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Sample records for physics meets biology

  1. Quantum physics meets biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Markus; Juffmann, Thomas; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-12-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the past decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world-view of quantum coherences, entanglement, and other nonclassical effects, has been heading toward systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a "pedestrian guide" to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future "quantum biology," its current status, recent experimental progress, and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  2. Quantum physics meets biology

    CERN Document Server

    Arndt, Markus; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-01-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the last decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world view of quantum coherences, entanglement and other non-classical effects, has been heading towards systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a pedestrian guide to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future quantum biology, its current status, recent experimental progress and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolat...

  3. Quantitative biology: where modern biology meets physical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Zhu, Lian; Mazutis, Linas; Sgro, Allyson E; Fai, Thomas G; Podolski, Marija

    2014-11-05

    Quantitative methods and approaches have been playing an increasingly important role in cell biology in recent years. They involve making accurate measurements to test a predefined hypothesis in order to compare experimental data with predictions generated by theoretical models, an approach that has benefited physicists for decades. Building quantitative models in experimental biology not only has led to discoveries of counterintuitive phenomena but has also opened up novel research directions. To make the biological sciences more quantitative, we believe a two-pronged approach needs to be taken. First, graduate training needs to be revamped to ensure biology students are adequately trained in physical and mathematical sciences and vice versa. Second, students of both the biological and the physical sciences need to be provided adequate opportunities for hands-on engagement with the methods and approaches necessary to be able to work at the intersection of the biological and physical sciences. We present the annual Physiology Course organized at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA) as a case study for a hands-on training program that gives young scientists the opportunity not only to acquire the tools of quantitative biology but also to develop the necessary thought processes that will enable them to bridge the gap between these disciplines. © 2014 Shekhar, Zhu, Mazutis, Sgro, Fai, and Podolski. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. When physics and biology meet: the nanoscale case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Otávio

    2011-06-01

    As an illustration of the complexities involved in connecting physics and molecular biology at the nanoscale, in this paper I discuss two case studies from nanoscience. The first examines the use of a biological structure (DNA) to build nanostructures in a controlled way. The second discusses the attempt to build a single molecular wire, and then decide whether such a wire is indeed conducting. After presenting the central features of each case study, I examine the role played in them by microscopic imaging, the different styles of reasoning involved, and the various theoretical, methodological, and axiological differences. I conclude by arguing that, except for the probe microscopes that are used, there is very little in common between the two cases. At the nanoscale, physics and molecular biology seem to meet in a non-unified way. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomaterials — where biology, physics, chemistry, engineering and medicine meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, K. A.

    2008-03-01

    The success or failure of an implant material in the body depends on a complex interaction between a synthetic 'foreign body' and the 'host tissue'. These interactions occur at many levels from the sub-microscopic level, where subtle changes in the surface physio-chemistry can substantially alter the nature of the biomaterial-host tissue interface, through the microscopical level (e.g. sensitivity to surface topography) to the macrostructural level (e.g. dependence on scaffold porosity). Thus the factors that control these responses are not only biologically determined but also mechanically, physically and chemically mediated, although identifying where one starts and the other finishes can be difficult. Design of a successful medical device has therefore to call on expertise within a wide range of disciplines. In terms of both investigating the basic science behind the factors which orchestrate a biological response and developing research tools that enable study of these responses. However, a medical device must also meet the economic and practical demands of health care professionals who will ultimately be using it in the clinic. Bone graft substitute materials are used in orthopaedics as an alternative or adjunct to autografting, a practice where the patient 'donates' bone from a healthy site to aid bone repair at a damaged or diseased site. These materials are used in a wide range of procedures from total hip revision to spinal fusion and their evolution over the last 10 years illustrates how an interdisciplinary approach has benefited their development and may lead to further innovation in the future.

