. We review PBPK models for therapeutic proteins with an emphasis on mAbs. Due to their size and similarity to endogenous antibodies, there are distinct differences between PBPK models for small molecules and mAbs. The high-level organization of a typical mAb PBPK model consists of a whole-body PBPK model with organ compartments interconnected by both blood and lymph flows. The whole-body PBPK model is coupled with tissue-level submodels used to describe key mechanisms governing mAb disposition including tissue efflux via the lymphatic system, elimination by catabolism, protection from catabolism binding to the neonatal Fc (FcRn) receptor, and nonlinear binding to specific pharmacological targets of interest. The use of PBPK modeling in the development of therapeutic proteins is still in its infancy. Further application of PBPK modeling for therapeutic proteins will help to define its developing role in drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Providing a Theoretical Basis for Nanotoxicity Risk Analysis Departing from Traditional Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    studies has left many unanswered questions, including one posed by Riviere and Tran in their article on pharmacokinetics of nanomaterials which asks...layer of thick mucus . Particles smaller than 10 m can reach the gas exchange surfaces (alveoli), where Brownian motion leads to deposition [8]. Very...breast milk are other possible means of secreting toxicants [34], but are 10 not included in this dissertation. 2.1.2 Organs of Concern. 2.1.2.1

  7. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  8. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic(PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide : relevance of extrahepatic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A M; Wormhoudt, L.W.; Sherratt, P.J.; Hayes, D.J.; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P; van Bladeren, P.J.

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new

  9. Challenges Associated With Applying Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for Public Health Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in chemical toxicology have grown steadily since their emergence in the 1980s. However, critical evaluation of PBPK models to support public health decision-making across federal agencies has t...

  10. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Terbinafine in Rats and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Yeganeh, Mahboubeh; McLachlan, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model capable of describing and predicting terbinafine concentrations in plasma and tissues in rats and humans. A PB-PK model consisting of 12 tissue and 2 blood compartments was developed using concentration-time data for tissues from rats (n = 33) after intravenous bolus administration of terbinafine (6 mg/kg of body weight). It was assumed that all tissues except skin and testis tissues were well-stirred compartments with perfusion rate limitations. The uptake of terbinafine into skin and testis tissues was described by a PB-PK model which incorporates a membrane permeability rate limitation. The concentration-time data for terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were predicted by use of a scaled-up PB-PK model, which took oral absorption into consideration. The predictions obtained from the global PB-PK model for the concentration-time profile of terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were in close agreement with the observed concentration data for rats. The scaled-up PB-PK model provided an excellent prediction of published terbinafine concentration-time data obtained after the administration of single and multiple oral doses in humans. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) obtained from the PB-PK model agreed with the reported value of 11 liters/kg. The apparent volume of distribution of terbinafine in skin and adipose tissues accounted for 41 and 52%, respectively, of the Vss for humans, indicating that uptake into and redistribution from these tissues dominate the pharmacokinetic profile of terbinafine. The PB-PK model developed in this study was capable of accurately predicting the plasma and tissue terbinafine concentrations in both rats and humans and provides insight into the physiological factors that determine terbinafine disposition. PMID:12069977

  11. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  12. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulke, Christopher M.; Chang, Daniel T.; Brooks, Raina D.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Phillips, Martin B.; Hypes, Ethan D.; Fair, Matthew J.; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Johnson, Jeffre; Dary, Curtis C.; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be a great resource for the construction of models pertaining to new chemicals. A PBPK knowledgebase was compiled and developed from existing PBPK-related articles and used to develop new models. From 2,039 PBPK-related articles published between 1977 and 2013, 307 unique chemicals were identified for use as the basis of our knowledgebase. Keywords related to species, gender, developmental stages, and organs were analyzed from the articles within the PBPK knowledgebase. A correlation matrix of the 307 chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase was calculated based on pharmacokinetic-relevant molecular descriptors. Chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase were ranked based on their correlation toward ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Next, multiple chemicals were selected to represent exact matches, close analogues, or non-analogues of the target case study chemicals. Parameters, equations, or experimental data relevant to existing models for these chemicals and their analogues were used to construct new models, and model predictions were compared to observed values. This compiled knowledgebase provides a chemical structure-based approach for identifying PBPK models relevant to other chemical entities. Using suitable correlation metrics, we demonstrated that models of chemical analogues in the PBPK knowledgebase can guide the construction of PBPK models for other chemicals. PMID:26871706

  13. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic knowledgebase and web-based interface for rapid model ranking and querying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific pa...

  14. Availability of Acute and/or Subacute Toxicokinetic Data for Select Compounds for the Rat and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models for Rats and Humans for Those Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-04

    DMA, and total As in urine Mouse: radioactivity in feces, liver, kidneys, lungs, and carcass (DMA), DMA in urine; after arsenate dose...radioactivity in urine, feces, liver, kidneys, lungs, skin, carcass and blood and AsV, AsIII, MMA and DMA excreted in urine; after arsenite dose, AsV, AsIII...Pharmacokinetic parameter values were taken from a variety of sources, including animal studies (e.g., oral absorption rate), in vitro kinetic

  15. Reproductive performance in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) may be affected by organohalogen contaminants as shown by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F.

    2009-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feed mainly on ringed seal (Phoca hispida) and consume large quantities of blubber and consequently have one of the highest tissue concentrations of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) worldwide. In East Greenland, studies of OHC time trends and organ system health...... effects, including reproductive, were conducted during 1990–2006. However, it has been difficult to determine the nature of the effects induced by OHC exposures on wild caught polar bears using body burden data and associated changes in reproductive organs and systems. We therefore conducted a risk......, oxychlordane, HCHs, HCB, PBDEs and PFOS in East Greenland polar bears based on known OHC pharmacokinetics and dynamics in laboratory rats (Rattus rattus). The results showed that subcutaneous adipose tissue concentrations of dieldrin (range: 79–1271 ng g−1 lw) and PCBs (range: 4128–53 923 ng g−1 lw) reported...

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Methodology, Applications, and Limitations with a Focus on Its Role in Pediatric Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was introduced years ago, but it has not been practiced significantly. However, interest in and implementation of this modeling technique have grown, as evidenced by the increased number of publications in this field. This paper demonstrates briefly the methodology, applications, and limitations of PBPK modeling with special attention given to discuss the use of PBPK models in pediatric drug development and some examples described in detail. Although PBPK models do have some limitations, the potential benefit from PBPK modeling technique is huge. PBPK models can be applied to investigate drug pharmacokinetics under different physiological and pathological conditions or in different age groups, to support decision-making during drug discovery, to provide, perhaps most important, data that can save time and resources, especially in early drug development phases and in pediatric clinical trials, and potentially to help clinical trials become more “confirmatory” rather than “exploratory”.

  17. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiz Mumtaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures.

  18. Integration of Genome Scale Metabolic Networks and Gene Regulation of Metabolic Enzymes With Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Elaina M; Leoncikas, Vytautas; Fisher, Ciarán P; Moore, J Bernadette; Plant, Nick J; Kierzek, Andrzej M

    2017-11-01

    The scope of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can be expanded by assimilation of the mechanistic models of intracellular processes from systems biology field. The genome scale metabolic networks (GSMNs) represent a whole set of metabolic enzymes expressed in human tissues. Dynamic models of the gene regulation of key drug metabolism enzymes are available. Here, we introduce GSMNs and review ongoing work on integration of PBPK, GSMNs, and metabolic gene regulation. We demonstrate example models. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Absorption Modeling for Osmotic Pump Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhanglin; Talattof, Arjang; Fan, Jianghong; Tsakalozou, Eleftheria; Sharan, Satish; Sun, Dajun; Wen, Hong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2017-07-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and absorption modeling approaches were employed for oral extended-release (ER) drug products based on an osmotic drug delivery system (osmotic pumps). The purpose was to systemically evaluate the in vivo relevance of in vitro dissolution for this type of formulation. As expected, in vitro dissolution appeared to be generally predictive of in vivo PK profiles, because of the unique feature of this delivery system that the in vitro and in vivo release of osmotic pump drug products is less susceptible to surrounding environment in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as pH, hydrodynamic, and food effects. The present study considered BCS (Biopharmaceutics Classification System) class 1, 2, and 3 drug products with half-lives ranging from 2 to greater than 24 h. In some cases, the colonic absorption models needed to be adjusted to account for absorption in the colon. C max (maximum plasma concentration) and AUCt (area under the concentration curve) of the studied drug products were sensitive to changes in colon permeability and segmental GI transit times in a drug product-dependent manner. While improvement of the methodology is still warranted for more precise prediction (e.g., colonic absorption and dynamic movement in the GI tract), the results from the present study further emphasized the advantage of using PBPK modeling in addressing product-specific questions arising from regulatory review and drug development.

  20. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Yuko; Matsuyama, Wakoto; Wada, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Junko; Chan, Melissa Pui Ling; Nakayama, Aki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses

  1. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics model for estimating urinary excretion of short half-life nuclides in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Konishi, E.; Kusama, T.; Aoki, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The biokinetic model in ICRP 53 is used for calculating absorbed dose to each organ of a patient in nuclear medicine. The ICRP model is a simple compartment model based on human data; however, the model cannot produce the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals under various physiological conditions. On the other hand, a physiologically based pharmacokinetics model (PBPK model) can describe the flow of radiopharmaceuticals as a compartment model for any physiological conditions theoretically. The PBPK model was applied especially for the kidney-bladder dynamics, and similar results obtained compared with the ICRP model. This suggests the possibility of the PBPK model for predicting the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals under various physiological conditions. (Author)

  2. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  3. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d 6 -BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d 6 -BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d 6 -BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in adult humans. • Serum concentrations of aglycone BPA are available for model calibration. • Model predicted peak BPA serum levels for adult humans were in the range of pM. • Model predicted 95% of human variability fell within an order of magnitude.

  4. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: xiaoxia.yang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Teeguarden, Justin G. [Health Effects and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d{sub 6}-BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d{sub 6}-BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d{sub 6}-BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in adult humans. • Serum concentrations of aglycone BPA are available for model calibration. • Model predicted peak BPA serum levels for adult humans were in the range of pM. • Model predicted 95% of human variability fell within an order of magnitude.

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling using microsoft excel and visual basic for applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Dale J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical descriptions depicting the relationship between external exposure and internal dose. These models have found great utility for interspecies extrapolation. However, specialized computer software packages, which are not widely distributed, have typically been used for model development and utilization. A few physiological models have been reported using more widely available software packages (e.g., Microsoft Excel), but these tend to include less complex processes and dose metrics. To ascertain the capability of Microsoft Excel and Visual Basis for Applications (VBA) for PBPK modeling, models for styrene, vinyl chloride, and methylene chloride were coded in Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), Excel, and VBA, and simulation results were compared. For styrene, differences between ACSL and Excel or VBA compartment concentrations and rates of change were less than +/-7.5E-10 using the same numerical integration technique and time step. Differences using VBA fixed step or ACSL Gear's methods were generally Excel and VBA PBPK model dose metrics differed by no more than -0.013% or -0.23%, respectively, from ACSL results. These differences are likely attributable to different step sizes rather than different numerical integration techniques. These results indicate that Microsoft Excel and VBA can be useful tools for utilizing PBPK models, and given the availability of these software programs, it is hoped that this effort will help facilitate the use and investigation of PBPK modeling.

  6. Characterizing uncertainty and population variability in the toxicokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in mice, rats, and humans using an updated database, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, and Bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Okino, Miles S.; Evans, Marina V.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a comprehensive, Bayesian, PBPK model-based analysis of the population toxicokinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites in mice, rats, and humans, considering a wider range of physiological, chemical, in vitro, and in vivo data than any previously published analysis of TCE. The toxicokinetics of the 'population average,' its population variability, and their uncertainties are characterized in an approach that strives to be maximally transparent and objective. Estimates of experimental variability and uncertainty were also included in this analysis. The experimental database was expanded to include virtually all available in vivo toxicokinetic data, which permitted, in rats and humans, the specification of separate datasets for model calibration and evaluation. The total combination of these approaches and PBPK analysis provides substantial support for the model predictions. In addition, we feel confident that the approach employed also yields an accurate characterization of the uncertainty in metabolic pathways for which available data were sparse or relatively indirect, such as GSH conjugation and respiratory tract metabolism. Key conclusions from the model predictions include the following: (1) as expected, TCE is substantially metabolized, primarily by oxidation at doses below saturation; (2) GSH conjugation and subsequent bioactivation in humans appear to be 10- to 100-fold greater than previously estimated; and (3) mice had the greatest rate of respiratory tract oxidative metabolism as compared to rats and humans. In a situation such as TCE in which there is large database of studies coupled with complex toxicokinetics, the Bayesian approach provides a systematic method of simultaneously estimating model parameters and characterizing their uncertainty and variability. However, care needs to be taken in its implementation to ensure biological consistency, transparency, and objectivity.

  7. Prediction of a Therapeutic Dose for Buagafuran, a Potent Anxiolytic Agent by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling Starting from Pharmacokinetics in Rats and Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK/pharmacodynamic (PD models can contribute to animal-to-human extrapolation and therapeutic dose predictions. Buagafuran is a novel anxiolytic agent and phase I clinical trials of buagafuran have been completed. In this paper, a potentially effective dose for buagafuran of 30 mg t.i.d. in human was estimated based on the human brain concentration predicted by a PBPK/PD modeling. The software GastroPlusTM was used to build the PBPK/PD model for buagafuran in rat which related the brain tissue concentrations of buagafuran and the times of animals entering the open arms in the pharmacological model of elevated plus-maze. Buagafuran concentrations in human plasma were fitted and brain tissue concentrations were predicted by using a human PBPK model in which the predicted plasma profiles were in good agreement with observations. The results provided supportive data for the rational use of buagafuran in clinic.

  8. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers.

  9. Prediction of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Monoclonal Antibody, Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic FcRn Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Li, Linzhong; Rose, Rachel; Machavaram, Krishna; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Gardner, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Although advantages of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) are now well established, PBPK models that are linked to pharmacodynamic (PD) models to predict pharmacokinetics (PK), PD, and efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in humans are uncommon. The aim of this study was to develop a PD model that could be linked to a physiologically based mechanistic FcRn model to predict PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. The mechanistic FcRn model for mAbs with target-mediated drug disposition within the Simcyp population-based simulator was used to simulate the pharmacokinetic profiles for three different single doses and two multiple doses of efalizumab administered to virtual Caucasian healthy volunteers. The elimination of efalizumab was modeled with both a target-mediated component (specific) and catabolism in the endosome (non-specific). This model accounted for the binding between neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and efalizumab (protective against elimination) and for changes in CD11a target concentration. An integrated response model was then developed to predict the changes in mean Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores that were measured in a clinical study as an efficacy marker for efalizumab treatment. PASI scores were approximated as continuous and following a first-order asymptotic progression model. The reported steady state asymptote (Y ss) and baseline score [Y (0)] was applied and parameter estimation was used to determine the half-life of progression (Tp) of psoriasis. Results suggested that simulations using this model were able to recover the changes in PASI scores (indicating efficacy) observed during clinical studies. Simulations of both single dose and multiple doses of efalizumab concentration-time profiles as well as suppression of CD11a concentrations recovered clinical data reasonably well. It can be concluded that the developed PBPK FcRn model linked to a PD model adequately predicted PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. PMID

  10. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  11. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models with Adverse Outcome Pathways and Environmental Exposure Models to Screen for Environmental Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolat...

  12. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inhalation of jet fuels in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sheppard A; Campbell, Jerry L; Tremblay, Raphael T; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic behavior of the majority of jet fuel constituents has not been previously described in the framework of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhalation exposure. Toxic effects have been reported in multiple organ systems, though exposure methods varied across studies, utilizing either vaporized or aerosolized fuels. The purpose of this work was to assess the pharmacokinetics of aerosolized and vaporized fuels, and develop a PBPK model capable of describing both types of exposures. To support model development, n-tetradecane and n-octane exposures were conducted at 89 mg/m(3) aerosol+vapor and 1000-5000 ppm vapor, respectively. Exposures to JP-8 and S-8 were conducted at ~900-1000 mg/m(3), and ~200 mg/m(3) to a 50:50 blend of both fuels. Sub-models were developed to assess the behavior of representative constituents and grouped unquantified constituents, termed "lumps", accounting for the remaining fuel mass. The sub-models were combined into the first PBPK model for petroleum and synthetic jet fuels. Inhalation of hydrocarbon vapors was described with simple gas-exchange assumptions for uptake and exhalation. For aerosol droplets systemic uptake occurred in the thoracic region. Visceral tissues were described using perfusion and diffusion-limited equations. The model described kinetics at multiple fuel concentrations, utilizing a chemical "lumping" strategy to estimate parameters for fractions of speciated and unspeciated hydrocarbons and gauge metabolic interactions. The model more accurately simulated aromatic and lower molecular weight (MW) n-alkanes than some higher MW chemicals. Metabolic interactions were more pronounced at high (~2700-1000 mg/m(3)) concentrations. This research represents the most detailed assessment of fuel pharmacokinetics to date.

  13. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, Harish; Adeshina, Femi; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available pharmacokinetic data. • The model can be used for extrapolating across routes, doses and exposure durations. • We illustrate how the model can be used for developing Provisional Advisory Levels

  14. Addressing Early Life Sensitivity Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Miyoung; Clewell, Harvey J

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can provide an effective way to utilize in vitro and in silico based information in modern risk assessment for children and other potentially sensitive populations. In this review, we describe the process of in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) to develop PBPK models for a chemical in different ages in order to predict the target tissue exposure at the age of concern in humans. We present our on-going studies on pyrethroids as a proof of concept to guide the readers through the IVIVE steps using the metabolism data collected either from age-specific liver donors or expressed enzymes in conjunction with enzyme ontogeny information to provide age-appropriate metabolism parameters in the PBPK model in the rat and human, respectively. The approach we present here is readily applicable to not just to other pyrethroids, but also to other environmental chemicals and drugs. Establishment of an in vitro and in silico-based evaluation strategy in conjunction with relevant exposure information in humans is of great importance in risk assessment for potentially vulnerable populations like early ages where the necessary information for decision making is limited.

  15. Characterization of the pharmacokinetics of gasoline using PBPK modeling with a complex mixtures chemical lumping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, James E; Andersen, Melvin E; Yang, Raymond S H

    2003-09-01

    Gasoline consists of a few toxicologically significant components and a large number of other hydrocarbons in a complex mixture. By using an integrated, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and lumping approach, we have developed a method for characterizing the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of gasoline in rats. The PBPK model tracks selected target components (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene [BTEX], and n-hexane) and a lumped chemical group representing all nontarget components, with competitive metabolic inhibition between all target compounds and the lumped chemical. PK data was acquired by performing gas uptake PK studies with male F344 rats in a closed chamber. Chamber air samples were analyzed every 10-20 min by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection and all nontarget chemicals were co-integrated. A four-compartment PBPK model with metabolic interactions was constructed using the BTEX, n-hexane, and lumped chemical data. Target chemical kinetic parameters were refined by studies with either the single chemical alone or with all five chemicals together. o-Xylene, at high concentrations, decreased alveolar ventilation, consistent with respiratory irritation. A six-chemical interaction model with the lumped chemical group was used to estimate lumped chemical partitioning and metabolic parameters for a winter blend of gasoline with methyl t-butyl ether and a summer blend without any oxygenate. Computer simulation results from this model matched well with experimental data from single chemical, five-chemical mixture, and the two blends of gasoline. The PBPK model analysis indicated that metabolism of individual components was inhibited up to 27% during the 6-h gas uptake experiments of gasoline exposures.

  16. Reconstructing Organophosphorus Pesticide Doses Using the Reversed Dosimetry Approach in a Simple Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrated the development of a simple pharmacokinetic (SPK model aiming to estimate the absorbed chlorpyrifos doses using urinary biomarker data, 3,5,6-trichlorpyridinol as the model input. The effectiveness of the SPK model in the pesticide risk assessment was evaluated by comparing dose estimates using different urinary composite data. The dose estimates resulting from the first morning voids appeared to be lower than but not significantly different to those using before bedtime, lunch or dinner voids. We found similar trend for dose estimates using three different urinary composite data. However, the dose estimates using the SPK model for individual children were significantly higher than those from the conventional physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling using aggregate environmental measurements of chlorpyrifos as the model inputs. The use of urinary data in the SPK model intuitively provided a plausible alternative to the conventional PBPK model in reconstructing the absorbed chlorpyrifos dose.

  17. A human life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for chlorpyrifos: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Hinderliter, Paul M; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, Michael J; Poet, Torka S

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to some chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to predict disposition of chlorpyrifos and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, previously measured age-dependent metabolism of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon were integrated into age-related descriptions of human anatomy and physiology. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ⩾0.6mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (100- to 1000-fold higher than environmental exposure levels), 6months old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent doses. At lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, simulations predict that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict chlorpyrifos disposition and biological response over various postnatal life stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A generic whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for therapeutic proteins in PK-Sim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederalt, Christoph; Kuepfer, Lars; Solodenko, Juri; Eissing, Thomas; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Block, Michael; Willmann, Stefan; Lippert, Jörg

    2018-04-01

    Proteins are an increasingly important class of drugs used as therapeutic as well as diagnostic agents. A generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in order to represent at whole body level the fundamental mechanisms driving the distribution and clearance of large molecules like therapeutic proteins. The model was built as an extension of the PK-Sim model for small molecules incorporating (i) the two-pore formalism for drug extravasation from blood plasma to interstitial space, (ii) lymph flow, (iii) endosomal clearance and (iv) protection from endosomal clearance by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) mediated recycling as especially relevant for antibodies. For model development and evaluation, PK data was used for compounds with a wide range of solute radii. The model supports the integration of knowledge gained during all development phases of therapeutic proteins, enables translation from pre-clinical species to human and allows predictions of tissue concentration profiles which are of relevance for the analysis of on-target pharmacodynamic effects as well as off-target toxicity. The current implementation of the model replaces the generic protein PBPK model available in PK-Sim since version 4.2 and becomes part of the Open Systems Pharmacology Suite.

  19. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite α-halocarboxymethylglutathione (αH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical-and species-specific parameters.

  20. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of vaginally administered dapivirine ring and film formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Katherine; Shah, Dhaval K; Rohan, Lisa; Bies, Robert

    2018-05-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of the vaginal space was developed with the aim of predicting concentrations in the vaginal and cervical space. These predictions can be used to optimize the probability of success of vaginally administered dapivirine (DPV) for HIV prevention. We focus on vaginal delivery using either a ring or film. A PBPK model describing the physiological structure of the vaginal tissue and fluid was defined mathematically and implemented in MATLAB. Literature reviews provided estimates for relevant physiological and physiochemical parameters. Drug concentration-time profiles were simulated in luminal fluids, vaginal tissue and plasma after administration of ring or film. Patient data were extracted from published clinical trials and used to test model predictions. The DPV ring simulations tested the two dosing regimens and predicted PK profiles and area under the curve of luminal fluids (29 079 and 33 067 mg h l -1 in groups A and B, respectively) and plasma (0.177 and 0.211 mg h l -1 ) closely matched those reported (within one standard deviation). While the DPV film study reported drug concentration at only one time point per patient, our simulated profiles pass through reported concentration range. HIV is a major public health issue and vaginal microbicides have the potential to provide a crucial, female-controlled option for protection. The PBPK model successfully simulated realistic representations of drug PK. It provides a reliable, inexpensive and accessible platform where potential effectiveness of new compounds and the robustness of treatment modalities for pre-exposure prophylaxis can be evaluated. © 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Identification of intestinal loss of a drug through physiologically based pharmacokinetic simulation of plasma concentration-time profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the role of the gut as a metabolizing organ, recognition of gut wall metabolism and/or other factors contributing to intestinal loss of a compound has been a challenging task due to the lack of well characterized methods to distinguish it from first-pass hepatic extraction. The implications of identifying intestinal loss of a compound in drug discovery and development can be enormous. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) simulations of pharmacokinetic profiles provide a simple, reliable and cost-effective way to understand the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic processes. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of PBPK simulations in bringing to light intestinal loss of orally administered drugs, using two example compounds: verapamil and an in-house compound that is no longer in development (referred to as compound A in this article). A generic PBPK model, built in-house using MATLAB software and incorporating absorption, metabolism, distribution, biliary and renal elimination models, was employed for simulation of concentration-time profiles. Modulation of intrinsic hepatic clearance and tissue distribution parameters in the generic PBPK model was done to achieve a good fit to the observed intravenous pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds studied. These optimized clearance and distribution parameters are expected to be invariant across different routes of administration, as long as the kinetics are linear, and were therefore employed to simulate the oral profiles of the compounds. For compounds with reasonably good solubility and permeability, an area under the concentration-time curve for the simulated oral profile that far exceeded the observed would indicate some kind of loss in the intestine. PBPK simulations applied to compound A showed substantial loss of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract in humans but not in rats. This accounted for the lower bioavailability of the

  2. Preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, Susan Ritger; Amin, Shantu G.; Anderson, Kim A.; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Sharma, Arun K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Williams, David E.; Corley, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants generated as byproducts of natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Despite significant public health concern, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling efforts for PAHs have so far been limited to naphthalene, plus simpler PK models for pyrene, nitropyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The dearth of published models is due in part to the high lipophilicity, low volatility, and myriad metabolic pathways for PAHs, all of which present analytical and experimental challenges. Our research efforts have focused upon experimental approaches and initial development of PBPK models for the prototypic PAH, B[a]P, and the more potent, albeit less studied transplacental carcinogen, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). For both compounds, model compartments included arterial and venous blood, flow limited lung, liver, richly perfused and poorly perfused tissues, diffusion limited fat, and a two compartment theoretical gut (for oral exposures). Hepatic and pulmonary metabolism was described for both compounds, as were fractional binding in blood and fecal clearance. Partition coefficients for parent PAH along with their diol and tetraol metabolites were estimated using published algorithms and verified experimentally for the hydroxylated metabolites. The preliminary PBPK models were able to describe many, but not all, of the available data sets, comprising multiple routes of exposure (oral, intravenous) and nominal doses spanning several orders of magnitude. Supported by Award Number P42 ES016465 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. -- Highlights: ► We present PBPK models for benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). ► B[a]P model accurately predicts data from multiple sources over a wide dose range. ► DBC model was based on the B[a]P model as less chemical specific data is available. ► DBC model accurately predicted preliminary

  3. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish, E-mail: harish.shankaran@pnnl.gov [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Adeshina, Femi [National Homeland Security Research Center, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Teeguarden, Justin G. [Systems Toxicology Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 < 1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90 ∼ 300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90 ∼ 20–40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90 ∼ 160–300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs. - Highlights: • We develop a Fentanyl PBPK model for relating external dose to internal levels. • We calibrate the model to oral and inhalation exposures using > 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available

  4. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  5. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaku, Tomoyuki, E-mail: takakut@sc.sumitomo-chem.co.jp; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Sogame, Yoshihisa

    2014-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U-{sup 14}C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up {sup 14}C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than K{sub m} (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments.

  6. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Tomoyuki; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Sogame, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U- 14 C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up 14 C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than K m (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments

  7. Proposed mechanistic description of dose-dependent BDE-47 urinary elimination in mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, Claude, E-mail: claude.emond@umontreal.ca [BioSimulation Consulting Inc., Newark, DE (United States); Departments of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medicine Faculty, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sanders, J. Michael, E-mail: sander10@mail.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wikoff, Daniele, E-mail: dwikoff@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Austin, TX (United States); Birnbaum, Linda S., E-mail: birnbaumls@niehs.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a wide variety of consumer applications as additive flame retardants. In North America, scientists have noted continuing increases in the levels of PBDE congeners measured in human serum. Some recent studies have found that PBDEs are associated with adverse health effects in humans, in experimental animals, and wildlife. This laboratory previously demonstrated that urinary elimination of 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is saturable at high doses in mice; however, this dose-dependent urinary elimination has not been observed in adult rats or immature mice. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to examine the mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in adult mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. To support this objective, additional laboratory data were collected to evaluate the predictions of the PBPK model using novel information from adult multi-drug resistance 1a/b knockout mice. Using the PBPK model, the roles of mouse major urinary protein (a blood protein carrier) and P-glycoprotein (an apical membrane transporter in proximal tubule cells in the kidneys, brain, intestines, and liver) were investigated in BDE-47 elimination. The resulting model and new data supported the major role of m-MUP in excretion of BDE-47 in the urine of adult mice, and a lesser role of P-gp as a transporter of BDE-47 in mice. This work expands the knowledge of BDE-47 kinetics between species and provides information for determining the relevancy of these data for human risk assessment purposes. - Highlights: • We report the first study on PBPK model on flame retardant in mice for BDE-47. • We examine mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in mice using a PBPK model. • We investigated roles of m-MUP and P-gp as transporters in urinary elimination.

  8. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Performance Assessment and Translation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models From acslX to Berkeley Madonna, MATLAB, and R Language: Oxytetracycline and Gold Nanoparticles As Case Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; He, Chunla; Jin, Shiqiang; Yang, Raymond S H; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-07-01

    Many physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for environmental chemicals, drugs, and nanomaterials have been developed to aid risk and safety assessments using acslX. However, acslX has been rendered sunset since November 2015. Alternative modeling tools and tutorials are needed for future PBPK applications. This forum article aimed to: (1) demonstrate the performance of 4 PBPK modeling software packages (acslX, Berkeley Madonna, MATLAB, and R language) tested using 2 existing models (oxytetracycline and gold nanoparticles); (2) provide a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion from acslX to Berkeley Madonna, MATLAB, and R language; (3) discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each software package in the implementation of PBPK models in toxicology, and (4) share our perspective about future direction in this field. Simulation results of plasma/tissue concentrations/amounts of oxytetracycline and gold from different models were compared visually and statistically with linear regression analyses. Simulation results from the original models were correlated well with results from the recoded models, with time-concentration/amount curves nearly superimposable and determination coefficients of 0.86-1.00. Step-by-step explanations of the recoding of the models in different software programs are provided in the Supplementary Data. In summary, this article presents a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion for a small molecule and a nanoparticle among 4 software packages, and a performance comparison of these software packages in PBPK model implementation. This tutorial helps beginners learn PBPK modeling, provides suggestions for selecting a suitable tool for future projects, and may lead to the transition from acslX to alternative modeling tools. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for ethylene oxide in mouse, rat, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, T R; Brown, C D

    2001-06-15

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is widely used as a gaseous sterilant and industrial intermediate and is a direct-acting mutagen and carcinogen. The objective of these studies was to develop physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) models for EO to describe the exposure-tissue dose relationship in rodents and humans. We previously reported results describing in vitro and in vivo kinetics of EO metabolism in male and female F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice. These studies were extended by determining the kinetics of EO metabolism in human liver cytosol and microsomes. The results indicate enzymatically catalyzed GSH conjugation via cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (cGST) and hydrolysis via microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) occur in both rodents and humans. The in vitro kinetic constants were scaled to account for cytosolic (cGST) and microsomal (mEH) protein content and incorporated into PB-PK descriptions for mouse, rat, and human. Flow-limited models adequately predicted blood and tissue EO levels, disposition, and elimination kinetics determined experimentally in rats and mice, with the exception of testis concentrations, which were overestimated. Incorporation of a diffusion-limited description for testis improved the ability of the model to describe testis concentrations. The model accounted for nonlinear increases in blood and tissue concentrations that occur in mice on exposure to EO concentrations greater than 200 ppm. Species differences are predicted in the metabolism and exposure-dose relationship, with a nonlinear relationship observed in the mouse as a result of GSH depletion. These models represent an essential step in developing a mechanistically based EO exposure-dose-response description for estimating human risk from exposure to EO. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min JS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jee Sun Min,1 Doyun Kim,1 Jung Bae Park,1 Hyunjin Heo,1 Soo Hyeon Bae,2 Jae Hong Seo,1 Euichaul Oh,1 Soo Kyung Bae1 1Integrated Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea Background: Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs is clinically important. Objective: To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenylethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino-2-propanol (M-1, in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods: The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results: The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol

  12. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  13. A Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Colistin and Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchene, Salim; Marchand, Sandrine; Couet, William; Friberg, Lena E; Gobin, Patrice; Lamarche, Isabelle; Grégoire, Nicolas; Björkman, Sven; Karlsson, Mats O

    2018-04-17

    Colistin is a polymyxin antibiotic used to treat patients infected with multidrug-resistant Gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). The objective of this work was to develop a whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) model to predict tissue distribution of colistin in rat. The distribution of a drug in a tissue is commonly characterized by its tissue-to-plasma partition coefficient, K p . Colistin and its prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) K p priors were measured experimentally from rat tissue homogenates or predicted in silico. The PK parameters of both compounds were estimated fitting in vivo their plasma concentration-time profiles from six rats receiving an i.v. bolus of CMS. The variability in the data was quantified by applying a non-linear mixed effect (NLME) modelling approach. A WB-PBPK model was developed assuming a well-stirred and perfusion-limited distribution in tissue compartments. Prior information on tissue distribution of colistin and CMS was investigated following three scenarios: K p were estimated using in silico K p priors (I) or K p were estimated using experimental K p priors (II) or K p were fixed to the experimental values (III). The WB-PBPK model best described colistun and CMS plasma concentration-time profiles in scenario II. Colistin predicted concentrations in kidneys in scenario II were higher than in other tissues, which was consistent with its large experimental K p prior. This might be explained by a high affinity of colistin for renal parenchyma and active reabsorption into the proximal tubular cells. In contrast, renal accumulation of colistin was not predicted in scenario I. Colistin and CMS clearance estimates were in agreement with published values. The developed model suggests using experimental priors over in silico K p priors for kidneys to provide a better prediction of colistin renal distribution. Such models might serve in drug development for interspecies scaling and investigating the impact of

  14. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic toolkit to evaluate environmental exposures: Applications of the dioxin model to study real life exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, Claude, E-mail: claude.emond@biosmc.com [BioSimulation Consulting Inc, Newark, DE (United States); Ruiz, Patricia; Mumtaz, Moiz [Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) are a series of mono- to octa-chlorinated homologous chemicals commonly referred to as polychlorinated dioxins. One of the most potent, well-known, and persistent member of this family is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). As part of translational research to make computerized models accessible to health risk assessors, we present a Berkeley Madonna recoded version of the human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the recent dioxin assessment. This model incorporates CYP1A2 induction, which is an important metabolic vector that drives dioxin distribution in the human body, and it uses a variable elimination half-life that is body burden dependent. To evaluate the model accuracy, the recoded model predictions were compared with those of the original published model. The simulations performed with the recoded model matched well with those of the original model. The recoded model was then applied to available data sets of real life exposure studies. The recoded model can describe acute and chronic exposures and can be useful for interpreting human biomonitoring data as part of an overall dioxin and/or dioxin-like compounds risk assessment. - Highlights: • The best available dioxin PBPK model for interpreting human biomonitoring data is presented. • The original PBPK model was recoded from acslX to the Berkeley Madonna (BM) platform. • Comparisons were made of the accuracy of the recoded model with the original model. • The model is a useful addition to the ATSDR's BM based PBPK toolkit that supports risk assessors. • The application of the model to real-life exposure data sets is illustrated.

  15. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of vitamin D ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    See attached 1. Please explain the nature of the study that resulted in this paper or presentation. This study presents an application of PBPK modeling to describe the formation of Vitamin D3. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the health benefits of Vitamin D3, from heart health to cancer. Despite its importance, a PBPK model for Vitamin D3 does not exist in the literature. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, Vitamin D3 is being prescribed to patients suffering diverse chronic illnesses. Because of its importance in several conditions, we thought it was important to understand its metabolic formation from precursors and distribution in the body. Time course data from the literature following the effect of oral supplementation in healthy adults was used to develop the first PBPK model for Vitamin D formation. 2. Why was this study done? The goal of this paper was to develop a PBPK model describing the metabolic formation of Vitamin D (as Vitamin D3) when receiving oral supplementation. In the process of developing the PBPK model, several novel concepts were used. For example, due to the extreme lipophilic nature of this vitamin (derived from cholesterol), partition coefficients were varied as a function of dose and time. Also, the regulation of enzymatic metabolism by its product (Vitamin D) was also examined. The result was a very different approach used, and a PBPK model that describes an essential vitamin in the body. 3. What is t

  16. Predicting the effect of cytochrome P450 inhibitors on substrate drugs: analysis of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Pan, Yuzhuo; Hsu, Vicky; Grillo, Joseph A; Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S; Sinha, Vikram; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has seen a recent increase in the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling towards assessing the potential of drug-drug interactions (DDI) in clinically relevant scenarios. To continue our assessment of such approaches, we evaluated the predictive performance of PBPK modeling in predicting cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated DDI. This evaluation was based on 15 substrate PBPK models submitted by nine sponsors between 2009 and 2013. For these 15 models, a total of 26 DDI studies (cases) with various CYP inhibitors were available. Sponsors developed the PBPK models, reportedly without considering clinical DDI data. Inhibitor models were either developed by sponsors or provided by PBPK software developers and applied with minimal or no modification. The metric for assessing predictive performance of the sponsors' PBPK approach was the R predicted/observed value (R predicted/observed = [predicted mean exposure ratio]/[observed mean exposure ratio], with the exposure ratio defined as [C max (maximum plasma concentration) or AUC (area under the plasma concentration-time curve) in the presence of CYP inhibition]/[C max or AUC in the absence of CYP inhibition]). In 81 % (21/26) and 77 % (20/26) of cases, respectively, the R predicted/observed values for AUC and C max ratios were within a pre-defined threshold of 1.25-fold of the observed data. For all cases, the R predicted/observed values for AUC and C max were within a 2-fold range. These results suggest that, based on the submissions to the FDA to date, there is a high degree of concordance between PBPK-predicted and observed effects of CYP inhibition, especially CYP3A-based, on the exposure of drug substrates.

  17. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-05-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the other’s in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

  18. Overview of Dioxin Kinetics and Application of Dioxin Physiologically Based Phannacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The available data on the pharmacokinetics of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in animals and humans have been thoroughly reviewed in literature. It is evident based on these reviews and other analyses that three distinctive features of TCDD play important roles in dete...

  19. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: Xiaoxia.Yang@fda.hhs.gov; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  20. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys

  1. Prediction of Deoxypodophyllotoxin Disposition in Mouse, Rat, Monkey and Dog by Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Model and the Extrapolation to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT is a potential anti-tumor candidate prior to its clinical phase. The aim of the study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model consisting of 13 tissue compartments to predict DPT disposition in mouse, rat, monkey and dog based on in vitro and in silico inputs. Since large interspecies difference was found in unbound fraction of DPT in plasma, we assumed that Kt:pl,u (unbound tissue-to-plasma concentration ratio was identical across species. The predictions of our model were then validated by in vivo data of corresponding preclinical species, along with visual predictive checks. Reasonable matches were found between observed and predicted plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in all four animal species. The prediction in the related seven tissues of mouse was also desirable. We also attempted to predict human pharmacokinetic profile by both the developed PBPK model and interspecies allometric scaling across mouse, rat and monkey, while dog was excluded from the scaling. The two approaches reached similar results. We hope the study will help in the efficacy and safety assessment of DPT in future clinical studies and provide a reference to the preclinical screening of similar compounds by PBPK model.

  2. Applying a Global Sensitivity Analysis Workflow to Improve the Computational Efficiencies in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Hung Hsieh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the solution to reduce parameter dimensionality in a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model is through expert judgment. However, this approach may lead to bias in parameter estimates and model predictions if important parameters are fixed at uncertain or inappropriate values. The purpose of this study was to explore the application of global sensitivity analysis (GSA to ascertain which parameters in the PBPK model are non-influential, and therefore can be assigned fixed values in Bayesian parameter estimation with minimal bias. We compared the elementary effect-based Morris method and three variance-based Sobol indices in their ability to distinguish “influential” parameters to be estimated and “non-influential” parameters to be fixed. We illustrated this approach using a published human PBPK model for acetaminophen (APAP and its two primary metabolites APAP-glucuronide and APAP-sulfate. We first applied GSA to the original published model, comparing Bayesian model calibration results using all the 21 originally calibrated model parameters (OMP, determined by “expert judgment”-based approach vs. the subset of original influential parameters (OIP, determined by GSA from the OMP. We then applied GSA to all the PBPK parameters, including those fixed in the published model, comparing the model calibration results using this full set of 58 model parameters (FMP vs. the full set influential parameters (FIP, determined by GSA from FMP. We also examined the impact of different cut-off points to distinguish the influential and non-influential parameters. We found that Sobol indices calculated by eFAST provided the best combination of reliability (consistency with other variance-based methods and efficiency (lowest computational cost to achieve convergence in identifying influential parameters. We identified several originally calibrated parameters that were not influential, and could be fixed to improve computational

  3. Estimated cancer risk of dioxins to humans using a bioassay and physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Wakae; Aoki, Yasunobu

    2006-01-01

    The health risk of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds to humans was analyzed quantitatively using experimental data and mathematical models. To quantify the toxicity of a mixture of three dioxin congeners, we calculated the new relative potencies (REPs) for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), and 2,3,4,7,8- pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), focusing on their tumor promotion activity. We applied a liver foci formation assay to female SD rats after repeated oral administration of dioxins. The REP of dioxin for a rat was determined using dioxin concentration and the number of the foci in rat liver. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK model) was used for interspecies extrapolation targeting on dioxin concentration in liver. Toxic dose for human was determined by back-estimation with a human PBPK model, assuming that the same concentration in the target tissue may cause the same level of effect in rats and humans, and the REP for human was determined by the toxic dose obtained. The calculated REPs for TCDD, PeCDD, and PeCDF were 1.0, 0.34, and 0.05 for rats, respectively, and the REPs for humans were almost the same as those for rats. These values were different from the toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) presented previously (Van den Berg, M., Birnbaum, L., Bosveld, A.T.C., Brunstrom, B., Cook, P., Feeley, M., Giesy, J.P., Hanberg, A., Hasegawa, R., Kennedy, S.W., Kubiak, T., Larsen, J.C., Rolaf van Leeuwen, F.X., Liem, A.K.D., Nolt, C., Peterson, R.E., Poellinger. L., Safe, S., Schrenk, D., Tillitt, D, Tysklind, M., Younes, M., Waern, F., Zacharewski, T., 1998. Toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs for humans and wildlife. Environ. Health Perspect. 106, 775-792). The relative risk of excess liver cancer for Japanese people in general was 1.7-6.5 x 10 -7 by TCDD only, and 2.9-11 x 10 -7 by the three dioxins at the present level of contamination

  4. Parameters for Pyrethroid Insecticide QSAR and PBPK/PD Models for Human Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This pyrethroid insecticide parameter review is an extension of our interest in developing quantitative structure–activity relationship–physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (QSAR-PBPK/PD) models for assessing health risks, which interest started with the organoph...

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. R-warfarin clearances from plasma associated with polymorphic cytochrome P450 2C19 and simulated by individual physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for 11 cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utoh, Masahiro; Kusama, Takashi; Miura, Tomonori; Mitsui, Marina; Kawano, Mirai; Hirano, Takahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 2C19 (formerly known as P450 2C75), homologous to human P450 2C19, has been identified as R-warfarin 7-hydroxylase. In this study, simulations of R-warfarin clearance in individual cynomolgus monkeys genotyped for P450 2C19 p.[(Phe100Asn; Ala103Val; Ile112Leu)] were performed using individual simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters and absorption rate constants, volumes of the systemic circulation, and hepatic intrinsic clearances for individual PBPK models were estimated for eleven cynomolgus monkeys. 3. One-way ANOVA revealed significant effects of the genotype (p warfarin among the homozygous mutant, heterozygous mutant, and wild-type groups. R-Warfarin clearances in individual cynomolgus monkeys genotyped for P450 2C19 were simulated by simplified PBPK modeling. The modeled hepatic intrinsic clearances were significantly associated with the P450 2C19 genotypes. The liver microsomal elimination rates of R-warfarin for individual animals after in vivo administration showed significant reductions associated with the genotype (p warfarin and related medicines associated with polymorphic P450 2C19 in individual cynomolgus monkeys, thereby facilitating calculation of the fraction of hepatic clearance.