  6. Biology meets Physics: Reductionism and Multi-scale Modeling of Morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara; Batterman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    from philosophers of biology. Specifically, scholars have pointed to the impossibility of deducing biological explanations from physical ones, and to the irreducible nature of distinctively biological processes such as gene regulation and evolution. This paper takes a step back in asking whether bottom......-up modeling is feasible even when modeling simple physical systems across scales. By comparing examples of multi-scale modeling in physics and biology, we argue that the “tyranny of scales” problem present a challenge to reductive explanations in both physics and biology. The problem refers to the scale...... and biology. Contrary to the assumption that physical science approaches provide reductive explanations in biology, we exemplify how inputs from physical science approaches often reveal the importance of macro-scale models and explanations. We illustrate this through an examination of the role of biomechanics...

  7. Biology meets Physics: Reductionism and Multi-scale Modeling of Morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara; Batterman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    and biology. Contrary to the assumption that physical science approaches provide reductive explanations in biology, we exemplify how inputs from physical science approaches often reveal the importance of macro-scale models and explanations. We illustrate this through an examination of the role of biomechanics...

  8. Biology meets physics: Reductionism and multi-scale modeling of morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sara; Batterman, Robert

    2017-02-01

    A common reductionist assumption is that macro-scale behaviors can be described "bottom-up" if only sufficient details about lower-scale processes are available. The view that an "ideal" or "fundamental" physics would be sufficient to explain all macro-scale phenomena has been met with criticism from philosophers of biology. Specifically, scholars have pointed to the impossibility of deducing biological explanations from physical ones, and to the irreducible nature of distinctively biological processes such as gene regulation and evolution. This paper takes a step back in asking whether bottom-up modeling is feasible even when modeling simple physical systems across scales. By comparing examples of multi-scale modeling in physics and biology, we argue that the "tyranny of scales" problem presents a challenge to reductive explanations in both physics and biology. The problem refers to the scale-dependency of physical and biological behaviors that forces researchers to combine different models relying on different scale-specific mathematical strategies and boundary conditions. Analyzing the ways in which different models are combined in multi-scale modeling also has implications for the relation between physics and biology. Contrary to the assumption that physical science approaches provide reductive explanations in biology, we exemplify how inputs from physics often reveal the importance of macro-scale models and explanations. We illustrate this through an examination of the role of biomechanical modeling in developmental biology. In such contexts, the relation between models at different scales and from different disciplines is neither reductive nor completely autonomous, but interdependent.

  9. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G; Pastore, A; Piazza, F; Temussi, P A

    2013-08-02

    conference held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding

  10. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding through an

  11. Nanoelectronics Meets Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Charles

    2012-02-01

    Nanoscale materials enable unique opportunities at the interface between the physical and life sciences, and the interface between nanoelectronic devices and biological systems makes possible communication between these two diverse systems at the length scale relevant to biological function. In this presentation, the development of nanowire nanoelectronic devices and their application as powerful tools for the life sciences will be discussed. First, a brief introduction to nanowire nanoelectronic devices as well as comparisons to other electrophysiological tools will be presented to illuminate the unique strengths and opportunities enabled at the nanoscale. Second, illustration of detection capabilities including signal-to-noise and applications for real-time label-free detection of biochemical markers down to the level of single molecules will be described. Third, the use of nanowire nanoelectronics for building interfaces to cells and tissue will be reviewed. Multiplexed measurements made from nanowire devices fabricated on flexible and transparent substrates recording signal propagation across cultured cells, acute tissue slices and intact organs will be illustrated, including quantitative analysis of the high simultaneous spatial and temporal resolution achieved with these nanodevices. Specific examples of subcellular and near point detection of extracellular potential will be used to illustrate the unique capabilities, such as recording localized potential changes due to neuronal activities simultaneously across many length scales, which provide key information for functional neural circuit studies. Last, emerging opportunities for the creation of powerful new probes based on controlled synthesis and/or bottom-up assembly of nanomaterials will be described with an emphasis on nanowire probes demonstrating the first intracellular transistor recordings, and the development of ``cyborg'' tissue. The prospects for blurring the distinction between nanoelectronic

  12. The 54th International Meeting of Physical Chemistry; Fast Elementary Processes in Chemical and Biological Systems Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tramer, A. [Lab. de Photophysique Moleculaire Bat. 213 - Universite Paris-Sud, 91495 - ORSAY Cedex (France)

    1996-07-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 54th International Meeting of Physical Chemistry held in Villeneuve d`Ascq in France. Topics discussed include ultrafast studies in biophysics surface phenomena, photochemical processes, electron and proton transfer, crystalline and microdisperse media and isolated molecules. There were 80 papers presented at the meeting and 14 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  13. When cell biology meets theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Cell biologists now have tools and knowledge to generate useful quantitative data. But how can we make sense of these data, and are we measuring the correct parameters? Moreover, how can we test hypotheses quantitatively? To answer these questions, the theory of physics is required and is essential to the future of quantitative cell biology. PMID:26416957

  14. When cell biology meets theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos; Roux, Aurélien

    2015-09-28

    Cell biologists now have tools and knowledge to generate useful quantitative data. But how can we make sense of these data, and are we measuring the correct parameters? Moreover, how can we test hypotheses quantitatively? To answer these questions, the theory of physics is required and is essential to the future of quantitative cell biology.

  15. Biological scaling and physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R P Rau

    2002-09-01

    Kleiber’s law in biology states that the specific metabolic rate (metabolic rate per unit mass) scales as -1/4 in terms of the mass of the organism. A long-standing puzzle is the (- 1/4) power in place of the usual expectation of (- 1/3) based on the surface to volume ratio in three-dimensions. While recent papers by physicists have focused exclusively on geometry in attempting to explain the puzzle, we consider here a specific law of physics that governs fluid flow to show how the (- 1/4) power arises under certain conditions. More generally, such a line of approach that identifies a specific physical law as involved and then examines the implications of a power law may illuminate better the role of physics in biology.

  16. Biological scaling and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, A R P

    2002-09-01

    Kleiber's law in biology states that the specific metabolic rate (metabolic rate per unit mass) scales as M- 1/4 in terms of the mass M of the organism. A long-standing puzzle is the (- 1/4) power in place of the usual expectation of (- 1/3) based on the surface to volume ratio in three-dimensions. While recent papers by physicists have focused exclusively on geometry in attempting to explain the puzzle, we consider here a specific law of physics that governs fluid flow to show how the (- 1/4) power arises under certain conditions. More generally, such a line of approach that identifies a specific physical law as involved and then examines the implications of a power law may illuminate better the role of physics in biology.

  17. Physics of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.

    The biological membrane is a complex system consisting of an aqueous biomolecular planar aggregate of predominantly lipid and protein molecules. At physiological temperatures, the membrane may be considered a thin (˜50Å) slab of anisotropic fluid characterized by a high lateral mobility of the various molecular components. A substantial fraction of biological activity takes place in association with membranes. As a very lively piece of condensed matter, the biological membrane is a challenging research topic for both the experimental and theoretical physicists who are facing a number of fundamental physical problems including molecular self-organization, macromolecular structure and dynamics, inter-macromolecular interactions, structure-function relationships, transport of energy and matter, and interfacial forces. This paper will present a brief review of recent theoretical and experimental progress on such problems, with special emphasis on lipid bilayer structure and dynamics, lipid phase transitions, lipid-protein and lipid-cholesterol interactions, intermembrane forces, and the physical constraints imposed on biomembrane function and evolution. The paper advocates the dual point of view that there are a number of interesting physics problems in membranology and, at the same time, that the physical properties of biomembranes are important regulators of membrane function.

  18. PREFACE: VII Brazilian Meeting on Simulational Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascak, Joao Antonio; Rosas, Alexandres

    2014-03-01

    This special issue includes invited and selected articles of the VIIth Brazilian Meeting on Simulational Physics (BMSP), held in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, from the 5th to 10th August, 2013. This is the seventh such meeting, and the first one to have contributed papers published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The previous meetings in the BMSP series took place in the mountains of Minas Gerais and in the region of the Brazilian Pantanal. Now, for the first time, the Meeting was held in the pleasant shores of João Pessoa, the capital of the Paraíba state. The VIIth BMSP brought together more than 50 researchers from all over the world for a vibrant and productive period. As in the previous meetings, the talks and posters highlighted recent advances in applications, algorithms, and implementations of computer simulation methods for the study of condensed matter, materials, out of equilibrium, quantum and biologically motivated systems. We are sure that this meeting series will continue to provide a valuable venue for people working in simulational physics to exchange ideas and discuss the state of art of this always expanding field. We are very glad to realize this special issue, and are most appreciative to the editors of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series for making this publication possible. We are grateful for the outstanding work of the João Pessoa team, for the financial support of the Brazilian agencies CNPq, CAPES, FAPESQ, and of the Federal Universities UFPB and UFMG. At last, but not least, we would like to acknowledge all of the authors of this special issue for their contributions. João Antonio Plascak Alexandre Rosas Guest Editors Conference photograph