  7. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  8. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  10. Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions with Bupropion and Its Metabolites as CYP2D6 Inhibitors Using a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Caifu; Zhang, Xunjie; Cai, Weimin

    2017-12-21

    The potential of inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs to contribute to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is uncommon and underestimated. However, the occurrence of unexpected DDI suggests the potential contribution of metabolites to the observed DDI. The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bupropion and its three primary metabolites-hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion and erythrohydrobupropion-based on a mixed "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach and to contribute to the understanding of the involvement and impact of inhibitory metabolites for DDIs observed in the clinic. PK profiles from clinical researches of different dosages were used to verify the bupropion model. Reasonable PK profiles of bupropion and its metabolites were captured in the PBPK model. Confidence in the DDI prediction involving bupropion and co-administered CYP2D6 substrates could be maximized. The predicted maximum concentration (C max ) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values and C max and AUC ratios were consistent with clinically observed data. The addition of the inhibitory metabolites into the PBPK model resulted in a more accurate prediction of DDIs (AUC and C max ratio) than that which only considered parent drug (bupropion) P450 inhibition. The simulation suggests that bupropion and its metabolites contribute to the DDI between bupropion and CYP2D6 substrates. The inhibitory potency from strong to weak is hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and bupropion, respectively. The present bupropion PBPK model can be useful for predicting inhibition from bupropion in other clinical studies. This study highlights the need for caution and dosage adjustment when combining bupropion with medications metabolized by CYP2D6. It also demonstrates the feasibility of applying the PBPK approach to predict the DDI potential of drugs undergoing complex metabolism, especially in the DDI involving inhibitory

  11. A tissue dose-based comparative exposure assessment of manganese using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling—The importance of homeostatic control for an essential metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, P. Robinan, E-mail: rgentry@ramboll.com [Ramboll Environ US Corporation, 3701 Armand St., Monroe, LA 71201 (United States); Van Landingham, Cynthia; Fuller, William G. [Ramboll Environ US Corporation, 3701 Armand St., Monroe, LA 71201 (United States); Sulsky, Sandra I. [Ramboll Environ US Corporation, Amherst, MA (United States); Greene, Tracy B. [Ramboll Environ US Corporation, 3701 Armand St., Monroe, LA 71201 (United States); Clewell, Harvey J.; Andersen, Melvin E. [ScitoVation, RTP, NC (United States); Roels, Harry A. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Taylor, Michael D. [NIPERA, Durham, NC (United States); Keene, Athena M. [Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model (Schroeter et al., 2011) was applied to simulate target tissue manganese (Mn) concentrations following occupational and environmental exposures. These estimates of target tissue Mn concentrations were compared to determine margins of safety (MOS) and to evaluate the biological relevance of applying safety factors to derive acceptable Mn air concentrations. Mn blood concentrations measured in occupational studies permitted verification of the human PBPK models, increasing confidence in the resulting estimates. Mn exposure was determined based on measured ambient air Mn concentrations and dietary data in Canada and the United States (US). Incorporating dietary and inhalation exposures into the models indicated that increases in target tissue concentrations above endogenous levels only begin to occur when humans are exposed to levels of Mn in ambient air (i.e. > 10 μg/m{sup 3}) that are far higher than those currently measured in Canada or the US. A MOS greater than three orders of magnitude was observed, indicating that current Mn air concentrations are far below concentrations that would be required to produce the target tissue Mn concentrations associated with subclinical neurological effects. This application of PBPK modeling for an essential element clearly demonstrates that the conventional application of default factors to “convert” an occupational exposure to an equivalent continuous environmental exposure, followed by the application of safety factors, is not appropriate in the case of Mn. PBPK modeling demonstrates that the relationship between ambient Mn exposures and dose-to-target tissue is not linear due to normal tissue background levels and homeostatic controls. - Highlights: • Manganese is an essential nutrient, adding complexity to its risk assessment. • Nonlinearities in biological processes are important for manganese risk assessment. • A PBPK model was used to estimate target tissue

  12. High Throughput PBPK: Evaluating EPA's Open-Source Data and Tools for Dosimetry and Exposure Reconstruction (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To address this need, new tools have been created for characterizing, simulating, and evaluating chemical biokinetics. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide estimates of chemical exposures that produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations, while tissu...

  13. Quantitative analysis of elevation of serum creatinine via renal transporter inhibition by trimethoprim in healthy subjects using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Tomohisa; Kudo, Toshiyuki; Kume, Toshiyuki; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kiyomi

    2018-02-01

    Serum creatinine (SCr) levels rise during trimethoprim therapy for infectious diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether the elevation of SCr can be quantitatively explained using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating inhibition by trimethoprim on tubular secretion of creatinine via renal transporters such as organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), OCT3, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1), and MATE2-K. Firstly, pharmacokinetic parameters in the PBPK model of trimethoprim were determined to reproduce the blood concentration profile after a single intravenous and oral administration of trimethoprim in healthy subjects. The model was verified with datasets of both cumulative urinary excretions after a single administration and the blood concentration profile after repeated oral administration. The pharmacokinetic model of creatinine consisted of the creatinine synthesis rate, distribution volume, and creatinine clearance (CL cre ), including tubular secretion via each transporter. When combining the models for trimethoprim and creatinine, the predicted increments in SCr from baseline were 29.0%, 39.5%, and 25.8% at trimethoprim dosages of 5 mg/kg (b.i.d.), 5 mg/kg (q.i.d.), and 200 mg (b.i.d.), respectively, which were comparable with the observed values. The present model analysis enabled us to quantitatively explain increments in SCr during trimethoprim treatment by its inhibition of renal transporters. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identifiability of PBPK Models with Applications to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss different types of identifiability that occur in PBPK models and give reasons why they occur. We particularly focus on how the mathematical structure of a PBPK model and lack of appropriate data can lead to statistical models in which it is impossible to estimate at least some parameters precisely. Methods are reviewed which can determine whether a purely linear PBPK model is globally identifiable. We propose a theorem which determines when identifiability at a set of finite and specific values of the mathematical PBPK model (global discrete identifiability) implies identifiability of the statistical model. However, we are unable to establish conditions that imply global discrete identifiability, and conclude that the only safe approach to analysis of PBPK models involves Bayesian analysis with truncated priors. Finally, computational issues regarding posterior simulations of PBPK models are discussed. The methodology is very general and can be applied to numerous PBPK models which can be expressed as linear time-invariant systems. A real data set of a PBPK model for exposure to dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA(V)) is presented to illustrate the proposed methodology. We consider statistical analy

  15. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Lead Optimization. 1. Evaluation and Adaptation of GastroPlus To Predict Bioavailability of Medchem Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Pankaj R; Bolger, Michael B; Haworth, Ian S; Clark, Robert D; Martin, Eric J

    2018-03-05

    When medicinal chemists need to improve bioavailability (%F) within a chemical series during lead optimization, they synthesize new series members with systematically modified properties mainly by following experience and general rules of thumb. More quantitative models that predict %F of proposed compounds from chemical structure alone have proven elusive. Global empirical %F quantitative structure-property (QSPR) models perform poorly, and projects have too little data to train local %F QSPR models. Mechanistic oral absorption and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models simulate the dissolution, absorption, systemic distribution, and clearance of a drug in preclinical species and humans. Attempts to build global PBPK models based purely on calculated inputs have not achieved the optimization. In this work, local GastroPlus PBPK models are instead customized for individual medchem series. The key innovation was building a local QSPR for a numerically fitted effective intrinsic clearance (CL loc ). All inputs are subsequently computed from structure alone, so the models can be applied in advance of synthesis. Training CL loc on the first 15-18 rat %F measurements gave adequate predictions, with clear improvements up to about 30 measurements, and incremental improvements beyond that.

  16. Human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen extrapolated from in vivo animal pharmacokinetics using in vitro human hepatic clearances and simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for radio-labeled microdose clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kunikane, Eriko; Nishiyama, Sayako; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Chiba, Koji; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics of drug substances orally administered in humans from rat pharmacokinetic data using tolbutamide and acetaminophen as model compounds. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from rat studies based on reported plasma concentrations were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors. In this extrapolation, in vitro metabolic clearance data were obtained using liver preparations. Rates of tolbutamide elimination were roughly similar in rat and human liver microsome experiments, but acetaminophen elimination by rat liver microsomes and cytosolic preparations showed a tendency to be faster than those in humans. Using a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, estimated human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen were consistent with reported concentrations. Tolbutamide cleared in a roughly similar manner in humans and rats, but medical-dose levels of acetaminophen cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in rats. The data presented here illustrate how pharmacokinetic data in combination with a simple PBPK model can be used to assist evaluations of the pharmacological/toxicological potential of new drug substances and for estimating human radiation exposures from radio-labeled drugs when planning human studies. (author)

  17. Elucidating the in vivo fate of nanocrystals using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model: a case study with the anticancer agent SNX-2112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong D

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dong Dong,1* Xiao Wang,1* Huailing Wang,1 Xingwang Zhang,2 Yifei Wang,1 Baojian Wu2 1Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, 2Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: SNX-2112 is a promising anticancer agent but has poor solubility in both water and oil. In the study reported here, we aimed to develop a nanocrystal formulation for SNX-2112 and to determine the pharmacokinetic behaviors of the prepared nanocrystals. Methods: Nanocrystals of SNX-2112 were prepared using the wet-media milling technique and characterized by particle size, differential scanning calorimetry, drug release, etc. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was undertaken to evaluate the drug’s disposition in rats following administration of drug cosolvent or nanocrystals. Results: The optimized SNX-2112 nanocrystals (with poloxamer 188 as the stabilizer were 203 nm in size with a zeta potential of -11.6 mV. In addition, the nanocrystals showed a comparable release profile to the control (drug cosolvent. Further, the rat PBPK model incorporating the parameters of particulate uptake (into the liver and spleen and of in vivo drug release was well fitted to the experimental data following administration of the drug nanocrystals. The results reveal that the nanocrystals rapidly released drug molecules in vivo, accounting for their cosolvent-like pharmacokinetic behaviors. Due to particulate uptake, drug accumulation in the liver and spleen was significant at the initial time points (within 1 hour. Conclusion: The nanocrystals should be a good choice for the systemic delivery of the poorly soluble drug SNX-2112. Also, our study contributes to an improved understanding of the in vivo fate of nanocrystals. Keywords: intravenous delivery, PBPK, tissue distribution, poloxamer 188

  18. The calculation of human toxicity thresholds of 2,3,7,8-TCDD; A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; van Eijkeren JCH; LBO

    1998-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft de toepassing van een 'Physiologically Based PharmacoKinetic' model (PBPK model) bij het berekenen van de verwachte 'No Adverse Effect Level' van 2,3,7,8-TetraChloroDibenzo-p-Dioxine (TCDD) bij de mens. Het model houdt rekening met variabiliteit en

  19. Using Human Life Stage PBPK/PD Model Predictions of Perchlorate-Induced Iodide Inhibition to Inform Risk Assessment in Sensitive Populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattie, David R; Sterner, Teresa R; Merrill, Elaine A; Clewell, Rebecca A

    2006-01-01

    .... Recently, existing physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models across life-stages in rat and in adult human were expanded to describe inhibition kinetics during-perinatal development in humans...

  20. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  1. A computer-aided framework for development, identification andmanagement of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitzig, Martina; Linninger, Andreas; Sin, Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a generic computer-aided modelling framework to support the development of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models thereby increasing the efficiency and quality of the modelling process. In particular, the framework systematizes the modelling...

  2. The Use of Physiology-Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling in the Discovery of the Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist ACT-541468.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Alexander; de Kanter, Ruben; Roch, Catherine; Gatfield, John; Boss, Christoph; von Raumer, Markus; Schindelholz, Benno; Muehlan, Clemens; van Gerven, Joop; Jenck, Francois

    2017-09-01

    The identification of new sleep drugs poses particular challenges in drug discovery owing to disease-specific requirements such as rapid onset of action, sleep maintenance throughout major parts of the night, and absence of residual next-day effects. Robust tools to estimate drug levels in human brain are therefore key for a successful discovery program. Animal models constitute an appropriate choice for drugs without species differences in receptor pharmacology or pharmacokinetics. Translation to man becomes more challenging when interspecies differences are prominent. This report describes the discovery of the dual orexin receptor 1 and 2 (OX 1 and OX 2 ) antagonist ACT-541468 out of a class of structurally related compounds, by use of physiology-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) modeling applied early in drug discovery. Although all drug candidates exhibited similar target receptor potencies and efficacy in a rat sleep model, they exhibited large interspecies differences in key factors determining their pharmacokinetic profile. Human PK models were built on the basis of in vitro metabolism and physicochemical data and were then used to predict the time course of OX 2 receptor occupancy in brain. An active ACT-541468 dose of 25 mg was estimated on the basis of OX 2 receptor occupancy thresholds of about 65% derived from clinical data for two other orexin antagonists, almorexant and suvorexant. Modeling predictions for ACT-541468 in man were largely confirmed in a single-ascending dose trial in healthy subjects. PBPK-PD modeling applied early in drug discovery, therefore, has great potential to assist in the identification of drug molecules when specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements need to be met. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Estimating Margin of Exposure to Thyroid Peroxidase Inhibitors Using High-Throughput in vitro Data, High-Throughput Exposure Modeling, and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jeremy A.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Gilbert, Mary; Isaacs, Kristin; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Some pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals bind the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) enzyme and disrupt thyroid hormone production. The potential for TPO inhibition is a function of both the binding affinity and concentration of the chemical within the thyroid gland. The former can be determined through in vitro assays, and the latter is influenced by pharmacokinetic properties, along with environmental exposure levels. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was integrated with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to establish internal doses capable of inhibiting TPO in relation to external exposure levels predicted through exposure modeling. The PBPK/PD model was evaluated using published serum or thyroid gland chemical concentrations or circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormone levels measured in rats and humans. After evaluation, the model was used to estimate human equivalent intake doses resulting in reduction of T4 and T3 levels by 10% (ED10) for 6 chemicals of varying TPO-inhibiting potencies. These chemicals were methimazole, 6-propylthiouracil, resorcinol, benzophenone-2, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and triclosan. Margin of exposure values were estimated for these chemicals using the ED10 and predicted population exposure levels for females of child-bearing age. The modeling approach presented here revealed that examining hazard or exposure alone when prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment may be insufficient, and that consideration of pharmacokinetic properties is warranted. This approach also provides a mechanism for integrating in vitro data, pharmacokinetic properties, and exposure levels predicted through high-throughput means when interpreting adverse outcome pathways based on biological responses. PMID:26865668

  4. Improved physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oral exposures to chromium in mice, rats, and humans to address temporal variation and sensitive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, C R; Suh, M; Proctor, D M; Hays, S M

    2017-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in mice, rats, and humans developed previously (Kirman et al., 2012, 2013), was updated to reflect an improved understanding of the toxicokinetics of the gastrointestinal tract following oral exposures. Improvements were made to: (1) the reduction model, which describes the pH-dependent reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the gastrointestinal tract under both fasted and fed states; (2) drinking water pattern simulations, to better describe dosimetry in rodents under the conditions of the NTP cancer bioassay; and (3) parameterize the model to characterize potentially sensitive human populations. Important species differences, sources of non-linear toxicokinetics, and human variation are identified and discussed within the context of human health risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Probabilistic risk assessment of gold nanoparticles after intravenous administration by integrating in vitro and in vivo toxicity with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Lin, Zhoumeng

    2018-04-14

    This study aimed to conduct an integrated and probabilistic risk assessment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based on recently published in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies coupled to a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Dose-response relationships were characterized based on cell viability assays in various human cell types. A previously well-validated human PBPK model for AuNPs was applied to quantify internal concentrations in liver, kidney, skin, and venous plasma. By applying a Bayesian-based probabilistic risk assessment approach incorporating Monte Carlo simulation, probable human cell death fractions were characterized. Additionally, we implemented in vitro to in vivo and animal-to-human extrapolation approaches to independently estimate external exposure levels of AuNPs that cause minimal toxicity. Our results suggest that under the highest dosing level employed in existing animal studies (worst-case scenario), AuNPs coated with branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) would likely induce ∼90-100% cellular death, implying high cytotoxicity compared to risk prediction, and point of departure estimation of AuNP exposure for humans and illustrate an approach that could be applied to other NPs when sufficient data are available.

  6. Improved physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oral exposures to chromium in mice, rats, and humans to address temporal variation and sensitive populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirman, C.R., E-mail: ckirman@summittoxicology.com [Summit Toxicology, PO Box 3209, Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States); Suh, M.; Proctor, D.M. [ToxStrategies, Mission Viejo, CA (United States); Hays, S.M. [Summit Toxicology, PO Box 3209, Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in mice, rats, and humans developed previously (Kirman et al., 2012, 2013), was updated to reflect an improved understanding of the toxicokinetics of the gastrointestinal tract following oral exposures. Improvements were made to: (1) the reduction model, which describes the pH-dependent reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the gastrointestinal tract under both fasted and fed states; (2) drinking water pattern simulations, to better describe dosimetry in rodents under the conditions of the NTP cancer bioassay; and (3) parameterize the model to characterize potentially sensitive human populations. Important species differences, sources of non-linear toxicokinetics, and human variation are identified and discussed within the context of human health risk assessment. - Highlights: • An improved version of the PBPK model for Cr(VI) toxicokinetics was developed. • The model incorporates data collected to fill important data gaps. • Model predictions for specific age groups and sensitive subpopulations are provided. • Implications to human health risk assessment are discussed.

  7. Terbinafine in combination with other antifungal agents for treatment of resistant or refractory mycoses: investigating optimal dosing regimens using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolton, Michael J; Perera, Vidya; Pont, Lisa G; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Terbinafine is increasingly used in combination with other antifungal agents to treat resistant or refractory mycoses due to synergistic in vitro antifungal activity; high doses are commonly used, but limited data are available on systemic exposure, and no assessment of pharmacodynamic target attainment has been made. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for terbinafine, this study aimed to predict total and unbound terbinafine concentrations in plasma with a range of high-dose regimens and also calculate predicted pharmacodynamic parameters for terbinafine. Predicted terbinafine concentrations accumulated significantly during the first 28 days of treatment; the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratios and AUC for the free, unbound fraction (fAUC)/MIC ratios increased by 54 to 62% on day 7 of treatment and by 80 to 92% on day 28 compared to day 1, depending on the dose regimen. Of the high-dose regimens investigated, 500 mg of terbinafine taken every 12 h provided the highest systemic exposure; on day 7 of treatment, the predicted AUC, maximum concentration (Cmax), and minimum concentration (Cmin) were approximately 4-fold, 1.9-fold, and 4.4-fold higher than with a standard-dose regimen of 250 mg once daily. Close agreement was seen between the concentrations predicted by the PBPK model and the observed concentrations, indicating good predictive performance. This study provides the first report of predicted terbinafine exposure in plasma with a range of high-dose regimens.

  8. Physiologically-based PK/PD modelling of therapeutic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Peter; Macheras, Panos; Van Peer, Achiel

    2009-12-01

    Therapeutic proteins are a diverse class of drugs consisting of naturally occurring or modified proteins, and due to their size and physico-chemical properties, they can pose challenges for the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling has been effective for early in silico prediction of pharmacokinetic properties of new drugs. The aim of the present workshop was to discuss the feasibility of PBPK modelling of macromolecules. The classical PBPK approach was discussed with a presentation of the successful example of PBPK modelling of cyclosporine A. PBPK model was performed with transport of the cyclosporine across cell membranes, affinity to plasma proteins and active membrane transporters included to describe drug transport between physiological compartments. For macromolecules, complex PBPK modelling or permeability-limited and/or target-mediated distribution was discussed. It was generally agreed that PBPK modelling was feasible and desirable. The role of the lymphatic system should be considered when absorption after extravascular administration is modelled. Target-mediated drug disposition was regarded as an important feature for generation of PK models. Complex PK-models may not be necessary when a limited number of organs are affected. More mechanistic PK/PD models will be relevant when adverse events/toxicity are included in the PK/PD modelling.

  9. Evaluation of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model Used to Develop Health Protective Levels for Trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    mice. Toxicol Sci 45(1): 33-41. Merdink, J.L., Stenner , R.D., Stevens, D.K., Parker, J.C. and Bull, R.J. 1999. Effect of enterohepatic circulation...Document RR-03-07. Stenner , R.D., Merdink, J.L., Stevens, D.K., Springer, D.L. and Bull, R.J. 1997. Enterohepatic recirculation of trichloroethanol...Pharmacol 123(1): 1-8. Templin, M.V., Stevens, D.K., Stenner , R.D., Bonate, P.L., Tuman, D. and Bull, R.J. 1995. Factors affecting species differences

  10. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of Interstrain Variability in Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, inter-individual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cas...

  11. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of trichloroethylene in rats for estimation of internal dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potential human health risk from chemical exposure must often be assessed for conditions for which suitable human or animal data are not available, requiring extrapolation across duration and concentration. The default method for exposure-duration adjustment is based on Haber's r...

  12. A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model With Metabolic Interactions of Chloroform (CHCL3) and Trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to mixtures is frequent, but biologic pathways such as metabolic inhibition, are poorly understood. CHCl3 and TCE are model volatiles frequently co-occurring; combined exposure results in less than additive hepatotoxicity. Here, we explore the underlying metabolic inte...

  13. EVALUATION OF ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF OLDER ADULTS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The population of older Americans is increasing due to the aging of the Baby Boomers as well as an increase in the average life span. A number of physiological and biochemical changes occur during aging that could influence the relationship between exposure, dose, and response to...

  14. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the effects of flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) polymorphisms on itopride exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wangda; Humphries, Helen; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Gardner, Iain; Masson, Eric; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Zhou, Diansong

    2017-09-01

    Itopride, a substrate of FMO3, has been used for the symptomatic treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to evaluate the impact of FMO3 polymorphism on itopride pharmacokinetics (PK). The Asian populations within the Simcyp simulator were updated to incorporate information on the frequency, activity and abundance of FMO3 enzyme with different phenotypes. A meta-analysis of relative enzyme activities suggested that FMO3 activity in subjects with homozygous Glu158Lys and Glu308Gly mutations (Lys158 and Gly308) in both alleles is ~47% lower than those carrying two wild-type FMO3 alleles. Individuals with homozygous Lys158 and Gly308 mutations account for about 5% of the total population in Asian populations. A CL int of 9 μl/min/pmol was optimised for itopride via a retrograde approach as human liver microsomal results would under-predict its clearance by ~7.9-fold. The developed itopride PBPK model was first verified with three additional clinical studies in Korean and Japanese subjects resulting in a predicted clearance of 52 to 69 l/h, which was comparable to those observed (55 to 88 l/h). The model was then applied to predict plasma concentration-time profiles of itopride in Chinese subjects with wild type or homozygous Lys158 and Gly308 FMO3 genotypes. The ratios of predicted to observed AUC of itopride in subjects with each genotype were 1.23 and 0.94, respectively. In addition, the results also suggested that for FMO3 metabolised drugs with a safety margin of 2 or more, proactive genotyping FMO3 to exclude subjects with homozygous Lys158/Gly308 alleles may not be necessary. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Application of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Prediction of Tofacitinib Exposure in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Misaki; Tse, Susanna; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2017-05-09

    Tofacitinib (3-[(3R,4R)-4-methyl-3-[methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]piperidin-1-yl]-3 -oxopropanenitrile) is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is approved in countries including Japan and the United States for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and is being developed across the globe for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was applied to compare the pharmacokinetics of tofacitinib in Japanese and Caucasians to assess the potential impact of ethnicity on the dosing regimen in the two populations. Simulated plasma concentration profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e. maximum concentration and area under plasma concentration-time curve, in Japanese and Caucasian populations after single or multiple doses of 1 to 30 mg tofacitinib were in agreement with clinically observed data. The similarity in simulated exposure between Japanese and Caucasian populations supports the currently approved dosing regimen in Japan and the United States, where there is no recommendation for dose adjustment according to race. Simulated results for single (1 to 100 mg) or multiple doses (5 mg twice daily) of tofacitinib in extensive and poor metabolizers of CYP2C19, an enzyme which has been shown to contribute in part to tofacitinib elimination and is known to exhibit higher frequency in Japanese compared to Caucasians, were also in support of no recommendation for dose adjustment in CYP2C19 poor metabolizers. This study demonstrated a successful application of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling in evaluating ethnic sensitivity in pharmacokinetics at early stages of development, presenting its potential value as an efficient and scientific method for optimal dose setting in the Japanese population.

  16. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, Kyle, E-mail: saylor@vt.edu; Zhang, Chenming, E-mail: chzhang2@vt.edu

    2016-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. - Highlights: • Modelling of nicotine disposition in the presence of anti-nicotine antibodies • Key vaccine efficacy factors are evaluated in silico in rats and in humans. • Model predicts insufficient antibody binding in past human nicotine vaccines. • Improving immunogenicity and antibody specificity may lead to vaccine success.

  17. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of tamoxifen and its metabolites in women of different CYP2D6 phenotypes provides new insight into the tamoxifen mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eDickschen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen is a first-line endocrine agent in the mechanism-based treatment of estrogen receptor positive (ER+ mammary carcinoma and applied to breast cancer patients all over the world. Endoxifen is a secondary and highly active metabolite of tamoxifen that is formed among others by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6. It is widely accepted that CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PM exert a pronounced decrease in endoxifen steady-state plasma concentrations compared to CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EM. Nevertheless, an in-depth understanding of the chain of cause and effect between CYP2D6 genotype, endoxifen steady-state plasma concentration, and subsequent tamoxifen treatment benefit still remains to be evolved.In this context, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK-modeling provides a useful tool to mechanistically investigate the impact of CYP2D6 phenotype on endoxifen formation in female breast cancer patients undergoing tamoxifen therapy.It has long been thought that only a minor percentage of endoxifen is formed via 4-hydroxytamoxifen. However, the current investigation supports very recently published data that postulates a contribution of 4-hydroxytamoxifen above 20 % to total endoxifen formation. The developed PBPK-model describes tamoxifen PK in rats and humans. Moreover, tamoxifen metabolism in dependence of CYP2D6 phenotype in populations of European female individuals is well described, thus providing a good basis to further investigate the linkage of PK, mode of action, and treatment outcome in dependence of factors such as phenotype, ethnicity or co-treatment with CYP2D6 inhibitors.

  18. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saylor, Kyle; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. - Highlights: • Modelling of nicotine disposition in the presence of anti-nicotine antibodies • Key vaccine efficacy factors are evaluated in silico in rats and in humans. • Model predicts insufficient antibody binding in past human nicotine vaccines. • Improving immunogenicity and antibody specificity may lead to vaccine success.

  19. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh Badhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF, choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways.

  20. Investigation of clinical pharmacokinetic variability of an opioid antagonist through physiologically based absorption modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuan; He, Minxia; Kulkarni, Rajesh; Patel, Nita; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2013-08-01

    Identifying the source of inter- and/or intrasubject variability in pharmacokinetics (PK) provides fundamental information in understanding the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics relationship of a drug and project its efficacy and safety in clinical populations. This identification process can be challenging given that a large number of potential causes could lead to PK variability. Here we present an integrated approach of physiologically based absorption modeling to investigate the root cause of unexpectedly high PK variability of a Phase I clinical trial drug. LY2196044 exhibited high intersubject variability in the absorption phase of plasma concentration-time profiles in humans. This could not be explained by in vitro measurements of drug properties and excellent bioavailability with low variability observed in preclinical species. GastroPlus™ modeling suggested that the compound's optimal solubility and permeability characteristics would enable rapid and complete absorption in preclinical species and in humans. However, simulations of human plasma concentration-time profiles indicated that despite sufficient solubility and rapid dissolution of LY2196044 in humans, permeability and/or transit in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may have been negatively affected. It was concluded that clinical PK variability was potentially due to the drug's antagonism on opioid receptors that affected its transit and absorption in the GI tract. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  2. Prediction of interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo from individual enzyme kinetic data and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Hissink, E.M.; Briggs, M.; Weaver, R.; Jochemsen, R.; Jackson, P.; Bertrand, M.; Bladeren, P. van

    2000-01-01

    A strategy is presented to predict interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo by the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and human in vitro metabolic parameters, obtained through the combined use of microsomes containing single cytochrome P450 enzymes and a human liver

  3. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Trichloroethylene and Its Metabolities for Use in Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Stenner , R.D., Merdink, J.L., Fisher, J.W., and Bull, R., Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for trichloroethylene considering enterohepatic...B6C3F1 mice. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol., 123, 1- 8, 1993. 21. Templin, M.V., Stevens, D.K., Stenner , R.D., Bonate, P.L., Tuman, D., and Bull, R.J

  4. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhoumeng [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wang, Ran [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Institute of Food Safety, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Ross, Matthew K. [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Filipov, Nikolay M., E-mail: filipov@uga.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data

  5. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data.

  6. Development and application of a multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oxytetracycline in dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a commonly used tetracycline antibiotic in veterinary and human medicine. To establish a quantitative model for predicting OTC plasma and tissue exposure, a permeability-limited multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed in dogs. The model was calibrated with plasma pharmacokinetic data in beagle dogs following single intravenous (5 mg/kg), oral (100 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations. The model predicted other available dog data well, including drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and muscle after repeated exposure, and data in the mixed-breed dog. The model was extrapolated to humans and the human model adequately simulated measured plasma OTC concentrations after intravenous (7.14 mg/kg) and oral exposures (6.67 mg/kg). The dog model was applied to predict 24-h OTC area-under-the-curve after three therapeutic treatments. Results were 27.75, 51.76, and 64.17 μg/mL*h in the plasma, and 120.93, 225.64, and 279.67 μg/mL*h in the kidney for oral (100 mg/kg), intravenous (10 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations, respectively. This model can be used to predict plasma and tissue concentrations to aid in designing optimal therapeutic regimens with OTC in veterinary, and potentially, human medicine; and as a foundation for scaling to other tetracycline antibiotics and to other animal species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:233-243, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Evaluation and optimisation of current milrinone prescribing for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery using a physiology-based pharmacokinetic drug-disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Milrinone is the drug of choice for the treatment and prevention of low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) in paediatric patients after open heart surgery across Europe. Discrepancies, however, among prescribing guidance, clinical studies and practice pattern require clarification to ensure safe and effective prescribing. However, the clearance prediction equations derived from classical pharmacokinetic modelling provide limited support as they have recently failed a clinical practice evaluation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate current milrinone dosing using physiology-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling and simulation to complement the existing pharmacokinetic knowledge and propose optimised dosing regimens as a basis for improving the standard of care for paediatric patients. A PBPK drug-disease model using a population approach was developed in three steps from healthy young adults to adult patients and paediatric patients with and without LCOS after open heart surgery. Pre- and postoperative organ function values from adult and paediatric patients were collected from literature and integrated into a disease model as factorial changes from the reference values in healthy adults aged 20-40 years. The disease model was combined with the PBPK drug model and evaluated against existing pharmacokinetic data. Model robustness was assessed by parametric sensitivity analysis. In the next step, virtual patient populations were created, each with 1,000 subjects reflecting the average adult and paediatric patient characteristics with regard to age, sex, bodyweight and height. They were integrated into the PBPK drug-disease model to evaluate the effectiveness of current milrinone dosing in achieving the therapeutic target range of 100-300 ng/mL milrinone in plasma. Optimised dosing regimens were subsequently developed. The pharmacokinetics of milrinone in healthy young adults as well as adult and paediatric patients were accurately described with an

  8. Relative contributions of the major human CYP450 to the metabolism of icotinib and its implication in prediction of drug-drug interaction between icotinib and CYP3A4 inhibitors/inducers using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Liu, Dongyang; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Jiang, Ji; Hu, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Icotinib is an anticancer drug, but relative contributions of CYP450 have not been identified. This study was carried out to identify the contribution percentage of CYP450 to icotinib and use the results to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, which can help to predict drug-drug interaction (DDI). Human liver microsome (HLM) and supersome using relative activity factor (RAF) were employed to determine the relative contributions of the major human P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib. These values were introduced to develop a PBPK model using SimCYP. The model was validated by the observed data in a Phase I clinical trial in Chinese healthy subjects. Finally, the model was used to simulate the DDI with ketoconazole or rifampin. Final contribution of CYP450 isoforms determined by HLM showed that CYP3A4 provided major contributions to the metabolism of icotinib. The percentage contributions of the P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib were determined by HLM inhibition assay and RAF. The AUC ratio under concomitant use of ketoconazole and rifampin was 3.22 and 0.55, respectively. Percentage of contribution of CYP450 to icotinib metabolism was calculated by RAF. The model has been proven to fit the observed data and is used in predicting icotinib-ketoconazole/rifampin interaction.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Complex Drug-Drug Interactions Between Repaglinide and Cyclosporin A/Gemfibrozil Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models With In Vitro Transporter/Enzyme Inhibition Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Toshimoto, Kota; Yao, Yoshiaki; Yoshikado, Takashi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of transporter- and enzyme-mediated complex drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is challenging. Repaglinide (RPG) is transported into the liver by OATP1B1 and then is metabolized by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4. The purpose of this study was to describe the complex DDIs of RPG quantitatively based on unified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models using in vitro K i values for OATP1B1, CYP3A4, and CYP2C8. Cyclosporin A (CsA) or gemfibrozil (GEM) increased the blood concentrations of RPG. The time profiles of RPG and the inhibitors were analyzed by PBPK models, considering the inhibition of OATP1B1 and CYP3A4 by CsA or OATP1B1 inhibition by GEM and its glucuronide and the mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8 by GEM glucuronide. RPG-CsA interaction was closely predicted using a reported in vitro K i,OATP1B1 value in the presence of CsA preincubation. RPG-GEM interaction was underestimated compared with observed data, but the simulation was improved with the increase of f m,CYP2C8 . These results based on in vitro K i values for transport and metabolism suggest the possibility of a bottom-up approach with in vitro inhibition data for the prediction of complex DDIs using unified PBPK models and in vitro f m value of a substrate for multiple enzymes should be considered carefully for the prediction. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The In Vivo Quantitation of Diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and Their Major Metabolites in Rat Blood for the Refinement of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, A.; Kousba, A.; Timchalk, C.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF)(O,O-diethyl-O-[3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl]-phosphorothioate, CAS 2921-88-2), and diazinon (DZN)(O,O-diethyl-O-2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-pyrimidyl thiophosphate, CAS 333-41-5) are commonly encountered organophosphorus insecticides whose oxon metabolites (CPF-oxon and DZN-oxon) have the ability to strongly inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme responsible for the breakdown of acetylcholine at nerve synapses. Chlorpyrifos-oxon and DZN-oxon are highly unstable compounds that degrade via hepatic, peripheral blood, and intestinal metabolism to the more stable metabolites, TCP (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, CAS not assigned) and IMHP (2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol, CAS 2814-20-2), respectively. Studies have been performed to understand and model the chronic and acute toxic effects of CPF and DZN individually but little is known about their combined effects. The purpose of this study was to improve physiologically based pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) computational models by quantifying concentrations of CPF and DZN and their metabolites TCP and IMHP in whole rat blood, following exposure to the chemicals individually or as a mixture. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally dosed with 60 mg/kg of CPF, DZN, or a mixture of these two pesticides. When administered individually DZN and CPF were seen to reach their maximum concentration at ~3 hours post-dosing. When given as a mixture, both DZN and CPF peak blood concentrations were not achieved until ~6 hours post-dosing and the calculated blood area under the curve (AUC) for both chemicals exceeded those calculated following the single dose. Blood concentrations of IMHP and TCP correlated with these findings. It is proposed that the higher AUC obtained for both CPF and DZN as a mixture resulted from competition for the same metabolic enzyme systems.

  11. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of human exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid suggests historical non drinking-water exposures are important for predicting current serum concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Rachel Rogers; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    Manufacturing of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a synthetic chemical with a long half-life in humans, peaked between 1970 and 2002, and has since diminished. In the United States, PFOA is detected in the blood of >99% of people tested, but serum concentrations have decreased since 1999. Much is known about exposure to PFOA in drinking water; however, the impact of non-drinking water PFOA exposure on serum PFOA concentrations is not well characterized. The objective of this research is to apply physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and Monte Carlo analysis to evaluate the impact of historic non-drinking water PFOA exposure on serum PFOA concentrations. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation was utilized to inform descriptions of PFOA transport in the kidney. Monte Carlo simulations were incorporated to evaluate factors that account for the large inter-individual variability of serum PFOA concentrations measured in individuals from North Alabama in 2010 and 2016, and the Mid-Ohio River Valley between 2005 and 2008. Predicted serum PFOA concentrations were within two-fold of experimental data. With incorporation of Monte Carlo simulations, the model successfully tracked the large variability of serum PFOA concentrations measured in populations from the Mid-Ohio River Valley. Simulation of exposure in a population of 45 adults from North Alabama successfully predicted 98% of individual serum PFOA concentrations measured in 2010 and 2016, respectively, when non-drinking water ingestion of PFOA exposure was included. Variation in serum PFOA concentrations may be due to inter-individual variability in the disposition of PFOA and potentially elevated historical non-drinking water exposures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The Role of Extracellular Binding Proteins in the Cellular Uptake of Drugs: Impact on Quantitative In Vitro-to-In Vivo Extrapolations of Toxicity and Efficacy in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick; Burczynski, Frank J; Haddad, Sami

    2016-02-01

    A critical component in the development of physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models for estimating target organ dosimetry in pharmacology and toxicology studies is the understanding of the uptake kinetics and accumulation of drugs and chemicals at the cellular level. Therefore, predicting free drug concentrations in intracellular fluid will contribute to our understanding of concentrations at the site of action in cells in PBPK/PD research. Some investigators believe that uptake of drugs in cells is solely driven by the unbound fraction; conversely, others argue that the protein-bound fraction contributes a significant portion of the total amount delivered to cells. Accordingly, the current literature suggests the existence of a so-called albumin-mediated uptake mechanism(s) for the protein-bound fraction (i.e., extracellular protein-facilitated uptake mechanisms) at least in hepatocytes and cardiac myocytes; however, such mechanism(s) and cells from other organs deserve further exploration. Therefore, the main objective of this present study was to discuss further the implication of potential protein-facilitated uptake mechanism(s) on drug distribution in cells under in vivo conditions. The interplay between the protein-facilitated uptake mechanism(s) and the effects of a pH gradient, metabolism, transport, and permeation limitation potentially occurring in cells was also discussed, as this should violate the basic assumption on similar free drug concentration in cells and plasma. This was made because the published equations used to calculate drug concentrations in cells in a PBPK/PD model did not consider potential protein-facilitated uptake mechanism(s). Consequently, we corrected some published equations for calculating the free drug concentrations in cells compared with plasma in PBPK/PD modeling studies, and we proposed a refined strategy for potentially performing more accurate quantitative in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolations

  13. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) Model for Multiple Exposure Routes of Soman in Multiple Species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sweeney, Richard E; Langenberg, Jan P; Maxwell, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    ...) levels of soman challenge in three species (rat, guinea pig, marmoset). Allometric formulae were used to compute the compartment volumes, blood flow rates, tidal volume and respiratory rate based upon total animal weight...

  14. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling of immune, reproductive and carcinogenic effects from contaminant exposure in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) across the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Rune; Gustavson, Kim; Sonne, Christian; Desforges, Jean-Pierre; Rigét, Frank F; Pavlova, Viola; McKinney, Melissa A; Letcher, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) consume large quantities of seal blubber and other high trophic marine mammals and consequently have some of the highest tissue concentrations of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) among Arctic biota. In the present paper we carried out a risk quotient (RQ) evaluation on OHC-exposed polar bears harvested from 1999 to 2008 and from 11 circumpolar subpopulations spanning from Alaska to Svalbard in order to evaluate the risk of OHC-mediated reproductive effects (embryotoxicity, teratogenicity), immunotoxicity and carcinogenicity (genotoxicity). This RQ evaluation was based on the Critical Body Residue (CBR) concept and a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modelling (PBPK) approach using OHC concentrations measured in polar bear adipose or liver tissue. The range of OHC concentrations within polar bear populations were as follows for adipose, sum polychlorinated biphenyls ∑PCBs (1797-10,537 ng/g lw), sum methylsulphone-PCB ∑MeSO2-PCBs (110-672 ng/g lw), sum chlordanes ∑CHLs (765-3477 ng/g lw), α-hexachlorocyclohexane α-HCH (8.5-91.3 ng/g lw), β-hexachlorocyclohexane β-HCH (65.5-542 ng/g lw), sum chlorbenzenes ∑ClBzs (145-304 ng/g lw), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane ∑DDTs (31.5-206 ng/g lw), dieldrin (69-249 ng/g lw), polybrominated diphenyl ethers ∑PBDEs (4.6-78.4 ng/g lw). For liver, the perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) concentrations ranged from 231-2792 ng/g ww. The total additive RQ from all OHCs ranged from 4.3 in Alaska to 28.6 in East Greenland bears for effects on reproduction, immune health and carcinogenicity, highlighting the important result that the toxic effect threshold (i.e. RQ>1) was exceeded for all polar bear populations assessed. PCBs were the main contributors for all three effect categories, contributing from 70.6% to 94.3% of the total risk and a RQ between 3.8-22.5. ∑MeSO2-PCBs were the second highest effect contributor for reproductive and immunological effects (0.17polar bears. We therefore

  15. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic rat model for methyl tertiary-butyl ether; comparison of selected dose metrics following various MTBE exposure scenarios used for toxicity and carcinogenicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghoff, Susan J.; Parkinson, Horace; Leavens, Teresa L.

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of cancer and toxicity studies that have been carried out to assess hazard from methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) exposure via inhalation and oral administration. MTBE has been detected in surface as well as ground water supplies which emphasized the need to assess the risk from exposure via drinking water contamination. This model can now be used to evaluate route-to-route extrapolation issues concerning MTBE exposures but also as a means of comparing potential dose metrics that may provide insight to differences in biological responses observed in rats following different routes of MTBE exposure. Recently an updated rat physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was published that relied on a description of MTBE and its metabolite tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA) binding to α2u-globulin, a male rat-specific protein. This model was used to predict concentrations of MTBE and TBA in the kidney, a target tissue in the male rat. The objective of this study was to use this model to evaluate the dosimetry of MTBE and TBA in rats following different exposure scenarios, used to evaluate the toxicity and carcinogenicity of MTBE, and compare various dose metrics under these different conditions. Model simulations suggested that although inhalation and drinking water exposures show a similar pattern of MTBE and TBA exposure in the blood and kidney (i.e. concentration-time profiles), the total blood and kidney levels following exposure of MTBE to 7.5 mg/ml MTBE in the drinking water for 90 days is in the same range as administration of an oral dose of 1000 mg/kg MTBE. Evaluation of the dose metrics also supports that a high oral bolus dose (i.e. 1000 mg/kg MTBE) results in a greater percentage of the dose exhaled as MTBE with a lower percent metabolized to TBA as compared to dose of MTBE that is delivered over a longer period of time as in the case of drinking water.

  16. The pharmacokinetics of the interstitial space in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G

    2003-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics of extracellular solutes is determined by the blood-tissue exchange kinetics and the volume of distribution in the interstitial space in the different organs. This information can be used to develop a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model applicable to most extracellular solutes. Methods The human pharmacokinetic literature was surveyed to tabulate the steady state and equilibrium volume of distribution of the solutes mannitol, EDTA, morphi...

  17. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for the Oxime TMB-4: Simulation of Rodent and Human Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-13

    later, Garrigue and other colleagues (Maurizis et al. 1992) pub- lished an in vitro binding study of TMB-4 with rabbit cartilaginous tissue cultures...as well as fat, kidney, liver, rapidly perfused tissues and slowly perfused tissues . All tissue compartments are diffusion limited. Model...pharmacokinetic data from the literature. The model was parameterized using rat plasma, tissue and urine time course data from intramuscular administration, as

  18. Incorporation of the Time-Varying Postprandial Increase in Splanchnic Blood Flow into a PBPK Model to Predict the Effect of Food on the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered High-Extraction Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Rachel H; Turner, David B; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Jamei, Masoud

    2017-07-01

    Following a meal, a transient increase in splanchnic blood flow occurs that can result in increased exposure to orally administered high-extraction drugs. Typically, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have incorporated this increase in blood flow as a time-invariant fed/fasted ratio, but this approach is unable to explain the extent of increased drug exposure. A model for the time-varying increase in splanchnic blood flow following a moderate- to high-calorie meal (TV-Q Splanch ) was developed to describe the observed data for healthy individuals. This was integrated within a PBPK model and used to predict the contribution of increased splanchnic blood flow to the observed food effect for two orally administered high-extraction drugs, propranolol and ibrutinib. The model predicted geometric mean fed/fasted AUC and C max ratios of 1.24 and 1.29 for propranolol, which were within the range of published values (within 1.0-1.8-fold of values from eight clinical studies). For ibrutinib, the predicted geometric mean fed/fasted AUC and C max ratios were 2.0 and 1.84, respectively, which was within 1.1-fold of the reported fed/fasted AUC ratio but underestimated the reported C max ratio by up to 1.9-fold. For both drugs, the interindividual variability in fed/fasted AUC and C max ratios was underpredicted. This suggests that the postprandial change in splanchnic blood flow is a major mechanism of the food effect for propranolol and ibrutinib but is insufficient to fully explain the observations. The proposed model is anticipated to improve the prediction of food effect for high-extraction drugs, but should be considered with other mechanisms.

  19. Ibrutinib Dosing Strategies Based on Interaction Potential of CYP3A4 Perpetrators Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwart, L; Snoeys, J; De Jong, J; Sukbuntherng, J; Mannaert, E; Monshouwer, M

    2016-11-01

    Based on ibrutinib pharmacokinetics and potential sensitivity towards CYP3A4-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs), a physiologically based pharmacokinetic approach was developed to mechanistically describe DDI with various CYP3A4 perpetrators in healthy men under fasting conditions. These models were verified using clinical data for ketoconazole (strong CYP3A4 inhibitor) and used to prospectively predict and confirm the inducing effect of rifampin (strong CYP3A4 inducer); DDIs with mild (fluvoxamine, azithromycin) and moderate inhibitors (diltiazem, voriconazole, clarithromycin, itraconazole, erythromycin), and moderate (efavirenz) and strong CYP3A4 inducers (carbamazepine), were also predicted. Ketoconazole increased ibrutinib area under the curve (AUC) by 24-fold, while rifampin decreased ibrutinib AUC by 10-fold; coadministration of ibrutinib with strong inhibitors or inducers should be avoided. The ibrutinib dose should be reduced to 140 mg (quarter of maximal prescribed dose) when coadministered with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors so that exposures remain within observed ranges at therapeutic doses. Thus, dose recommendations for CYP3A4 perpetrator use during ibrutinib treatment were developed and approved for labeling. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Characterize the Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Oral Extended Release Methylphenidate Products in Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available A previously presented physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for immediate release (IR methylphenidate (MPH was extended to characterize the pharmacokinetic behaviors of oral extended release (ER MPH formulations in adults for the first time. Information on the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, together with the biopharmaceutical properties of MPH, was integrated into the original model, with model parameters representing hepatic metabolism and intestinal non-specific loss recalibrated against in vitro and in vivo kinetic data sets with IR MPH. A Weibull function was implemented to describe the dissolution of different ER formulations. A variety of mathematical functions can be utilized to account for the engineered release/dissolution technologies to achieve better model performance. The physiological absorption model tracked well the plasma concentration profiles in adults receiving a multilayer-release MPH formulation or Metadate CD, while some degree of discrepancy was observed between predicted and observed plasma concentration profiles for Ritalin LA and Medikinet Retard. A local sensitivity analysis demonstrated that model parameters associated with the GI tract significantly influenced model predicted plasma MPH concentrations, albeit to varying degrees, suggesting the importance of better understanding the GI tract physiology, along with the intestinal non-specific loss of MPH. The model provides a quantitative tool to predict the biphasic plasma time course data for ER MPH, helping elucidate factors responsible for the diverse plasma MPH concentration profiles following oral dosing of different ER formulations.

  1. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin in rats. An application of the capillary membrane-limited model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sawada, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1987-07-01

    In order to simulate the distribution and elimination of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-EP) after iv bolus injection in rats, we proposed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model incorporating diffusional transport of /sup 125/I-beta-EP across the capillary membrane. This model assumes that the distribution of /sup 125/I-beta-EP is restricted only within the blood and the tissue interstitial fluid, and that a diffusional barrier across the capillary membrane exists in each tissue except the liver. The tissue-to-blood partition coefficients were estimated from the ratios of the concentration in tissues to that in arterial plasma at the terminal (pseudoequilibrium) phase. The total body plasma clearance (9.0 ml/min/kg) was appropriately assigned to the liver and kidney. The transcapillary diffusion clearances of /sup 125/I-beta-EP were also estimated and shown to correlate linearly with that of inulin in several tissues. Numerically solving the mass-balance differential equations as to plasma and each tissue simultaneously, simulated concentration curves of /sup 125/I-beta-EP corresponded well with the observed data. It was suggested by the simulation that the initial rapid disappearance of /sup 125/I-beta-EP from plasma after iv injection could be attributed in part to the transcapillary diffusion of the peptide.

  2. Application of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development at Pfizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Dickins, Maurice; Youdim, Kuresh; Gosset, James R; Attkins, Neil J; Hay, Tanya L; Gurrell, Ian K; Logan, Y Raj; Bungay, Peter J; Jones, Barry C; Gardner, Iain B

    2012-01-01

    Early prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and drug-drug interactions (DDI) in drug discovery and development allows for more informed decision making. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling can be used to answer a number of questions throughout the process of drug discovery and development and is thus becoming a very popular tool. PBPK models provide the opportunity to integrate key input parameters from different sources to not only estimate PK parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. Using examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilized through the stages of drug discovery and development to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and to increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however, some limitations need to be addressed to realize its application and utility more broadly.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and PBPK Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the landmark report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (NRC 1993), children at all stages of development, from fertilization through postnatal maturation, have explicitly been identified as an area of emphasis in human health risk assessments. Exposure to drugs or chemicals at any point in development has the potential for causing irreversible changes that can be unique to each stage of development (Grabowski and Daston 1983; Rodier 1978; Wilson 1973). While exposures of a developing embryo or fetus are mediated by the mother, postnatal exposures consist of maternal influences via breastfeeding as well as environmental factors (Figure 1). As a result, risk assessments for developmental toxicity must consider the sources as well as timing of potential exposures to adequately protect children when they may be the most exposed or the most sensitive to adverse consequences (NRC 1993).

  4. Pharmacokinetics and PBPK Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Richard A.

    2010-07-01

    Since the landmark report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (NRC 1993), children at all stages of development, from fertilization through postnatal maturation, have explicitly been identified as an area of emphasis in human health risk assessments. Exposure to drugs or chemicals at any point in development has the potential for causing irreversible changes that can be unique to each stage of development (Grabowski and Daston 1983; Rodier 1978; Wilson 1973). While exposures of a developing embryo or fetus are mediated by the mother, postnatal exposures consist of maternal influences via breastfeeding as well as environmental factors (Figure 1). As a result, risk assessments for developmental toxicity must consider the sources as well as timing of potential exposures to adequately protect children when they may be the most exposed or the most sensitive to adverse consequences (NRC 1993).

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DELTAMETHRIN IN THE ADULT MALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltamethrin (DLT) is a Type II pyrethroid insecticide widely used in agriculture and public health. DLT is a potent neurotoxin that is primarily cleared from the body by metabolism. To better understand the dosimetry of DLT in the central nervous system, a physiologically based ...

  6. IN VITRO ESTIMATES OF METABOLIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR USE IN PREDICTIVE PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING (PBPK) OF THE TYPE I PYRETHROIDS PERMETHRIN AND BIFENTHRIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides that are used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Hepatic clearance of the Type I pyrethroids permethrin and bifenthrin may be a critical determinant of their toxic effect. Rat LD50s reported in the literatur...

  7. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of two binary mixtures: metabolic activation of carbon tetrachloride by trichloroethylene and metabolic inhibition of chloroform by trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interaction between trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform (CHCI3) has been described as less than additive, with co-exposure to TCE and CHC13 resulting in less hepatic and renal toxicity than observed with CHCl3 alone. In contrast, the nonadditive interaction between TCE and...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR THE INHALATION OF 2,2,4-TRIMETHYLPENTANE (TMP) IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TMP (2,2,4-trimethylpentane,“isooctane”) is a colorless liquid used primarily in the alkylation of isobutene and butylene reactions to derive high-octane fuels. TMP is released in the environment through the manufacture, use, and disposal of products associated with the gasoline ...

  9. Development of an inhalation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for 2,2, 4-trimethylpentane (TMP) in male Long-Evans rats using gas uptake experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2,2,4-Trimethylpentane (TMP) is a volatile colorless liquid used primarily to increase the octane rating of combustible fuels. TMP is released in the environment through the manufacture, use, and disposal of products associated with the gasoline and petroleum industry. Short-term...

  10. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-05-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin C max by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CL int,T ) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves C max that coincide with the low C max of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A Population WB-PBPK Model of Colistin and its Prodrug CMS in Pigs: Focus on the Renal Distribution and Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Alexis; Henri, Jérôme; Bouchène, Salim; Laroche, Julian; Rolland, Jean-Guy; Manceau, Jacqueline; Laurentie, Michel; Couet, William; Grégoire, Nicolas

    2018-03-12

    The objective was the development of a whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) model for colistin, and its prodrug colistimethate sodium (CMS), in pigs to explore their tissue distribution, especially in kidneys. Plasma and tissue concentrations of CMS and colistin were measured after systemic administrations of different dosing regimens of CMS in pigs. The WB-PBPK model was developed based on these data according to a non-linear mixed effect approach and using NONMEM software. A detailed sub-model was implemented for kidneys to handle the complex disposition of CMS and colistin within this organ. The WB-PBPK model well captured the kinetic profiles of CMS and colistin in plasma. In kidneys, an accumulation and slow elimination of colistin were observed and well described by the model. Kidneys seemed to have a major role in the elimination processes, through tubular secretion of CMS and intracellular degradation of colistin. Lastly, to illustrate the usefulness of the PBPK model, an estimation of the withdrawal periods after veterinary use of CMS in pigs was made. The WB-PBPK model gives an insight into the renal distribution and elimination of CMS and colistin in pigs; it may be further developed to explore the colistin induced-nephrotoxicity in humans.

  12. Pharmacokinetics for regulatory risk analysis: the case of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, K T

    1988-12-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describing the uptake, metabolism, and excretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are now proposed for use in regulatory health-risk assessment. A steady-state analysis of one such model is shown to provide simple, convenient predicted relationships between an applied dose and the corresponding toxicologically effective, metabolized dose for certain VOCs like trichloroethylene (TCE). A version of this PBPK model was fit to data on human metabolism of TCE to urinary metabolites in chronically exposed workers, yielding a direct estimate of PBPK parameters governing human capacity to metabolize TCE. It is shown that this estimate is consistent with others based on experimental studies of TCE metabolism in humans exposed to TCE by inhalation for short periods. These results are applied to human cancer-risk assessment using rodent bioassay data on TCE-induced tumorigenesis.

  13. Chlorpyrifos PBPK/PD model for multiple routes of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poet, Torka S; Timchalk, Charles; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Bartels, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    1. Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an important pesticide used to control crop insects. Human Exposures to CPF will occur primarily through oral exposure to residues on foods. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model has been developed that describes the relationship between oral, dermal and inhalation doses of CPF and key events in the pathway for cholinergic effects. The model was built on a prior oral model that addressed age-related changes in metabolism and physiology. This multi-route model was developed in rats and humans to validate all scenarios in a parallelogram design. 2. Critical biological effects from CPF exposure require metabolic activation to CPF oxon, and small amounts of metabolism in tissues will potentially have a great effect on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic outcomes. Metabolism (bioactivation and detoxification) was therefore added in diaphragm, brain, lung and skin compartments. Pharmacokinetic data are available for controlled human exposures via the oral and dermal routes and from oral and inhalation studies in rats. The validated model was then used to determine relative dermal versus inhalation uptake from human volunteers exposed to CPF in an indoor scenario.

  14. Evaluation of deltamethrin kinetics and dosimetry in the maturing rat using a PBPK model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Kim, Hyo J.; Haines, Wendy T.; Bruckner, James V.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study (Kim et al., in press) revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90 days old. The objective of the current study was to modify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DLM disposition in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat (Mirfazaelian et al., 2006), so blood and target organ dosimetry could be accurately predicted during maturation. Age-specific organ weights and age-dependent changes in the oxidative and hydrolytic clearance of DLM were modeled with a generalized Michaelis-Menten model for growth and the summary equations incorporated into the PBPK model. The model's simulations compared favorably with empirical DLM time-courses in plasma, blood, brain and fat for the four age-groups evaluated (10, 21, 40 and 90 days old). PND 10 pups' area under the 24-h brain concentration time curve (AUC 0-24h ) was 3.8-fold higher than that of the PND 90 adults. Our maturing rat PBPK model allows for updating with age- and chemical-dependent parameters, so pyrethroid dosimetry can be forecast in young and aged individuals. Hence, this model provides a methodology for risk assessors to consider age-specific adjustments to oral Reference Doses on the basis of PK differences.

  15. Cutting Edge PBPK Models and Analyses: Providing the Basis for Future Modeling Efforts and Bridges to Emerging Toxicology Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Caldwell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK models are used for predictions of internal or target dose from environmental and pharmacologic chemical exposures. Their use in human risk assessment is dependent on the nature of databases (animal or human used to develop and test them, and includes extrapolations across species, experimental paradigms, and determination of variability of response within human populations. Integration of state-of-the science PBPK modeling with emerging computational toxicology models is critical for extrapolation between in vitro exposures, in vivo physiologic exposure, whole organism responses, and long-term health outcomes. This special issue contains papers that can provide the basis for future modeling efforts and provide bridges to emerging toxicology paradigms. In this overview paper, we present an overview of the field and introduction for these papers that includes discussions of model development, best practices, risk-assessment applications of PBPK models, and limitations and bridges of modeling approaches for future applications. Specifically, issues addressed include: (a increased understanding of human variability of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the population, (b exploration of mode of action hypotheses (MOA, (c application of biological modeling in the risk assessment of individual chemicals and chemical mixtures, and (d identification and discussion of uncertainties in the modeling process.

  16. Assessing human variability in kinetics for exposures to multiple environmental chemicals: a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling case study with dichloromethane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcke, Mathieu; Haddad, Sami

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the magnitude of interindividual variability in internal dose for inhalation exposure to single versus multiple chemicals. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for adults (AD), neonates (NEO), toddlers (TODD), and pregnant women (PW) were used to simulate inhalation exposure to "low" (RfC-like) or "high" (AEGL-like) air concentrations of benzene (Bz) or dichloromethane (DCM), along with various levels of toluene alone or toluene with ethylbenzene and xylene. Monte Carlo simulations were performed and distributions of relevant internal dose metrics of either Bz or DCM were computed. Area under the blood concentration of parent compound versus time curve (AUC)-based variability in AD, TODD, and PW rose for Bz when concomitant "low" exposure to mixtures of increasing complexities occurred (coefficient of variation (CV) = 16-24%, vs. 12-15% for Bz alone), but remained unchanged considering DCM. Conversely, AUC-based CV in NEO fell (15 to 5% for Bz; 12 to 6% for DCM). Comparable trends were observed considering production of metabolites (AMET), except for NEO's CYP2E1-mediated metabolites of Bz, where an increased CV was observed (20 to 71%). For "high" exposure scenarios, Cmax-based variability of Bz and DCM remained unchanged in AD and PW, but decreased in NEO (CV= 11-16% to 2-6%) and TODD (CV= 12-13% to 7-9%). Conversely, AMET-based variability for both substrates rose in every subpopulation. This study analyzed for the first time the impact of multiple exposures on interindividual variability in toxicokinetics. Evidence indicates that this impact depends upon chemical concentrations and biochemical properties, as well as the subpopulation and internal dose metrics considered.

  17. Variation in predicted internal concentrations in relation to PBPK model complexity for rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmina, E.S.; Wondrousch, D. [UFZ Department of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Institute for Organic Chemistry, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Str. 29, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Kühne, R. [UFZ Department of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Potemkin, V.A. [Department of Chemistry, South Ural State Medical University, Vorovskogo 64, 454048, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Schüürmann, G. [UFZ Department of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Institute for Organic Chemistry, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Str. 29, 09596 Freiberg (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    The present study is motivated by the increasing demand to consider internal partitioning into tissues instead of exposure concentrations for the environmental toxicity assessment. To this end, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can be applied. We evaluated the variation in accuracy of PBPK model outcomes depending on tissue constituents modeled as sorptive phases and chemical distribution tendencies addressed by molecular descriptors. The model performance was examined using data from 150 experiments for 28 chemicals collected from US EPA databases. The simplest PBPK model is based on the “K{sub ow}-lipid content” approach as being traditional for environmental toxicology. The most elaborated one considers five biological sorptive phases (polar and non-polar lipids, water, albumin and the remaining proteins) and makes use of LSER (linear solvation energy relationship) parameters to describe the compound partitioning behavior. The “K{sub ow}-lipid content”-based PBPK model shows more than one order of magnitude difference in predicted and measured values for 37% of the studied exposure experiments while for the most elaborated model this happens only for 7%. It is shown that further improvements could be achieved by introducing corrections for metabolic biotransformation and compound transmission hindrance through a cellular membrane. The analysis of the interface distribution tendencies shows that polar tissue constituents, namely water, polar lipids and proteins, play an important role in the accumulation behavior of polar compounds with H-bond donating functional groups. For compounds without H-bond donating fragments preferable accumulation phases are storage lipids and water depending on compound polarity. - Highlights: • For reliable predictions, models of a certain complexity should be compared. • For reliable predictions non-lipid fish tissue constituents should be considered. • H-donor compounds preferably accumulate in water

  18. Variation in predicted internal concentrations in relation to PBPK model complexity for rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmina, E.S.; Wondrousch, D.; Kühne, R.; Potemkin, V.A.; Schüürmann, G.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is motivated by the increasing demand to consider internal partitioning into tissues instead of exposure concentrations for the environmental toxicity assessment. To this end, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can be applied. We evaluated the variation in accuracy of PBPK model outcomes depending on tissue constituents modeled as sorptive phases and chemical distribution tendencies addressed by molecular descriptors. The model performance was examined using data from 150 experiments for 28 chemicals collected from US EPA databases. The simplest PBPK model is based on the “K_o_w-lipid content” approach as being traditional for environmental toxicology. The most elaborated one considers five biological sorptive phases (polar and non-polar lipids, water, albumin and the remaining proteins) and makes use of LSER (linear solvation energy relationship) parameters to describe the compound partitioning behavior. The “K_o_w-lipid content”-based PBPK model shows more than one order of magnitude difference in predicted and measured values for 37% of the studied exposure experiments while for the most elaborated model this happens only for 7%. It is shown that further improvements could be achieved by introducing corrections for metabolic biotransformation and compound transmission hindrance through a cellular membrane. The analysis of the interface distribution tendencies shows that polar tissue constituents, namely water, polar lipids and proteins, play an important role in the accumulation behavior of polar compounds with H-bond donating functional groups. For compounds without H-bond donating fragments preferable accumulation phases are storage lipids and water depending on compound polarity. - Highlights: • For reliable predictions, models of a certain complexity should be compared. • For reliable predictions non-lipid fish tissue constituents should be considered. • H-donor compounds preferably accumulate in water, polar

  19. Application of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to explore the role of kidney transporters in renal reabsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, Rachel Rogers; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Renal elimination and the resulting clearance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the serum exhibit pronounced sex differences in the adult rat. The literature suggests that this is largely due to hormonally regulated expression of organic anion transporters (OATs) on the apical and basolateral membranes of the proximal tubule cells that facilitate excretion and reabsorption of PFOA from the filtrate into the blood. Previously developed PBPK models of PFOA exposure in the rat have not been parameterized to specifically account for transporter-mediated renal elimination. We developed a PBPK model for PFOA in male and female rats to explore the role of Oat1, Oat3, and Oatp1a1 in sex-specific renal reabsorption and excretion of PFOA. Descriptions of the kinetic behavior of these transporters were extrapolated from in vitro studies and the model was used to simulate time-course serum, liver, and urine data for intravenous (IV) and oral exposures in both sexes. Model predicted concentrations of PFOA in the liver, serum, and urine showed good agreement with experimental data for both male and female rats indicating that in vitro derived physiological descriptions of transporter-mediated renal reabsorption can successfully predict sex-dependent excretion of PFOA in the rat. This study supports the hypothesis that sex-specific serum half-lives for PFOA are largely driven by expression of transporters in the kidney and contribute to the development of PBPK modeling as a tool for evaluating the role of transporters in renal clearance. - Highlights: • The PBPK model for PFOA in the rat explores the role of OATs in sex-specific clearance. • Descriptions of OAT kinetics were extrapolated from in vitro studies. • Model predictions showed good fit with experimental data for male and female rats.

  20. Application of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to explore the role of kidney transporters in renal reabsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, Rachel Rogers, E-mail: idz7@cdc.gov [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Community Health Investigations, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, 341 Pharmacy South, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey [Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, 341 Pharmacy South, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Food and Drug Administration, National Center for Toxicological Research, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    ABSTRACT: Renal elimination and the resulting clearance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the serum exhibit pronounced sex differences in the adult rat. The literature suggests that this is largely due to hormonally regulated expression of organic anion transporters (OATs) on the apical and basolateral membranes of the proximal tubule cells that facilitate excretion and reabsorption of PFOA from the filtrate into the blood. Previously developed PBPK models of PFOA exposure in the rat have not been parameterized to specifically account for transporter-mediated renal elimination. We developed a PBPK model for PFOA in male and female rats to explore the role of Oat1, Oat3, and Oatp1a1 in sex-specific renal reabsorption and excretion of PFOA. Descriptions of the kinetic behavior of these transporters were extrapolated from in vitro studies and the model was used to simulate time-course serum, liver, and urine data for intravenous (IV) and oral exposures in both sexes. Model predicted concentrations of PFOA in the liver, serum, and urine showed good agreement with experimental data for both male and female rats indicating that in vitro derived physiological descriptions of transporter-mediated renal reabsorption can successfully predict sex-dependent excretion of PFOA in the rat. This study supports the hypothesis that sex-specific serum half-lives for PFOA are largely driven by expression of transporters in the kidney and contribute to the development of PBPK modeling as a tool for evaluating the role of transporters in renal clearance. - Highlights: • The PBPK model for PFOA in the rat explores the role of OATs in sex-specific clearance. • Descriptions of OAT kinetics were extrapolated from in vitro studies. • Model predictions showed good fit with experimental data for male and female rats.

  1. Physiologically Based Simulations of Deuterated Glucose for Quantifying Cell Turnover in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Niederalt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In vivo [6,6-2H2]-glucose labeling is a state-of-the-art technique for quantifying cell proliferation and cell disappearance in humans. However, there are discrepancies between estimates of T cell proliferation reported in short (1-day versus long (7-day 2H2-glucose studies and very-long (9-week 2H2O studies. It has been suggested that these discrepancies arise from underestimation of true glucose exposure from intermittent blood sampling in the 1-day study. Label availability in glucose studies is normally approximated by a “square pulse” (Sq pulse. Since the body glucose pool is small and turns over rapidly, the availability of labeled glucose can be subject to large fluctuations and the Sq pulse approximation may be very inaccurate. Here, we model the pharmacokinetics of exogenous labeled glucose using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model to assess the impact of a more complete description of label availability as a function of time on estimates of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation and disappearance. The model enabled us to predict the exposure to labeled glucose during the fasting and de-labeling phases, to capture the fluctuations of labeled glucose availability caused by the intake of food or high-glucose beverages, and to recalculate the proliferation and death rates of immune cells. The PBPK model was used to reanalyze experimental data from three previously published studies using different labeling protocols. Although using the PBPK enrichment profile decreased the 1-day proliferation estimates by about 4 and 7% for CD4 and CD8+ T cells, respectively, differences with the 7-day and 9-week studies remained significant. We conclude that the approximations underlying the “square pulse” approach—recently suggested as the most plausible hypothesis—only explain a component of the discrepancy in published T cell proliferation rate estimates.

  2. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC INFORMATION IN THE ARSENIC PBPK MODEL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    INCORPORATING MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS IN A PBPK MODEL FOR ARSENICElaina M. Kenyon, Michael F. Hughes, Marina V. Evans, David J. Thomas, U.S. EPA; Miroslav Styblo, University of North Carolina; Michael Easterling, Analytical Sciences, Inc.A physiologically based phar...

  4. Integration of genome-scale metabolic networks into whole-body PBPK models shows phenotype-specific cases of drug-induced metabolic perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Henrik; Thiel, Christoph; Baier, Vanessa; Blank, Lars M; Kuepfer, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Drug-induced perturbations of the endogenous metabolic network are a potential root cause of cellular toxicity. A mechanistic understanding of such unwanted side effects during drug therapy is therefore vital for patient safety. The comprehensive assessment of such drug-induced injuries requires the simultaneous consideration of both drug exposure at the whole-body and resulting biochemical responses at the cellular level. We here present a computational multi-scale workflow that combines whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and organ-specific genome-scale metabolic network (GSMN) models through shared reactions of the xenobiotic metabolism. The applicability of the proposed workflow is illustrated for isoniazid, a first-line antibacterial agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis , which is known to cause idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injuries (DILI). We combined GSMN models of a human liver with N-acetyl transferase 2 (NAT2)-phenotype-specific PBPK models of isoniazid. The combined PBPK-GSMN models quantitatively describe isoniazid pharmacokinetics, as well as intracellular responses, and changes in the exometabolome in a human liver following isoniazid administration. Notably, intracellular and extracellular responses identified with the PBPK-GSMN models are in line with experimental and clinical findings. Moreover, the drug-induced metabolic perturbations are distributed and attenuated in the metabolic network in a phenotype-dependent manner. Our simulation results show that a simultaneous consideration of both drug pharmacokinetics at the whole-body and metabolism at the cellular level is mandatory to explain drug-induced injuries at the patient level. The proposed workflow extends our mechanistic understanding of the biochemistry underlying adverse events and may be used to prevent drug-induced injuries in the future.

  5. Incorporating pharmacokinetic differences between children and adults in assessing children's risks to environmental toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Hattis, Dale; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2004-01-01

    Children's risks from environmental toxicant exposure can be affected by pharmacokinetic factors that affect the internal dose of parent chemical or active metabolite. There are numerous physiologic differences between neonates and adults that affect pharmacokinetics including size of lipid, and tissue compartments, organ blood flows, protein binding capacity, and immature function of renal and hepatic systems. These factors combine to decrease the clearance of many therapeutic drugs, which can also be expected to occur with environmental toxicants in neonates. The net effect may be greater or lesser internal dose of active toxicant depending upon how the agent is distributed, metabolized, and eliminated. Child/adult pharmacokinetic differences decrease with increasing postnatal age, but these factors should still be considered in any children's age group, birth through adolescence, for which there is toxicant exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can simulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics in both children and adults, allowing for a direct comparison of internal dose and risk across age groups. This review provides special focus on the development of hepatic cytochrome P-450 enzymes (CYPs) in early life and how this information, along with many factors unique to children, can be applied to PBPK models for this receptor population. This review describes a case study involving the development of neonatal PBPK models for the CYP1A2 substrates caffeine and theophylline. These models were calibrated with pharmacokinetic data in neonates and used to help understand key metabolic differences between neonates and adults across these two drugs

  6. Development of PBPK models for PFOA and PFOS for human pregnancy and lactation life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loccisano, Anne E; Longnecker, Matthew P; Campbell, Jerry L; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acid carboxylates and sulfonates (PFAA) have many consumer and industrial applications. Developmental toxicity studies in animals have raised concern about potential reproductive/developmental effects of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS); however, in humans conflicting results have been reported for associations between maternal PFAA levels and these outcomes. Risk assessments and interpretation of available human data during gestation and lactation are hindered due to lack of a framework for understanding and estimating maternal, fetal, and neonatal pharmacokinetics (PK). Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed for PFOA and PFOS for the gestation and lactation life stages in humans to understand how the physiological changes associated with development affect pharmacokinetics of these compounds in the mother, fetus, and infant. These models were derived from PBPK models for PFOA/PFOS that were previously developed for adult humans and rats during gestation and lactation and from existing human pregnancy and lactation models developed for other chemicals. The models simulated PFOA and PFOS concentrations in fetal, infant, and maternal plasma and milk, were compared to available data in humans, and also were used to estimate maternal exposure. The models reported here identified several research needs, which include (1) the identification of transporters involved in renal resorption to explain the multiyear half-lives of these compounds in humans, (2) factors affecting clearance of PFOA/PFOS during gestation and lactation, and (3) data to estimate clearance of PFOA/PFOS in infants. These models may help address concerns regarding possible adverse health effects due to PFOA/PFOS exposure in the fetus and infant and may be useful in comparing pharmacokinetics across life stages.

  7. Use of a probabilistic PBPK/PD model to calculate Data Derived Extrapolation Factors for chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poet, Torka S; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, Michael J; Smith, Jordan N; McDougal, Robin; Juberg, Daland R; Price, Paul S

    2017-06-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model combined with Monte Carlo analysis of inter-individual variation was used to assess the effects of the insecticide, chlorpyrifos and its active metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon in humans. The PBPK/PD model has previously been validated and used to describe physiological changes in typical individuals as they grow from birth to adulthood. This model was updated to include physiological and metabolic changes that occur with pregnancy. The model was then used to assess the impact of inter-individual variability in physiology and biochemistry on predictions of internal dose metrics and quantitatively assess the impact of major sources of parameter uncertainty and biological diversity on the pharmacodynamics of red blood cell acetylcholinesterase inhibition. These metrics were determined in potentially sensitive populations of infants, adult women, pregnant women, and a combined population of adult men and women. The parameters primarily responsible for inter-individual variation in RBC acetylcholinesterase inhibition were related to metabolic clearance of CPF and CPF-oxon. Data Derived Extrapolation Factors that address intra-species physiology and biochemistry to replace uncertainty factors with quantitative differences in metrics were developed in these same populations. The DDEFs were less than 4 for all populations. These data and modeling approach will be useful in ongoing and future human health risk assessments for CPF and could be used for other chemicals with potential human exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Applications of linking PBPK and PD models to predict the impact of genotypic variability, formulation differences, differences in target binding capacity and target site drug concentrations on drug responses and variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoranjenni eChetty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate the added value of integrating prior in vitro data and knowledge-rich physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models with pharmacodynamics (PD models. Four distinct applications that were developed and tested are presented here. PBPK models were developed for metoprolol using different CYP2D6 genotypes based on in vitro data. Application of the models for prediction of phenotypic differences in the pharmacokinetics (PK and PD compared favourably with clinical data, demonstrating that these differences can be predicted prior to the availability of such data from clinical trials. In the second case, PK and PD data for an immediate release formulation of nifedipine together with in vitro dissolution data for a controlled release formulation (CR were used to predict the PK and PD of the CR. This approach can be useful to pharmaceutical scientists during formulation development. The operational model of agonism was used in the third application to describe the hypnotic effects of triazolam, and this was successfully extrapolated to zolpidem by changing only the drug related parameters from in vitro experiments. This PBPK modelling approach can be useful to developmental scientists who which to compare several drug candidates in the same therapeutic class. Finally, differences in QTc prolongation due to quinidine in Caucasian and Korean females were successfully predicted by the model using free heart concentrations as an input to the PD models. This PBPK linked PD model was used to demonstrate a higher sensitivity to free heart concentrations of quinidine in Caucasian females, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding of a clinical observation. In general, permutations of certain conditions which potentially change PK and hence PD may not be amenable to the conduct of clinical studies but linking PBPK with PD provides an alternative method of investigating the potential impact of PK changes on PD.

  9. Applications of linking PBPK and PD models to predict the impact of genotypic variability, formulation differences, differences in target binding capacity and target site drug concentrations on drug responses and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Rose, Rachel H; Abduljalil, Khaled; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Lu, Gaohua; Cain, Theresa; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the added value of integrating prior in vitro data and knowledge-rich physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models with pharmacodynamics (PDs) models. Four distinct applications that were developed and tested are presented here. PBPK models were developed for metoprolol using different CYP2D6 genotypes based on in vitro data. Application of the models for prediction of phenotypic differences in the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and PD compared favorably with clinical data, demonstrating that these differences can be predicted prior to the availability of such data from clinical trials. In the second case, PK and PD data for an immediate release formulation of nifedipine together with in vitro dissolution data for a controlled release (CR) formulation were used to predict the PK and PD of the CR. This approach can be useful to pharmaceutical scientists during formulation development. The operational model of agonism was used in the third application to describe the hypnotic effects of triazolam, and this was successfully extrapolated to zolpidem by changing only the drug related parameters from in vitro experiments. This PBPK modeling approach can be useful to developmental scientists who which to compare several drug candidates in the same therapeutic class. Finally, differences in QTc prolongation due to quinidine in Caucasian and Korean females were successfully predicted by the model using free heart concentrations as an input to the PD models. This PBPK linked PD model was used to demonstrate a higher sensitivity to free heart concentrations of quinidine in Caucasian females, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding of a clinical observation. In general, permutations of certain conditions which potentially change PK and hence PD may not be amenable to the conduct of clinical studies but linking PBPK with PD provides an alternative method of investigating the potential impact of PK changes on PD.

  10. Hydroquinone PBPK model refinement and application to dermal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poet, Torka S; Carlton, Betsy D; Deyo, James A; Hinderliter, Paul M

    2010-11-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for hydroquinone (HQ) was refined to include an expanded description of HQ-glucuronide metabolites and a description of dermal exposures to support route-to-route and cross-species extrapolation. Total urinary excretion of metabolites from in vivo rat dermal exposures was used to estimate a percutaneous permeability coefficient (K(p); 3.6×10(-5) cm/h). The human in vivo K(p) was estimated to be 1.62×10(-4) cm/h, based on in vitro skin permeability data in rats and humans and rat in vivo values. The projected total multi-substituted glutathione (which was used as an internal dose surrogate for the toxic glutathione metabolites) was modeled following an exposure scenario based on submersion of both hands in a 5% aqueous solution of HQ (similar to black and white photographic developing solution) for 2 h, a worst-case exposure scenario. Total multi-substituted glutathione following this human dermal exposure scenario was several orders of magnitude lower than the internal total glutathione conjugates in rats following an oral exposure to the rat NOEL of 20 mg/kg. Thus, under more realistic human dermal exposure conditions, it is unlikely that toxic glutathione conjugates (primarily the di- and, to a lesser degree, the tri-glutathione conjugate) will reach significant levels in target tissues. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Dynamical coupling of PBPK/PD and AUC-based toxicity models for arsenic in tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus from blackfoot disease area in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.-M.; Liang, H.-M.; Chen, B.-C.; Singh Sher; Tsai, J.-W.; Chou, Y.-H.; Lin, W.-T.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models were developed for arsenic (As) in tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus from blackfoot disease area in Taiwan. The PBPK/PD model structure consisted of muscle, gill, gut wall, alimentary canal, and liver, which were interconnected by blood circulation. We integrate the target organ concentrations and dynamic response describing uptake, metabolism, and disposition of As and the associated area-under-curve (AUC)-based toxicological dynamics following an acute exposure. The model validations were compared against the field observations from real tilapia farms and previously published uptake/depuration experimental data, indicating that predicted and measured As concentrations in major organs of tilapia were in good agreement. The model was utilized to reasonably simulate and construct a dose-dependent dynamic response between mortality effect and equilibrium target organ concentrations. Model simulations suggest that tilapia gills may serve as a surrogate sensitive biomarker of short-term exposure to As. This integrated As PBPK/PD/AUC model quantitatively estimates target organ concentration and dynamic response in tilapia and is a strong framework for future waterborne metal model development and for refining a biologically-based risk assessment for exposure of aquatic species to waterborne metals under a variety of scenarios. - Integrated toxicity models can identify dynamic responses of fish to arsenic

  12. Dynamical coupling of PBPK/PD and AUC-based toxicity models for arsenic in tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus from blackfoot disease area in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C.-M. [Ecotoxicological Modeling Center, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China)]. E-mail: cmliao@ntu.edu.tw; Liang, H.-M. [Ecotoxicological Modeling Center, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China); Chen, B.-C. [Department of Post-Modern Agriculture, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan 52345 (China); Singh Sher [Center of Genomics Medicine, School of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China); Tsai, J.-W. [Ecotoxicological Modeling Center, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China); Chou, Y.-H. [Ecotoxicological Modeling Center, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617 (China); Lin, W.-T. [Environment Change Research Center, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan 11517 (China)

    2005-05-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models were developed for arsenic (As) in tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus from blackfoot disease area in Taiwan. The PBPK/PD model structure consisted of muscle, gill, gut wall, alimentary canal, and liver, which were interconnected by blood circulation. We integrate the target organ concentrations and dynamic response describing uptake, metabolism, and disposition of As and the associated area-under-curve (AUC)-based toxicological dynamics following an acute exposure. The model validations were compared against the field observations from real tilapia farms and previously published uptake/depuration experimental data, indicating that predicted and measured As concentrations in major organs of tilapia were in good agreement. The model was utilized to reasonably simulate and construct a dose-dependent dynamic response between mortality effect and equilibrium target organ concentrations. Model simulations suggest that tilapia gills may serve as a surrogate sensitive biomarker of short-term exposure to As. This integrated As PBPK/PD/AUC model quantitatively estimates target organ concentration and dynamic response in tilapia and is a strong framework for future waterborne metal model development and for refining a biologically-based risk assessment for exposure of aquatic species to waterborne metals under a variety of scenarios. - Integrated toxicity models can identify dynamic responses of fish to arsenic.

  13. Calibration and validation of a physiologically based model for soman intoxication in the rat, marmoset, guinea pig and pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaizhen; Seng, Kok-Yong

    2012-09-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model has been developed for low, medium and high levels of soman intoxication in the rat, marmoset, guinea pig and pig. The primary objective of this model was to describe the pharmacokinetics of soman after intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration in the rat, marmoset, guinea pig, and pig as well as its subsequent pharmacodynamic effects on blood acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, relating dosimetry to physiological response. The reactions modelled in each physiologically realistic compartment are: (1) partitioning of C(±)P(±) soman from the blood into the tissue; (2) inhibition of AChE and carboxylesterase (CaE) by soman; (3) elimination of soman by enzymatic hydrolysis; (4) de novo synthesis and degradation of AChE and CaE; and (5) aging of AChE-soman and CaE-soman complexes. The model was first calibrated for the rat, then extrapolated for validation in the marmoset, guinea pig and pig. Adequate fits to experimental data on the time course of soman pharmacokinetics and AChE inhibition were achieved in the mammalian models. In conclusion, the present model adequately predicts the dose-response relationship resulting from soman intoxication and can potentially be applied to predict soman pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in other species, including human. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of potential toxicity from co-exposure to three CNS depressants (toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) under resting and working conditions using PBPK modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, James E; Bigelow, Philip L; Mumtaz, Moiz M; Andersen, Melvin E; Dobrev, Ivan D; Yang, Raymond S H

    2005-03-01

    Under OSHA and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) guidelines, the mixture formula (unity calculation) provides a method for evaluating exposures to mixtures of chemicals that cause similar toxicities. According to the formula, if exposures are reduced in proportion to the number of chemicals and their respective exposure limits, the overall exposure is acceptable. This approach assumes that responses are additive, which is not the case when pharmacokinetic interactions occur. To determine the validity of the additivity assumption, we performed unity calculations for a variety of exposures to toluene, ethylbenzene, and/or xylene using the concentration of each chemical in blood in the calculation instead of the inhaled concentration. The blood concentrations were predicted using a validated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to allow exploration of a variety of exposure scenarios. In addition, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and ACGIH occupational exposure limits were largely based on studies of humans or animals that were resting during exposure. The PBPK model was also used to determine the increased concentration of chemicals in the blood when employees were exercising or performing manual work. At rest, a modest overexposure occurs due to pharmacokinetic interactions when exposure is equal to levels where a unity calculation is 1.0 based on threshold limit values (TLVs). Under work load, however, internal exposure was 87%higher than provided by the TLVs. When exposures were controlled by a unity calculation based on permissible exposure limits (PELs), internal exposure was 2.9 and 4.6 times the exposures at the TLVs at rest and workload, respectively. If exposure was equal to PELs outright, internal exposure was 12.5 and 16 times the exposure at the TLVs at rest and workload, respectively. These analyses indicate the importance of (1) selecting appropriate exposure limits, (2) performing unity

  15. A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S.H.; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18 years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. - Highlights: → PBPK modeling was used to study the kinetics of several PCBs in a marine mammal. → Harbor porpoises are sensitive to pollution and therefore ideal model organisms. → Black Sea data were used for parameterization. → North Sea data for assessing temporal trends (1990-2008). → PBPK modeling is a non-invasive and non-destructive tool.

  16. Measuring the Impact of Gastrointestinal Variables on the Systemic Outcome of Two Suspensions of Posaconazole by a PBPK Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Bart; Talattof, Arjang; Paixão, Paulo; Bermejo, Marival; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Löbenberg, Raimar; Amidon, Gordon L

    2018-03-29

    For the last two decades, the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models has grown exponentially in the field of oral absorption and in a regulatory context. Although these models are widely used, their predictive power should be validated and optimized in order to rely on these models and to know exactly what is going on "under the hood". In this study, an automated sensitivity analysis (ASA) was performed for 11 gastrointestinal (GI) variables that are integrated into the PBPK software program Simcyp®. The model of interest was a previously validated workspace that was able to predict the intraluminal and systemic behavior of two different suspensions of posaconazole in the Simcyp® Simulator. The sensitivity of the following GI parameters was evaluated in this model: gastric and duodenal pH, gastric and duodenal bicarbonate concentrations (reflecting buffer capacity), duodenal bile salts concentration, gastric emptying, the interdigestive migrating motor complex (IMMC), small intestinal transit time (SITT), gastric and jejunal volumes, and permeability. The most sensitive parameters were gastric/duodenal pH and gastric emptying, for both suspensions. The outcome of the sensitivity analyses highlights the important GI variables that must be integrated into an in vivo predictive dissolution test to help and create a rational and scientific framework/design for product development of novel and generic drug products.

  17. Pharmacokinetics for regulatory risk analysis: the case of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (methyl chloroform).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, K T; Hall, L C

    1989-08-01

    A methodology for using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to derive predicted safe concentrations of noncarcinogens in drinking water for humans based on experimentally determined no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) in animals is presented and applied to the case of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (methyl chloroform, MC). For each toxic endpoint and lowest corresponding NOAEL identified for MC, we considered a set of toxicologically plausible options regarding the presumed toxic agent and the metric for effective dose to target tissue. A four-compartment PBPK model for rodents was used to estimate corresponding effective doses to the animals used to obtain the experimental NOAELs. A five-compartment PBPK model was then applied, in conjunction with a multiroute (inhalation, ingestion and dermal) human-exposure scenario, to calculate alternative concentrations of MC in drinking water predicted to result in corresponding effective doses to the same target tissues in humans. In the case of MC, the PBPK approach to interspecies and interroute extrapolation of toxicity data resulted in lower drinking water concentrations predicted to be nontoxic to humans than corresponding concentrations obtained using a traditional method for determining safe levels.

  18. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 μg d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Völkel et al., 2002). Völkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Völkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: ► A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. ► The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. ► The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. ► Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. ► Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  19. Application of Pharmacokinetics Modelling to Predict Human Exposure of a Cationic Liposomal Subunit Antigen Vaccine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. S. Badhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of a liposomal subunit antigen vaccine system composed of the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA and the immunostimulatory agent trehalose 6,6-dibehenate (TDB (8:1 molar ratio combined with the Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1 antigen were modelled using mouse in-vivo data. Compartment modelling and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK were used to predict the administration site (muscle and target site (lymph temporal concentration profiles and factors governing these. Initial estimates using compartmental modelling established that quadriceps pharmacokinetics for the liposome demonstrated a long half-life (22.6 days compared to the associated antigen (2.62 days. A mouse minimal-PBPK model was developed and successfully predicted quadriceps liposome and antigen pharmacokinetics. Predictions for the popliteal lymph node (PLN aligned well at earlier time-points. A local sensitivity analysis highlighted that the predicted AUCmuscle was sensitive to the antigen degradation constant kdeg (resulting in a 3-log change more so than the fraction escaping the quadriceps (fe (resulting in a 10-fold change, and the predicted AUCPLN was highly sensitive to fe. A global sensitivity analysis of the antigen in the muscle demonstrated that model predictions were within the 50th percentile for predictions and showed acceptable fits. To further translate in-vitro data previously generated by our group, the mouse minimal-PBPK model was extrapolated to humans and predictions made for antigen pharmacokinetics in muscle and PLN. Global analysis demonstrated that both kdeg and fe had a minimal impact on the resulting simulations in the muscle but a greater impact in the PLN. In summary, this study has predicted the in-vivo fate of DDA:TDB:H1 in humans and demonstrated the roles that formulation degradation and fraction escaping the depot site can play upon the overall depot effect within the site of administration.

  20. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?-An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0-35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis.

  1. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?—An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Huynh-Delerme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0–35 mg/L in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004. The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis.

  2. Maximum Recommended Dosage of Lithium for Pregnant Women Based on a PBPK Model for Lithium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Horton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of bipolar disorder with lithium therapy during pregnancy is a medical challenge. Bipolar disorder is more prevalent in women and its onset is often concurrent with peak reproductive age. Treatment typically involves administration of the element lithium, which has been classified as a class D drug (legal to use during pregnancy, but may cause birth defects and is one of only thirty known teratogenic drugs. There is no clear recommendation in the literature on the maximum acceptable dosage regimen for pregnant, bipolar women. We recommend a maximum dosage regimen based on a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model. The model simulates the concentration of lithium in the organs and tissues of a pregnant woman and her fetus. First, we modeled time-dependent lithium concentration profiles resulting from lithium therapy known to have caused birth defects. Next, we identified maximum and average fetal lithium concentrations during treatment. Then, we developed a lithium therapy regimen to maximize the concentration of lithium in the mother’s brain, while maintaining the fetal concentration low enough to reduce the risk of birth defects. This maximum dosage regimen suggested by the model was 400 mg lithium three times per day.