  19. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High Velocity Penetration, Blunt Trauma and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne eYoung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of TBI in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems.

  20. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High-Velocity Penetration, Blunt Impact, and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T.; Bocchieri, Robert T.; Walilko, Timothy J.; Burns, Jennie M.; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  1. Where Synthetic Biology Meets ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  2. Biomaterial science meets computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Little, J Paige; Pettet, Graeme J; Loessner, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    There is a pressing need for a predictive tool capable of revealing a holistic understanding of fundamental elements in the normal and pathological cell physiology of organoids in order to decipher the mechanoresponse of cells. Therefore, the integration of a systems bioengineering approach into a validated mathematical model is necessary to develop a new simulation tool. This tool can only be innovative by combining biomaterials science with computational biology. Systems-level and multi-scale experimental data are incorporated into a single framework, thus representing both single cells and collective cell behaviour. Such a computational platform needs to be validated in order to discover key mechano-biological factors associated with cell-cell and cell-niche interactions.

  3. Italian Meeting on High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nicrosini, Oreste; Vercesi, Valerio; IFAE 2006; Incontri Di Fisica Delle Alte Energie

    2007-01-01

    This book collects the Proceedings of the Workshop ``Incontri di Fisica delle Alte Energie (IFAE) 2006, Pavia, 19-21 April 2006". This is the fifth edition of a new series of meetings on fundamental research in particle physics and was attended by more than 150 researchers. Presentations, both theoretical and experimental, addressed the status of Standard Model and Flavour phyiscs, Neutrino and Cosmological topics, new insights beyond the present understanding of particle physics and cross-fertilization in areas such as medicine, biology, technological spin-offs and computing. Special emphasis was given to the expectations of the forthcoming Large Hadron Collider, due in operation in 2007. The venue of plenary sessions interleaved with parallel ones allowed for a rich exchange of ideas, presented in these Proceedings, that form a coherent picture of the findings and of the open questions in this extremely challenging cultural field.

  4. Synthetic biology meets tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jamie A; Cachat, Elise

    2016-06-15

    Classical tissue engineering is aimed mainly at producing anatomically and physiologically realistic replacements for normal human tissues. It is done either by encouraging cellular colonization of manufactured matrices or cellular recolonization of decellularized natural extracellular matrices from donor organs, or by allowing cells to self-organize into organs as they do during fetal life. For repair of normal bodies, this will be adequate but there are reasons for making unusual, non-evolved tissues (repair of unusual bodies, interface to electromechanical prostheses, incorporating living cells into life-support machines). Synthetic biology is aimed mainly at engineering cells so that they can perform custom functions: applying synthetic biological approaches to tissue engineering may be one way of engineering custom structures. In this article, we outline the 'embryological cycle' of patterning, differentiation and morphogenesis and review progress that has been made in constructing synthetic biological systems to reproduce these processes in new ways. The state-of-the-art remains a long way from making truly synthetic tissues, but there are now at least foundations for future work. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. Control theory meets synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Dy, Aaron J; Qian, Yili

    2016-07-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology.

  6. Control theory meets synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology. PMID:27440256

  7. Abstracts of the 28. annual meeting of the Austrian Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology and Medical Radiation Physics Society (OeGRO 2011); Abstracts der 28. Jahrestagung der Oesterreichischen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, Radiobiologie und Medizinische Radiophysik (OeGRO 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2012-06-15

    The second part of the volume includes the abstracts of the 28th annual meeting of the Austrian Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology and Medical Radiation Physics Society (OeGRO 2011), covering the following topics: extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy; brachytherapy, hyperthermia; radiotherapy side effects; psycho-oncology in radiotherapy; head-neck carcinomas; radiation source implants for carcinoma irradiation; MRI-supported adaptive radiotherapy; CT-guided radiotherapy; mammary carcinomas; prostate carcinomas; magnetic nanoparticles for future medical applications.