  3. Development of an updated PBPK model for trichloroethylene and metabolites in mice, and its application to discern the role of oxidative metabolism in TCE-induced hepatomegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M V; Chiu, W A; Okino, M S; Caldwell, J C

    2009-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a lipophilic solvent rapidly absorbed and metabolized via oxidation and conjugation to a variety of metabolites that cause toxicity to several internal targets. Increases in liver weight (hepatomegaly) have been reported to occur quickly in rodents after TCE exposure, with liver tumor induction reported in mice after long-term exposure. An integrated dataset for gavage and inhalation TCE exposure and oral data for exposure to two of its oxidative metabolites (TCA and DCA) was used, in combination with an updated and more accurate physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, to examine the question as to whether the presence of TCA in the liver is responsible for TCE-induced hepatomegaly in mice. The updated PBPK model was used to help discern the quantitative contribution of metabolites to this effect. The update of the model was based on a detailed evaluation of predictions from previously published models and additional preliminary analyses based on gas uptake inhalation data in mice. The parameters of the updated model were calibrated using Bayesian methods with an expanded pharmacokinetic database consisting of oral, inhalation, and iv studies of TCE administration as well as studies of TCE metabolites in mice. The dose-response relationships for hepatomegaly derived from the multi-study database showed that the proportionality of dose to response for TCE- and DCA-induced hepatomegaly is not observed for administered doses of TCA in the studied range. The updated PBPK model was used to make a quantitative comparison of internal dose of metabolized and administered TCA. While the internal dose of TCA predicted by modeling of TCE exposure (i.e., mg TCA/kg-d) showed a linear relationship with hepatomegaly, the slope of the relationship was much greater than that for directly administered TCA. Thus, the degree of hepatomegaly induced per unit of TCA produced through TCE oxidation is greater than that expected per unit of TCA

  4. Development of an updated PBPK model for trichloroethylene and metabolites in mice, and its application to discern the role of oxidative metabolism in TCE-induced hepatomegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.V.; Chiu, W.A.; Okino, M.S.; Caldwell, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a lipophilic solvent rapidly absorbed and metabolized via oxidation and conjugation to a variety of metabolites that cause toxicity to several internal targets. Increases in liver weight (hepatomegaly) have been reported to occur quickly in rodents after TCE exposure, with liver tumor induction reported in mice after long-term exposure. An integrated dataset for gavage and inhalation TCE exposure and oral data for exposure to two of its oxidative metabolites (TCA and DCA) was used, in combination with an updated and more accurate physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, to examine the question as to whether the presence of TCA in the liver is responsible for TCE-induced hepatomegaly in mice. The updated PBPK model was used to help discern the quantitative contribution of metabolites to this effect. The update of the model was based on a detailed evaluation of predictions from previously published models and additional preliminary analyses based on gas uptake inhalation data in mice. The parameters of the updated model were calibrated using Bayesian methods with an expanded pharmacokinetic database consisting of oral, inhalation, and iv studies of TCE administration as well as studies of TCE metabolites in mice. The dose-response relationships for hepatomegaly derived from the multi-study database showed that the proportionality of dose to response for TCE- and DCA-induced hepatomegaly is not observed for administered doses of TCA in the studied range. The updated PBPK model was used to make a quantitative comparison of internal dose of metabolized and administered TCA. While the internal dose of TCA predicted by modeling of TCE exposure (i.e., mg TCA/kg-d) showed a linear relationship with hepatomegaly, the slope of the relationship was much greater than that for directly administered TCA. Thus, the degree of hepatomegaly induced per unit of TCA produced through TCE oxidation is greater than that expected per unit of TCA

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling of 4,4'-methylenedianiline released from reused polyurethane dialyzer potting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Luu, H M; Hutter, J C

    2000-01-01

    4, 4'-Methylenedianiline (MDA) is a hydrolysis degradation product that can be released from polyurethanes commonly used in medical device applications. MDA is mutagenic and carcinogenic in animals. In humans, it is hepatotoxic, a known contact and respiratory allergen, and a suspected carcinogen. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of MDA in patients exposed to MDA leached from the potting materials of hemodialyzers. A worst-case reuse situation and a single use case were investigated. The PBPK model included five tissue compartments: liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, slowly perfused tissues, and richly perfused tissues. Physiological and chemical parameters of a healthy individual used in the model were obtained from the literature. The model was calibrated using previously published kinetic studies of IV administered doses of (14) C-MDA to rats. The model was validated using independent data published for MDA-exposed workers. The PBPK results indicated that dialysis patients who are exposed to MDA released from dialyzers (new or reused) could accumulate low levels of MDA and metabolites (total MDA) over time. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Prediction of time-integrated activity coefficients in PRRT using simulated dynamic PET and a pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiansyah, Deni; Attarwala, Ali Asgar; Kletting, Peter; Mottaghy, Felix M; Glatting, Gerhard

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the accuracy of predicted time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using simulated dynamic PET data and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. PBPK parameters were estimated using biokinetic data of 15 patients after injection of (152±15)MBq of 111 In-DTPAOC (total peptide amount (5.78±0.25)nmol). True mathematical phantoms of patients (MPPs) were the PBPK model with the estimated parameters. Dynamic PET measurements were simulated as being done after bolus injection of 150MBq 68 Ga-DOTATATE using the true MPPs. Dynamic PET scans around 35min p.i. (P 1 ), 4h p.i. (P 2 ) and the combination of P 1 and P 2 (P 3 ) were simulated. Each measurement was simulated with four frames of 5min each and 2 bed positions. PBPK parameters were fitted to the PET data to derive the PET-predicted MPPs. Therapy was simulated assuming an infusion of 5.1GBq of 90 Y-DOTATATE over 30min in both true and PET-predicted MPPs. TIACs of simulated therapy were calculated, true MPPs (true TIACs) and predicted MPPs (predicted TIACs) followed by the calculation of variabilities v. For P 1 and P 2 the population variabilities of kidneys, liver and spleen were acceptable (v10%). Treatment planning of PRRT based on dynamic PET data seems possible for the kidneys, liver and spleen using a PBPK model and patient specific information. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of multiple-unit (pellet) dosage forms using a modeling and simulation approach coupled with biorelevant dissolution testing: case example diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Atsushi; Blume, Henning; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the dissolution profile of a poorly soluble drug, diclofenac, from a commercially available multiple-unit enteric coated dosage form, Diclo-Puren® capsules, and to develop a predictive model for its oral pharmacokinetic profile. The paddle method was used to obtain the dissolution profiles of this dosage form in biorelevant media, with the exposure to simulated gastric conditions being varied in order to simulate the gastric emptying behavior of pellets. A modified Noyes-Whitney theory was subsequently fitted to the dissolution data. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for multiple-unit dosage forms was designed using STELLA® software and coupled with the biorelevant dissolution profiles in order to simulate the plasma concentration profiles of diclofenac from Diclo-Puren® capsule in both the fasted and fed state in humans. Gastric emptying kinetics relevant to multiple-units pellets were incorporated into the PBPK model by setting up a virtual patient population to account for physiological variations in emptying kinetics. Using in vitro biorelevant dissolution coupled with in silico PBPK modeling and simulation it was possible to predict the plasma profile of this multiple-unit formulation of diclofenac after oral administration in both the fasted and fed state. This approach might be useful to predict variability in the plasma profiles for other drugs housed in multiple-unit dosage forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a paediatric population-based model of the pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Stefan; Becker, Corina; Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Edginton, Andrea; Lippert, Jörg; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Thelen, Kirstin; Mück, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has been increasingly recognised as a clinical problem in the paediatric population. Guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in paediatric patients are based mainly on extrapolation from adult clinical trial data, owing to the limited number of clinical trials in paediatric populations. The oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been approved in adult patients for several thromboembolic disorders, and its well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and efficacy and safety profiles in adults warrant further investigation of this agent in the paediatric population. The objective of this study was to develop and qualify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for rivaroxaban doses of 10 and 20 mg in adults and to scale this model to the paediatric population (0-18 years) to inform the dosing regimen for a clinical study of rivaroxaban in paediatric patients. Experimental data sets from phase I studies supported the development and qualification of an adult PBPK model. This adult PBPK model was then scaled to the paediatric population by including anthropometric and physiological information, age-dependent clearance and age-dependent protein binding. The pharmacokinetic properties of rivaroxaban in virtual populations of children were simulated for two body weight-related dosing regimens equivalent to 10 and 20 mg once daily in adults. The quality of the model was judged by means of a visual predictive check. Subsequently, paediatric simulations of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum (peak) plasma drug concentration (C max) and concentration in plasma after 24 h (C 24h) were compared with the adult reference simulations. Simulations for AUC, C max and C 24h throughout the investigated age range largely overlapped with values obtained for the corresponding dose in the adult reference simulation for both body weight-related dosing regimens. However

  9. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Supporting Cumulative Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Mei; Clewell, Harvey; Campbell, Jerry; Andersen, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture by other chemical(s), resulting in a change in the toxicity from that predicted from the summation of the effects of the single chemicals using dose additivity. In such cases, conducting quantitative cumulative risk assessment for chemicals present as a mixture is difficult. The uncertainties that arise from PK interactions can be addressed by developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the disposition of chemical mixtures. Further, PK models can be developed to describe mechanisms of action and tissue responses. In this article, PBPK/PD modeling efforts conducted to investigate chemical interactions at the PK and PD levels are reviewed to demonstrate the use of this predictive modeling framework in assessing health risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures. PMID:21655141

  10. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Integration of in vitro biorelevant dissolution and in silico PBPK model of carvedilol to predict bioequivalence of oral drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Manuel; Valiante, Cristian; Sopeña, Patricia; Schiavo, Alejandra; Lorier, Marianela; Vázquez, Marta; Fagiolino, Pietro

    2018-06-15

    Bioequivalence implementation in developing countries where a high proportion of similar drug products are being marketed has found several obstacles, impeding regulatory agencies to move forward with this policy. Biopharmaceutical quality of these products, several of which are massively prescribed, remains unknown. In this context, an in vitro-in silico-in vivo approach is proposed as a mean to screen product performance and target specific formulations for bioequivalence assessment. By coupling in vitro biorelevant dissolution testing in USP-4 Apparatus (flow-through cell) with physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in PK-Sim® software (Bayer, Germany), the performance of seven similar products of carvedilol tablets containing 25 mg available in the Uruguayan market were compared with the brand-name drug Dilatrend®. In silico simulations for Dilatrend® were compared with published results of bioequivalence studies performed in fasting conditions allowing model development through a learning and confirming process. Single-dose pharmacokinetic profiles were then simulated for the brand-name drug and two similar drug products selected according to in vitro observations, in a virtual Caucasian population of 1000 subjects (50% male, aged between 18 and 50 years with standard body-weights). Population bioequivalence ratios were estimated revealing that in vitro differences in drug release would have a major impact in carvedilol maximum plasma concentration, leading to a non-bioequivalence outcome. Predictions support the need to perform in vivo bioequivalence for these products of extensive use. Application of the in vitro-in silico-in vivo approach stands as an interesting alternative to tackle and reduce drug product variability in biopharmaceutical quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and application of a rat PBPK model to elucidate kidney and liver effects induced by ETBE and tert-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, Keith D.; Brinkerhoff, Christopher J.; Lee, Janice S.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2015-01-01

    Subchronic and chronic studies in rats of the gasoline oxygenates ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-butanol (TBA) report similar noncancer kidney and liver effects but differing results with respect to kidney and liver tumors. Because TBA is a major metabolite of ETBE, it is possible that TBA is the active toxic moiety in all these studies, with reported differences due simply to differences in the internal dose. To test this hypothesis, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for ETBE and TBA to calculate internal dosimetrics of TBA following either TBA or ETBE exposure. This model, based on earlier PBPK models of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), was used to evaluate whether kidney and liver effects are consistent across routes of exposure, as well as between ETBE and TBA studies, on the basis of estimated internal dose. The results demonstrate that noncancer kidney effects, including kidney weight changes, urothelial hyperplasia, and chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN), yielded consistent dose–response relationships across routes of exposure and across ETBE and TBA studies using TBA blood concentration as the dose metric. Relative liver weights were also consistent across studies on the basis of TBA metabolism, which is proportional to TBA liver concentrations. However, kidney and liver tumors were not consistent using any dose metric. These results support the hypothesis that TBA mediates the noncancer kidney and liver effects following ETBE administration; however, additional factors besides internal dose are necessary to explain the induction of liver and kidney tumors. - Highlights: • We model two metabolically-related fuel oxygenates to address toxicity data gaps. • Kidney and liver effects are compared on an internal dose basis. • Noncancer kidney effects are consistent using TBA blood concentration. • Liver weight changes are consistent using TBA metabolic rate. • Kidney and liver tumors are not consistent using

  13. Development and application of a rat PBPK model to elucidate kidney and liver effects induced by ETBE and tert-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, Keith D., E-mail: Salazar.keith@epa.gov [Toxicity Pathways Branch, IRIS Division, NCEA, ORD, US EPA, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Brinkerhoff, Christopher J., E-mail: Brinkerhoff.Chris@epa.gov [Risk Assessment Division, OPPT, OCSPP, US EPA, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Lee, Janice S., E-mail: Lee.JaniceS@epa.gov [Toxicity Pathways Branch, IRIS Division, NCEA, ORD, US EPA, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: wchiu@cvm.tamu.edu [Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Subchronic and chronic studies in rats of the gasoline oxygenates ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-butanol (TBA) report similar noncancer kidney and liver effects but differing results with respect to kidney and liver tumors. Because TBA is a major metabolite of ETBE, it is possible that TBA is the active toxic moiety in all these studies, with reported differences due simply to differences in the internal dose. To test this hypothesis, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for ETBE and TBA to calculate internal dosimetrics of TBA following either TBA or ETBE exposure. This model, based on earlier PBPK models of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), was used to evaluate whether kidney and liver effects are consistent across routes of exposure, as well as between ETBE and TBA studies, on the basis of estimated internal dose. The results demonstrate that noncancer kidney effects, including kidney weight changes, urothelial hyperplasia, and chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN), yielded consistent dose–response relationships across routes of exposure and across ETBE and TBA studies using TBA blood concentration as the dose metric. Relative liver weights were also consistent across studies on the basis of TBA metabolism, which is proportional to TBA liver concentrations. However, kidney and liver tumors were not consistent using any dose metric. These results support the hypothesis that TBA mediates the noncancer kidney and liver effects following ETBE administration; however, additional factors besides internal dose are necessary to explain the induction of liver and kidney tumors. - Highlights: • We model two metabolically-related fuel oxygenates to address toxicity data gaps. • Kidney and liver effects are compared on an internal dose basis. • Noncancer kidney effects are consistent using TBA blood concentration. • Liver weight changes are consistent using TBA metabolic rate. • Kidney and liver tumors are not consistent using

  14. Target and Tissue Selectivity Prediction by Integrated Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic-Target Binding and Quantitative Structure Activity Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, Anna H C; de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; van Westen, Gerard J P; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2017-12-04

    Selectivity is an important attribute of effective and safe drugs, and prediction of in vivo target and tissue selectivity would likely improve drug development success rates. However, a lack of understanding of the underlying (pharmacological) mechanisms and availability of directly applicable predictive methods complicates the prediction of selectivity. We explore the value of combining physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling to predict the influence of the target dissociation constant (K D ) and the target dissociation rate constant on target and tissue selectivity. The K D values of CB1 ligands in the ChEMBL database are predicted by QSAR random forest (RF) modeling for the CB1 receptor and known off-targets (TRPV1, mGlu5, 5-HT1a). Of these CB1 ligands, rimonabant, CP-55940, and Δ 8 -tetrahydrocanabinol, one of the active ingredients of cannabis, were selected for simulations of target occupancy for CB1, TRPV1, mGlu5, and 5-HT1a in three brain regions, to illustrate the principles of the combined PBPK-QSAR modeling. Our combined PBPK and target binding modeling demonstrated that the optimal values of the K D and k off for target and tissue selectivity were dependent on target concentration and tissue distribution kinetics. Interestingly, if the target concentration is high and the perfusion of the target site is low, the optimal K D value is often not the lowest K D value, suggesting that optimization towards high drug-target affinity can decrease the benefit-risk ratio. The presented integrative structure-pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling provides an improved understanding of tissue and target selectivity.

  15. Bringing in vitro analysis closer to in vivo: Studying doxorubicin toxicity and associated mechanisms in 3D human microtissues with PBPK-based dose modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Marcha; Schrooders, Yannick; Gmuender, Hans; Nudischer, Ramona; Clayton, Olivia; Hynes, James; Niederer, Steven; Cordes, Henrik; Kuepfer, Lars; Kleinjans, Jos; Caiment, Florian

    2018-05-24

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent of which the medical use is limited due to cardiotoxicity. While acute cardiotoxicity is reversible, chronic cardiotoxicity is persistent or progressive, dose-dependent and irreversible. While DOX mechanisms of action are not fully understood yet, 3 toxicity processes are known to occur in vivo: cardiomyocyte dysfunction, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. We present an in vitro experimental design aimed at detecting DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by obtaining a global view of the induced molecular mechanisms through RNA-sequencing. To better reflect the in vivo situation, human 3D cardiac microtissues were exposed to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) relevant doses of DOX for 2 weeks. We analysed a therapeutic and a toxic dosing profile. Transcriptomics analysis revealed significant gene expression changes in pathways related to "striated muscle contraction" and "respiratory electron transport", thus suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction as an underlying mechanism for cardiotoxicity. Furthermore, expression changes in mitochondrial processes differed significantly between the doses. Therapeutic dose reflects processes resembling the phenotype of delayed chronic cardiotoxicity, while toxic doses resembled acute cardiotoxicity. Overall, these results demonstrate the capability of our innovative in vitro approach to detect the three known mechanisms of DOX leading to toxicity, thus suggesting its potential relevance for reflecting the patient situation. Our study also demonstrated the importance of applying physiologically relevant doses during toxicological research, since mechanisms of acute and chronic toxicity differ. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetic interplay of phase II metabolism and transport: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baojian

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the interdependence of cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein in disposition of drugs (also termed "transport-metabolism interplay") has been significantly advanced in recent years. However, whether such "interplay" exists between phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters remains largely unknown. The objective of this article is to explore the role of efflux transporters (acting on the phase II metabolites) in disposition of the parent drug in Caco-2 cells, liver, and intestine via simulations utilizing a catenary model (for Caco-2 system) and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models (for the liver and intestine). In all three models, "transport-metabolism interplay" (i.e., inhibition of metabolite efflux decreases the metabolism) can be observed only when futile recycling (or deconjugation) occurred. Futile recycling appeared to bridge the two processes (i.e., metabolite formation and excretion) and enable the interplay thereof. Without futile recycling, metabolite formation was independent on its downstream process excretion, thus impact of metabolite excretion on its formation was impossible. Moreover, in liver PBPK model with futile recycling, impact of biliary metabolite excretion on the exposure of parent drug [(systemic (reservoir) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(R1))] was limited; a complete inhibition of efflux resulted in AUC(R1) increases of less than 1-fold only. In intestine PBPK model with futile recycling, even though a complete inhibition of efflux could result in large elevations (e.g., 3.5-6.0-fold) in AUC(R1), an incomplete inhibition of efflux (e.g., with a residual activity of ≥ 20% metabolic clearance) saw negligible increases (interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. Those studying such "interplay" are encouraged to adequately consider potential consequences of inhibition of efflux transporters in humans. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis comparing diverse effects of detomidine, medetomidine, and dexmedetomidine in the horse: a population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsrud, K N; Ait-Oudhia, S; Durbin-Johnson, B P; Rocke, D M; Mama, K R; Rezende, M L; Stanley, S D; Jusko, W J

    2015-02-01

    The present study characterizes the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonists detomidine (DET), medetomidine (MED) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) in parallel groups of horses from in vivo data after single bolus doses. Head height (HH), heart rate (HR), and blood glucose concentrations were measured over 6 h. Compartmental PK and minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) models were applied and incorporated into basic and extended indirect response models (IRM). Population PK/PD analysis was conducted using the Monolix software implementing the stochastic approximation expectation maximization algorithm. Marked reductions in HH and HR were found. The drug concentrations required to obtain inhibition at half-maximal effect (IC50 ) were approximately four times larger for DET than MED and DEX for both HH and HR. These effects were not gender dependent. Medetomidine had a greater influence on the increase in glucose concentration than DEX. The developed models demonstrate the use of mechanistic and mPBPK/PD models for the analysis of clinically obtainable in vivo data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkaoui-Rbati, Mohammed H; Paine, Stuart W; Littlewood, Peter; Rauch, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of new chemical entities (NCEs) and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit), located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level). A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s) including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  19. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H Cherkaoui-Rbati

    Full Text Available All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs of new chemical entities (NCEs and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit, located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level. A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  20. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  1. Chemical-specific screening criteria for interpretation of biomonitoring data for volatile organic compounds (VOCs)--application of steady-state PBPK model solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Lesa L; Kirman, Chris R; Blount, Ben C; Hays, Sean M

    2010-10-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) generates population-representative biomonitoring data for many chemicals including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in blood. However, no health or risk-based screening values are available to evaluate these data from a health safety perspective or to use in prioritizing among chemicals for possible risk management actions. We gathered existing risk assessment-based chronic exposure reference values such as reference doses (RfDs), reference concentrations (RfCs), tolerable daily intakes (TDIs), cancer slope factors, etc. and key pharmacokinetic model parameters for 47 VOCs. Using steady-state solutions to a generic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, we estimated chemical-specific steady-state venous blood concentrations across chemicals associated with unit oral and inhalation exposure rates and with chronic exposure at the identified exposure reference values. The geometric means of the slopes relating modeled steady-state blood concentrations to steady-state exposure to a unit oral dose or unit inhalation concentration among 38 compounds with available pharmacokinetic parameters were 12.0 microg/L per mg/kg-d (geometric standard deviation [GSD] of 3.2) and 3.2 microg/L per mg/m(3) (GSD=1.7), respectively. Chemical-specific blood concentration screening values based on non-cancer reference values for both oral and inhalation exposure range from 0.0005 to 100 microg/L; blood concentrations associated with cancer risk-specific doses at the 1E-05 risk level ranged from 5E-06 to 6E-02 microg/L. The distribution of modeled steady-state blood concentrations associated with unit exposure levels across VOCs may provide a basis for estimating blood concentration screening values for VOCs that lack chemical-specific pharmacokinetic data. The screening blood concentrations presented here provide a tool for risk assessment-based evaluation of population biomonitoring data for VOCs and

  2. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the plethora of studies discussing the benefits of vitamin D on physiological functioning, few mathematical models of vitamin D predict the response of the body on low-concentration supplementation of vitamin D under sunlight-restricted conditions. This study developed a ...

  3. Time-integrated activity coefficient estimation for radionuclide therapy using PET and a pharmacokinetic model: A simulation study on the effect of sampling schedule and noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardiansyah, Deni [Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim 68167, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim 68167 (Germany); Guo, Wei; Glatting, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.glatting@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim 68167 (Germany); Kletting, Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074, Germany and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center MUMC+, Maastricht 6229 (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of PET-based treatment planning for predicting the time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs). Methods: The parameters of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model were fitted to the biokinetic data of 15 patients to derive assumed true parameters and were used to construct true mathematical patient phantoms (MPPs). Biokinetics of 150 MBq {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE-PET was simulated with different noise levels [fractional standard deviation (FSD) 10%, 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%], and seven combinations of measurements at 30 min, 1 h, and 4 h p.i. PBPK model parameters were fitted to the simulated noisy PET data using population-based Bayesian parameters to construct predicted MPPs. Therapy simulations were performed as 30 min infusion of {sup 90}Y-DOTATATE of 3.3 GBq in both true and predicted MPPs. Prediction accuracy was then calculated as relative variability v{sub organ} between TIACs from both MPPs. Results: Large variability values of one time-point protocols [e.g., FSD = 1%, 240 min p.i., v{sub kidneys} = (9 ± 6)%, and v{sub tumor} = (27 ± 26)%] show inaccurate prediction. Accurate TIAC prediction of the kidneys was obtained for the case of two measurements (1 and 4 h p.i.), e.g., FSD = 1%, v{sub kidneys} = (7 ± 3)%, and v{sub tumor} = (22 ± 10)%, or three measurements, e.g., FSD = 1%, v{sub kidneys} = (7 ± 3)%, and v{sub tumor} = (22 ± 9)%. Conclusions: {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE-PET measurements could possibly be used to predict the TIACs of {sup 90}Y-DOTATATE when using a PBPK model and population-based Bayesian parameters. The two time-point measurement at 1 and 4 h p.i. with a noise up to FSD = 1% allows an accurate prediction of the TIACs in kidneys.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Antibody Drug Conjugates: Connecting tissue and cellular distribution to whole animal pharmacokinetics and potential implications for efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Guo, Hans; Liao, Jianshan; Christodolu, Nikolas; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates exhibit complex pharmacokinetics due to their combination of macromolecular and small molecule properties. These issues range from systemic concerns, such as deconjugation of the small molecule drug during the long antibody circulation time or rapid clearance from non-specific interactions, to local tumor tissue heterogeneity, cell bystander effects, and endosomal escape. Mathematical models can be used to study the impact of these processes on overall distribution in an efficient manner, and several types of models have been used to analyze varying aspects of antibody distribution including physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and tissue-level simulations. However, these processes are quantitative in nature and cannot be handled qualitatively in isolation. For example, free antibody from deconjugation of the small molecule will impact the distribution of conjugated antibodies within the tumor. To incorporate these effects into a unified framework, we have coupled the systemic and organ-level distribution of a PBPK model with the tissue-level detail of a distributed parameter tumor model. We used this mathematical model to analyze new experimental results on the distribution of the clinical antibody drug conjugate Kadcyla in HER2 positive mouse xenografts. This model is able to capture the impact of the drug antibody ratio (DAR) on tumor penetration, the net result of drug deconjugation, and the effect of using unconjugated antibody to drive ADC penetration deeper into the tumor tissue. This modeling approach will provide quantitative and mechanistic support to experimental studies trying to parse the impact of multiple mechanisms of action for these complex drugs. PMID:27287046

  5. PBPK Modeling - A Predictive, Eco-Friendly, Bio-Waiver Tool for Drug Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Baishakhi; Bhandari, Koushik; Mukherjee, Ranjan; Katakam, Prakash; Adiki, Shanta K; Gundamaraju, Rohit; Mitra, Analava

    2017-01-01

    The world has witnessed growing complexities in disease scenario influenced by the drastic changes in host-pathogen- environment triadic relation. Pharmaceutical R&Ds are in constant search of novel therapeutic entities to hasten transition of drug molecules from lab bench to patient bedside. Extensive animal studies and human pharmacokinetics are still the "gold standard" in investigational new drug research and bio-equivalency studies. Apart from cost, time and ethical issues on animal experimentation, burning questions arise relating to ecological disturbances, environmental hazards and biodiversity issues. Grave concerns arises when the adverse outcomes of continued studies on one particular disease on environment gives rise to several other pathogenic agents finally complicating the total scenario. Thus Pharma R&Ds face a challenge to develop bio-waiver protocols. Lead optimization, drug candidate selection with favorable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, toxicity assessment are vital steps in drug development. Simulation tools like Gastro Plus™, PK Sim®, SimCyp find applications for the purpose. Advanced technologies like organ-on-a chip or human-on-a chip where a 3D representation of human organs and systems can mimic the related processes and activities, thereby linking them to major features of human biology can be successfully incorporated in the drug development tool box. PBPK provides the State of Art to serve as an optional of animal experimentation. PBPK models can successfully bypass bio-equivalency studies, predict bioavailability, drug interactions and on hyphenation with in vitro-in vivo correlation can be extrapolated to humans thus serving as bio-waiver. PBPK can serve as an eco-friendly bio-waiver predictive tool in drug development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Assumptions Using a 443 Chemical Library (IVIVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing availability of high-throughput and in vitro data for untested chemicals, there is a need for pharmacokinetic (PK) models for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Though some PBPK models have been created for individual compounds us...

  7. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Assumptions Using a 443 Chemical Library (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing availability of high-throughput and in vitro data for untested chemicals, there is a need for pharmacokinetic (PK) models for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Though some PBPK models have been created for individual compounds using in vivo data, we ...

  8. Using pharmacokinetic modelling to improve prescribing practices of intravenous aminophylline in childhood asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Lewis; McBride, Antonia; Lilley, Andrew; Sinha, Ian; Johnson, Trevor N; Hawcutt, Daniel B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling (PBPK) software in paediatric asthma patients using intravenous aminophylline. Prospective clinical audit of children receiving iv aminophylline (July 2014 to June 2016), and in-silico modelling using Simcyp software. Thirty-eight admissions (25 children) were included. Children with aminophylline levels ≥10 mg/l had equivalent clinical outcomes compared to those model. PBPK modelling of a 5 mg/kg iv loading dose (≤18yr) shows a mean C max of 8.99 mg/L (5th-95th centiles 5.5-13.7 mg/L), with 70.3% of subjects  20 mg/L. For an aminophylline infusion (0-12 y) of 1.0  mg/kg/h, the mean steady state infusion concentration was 16.4 mg/L, (5th-95th centiles 5.3-32 mg/L), with 26.8% having a serum concentration >20 mg/L. For 12-18yr receiving 0.5  mg/kg/h infusion, the mean steady state infusion concentration was 9.37 mg/L (5th-95th centiles 3.4-18 mg/L), with 59.8% having a serum concentration modelling correlates well with clinical data. Current aminophylline iv loading dosage recommendations achieve levels risk of toxicity (>20 mg/l). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic effects of amiodarone in plasma of ponies after single intravenous administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trachsel, D.; Tschudi, P.; Portier, C.J.; Kuhn, M.; Thormann, W.; Scholtysik, G.; Mevissen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a well-known heart disease in horses. The common therapy consists of administration of quinidine. More potent antiarrhythmic drugs have become available for human therapy and the use of these as alternatives to quinidine for equine antiarrhythmic therapy is a matter of interest. Amiodarone (AMD) is used in human medicine for treatment of many arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. Its disposition in horses has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of single intravenous doses of amiodarone (5 and 7 mg/kg) on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) of healthy minishetland ponies during the first 2 days after drug administration and to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) using amiodarone and desethylamiodarone (DAMD) plasma levels that were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As expected for a K + -channel-blocker, the main effect on the measured ECG could be seen on the ventricular complex, as the QT interval and the T wave showed statistically significant alterations. The doses investigated were well tolerated clinically. Results from the pharmacokinetic model were found to compare well with literature data of rats, dogs, and humans. It showed a rapid distribution in the tissue, beginning with the rapidly perfused tissue, like the heart, followed by slowly perfused tissues, and finally an accumulation in fat. The half-life for total elimination was calculated to be 16.3 days with 99% eliminated by 97 days. The model predicts that approximately 96% of amiodarone is eliminated as desethylamiodarone in urine, 2% eliminated as desethylamiodarone in bile, and 2% as other metabolites

  10. A paradigm shift in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling: rule of thumb for estimating free drug level in tissue compared with plasma to guide drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    A basic assumption in pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics research is that the free drug concentration is similar in plasma and tissue, and, hence, in vitro plasma data can be used to estimate the in vivo condition in tissue. However, in a companion manuscript, it has been demonstrated that this assumption is violated for the ionized drugs. Nonetheless, these observations focus on in vitro static environments and do not challenge data with an in vivo dynamic system. Therefore, an extension from an in vitro to an in vivo system becomes the necessary next step. The objective of this study was to perform theoretical simulations of the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma by using a physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model reproducing the in vivo conditions in human. Therefore, the effects of drug ionization, lipophilicity, and clearance have been taken into account in a dynamic system. This modeling exercise was performed as a proof of concept to demonstrate that free drug concentration in tissue and plasma may also differ in a dynamic system for passively permeable drugs that are ionized at the physiological pH. The PBPK model simulations indicated that free drug concentrations in tissue cells and plasma significantly differ for the ionized drugs because of the pH gradient effect between cells and interstitial space. Hence, a rule of thumb for potentially performing more accurate PBPK/PD modeling is suggested, which states that the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma will differ for the ionizable drugs in contrast to the neutral drugs. In addition to the pH gradient effect for the ionizable drugs, lipophilicity and clearance effects will increase or decrease the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma for each class of drugs; thus, higher will be the drug lipophilicity and clearance, lower would be the free drug concentration in plasma, and, hence, in tissue, in a dynamic in vivo system. Therefore, only considering the value of free

  11. Reconstructing exposures from biomarkers using exposure-pharmacokinetic modeling--A case study with carbaryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen; Phillips, Martin; Grulke, Christopher; Yoon, Miyoung; Young, Bruce; McDougall, Robin; Leonard, Jeremy; Lu, Jingtao; Lefew, William; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for short half-life chemicals were characterized using computational models that link external exposures to biomarkers. Using carbaryl as an example, an exposure model, the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl. These exposure profiles were used as inputs into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict urinary biomarker concentrations. These matching dietary intake levels and biomarker concentrations were used to (1) compare three reverse dosimetry approaches based on their ability to predict the central tendency of the intake dose distribution; and (2) identify parameters necessary for a more accurate exposure reconstruction. This study illustrates the trade-offs between using non-iterative reverse dosimetry methods that are fast, less precise and iterative methods that are slow, more precise. This study also intimates the necessity of including urine flow rate and elapsed time between last dose and urine sampling as part of the biomarker sampling collection for better interpretation of urinary biomarker data of short biological half-life chemicals. Resolution of these critical data gaps can allow exposure reconstruction methods to better predict population-level intake doses from large biomonitoring studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Can the observed association between serum perfluoroalkyl substances and delayed menarche be explained on the basis of puberty-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huali; Yoon, Miyoung; Verner, Marc-André; Xue, Jianping; Luo, Man; Andersen, Melvin E; Longnecker, Matthew P; Clewell, Harvey J

    2015-09-01

    An association between serum levels of two perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and delayed age at menarche was reported in a cross-sectional study of adolescents. Because perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have half-lives of years, growth dilution and the development of a new route of excretion (menstruation) could account for some or all of the reported association. To assess how much of the epidemiologic association between PFAS and delayed menarche can be explained by the correlation of growth and maturation with PFAS body burden. We developed a Monte Carlo (MC) physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PFAS to simulate plasma PFAS levels in a hypothetical female population aged 2 to 20years old. Realistic distributions of physiological parameters as well as timing of growth spurts and menarche were incorporated in the model. The association between PFAS level and delayed menarche in the simulated data was compared with the reported association. The prevalence of menarche, distributions of age-dependent physiological parameters, and quartiles of serum PFAS concentrations in the simulated subjects were comparable to those reported in the epidemiologic study. The delay of menarche in days per natural log increase in PFAS concentrations in the simulated data were about one third as large as the observed values. The reported relationship between PFAS and age at menarche appears to be at least partly explained by pharmacokinetics rather than a toxic effect of these substances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling interchild differences in pharmacokinetics on the basis of subject-specific data on physiology and hepatic CYP2E1 levels: A case study with toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nong, A.; McCarver, D.G.; Hines, R.N.; Krishnan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the magnitude of interindividual variability in the internal dose of toluene in children of various age groups, on the basis of subject-specific hepatic CYP2E1 content and physiology. The methodology involved the use of a previously validated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, in which the intrinsic clearance for hepatic metabolism (CL int ) was expressed in terms of the CYP2E1 content. The adult toluene PBPK model, with enzyme content-normalized CL int , facilitated the calculation of child-specific CL int based on knowledge of hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels. The child-specific physiological parameters, except liver volume, were computed with knowledge of age and body weight, whereas physicochemical parameters for toluene were kept age-invariant based on available data. The actual individual-specific liver volume (autopsy data) was also included in the model. The resulting model was used to simulate the blood concentration profiles in children exposed by inhalation, to 1 ppm toluene for 24 h. For this exposure scenario, the area under the venous blood concentration vs. time curve (AUC) ranged from 0.30 to 1.01 μg/ml x h in neonates with low CYP2E1 concentration (<3.69 pmol/mg protein). The simulations indicated that neonates with higher levels of CYP2E1 (4.33 to 55.93 pmol/mg protein) as well as older children would have lower AUC (0.16 to 0.43 μg/ml x h). The latter values were closer to those simulated for adults. Similar results were also obtained for 7 h exposure to 17 ppm toluene, a scenario previously evaluated in human volunteers. The interindividual variability factor for each subgroup of children and adults, calculated as the ratio of the 95th and 50th percentile values of AUC, was within a factor of 2. The 95th percentile value of the low metabolizing neonate group, however, was greater than the mean adult AUC by a factor of 3.9. This study demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating

  14. Physiological Based Simulator Fidelity Design Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Thomas; Hamel, Nancy; Postnikov, Alex; Hoke, Jaclyn; McLean, Angus L. M. Thom, III

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the role of flight simulation has reinforced assumptions in aviation that the degree of realism in a simulation system directly correlates to the training benefit, i.e., more fidelity is always better. The construct of fidelity has several dimensions, including physical fidelity, functional fidelity, and cognitive fidelity. Interaction of different fidelity dimensions has an impact on trainee immersion, presence, and transfer of training. This paper discusses research results of a recent study that investigated if physiological-based methods could be used to determine the required level of simulator fidelity. Pilots performed a relatively complex flight task consisting of mission task elements of various levels of difficulty in a fixed base flight simulator and a real fighter jet trainer aircraft. Flight runs were performed using one forward visual channel of 40 deg. field of view for the lowest level of fidelity, 120 deg. field of view for the middle level of fidelity, and unrestricted field of view and full dynamic acceleration in the real airplane. Neuro-cognitive and physiological measures were collected under these conditions using the Cognitive Avionics Tool Set (CATS) and nonlinear closed form models for workload prediction were generated based on these data for the various mission task elements. One finding of the work described herein is that simple heart rate is a relatively good predictor of cognitive workload, even for short tasks with dynamic changes in cognitive loading. Additionally, we found that models that used a wide range of physiological and neuro-cognitive measures can further boost the accuracy of the workload prediction.

  15. Acute Exposure to Perchlorethylene alters Rat Visual Evoked Potentials in Relation to Brain Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    These experiments sought to establish a dose-effect relationship between the concentration of perchloroethylene (PCE) in brain tissue and concurrent changes in visual function. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was implemented to predict concentrations of PCE ...

  16. Human health and the environment: Predicting plasma protein binding and metabolic clearance rates of environmentally relevant chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In silico methods provide a rapid, inexpensive means of screening a wide array of environmentally relevant pollutants, pesticides, fungicides and consumer products for further toxicity testing. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models bridge the gap between in vitro as...

  17. DETERMINATION OF AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISPOSITION OF 2-BUTOXYETHANOL AND ITS METABOLITES IN MICE AND RATS TO IMPROVE PBPK MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Rick A.; Grant, Donna M.; Farris, Elizabeth; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Thrall, K D.; Poet, Torka S.

    2005-03-28

    2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is the most widely used glycol ether solvent. BE's major metabolite, butoxyacetic acid (BAA), causes hemolysis with significant species differences in sensitivity. Several PBPK models have been developed over the past two decades to describe the disposition of BE and BAA in male rats and humans to refine health risk assessments. More recent efforts by Lee et al. (1998) to describe the kinetics of BE and BAA in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) chronic inhalation studies required the use of several assumptions to extrapolate model parameters from earlier PBPK models developed for young male rats to include female F344 and both sexes of B6C3F1 mice and the effects of aging. To replace these assumptions, studies were conducted to determine the impact of age, gender and species on the metabolism of BE, and the tissue partitioning, renal acid transport and plasma protein binding of BAA. In the current study, the Lee et al. PBPK model was updated and expanded to include the further metabolism of BAA and the salivary excretion of BE and BAA which may contribute to the forestomach irritation observed in mice in the NTP study. The revised model predicted that peak blood concentrations of BAA achieved following 6-hr inhalation exposures are greatest in young adult female rats at concentrations up to 300 ppm. This is not the case predicted for old (>18 months) animals, where peak blood concentrations of BAA in male and female mice were similar to or greater than female rats. The revised model serves as a quantitative tool for integrating an extensive pharmacokinetic and mechanistic database into a format that can readily be used to compare internal dosimetry across dose, route of exposure and species.

  18. Comparative chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics via multiple routes of exposure and vehicles of administration in the adult rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Campbell, James A.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Barr, Dana B.; Timchalk, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a commonly used organophosphorus pesticide. A number of toxicity and mechanistic studies have been conducted in animals, where CPF has been administered via a variety of different exposure routes and dosing vehicles. This study compared chlorpyrifos (CPF) pharmacokinetics using oral, intravenous (IV), and subcutaneous (SC) exposure routes and corn oil, saline/Tween 20, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as dosing vehicles. Two groups of rats were co-administered target doses (5 mg/kg) of CPF and isotopically labeled CPF (L-CPF). One group was exposed by both oral (CPF) and IV (L-CPF) routes using saline/Tween 20 vehicle; whereas, the second group was exposed by the SC route using two vehicles, corn oil (CPF) and DMSO (L-CPF). A third group was only administered CPF by the oral route in corn oil. For all treatments, blood and urine time course samples were collected and analyzed for 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), and isotopically labeled 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (L-TCPy). Peak TCPy/L-TCPy concentrations in blood (20.2 μmol/l), TCPy/L-TCPy blood AUC (94.9 μmol/l h), and percent of dose excreted in urine (100%) were all highest in rats dosed orally with CPF in saline/Tween 20 and second highest in rats dosed orally with CPF in corn oil. Peak TCPy concentrations in blood were more rapidly obtained after oral administration of CPF in saline/Tween 20 compared to all other dosing scenarios (>1.5 h). These results indicate that orally administered CPF is more extensively metabolized than systemic exposures of CPF (SC and IV), and vehicle of administration also has an effect on absorption rates. Thus, equivalent doses via different routes and/or vehicles of administration could potentially lead to different body burdens of CPF, different rates of bioactivation to CPF-oxon, and different toxic responses. Simulations using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model for CPF are consistent with these possibilities

  19. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in setting acute exposure guideline levels for methylene chloride.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Peter Martinus Jozef; Zeilmaker, Marco Jacob; Eijkeren, Jan Cornelis Henri van

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) are derived to protect the human population from adverse health effects in case of single exposure due to an accidental release of chemicals into the atmosphere. AEGLs are set at three different levels of increasing toxicity for exposure durations ranging from

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of Dichloroacetic Acid Kinetics in Human -- A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    weight) Plasma VPLAC 4.4 (Merrill et al., 2005) Liver VLC 2.6 (Brown et al., 1997) Kidney VKC 0.44 (Brown et al., 1997) Rapidly perfused VRC 9.86...entire data set with the exception of individual subject optimized kinetic data reported by Schultz and Shangraw (2006). Perhaps the most challenging ...GSTzeta as well as the 0.02 mg/kg DCA administered daily in drinking water between the 2 challenges . If a person is administered 50 mg/kg/day by IV

  1. Evolving PBPK applications in regulatory risk assessment: current situation and future goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation includes current applications of PBPK modeling in regulatory risk assessment and discussions on conflicts between assuring consistency with experimental data in current situation and the desire for animal-free model development.

  2. A physiologically based nonhomogeneous Poisson counter model of visual identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeppe H; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    A physiologically based nonhomogeneous Poisson counter model of visual identification is presented. The model was developed in the framework of a Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990; Kyllingsbæk, Markussen, & Bundesen, 2012) and meant for modeling visual identification of objects that are ......A physiologically based nonhomogeneous Poisson counter model of visual identification is presented. The model was developed in the framework of a Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990; Kyllingsbæk, Markussen, & Bundesen, 2012) and meant for modeling visual identification of objects...... that mimicked the dynamics of receptive field selectivity as found in neurophysiological studies. Furthermore, the initial sensory response yielded theoretical hazard rate functions that closely resembled empirically estimated ones. Finally, supplied with a Naka-Rushton type contrast gain control, the model...

  3. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A physiologically based nonhomogeneous Poisson counter model of visual identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jeppe H; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus; Kyllingsbæk, Søren

    2018-04-30

    A physiologically based nonhomogeneous Poisson counter model of visual identification is presented. The model was developed in the framework of a Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990; Kyllingsbæk, Markussen, & Bundesen, 2012) and meant for modeling visual identification of objects that are mutually confusable and hard to see. The model assumes that the visual system's initial sensory response consists in tentative visual categorizations, which are accumulated by leaky integration of both transient and sustained components comparable with those found in spike density patterns of early sensory neurons. The sensory response (tentative categorizations) feeds independent Poisson counters, each of which accumulates tentative object categorizations of a particular type to guide overt identification performance. We tested the model's ability to predict the effect of stimulus duration on observed distributions of responses in a nonspeeded (pure accuracy) identification task with eight response alternatives. The time courses of correct and erroneous categorizations were well accounted for when the event-rates of competing Poisson counters were allowed to vary independently over time in a way that mimicked the dynamics of receptive field selectivity as found in neurophysiological studies. Furthermore, the initial sensory response yielded theoretical hazard rate functions that closely resembled empirically estimated ones. Finally, supplied with a Naka-Rushton type contrast gain control, the model provided an explanation for Bloch's law. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling of therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sherwin, Catherine MT; Yu, Tian; Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Brunner, Hermine I; Vinks, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of different types of therapies in treating autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), there is a need to utilize pharmacokinetic (PK) strategies to optimize the clinical outcome of these treatments. Various PK analysis approaches, including population PK modeling and physiologically based PK modeling, have been used to evaluate drug PK characteristics and population variability or to predict drug PK profiles in a mechanistic manner. This review ou...

  6. In Silico Modeling of Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption: Predictive Performance of Three Physiologically Based Absorption Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Thörn, Helena; Tannergren, Christer

    2016-06-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) drug absorption is a complex process determined by formulation, physicochemical and biopharmaceutical factors, and GI physiology. Physiologically based in silico absorption models have emerged as a widely used and promising supplement to traditional in vitro assays and preclinical in vivo studies. However, there remains a lack of comparative studies between different models. The aim of this study was to explore the strengths and limitations of the in silico absorption models Simcyp 13.1, GastroPlus 8.0, and GI-Sim 4.1, with respect to their performance in predicting human intestinal drug absorption. This was achieved by adopting an a priori modeling approach and using well-defined input data for 12 drugs associated with incomplete GI absorption and related challenges in predicting the extent of absorption. This approach better mimics the real situation during formulation development where predictive in silico models would be beneficial. Plasma concentration-time profiles for 44 oral drug administrations were calculated by convolution of model-predicted absorption-time profiles and reported pharmacokinetic parameters. Model performance was evaluated by comparing the predicted plasma concentration-time profiles, Cmax, tmax, and exposure (AUC) with observations from clinical studies. The overall prediction accuracies for AUC, given as the absolute average fold error (AAFE) values, were 2.2, 1.6, and 1.3 for Simcyp, GastroPlus, and GI-Sim, respectively. The corresponding AAFE values for Cmax were 2.2, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively, and those for tmax were 1.7, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively. Simcyp was associated with underprediction of AUC and Cmax; the accuracy decreased with decreasing predicted fabs. A tendency for underprediction was also observed for GastroPlus, but there was no correlation with predicted fabs. There were no obvious trends for over- or underprediction for GI-Sim. The models performed similarly in capturing dependencies on dose and

  7. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Trichloroethylene and Its Metabolites for Use in Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    and free trichloroethanol. Toxicol. App!. Pharmacol., 152, 339-359, 1998. 10. Stenner , R.D., Merdink, J.L., Fisher, J.W., and Bull, R...M.V., Stevens, D.K., Stenner , R.D., Bonate, P.L., Tuman, D., and Bull, R.J., Factors affecting species differences in the kinetics of metabolites of

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF PHYSIOLOGICAL-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DERMAL ABSORPTION NAD PENETRATION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic chemical that is added to gasoline as an octane booster and to reduce vehicular emissions of carbon monoxide. MTBE is introduced into the environment through fuel spills, leakage of storage tanks, and evaporat...

  9. Development and Application of a Human PBPK Model for Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) to Investigate Impacts of Multi-Route Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to its presence in water as a volatile disinfection byproduct, BDCM, which is mutagenic and a rodent carcinogen, poses a risk for exposure via multiple routes. We developed a refined human PBPK model for BDCM (including new chemical-specific human parameters) to evaluate the...

  10. Reconstruction of Exposure to m-Xylene from Human Biomonitoring Data Using PBPK Modelling, Bayesian Inference, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Kevin; Cotton, Richard; Cocker, John; Jones, Kate; Bartels, Mike; Rick, David; Price, Paul; Loizou, George

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous biomonitoring programs, both recent and ongoing, to evaluate environmental exposure of humans to chemicals. Due to the lack of exposure and kinetic data, the correlation of biomarker levels with exposure concentrations leads to difficulty in utilizing biomonitoring data for biological guidance values. Exposure reconstruction or reverse dosimetry is the retrospective interpretation of external exposure consistent with biomonitoring data. We investigated the integration of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling, global sensitivity analysis, Bayesian inference, and Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a population estimate of inhalation exposure to m-xylene. We used exhaled breath and venous blood m-xylene and urinary 3-methylhippuric acid measurements from a controlled human volunteer study in order to evaluate the ability of our computational framework to predict known inhalation exposures. We also investigated the importance of model structure and dimensionality with respect to its ability to reconstruct exposure. PMID:22719759

  11. Reconstruction of Exposure to m-Xylene from Human Biomonitoring Data Using PBPK Modelling, Bayesian Inference, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin McNally

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous biomonitoring programs, both recent and ongoing, to evaluate environmental exposure of humans to chemicals. Due to the lack of exposure and kinetic data, the correlation of biomarker levels with exposure concentrations leads to difficulty in utilizing biomonitoring data for biological guidance values. Exposure reconstruction or reverse dosimetry is the retrospective interpretation of external exposure consistent with biomonitoring data. We investigated the integration of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling, global sensitivity analysis, Bayesian inference, and Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a population estimate of inhalation exposure to m-xylene. We used exhaled breath and venous blood m-xylene and urinary 3-methylhippuric acid measurements from a controlled human volunteer study in order to evaluate the ability of our computational framework to predict known inhalation exposures. We also investigated the importance of model structure and dimensionality with respect to its ability to reconstruct exposure.

  12. Pharmacokinetics: curiosity or cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    What is the fate of a drug from the time of its introduction into the body to the end of its duration. Pharmacokinetic studies are often designed to provide an answer to this question. But this question may be asked of any drug and research that is limited to answering it will remain empirical. Pharmacokinetic studies can provide answers to many other drug-related questions. In doing so pharmacokinetic research has the potential of improving drug therapy as well as the design and evaluation of drugs. While significant contributions can be cited, the future of pharmacokinetics depends upon its increased impact on clinical practice and drug design. How can a molecule be tailored for site specificity. Can chemical modification selectively alter absorption, distribution, metabolism, binding or excretion. In what new ways can pharmacokinetic information increase the predictability of drug therapy. Such questions, to which pharmacokinetics should provide answers, are numerous and easily identified. But the definitive studies are difficult both to create and conduct. Whether or not pharmacokinetics can achieve its full potential will depend upon the extent to which it can provide answers to these currently unanswered questions

  13. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PBPK modeling of the cis- and trans-permethrin isomers and their major urinary metabolites in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité Modèles pour l' Ecotoxicologie et la Toxicologie (METO), Parc ALATA BP2, 60550, Verneuil en Halatte (France); Sorbonne University, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, CNRS, UMR 7338 Biomechanics and Bioengineering, Centre de recherche Royallieu CS 60319,60203 Compiègnee Cedex (France); Desmots, Sophie [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité Toxicologie Expérimentale (TOXI), Parc ALATA BP2, 60550, Verneuil en Halatte (France); Le Grand, Rozenn [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Limoges, Service de Pharmacologie et de Toxicologie — Pharmacovigilance, 2, avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges (France); Lestremau, François [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité Innovation pour la Mesure (NOVA), Parc ALATA BP2, 60550, Verneuil en Halatte (France); Zeman, Florence A. [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité Modèles pour l' Ecotoxicologie et la Toxicologie (METO), Parc ALATA BP2, 60550, Verneuil en Halatte (France); Leclerc, Eric [Sorbonne University, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, CNRS, UMR 7338 Biomechanics and Bioengineering, Centre de recherche Royallieu CS 60319,60203 Compiègnee Cedex (France); Moesch, Christian [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Limoges, Service de Pharmacologie et de Toxicologie — Pharmacovigilance, 2, avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges (France); and others

    2016-03-01

    Permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, is suspected to induce neuronal and hormonal disturbances in humans. The widespread exposure of the populations has been confirmed by the detection of the urinary metabolites of permethrin in biomonitoring studies. Permethrin is a chiral molecule presenting two forms, the cis and the trans isomers. Because in vitro studies indicated a metabolic interaction between the trans and cis isomers of permethrin, we adapted and calibrated a PBPK model for trans- and cis-permethrin separately in rats. The model also describes the toxicokinetics of three urinary metabolites, cis- and trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (cis- and trans-DCCA), 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and 4′OH-phenoxybenzoic acid (4′-OH-PBA). In vivo experiments performed in Sprague–Dawley rats were used to calibrate the PBPK model in a Bayesian framework. The model captured well the toxicokinetics of permethrin isomers and their metabolites including the rapid absorption, the accumulation in fat, the extensive metabolism of the parent compounds, and the rapid elimination of metabolites in urine. Average hepatic clearances in rats were estimated to be 2.4 and 5.7 L/h/kg for cis- and trans-permethrin, respectively. High concentrations of the metabolite 4′-OH-PBA were measured in urine compared to cis- and trans-DCCA and 3-PBA. The confidence in the extended PBPK model was then confirmed by good predictions of published experimental data obtained using the isomers mixture. The extended PBPK model could be extrapolated to humans to predict the internal dose of exposure to permethrin from biomonitoring data in urine. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of isomers of permethrin and its urinary metabolites was developed. • A quantitative link was established for permethrin and its biomarkers of exposure. • The bayesian framework allows getting confidence interval on the estimated parameters. • The PBPK model can be extrapolated

  15. PBPK modeling of the cis- and trans-permethrin isomers and their major urinary metabolites in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Desmots, Sophie; Le Grand, Rozenn; Lestremau, François; Zeman, Florence A.; Leclerc, Eric; Moesch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, is suspected to induce neuronal and hormonal disturbances in humans. The widespread exposure of the populations has been confirmed by the detection of the urinary metabolites of permethrin in biomonitoring studies. Permethrin is a chiral molecule presenting two forms, the cis and the trans isomers. Because in vitro studies indicated a metabolic interaction between the trans and cis isomers of permethrin, we adapted and calibrated a PBPK model for trans- and cis-permethrin separately in rats. The model also describes the toxicokinetics of three urinary metabolites, cis- and trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (cis- and trans-DCCA), 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and 4′OH-phenoxybenzoic acid (4′-OH-PBA). In vivo experiments performed in Sprague–Dawley rats were used to calibrate the PBPK model in a Bayesian framework. The model captured well the toxicokinetics of permethrin isomers and their metabolites including the rapid absorption, the accumulation in fat, the extensive metabolism of the parent compounds, and the rapid elimination of metabolites in urine. Average hepatic clearances in rats were estimated to be 2.4 and 5.7 L/h/kg for cis- and trans-permethrin, respectively. High concentrations of the metabolite 4′-OH-PBA were measured in urine compared to cis- and trans-DCCA and 3-PBA. The confidence in the extended PBPK model was then confirmed by good predictions of published experimental data obtained using the isomers mixture. The extended PBPK model could be extrapolated to humans to predict the internal dose of exposure to permethrin from biomonitoring data in urine. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of isomers of permethrin and its urinary metabolites was developed. • A quantitative link was established for permethrin and its biomarkers of exposure. • The bayesian framework allows getting confidence interval on the estimated parameters. • The PBPK model can be extrapolated

  16. PBPK and population modelling to interpret urine cadmium concentrations of the French population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Béchaux, Camille, E-mail: Camille.bechaux@anses.fr [ANSES, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety, 27-31 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 94701 Maisons-Alfort (France); Bodin, Laurent [ANSES, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety, 27-31 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 94701 Maisons-Alfort (France); Clémençon, Stéphan [Telecom ParisTech, 46 rue Barrault, 75634 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Crépet, Amélie [ANSES, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety, 27-31 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 94701 Maisons-Alfort (France)

    2014-09-15

    As cadmium accumulates mainly in kidney, urinary concentrations are considered as relevant data to assess the risk related to cadmium. The French Nutrition and Health Survey (ENNS) recorded the concentration of cadmium in the urine of the French population. However, as with all biomonitoring data, it needs to be linked to external exposure for it to be interpreted in term of sources of exposure and for risk management purposes. The objective of this work is thus to interpret the cadmium biomonitoring data of the French population in terms of dietary and cigarette smoke exposures. Dietary and smoking habits recorded in the ENNS study were combined with contamination levels in food and cigarettes to assess individual exposures. A PBPK model was used in a Bayesian population model to link this external exposure with the measured urinary concentrations. In this model, the level of the past exposure was corrected thanks to a scaling function which account for a trend in the French dietary exposure. It resulted in a modelling which was able to explain the current urinary concentrations measured in the French population through current and past exposure levels. Risk related to cadmium exposure in the general French population was then assessed from external and internal critical values corresponding to kidney effects. The model was also applied to predict the possible urinary concentrations of the French population in 2030 assuming there will be no more changes in the exposures levels. This scenario leads to significantly lower concentrations and consequently lower related risk. - Highlights: • Interpretation of urine cadmium concentrations in France • PBPK and Bayesian population modelling of cadmium exposure • Assessment of the historic time-trend of the cadmium exposure in France • Risk assessment from current and future external and internal exposure.

  17. PBPK and population modelling to interpret urine cadmium concentrations of the French population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Béchaux, Camille; Bodin, Laurent; Clémençon, Stéphan; Crépet, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    As cadmium accumulates mainly in kidney, urinary concentrations are considered as relevant data to assess the risk related to cadmium. The French Nutrition and Health Survey (ENNS) recorded the concentration of cadmium in the urine of the French population. However, as with all biomonitoring data, it needs to be linked to external exposure for it to be interpreted in term of sources of exposure and for risk management purposes. The objective of this work is thus to interpret the cadmium biomonitoring data of the French population in terms of dietary and cigarette smoke exposures. Dietary and smoking habits recorded in the ENNS study were combined with contamination levels in food and cigarettes to assess individual exposures. A PBPK model was used in a Bayesian population model to link this external exposure with the measured urinary concentrations. In this model, the level of the past exposure was corrected thanks to a scaling function which account for a trend in the French dietary exposure. It resulted in a modelling which was able to explain the current urinary concentrations measured in the French population through current and past exposure levels. Risk related to cadmium exposure in the general French population was then assessed from external and internal critical values corresponding to kidney effects. The model was also applied to predict the possible urinary concentrations of the French population in 2030 assuming there will be no more changes in the exposures levels. This scenario leads to significantly lower concentrations and consequently lower related risk. - Highlights: • Interpretation of urine cadmium concentrations in France • PBPK and Bayesian population modelling of cadmium exposure • Assessment of the historic time-trend of the cadmium exposure in France • Risk assessment from current and future external and internal exposure

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suchaya Sanhajariya; Stephen B. Duffull; Geoffrey K. Isbister

    2018-01-01

    Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present) and Medline (1946–present). For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, ...

  19. Life-Stage PBPK Models for Multiple Routes of Ethanol Exposure in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol is commonly blended with gasoline (10% ethanol) in the US, and higher ethanol concentrations are being considered. While the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of orally-ingested ethanol are widely reported, comparable work is limited for inhalation exposure (IE), particularly...

  20. Retrospective use of PBPK modelling to understand a clinical drug-drug interaction between dextromethorphan and GSK1034702.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael J; Bloomer, Jackie; Dear, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    1. In a clinical trial, a strong drug-drug interaction (DDI) was observed between dextromethorphan (DM, the object or victim drug) and GSK1034702 (the precipitant or perpetrator drug), following single and repeat doses. This study determined the inhibition parameters of GSK1034702 in vitro and applied PBPK modelling approaches to simulate the clinical observations and provide mechanistic hypotheses to understand the DDI. 2. In vitro assays were conducted to determine the inhibition parameters of human CYP2D6 by GSK1034702. PBPK models were populated with the in vitro parameters and DDI simulations conducted and compared to the observed data from a clinical study with DM and GSK1034702. 3. GSK1034702 was a potent direct and metabolism-dependent inhibitor of human CYP2D6, with inhibition parameters of: IC 50  =   1.6 μM, K inact  = 3.7 h -1 and K I  = 0.8 μM. Incorporating these data into PBPK models predicted a DDI after repeat, but not single, 5 mg doses of GSK1034702. 4. The DDI observed with repeat administration of GSK1034702 (5 mg) can be attributed to metabolism-dependent inhibition of CYP2D6. Further, in vitro data were generated and several potential mechanisms proposed to explain the interaction observed following a single dose of GSK1034702.

  1. A physiologically-based recirculatory meta-model for nasal fentanyl in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Upton, RN; Foster, DJR; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data were available from a study of a nasal delivery system for the opioid analgesic fentanyl, together with data on the kinetics of fentanyl in arterial blood in man, and in the lung and brain of sheep. Our aim was to reconcile these data using a phy...

  2. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    was performed in PubMed and Embase databases. The pharmacokinetic variables included maximal plasma/serum concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma/serum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T1/2), area-under-the-curve plasma/serum concentrations (AUC), clearance (Cl), volume of distribution (VD......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  3. Performance Evaluation of Glottal Inverse Filtering Algorithms Using a Physiologically Based Articulatory Speech Synthesizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    vol. 74, pp. 279–295, 1999. [11] M. Fröhlich, D. Michaelis, and H. W. Strube, “SIM— simultaneous inverse filtering and matching of a glottal flow...1 Performance Evaluation of Glottal Inverse Filtering Algorithms Using a Physiologically Based Articulatory Speech Synthesizer Yu-Ren Chien, Daryush...D. Mehta, Member, IEEE, Jón Guðnason, Matías Zañartu, Member, IEEE, and Thomas F. Quatieri, Fellow, IEEE Abstract—Glottal inverse filtering aims to

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread clinical application of melatonin, several unanswered questions remain regarding the pharmacokinetics of this drug. This lack of knowledge may contribute to the inconsistency of results in previous clinical studies. Currently, a t max value of 30-45 min and a t ½elimination of ...

  5. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    correlates with renal function and it may be safely used with vitamin supplementation in patients with creatinine clearance ≥ 45 ml/min. The pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed is also largely unchanged in third-space fluids and can be feasibly and safely administered in combination with several other cytotoxic...

  6. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    correlates with renal function and it may be safely used with vitamin supplementation in patients with creatinine clearance = 45 ml/min. The pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed is also largely unchanged in third-space fluids and can be feasibly and safely administered in combination with several other cytotoxic...

  7. A unified algorithm for predicting partition coefficients for PBPK modeling of drugs and environmental chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyret, Thomas; Poulin, Patrick; Krishnan, Kannan

    2010-01-01

    The algorithms in the literature focusing to predict tissue:blood PC (P tb ) for environmental chemicals and tissue:plasma PC based on total (K p ) or unbound concentration (K pu ) for drugs differ in their consideration of binding to hemoglobin, plasma proteins and charged phospholipids. The objective of the present study was to develop a unified algorithm such that P tb , K p and K pu for both drugs and environmental chemicals could be predicted. The development of the unified algorithm was accomplished by integrating all mechanistic algorithms previously published to compute the PCs. Furthermore, the algorithm was structured in such a way as to facilitate predictions of the distribution of organic compounds at the macro (i.e. whole tissue) and micro (i.e. cells and fluids) levels. The resulting unified algorithm was applied to compute the rat P tb , K p or K pu of muscle (n = 174), liver (n = 139) and adipose tissue (n = 141) for acidic, neutral, zwitterionic and basic drugs as well as ketones, acetate esters, alcohols, aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. The unified algorithm reproduced adequately the values predicted previously by the published algorithms for a total of 142 drugs and chemicals. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated the relative importance of the various compound properties reflective of specific mechanistic determinants relevant to prediction of PC values of drugs and environmental chemicals. Overall, the present unified algorithm uniquely facilitates the computation of macro and micro level PCs for developing organ and cellular-level PBPK models for both chemicals and drugs.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, R A; Minard, K R; Kabilan, S; Einstein, D R; Kuprat, A P; Harkema, J R; Kimbell, J S; Gargas, M L; Kinzell, John H

    2009-05-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflow calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (approximately 50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  9. Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic Modelling as a Tool to Support Risk Assessment: Three Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Mielke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present three case studies of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK modelling in regulatory risk assessment. (1 Age-dependent lower enzyme expression in the newborn leads to bisphenol A (BPA blood levels which are near the levels of the tolerated daily intake (TDI at the oral exposure as calculated by EFSA. (2 Dermal exposure of BPA by receipts, car park tickets, and so forth, contribute to the exposure towards BPA. However, at the present levels of dermal exposure there is no risk for the adult. (3 Dermal exposure towards coumarin via cosmetic products leads to external exposures of two-fold the TDI. PBTK modeling helped to identify liver peak concentration as the metric for liver toxicity. After dermal exposure of twice the TDI, the liver peak concentration was lower than that present after oral exposure with the TDI dose. In the presented cases, PBTK modeling was useful to reach scientifically sound regulatory decisions.

  10. A temperature-dependent physiologically based model for the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, Gianni; Pasquali, Sara; Martín, Pablo R.; Carlsson, Nils; Mariani, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    In order to set priorities in management of costly and ecosystem-damaging species, policymakers and managers need accurate predictions not only about where a specific invader may establish but also about its potential abundance at different geographical scales. This is because density or biomass per unit area of an invasive species is a key predictor of the magnitude of environmental and economic impact in the invaded habitat. Here, we present a physiologically based demographic model describing and explaining the population dynamics of a widespread freshwater invader, the golden apple snail Pomacea canaliculata, which is causing severe environmental and economic impacts in invaded wetlands and rice fields in Southeastern Asia and has also been introduced to North America and Europe . The model is based on bio-demographic functions for mortality, development and fecundity rates that are driven by water temperature for the aquatic stages (juveniles and adults) and by air temperature for the aerial egg masses. Our model has been validated against data on the current distribution in South America and Japan, and produced consistent and realistic patterns of reproduction, growth, maturation and mortality under different scenarios in accordance to what is known from real P. canaliculata populations in different regions and climates. The model further shows that P. canaliculata will use two different reproductive strategies (semelparity and iteroparity) within the potential area of establishment, a plasticity that may explain the high invasiveness of this species across a wide range of habitats with different climates. Our results also suggest that densities, and thus the magnitude of environmental and agricultural damage, will be largely different in locations with distinct climatic regimes within the potential area of establishment. We suggest that physiologically based demographic modelling of invasive species will become a valuable tool for invasive species managers.

  11. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Paclitaxel Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore B; Bergmann, Troels K; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2018-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent efficacious in the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer. Due to a strong link between the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel, we reviewed the literature on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics. Systematic data mining was performed to extract ...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchaya Sanhajariya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present and Medline (1946–present. For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, the disposition of snake venom was described by a two-compartment model consisting of a rapid distribution phase and a slow elimination phase, with half-lives of 5 to 48 min and 0.8 to 28 h, respectively, following rapid intravenous injection of the venoms or toxins. When the venoms or toxins were administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously, an initial absorption phase and slow elimination phase were observed. The bioavailability of venoms or toxins ranged from 4 to 81.5% following intramuscular administration and 60% following subcutaneous administration. The volume of distribution and the clearance varied between snake species. For humans, 24 out of 666 initially identified publications contained sufficient information and timed venom concentrations in the absence of antivenom therapy for data extraction. The data were extracted and modelled in NONMEM. A one-compartment model provided the best fit, with an elimination half-life of 9.71 ± 1.29 h. It is intended that the quantitative information provided in this review will provide a useful basis for future studies that address the pharmacokinetics of snakebite in humans.

  13. Physiology-based modelling approaches to characterize fish habitat suitability: Their usefulness and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teal, Lorna R.; Marras, Stefano; Peck, Myron A.; Domenici, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    Models are useful tools for predicting the impact of global change on species distribution and abundance. As ectotherms, fish are being challenged to adapt or track changes in their environment, either in time through a phenological shift or in space by a biogeographic shift. Past modelling efforts have largely been based on correlative Species Distribution Models, which use known occurrences of species across landscapes of interest to define sets of conditions under which species are likely to maintain populations. The practical advantages of this correlative approach are its simplicity and the flexibility in terms of data requirements. However, effective conservation management requires models that make projections beyond the range of available data. One way to deal with such an extrapolation is to use a mechanistic approach based on physiological processes underlying climate change effects on organisms. Here we illustrate two approaches for developing physiology-based models to characterize fish habitat suitability. (i) Aerobic Scope Models (ASM) are based on the relationship between environmental factors and aerobic scope (defined as the difference between maximum and standard (basal) metabolism). This approach is based on experimental data collected by using a number of treatments that allow a function to be derived to predict aerobic metabolic scope from the stressor/environmental factor(s). This function is then integrated with environmental (oceanographic) data of current and future scenarios. For any given species, this approach allows habitat suitability maps to be generated at various spatiotemporal scales. The strength of the ASM approach relies on the estimate of relative performance when comparing, for example, different locations or different species. (ii) Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models are based on first principles including the idea that metabolism is organised in the same way within all animals. The (standard) DEB model aims to describe

  14. Analysis of Algorithms Predicting Blood: Air and Tissue: Blood Partition Coefficient from Solvent Partition Coefficients for Use in Complex Mixture Physiological Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    8217)~)a EA~U M) 12. Cu 05 𔃺 ). C C a) a’r - (a 04 W- a’ En a 0 4) 0X0 a’ 1 En I W M*E .x 0 a 00o0 0 CLu 0 n4~) 0 S 5 cc 02. 0 3 02 0 0 0 0~ ~> CDL- F5 ...0 E E 0 0 0 E0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 F5 Fn i Fn Fn Fn Fn Fn in Fn Fn Fn #AC U C U C U C C U C U () C) C C C C CC C C CC C C1 o) t_- c) c c o t)O L- C14- ) CD...a a W 4 0 0 Mu CD EL a..M C 0 -am- o uWMWWZZM W IL IL WWWWIM:Ma 0- Il (L(LWW WWI w t I 0) 0 a) a000) 0 C0 0r0 CcC_ C C C acCa .03 0 03 03 2 M 2

  15. Development and application of a population physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for penicillin G in swine and cattle for food safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Miao; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E; Lin, Zhoumeng

    Penicillin G is a widely used antimicrobial in food-producing animals, and one of the most predominant drug residues in animal-derived food products. Due to reduced sensitivity of bacteria to penicillin, extralabel use of penicillin G is common, which may lead to violative residues in edible tissues

  16. In Situ Stem Psychrometry: toward a Physiologically-Based Drought Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOCH, G. W.; Williams, C.; Ambrose, A.

    2012-12-01

    Plant water potential is a synoptic variable that integrates soil and atmospheric moisture stress and interacts with plant-internal factors to regulate gas exchange and determine vulnerability to drought-induced hydraulic dysfunction. Despite its importance, methods for measuring water potential are labor intensive. This limitation reduces measurement frequency, likely causes important transient events to be overlooked, and restricts development of a richer understanding of the impacts of integrated water stress on plant and ecosystem function. Recent technological advances have enabled in-situ, automated measurement of branch water potential over periods of weeks to months using stem psychrometers. We evaluated this technology through laboratory and field comparisons to standard pressure chamber measurements and with field installations in temperate forest, semi-arid woodland, and chaparral ecosystems. Performance was highly sensitive to installation procedures. With proper sealing, insulation, and radiation shielding, psychrometers typically differed from pressure chamber measurements by less than 0.2 MPa down to water potentials as low as -7 MPa. Measurements in tall trees reaffirmed the influence of gravity on water potential as previously documented with the pressure chamber. Psychrometer performance in situ was stable for periods of several weeks to months, with tissue wound response degrading sensor operation over time. We conclude that stem psychrometer technology is now suitable to serve as the foundation for a physiologically-based drought monitoring network that can anticipate important ecosystem impacts including changes in whole-system fluxes and mortality events.

  17. Developing a physiologically based approach for modeling plutonium decorporation therapy with DTPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastl, Manuel; Giussani, Augusto; Blanchardon, Eric; Breustedt, Bastian; Fritsch, Paul; Hoeschen, Christoph; Lopez, Maria Antonia

    2014-11-01

    To develop a physiologically based compartmental approach for modeling plutonium decorporation therapy with the chelating agent Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Ca-DTPA/Zn-DTPA). Model calculations were performed using the software package SAAM II (©The Epsilon Group, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA). The Luciani/Polig compartmental model with age-dependent description of the bone recycling processes was used for the biokinetics of plutonium. The Luciani/Polig model was slightly modified in order to account for the speciation of plutonium in blood and for the different affinities for DTPA of the present chemical species. The introduction of two separate blood compartments, describing low-molecular-weight complexes of plutonium (Pu-LW) and transferrin-bound plutonium (Pu-Tf), respectively, and one additional compartment describing plutonium in the interstitial fluids was performed successfully. The next step of the work is the modeling of the chelation process, coupling the physiologically modified structure with the biokinetic model for DTPA. RESULTS of animal studies performed under controlled conditions will enable to better understand the principles of the involved mechanisms.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Chinese medicines: strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ru; Yang, Ying; Chen, Yijia

    2018-01-01

    The modernization and internationalization of Chinese medicines (CMs) are hampered by increasing concerns on the safety and the efficacy. Pharmacokinetic (PK) study is indispensable to establish concentration-activity/toxicity relationship and facilitate target identification and new drug discovery from CMs. To cope with tremendous challenges rooted from chemical complexity of CMs, the classic PK strategies have evolved rapidly from PK study focusing on marker/main drug components to PK-PD correlation study adopting metabolomics approaches to characterize associations between disposition of global drug-related components and host metabolic network shifts. However, the majority of PK studies of CMs have adopted the approaches tailored for western medicines and focused on the systemic exposures of drug-related components, most of which were found to be too low to account for the holistic benefits of CMs. With an area under concentration-time curve- or activity-weighted approach, integral PK attempts to understand the PK-PD relevance with the integrated PK profile of multiple co-existing structural analogs (prototyes/metabolites). Cellular PK-PD complements traditional PK-PD when drug targets localize inside the cells, instead of at the surface of cell membrane or extracellular space. Considering the validated clinical benefits of CMs, reverse pharmacology-based reverse PK strategy was proposed to facilitate target identification and new drug discovery. Recently, gut microbiota have demonstrated multifaceted roles in drug efficacy/toxicity. In traditional oral intake, the presystemic interactions of CMs with gut microbiota seem inevitable, which can contribute to the holistic benefits of CMs through biotransforming CMs components, acting as the peripheral target, and regulating host drug disposition. Hence, we propose a global PK-PD approach which includes the presystemic interaction of CMs with gut microbiota and combines omics with physiologically based

  19. Measuring the Differences between Traditional Learning and Game-Based Learning Using Electroencephalography (EEG) Physiologically Based Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huei

    2017-01-01

    Students' cognitive states can reflect a learning experience that results in engagement in an activity. In this study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) physiologically based methodology to evaluate students' levels of attention and relaxation, as well as their learning performance within a traditional and game-based learning context. While no…

  20. Investigating the state of physiologically based kinetic modelling practices and challenges associated with gaining regulatory acceptance of model applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiologically based kinetic (PBK) models are used widely throughout a number of working sectors, including academia and industry, to provide insight into the dosimetry related to observed adverse health effects in humans and other species. Use of these models has increased over...

  1. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Postnova

    Full Text Available Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8 in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  2. A Physiologically Based, Multi-Scale Model of Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrle, O.; Davidson, J. B.; Pullan, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle’s response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modeling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle’s response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modeling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibers and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor-unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behavior of single muscle fibers within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenization. The effect of homogenization has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibers and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the tibialis anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modeling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behavior ranging from motor-unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue. PMID:22993509

  3. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Eichbaum, Kathrin [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kammann, Ulrike [Thünen-Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Hudjetz, Sebastian [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Cofalla, Catrina [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), Department G3: Biochemistry, Ecotoxicology, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Schüttrumpf, Holger [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Preuss, Thomas [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt- Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); and others

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A PBTK model for trout was coupled with a sediment equilibrium partitioning model. • The influence of physical exercise on pollutant uptake was studies using the model. • Physical exercise during flood events can increase the level of biliary metabolites. • Cardiac output and effective respiratory volume were identified as relevant factors. • These confounding factors need to be considered also for bioconcentration studies. - Abstract: As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24 °C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios.

  4. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A; Postnov, Dmitry D

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  5. Adaptation to Shift Work: Physiologically Based Modeling of the Effects of Lighting and Shifts’ Start Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A.; Postnov, Dmitry D.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers’ sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers’ adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21∶00 instead of 00∶00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters. PMID:23308206

  6. Modeling gravity-dependent plasticity of the angular vestibuloocular reflex with a physiologically based neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yongqing; Yakushin, Sergei B; Cohen, Bernard; Raphan, Theodore

    2006-12-01

    A neural network model was developed to explain the gravity-dependent properties of gain adaptation of the angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR). Gain changes are maximal at the head orientation where the gain is adapted and decrease as the head is tilted away from that position and can be described by the sum of gravity-independent and gravity-dependent components. The adaptation process was modeled by modifying the weights and bias values of a three-dimensional physiologically based neural network of canal-otolith-convergent neurons that drive the aVOR. Model parameters were trained using experimental vertical aVOR gain values. The learning rule aimed to reduce the error between eye velocities obtained from experimental gain values and model output in the position of adaptation. Although the model was trained only at specific head positions, the model predicted the experimental data at all head positions in three dimensions. Altering the relative learning rates of the weights and bias improved the model-data fits. Model predictions in three dimensions compared favorably with those of a double-sinusoid function, which is a fit that minimized the mean square error at every head position and served as the standard by which we compared the model predictions. The model supports the hypothesis that gravity-dependent adaptation of the aVOR is realized in three dimensions by a direct otolith input to canal-otolith neurons, whose canal sensitivities are adapted by the visual-vestibular mismatch. The adaptation is tuned by how the weights from otolith input to the canal-otolith-convergent neurons are adapted for a given head orientation.

  7. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Kammann, Ulrike; Hudjetz, Sebastian; Cofalla, Catrina; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Preuss, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A PBTK model for trout was coupled with a sediment equilibrium partitioning model. • The influence of physical exercise on pollutant uptake was studies using the model. • Physical exercise during flood events can increase the level of biliary metabolites. • Cardiac output and effective respiratory volume were identified as relevant factors. • These confounding factors need to be considered also for bioconcentration studies. - Abstract: As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24 °C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios

  8. Physiologically-Based Toxicokinetic Modeling of Zearalenone and Its Metabolites: Application to the Jersey Girl Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Royce, Steven G.; Alexander, Jocelyn A.; Buckley, Brian; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Zarbl, Helmut; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA), a fungal mycotoxin, and its metabolite zeranol (ZAL) are known estrogen agonists in mammals, and are found as contaminants in food. Zeranol, which is more potent than ZEA and comparable in potency to estradiol, is also added as a growth additive in beef in the US and Canada. This article presents the development and application of a Physiologically-Based Toxicokinetic (PBTK) model for ZEA and ZAL and their primary metabolites, zearalenol, zearalanone, and their conjugated glucuronides, for rats and for human subjects. The PBTK modeling study explicitly simulates critical metabolic pathways in the gastrointestinal and hepatic systems. Metabolic events such as dehydrogenation and glucuronidation of the chemicals, which have direct effects on the accumulation and elimination of the toxic compounds, have been quantified. The PBTK model considers urinary and fecal excretion and biliary recirculation and compares the predicted biomarkers of blood, urinary and fecal concentrations with published in vivo measurements in rats and human subjects. Additionally, the toxicokinetic model has been coupled with a novel probabilistic dietary exposure model and applied to the Jersey Girl Study (JGS), which involved measurement of mycoestrogens as urinary biomarkers, in a cohort of young girls in New Jersey, USA. A probabilistic exposure characterization for the study population has been conducted and the predicted urinary concentrations have been compared to measurements considering inter-individual physiological and dietary variability. The in vivo measurements from the JGS fall within the high and low predicted distributions of biomarker values corresponding to dietary exposure estimates calculated by the probabilistic modeling system. The work described here is the first of its kind to present a comprehensive framework developing estimates of potential exposures to mycotoxins and linking them with biologically relevant doses and biomarker measurements

  9. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRöhrle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modelling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modelling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibres and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behaviour of single muscle fibres within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenisation. The effect of homogenisation has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibres and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modelling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behaviour ranging from motor unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  10. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain J McGilveray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (marijuana. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC, but also includes known information for cannabinol and cannabidiol, as well as the synthetic marketed cannabinoids, dronabinol (synthetic THC and nabilone. The variability of THC in plant material (0.3% to 30% leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level of 152±86.3 ng/mL occured approximately 10 min after inhalation. Oral THC, on the other hand, is only 4% to 12% bioavailable and absorption is highly variable. THC is eliminated from plasma in a multiphasic manner, with low amounts detectable for over one week after dosing. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20% and 100% of parent, respectively. THC is widely distributed, particularly to fatty tissues, but less than 1% of an administered dose reaches the brain, while the spleen and body fat are long-term storage sites. The elimination of THC and its many metabolites (from all routes occurs via the feces and urine. Metabolites persist in the urine and feces for severalweeks. Nabilone is well absorbed and the pharmacokinetics, although variable, appear to be linear from oral doses of 1 mg to 4 mg (these doses show a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 2 h. As with THC, there is a high first-pass effect, and the feces to urine ratio of excretion is similar to other cannabinoids. Pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic modelling with plasma THC versus cardiac and psychotropic effects show that after equilibrium is reached, the intensity of effect is proportional to the plasma THC profile. Clinical trials have found that nabilone produces less tachycardia and less euphoria than THC for a similar antiemetic response.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of clomipramine during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, P G J; Proost, J H; Smit, J P; Vries, M T; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Wilffert, B

    2015-01-01

    Clomipramine is one of the drugs for depression during pregnancy; however, pharmacokinetic data of clomipramine and its active metabolite desmethylclomipramine in this vulnerable period are lacking. In this study, we describe clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine concentrations including their

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  14. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  15. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007).

  16. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Tucker A. [Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Twaddle, Nathan C. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Roegge, Cindy S. [Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Callicott, Ralph J. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Priority One Services Corp, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 μg/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 μg/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures to BPA from food contact, medical devices, and other environmental sources. - Highlights: ► Maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism attenuate fetal exposure to BPA. ► Serum AUC for aglycone BPA in fetal monkeys is less than half of that in the dam. ► BPA profiles in monkey fetus rule out selective deconjugation and accumulation. ► BPA levels in monkey placenta are similar to other metabolically active tissues. ► Some published human cord blood data for BPA are inconsistent with these measurements.

  17. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  18. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Graafland, O; Cranendonk, A; Vermeulen, R J; van Weissenbruch, M M

    2000-01-01

    Demographic and clinical pharmacokinetic data collected from term and preterm neonates who were treated with intravenous phenobarbital have been analysed to evaluate the role of patient characteristics in pharmacokinetic parameters. Significant relationships between total body weight (TBW) or body

  20. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillastre, J P; Leroy, A; Humbert, G

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were investigated in 12 normal subjects and 21 uremic patients after the administration of a single oral 200-mg dose. An open three-compartment body model was used to calculate ofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. In healthy subjects, the peak plasma level averaged 2.24 +/- 0.90 micrograms/ml and was obtained at 0.83 +/- 0.31 h. The absorption rate constant was 4.22 +/- 1.64 h-1. The terminal half-life was 7.86 +/- 1.81 h. The apparent volume of distribution...

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Mequindox and Its Marker Residue 1,4-Bisdesoxymequindox in Swine Following Multiple Oral Gavage and Intramuscular Administration : An Experimental Study Coupled with Population Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Dongping; Lin, Zhoumeng; Fang, Binghu; Li, Miao; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E; Zeng, Zhenling

    2017-01-01

    Mequindox (MEQ) is a quinoxaline-N,N-dioxide antibiotic used in food-producing animals. MEQ residue in animal-derived foods is a food safety concern. The tissue distribution of MEQ and its marker residue 1,4-bisdesoxymequindox (M1) were determined in swine following oral gavage or intramuscular

  2. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACOKINETIC DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP OF ROCURONIUM BROMIDE IN HUMANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; PROOST, JH; SCHIERE, S; HOMMES, FDM

    The existing human pharmacokinetic studies have been reviewed and compared with data derived from animals. The earliest study confirms the similarity of rocuronium to vecuronium with respect to the variables derived from the plasma concentration decay curves and the proportion excreted renally.

  3. From in vitro to in vivo: Integration of the virtual cell based assay with physiologically based kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paini, Alicia; Sala Benito, Jose Vicente; Bessems, Jos; Worth, Andrew P

    2017-12-01

    Physiologically based kinetic (PBK) models and the virtual cell based assay can be linked to form so called physiologically based dynamic (PBD) models. This study illustrates the development and application of a PBK model for prediction of estragole-induced DNA adduct formation and hepatotoxicity in humans. To address the hepatotoxicity, HepaRG cells were used as a surrogate for liver cells, with cell viability being used as the in vitro toxicological endpoint. Information on DNA adduct formation was taken from the literature. Since estragole induced cell damage is not directly caused by the parent compound, but by a reactive metabolite, information on the metabolic pathway was incorporated into the model. In addition, a user-friendly tool was developed by implementing the PBK/D model into a KNIME workflow. This workflow can be used to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolation and forward as backward dosimetry in support of chemical risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF THE BPG AXIS IN FATHEAD MINNOWS: PREDICTING EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ON REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes development and application of a physiologically-based computational model that simulates the brain-pituitary-gonadal (BPG) axis and other endpoints important in reproduction such as concentrations of sex steroid hormones, 17-estradiol, testosterone, a...

  5. Development of a PBPK model of thiocyanate in rats with an extrapolation to humans: A computational study to quantify the mechanism of action of thiocyanate kinetics in thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Lumen, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid homeostasis can be disturbed due to thiocyanate exposure from the diet or tobacco smoke. Thiocyanate inhibits both thyroidal uptake of iodide, via the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), and thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis in the thyroid, via thyroid peroxidase (TPO), but the mode of action of thiocyanate is poorly quantified in the literature. The characterization of the link between intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations and dose of exposure is crucial for assessing the risk of thyroid perturbations due to thiocyanate exposure. We developed a PBPK model for thiocyanate that describes its kinetics in the whole-body up to daily doses of 0.15 mmol/kg, with a mechanistic description of the thyroidal kinetics including NIS, passive diffusion, and TPO. The model was calibrated in a Bayesian framework using published studies in rats. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, especially for intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations. Thiocyanate kinetic processes were quantified in vivo, including the metabolic clearance by TPO. The passive diffusion rate was found to be greater than NIS-mediated uptake rate. The model captured the dose-dependent kinetics of thiocyanate after acute and chronic exposures. Model behavior was evaluated using a Morris screening test. The distribution of thiocyanate into the thyroid was found to be determined primarily by the partition coefficient, followed by NIS and passive diffusion; the impact of the latter two mechanisms appears to increase at very low doses. Extrapolation to humans resulted in good predictions of thiocyanate kinetics during chronic exposure. The developed PBPK model can be used in risk assessment to quantify dose-response effects of thiocyanate on TH. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of thiocyanate (SCN − ) was calibrated in rats in a Bayesian framework. • The intra-thyroidal kinetics of thiocyanate including NIS and TPO was modeled. • Passive diffusion rate for SCN − seemed to be greater than the NIS

  6. Development of a PBPK model of thiocyanate in rats with an extrapolation to humans: A computational study to quantify the mechanism of action of thiocyanate kinetics in thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Lumen, Annie, E-mail: Annie.Lumen@fda.hhs.gov

    2016-09-15

    Thyroid homeostasis can be disturbed due to thiocyanate exposure from the diet or tobacco smoke. Thiocyanate inhibits both thyroidal uptake of iodide, via the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), and thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis in the thyroid, via thyroid peroxidase (TPO), but the mode of action of thiocyanate is poorly quantified in the literature. The characterization of the link between intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations and dose of exposure is crucial for assessing the risk of thyroid perturbations due to thiocyanate exposure. We developed a PBPK model for thiocyanate that describes its kinetics in the whole-body up to daily doses of 0.15 mmol/kg, with a mechanistic description of the thyroidal kinetics including NIS, passive diffusion, and TPO. The model was calibrated in a Bayesian framework using published studies in rats. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, especially for intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations. Thiocyanate kinetic processes were quantified in vivo, including the metabolic clearance by TPO. The passive diffusion rate was found to be greater than NIS-mediated uptake rate. The model captured the dose-dependent kinetics of thiocyanate after acute and chronic exposures. Model behavior was evaluated using a Morris screening test. The distribution of thiocyanate into the thyroid was found to be determined primarily by the partition coefficient, followed by NIS and passive diffusion; the impact of the latter two mechanisms appears to increase at very low doses. Extrapolation to humans resulted in good predictions of thiocyanate kinetics during chronic exposure. The developed PBPK model can be used in risk assessment to quantify dose-response effects of thiocyanate on TH. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of thiocyanate (SCN{sup −}) was calibrated in rats in a Bayesian framework. • The intra-thyroidal kinetics of thiocyanate including NIS and TPO was modeled. • Passive diffusion rate for SCN{sup −} seemed to be greater than the NIS

  7. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakulsrichai S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Satariya Trakulsrichai,1,2 Korbtham Sathirakul,3,4 Saranya Auparakkitanon,5 Jatupon Krongvorakul,5 Jetjamnong Sueajai,5 Nantida Noumjad,5 Chonlaphat Sukasem,5 Winai Wananukul2,6 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 2Ramathibodi Poison Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 3Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Center for Drug Research Discovery and Development, Thammasat Univerisity, Prathumthani, Thailand; 5Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 6Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth., is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users.Methods: Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results: Ten male subjects completed

  8. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors....... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  10. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    Background and Objective: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Methods: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  11. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, H.; Erp, N. van; Bins, S.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.; Steeghs, N.; Huitema, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. METHODS: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  12. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  14. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry, an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Classical pharmacokinetic techniques attempt to quantify the time course for drug in the body by assaying samples of blood or urine as a function of time. The mathematical descriptions that have emerged from this approach have proven extremely valuable to both drug research and drug therapy. Since the monitoring of patients' drug blood levels by obtaining a few small blood samples at key times is clinically practical, individualization of dosage regimens has become a reality. This has dramatically altered certain types of drug therapy. These improvements are limited to cases wherein biological response can be related to drug blood levels since the mathematics are capable only of describing the sampled fluids. Non-sampled fluids are considered as additional compartments or pools and described collectively using kinetic equations for mass balance. This limits progress in those areas of research which require assessment of the relationship of specific organ contents to that of the blood. The author suggests that radiopharmaceutical techniques which can provide the time course in specific organs might be coupled with classical pharmacokinetic approaches to provide insight not previously achieved

  15. Pharmacokinetics of metformin during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Easterling, Thomas R; Carr, Darcy; Umans, Jason G; Miodovnik, Menachem; Hankins, Gary D V; Clark, Shannon M; Risler, Linda; Wang, Joanne; Kelly, Edward J; Shen, Danny D; Hebert, Mary F

    2010-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of metformin during pregnancy. Serial blood and urine samples were collected over one steady-state dosing interval in women treated with metformin during early to late pregnancy (n = 35) and postpartum (n = 16). Maternal and umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at delivery from 12 women. Metformin concentrations were also determined in breast milk samples obtained over one dosing interval in 6 women. Metformin renal clearance increased significantly in mid (723 +/- 243 ml/min, P pregnancy (625 +/- 130 ml/min, P metformin net secretion clearance (480 +/- 190 ml/min, P pregnancy versus postpartum, respectively. Metformin concentrations at the time of delivery in umbilical cord plasma ranged between nondetectable (metformin through breast milk was 0.13 to 0.28 mg, and the relative infant dose was metformin pharmacokinetics are affected by pregnancy-related changes in renal filtration and net tubular transport and can be roughly estimated by the use of creatinine clearance. At the time of delivery, the fetus is exposed to metformin concentrations from negligible to as high as maternal concentrations. In contrast, infant exposure to metformin through the breast milk is low.

  16. Obesity and drug pharmacology: a review of the influence of obesity on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Cornelis; De Hoogd, Sjoerd; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Knibbe, Catherijne A J

    2018-03-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity confronts clinicians with dosing problems in the (extreme) overweight population. Obesity has a great impact on key organs that play a role in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of drugs, however the ultimate impact of these changes on how to adapt the dose may not always be known. Areas covered: In this review, physiological changes associated with obesity are discussed. An overview is provided on the alterations in absorption, distribution, drug metabolism and clearance in (morbid) obesity focusing on general principles that can be extracted from pharmacokinetic studies. Also, relevant pharmacodynamic considerations in obesity are discussed. Expert opinion: Over the last two decades, increased knowledge is generated on PK and PD in obesity. Future research should focus on filling in the knowledge gaps that remain, especially in connecting obesity-related physiological changes with changes in PK and/or PD and vice versa. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to develop physiologically based PK and PD models on the basis of quantitative systems pharmacology principles. Moreover, efforts should focus on thorough prospective evaluation of developed model-based doses with subsequent implementation of these dosing recommendations in clinical practice.

  17. Metabolic profiles of pomalidomide in human plasma simulated with pharmacokinetic data in control and humanized-liver mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Makiko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Mitsui, Marina; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    1. Pomalidomide has been shown to be potentially teratogenic in thalidomide-sensitive animal species such as rabbits. Screening for thalidomide analogs devoid of teratogenicity/toxicity - attributable to metabolites formed by cytochrome P450 enzymes - but having immunomodulatory properties is a strategic pathway towards development of new anticancer drugs. 2. In this study, plasma concentrations of pomalidomide, its primary 5-hydroxylated metabolite, and its glucuronide conjugate(s) were investigated in control and humanized-liver mice. Following oral administration of pomalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of 7-hydroxypomalidomide and 5-hydroxypomalidomide glucuronide were slightly higher in humanized-liver mice than in control mice. 3. Simulations of human plasma concentrations of pomalidomide were achieved with simplified physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models in both groups of mice in accordance with reported pomalidomide concentrations after low dose administration in humans. 4. The results indicate that pharmacokinetic profiles of pomalidomide were roughly similar between control mice and humanized-liver mice and that control and humanized-liver mice mediated pomalidomide 5-hydroxylation in vivo. Introducing one aromatic amino group into thalidomide resulted in less species differences in in vivo pharmacokinetics in control and humanized-liver mice.

  18. Computational Analysis of Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Ampicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Ďurišová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available orrespondence: Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Phone + 42-1254775928; Fax +421254775928; E-mail: maria.durisova@savba.sk 84 RESEARCH ARTICLE The objective of this study was to perform a computational analysis of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ampicillin, using data from the literature. A method based on the theory of dynamic systems was used for modeling purposes. The method used has been introduced to pharmacokinetics with the aim to contribute to the knowledge base in pharmacokinetics by including the modeling method which enables researchers to develop mathematical models of various pharmacokinetic processes in an identical way, using identical model structures. A few examples of a successful use of the modeling method considered here in pharmacokinetics can be found in full texts articles available free of charge at the website of the author, and in the example given in the this study. The modeling method employed in this study can be used to develop a mathematical model of the pharmacokinetic behavior of any drug, under the condition that the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug under study can be at least partially approximated using linear models.