  8. The Physics behind Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radde Nicole E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Systems Biology is a young and rapidly evolving research field, which combines experimental techniques and mathematical modeling in order to achieve a mechanistic understanding of processes underlying the regulation and evolution of living systems. Systems Biology is often associated with an Engineering approach: The purpose is to formulate a data-rich, detailed simulation model that allows to perform numerical (‘in silico’ experiments and then draw conclusions about the biological system. While methods from Engineering may be an appropriate approach to extending the scope of biological investigations to experimentally inaccessible realms and to supporting data-rich experimental work, it may not be the best strategy in a search for design principles of biological systems and the fundamental laws underlying Biology. Physics has a long tradition of characterizing and understanding emergent collective behaviors in systems of interacting units and searching for universal laws. Therefore, it is natural that many concepts used in Systems Biology have their roots in Physics. With an emphasis on Theoretical Physics, we will here review the ‘Physics core’ of Systems Biology, show how some success stories in Systems Biology can be traced back to concepts developed in Physics, and discuss how Systems Biology can further benefit from its Theoretical Physics foundation.

  9. Plasmonics Meets Biology through Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano De Sio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (NPs represent a relevant class of nanomaterials, which is able to achieve light localization down to nanoscale by exploiting a phenomenon called Localized Plasmon Resonance. In the last few years, NPs have been proposed to trigger DNA release or enhance ablation of diseased tissues, while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. In view of the therapeutic relevance of such plasmonic NPs; a detailed characterization of the electrostatic interaction between positively charged gold nanorods (GNRs and a negatively charged whole-genome DNA solution is reported. The preparation of the hybrid biosystem has been investigated as a function of DNA concentration by means of ζ-potential; hydrodynamic diameter and gel electrophoresis analysis. The results have pointed out the specific conditions to achieve the most promising GNRs/DNA complex and its photo-thermal properties have been investigated. The overall study allows to envisage the possibility to ingeniously combine plasmonic and biological materials and, thus, enable design and development of an original non invasive all-optical methodology for monitoring photo-induced temperature variation with high sensitivity.

  10. Basic radiotherapy physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, David S; Das, Indra J; Mendonca, Marc S; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    This book is a concise and well-illustrated review of the physics and biology of radiation therapy intended for radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. It presents topics that are included on the Radiation Therapy Physics and Biology examinations and is designed with the intent of presenting information in an easily digestible format with maximum retention in mind. The inclusion of mnemonics, rules of thumb, and reader-friendly illustrations throughout the book help to make difficult concepts easier to grasp. Basic Radiotherapy Physics and Biology is a

  11. How physics can inspire biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, Alexei

    2009-07-01

    In July 1997 Adrian Parsegian, a biophysicist at the National Institutes of Health in the US and a former president of the Biophysical Society, published an article in Physics Today in which he outlined his thoughts about the main obstacles to a happy marriage between physics and biology. Parsegian started his article with a joke about a physicist talking to his biology-trained friend.

  12. The Physics of Marine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Discusses ways in which marine biology can be integrated into the physics classroom. Topics suggested for incorporation include the harmonic motion of ocean waves, ocean currents, the interaction of visible light with ocean water, pressure, light absorption, and sound transfer in water. (MDH)

  13. International Meeting on Physics at KAON

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, David; Speth, Josef

    1990-01-01

    "Physics at KAON", an international meeting jointly organized by the KFA Jillich and TRI­ UMF, was held in the Physikzentrum Bad Honnef from June 7 through June 9, 1989. This was one of a series of meetings - the first one in Europe - in which plans for the medium energy physics laboratory KAON were presented and some aspects of the physics at this new facility were discussed. The meeting focussed mainly on the topics of hadron spectroscopy, J{ -meson scattering, strangeness in nuclei, and rare decays. Also presented were some of the research programs at SATURNE and COSY which may well lead to KAON physics in the future. These proceed­ ings include articles which summarize our current experimental and theoretical knowledge in the various areas, as well as papers which describe lines of research feasible with KAON. The large number of participants - limited, in fact, by the capacity of the Physikzentrum - clearly demonstrates the great interest of the European physics community in the research avenue...