  19. Effect of In Vivo Nicotine Exposure on Chlorpyrifos Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Routine use of tobacco products may modify physiological and metabolic functions, including drug metabolizing enzymes, which may impact the pharmacokinetics of environmental contaminants. Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is bioactivated to chlorpyrifos-oxon, and manifests its neurotoxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated nicotine exposure on the pharmacokinetics of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine and also to determine the impact on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma and brain. Animals were exposed to 7-daily doses of either 1 mg nicotine/kg or saline (sc), and to either a single oral dose of 35 mg CPF/kg or a repeated dose of 5 mg CPF/kg/day for 7 days. Groups of rats were then sacrificed at multiple time-points after receiving the last dose of CPF. Repeated nicotine and CPF exposures resulted in enhanced metabolism of CPF to TCPy, as evidenced by increases in the measured TCPy concentration and AUC in blood. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of TCPy (free or total) excreted in the urine. The extent of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was reduced due to nicotine co-exposure consistent with an increase in CYP450-mediated dearylation (detoxification) versus desulfuration. It was of interest to note that the impact of nicotine co-exposure was experimentally observed only after repeated CPF doses. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations of CPF-oxon concentrations in blood and brain were predicted to be lower in nicotine treated groups, which were simulated by increasing the dearylation Vmax based upon previously conducted in vitro metabolism studies. These results were consistent with the experimental data. The current study demonstrated that repeated nicotine exposure could alter CPF metabolism in vivo, further modulating brain AChE inhibition.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats: role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution in the non-linear pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. The first phase of the research was an attempt to elucidate the causes of intersubject differences in serum protein binding of warfarin in rats. It was found that the distribution of S-warfarin between blood and liver, kidneys, muscle, or fatty tissue was non-linear. Based on the tissue distribution data obtained, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the time course of S-warfarin concentrations in the serum and tissues of rats. The proposed model was able to display the dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. Namely a lower clearance and a smaller apparent volume of distribution with increasing dose, which appear to be due to the presence of capacity-limited, high-affinity binding sites for warfarin in various tissues. To determine if the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the liver of rats is reversible, concentrations of S-warfarin in the liver and serum of rats were monitored for a very long time after an intravenous injection of a 1 mg/kg dose. In another study in rats, non-radioactive warfarin was found to be able to displace tissue-bound C 14 -warfarin which was administered about 200 hours before the i.v. injection of the non-radioactive warfarin, showing that the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the body is persistent and reversible

  1. Mode of action based risk assessment of the botanical food-borne alkenylbenzene apiol from parsley using physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling and read-across from safrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alajlouni, A.M.; Al-Malahmeh, A.J.; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Al-Subeihi, A.A.A.; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study developed physiologically-based kinetic (PBK) models for the alkenylbenzene apiol in order to facilitate risk assessment based on read-across from the related alkenylbenzene safrole. Model predictions indicate that in rat liver the formation of the 1'-sulfoxy metabolite is about

  2. A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model for moderately hydrophobic organic chemicals in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Markus [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, ABBt — Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Freese, Marko; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Kammann, Ulrike [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Hamburg (Germany); Preuss, Thomas G. [Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research, ABBt — Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), Department G3: Biochemistry, Ecotoxicology, Koblenz (Germany); Beiermeister, Anne; Hanel, Reinhold [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Hamburg (Germany); Hollert, Henner, E-mail: Henner.hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, ABBt — Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Yangtze Water Environment, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-12-01

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a facultatively catadromous fish species with a complex life cycle. Its current population status is alarming: recruitment has decreased drastically since the 1980s and its stock is still considered to be outside safe biological limits. Although there is no consensus on the reasons for this situation, it is currently thought to have resulted from a combination of different stressors, including anthropogenic contaminants. To deepen our understanding of the processes leading to the accumulation of lipophilic organic contaminants in yellow eels (i.e. the feeding, continental growth stage), we developed a physiologically based toxicokinetic model using our own data and values from the literature. Such models can predict the uptake and distribution of water-borne organic chemicals in the whole fish and in different tissues at any time during exposure. The predictive power of the model was tested against experimental data for six chemicals with n-octanol-water partitioning coefficient (log K{sub ow}) values ranging from 2.13–4.29. Model performance was excellent, with a root mean squared error of 0.28 log units. This model has the potential to help identify suitable habitats for restocking under eel management plans. - Highlights: • A PBTK model was developed for European eel (Anguilla anguilla). • Own experimental data and data from the literature were used for parameterization. • The predictive power of the model was excellent, with RMSE of 0.28 log units. • The developed model can be amended with sub-models for dietary and dermal exposure.

  3. A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model for moderately hydrophobic organic chemicals in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Freese, Marko; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Kammann, Ulrike; Preuss, Thomas G.; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Beiermeister, Anne; Hanel, Reinhold; Hollert, Henner

    2015-01-01

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a facultatively catadromous fish species with a complex life cycle. Its current population status is alarming: recruitment has decreased drastically since the 1980s and its stock is still considered to be outside safe biological limits. Although there is no consensus on the reasons for this situation, it is currently thought to have resulted from a combination of different stressors, including anthropogenic contaminants. To deepen our understanding of the processes leading to the accumulation of lipophilic organic contaminants in yellow eels (i.e. the feeding, continental growth stage), we developed a physiologically based toxicokinetic model using our own data and values from the literature. Such models can predict the uptake and distribution of water-borne organic chemicals in the whole fish and in different tissues at any time during exposure. The predictive power of the model was tested against experimental data for six chemicals with n-octanol-water partitioning coefficient (log K ow ) values ranging from 2.13–4.29. Model performance was excellent, with a root mean squared error of 0.28 log units. This model has the potential to help identify suitable habitats for restocking under eel management plans. - Highlights: • A PBTK model was developed for European eel (Anguilla anguilla). • Own experimental data and data from the literature were used for parameterization. • The predictive power of the model was excellent, with RMSE of 0.28 log units. • The developed model can be amended with sub-models for dietary and dermal exposure

  4. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of thiamphenicol in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, G; Intorre, L; Franquelo, C; Cristòfol, C; Pérez, B; Martí, G; Arboix, M

    1998-11-01

    To determine pharmacokinetic parameters of thiamphenicol (TAP) after IV and IM administration in dogs. 6 healthy 2- to 3-year-old male Beagles. IN a crossover design study, 3 dogs were given TAP IV, and 3 dogs were given TAP IM, each at a dosage of 40 mg/kg of body weight. Three weeks later, the same dogs were given a second dose by the opposite route. At preestablished times after TAP administration, blood samples were collected through a catheter placed in the cephalic vein, and TAP concentration was determined by use of a high-performance liquid chromatography. Results-Kinetics of TAP administered IV were fitted by a biexponential equation with a rapid first disposition phase followed by a slower disposition phase. Elimination half-life was short (1.7+/-0.3 hours), volume of distribution at steady state was 0.66+/-0.05 L/kg, and plasma clearance was 5.3+/-0.7 ml/min/kg. After IM administration, absorption was rapid. Peak plasma concentration (25.1+/-10.3 microg/ml) was reached about 45 minutes after drug administration. The apparent elimination half-life after IM administration (5.6+/-4.6 hours) was longer than that after IV administration probably because of the slow absorption rate from the muscle. Mean bioavailability after IM administration was 96+/-7%. The pharmacokinetic profile of TAP in dogs suggests that it may be therapeutically useful against susceptible microorganisms involved in the most common infections in dogs, such as tracheobronchitis, enterocolitis, mastitis, and urinary tract infections.

  6. [Pharmacokinetics of crocetin in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-zheng; Qian, Zhi-yu

    2002-05-01

    To develop an HPLC method for the determination of crocetin in rat plasma and study the pharmacokinetics in rats. Hypersil C18 column (5 microns, 4.6 mm x 200 mm) was used at column temperature 30 degrees C. The mobile phase consisted of methanol-water-acetic acid (75:24.5:0.5) at the flow rate of 1.0 mL.min-1. The UV detection wave length was 423 nm. The calibration curve was linear (gamma = 0.9996) in the range from 0.49 microgram.mL-1 to 7.87 micrograms.mL-1 for crocetin. The mean recovery was 105.2%. The lowest detectable concentration of crocetin was 0.14 microgram.mL-1 (S/N = 3). The RSDs of within-day and between-day were all less than 5%. The plasma crocetin was steady. The HPLC method of determination of crocetin in the plasma was established. After single dose of 50 mg.kg-1 ig in 10 rats, the main pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated as follows: T1/2 alpha (30 +/- 6) min, Tmax(65 +/- 16) min, Cmax(5.0 +/- 1.0) microgram.mL-1, AUC0-T(845 +/- 109) microgram.min.mL-1, Vd(5.0 +/- 0.8) L.kg-1. Crocetin was shown to be absorbed into the blood through the gastrointestinal tract. This method is quick, precise and reliable. Crocetin was shown to be quickly absorbed in rats.

  7. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of .... dependency or drug abuse, known allergy to ... HPLC analysis of glipizide ... months when stored at 4 0C, protected from .... plasma and urine.

  8. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  9. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Systemically Administered Antileishmanial Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    This review describes the pharmacokinetic properties of the systemically administered antileishmanial drugs pentavalent antimony, paromomycin, pentamidine, miltefosine and amphotericin B (AMB), including their absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and potential drug-drug interactions.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Botanical Drugs and Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez More, Gina Paola; Cardenas, Paola Andrea; Costa, Geison M; Simoes, Claudia M O; Aragon, Diana Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Botanical drugs contain plant extracts, which are complex mixtures of compounds. As with conventional drugs, it is necessary to validate their efficacy and safety through preclinical and clinical studies. However, pharmacokinetic studies for active constituents or characteristic markers in botanical drugs are rare. The objective of this review was to investigate the global state of the art in pharmacokinetic studies of active ingredients present in plant extracts and botanical drugs. A review of pharmacokinetics studies of chemical constituents of plant extracts and botanical drugs was performed, with a total of 135 studies published between January 2004 and February 2015 available in recognized scientific databases. Botanical preparations were mainly found in the form of aqueous extracts of roots and rhizomes. The most widely studied species was Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the compound most frequently used as a pharmacokinetic marker was berberine. Most studies were performed using the Sprague Dawley rat model, and the preparations were mainly administered orally in a single dose. Quantification of plasma concentrations of pharmacokinetic markers was performed mainly by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector. In conclusion, in recent years there has been an increasing interest among researchers worldwide in the study of pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs and plant extracts, especially those from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Use of the physiologically-based extraction test to assess the oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown in contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intawongse, Marisa; Dean, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown on contaminated soil was assessed. This was done using the physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) to simulate the human digestion of plant material. A range of vegetable plants, i.e. carrot, lettuce, radish and spinach, were grown on metal contaminated soil. After reaching maturity the plants were harvested and analysed for their total metal content (i.e. Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The plant samples were then subsequently extracted using an in vitro gastrointestinal approach or PBET to assess the likelihood of oral bioaccessibility if the material was consumed by humans. - Evaluation of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess the risk to humans of consuming contaminated vegetables

  12. Use of the physiologically-based extraction test to assess the oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown in contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intawongse, Marisa [Biomolecular and Biomedical Research Centre, School of Applied Sciences, University of Northumbria at Newcastle, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Dean, John R. [Biomolecular and Biomedical Research Centre, School of Applied Sciences, University of Northumbria at Newcastle, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.dean@unn.ac.uk

    2008-03-15

    The oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown on contaminated soil was assessed. This was done using the physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) to simulate the human digestion of plant material. A range of vegetable plants, i.e. carrot, lettuce, radish and spinach, were grown on metal contaminated soil. After reaching maturity the plants were harvested and analysed for their total metal content (i.e. Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The plant samples were then subsequently extracted using an in vitro gastrointestinal approach or PBET to assess the likelihood of oral bioaccessibility if the material was consumed by humans. - Evaluation of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess the risk to humans of consuming contaminated vegetables.

  13. Computational modeling of human oral bioavailability: what will be next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Pham-The, Hai

    2018-06-01

    The oral route is the most convenient way of administrating drugs. Therefore, accurate determination of oral bioavailability is paramount during drug discovery and development. Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR), rule-of-thumb (RoT) and physiologically based-pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approaches are promising alternatives to the early oral bioavailability prediction. Areas covered: The authors give insight into the factors affecting bioavailability, the fundamental theoretical framework and the practical aspects of computational methods for predicting this property. They also give their perspectives on future computational models for estimating oral bioavailability. Expert opinion: Oral bioavailability is a multi-factorial pharmacokinetic property with its accurate prediction challenging. For RoT and QSPR modeling, the reliability of datasets, the significance of molecular descriptor families and the diversity of chemometric tools used are important factors that define model predictability and interpretability. Likewise, for PBPK modeling the integrity of the pharmacokinetic data, the number of input parameters, the complexity of statistical analysis and the software packages used are relevant factors in bioavailability prediction. Although these approaches have been utilized independently, the tendency to use hybrid QSPR-PBPK approaches together with the exploration of ensemble and deep-learning systems for QSPR modeling of oral bioavailability has opened new avenues for development promising tools for oral bioavailability prediction.

  14. Earthworms and in vitro physiologically-based extraction tests : complementary tools for a holistic approach towards understanding risk at arsenic-contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    Button, Mark; Watts, Michael J.; Cave, Mark R.; Harrington, Chris F.; Jenkin, Gawen R.T.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship of the total arsenic content of a soil and its bioaccumulation by earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Dendrodrilus rubidus) to the arsenic fraction bioaccessible to humans, measured using an in vitro physiologically-based extraction test (PBET), was investigated. Soil and earthworm samples were collected at 24 sites at the former arsenic mine at the Devon Great Consols (DGC) in southwest England (UK), along with an uncontaminated site in Nottingham, UK, for comparison. Analysi...

  15. The pharmacokinetic behaviour of hypoxoside taken orally by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measured with a high-performance liquid chromatography . method. For the ... the South African Medicines Control Council to conduct a phase I pharmacokinetic and ... The significance of various factors that influence the pharmacokinetic ...

  16. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  17. An interactive program for pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D R; Mao, F

    1993-05-01

    A computer program, PharmK, was developed for pharmacokinetic modeling of experimental data. The program was written in C computer language based on the high-level user-interface Macintosh operating system. The intention was to provide a user-friendly tool for users of Macintosh computers. An interactive algorithm based on the exponential stripping method is used for the initial parameter estimation. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic model fitting is based on the maximum likelihood estimation method and is performed by the Levenberg-Marquardt method based on chi 2 criterion. Several methods are available to aid the evaluation of the fitting results. Pharmacokinetic data sets have been examined with the PharmK program, and the results are comparable with those obtained with other programs that are currently available for IBM PC-compatible and other types of computers.

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics of 5-methyltetrahydrohomofolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loo, T.L.; Jiushi, L.; Lu, K.; Savaraj, N.

    1983-01-01

    DL-N5-Methyltetrahydrohomofolate (MTHHF; NSC-139490; N- [(4-[(2-(2-amino-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-5-methyl-6- pteridinyl)ethyl) amino) benzoyl)] -L-glutamate), a new folate antagonist of relatively low toxicity, is active against experimental tumor systems resistant to methotrexate and consequently now in clinical trial. We investigated its clinical pharmacokinetics in six patients; four of them received by rapid i.v. infusion tracer doses of [N5-methyl- 14 C]MTHHF ranging from 13 to 16 mg/sq m, and 2 received 150 mg/sq m; the total radioactivity dose was 100 to 200 mu Ci/patient. MTHHF was assayed by radiochemical and chromatographic techniques. The elimination of MTHHF from the plasma followed a triexponential pattern, with a harmonic mean initial half-life of 20.1 min, an intermediary half-life of 4.5 hr, and a terminal half-life of 74.6 hr. The apparent volume of distribution was 1.6 liters/kg, suggesting rapid and extensive tissue binding. This, together with the low total clearance of 0.2 ml/kg/min, contributed to the long half-life of this agent. Although 68% of the administered dose was excreted in the urine on the first day, only an additional 1% was excreted on the ensuing 3 days. In the two patients who received the higher dose, very little MTHHF was found in the cerebrospinal fluid. In concentrations ranging from 25 to 500 micrograms/ml, the drug was about 50% bound to plasma protein. MTHHF was not metabolized in humans as also reported in animals. These results suggest that MTHHF is excreted in the bile to certain extent. Moreover, since it tends to localize and persist in the body, to forestall cumulative toxicity, frequent administration of this agent should be undertaken only with caution

  19. Pharmacokinetics of thiamine derivatives especially of benfotiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, D

    1996-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic data of orally administered lipid-soluble thiamine analogues like benfotiamine are reviewed and assessed. It is quite clear that benfotiamine is absorbed much more better than water-soluble thiamine salts: maximum plasma levels of thiamine are about 5 times higher after benfotiamine, the bioavailability is at maximum about 3.6 times as high as that of thiamine hydrochloride and better than other lipophilic thiamine derivates. The physiological activity (alphaETK) increased only after benfotiamine was given. Due to its excellent pharmacokinetic profile benfotiamine should be preferred in treatment of relevant indications.

  20. Modeling the in vivo case with in vitro nanotoxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Michael L; Wagner, Andrew J; Hussain, Saber M; Bleckmann, Charles

    2008-01-01

    As more in vitro nanotoxicity data appear in the literature, these findings must be translated to in vivo effects to define nanoparticle exposure risk. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling has played a significant role in guiding and validating in vivo studies for molecular chemical exposure and can develop as a significant tool in guiding similar nanotoxicity studies. This study models the population dynamics of a single cell type within a specific tissue. It is the first attempt to model the in vitro effects of a nanoparticle exposure, in this case aluminum (80 nm) and its impact on a population of rat alveolar macrophages (Wagner et al. 2007, J. Phys. Chem. B 111:7353-7359). The model demonstrates how in vitro data can be used within a simulation setting of in vivo cell dynamics and suggests that PBPK models should be developed quickly to interpret nanotoxicity data, guide in vivo study design, and accelerate nanoparticle risk assessment.

  1. A Realistic Human Exposure Assessment of Indoor Radon released from Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2002-01-01

    The work presents a realistic human exposure assessment of indoor radon released from groundwater in a house. At first, a two-compartment model is developed to describe the generation and transfer of radon in indoor air from groundwater. The model is used to estimate radon concentrations profile of indoor air in a house using by showering, washing clothes, and flushing toilets. Then, the study performs an uncertainty analysis of model input parameters to quantify the uncertainty in radon concentration profile. In order to estimate a daily internal dose of a specific tissue group in an adult through the inhalation of such indoor radon, a PBPK(Physiologically-Based Pharmaco-Kinetic) model is developed. Combining indoor radon profile and PBPK model is used to a realistic human assessment for such exposure. The results obtained from this study would be used to the evaluation of human risk by inhalation associated with the indoor radon released from groundwater

  2. Testing the coherence between occupational exposure limits for inhalation and their biological limit values with a generalized PBPK-model: the case of 2-propanol and acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Daan; Huijbregts, Mark A J; van Rooij, Joost G M; Ragas, Ad M J

    2014-08-01

    The coherence between occupational exposure limits (OELs) and their corresponding biological limit values (BLVs) was evaluated for 2-propanol and acetone. A generic human PBPK model was used to predict internal concentrations after inhalation exposure at the level of the OEL. The fraction of workers with predicted internal concentrations lower than the BLV, i.e. the 'false negatives', was taken as a measure for incoherence. The impact of variability and uncertainty in input parameters was separated by means of nested Monte Carlo simulation. Depending on the exposure scenario considered, the median fraction of the population for which the limit values were incoherent ranged from 2% to 45%. Parameter importance analysis showed that body weight was the main factor contributing to interindividual variability in blood and urine concentrations and that the metabolic parameters Vmax and Km were the most important sources of uncertainty. This study demonstrates that the OELs and BLVs for 2-propanol and acetone are not fully coherent, i.e. enforcement of BLVs may result in OELs being violated. In order to assess the acceptability of this "incoherence", a maximum population fraction at risk of exceeding the OEL should be specified as well as a minimum level of certainty in predicting this fraction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling and Simulation for Formulation Development and Bioequivalence Evaluation: Report of an FDA Public Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Duan, J; Kesisoglou, F; Novakovic, J; Amidon, G L; Jamei, M; Lukacova, V; Eissing, T; Tsakalozou, E; Zhao, L; Lionberger, R

    2017-08-01

    On May 19, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hosted a public workshop, entitled "Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling and Simulation for Formulation Development and Bioequivalence Evaluation." The topic of mechanistic oral absorption modeling, which is one of the major applications of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation, focuses on predicting oral absorption by mechanistically integrating gastrointestinal transit, dissolution, and permeation processes, incorporating systems, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and the drug product information, into a systemic mathematical whole-body framework. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically

  5. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Albiglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel B

    2017-01-01

    Albiglutide is a long-acting, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for subcutaneous administration with a recommended dose of 30-50 mg once weekly. The aim of this article is to outline the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of albiglutide including the clinical efficacy and safet...

  6. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) on the ... assayed using a sensitive and validated reverse phase high performance liquid ..... factors may contribute to these variations. [17].

  7. Pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic study of hyperoside ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties revealed that it is a stable compound ... attention in drug discovery and food supplement research ... neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP response element ... antidepressant effect of hyperoside is mediated through .... Saposhnikovia divaricata by high performance counter-.

  8. The role of pharmacokinetics in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, R.H.; Fox, T.R.; Watanabe, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics can aid in the formulation of risk estimations by selection of doses for toxicity studies, by distinguishing between ''internal dose or toxifor concentration'' and ''applied dose,'' by providing a physiological basis for extrapolating between species, and by helping us to visualize the toxicological consequences of processes which we cannot quantify. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Human pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ravn, P; Rønn, A

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites cycloguanil and p-chlorophenylbiguanide were studied in five healthy volunteers taking 200 mg orally for 14 days. A highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was applied, clearly identifying all three compounds...

  10. Circadian variation in the pharmacokinetics of verapamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, C M; Frederiksen, M; Hansen, J F

    1989-01-01

    greater bioavailability (AUC) and a prolonged time to peak concentration was found. During the night (24.00 h-06.00 h) the half-life of verapamil was significantly longer than during the day (16.00 h-22.00 h). These differences in pharmacokinetics may be due to reduced hepatic blood flow at night...

  11. [Impact of ECMO on drugs pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasni, Nesrine; Lemaitre, Florian; Fernandez, Christine; Combes, Alain; Farinotti, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used in the treatment of patients of all ages with severe respiratory or cardiorespiratory failure. Despite the intensive use of drugs in the treatment of patients on ECMO, few studies have been conducted to determine the impact of this device on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Publications in this field have shown pharmacokinetics changes resulting in an increase in volume of distribution of drugs and/or decreased clearance with consequent increase of their half-life. Reduced plasma concentrations of some drugs due to their adsorption on the different components of the circuit further complicates the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of patients treated by ECMO. The literature published up to now on the pharmacokinetic changes associated with ECMO provide preliminary support for dosage adjustment. However, more research is needed to identify dosage strategies for this patient population. © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  12. First principles pharmacokinetic modeling: A quantitative study on Cyclosporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mošat', Andrej; Lueshen, Eric; Heitzig, Martina

    2013-01-01

    renal and hepatic clearances, elimination half-life, and mass transfer coefficients, to establish drug biodistribution dynamics in all organs and tissues. This multi-scale model satisfies first principles and conservation of mass, species and momentum.Prediction of organ drug bioaccumulation...... as a function of cardiac output, physiology, pathology or administration route may be possible with the proposed PBPK framework. Successful application of our model-based drug development method may lead to more efficient preclinical trials, accelerated knowledge gain from animal experiments, and shortened time-to-market...

  13. Physiologically-based, predictive analytics using the heart-rate-to-Systolic-Ratio significantly improves the timeliness and accuracy of sepsis prediction compared to SIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Omar K; Hendren, Sandra; Santiago, Ethel; Nye, Brittany; Abraham, Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Enhancing the efficiency of diagnosis and treatment of severe sepsis by using physiologically-based, predictive analytical strategies has not been fully explored. We hypothesize assessment of heart-rate-to-systolic-ratio significantly increases the timeliness and accuracy of sepsis prediction after emergency department (ED) presentation. We evaluated the records of 53,313 ED patients from a large, urban teaching hospital between January and June 2015. The HR-to-systolic ratio was compared to SIRS criteria for sepsis prediction. There were 884 patients with discharge diagnoses of sepsis, severe sepsis, and/or septic shock. Variations in three presenting variables, heart rate, systolic BP and temperature were determined to be primary early predictors of sepsis with a 74% (654/884) accuracy compared to 34% (304/884) using SIRS criteria (p < 0.0001)in confirmed septic patients. Physiologically-based predictive analytics improved the accuracy and expediency of sepsis identification via detection of variations in HR-to-systolic ratio. This approach may lead to earlier sepsis workup and life-saving interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Review on Pharmacokinetic Modeling and the Effects of Environmental Stressors on Pharmacokinetics for Operational Medicine: Operational Pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Manning et al. 1986), which may cause physiological changes. For example, emotional distress may lead to elevated heart rate, blood pressure and...related changes in renal functions were reported during a Stroop word color conflict test (Fauvel, Hadj-Aissa et al. 1991). Emotional stressors could...M. Skee, et al. (2001). "Pharmacokinetics of norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol delivered by a contraceptive patch (Ortho Evra (TM)/Evra (TM

  15. PHARMACOKINETICS OF PIROXICAM IN CRANES (FAMILY GRUIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiper, Naomi L; Cox, Sherry K; Doss, Grayson A; Elsmo, Betsy; Franzen-Klein, Dana; Hartup, Barry K

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) piroxicam in cranes, three brolgas (Antigone rubicunda) were administered piroxicam as a single oral dose at 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg during separate trials. Serial blood samples were collected for quantification of piroxicam in plasma. Piroxicam was readily absorbed at both dosages, and no adverse effects were observed. Plasma concentrations peaked at 3.67 hr with a concentration of 4.00 μg/ml for the lower dosage, and at 0.83 hr at 8.77 μg/ml for the higher dosage. Piroxicam may exhibit linear kinetics and dose proportionality in brolgas, but will require further study. Mean peak plasma concentrations in brolgas were comparable to concentrations demonstrated to be analgesic in humans. To the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first pharmacokinetic investigation of piroxicam in an avian species.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Alternative Administration Routes of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P.H.; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melatonin is traditionally administered orally but has a poor and variable bioavailability. This study aims to present an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed...... and included experimental or clinical studies, investigating pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin in vivo. Alternative administration routes were defined as all administration routes except oral and intravenous. Results: 10 studies were included in the review. Intranasal....... Subcutaneous injection of melatonin displayed a rapid absorption rate compared to oral administration. Conclusion: Intranasal administration of melatonin has a large potential, and more research in humans is warranted. Transdermal application of melatonin has a possible use in a local application, due to slow...

  17. Tubocurarine and pancuronium: a pharmacokinetic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, C A; Somogyi, A A; Ramzan, M I; Triggs, E J

    1980-02-01

    This review is an attempt to bring together the pharmacokinetic data on d-tubocurarine and pancuronium with clinical observations on relaxant dosage and effect. The modelling techniques used here represent an oversimplification of the relationships between relaxant plasma concentration and response as they do not predict either the time of onset of paralysis or its peak intensity. However, they do enable calculation of a bolus dose of relaxant required to achieve a particular intensity of paralysis for the average patient once pseudo-distribution equilibrium has been achieved. This has been further extended to predict the cumulation of the relaxants with subsequent dosage in average patients. Suggested regimens incorporating bolus and infusion doses of the relaxants to achieve continuous neuromuscular blockade have been calculated also. Averaged pharmacokinetic parameters derived from patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction have been used to predict the likely duration and intensities of paralysis for the relaxants.

  18. Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of Levetiracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanin Clark Wright

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus and acute repetitive seizures still pose a management challenge despite the recent advances in the field of epilepsy. Parenteral formulations of old anticonvulsants are still a cornerstone in acute seizure management and are approved by the FDA. Intravenous levetiracetam, a second generation anticonvulsant, is approved by the FDA as an adjunctive treatment in patients 16 years or older when oral administration is not available. Data have shown that it has a unique mechanism of action, linear pharmacokinetics and no known drug interactions with other anticonvulsants. In this paper, we will review the current literature about the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of intravenous levetiracetam and the safety profile of this new anticonvulsant in acute seizure management of both adults and children.

  19. Preparation and ocular pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2007-01-01

    Ophthalmic liposomes of ganciclovir (GCV) were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, and their ocular pharmacokinetics in albino rabbits were compared with those obtained after dosing with GCV solution. The in vitro transcorneal permeability of GCV liposomes was found to be 3.9-fold higher than that of the solution. After in vivo instillation in albino rabbits, no difference was found in the precorneal elimination rate of GCV from liposome vs solution dosing. The aqueous humor con...

  20. Perioperative pharmacokinetics of methadone in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshuman; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Kim, Thomas; London, Amy; Kharasch, Evan D

    2011-12-01

    Methadone is frequently administered to adults experiencing anesthesia and receiving pain treatment. Methadone pharmacokinetics in adults are well characterized, including the perioperative period. Methadone is also used in children. There is, however, no information on methadone pharmacokinetics in children of any age. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the pharmacokinetics of intravenous methadone in children undergoing surgery. Perioperative opioid-sparing effects were also assessed. Eligible subjects were children 5-18 yr undergoing general anesthesia and surgery, with an anticipated postoperative inpatient stay exceeding 3 days. Three groups of 10 to 11 patients each received intravenous methadone hydrochloride after anesthetic induction in ascending dose groups of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg (up to 20 mg). Anesthetic care was not otherwise changed. Venous blood was obtained for 4 days, for stereoselective determination of methadone and metabolites. Pain assessments were made each morning. Daily and total opioid consumption was determined. Perioperative opioid consumption and pain was determined in a second cohort, which was matched to age, sex, race, ethnicity, surgical procedure, and length of stay, but not receiving methadone. The final methadone study cohort was 31 adolescents (14 ± 2 yr, range 10-18) undergoing major spine surgery for a diagnosis of scoliosis. Methadone pharmacokinetics were linear over the dose range 0.1-0.3 mg/kg. Disposition was stereoselective. Methadone administration did not dose-dependently affect postoperative pain scores, and did not dose-dependently decrease daily or total postoperative opioid consumption in spinal fusion patients. Methadone enantiomer disposition in adolescents undergoing surgery was similar to that in healthy adults.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of linezolid in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazdanovic, Predrag; Jankovic, Slobodan M; Kostic, Marina; Dimitrijevic, Aleksandra; Stefanovic, Srdjan

    2016-06-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic active against Gram-positive bacteria, and is most commonly used to treat life-threatening infections in critically ill patients. The pharmacokinetics of linezolid are profoundly altered in critically ill patients, partly due to decreased function of vital organs, and partly because life-sustaining drugs and devices may change the extent of its excretion. This article is summarizes key changes in the pharmacokinetics of linezolid in critically ill patients. The changes summarized are clinically relevant and may serve as rationale for dosing recommendations in this particular population. While absorption and penetration of linezolid to tissues are not significantly changed in critically ill patients, protein binding of linezolid is decreased, volume of distribution increased, and metabolism may be inhibited leading to non-linear kinetics of elimination; these changes are responsible for high inter-individual variability of linezolid plasma concentrations, which requires therapeutic plasma monitoring and choice of continuous venous infusion as the administration method. Acute renal or liver failure decrease clearance of linezolid, but renal replacement therapy is capable of restoring clearance back to normal, obviating the need for dosage adjustment. More population pharmacokinetic studies are necessary which will identify and quantify the influence of various factors on clearance and plasma concentrations of linezolid in critically ill patients.

  2. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Keumhan; Bae, Kyoungjin; Min, Bokyoung; Kim, Eunyoung; Kwon, Kwang-il; Jeong, Taecheon; Kang, Wonku

    2010-02-01

    Racemic sibutramine is widely used to treat obesity owing to its inhibition of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake in synapses. Although the enantioselective effects of sibutramine and its two active desmethyl-metabolites, monodesmethylsibutramine (MDS) and didesmethylsibutramine (DDS), on anorexia and energy expenditure have been elucidated, the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine are still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and its metabolites in plasma and urine following an intravenous and a single oral administration of sibutramine in rats. The absolute bioavailability of sibutramine was only about 7%. The pharmacologically less effective S-isomer of DDS was predominant in the plasma: the C ( max ) and the AUC ( inf ) were 28 and 30 times higher than those of the R-isomer, respectively (psibutramine metabolites MDS and DDS were present at lower concentrations, owing to their rapid biotransformation to hydroxylated and/or carbamoylglucuronized forms and their faster excretion in the urine. The present study is the first to elucidate the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rats.

  3. The use of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess relationships between bioaccessible metals in urban soil and neurodevelopmental conditions in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jie; Wang, Yinding; McDermott, Suzanne; Cai, Bo; Aelion, C. Marjorie; Lead, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) and cerebral palsy (CP) are serious neurodevelopment conditions and low birth weight (LBW) is correlated with both ID and CP. The actual causes and mechanisms for each of these child outcomes are not well understood. In this study, the relationship between bioaccessible metal concentrations in urban soil and these child conditions were investigated. A physiologically based extraction test (PBET) mimicking gastric and intestinal processes was applied to measure the bio-accessibility of four metals (cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and lead (Pb)) in urban soil, and a Bayesian Kriging method was used to estimate metal concentrations in geocoded maternal residential sites. The results showed that bioaccessible metal concentrations of Cd, Ni, and Pb in the intestinal phase were statistically significantly associated with the child outcomes. Lead and nickel were associated with ID, lead and cadmium was associated with LBW, and cadmium was associated with CP. The total concentrations and stomach concentrations were not correlated to significant effects in any of the analyses. For lead, an estimated threshold value was found that was statistically significant in predicting low birth weight. The change point test was statistically significant (p value = 0.045) at an intestine threshold level of 9.2 mg/kg (95% confidence interval 8.9–9.4, p value = 0.0016), which corresponds to 130.6 mg/kg of total Pb concentration in the soil. This is a narrow confidence interval for an important relationship. - Highlights: • Correlation between bioavailable metals and child development were investigated. • Cd, Ni, and Pb in the intestinal phase significantly affect neurodevelopment. • Pb has a threshold value 130.6 mg/kg (of whole soil) for low birth weight. - Based on physiologically based extraction test, the 130.6 mg/kg of total Pb concentration in the soil may cause low birth weight of baby.

  4. Population pharmacokinetics and relationship between demographic and clinical variables and pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, L M L; Degraeuwe, P L J; Nieman, F H M; de Wolf, M C; de Boer, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346

    Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were calculated from 725 routine plasma gentamicin concentrations obtained in 177 neonates of 24 to 42 weeks' gestational age in their first week of life. Kel increases and V/W decreases with increasing gestational age. Almost identical results were

  5. Dermal pharmacokinetics of microemulsion formulations determined by in vivo microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data.......To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data....

  6. Pharmacokinetics of first-line tuberculosis drugs in tanzanian patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tostmann, A.; Mtabho, C.M.; Semvua, H.H.; Boogaard, J. van den; Kibiki, G.S.; Boeree, M.J.; Aarnoutse, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    East Africa has a high tuberculosis (TB) incidence and mortality, yet there are very limited data on exposure to TB drugs in patients from this region. We therefore determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics of first-line TB drugs in Tanzanian patients using intensive pharmacokinetic sampling.

  7. [Pharmacokinetics of digoxin in hyperthyroidism. Effect of methimazole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Maria; Gasińska, Teresa; Dec, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities may be the only manifestations of overt hyperthyroidism. In patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation digoxin can be beneficial in controlling the symptoms and signs, but hyperthyroid patients show an impaired response or even resistance to digoxin treatment. The aim of the study is to establish: 1. Are there any differences in the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin between hypertyroid and euthyroid patients? 2. Does simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole affect the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of dogoxin? 3. Does methimazole-induced euthyroidism change the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin? The subject of the study were 28 patients with hyperthyroidism and 15 healthy persons. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin. Moreover we evaluated pharmacokinetics of a single dose of digoxin after simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole in 12 patients and 12 methimazole treated patients werere-assessed once they had become euthyroid. Hyperthyroid patients showed significantly lower serum digoxin concentrations, shorter T1/2 beta and a significantly smaller area under the concentration curve (AUC) that the control group. Administration of methimazole did not affect digoxin pharmacokinetics. In hyperthyroid patients: 1. the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin does differ from that observed in healthy subjects. 2.methimazole do not alter digoxin pharmacokinetics.

  8. Acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Brian J; van Lingen, Richard A; Hansen, Tom G

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens.......The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens....

  9. An Allometric Model of Remifentanil Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vereecke, Hugo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Olofsen, Erik; Vuyk, Jaap; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Background: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models are used to predict and explore drug infusion schemes and their resulting concentration profiles for clinical application. Our aim was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for remifentanil that is accurate in patients with a wide

  10. Pharmacokinetic Variability of Drugs Used for Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Pavbro, Agniezka

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate the variability in the pharmacokinetics of 11 drugs with established prophylactic effects in migraine to facilitate 'personalized medicine' with these drugs. PubMed was searched for 'single-dose' and 'steady-state' pharmacokinetic studies of these 11 drugs. The maximum...

  11. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a population pharmacokinetic modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, Amélie; Brevaut-Malaty, Véronique; Vialet, Renaud; Boulamery, Audrey; Bruguerolle, Bernard; Simon, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Phenobarbital is widely used for treatment of neonatal seizures. Its optimal use in neonates and young infants requires information regarding pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study is to characterize the absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a pharmacokinetic parameter which has not yet been investigated. Routine clinical pharmacokinetic data were retrospectively collected from 48 neonates and infants (weight: 0.7-10 kg; patient's postnatal age: 0-206 days; GA: 27-42 weeks) treated with phenobarbital, who were administered as intravenous or suspension by oral routes and hospitalized in a paediatric intensive care unit. Total mean dose of 4.6 mg/kg (3.1-10.6 mg/kg) per day was administered by 30-min infusion or by oral route. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed-effect population model software). Data were modelled with an allometric pharmacokinetic model, using three-fourths scaling exponent for clearance (CL). The population typical mean [per cent relative standard error (%RSE)] values for CL, apparent volume of distribution (Vd ) and bioavailability (F) were 0.0054 L/H/kg (7%), 0.64 L/kg (15%) and 48.9% (22%), respectively. The interindividual variability of CL, Vd , F (%RSE) and residual variability (%RSE) was 17% (31%), 50% (27%), 39% (27%) and 7.2 mg/L (29%), respectively. The absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and infants was estimated. The dose should be increased when switching from intravenous to oral administration. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Investigating pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of inhaled olodaterol in healthy volunteers using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kunz, Christina; Formella, Stephan; Kloft, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    Olodaterol, a novel β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, is a long-acting, once-daily inhaled bronchodilator approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of the present study was to describe the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers by population pharmacokinetic modelling and thereby to infer its pulmonary fate. Plasma and urine data after intravenous administration (0.5-25 μg) and oral inhalation (2.5-70 μg via the Respimat® inhaler) were available from a total of 148 healthy volunteers (single and multiple dosing). A stepwise model building approach was applied, using population pharmacokinetic modelling. Systemic disposition parameters were fixed to estimates obtained from intravenous data when modelling data after inhalation. A pharmacokinetic model, including three depot compartments with associated parallel first-order absorption processes (pulmonary model) on top of a four-compartment body model (systemic disposition model), was found to describe the data the best. The dose reaching the lung (pulmonary bioavailable fraction) was estimated to be 49.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46.1, 52.7%] of the dose released from the device. A large proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction [70.1% (95% CI 66.8, 73.3%)] was absorbed with a half-life of 21.8 h (95% CI 19.7, 24.4 h). The plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers were adequately described. The key finding was that a high proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction had an extended pulmonary residence time. This finding was not expected based on the physicochemical properties of olodaterol. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction.

  14. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of oral terbinafine in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younkin, T J; Davis, E G; Kukanich, B

    2017-08-01

    The primary study objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics of p.o. terbinafine alone to p.o. terbinafine administered with p.o. cimetidine in healthy adult horses. The second objective was to assess the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine when administered per rectum in two different suspensions at 30 mg/kg to adult horses. Six healthy adult horses were included in this crossover study. Plasma terbinafine concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The half-life (geometric mean) was 8.38 and 10.76 h, for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. The mean maximum plasma concentrations were 0.291 μg/mL at 1.54 h and 0.418 μg/mL at 1.28 h for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. Terbinafine with cimetidine had an average C MAX 44% higher and the relative F was 153% compared p.o. terbinafine alone, but was not statistically different (P > 0.05). Terbinafine was infrequently detected when administered per rectum in two different suspensions (water or olive oil). Minor adverse effects included oral irritation, fever, and colic. All resolved spontaneously. More pharmacokinetic studies are indicated assessing drug-drug interactions and using multiple dosing intervals to improve our knowledge of effective oral dosing, the potential for drug accumulation, and systemic adverse effect of terbinafine in horses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Low heritability in pharmacokinetics of talinolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Gal, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efflux transporters like MDR1 and MRP2 may modulate the pharmacokinetics of about 50 % of all drugs. It is currently unknown how much of the variation in the activities of important drug membrane transporters like MDR1 or MRP2 is determined by genetic or by environmental factors...... of talinolol was predefined as the primary parameter. Heritability was analyzed by structural equation modeling and by within- and between-subject variance and talinolol clearance was correlated with polymorphisms in MDR1, MRP2, BCRP, MDR5, OATP1B1, and OCT1. RESULTS: Talinolol clearance varied approximately...

  17. Cocrystals and alloys of nitazoxanide: enhanced pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Kuthuru; Mannava, M K Chaitanya; Nangia, Ashwini

    2016-03-18

    Two isomorphous cocrystals of nitazoxanide (NTZ) with p-aminosalicylic acid (PASA) and p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as well as their alloys were prepared by slurry and grinding techniques. The cocrystals exhibit faster dissolution rates and higher pharmacokinetic properties compared to the reference drug, and surprisingly the cocrystal alloy NTZ-PABA : NTZ-PASA (0.75 : 0.25) exhibited 4 fold higher bioavailability of NTZ in Sprague Dawley rats. This study opens the opportunity for cocrystal alloys as improved medicines.

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics of nisoldipine coat-core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, R

    1998-09-01

    Nisoldipine, a calcium antagonist of the dihydropyridine type, is the active ingredient of the controlled release nisoldipine coat-core (CC) formulation. In humans, the absorption from nisoldipine CC occurs across the entire gastrointestinal tract with an increase in bioavailability in the colon because of the lower concentrations of metabolising enzymes in the distal gut wall. Although nisoldipine is almost completely absorbed, its absolute bioavailability from the CC tablet is only 5.5%, as a result of significant first-pass metabolism in the gut and liver. Nisoldipine is a high-clearance drug with substantial interindividual and relatively lower intraindividual variability in pharmacokinetics, dependent on liver blood flow. Nisoldipine is highly (> 99%) protein bound. Its elimination is almost exclusively via the metabolic route and renal excretion of metabolites dominates over excretion in the faeces. Although nisoldipine is administered as a racemic mixture, its plasma concentrations are almost entirely caused by the eutomer as a result of highly stereoselective intrinsic clearance. Nisoldipine CC demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics in the therapeutic dose range and its steady-state pharmacokinetics are predictable from single dose data. Steady-state is reached with the second dose when the drug is given once daily and the peak-trough fluctuations in plasma concentration is minimal. Plasma-concentrations of nisoldipine increase with age. Careful dose titration according to individual clinical response is recommended in the elderly. Nisoldipine CC should not be used in patients with liver cirrhosis, though dosage adjustments in patients with renal impairment are not necessary. Inter-ethnic differences in its pharmacokinetics are not evident. Owing to inhibition of metabolising enzymes, a small dosage adjustment decrement for nisoldipine CC may be required when it is given in combination with cimetidine. Concomitant ingestion of nisoldipine with grapefruit

  19. Pharmacokinetic comparison of seven 8-methoxypsoralen brands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Larsen, E

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of seven 8-MOP brands were evaluated in 7 volunteers using an incomplete bloc design. After a single oral dose the 8-MOP plasma level was followed for 3 hours. The plasma concentration was measured with a gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric method, using an isotopic...... dilution technique. The different brands could be divided into three groups. Two gave a high maximum concentration, four a medium, and one a low concentration. The large interbrand variation observed in this study can explain the variations in the results of the treatment and the differing numbers...

  20. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed

  1. Clinical Population Pharmacokinetics and Toxicodynamics of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, Lauren M.; Rayner, Craig R.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Paterson, David L.; Spelman, Denis; Khumra, Sharmila; Capitano, Blair; Forrest, Alan; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common side effect of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic often used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Various risk factors have been suggested, including linezolid dose and duration of therapy, baseline platelet counts, and renal dysfunction; still, the mechanisms behind this potentially treatment-limiting toxicity are largely unknown. A clinical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between linezolid pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics and inform strategies to prevent and manage linezolid-associated toxicity. Forty-one patients received 42 separate treatment courses of linezolid (600 mg every 12 h). A new mechanism-based, population pharmacokinetic/toxicodynamic model was developed to describe the time course of plasma linezolid concentrations and platelets. A linezolid concentration of 8.06 mg/liter (101% between-patient variability) inhibited the synthesis of platelet precursor cells by 50%. Simulations predicted treatment durations of 5 and 7 days to carry a substantially lower risk than 10- to 28-day therapy for platelet nadirs of linezolid therapy and large between-patient variability, close monitoring of patients for development of toxicity is important. Dose individualization based on plasma linezolid concentration profiles and platelet counts should be considered to minimize linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia. Overall, oxazolidinone therapy over 5 to 7 days even at relatively high doses was predicted to be as safe as 10-day therapy of 600 mg linezolid every 12 h. PMID:24514086

  2. Pharmacokinetics of rilmenidine in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genissel, P.; Bromet, N.; Fourtillan, J.B.; Mignot, A.; Albin, H.

    1988-01-01

    Rilmenidine is a novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, used in the treatment of mild or moderate hypertension at the oral dose of 1 mg once or twice daily. The pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated after single or repeated administration in healthy subjects, using labeled and unlabeled compounds. Rilmenidine was rapidly and extensively absorbed, with an absolute bioavailability factor close to 1 and a maximal plasma concentration achieved within 2 hours. Rilmenidine was not subject to presystemic metabolism. Distribution was independent of the free fraction because rilmenidine was weakly bound to plasma proteins (less than 10%). The volume of distribution was approximately 5 l.kg-1 (315 liters). Elimination was rapid with a total body plasma clearance of approximately 450 ml.min-1 and an elimination half-life of approximately 8 hours. Renal excretion was the major elimination process (two-thirds of the total clearance). Metabolism was very poor, with a renal elimination of rilmenidine as the parent drug (urinary fraction of rilmenidine was about 65% and no metabolite plasma levels were detected). Linear pharmacokinetics were demonstrated for rilmenidine from 0.5 to 2 mg but, at 3 mg, a slight deviation from linearity was observed. In repeated administration, the linear disposition of rilmenidine with dose was confirmed

  3. Preparation and ocular pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2007-12-07

    Ophthalmic liposomes of ganciclovir (GCV) were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, and their ocular pharmacokinetics in albino rabbits were compared with those obtained after dosing with GCV solution. The in vitro transcorneal permeability of GCV liposomes was found to be 3.9-fold higher than that of the solution. After in vivo instillation in albino rabbits, no difference was found in the precorneal elimination rate of GCV from liposome vs solution dosing. The aqueous humor concentration-time profiles of both liposomes and solution were well described by 2-compartmental pharmacokinetics with first-order absorption. The area under the curve of the aqueous humor concentration-time profiles of GCV liposomes was found to be 1.7-fold higher than that of GCV solution. Ocular tissue distribution of GCV from liposomes was 2 to 10 times higher in the sclera, cornea, iris, lens, and vitreous humor when compared with those observed after solution dosing. These results suggested that liposomes may hold some promise in ocular GCV delivery.

  4. Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged eCostantine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of procaterol in thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, K; Nomura, M; Toju, K; Ishikawa, Y; Minamijima, Y; Yamashita, S; Nagata, S

    2016-06-01

    Procaterol (PCR) is a beta-2-adrenergic bronchodilator widely used in Japanese racehorses for treating lower respiratory disease. The pharmacokinetics of PCR following single intravenous (0.5 μg/kg) and oral (2.0 μg/kg) administrations were investigated in six thoroughbred horses. Plasma and urine concentrations of PCR were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma PCR concentration following intravenous administration showed a biphasic elimination pattern. The systemic clearance was 0.47 ± 0.16 L/h/kg, the steady-state volume of the distribution was 1.21 ± 0.23 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 2.85 ± 1.35 h. Heart rate rapidly increased after intravenous administration and gradually decreased thereafter. A strong correlation between heart rate and plasma concentration of PCR was observed. Plasma concentrations of PCR after oral administration were not quantifiable in all horses. Urine concentrations of PCR following intravenous and oral administrations were quantified in all horses until 32 h after administration. Urine PCR concentrations were not significantly different on and after 24 h between intravenous and oral administrations. These results suggest that the bioavailability of orally administrated PCR in horses is very poor, and the drug was eliminated from the body slowly based on urinary concentrations. This report is the first study to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic character of PCR in thoroughbred horses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A Study on Pharmacokinetics of Bosentan with Systems Modeling, Part 1: Translating Systemic Plasma Concentration to Liver Exposure in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Niosi, Mark; Johnson, Nathaniel; Tess, David A; Kimoto, Emi; Lin, Jian; Yang, Xin; Riccardi, Keith A; Ryu, Sangwoo; El-Kattan, Ayman F; Maurer, Tristan S; Tremaine, Larry M; Di, Li

    2018-04-01

    Understanding liver exposure of hepatic transporter substrates in clinical studies is often critical, as it typically governs pharmacodynamics, drug-drug interactions, and toxicity for certain drugs. However, this is a challenging task since there is currently no easy method to directly measure drug concentration in the human liver. Using bosentan as an example, we demonstrate a new approach to estimate liver exposure based on observed systemic pharmacokinetics from clinical studies using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. The prediction was verified to be both accurate and precise using sensitivity analysis. For bosentan, the predicted pseudo steady-state unbound liver-to-unbound systemic plasma concentration ratio was 34.9 (95% confidence interval: 4.2, 50). Drug-drug interaction (i.e., CYP3A and CYP2B6 induction) and inhibition of hepatic transporters (i.e., bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins, and sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide) were predicted based on the estimated unbound liver tissue or plasma concentrations. With further validation and refinement, we conclude that this approach may serve to predict human liver exposure and complement other methods involving tissue biopsy and imaging. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Earthworms and in vitro physiologically-based extraction tests: complementary tools for a holistic approach towards understanding risk at arsenic-contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Mark; Watts, Michael J; Cave, Mark R; Harrington, Chris F; Jenkin, Gawen T

    2009-04-01

    The relationship of the total arsenic content of a soil and its bioaccumulation by earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Dendrodrilus rubidus) to the arsenic fraction bioaccessible to humans, measured using an in vitro physiologically-based extraction test (PBET), was investigated. Soil and earthworm samples were collected at 24 sites at the former arsenic mine at the Devon Great Consols (DGC) in southwest England (UK), along with an uncontaminated site in Nottingham, UK, for comparison. Analysis of soil and earthworm total arsenic via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was performed following a mixed acid digestion. Arsenic concentrations in the soil were elevated (204-9,025 mg kg(-1)) at DGC. The arsenic bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for both earthworm species was found to correlate positively with the human bioaccessible fraction (HBF), although the correlation was only significant (P earthworms as complementary tools is explored as a holistic and multidisciplinary approach towards understanding risk at contaminated sites. Arsenic resistant earthworm species such as the L. rubellus populations at DGC are presented as a valuable tool for understanding risk at highly contaminated sites.

  8. Mode of action based risk assessment of the botanical food-borne alkenylbenzene apiol from parsley using physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling and read-across from safrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajlouni, Abdalmajeed M; Al Malahmeh, Amer J; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Soffers, Ans E M F; Al-Subeihi, Ala A A; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-03-01

    The present study developed physiologically-based kinetic (PBK) models for the alkenylbenzene apiol in order to facilitate risk assessment based on read-across from the related alkenylbenzene safrole. Model predictions indicate that in rat liver the formation of the 1'-sulfoxy metabolite is about 3 times lower for apiol than for safrole. These data support that the lower confidence limit of the benchmark dose resulting in a 10% extra cancer incidence (BMDL10) that would be obtained in a rodent carcinogenicity study with apiol may be 3-fold higher for apiol than for safrole. These results enable a preliminary risk assessment for apiol, for which tumor data are not available, using a BMDL10 value of 3 times the BMDL10 for safrole. Based on an estimated BMDL10 for apiol of 5.7-15.3 mg/kg body wt per day and an estimated daily intake of 4 × 10(-5) mg/kg body wt per day, the margin of exposure (MOE) would amount to 140,000-385,000. This indicates a low priority for risk management. The present study shows how PBK modelling can contribute to the development of alternatives for animal testing, facilitating read-across from compounds for which in vivo toxicity studies on tumor formation are available to compounds for which these data are unavailable. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the repaglinide concentration increase produced by gemfibrozil and itraconazole based on the inhibition of the hepatic uptake transporter and metabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toshiyuki; Hisaka, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Ito, Kiyomi

    2013-02-01

    The plasma concentration of repaglinide is reported to increase greatly when given after repeated oral administration of itraconazole and gemfibrozil. The present study analyzed this interaction based on a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating inhibition of the hepatic uptake transporter and metabolic enzymes involved in repaglinide disposition. Firstly, the plasma concentration profiles of inhibitors (itraconazole, gemfibrozil, and gemfibrozil glucuronide) were reproduced by a PBPK model to obtain their pharmacokinetic parameters. The plasma concentration profiles of repaglinide were then analyzed by a PBPK model, together with those of the inhibitors, assuming a competitive inhibition of CYP3A4 by itraconazole, mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8 by gemfibrozil glucuronide, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide. The plasma concentration profiles of repaglinide were well reproduced by the PBPK model based on the above assumptions, and the optimized values for the inhibition constants (0.0676 nM for itraconazole against CYP3A4; 14.2 μM for gemfibrozil against OATP1B1; and 5.48 μM for gemfibrozil glucuronide against OATP1B1) and the fraction of repaglinide metabolized by CYP2C8 (0.801) were consistent with the reported values. The validity of the obtained parameters was further confirmed by sensitivity analyses and by reproducing the repaglinide concentration increase produced by concomitant gemfibrozil administration at various timings/doses. The present findings suggested that the reported concentration increase of repaglinide, suggestive of synergistic effects of the coadministered inhibitors, can be quantitatively explained by the simultaneous inhibition of the multiple clearance pathways of repaglinide.

  10. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine.

  11. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tracers: A New Tool for Medical Imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandia, Peggy; Jaudet, Cyril; Chatelut, Etienne; Concordet, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a medical imaging method measuring the activity of a radiotracer chosen to accumulate in cancer cells. A recent trend of medical imaging analysis is to account for the radiotracer's pharmacokinetic properties at a voxel (three-dimensional-pixel) level to separate the different tissues. These analyses are closely linked to population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling. Kineticists possess the cultural background to improve medical imaging analysis. This article stresses the common points with population pharmacokinetics and highlights the methodological locks that need to be lifted.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of vinyl chloride in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.M.; Laib, R.J.; Kappus, H.; Buchter, A.

    1977-01-01

    When rats are exposed to [ 14 C]vinyl chloride in a closed system, the vinyl chloride present in the atmosphere equilibrates with the animals' organism within 15 min. The course of equilibration could be determined using rats which had been given 6-nitro-1,2,3-benzothiadiazole. This compound completely blocks metabolism of vinyl chloride. The enzymes responsible for metabolism of vinyl chloride are saturated at an atmospheric concentration of vinyl chloride of 250 ppm. Pharmacokinetic analysis shows that no significant cumulation of vinyl chloride or its major metabolites is to be expected on repeated administration of vinyl chlorides. This may be consistent with the theory that a reactive, shortly living metabolite which occurs in low concentration only, may be responsible for the toxic effects of vinyl chloride

  13. Minocycline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Guardabassi, Luca; Papich, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although minocycline is not licensed for use in dogs, this tetracycline has therapeutic potential against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish rational dosage recommendations for minocycline use in dogs....... Specific objectives were to generate and analyse minocycline pharmacokinetic (PK) data on plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) concentrations, plasma protein binding and pharmacodynamic (PD) data on antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. ANIMALS: Six healthy dogs from a research colony were...... used in this study. METHODS: Dogs were administered 5 mg/kg intravenously and 10 mg/kg orally (p.o.) of minocycline hydrochloride in separate crossover experiments. In vivo drug concentrations in plasma and in ISF collected by ultrafiltration were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography...

  14. Pharmacokinetics of topically applied sparfloxacin in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satia Milan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Fluoroquinolones are antimicrobial agents that have a broad spectrum of activity and are widely used against many of the ocular pathogens, responsible for conjunctivitis, blepharitis, corneal ulcers etc. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ocular pharmacokinetics of sparfloxacin (0.3% w/v in the aqueous humour of rabbits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pharmacokinetics of topically administered sparfloxacin were determined after a single application of 50 µl topically. The aqueous humour samples were collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 hours after instillation. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatographic method was used to analyse the drug concentration in the aqueous humour samples. RESULTS: Fifteen minutes after the instillation of 50 µl of sparfloxacin 0.3% solution, the mean concentration in aqueous humour was found to be 1.4 µg/ml, which reaches the peak level of 3.7 µg/ml after 1.3 hours. At 6 hours, the sparfloxacin aqueous levels were 0.562 µg/ml. The clinical efficacy was predicted based on the Maximum Concentration (Cmax: Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Area Under the Concentration-time curve (AUC:MIC ratios. CONCLUSION: The sparfloxacin levels in aqueous humour of rabbits are sufficiently high up to the 6 hours after instillation in the conjunctival sac to provide bactericidal effect against most of the ocular pathogens. Both Cmax:MIC and AUC:MIC ratios are high enough to provide bactericidal effect against most of the ocular pathogens. Sparfloxacin (0.3% ophthalmic preparation has excellent penetration through cornea.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of terbutaline in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiansen, Anders; Eggert, Sarah; Pedersen, Erland

    2013-11-01

    In healthy individuals upwards of 90 % of an injected dose of terbutaline is excreted in the urine. The purpose of this study is to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of terbutaline in patients with severe renal impairment as defined by a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below 30 mL/min. Ten patients were included in the study. GFR was measured with Cr-EDTA clearance. They were given an intravenous injection of 0.500 mg of terbutaline. Blood samples were collected at intervals for 60 h and urine samples were collected for 96 h. The concentration of terbutaline in the blood and in the urine was used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. In patients with normal renal function the total clearance of terbutaline is 2.23-3 mL/min/kg. In our population the total clearance of terbutaline was found to be 1.72 (SD: 0.49) mL/min/kg of which approximately 15 % (0.25 mL/min/kg) was renal clearance. We calculated a distribution volume at steady state of 0.74 (SD: 0.22) L/kg with a terminal half-life of 7.93 (SD: 4.06) hours. The mean residence time (MRT) was 8.35 (SD: 4.93) hours. In healthy individuals the excretion of terbutaline is foremost renal but this study shows that severe renal impairment does not lower the total clearance of terbutaline to a degree that might be expected from the Cr-EDTA clearance. However, more research is needed to determine if dosage adjustment is warranted in patients with CKD.

  16. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Michael Thurber

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of intraocular flurbiprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazaki, S; Tsika, C; Tzatzarakis, M; Naoumidi, E; Tsatsakis, A; Tsatsanis, C; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K

    2017-12-01

    Intravitreal delivery of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could be an effective way to treat macular edema caused by posterior segment inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the intravitreal bioavailability and anti-inflammatory efficacy of flurbiprofen in rabbit eyes. For pharmacokinetics, 0.1 ml of 7.66 mg/ml flurbiprofen solution was injected intravitreally and vitreous drug levels were analyzed at specific time points using LC-MS technique. For efficacy, 100 ng lipopolysaccharide of E.coli was injected intravitreally in rabbits to induce inflammation. The animals were separated in three groups and received intraocular flurbiprofen, dexamethasone and PBS to serve as control. Complete ocular examination and total cell count in aqueous fluid were determined to evaluate the extent of inflammation. Eyes were then enucleated for histopathology analysis. The efficacy in the uveitis model was determined by clinical signs of inflammation, total leukocyte count and histology findings. No adverse events were observed during pharmacokinetic assessment. No signs of inflammation, hemorrhage or retina detachment were detected. The recovery of flurbiprofen from vitreous samples was 92.6%. The half-life of flurbiprofen was estimated to be 1.92 h with an elimination constant rate (K) of 0.36. Treatment with intraocular injections of flurbiprofen and dexamethasone significantly reduced total leukocyte count in a manner comparable to dexamethasone [reduction of 96.84% (p flurbiprofen injection compared to control eyes. Flurbiprofen is effective in suppressing inflammation in this experimental uveitis model. In our experimental setting, intravitreal flurbiprofen seem to have a therapeutic result comparable to dexamethasone. However, the half-life of the drug remains short, necessitating further research to prolong its presence in the vitreous cavity.

  18. [Pharmacokinetics of salazosulfapyridine in a hemodialysis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yuji; Fujimaki, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Yusei

    2003-06-01

    The patient was a 62-year-old female. Total gastrectomy was performed due to gastric ulcer in 1969. She was diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 1985 and was developed to amyloidosis in 1991. She was started on hemodialysis (HD) for chronic renal failure in 1996. In 1998, her arthralgia was aggravated, and 100 mg/day of bucillamine was administered on the day of HD. Her arthralgia persisted, and switching to salazosulfapyridine (SASP) was considered. As there were no standards and no reports for the use of SASP in HD patients, we examined the pharmacokinetics of SASP and its metabolites, and compared our patient with the results of phase one study in normal subjects in Japan. In this case, the blood concentration of SASP was similar to that in healthy controls after single administration of 500 mg of SASP on the day of non-HD, while the concentration of sulfapyridine (SP) was higher than that in healthy donors. However, the blood concentrations of SASP, SP, and N4-acetyl-SP (AcSP) at 24 hours after administration were similar to those obtained in healthy men. SASP was not dialyzed, while about half of SP and AcSP, were dialyzed. In a five-day consecutive administration study also, the blood concentrations of these compounds on Day 5 were similar to those of phase one study, suggesting no accumulation. No adverse drug reaction was observed. As this case had the past history of total gastrectomy and amyloidosis, it is possible that this result is influenced by the factors. Therefore it is necessary to examine pharmacokinetics of SASP and its metabolites beforehand when administering this agent to other HD/RA patients.

  19. Cefazolin pharmacokinetics in cats under surgical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarellos, Gabriela A; Montoya, Laura; Passini, Sabrina M; Lupi, Martín P; Lorenzini, Paula M; Landoni, María F

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the plasma pharmacokinetic profile, tissue concentrations and urine elimination of cefazolin in cats under surgical conditions after a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg. Methods Intravenous cefazolin (20 mg/kg) was administered to nine young mixed-breed cats 30 mins before they underwent surgical procedures (ovariectomy or orchiectomy). After antibiotic administration, samples from blood, some tissues and urine were taken. Cefazolin concentrations were determined in all biological matrices and pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Results Initial plasma concentrations were high (C p(0) , 134.80 ± 40.54 µg/ml), with fast and moderately wide distribution (distribution half-life [t ½(d) ] 0.16 ± 0.15 h; volume of distribution at steady state [V (d[ss]) ] 0.29 ± 0.10 l/kg) and rapid elimination (body clearance [Cl B ], 0.21 ± 0.06 l/h/kg; elimination half-life [t ½ ], 1.18 ± 0.27 h; mean residence time 1.42 ± 0.36 h). Thirty to 60 mins after intravenous administration, cefazolin tissue concentrations ranged from 9.24 µg/ml (subcutaneous tissue) to 26.44 µg/ml (ovary). The tissue/plasma concentration ratio ranged from 0.18 (muscle) to 0.58 (ovary). Cefazolin urine concentrations were high with 84.2% of the administered dose being eliminated in the first 6 h postadministration. Conclusions and relevance Cefazolin plasma concentrations remained above a minimum inhibitory concentration of ⩽2 µg/ml up to 4 h in all the studied cats. This suggests that a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg cefazolin would be adequate for perioperative prophylactic use in cats.

  20. Identification of nevadensin as an important herb-based constituent inhibiting estragole bioactivation and physiology-based biokinetic modeling of its possible in vivo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhusainy, W.; Paini, A.; Punt, A.; Louisse, J.; Spenkelink, A.; Vervoort, J.; Delatour, T.; Scholz, G.; Schilter, B.; Adams, T.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Estragole is a natural constituent of several herbs and spices including sweet basil. In rodent bioassays, estragole induces hepatomas, an effect ascribed to estragole bioactivation to 1'-sulfooxyestragole resulting in DNA adduct formation. The present paper identifies nevadensin as a basil constituent able to inhibit DNA adduct formation in rat hepatocytes exposed to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole and nevadensin. This inhibition occurs at the level of sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. The Ki for SULT inhibition by nevadensin was 4 nM in male rat and human liver fractions. Furthermore, nevadensin up to 20 μM did not inhibit 1'-hydroxyestragole detoxification by glucuronidation and oxidation. The inhibition of SULT by nevadensin was incorporated into the recently developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) rat and human models for estragole bioactivation and detoxification. The results predict that co-administration of estragole at a level inducing hepatic tumors in vivo (50 mg/kg bw) with nevadensin at a molar ratio of 0.06, representing the ratio of their occurrence in basil, results in almost 100% inhibition of the ultimate carcinogen 1'-sulfooxyestragole when assuming 100% uptake of nevadensin. Assuming 1% uptake, inhibition would still amount to more than 83%. Altogether these data point at a nevadensin-mediated inhibition of the formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, without reducing the capacity to detoxify 1'-hydroxyestragole via glucuronidation or oxidation. These data also point at a potential reduction of the cancer risk when estragole exposure occurs within a food matrix containing SULT inhibitors compared to what is observed upon exposure to pure estragole.

  1. Towards a physiology-based measure of pain: patterns of human brain activity distinguish painful from non-painful thermal stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin E Brown

    Full Text Available Pain often exists in the absence of observable injury; therefore, the gold standard for pain assessment has long been self-report. Because the inability to verbally communicate can prevent effective pain management, research efforts have focused on the development of a tool that accurately assesses pain without depending on self-report. Those previous efforts have not proven successful at substituting self-report with a clinically valid, physiology-based measure of pain. Recent neuroimaging data suggest that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and support vector machine (SVM learning can be jointly used to accurately assess cognitive states. Therefore, we hypothesized that an SVM trained on fMRI data can assess pain in the absence of self-report. In fMRI experiments, 24 individuals were presented painful and nonpainful thermal stimuli. Using eight individuals, we trained a linear SVM to distinguish these stimuli using whole-brain patterns of activity. We assessed the performance of this trained SVM model by testing it on 16 individuals whose data were not used for training. The whole-brain SVM was 81% accurate at distinguishing painful from non-painful stimuli (p<0.0000001. Using distance from the SVM hyperplane as a confidence measure, accuracy was further increased to 84%, albeit at the expense of excluding 15% of the stimuli that were the most difficult to classify. Overall performance of the SVM was primarily affected by activity in pain-processing regions of the brain including the primary somatosensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex, primary motor cortex, and cingulate cortex. Region of interest (ROI analyses revealed that whole-brain patterns of activity led to more accurate classification than localized activity from individual brain regions. Our findings demonstrate that fMRI with SVM learning can assess pain without requiring any communication from the person being tested. We outline tasks that should be

  2. Development of a Combined In Vitro Physiologically Based Kinetic (PBK) and Monte Carlo Modelling Approach to Predict Interindividual Human Variation in Phenol-Induced Developmental Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Spenkelink, Bert; Woutersen, Ruud A; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2017-06-01

    With our recently developed in vitro physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling approach, we could extrapolate in vitro toxicity data to human toxicity values applying PBK-based reverse dosimetry. Ideally information on kinetic differences among human individuals within a population should be considered. In the present study, we demonstrated a modelling approach that integrated in vitro toxicity data, PBK modelling and Monte Carlo simulations to obtain insight in interindividual human kinetic variation and derive chemical specific adjustment factors (CSAFs) for phenol-induced developmental toxicity. The present study revealed that UGT1A6 is the primary enzyme responsible for the glucuronidation of phenol in humans followed by UGT1A9. Monte Carlo simulations were performed taking into account interindividual variation in glucuronidation by these specific UGTs and in the oral absorption coefficient. Linking Monte Carlo simulations with PBK modelling, population variability in the maximum plasma concentration of phenol for the human population could be predicted. This approach provided a CSAF for interindividual variation of 2.0 which covers the 99th percentile of the population, which is lower than the default safety factor of 3.16 for interindividual human kinetic differences. Dividing the dose-response curve data obtained with in vitro PBK-based reverse dosimetry, with the CSAF provided a dose-response curve that reflects the consequences of the interindividual variability in phenol kinetics for the developmental toxicity of phenol. The strength of the presented approach is that it provides insight in the effect of interindividual variation in kinetics for phenol-induced developmental toxicity, based on only in vitro and in silico testing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Automated microdialysis-based system for in situ microsampling and investigation of lead bioavailability in terrestrial environments under physiologically based extraction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosende, María; Magalhães, Luis M; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    In situ automatic microdialysis sampling under batch-flow conditions is herein proposed for the first time for expedient assessment of the kinetics of lead bioaccessibility/bioavailability in contaminated and agricultural soils exploiting the harmonized physiologically based extraction test (UBM). Capitalized upon a concentric microdialysis probe immersed in synthetic gut fluids, the miniaturized flow system is harnessed for continuous monitoring of lead transfer across the permselective microdialysis membrane to mimic the diffusive transport of metal species through the epithelium of the stomach and of the small intestine. Besides, the addition of the UBM gastrointestinal fluid surrogates at a specified time frame is fully mechanized. Distinct microdialysis probe configurations and membranes types were investigated in detail to ensure passive sampling under steady-state dialytic conditions for lead. Using a 3-cm-long polysulfone membrane with averaged molecular weight cutoff of 30 kDa in a concentric probe and a perfusate flow rate of 2.0 μL min(-1), microdialysis relative recoveries in the gastric phase were close to 100%, thereby omitting the need for probe calibration. The automatic leaching method was validated in terms of bias in the analysis of four soils with different physicochemical properties and containing a wide range of lead content (16 ± 3 to 1216 ± 42 mg kg(-1)) using mass balance assessment as a quality control tool. No significant differences between the mass balance and the total lead concentration in the suite of analyzed soils were encountered (α = 0.05). Our finding that the extraction of soil-borne lead for merely one hour in the GI phase suffices for assessment of the bioavailable fraction as a result of the fast immobilization of lead species at near-neutral conditions would assist in providing risk assessment data from the UBM test on a short notice.

  4. Effect of Smoking on Pharmacokinetics of Clopidogrel, an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in patients undergoing PCI. Keywords: Antiplatelet, Clopidogrel, Pharmacokinetics, Smoking, Cigarette ..... regimen of choice to prevent thrombotic complications. [2,16]. ... either the parent drug [19] or the carboxylic acid metabolite as an ...

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Rhodamine 110 and Its Organ Distribution in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shiau-Han; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Huo, Teh-Ia; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-09-06

    Rhodamine dyes have been banned as food additives due to their potential tumorigenicity. Rhodamine 110 is illegal as a food additive, although its pharmacokinetics have not been characterized, and no accurate bioanalytical methods are available to quantify rhodamine 110. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fast, stable, and sensitive method to quantify rhodamine 110 using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to assess its pharmacokinetics and organ distribution in awake rats. Rhodamine 110 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics and slow elimination after oral administration. Furthermore, its oral bioavailability was approximately 34-35%. The distribution in the liver and kidney suggests that these organs are primarily responsible for rhodamine 110 metabolism and elimination. Our investigation describes the pharmacokinetics and a quantification method for rhodamine 110, improving our understanding of the food safety of rhodamine dyes.

  6. A Comparative Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Conventional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: To examine the pharmacokinetics of a formulated aceclofenac sustained release ... over 24 h and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). .... The response factor .... slower drug disposition and prolonged effect.

  7. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  8. Novel CNS drug discovery and development approach: model-based integration to predict neuro-pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Elizabeth C M; van den Brink, Willem; Yamamoto, Yumi; de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Wong, Yin Cheong

    2017-12-01

    CNS drug development has been hampered by inadequate consideration of CNS pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and disease complexity (reductionist approach). Improvement is required via integrative model-based approaches. Areas covered: The authors summarize factors that have played a role in the high attrition rate of CNS compounds. Recent advances in CNS research and drug discovery are presented, especially with regard to assessment of relevant neuro-PK parameters. Suggestions for further improvements are also discussed. Expert opinion: Understanding time- and condition dependent interrelationships between neuro-PK and neuro-PD processes is key to predictions in different conditions. As a first screen, it is suggested to use in silico/in vitro derived molecular properties of candidate compounds and predict concentration-time profiles of compounds in multiple compartments of the human CNS, using time-course based physiology-based (PB) PK models. Then, for selected compounds, one can include in vitro drug-target binding kinetics to predict target occupancy (TO)-time profiles in humans. This will improve neuro-PD prediction. Furthermore, a pharmaco-omics approach is suggested, providing multilevel and paralleled data on systems processes from individuals in a systems-wide manner. Thus, clinical trials will be better informed, using fewer animals, while also, needing fewer individuals and samples per individual for proof of concept in humans.

  9. Absorption and pharmacokinetics of grapefruit flavanones in beagles

    OpenAIRE

    Mata Bilbao, María de Lourdes; Andrés Lacueva, Ma. Cristina; Roura Carvajal, Elena; Jáuregui Pallarés, Olga; Escribano Ferrer, Elvira; Torre, Celina; Lamuela Raventós, Rosa Ma.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of three different grapefruit flavanone forms in dog plasma and demonstrated their absorption after an oral intake of a grapefruit extract; pharmacokinetic parameters of these forms were also determined. Ten healthy beagles were administered 70 mg citrus flavonoids as a grapefruit extract contained in capsules, while two additional dogs were used as controls and given an excipient. The grapefruit flavanone naringin, along with its metabolites n...

  10. Application of Biologically Based Lumping To Investigate the Toxicokinetic Interactions of a Complex Gasoline Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Micah N; Martin, Sheppard A; Oshiro, Wendy M; Ford, Jermaine; Bushnell, Philip J; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-03-15

    People are often exposed to complex mixtures of environmental chemicals such as gasoline, tobacco smoke, water contaminants, or food additives. We developed an approach that applies chemical lumping methods to complex mixtures, in this case gasoline, based on biologically relevant parameters used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Inhalation exposures were performed with rats to evaluate the performance of our PBPK model and chemical lumping method. There were 109 chemicals identified and quantified in the vapor in the chamber. The time-course toxicokinetic profiles of 10 target chemicals were also determined from blood samples collected during and following the in vivo experiments. A general PBPK model was used to compare the experimental data to the simulated values of blood concentration for 10 target chemicals with various numbers of lumps, iteratively increasing from 0 to 99. Large reductions in simulation error were gained by incorporating enzymatic chemical interactions, in comparison to simulating the individual chemicals separately. The error was further reduced by lumping the 99 nontarget chemicals. The same biologically based lumping approach can be used to simplify any complex mixture with tens, hundreds, or thousands of constituents.

  11. Application of Biologically-Based Lumping To Investigate the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    People are often exposed to complex mixtures of environmental chemicals such as gasoline, tobacco smoke, water contaminants, or food additives. However, investigators have often considered complex mixtures as one lumped entity. Valuable information can be obtained from these experiments, though this simplification provides little insight into the impact of a mixture's chemical composition on toxicologically-relevant metabolic interactions that may occur among its constituents. We developed an approach that applies chemical lumping methods to complex mixtures, in this case gasoline, based on biologically relevant parameters used in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Inhalation exposures were performed with rats to evaluate performance of our PBPK model. There were 109 chemicals identified and quantified in the vapor in the chamber. The time-course kinetic profiles of 10 target chemicals were also determined from blood samples collected during and following the in vivo experiments. A general PBPK model was used to compare the experimental data to the simulated values of blood concentration for the 10 target chemicals with various numbers of lumps, iteratively increasing from 0 to 99. Large reductions in simulation error were gained by incorporating enzymatic chemical interactions, in comparison to simulating the individual chemicals separately. The error was further reduced by lumping the 99 non-target chemicals. Application of this biologic

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of olprinone in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisawa T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hidefumi Kasai,2 Makoto Suda,2 Manabu Yoshimura,3 Ami Sugawara,3 Yuki Izumi,3 Takafumi Iida,3 Atsushi Kurosawa,3 Hiroshi Iwasaki3 1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Clinical Study Management Division, Bell Medical Solutions Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Olprinone decreases the cardiac preload and/or afterload because of its vasodilatory effect and increases myocardial contractility by inhibiting phosphodiesterase III. Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of olprinone after a single continuous infusion in healthy male volunteers. Methods: We used 500 plasma concentration data points collected from nine healthy male volunteers for the study. The population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM® software. Results: The time course of plasma concentration of olprinone was best described using a two-compartment model. The final pharmacokinetic parameters were total clearance (7.37 mL/minute/kg, distribution volume of the central compartment (134 mL/kg, intercompartmental clearance (7.75 mL/minute/kg, and distribution volume of the peripheral compartment (275 mL/kg. The interindividual variability in the total clearance was 12.4%, and the residual error variability (exponential and additive were 22.2% and 0.129 (standard deviation. The final pharmacokinetic model was assessed using a bootstrap method and visual predictive check. Conclusion: We developed a population pharmacokinetic model of olprinone in healthy male adults. The bootstrap method and visual predictive check showed that this model was appropriate. Our results might be used to develop the population pharmacokinetic model in patients. Keywords: phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, men, pharmacokinetic model

  13. Nicotinamide pharmacokinetics in humans and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, M.R.; Hoyer, M.; Overgaard, J.; Honess, D.J.; Dennis, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Healthy human volunteers orally ingested escalating doses of up to 6 g nicotinamide in capsule form on an empty stomach. Some side-effects were seen although these were mild and transient. HPLC analysis of blood samples showed peak plasma levels, typically within 45 min after ingestion, which were linearly dependent on dose ingested. The elimination half-life and AUC were also found to increase with drug dose, although these increases were non-linear. Pharmacokinetic studies were also performed to female CDF1 mice with C3H mammary carcinomas grown in the right rear foot. Analysis of blood and tumour samples taken from mice injected i.p. with nicotinamide doses between 100-1000 mg/kg showed similar characteristics as the human data, although the elimination half-lives were not dose-dependent. The average peak plasma concentration of 160 μg/ml measured in humans after taking 6 g of nicotinamide was equivalent to that seen in mice after injecting 171 mg/kg. Using a regrowth delay assay the enhancement of radiation damage by nicotinamide in this mouse tumour was found to be independent of drug dose from 100-1000 mg/kg, resulting in a constant 1.3-fold increase in radiation response. Doses of nicotinamide that can be tolerated clinically should therefore produce adequate enhancements of radiation damage in human tumours. (author)

  14. Gentamicin pharmacokinetics in the chicken inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Eric C; Park, Debra L; Durham, Dianne; Girod, Douglas A

    2004-06-01

    Avians have the unique ability to regenerate cochlear hair cells that are lost due to ototoxins or excessive noise. Many methodological techniques are available to damage the hair cells for subsequent scientific study. A recent method utilizes topical application of an ototoxic drug to the round window membrane. The current study examines the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in the inner ear of chickens following topical application to the round window membrane or a single systemic high dose given intraperitoneally. Chickens were given gentamicin topically or systemically and survived for 1, 4, 12, 24, or 120 h (controls at 4 and 120 h). Serum and perilymph samples were obtained prior to sacrifice and measured for gentamicin levels. Results revealed higher levels of gentamicin in the perilymph of topically treated chickens than systemically treated chickens, with significant amounts of gentamicin still present in both at the latest survival time of 5 days. As expected, systemically treated chickens had much higher levels of gentamicin in the serum than topically treated chickens. Advantages and disadvantages to each method of drug administration are discussed.

  15. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C 3 H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacotherapy of thionamides in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shannon M; Saade, George R; Snodgrass, Wayne R; Hankins, Gary D V

    2006-08-01

    Hyperthyroidism occurs in approximately 1 in every 1000 to 2000 pregnancies. Although the signs and symptoms of the disease are similar in the pregnant and nonpregnant patient, the complications of hyperthyroidism can have even more profound consequences for the mother and fetus during gestation. These include maternal heart failure, preeclampsia, miscarriage, and preterm labor; as well as fetal loss and low birth weight. Furthermore, thyroid function and laboratory testing for hyperthyroidism are altered in pregnancy. The gestational increase in thyroid size, increased thyroid-binding globulin levels, increased serum total T4 and total T3 levels, and decreased thyroid stimulating hormone levels often confuses the evaluation of the thyroid status in pregnancy. Worldwide, the thionamides-propylthiouracil, methimazole, and carbimazole-have been used in pregnancy for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. However, propylthiouracil has been the drug of choice in the United States because it is believed to have less potential to induce fetal/neonatal hypothyrodism, to cross the placenta and into breast milk to a lesser degree, and to be less teratogenic than methimazole or carbimazole. None of the above have been substantiated in more recent studies. The pharmacokinetics of the thionamides in the pregnant and nonpregnant states, as well as the pharmacotherapeutic recommendation for hyperthyroidism will be reviewed.

  18. [Pharmacokinetic interactions of telaprevir with other drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer Berenguer, Juan; González-García, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Telaprevir is a new direct-acting antiviral drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is both a substrate and an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes. With the introduction of this new drug, assessment of drug-drug interactions has become a key factor in the evaluation of patients under treatment for HCV infection. During the treatment of this infection, many patients require other drugs to mitigate the adverse effects of anti-HCV drugs and to control other comorbidities. Moreover, most patients coinfected with HIV and HCV require antiretroviral therapy during treatment for HCV. Physicians should therefore be familiar with the pharmacokinetic properties of direct-acting antivirals for HCV treatment and their potential drug-drug interactions. The present article reviews the available information to date on the interactions of telaprevir with other drugs and provides recommendations for daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Insulin analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange; Vølund

    1999-02-01

    The aim of insulin replacement therapy is to normalize blood glucose in order to reduce the complications of diabetes. The pharmacokinetics of the traditional insulin preparations, however, do not match the profiles of physiological insulin secretion. The introduction of the rDNA technology 20 years ago opened new ways to create insulin analogs with altered properties. Fast-acting analogs are based on the idea that an insulin with less tendency to self-association than human insulin would be more readily absorbed into the systemic circulation. Protracted-acting analogs have been created to mimic the slow, steady rate of insulin secretion in the fasting state. The present paper provides a historical review of the efforts to change the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of insulin in order to improve insulin therapy. The available clinical studies of the new insulins are surveyed and show, together with modeling results, that new strategies for optimal basal-bolus treatment are required for utilization of the new fast-acting analogs.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mivacurium in young adult and elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers......age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers...

  1. Impact of pharmaceutical cocrystals: the effects on drug pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ning; Perry, Miranda L; Weyna, David R; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystallization has emerged in the past decade as a new strategy to enhance the clinical performance of orally administered drugs. A pharmaceutical cocrystal is a multi-component crystalline material in which the active pharmaceutical ingredient is in a stoichiometric ratio with a second compound that is generally a solid under ambient conditions. The resulting cocrystal exhibits different solid-state thermodynamics, leading to changes in physicochemical properties that offer the potential to significantly modify drug pharmacokinetics. The impact of cocrystallization upon drug pharmacokinetics has not yet been well delineated. Herein, we compile previously published data to address two salient questions: what effect does cocrystallization impart upon physicochemical properties of a drug substance and to what degree can those effects impact its pharmacokinetics. Cocrystals can impact various aspects of drug pharmacokinetics, including, but not limited to, drug absorption. The diversity of solid forms offered through cocrystallization can facilitate drastic changes in solubility and pharmacokinetics. Therefore, it is unsurprising that cocrystal screening is now a routine step in early-stage drug development. With the increasing recognition of pharmaceutical cocrystals from clinical, regulatory and legal perspectives, the systematic commercialization of cocrystal containing drug products is just a matter of time.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of BMEDA after Intravenous Administration in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of N,N-bis(2-mercapatoethly-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA, a molecule that can form a chelate with rhenium-188 (188Re to produce the 188Re-BMEDA-liposomes, was studied. In this work, beagles received a single injection of BMEDA, at doses of 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg; the concentration of BMEDA in the beagles’ plasma was then analyzed and determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters of BMEDA, we found that male and female animals shared similar patterns indicating that the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA is independent of gender differences. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA was seen to be non-linear because the increase of mean AUC0–t and AUC0–∞ values tend to be greater than dose proportional while the mean Vss and CL values of BMEDA appeared to be dose dependent. The information on the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA generated from this study will serve as a basis to design appropriate pharmacology and toxicology studies for future human use.

  3. Drugs in space: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Johannes; Yu, Yichao; Seubert, Christoph N; Wotring, Virginia E; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2017-11-15

    Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety. Most commonly, medications are administered during space missions to treat sleep disturbances, allergies, space motion sickness, pain, and sinus congestion. These medications are administered under the assumption that they act in a similar way as on Earth, an assumption that has not been investigated systematically yet. Few inflight pharmacokinetic data have been published, and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies during spaceflight are also lacking. Therefore, bed-rest models are often used to simulate physiological changes observed during microgravity. In addition to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes, decreased drug and formulation stability in space could also influence efficacy and safety of medications. These alterations along with physiological changes and their resulting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects must to be considered to determine their ultimate impact on medication efficacy and safety during spaceflight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational opioid prescribing: a novel application of clinical pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Linares, Annemarie L

    2011-01-01

    We implemented a pharmacokinetics-based mathematical modeling technique using algebra to assist prescribers with point-of-care opioid dosing. We call this technique computational opioid prescribing (COP). Because population pharmacokinetic parameter values are needed to estimate drug dosing regimen designs for individual patients using COP, and those values are not readily available to prescribers because they exist scattered in the vast pharmacology literature, we estimated the population pharmacokinetic parameter values for 12 commonly prescribed opioids from various sources using the bootstrap resampling technique. Our results show that opioid dosing regimen design, evaluation, and modification is feasible using COP. We conclude that COP is a new technique for the quantitative assessment of opioid dosing regimen design evaluation and adjustment, which may help prescribers to manage acute and chronic pain at the point-of-care. Potential benefits include opioid dose optimization and minimization of adverse opioid drug events, leading to potential improvement in patient treatment outcomes and safety.

  5. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this new second edition book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with epirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, with two new chapters, one on fractional pharmacokinetics and one on bioequivalence; and the fourth mainly with classical and nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. This second edition has new information on reaction limited models of dissolution, non binary biopharmaceutic classification system, time varying models, and interf...

  6. Atomoxetine pharmacogenetics: associations with pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob T; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine is indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is predominantly metabolized by the CYP2D6 enzyme. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters as well as clinical treatment outcomes across CYP2D6 genotype groups have resulted in dosing recommendations within the product label, but clinical studies supporting the use of genotype guided dosing are currently lacking. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic and clinical studies have primarily focused on extensive as compared with poor metabolizers, with little information known about other metabolizer categories as well as genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of atomoxetine. This review describes the pharmacogenetic associations with atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability with considerations for the clinical utility of this information.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous melatonin in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Werner, Mads Utke; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin in healthy volunteers. METHODS: The study was performed as a cohort crossover study. The volunteers received either 10 mg oral melatonin or 10 mg intravenous melatonin on two separate study days. Blood samples were...... collected at different time points following oral administration and short iv infusion, respectively. Plasma melatonin concentrations were determined by RIA technique. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed by "the method of residuals" and compartmental analysis. The pharmacokinetic variables: k a, t 1....../2 absorption, t max, C max, t 1/2 elimination, AUC 0-∞, and bioavailability were determined for oral melatonin. C max, t 1/2 elimination, V d, CL and AUC 0-∞ were determined for intravenous melatonin. RESULTS: Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Baseline melatonin plasma levels did not differ...

  8. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...... of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221...

  9. Albendazole nanocrystals with improved pharmacokinetic performance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Alejandro J; Bruni, Sergio Sánchez; Allemandi, Daniel; Lanusse, Carlos; Palma, Santiago D

    2018-02-01

    Albendazole (ABZ) is a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent with poor aqueous solubility, which leads to poor/erratic bioavailability and therapeutic failures. Here, we aimed to produce a novel formulation of ABZ nanocrystals (ABZNC) and assess its pharmacokinetic performance in mice. Results/methodology: ABZNC were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and spray-drying processes. Redispersion capacity and solid yield were measured in order to obtain an optimized product. The final particle size was 415.69±7.40 nm and the solid yield was 72.32%. The pharmacokinetic parameters obtained in a mice model for ABZNC were enhanced (p < 0.05) with respect to the control formulation. ABZNC with improved pharmacokinetic behavior were produced by a simple, inexpensive and potentially scalable methodology.

  10. Special aspects of pharmacokinetics of inhalation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, J F A; De Wolf, A

    2008-01-01

    Recent interest in the use of low-flow or closed circuit anesthesia has rekindled interest in the pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics. The kinetic properties of inhaled anesthetics are most often modeled by physiologic models because of the abundant information that is available on tissue solubilities and organ perfusion. These models are intuitively attractive because they can be easily understood in terms of the underlying anatomy and physiology. The use of classical compartment modeling, on the other hand, allows modeling of data that are routinely available to the anesthesiologist, and eliminates the need to account for every possible confounding factor at each step of the partial pressure cascade of potent inhaled agents. Concepts used to describe IV kinetics can readily be applied to inhaled agents (e.g., context-sensitive half-time and effect site concentrations). The interpretation of the F(A)/F(I) vs time curve is expanded by reintroducing the concept of the general anesthetic equation-the focus is shifted from "how F(A) approaches F(I)" to "what combination of delivered concentration and fresh gas flow (FGF) can be used to attain the desired F(A)." When the desired F(A) is maintained with a FGF that is lower than minute ventilation, rebreathing causes a discrepancy between the concentration delivered by the anesthesia machine (=selected by the anesthesiologist on the vaporizer, F(D)) and that inspired by the patient. This F(D)-F(I) discrepancy may be perceived as "lack of control" and has been the rationale to use a high FGF to ensure the delivered matched the inspired concentration. Also, with low FGF there is larger variability in F(D) because of interpatient variability in uptake. The F(D)-F(I) discrepancy increases with lower FGF because of more rebreathing, and as a consequence the uptake pattern seems to be more reflected in the F(D) required to keep F(A) constant. The clinical implication for the anesthesiologist is that with high FGF few F

  11. Pharmacokinetics of heparin and related polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneu, B.; Dol, F.; Caranobe, C.; Sie, P.; Houin, G.