  14. Biology-inspired AMO physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    This Topical Review presents an overview of increasingly robust interconnects that are being established between atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics and the life sciences. AMO physics, outgrowing its historical role as a facilitator—a provider of optical methodologies, for instance—now seeks to partner biology in its quest to link systems-level descriptions of biological entities to insights based on molecular processes. Of course, perspectives differ when AMO physicists and biologists consider various processes. For instance, while AMO physicists link molecular properties and dynamics to potential energy surfaces, these have to give way to energy landscapes in considerations of protein dynamics. But there are similarities also: tunnelling and non-adiabatic transitions occur both in protein dynamics and in molecular dynamics. We bring to the fore some such differences and similarities; we consider imaging techniques based on AMO concepts, like 4D fluorescence microscopy which allows access to the dynamics of cellular processes, multiphoton microscopy which offers a built-in confocality, and microscopy with femtosecond laser beams to saturate the suppression of fluorescence in spatially controlled fashion so as to circumvent the diffraction limit. Beyond imaging, AMO physics contributes with optical traps that probe the mechanical and dynamical properties of single ‘live’ cells, highlighting differences between healthy and diseased cells. Trap methodologies have also begun to probe the dynamics governing of neural stem cells adhering to each other to form neurospheres and, with squeezed light to probe sub-diffusive motion of yeast cells. Strong field science contributes not only by providing a source of energetic electrons and γ-rays via laser-plasma accelerations schemes, but also via filamentation and supercontinuum generation, enabling mainstream collision physics into play in diverse processes like DNA damage induced by low-energy collisions to

  15. Condensed Matter Physics - Biology Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, G.

    The field of condensed matter physics had its genesis this century and it has had a remarkable evolution. A closer look at its growth reveals a hidden aim in the collective consciousness of the field - a part of the development this century is a kind of warm up exercise to understand the nature of living condensed matter, namely the field of biology, by a growing new breed of scientists in the coming century. Through some examples the vitality of this interaction will be pointed out.

  16. Biological physics--origin and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2002-03-12

    Biology and Physics share common ancestors. The two sciences have drifted apart during the last century, although they have often mutually fertilized each other. Often the discovery of a new physical method has triggered dramatic progresses in biology but there are also numerous examples of biology-inspired new developments in physics. In this special issue of ChemPhysChem, various facets and new developments of the interface between physics and biology are pointed out.

  17. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year Ph

  18. Is Biology based on Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2015-04-01

    The equation on Boltsmann's tomb is S = K log W, giving 137 = 10E60 where 10E60 closely stands for the age of the universe in Plank times. We wish we could add ``137 = 10E60'' on his tomb as a contribution leading physics towards information in biology as explained in our book ``Quantum Consciousness - the Road to Reality.'' (1) We draft our speculation that such a step may explain the underlying physical cause for mutations. Tiny immeasurable and slow changes well beyond the tenth digit of fine structure constant may suffice to change the information system in constituent particles of nucleotides with their external effects forcing changes in the genetic code with successful changes resulting into mutations. (2) Our quantum mechanical published derivation of the strong coupling implies gravity as a cumulative effect of quantum mechanical particles further implying that the universal constant of gravity (G) can not be constant everywhere. (1) and (2) put together should remove Darwin's confusion about the constancy of gravity. Moving planets and Sunstorms should also cause changes in G on earth unnoticeable to mankind, but large enough to have an impact on the internal particles of nucleotides which should implicitly have an external effect on the genetic code per our theory.

  19. 77 FR 19740 - Biological Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Biological Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee...: Name: Biological Sciences Advisory Committee ( 1110). Date and Time: April 26, 2011; 1 p.m. to 3 p.m...., Room 688, Arlington, VA 22230. All visitors must contact the Directorate of Biological Sciences...