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of standard heparin (SH), a low molecular weight derivative (CY 216) and of dermatan sulfate (DS), a new potential antithrombotic drug, was investigated in the rabbit over a large range of doses. After bolus i.v. injection of low doses, the biological activity of SH disappeared exponentially; however, its half-life was prolonged when the dose injected increased, and over 158 micrograms/kg (100 anti-factor Xa U/kg) the biological activity disappeared as a concave-convex curve. CY 216 disappeared more slowly than SH at low doses but faster than SH at higher doses. More than 90% of the DS biological activity present 1 minute after the i.v. injection disappeared exponentially without dose-dependent effects. Increasing doses of the three drugs were then delivered for 5 h under continuous infusions. Below 500 micrograms/kg/h the DS and CY 216 plateau concentrations were higher than that of SH while above this dose the SH concentration was higher than that of DS and CY 216. These observations may be explained by the results of pharmacokinetics experiments where 125 I-labeled compounds were delivered by bolus i.v. injection in association with increasing doses of their unlabeled counterparts. For SH there was a 10-fold difference between the half-life of the lower dose (32 micrograms/kg or 5 anti-factor Xa U/kg) and that of the higher dose (3200 micrograms/kg); it was demonstrated that the half-life of SH continuously shortened as its plasma concentration decreased. In contrast the CY 216 and DS half-lives were very close, independent of the dose delivered, and therefore longer than that of SH at low doses and shorter than that of SH at higher doses

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of (R,R)-Methoxyfenoterol in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Siluk, Danuta; Mager, Donald E.; Kim, Hee Seung; Wang, Yan; Furimsky, Anna M.; Ta, Amy; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Green, Carol E.; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    (R,R)-Fenoterol (Fen), a β2-adrenoceptor agonist, is under clinical investigation in the treatment of congestive heart disease. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the 4-methoxyphenyl derivative of (R,R)-Fen, (R,R)-MFen, have been determined following intravenous and oral administration to the rat and compared with corresponding results obtained with (R,R)-Fen. Results of the study suggest that (R,R)-MFen can offer pharmacokinetic and metabolic advantages in comparison to an earlier (R,R)-...

  13. Dosing antibiotics in neonates: review of the pharmacokinetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Chaparro, Nazario D; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Greenberg, Rachel G

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotics are often used in neonates despite the absence of relevant dosing information in drug labels. For neonatal dosing, clinicians must extrapolate data from studies for adults and older children, who have strikingly different physiologies. As a result, dosing extrapolation can lead to increased toxicity or efficacy failures in neonates. Driven by these differences and recent legislation mandating the study of drugs in children and neonates, an increasing number of pharmacokinetic studies of antibiotics are being performed in neonates. These studies have led to new dosing recommendations with particular consideration for neonate body size and maturation. Herein, we highlight the available pharmacokinetic data for commonly used systemic antibiotics in neonates.

  14. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 μg/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses)

  15. [Diagnostic value of quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters in breast lesions with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T T; Liu, W H; Zhang, Y Q; Li, L H; Wang, R; Ye, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the differential between the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative pharmacokinetic quantitative parameters in breast lesions. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 255 patients(262 breast lesions) who was obtained by clinical palpation , ultrasound or full-field digital mammography , and then all lessions were pathologically confirmed in Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University from May 2012 to May 2016. A 3.0 T MRI scanner was used to obtain the quantitative MR pharmacokinetic parameters: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), exchange rate constant (k(ep))and extravascular extracellular volume fraction (V(e)). And measured the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters of normal glands tissues which on the same side of the same level of the lesions; and then calculated the value of relative pharmacokinetic parameters: rK(rans)、rk(ep) and rV(e).To explore the diagnostic value of two pharmacokinetic parameters in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions using receiver operating curves and model of logistic regression. Results: (1)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in K(trans) and k(ep) ( t =15.489, 15.022, respectively, P 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve(AUC)of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) between malignant and benign lesions were 0.933, 0.948 and 0.387, the sensitivity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 77.1%, 85.0%, 51.0% , and the specificity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 96.3%, 93.6%, 60.8% for the differential diagnosis of breast lesions if taken the maximum Youden's index as cut-off. (2)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in rK(trans), rk(ep) and rV(e) ( t =14.177, 11.726, 2.477, respectively, P quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and the prediction probability of relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters( Z =0.867, P =0.195). Conclusion: There was no significant

  16. Human plasma metabolic profiles of benzydamine, a flavin-containing monooxygenase probe substrate, simulated with pharmacokinetic data from control and humanized-liver mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki-Nishioka, Miho; Shimizu, Makiko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Megumi; Mitsui, Marina; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    1. Benzydamine is used clinically as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in oral rinses and is employed in preclinical research as a flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) probe substrate. In this study, plasma concentrations of benzydamine and its primary N-oxide and N-demethylated metabolites were investigated in control TK-NOG mice, in humanized-liver mice, and in mice whose liver cells had been ablated with ganciclovir. 2. Following oral administration of benzydamine (10 mg/kg) in humanized-liver TK-NOG mice, plasma concentrations of benzydamine N-oxide were slightly higher than those of demethyl benzydamine. In contrast, in control and ganciclovir-treated TK-NOG mice, concentrations of demethyl benzydamine were slightly higher than those of benzydamine N-oxide. 3. Simulations of human plasma concentrations of benzydamine and its N-oxide were achieved using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic models based on data from control TK-NOG mice and from reported benzydamine concentrations after low-dose administration in humans. Estimated clearance rates based on data from humanized-liver and ganciclovir-treated TK-NOG mice were two orders magnitude high. 4. The pharmacokinetic profiles of benzydamine were different for control and humanized-liver TK-NOG mice. Humanized-liver mice are generally accepted human models; however, drug oxidation in mouse kidney might need to be considered when probe substrates undergo FMO-dependent drug oxidation in mouse liver and kidney.

  17. Pharmacokinetic interaction between scutellarin and valsartan in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming-Yu; Tian, Chong-Chong; Ju, Ai-Xia; Zhang, Chun-Ting; Li, Qiu-Hong

    2013-04-01

    Scutellarin is the main effective constituent of breviscapine, a flavonoid mixture isolated from the dried whole plant of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz, and valsartan is used as an antihypertensive drug. These two drugs have already been clinically used together to treat diabetic nephropathy (DN) in China, and the combined medications showed some enhanced protection against DN. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic interaction between scutellarin and valsartan in rats. Breviscapine injection (20 mg x kg(-1), i.v.) and valsartan (15 mg x kg-, i.g.), either alone or together were given to 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Concentrations of scutellarin and valsartan were quantified by HPLC, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental methods. We found that the pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin altered significantly after co-administration of oral valsartan. The plasma clearance (CL(p)) and the bile clearance (CL(b)) of scutellarin were reduced significantly in the presence of valsartan. After oral administration of valsartan with or without intravenous scutellarin, however, the pharmacokinetic parameters of valsartan were comparable. In conclusion, our data suggests that the concurrent use of valsartan reduces the biliary excretion of scutellarin, and this may be due to the inhibitory effect of valsartan on the biliary excretion of scutellarin mediated by Mrp2 (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2).

  18. Radioreceptor assay analysis of tamsulosin and terazosin pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taguchi, K.; Schäfers, R. F.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: A radioreceptor assay has been developed for alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes and applied to a pharmacokinetic analysis of tamsulosin and terazosin. METHODS: Young, male, healthy volunteers received 0.4 mg tamsulosin (as Omnic modified release capsules) or 5 mg terazosin (as Flotrin tablets) in a

  19. Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Magnolol and Piperine in Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of interaction between magnolol and piperine when co-administered to rats. Methods: The rats were divided into five groups as follows: magnolol group (625 mg/kg); low dose of piperine group (20 mg/kg); high dose of piperine group (40 mg/kg); low dose of piperine ...

  20. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Controlled-Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A coating layer was then applied with a mixture of HPMC, ethylcellulose, shellac, and HPMC phthalate. The effect of several formulation variables on in vitro drug release was studied; furthermore, the drug release kinetics of the optimized formulation was evaluated. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of the optimized formulation ...

  1. Pediatric Pharmacokinetic Data: Implications for Environmental Risk Assessment for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharmacology and toxicology share a common interest in pharmacokinetic data, especially as it is available in pediatric populations. These data have been critical to the clinical pharmacologist for many years in designing age-specific dosing regimens. Now they are being used incr...

  2. Pharmacokinetics of aerosolized tobramycin in adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Jacobs, F A; Brimicombe, R W; Heijerman, H G; Bakker, W; Briemer, D D

    This study was performed to determine the clinical pharmacokinetics of tobramycin in six patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) after inhalation of 600 mg. Tobramycin was administered with an ultrasonic nebulizer (WISTO SENIOR). Blood and urine were sampled until 24 h after inhalation. Maximum

  3. Pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaijser, G. P.; de Kraker, J.; Bult, A.; Underberg, W. J.; Beijnen, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children was investigated. The patients received various doses of ifosfamide, mostly by continuous infusion, over several days. The penetration of ifosfamide and its metabolites into the cerebrospinal fluid was also studied in four cases.

  4. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic guided trial design in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, Ch; Mathôt, R. A. A.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling in drug development has emerged during the past decades and it is has been suggested that the investigation of PK-PD relationships during drug development may facilitate and optimize the design of subsequent clinical

  5. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of Aspen Ceftriaxone and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous ceftriaxone, of which Rocephin (ROC) is the originator brand, is recommended as first-line therapy in South Africa. Despite concerns regarding therapeutic equivalence with generic agents, this is the first study that has been conducted comparing clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) of a generic ceftriaxone ...

  6. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  7. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in infancy | McIlleron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dosing in infancy is complicated by inadequate characterisation of pharmacokinetics, unpredictable drug concentrations and a lack of suitable dosage forms. Additional challenges are presented by the concomitant administration of interacting drugs (e.g. rifampicin in antituberculosis treatment) and disease conditions that ...

  8. Validation of Individual Non-Linear Predictive Pharmacokinetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Republic of Serbia ... Purpose: To evaluate the predictive performance of phenytoin multiple dosing non-linear pharmacokinetic ... status epilepticus affects an estimated 152,000 ..... causal factors, i.e., infection, inflammation, tissue.

  9. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of Aspen Ceftriaxone and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicines Control Council (MCC) requires proof of equivalence ... clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) of a generic ceftriaxone formulation with the originator. .... on performance of the quality control samples). ... Endogenous components of plasma had an insignificant effect .... Clinical features and prognostic factors in adults with.

  10. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Controlled-Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of several formulation variables on in ... The in vivo pharmacokinetics of the optimized formulation was compared ... Results: The core tablets exhibited extended release consisting of drug release from the embedded ... important factor in medical treatment with respect ... The solvents for high-performance liquid.

  11. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) Analysis with Drug Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-30

    Discriminative stimulus and other drug effects are determined by the concentration of drug at its target receptor and by the pharmacodynamic consequences of drug-receptor interaction. For in vivo procedures such as drug discrimination, drug concentration at receptors in a given anatomical location (e.g., the brain) is determined both by the dose of drug administered and by pharmacokinetic processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion that deliver drug to and from that anatomical location. Drug discrimination data are often analyzed by strategies of dose-effect analysis to determine parameters such as potency and efficacy. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) analysis is an alternative to conventional dose-effect analysis, and it relates drug effects to a measure of drug concentration in a body compartment (e.g., venous blood) rather than to drug dose. PKPD analysis can yield insights on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic determinants of drug action. PKPD analysis can also facilitate translational research by identifying species differences in pharmacokinetics and providing a basis for integrating these differences into interpretation of drug effects. Examples are discussed here to illustrate the application of PKPD analysis to the evaluation of drug effects in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline.

  12. Ibuprofen pharmacokinetics in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Overmeire, B; Touw, D; Schepens, P J; Kearns, G L; van den Anker, J N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study the pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in premature infants with patent ductus arteriosus on day 3 and day 5 after birth. METHODS: Ibuprofen was administered on days 3, 4, and 5 by a 15-minute intravenous infusion of 10, 5, and 5 mg/kg, respectively, with the aim of

  13. Whole body [O-15]water pharmacokinetics measured in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maguire, RP; Spyrou, NM; Leenders, KL

    A simple pharmacokinetic model to explain the time course of [0-15]water in human whole blood after bolus injection is described. The model has been derived from measurements in twelve healthy volunteers who were measured repeatedly, resulting in 67 datasets, made in the context of PET blood flow

  14. PHARMACOKINETIC-PHARMACODYNAMIC DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ; DESMET, PAGM

    1994-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are very commonly prescribed, especially in the elderly population. In many countries more than 10 different NSAIDs are available. As the older pyrazole compounds like phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone and azapropazone are most prone to pharmacokinetic

  15. In vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies on methylone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Just; Petersen, Trine Hedebrink; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of the stimulant designer drug methylone (methylenedioxymethcathinone) has been documented in most parts of the world. As with many of the new designer drugs that continuously appear in the illicit drug market, little is known about the pharmacokinetics of methylone. Using in vitro studies...

  16. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium in intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, H.J; Wierda, J.MKH; Proost, Johannes H.; Keller, C; Khuenl-Brady, K.S

    We have studied dose requirements, recovery times and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium in 32 intensive care patients. After an initial dose of 50 mg, rocuronium was administered as maintenance doses of 25 mg whenever two responses to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation reappeared (bolus group; n=27) or by

  17. 40 CFR 795.231 - Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal. 795.231 Section 795.231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... radioactivity in blood and in various tissues, including bone, brain, fat, gastrointestinal tract, gonads, heart...

  18. Effect of Dehydration on the Pharmacokinetics of Mefenamic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    QAMAR, Shadab

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability of mefenamic acid was studied in normal and dehydrated rabbits. High perfomance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for the assay of mefenamic acid in plasma samples. The mean plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve decreased but the volume of distribution and total body clearance increased significantly (P

  19. Grey-Box Modelling of Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L.; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling...

  20. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorononanoic acid in Rats and Mice*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) is found at low concentrations in the environment, but is also detectable in humans and wildlife. Previous studies have examined the pharmacokinetics (PK) of lower carbon-chain PFAAs, such as perfluorobut...

  1. First reports of clinical pharmacokinetics in Nigeria | Michael ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef ...

  2. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hammann, Felix; Liechti, Matthias E

    2017-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is used recreationally and in clinical research. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and exposure-response relationship of oral LSD. We analyzed pharmacokinetic data from two published placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies using oral administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg in 24 and 16 subjects, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of the 100-µg dose is shown for the first time and data for the 200-µg dose were reanalyzed and included. Plasma concentrations of LSD, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling. Concentration-effect relationships were described using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval) maximum plasma concentration values of 1.3 (1.2-1.9) and 3.1 (2.6-4.0) ng/mL were reached 1.4 and 1.5 h after administration of 100 and 200 µg LSD, respectively. The plasma half-life was 2.6 h (2.2-3.4 h). The subjective effects lasted (mean ± standard deviation) 8.2 ± 2.1 and 11.6 ± 1.7 h for the 100- and 200-µg LSD doses, respectively. Subjective peak effects were reached 2.8 and 2.5 h after administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg, respectively. A close relationship was observed between the LSD concentration and subjective response within subjects, with moderate counterclockwise hysteresis. Half-maximal effective concentration values were in the range of 1 ng/mL. No correlations were found between plasma LSD concentrations and the effects of LSD across subjects at or near maximum plasma concentration and within dose groups. The present pharmacokinetic data are important for the evaluation of clinical study findings (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging studies) and the interpretation of LSD intoxication. Oral LSD presented dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and first-order elimination up to 12 h. The effects of LSD were related

  4. Compartmental analysis, imaging techniques and population pharmacokinetic. Experiences at CENTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; León, Mariela; Leyva, Rene; Castro, Yusniel; Ayra, Fernando E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In pharmacokinetic evaluation small rodents are used in a large extend. Traditional pharmacokinetic evaluations by the two steps approach can be replaced by the sparse data design which may also represent a complicated situation to evaluate satisfactorily from the statistical point of view. In this presentation different situations of sparse data sampling are analyzed based on practical consideration. Non linear mixed effect model was selected in order to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters in simulated data from real experimental results using blood sampling and imaging procedures. Materials and methods: Different scenarios representing several experimental designs of incomplete individual profiles were evaluated. Data sets were simulated based on real data from previous experiments. In all cases three to five blood samples were considered per time point. A combination of compartmental analysis with tumor uptake obtained by gammagraphy of radiolabeled drugs is also evaluated.All pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed by means of MONOLIX software version 4.2.3. Results: All sampling schedules yield the same results when computed using the MONOLIX software and the SAEM algorithm. Population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were accurately estimated with three or five determination per sampling point. According with the used methodology and software tool, it can be an expected result, but demonstrating the method performance in such situations, allow us to select a more flexible design using a very small number of animals in preclinical research. The combination with imaging procedures also allows us to construct a completely structured compartmental analysis. Results of real experiments are presented demonstrating the versatility of used methodology in different evaluations. The same sampling approach can be considered in phase I or II clinical trials. (author)

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic-dynamic relationship between rapacuronium (Org 9487) and its 3-desacetyl metabolite (Org 9488)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiere, S; Proost, Hans; Schuringa, M; Wierda, J.MKH

    Rapacuronium (Org 9487) is a rapid-onset and short- to intermediate-acting muscle relaxant. Its 3-desacetyl metabolite, Org 9488, also exerts neuromuscular-blocking activity that. may became apparent after prolonged maintenance of relaxation with rapacuronium. In this study, the pharmacokinetic

  6. Simulated rat intestinal fluid improves oral exposure prediction for poorly soluble compounds over a wide dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Berghausen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solubility can be the absorption limiting factor for drug candidates and is therefore a very important input parameter for oral exposure prediction of compounds with limited solubility. Biorelevant media of the fasted and fed state have been published for humans, as well as for dogs in the fasted state. In a drug discovery environment, rodents are the most common animal model to assess the oral exposure of drug candidates. In this study a rat simulated intestinal fluid (rSIF is proposed as a more physiologically relevant media to describe drug solubility in rats. Equilibrium solubility in this medium was tested as input parameter for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK simulations of oral pharmacokinetics in the rat. Simulations were compared to those obtained using other solubility values as input parameters, like buffer at pH 6.8, human simulated intestinal fluid and a comprehensive dissolution assay based on rSIF. Our study on nine different compounds demonstrates that the incorporation of rSIF equilibrium solubility values into PBPK models of oral drug exposure can significantly improve the reliability of simulations in rats for doses up to 300 mg/kg compared to other media. The comprehensive dissolution assay may help to improve further simulation outcome, but the greater experimental effort as compared to equilibrium solubility may limit its use in a drug discovery environment. Overall, PBPK simulations based on solubility in the proposed rSIF medium can improve prioritizing compounds in drug discovery as well as planning dose escalation studies, e.g. during toxicological investigations.

  7. [Study on differences between pharmacokinetics and chromatopharmacodynamics for Chinese materia medica formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuyuan; Deng, Kaiwen; Zou, Huan; Qiu, Yun; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    To study on the differences between chromatopharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with fingerprint chromatography) and chromatopharmacodynamics (pharmacodynamics with fingerprint chromatography) of Chinese materia medica formulae to answer the question whether the pharmacokinetic parameters of multiple composites can be utilized to guide the medication of multiple composites. On the base of established four chromatopharmacology (pharmacology with chromatographic fingerprint), the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed comparably on their mathematical model and parameter definition. On the basis of quantitative pharmacology, the function expressions and total statistical parameters, such as total zero moment, total first moment, total second moment of the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed to the common expressions and elucidated results for single and multiple components in Chinese materia medica formulae. Total quantitative pharmacokinetic, i.e., chromatopharmacokinetic parameter were decided by each component pharmacokinetic parameters, whereas the total quantitative pharmacodynamic, i.e., chromatopharmacodynamic parameter were decided by both of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of each components. The pharmacokinetic parameters were corresponded to pharmacodynamic parameters with an existing stable effective coefficient when the constitutive ratio of each composite was a constant. The effects of Chinese materia medica were all controlled by pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic coefficient. It is a special case that the pharmacokinetic parameter could independently guide the clinical medication for single component whereas the chromatopharmacokinetic parameters are not applied to the multiple drug combination system, and not be used to solve problems of chromatopharmacokinetic of Chinese materia medica formulae.

  8. Modeling of corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrite, Aniruddha C; Edelhauser, Henry F; Kompella, Uday B

    2008-01-01

    To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation-based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0.99) with the observed values in

  9. Altering ethanol pharmacokinetics to treat alcohol use disorder: Can you teach an old dog new tricks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-07-01

    Disulfiram was the first pharmacotherapy approved to treat alcohol use disorder in the 1950s. Disulfiram alters ethanol pharmacokinetics and causes uncomfortable reactions (e.g. headache, tachycardia, nausea, flushing and hypotension) when alcohol is consumed. Subsequently, a better understanding of the neurobiological pathways involved in alcohol use disorder led to the development of other medications (e.g. naltrexone and acamprosate). These neurobiological-based medications act on alcohol use disorder-related phenotypes including craving, stress, and/or withdrawal. The original approach to treat alcohol use disorder, by altering ethanol pharmacokinetics has been much less investigated. Recent research on ethanol pharmacokinetics has shed light on the mechanisms of action underlying alcohol use disorder and how some medications that alter ethanol pharmacokinetics may be helpful in treating alcohol use disorder. This review summarizes and discusses the complex pharmacokinetics of ethanol, and proposes that altering ethanol pharmacokinetics via novel pharmacological approaches may be a viable approach to treat alcohol use disorder.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  11. Effect of diclofenac on the pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Guo, S; Xu, M; Wu, L-X; Zhang, J-H

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive and specific method was developed and validated for the determination of moxifloxacin in plasma using HPLC. The effect of diclofenac (12.5, 25, 50 mg/kg) on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered moxifloxacin (40 mg/kg) in rats was investigated. Pharmacokinetic parameters of moxifloxacin were determined in rats following oral administration to rats in the presence and absence of diclofenac. The coadministration of the 2 drugs resulted in 10~29.5% decrease of the AUC and a 24.7~34% decrease of t1/2 for moxifloxacin; Tmax for moxifloxacin was 1.41~1.9-fold higher than that after the administration of moxifloxacin alone; Cmax for moxifloxacin decreased by 20.5~49%, as compared to that after the administration of moxifloxacin alone. Consequently, moxifloxacin and diclofenac should be monitored closely for potential drug interactions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of trefoil peptides and their stability in gastrointestinal contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellev, Stine; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Nexø, Ebba

    2007-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are considered promising for therapeutic use in gastrointestinal diseases, and there is a need to explore the fate of injected TFF and the stability of the peptides in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the pharmacokinetics of intravenously (i.v.) administ......Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are considered promising for therapeutic use in gastrointestinal diseases, and there is a need to explore the fate of injected TFF and the stability of the peptides in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the pharmacokinetics of intravenously (i.......v.) administered hTFF2 in mice and rats and of hTFF3 administered i.v., intramuscularly, intraperitoneally, and subcutaneously in mice, and estimated by ELISA the decay of the peptides added to rat and human gastrointestinal contents. We found that i.v. injected hTFF2 and hTFF3 were cleared from the circulation...

  14. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chu-Han; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Huang, Yu-Wen; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities), socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX) is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary. Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX more efficiently than normal-weight individuals. Compared with the scenario in healthy subjects, standard 2-hour spacing of calcium formulations and oral LVX was insufficient to prevent a chelation interaction in cystic fibrosis patients. Inconsistent conclusions were derived from studies of the influence of sex on the pharmacokinetics of LVX, which might be

  15. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in cachectic patients: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Trobec

    Full Text Available Cachexia is a weight-loss process caused by an underlying chronic disease such as cancer, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or rheumatoid arthritis. It leads to changes in body structure and function that may influence the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Changes in gut function and decreased subcutaneous tissue may influence the absorption of orally and transdermally applied drugs. Altered body composition and plasma protein concentration may affect drug distribution. Changes in the expression and function of metabolic enzymes could influence the metabolism of drugs, and their renal excretion could be affected by possible reduction in kidney function. Because no general guidelines exist for drug dose adjustments in cachectic patients, we conducted a systematic search to identify articles that investigated the pharmacokinetics of drugs in cachectic patients.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of amikacin during hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regeur, L; Colding, H; Jensen, H

    1977-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of amikacin were examined in six bilaterally nephrectomized patients undergoing hemodialysis and in four patients with a minimal residual renal function undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The mean elimination half-life before the dialysis was 86.5 h in the anephric patients and 44...... renal function. During hemodialysis the half-life decreased to less than 10% (5.6 h) of the pretreatment value. The effectiveness of peritoneal dialysis was less as the half-life decreased to only about 30% (17.9 h) of the pretreatment value. During the dialyses a significant correlation between...... the half-life of amikacin and the decrease in blood urea and serum creatinine was demonstrated. The pharmacokinetic data were used to make dosage regimen recommendations for the treatment of patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis....

  17. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with empirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, and the fourth mainly with nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. Many examples are used to illustrate the intrinsic complexity of drug administration related phenomena in the human, justifying the use of advanced modeling methods. This timely and useful book will appeal to graduate students and researchers in pharmacology, pharmaceutical scienc...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab after topical and intravitreal administration in human eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Moisseiev, Elad; Waisbourd, Michael; Ben-Artsi, Elad; Levinger, Eliya; Barak, Adiel; Daniels, Tad; Csaky, Karl; Loewenstein, Anat; Barequet, Irina S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical bevacizumab is a potential treatment modality for corneal neovascularization, and several recent studies have demonstrated its efficacy. No previous study of the pharmacokinetics of topical bevacizumab has been performed in human eyes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pharmacokinetics of topical administration of bevacizumab in human eyes, and also to compare the pharmacokinetics of intravitreal bevacizumab injections with previously reported data. Methods Tw...

  19. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  20. Transplacental pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Kyohei; Hori, Satoko; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Nagata, Hideaki; Satoh, Shoji; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Nakano, Hitoo; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Taketani, Yuji; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac and to determine the effect of L-lactic acid on the transplacental transfer of diclofenac. The maternal and fetal vessels of human placenta were perfused in a single-pass mode with a solution containing diclofenac and antipyrine. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the time profiles of the drug concentrations in the effluent and placenta to obtain transplacental pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, chloride ion in the perfusate was partially replaced with L-lactic acid to see the change in the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac. The TPT(ss) value (ratio of the rate of amount transferred across the placenta to that infused in the steady state) of diclofenac was 2.22%, which was approximately one-third that of antipyrine and was significantly reduced in the presence of L-lactic acid. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model could adequately explain the transplacental transfer of diclofenac with influx clearances from maternal and fetal perfusates to placental tissue of 0.276 and 0.0345 ml/min/g cotyledon and efflux rate constants from placental tissue to maternal and fetal perfusates of 0.406 and 0.0337 min(-1), respectively. By taking into account protein binding, the placental tissue/plasma concentration ratio in humans for diclofenac was estimated to be 0.108 ml/g of cotyledon and was smaller than that of antipyrine. In conclusion, human placental perfusion and transplacental pharmacokinetic modeling allowed us to determine the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac quantitatively. Diclofenac may share transplacental transfer system(s) with L-lactic acid.

  1. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B transporters modulate hydroxyurea pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Aisha L.; Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Finkelstein, David; Ware, Russell E.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is currently the only FDA-approved drug that ameliorates the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. Unfortunately, substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hydroxyurea may result in variation of the drug's efficacy. However, little is known about mechanisms that modulate hydroxyurea PK. Recent in vitro studies identifying hydroxyurea as a substrate for organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B) transporters prompted the current investigation assess...

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fentanyl in the Critically Ill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Leena; Ferrell, Benjamin A; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Heltsley, Rebecca; Ely, E Wesley; Stein, C Michael; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize fentanyl population pharmacokinetics in patients with critical illness and identify patient characteristics associated with altered fentanyl concentrations. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs in a large tertiary care hospital in the United States. Patients Patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock who received fentanyl during the first five days of their ICU stay. Measurements and Main Results We collected clinical and hourly drug administration data and measured fentanyl concentrations in plasma collected once daily for up to five days after enrollment. Among 337 patients, the mean duration of infusion was 58 hours at a median rate of 100 µg/hr. Using a nonlinear mixed-effects model implemented by NONMEM, we found fentanyl pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model in which weight, severe liver disease, and congestive heart failure most affected fentanyl concentrations. For a patient population with a mean weight of 92 kg and no history of severe liver disease or congestive heart failure, the final model, which performed well in repeated 10-fold cross-validation, estimated total clearance (CL), intercompartmental clearance (Q), and volumes of distribution for the central (V1) and peripheral compartments (V2) to be 35 (95% confidence interval: 32 to 39) L/hr, 55 (42 to 68) L/hr, 203 (140 to 266) L, and 523 (428 to 618) L, respectively. Severity of illness was marginally associated with fentanyl pharmacokinetics but did not improve the model fit after liver and heart disease were included. Conclusions In this study, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during critical illness were strongly influenced by severe liver disease, congestive heart failure, and weight, factors that should be considered when dosing fentanyl in the ICU. Future studies are needed to determine if data-driven fentanyl dosing algorithms can improve outcomes for ICU patients. PMID:26491862

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Caffeic Acid from Methanol Seed Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To describe caffeic acid-based pharmacokinetics of methanol extract of seed of Syzygium cumini L. in rats. Methods: A dose of the extract (500 mg, equivalent to 37.135 mg caffeic acid) was administered orally to 6 male Wister rats, weighing 200 ± 10 g. Blood samples (0.5 mL), collected from the tail vein at 0, 15, ...

  4. [A study of population pharmacokinetics of linezolid in Chinese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Bai, N; Liu, Y N; Wang, R

    2016-12-12

    Objective: To study the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) profiles of linezolid in Chinese healthy volunteers and infected patients. Methods: Linezolid 600 mg was administered to 31 Chinese healthy volunteers with a single dose and to 57 infected patients every 12 h for at least 5 doses. High performance liquid chromatography was applied to determine the plasma concentration of linezolid. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling method was applied to analyze the PPK profiles. Results: For healthy volunteers with single dose of linezolid, 2-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume of central compartment was 26.99 L, volume of peripheral compartment was 22.22 L, apparent clearance of central compartment was 7.99 L/h, and clearance of peripheral compartment was 101.28 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.62 L of volume of peripheral compartment was correlated. For Chinese infected patients with multiple doses of linezolid, 1-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume was 38.85 L, and apparent clearance was 4.70 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.79 L of volume, as well as 0.04 L/h of clearance were correlated. For each 1 year deviation of age from the mean value, -0.045 L/h of clearance was correlated. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profiles of linezolid in Chinese simulate a 2-compartment with linear elimination model when single dose is administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume. While a 1-compartment with linear elimination model is appropriate when multiple doses are administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume and clearance, but the age is linearly negative-correlated to clearance.

  5. Dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics of apigenin trimethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Mai Gamal; Lin, Hai-Shu

    2018-06-15

    Apigenin trimethyl ether (5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone, ATE), one of the key polymethoxyflavones present in black ginger (rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora) possesses various health-promoting activities. To optimize its medicinal application, the pharmacokinetics of ATE was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats with emphases to identify the impacts from dose and repeated dosing on its major pharmacokinetic parameters. Plasma ATE levels were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Upon single intravenous administration (2 mg/kg), plasma levels of ATE declined through an apparent first-order process while dose-escalation to 4 and 8 mg/kg led to its non-linear disposition, which could be described by the Michaelis-Menten model. Similarly, dose-dependent oral pharmacokinetics was confirmed and when the dose was escalated from 5 to 15 and 45 mg/kg, much longer mean residence time (MRT 0→last ), higher dose-normalized maximal plasma concentration (C max /Dose) and exposure (AUC/Dose) were observed at 15 and/or 45 mg/kg. One-week daily oral administration of ATE at 15 mg/kg caused its accelerated elimination and the plasma exposure (AUC) after intravenous (2 mg/kg) and oral administration (15 mg/kg) dropped ~40 and 60%, respectively. As ATE displayed both dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics, caution is needed in the medicinal applications of ATE and/or black ginger. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of pirfenidone after topical administration in rabbit eye

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guoying; Lin, Xianchai; Zhong, Hua; Yang, Yangfan; Qiu, Xuan; Ye, Chengtian; Wu, Kaili; Yu, Minbin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Pirfenidone (5-methyl-1-phenyl-2-[1H]-pyridone) is a new, broad-spectrum agent that has an inhibition effect on the proliferation, migration, and collagen contraction of human Tenon’s fibroblasts, and thus modulating the wound healing process of glaucoma filtering surgical site. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics of topically administered pirfenidone (0.5%) in rabbit eyes. Methods Pirfenidone solution (50 μl) was instilled into the rabbit’s conjunctival sac. The rabbits were...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of a 5-fluorouracil liposomal delivery system.

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, S T; Sherwood, M B; Nichols, D A; Penne, R B; Sery, T; Spaeth, G L

    1988-01-01

    A liposomal delivery system was developed in an attempt to prolong ocular levels of 5-fluorouracil for glaucoma filtering surgery. The pharmacokinetics of the 5-fluorouracil liposomal delivery system were studied in normal pigmented rabbits with 5-fluorouracil labelled with carbon-14 (C-14). 14C 5-fluorouracil was incorporated into the liposomes at a concentration of 10 g/l and injected subconjunctivally in doses of 5 and 10 mg. Concentrations of 5-fluorouracil were assayed at 10 time interva...

  8. Influence of diabetes on the pharmacokinetic behavior of natural polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianbo; Högger, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The development of food fortified with polyphenols and polyphenol-rich foods represents a novel approach to prevent or attenuate type 2 diabetes. It has been reported that type 2 diabetes may affect the pharmacokinetics of various drugs in several animal models. There is powerful evidence linking dietary polyphenols consumption with the risk factors defining type 2 diabetes, even if some opposite results occurred. This mini-review summarizes important advances on diabetes-associated changes in pharmacokinetics of natural polyphenols. The pharmacokinetic behavior between drugs and dietary polyphenols probably may be different due to (i) Ingested dose/amount per day. The dietary polyphenol intake per day is much higher than that of clinical drugs; (ii) Complexity of the components. Clinical drugs are well-characterized and typically small molecules. However, the polyphenols in diet are unimaginably complex; (iii) Interaction with food proteins. Although the effects of food proteins on the bioavailability of polyphenols are still not examined in much detail, direct binding interactions of polyphenols to proteins always occur; (iv) The most common polyphenols in the human diet have a low intrinsic activity and are poorly absorbed from the intestine, highly metabolized, or rapidly eliminated. Although there is very limited information available so far, it is proposed that type 2 diabetes influences the pharmacokinetic behavior of dietary polyphenols including: i) competition of glucose with polyphenols regarding binding to plasma proteins; ii) weakened non-covalent interaction affinities of plasma proteins for natural polyphenols due to protein glycation in type II diabetes; iii) the enhanced clearance of polyphenols in type 2 diabetes. An understanding of diabetes-associated changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and bioactivities of natural polyphenols as well as the mechanism of the variability should lead to the improvement of the benefits of

  9. Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of Icariin and Icariside II in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To explore the pharmacokinetic properties of icariin (ICA and icariside II (ICA II following intragastric and intravenous administration in rats, a rapid and sensitive method by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS/MS was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of ICA and ICA II in rat plasma. The quantification was performed by using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions m/z 677.1/531.1 for ICA, 515.1/369.1 for ICA II and 463.1/301.1 for diosmetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (IS. The assay showed linearity over the concentration range of 1.03–1032 ng/mL, with correlation coefficients of 0.9983 and 0.9977. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were within 15%. The lower limit of quantification for both ICA and ICA II was 1.03 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery of ICA and ICA II was more than 86.2%. The LC-MS/MS method has been successfully used in the pharmacokinetic studies of ICA and ICA II in rats. The results indicated that 91.2% of ICA was transformed into ICA II after oral administration by rats, whereas only 0.4% of ICA was transformed into ICA II after intravenous administration. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of ICA and ICA II after oral administration revealed that the Cmax and AUC0–t of ICA II were 3.8 and 13.0 times higher, respectively, than those of ICA. However, after intravenous administration, the Cmax and AUC0–t of ICA II were about only 12.1% and 4.2% of those of ICA. These results suggest that ICA and ICA II have distinct pharmacokinetic properties, and the insights obtained facilitate future pharmacological action studies.

  10. Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics In Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing... immunology , PK, and data analyses are currently under way. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Trauma, hemorrhage, transfusion, fibrinolysis, immune suppression...pharmacokinetics, outcomes, adverse events. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  11. [Pharmacokinetic of four alkaloids of Yanshu injection in Beagel dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiping; Xue, Mei; Huang, Xin; Wang, Shu; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2012-06-01

    For studying the pharmacokinetic of Yanshu injections in Beagel dogs, a sensitive and reproducible LC-MS method for quantitative determination of matrine, oxymatrine, sophocarpine and oxysophocarpine in dog's plasma were developed and validated using monocrotaline as an internal standard after iv of Yanshu injections (Sophorae Flavescentis Radix and Heterosmilacis Japonicae Rhizoma). The separation of plasma samples was performed on a CN column by isocratic elution with methanol-10 mmol x L(-1) NH4Ac-0.02% HCOOH-H2O 90:10 as the mobile phase. The plasma concentration of four kinds of alkaloids were calculated in dog plasta by detection of healthy dogs given Yanshu injection fluid after in twelve hours of plasma samples, All data of concentration-time of four kinds of alkaloids were treated with pharmacokinetics program DAS 2. 0. MT, OMT, SP and OSP have a good linear relationship in 0.01-16.0, 0.02-60.0, 0.01-4.0, 0.02-16.0 mg x L(-1), respectively. The average recoveries were more than 90% and the RSD of precision and stability of the test were less than 6.4% iv 1.2 g x kg(-1) Yanshu injection, four kinds of alkaloids in rats meet the two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model, Cmax and the concentration of the original liquid in the proportion of the basic line, the AUC(0-infinity) of matrine and oxymatrine, sophocarpine and oxysophocarpine compared to the original both in the proportion of liquid increases, the MRT(0-infinity) and t(1/2z) of matrine and sophocarpine were less than oxymatrine and oxysophocarpine; four kinds of alkaloids apparent volume of distribution matrine > oxymatrine, sophocarpine > oxysophocarpine. A method with high recovery rate and good stabilitywas established to determine the blood concentration of MT, OMT, SP, OSP in Yanshu injection and applied in its pharmacokinetics successfully.

  12. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Cocaine in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Marion A; Jufer Phipps, Rebecca A; Cone, Edward J; Walsh, Sharon L

    2018-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of oral cocaine has not been fully characterized and prospective data on oral bioavailability are limited. A within-subject study was performed to characterize the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of oral cocaine. Fourteen healthy inpatient participants (six males) with current histories of cocaine use were administered two oral doses (100 and 200 mg) and one intravenous (IV) dose (40 mg) of cocaine during three separate dosing sessions. Plasma samples were collected for up to 24 h after dosing and analyzed for cocaine and metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis, and a two-factor model was used to assess for dose and sex differences. The mean ± SEM oral cocaine bioavailability was 0.32 ± 0.04 after 100 and 0.45 ± 0.06 after 200 mg oral cocaine. Volume of distribution (Vd) and clearance (CL) were both greatest after 100 mg oral (Vd = 4.2 L/kg; CL = 116.2 mL/[min kg]) compared to 200 mg oral (Vd = 2.9 L/kg; CL = 87.5 mL/[min kg]) and 40 mg IV (Vd = 1.3 L/kg; CL = 32.7 mL/[min kg]). Oral cocaine area-under-thecurve (AUC) and peak concentration increased in a dose-related manner. AUC metabolite-to-parent ratios of benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester were significantly higher after oral compared to IV administration and highest after the lower oral dose. In addition, minor metabolites were detected in higher concentrations after oral compared to IV cocaine. Oral cocaine produced a pharmacokinetic profile different from IV cocaine, which appears as a rightward and downward shift in the concentration-time profile. Cocaine bioavailability values were similar to previous estimates. Oral cocaine also produced a unique metabolic profile, with greater concentrations of major and minor metabolites.

  13. Nanomedicine for improved efficacy of tuberculosis drugs – Pharmacokinetic importance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hayeshi, R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of Tuberculosis Drugs ? Pharmacokinetic importance Emerging Researcher Symposium Dr. Rose Hayeshi 10 October 2012 Outline ? Challenges in TB treatment ? Nanomedicine as proposed solution ? Results ? Conclusions ? CSIR 2012 Slide 2... ? 1 x 106 cfu/lung 3 x 103 cfu/spleen Effects of the Nanodrug on Mycobacaterium tuberculosis replication ? Nanodrug once a week vs conventional drug daily ? Treatment with nanoencapsulated TB drugs once a week, comparable to daily treatment...

  14. Pharmacological considerations for predicting PK/PD at the site of action for therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weirong; Zhou, Honghui

    For therapeutic proteins whose sites of action are distal to the systemic circulation, both drug and target concentrations at the tissue sites are not necessarily proportional to those in systemic circulation, highlighting the importance of understanding pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship at the sites of action. This review summarizes the pharmacological considerations for predicting local PK/PD and the importance of measuring PK and PD at site of action. Three case examples are presented to show how mechanistic and physiologically based PK/PD (PBPK/PD) models which incorporated the PK and PD at the tissue site can be used to facilitate understanding the exposure-response relationship for therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of lysine clonixinate in children in postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martin, G; Cattan, C; Zuñiga, S

    1996-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of 2 doses of intravenous lysine clonixinate (4 and 6 mg x kg-1) were studied in 10 children (age 4-10 years) under postoperative care. A single dose of the drug was injected in a forearm vein. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals for 3 hours. Serum clonixin concentrations (expressed as clonixin) were analyzed using a high pressure liquid chromatography method. Pharmacokinetic values were estimated by a nonlinear computer program. The distribution volume was similar in both groups of children (1.288 +/- 0.829 1 and 1. 139 +/- 0.667 1, respectively). There were no differences between the values of total plasma clearance and the administered doses (0.026 +/- 0.017 ml x min-1 and 0.017 +/- 0.008 ml x min-1, t = 1.07, p = 0.76). The elimination half-life was longer in children who received 6 mg x kg-1 (44.26 +/- 6.34 min vs 38.63 +/- 10.93 min) but this difference was not statistically significant (t = 0.99, p < 0.34). The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated in these children were different from those found by other authors in adults and experimental animals.

  16. Availability, Pharmaceutics, Security, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Activities of Patchouli Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanying; Peng, Cheng; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhang, Sanyin; Cao, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is one of the critical bioactive ingredients and is mainly isolated from aerial part of Pogostemon cablin (known as guanghuoxiang in China) belonging to Labiatae. So far, PA has been widely applied in perfume industries. This review was written with the use of reliable information published between 1974 and 2016 from libraries and electronic researches including NCKI, PubMed, Reaxys, ACS, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Wiley-Blackwell, aiming at presenting comprehensive outline of security, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of PA and at further providing a potential guide in exploring the PA and its use in various medical fields. We found that PA maybe was a low toxic drug that was acquired numerously through vegetable oil isolation and chemical synthesis and its stability and low water dissolution were improved in pharmaceutics. It also possessed specific pharmacokinetic characteristics, such as two-compartment open model, first-order kinetic elimination, and certain biometabolism and biotransformation process, and was shown to have multiple biological activities, that is, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticidal, antiatherogenic, antiemetic, whitening, and sedative activity. However, the systematic evaluations of preparation, pharmaceutics, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities underlying molecular mechanisms of action also required further investigation prior to practices of PA in clinic.

  17. Effect of the menstrual cycle in ethanol pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, L; Milke, P; Zapata, L; de la Fuente, J R; Vargas-Vorácková, F; Lorenzana-Jiménez, M; Corte, G; Tamayo, J; Kaplan, M; Márquez, M; Kershenobich, D

    1998-01-01

    Differences in ethanol pharmacokinetics within the menstrual cycle have previously been reported and attributed to variations in body composition, hormonal influences and gastric emptying. To establish the role of the menstrual cycle in ethanol pharmacokinetics associated with changes in body composition, ethanol blood concentrations were measured in nine healthy women during the midfollicular (P1, days 8-10) and midluteal (P2, days 22-24) phases of the menstrual cycle after a postprandial oral ethanol dose (0.3 g kg(-1)). Total body water was assessed by dual-energy x-ray densitometry (DEXA) on both occasions. Median total body water did not vary during either phase of the menstrual cycle (P1 = 54.54%, P2 = 54.66%; P = 0.9296). Median area under the ethanol concentration-time curve (AUC) was lower during P1 (215.33 mg.h dl(-1)) than during P2 (231.33 mg.h dl(-1))(P = 0.8253). No significant differences were found on ethanol pharmacokinetics in either phase of the menstrual cycle.

  18. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Kanani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA. Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  19. Effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kayoko; Ohtori, Akira; Tojo, Kakuji

    2010-10-01

    A diffusion model of ocular pharmacokinetics was used to estimate the effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics. In vivo rabbit data after topical instillation of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were compared with the simulated concentrations in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The barrier capacity of the surrounding membranes such as the retina/choroid/sclera (RCS) membrane and the cornea was characterized by dimensionless Sherwood number derived by the pseudo-steady state approach (PSSA). We assumed the barrier capacity decreased by inflammation; when the barrier capacity of the RCS membrane and the cornea was assumed to be one-tenth for the RCS membrane and a half for the cornea respectively, the in vivo data agreed with the simulated profile without contradiction. The drug concentration gradient simulated in the vitreous body near the RCS membrane was more significant in the inflamed eyes than in the normal eyes, suggesting that the elimination of the drugs from the RCS membrane was enhanced by inflammation. The present diffusion model can better describe the ocular pharmacokinetics in both normal and diseased conditions.

  20. The Brain and Propranolol Pharmacokinetics in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Propranolol, a non-selective β-blocker, has been found to have a tremendous array of indications. Recent evidence has suggested that propranolol may be effective in patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder by suppressing activity in the amygdala and thereby inhibiting emotional memory formation. Dosage requirements have been well established in the pediatric and adult population, however, there has been no definitive geriatric dose recommended in the package inserts made available to the public. The aim of this paper is to use pharmacokinetic simulations in order to establish a pharmacokinetic profile dosage equivalent for the elderly as has been found in young patients. After completing the Monte-Carlo simulations for the elderly and young patients, a single 10mg dose in the elderly has shown comparable pharmacokinetic profiles as found in young patients administered a 40mg single dose.