  20. 78 FR 33115 - Biological Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Biological Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee...: Name: Biological Sciences Advisory Committee ( 1110). Date and Time: June 27, 2013; 8:30 a.m. to 11:30... Directorate of Biological Sciences [call 703-292-8400 or send an email message to erchiang@nsf.gov ] at...

  1. 77 FR 50174 - Biological Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Biological Sciences Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee...: Name: Biological Sciences Advisory Committee ( 1110). Date and Time: September 5, 2012, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m..., Arlington, VA 22230. All visitors must contact the Directorate for Biological Sciences at least 24...

  2. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  3. PREFACE: XXXVII Brazilian Meeting on Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The XXXVII Brazilian Meeting on Nuclear Physics (or XXXVII RTFNB 2014) gave continuity to a long sequence of workshops held in Brazil, devoted to the study of the different aspects of nuclear physics. The meeting took place in the Maresias Beach Hotel, in the town of Maresias (state of São Paulo) from 8th to 12th September 2014. Offering gentle weather, a charming piece of green land of splendid natural beauty with beach and all amenities, the place had all the conditions for very pleasant and fruitful discussions. The meeting involved 162 participants and attracted undergraduate and graduate students, Brazilian and South American physicists and invited speakers from overseas (USA, Italy, Spain, France, England, Switzerland, Germany and South Corea). In the program we had plenary morning sessions with review talks on recent developments in theory, computational techniques, experimentation and applications of the many aspects of nuclear physics. In the parallel sessions we had a total of 58 seminars. This volume contains 60 written contributions based on these talks and on the poster sessions. Evening talks and poster sessions gave still more insight and enlarged the scope of the scientific program. The contributed papers, representing mainly the scientific activity of young physicists, were exhibited as posters and are included in the present volume. Additional information about the meeting can be found at our website: http://www.sbfisica.org.br/~rtfnb/xxxvii-en Support and sponsorship came from brazilian national agencies: Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnoógico (CNPq); Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES); Fundação de Amparo á Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP); Fundação de Amparo á Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ); Sociedade Brasileira de Física (SBF) and Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo (IFUSP). We honored Professor Alejandro Szanto de Toledo, who completed

  4. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  5. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  6. [Reduction of biology to fundamental physics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhonin, V A

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that, while interpreting life as a physical phenomenon, fundamental physics allows for the following alternatives: relativity of animate and inanimate upon canonical transformations; the impossibility of the change from animate to inanimate state of isolated systems; the abandonment of attempts to reduce biology to the physics of isolated systems. The possibility of reducing biology to phenomenological physics was considered. A number of equations for the general phenomenological dynamics of density matrix was proposed.

  7. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-12-28

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with the ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by an overview of the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. The latest developments in molecular ferroelectrics and biological ferroelectricity will then be highlighted, and their implications and potential applications will be discussed. We close by noting molecular ferroelectric as an exciting frontier between electronics and biology, and a number of challenges ahead are also described.

  8. The physics behind systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Radde, Nicole; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Systems Biology is a young and rapidly evolving research field, which combines experimental techniques and mathematical modeling in order to achieve a mechanistic understanding of processes underlying the regulation and evolution of living systems. Systems Biology is often associated with an Engineering approach: The purpose is to formulate a data-rich, detailed simulation model that allows to perform numerical (‘in silico’) experiments and then draw conclusions about the biological system...

  9. Nanobiotechnology: synthetic biology meets materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Michael C; Patolsky, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Nanotechnology, the area of science focused on the control of matter in the nanometer scale, allows ground-breaking changes of the fundamental properties of matter that are often radically different compared to those exhibited by the bulk counterparts. In view of the fact that dimensionality plays a key role in determining the qualities of matter, the realization of the great potential of nanotechnology has opened the door to other disciplines such as life sciences and medicine, where the merging between them offers exciting new applications, along with basic science research. The application of nanotechnology in life sciences, nanobiotechnology, is now having a profound impact on biological circuit design, bioproduction systems, synthetic biology, medical diagnostics, disease therapy and drug delivery. This special issue is dedicated to the overview of how we are learning to control biopolymers and biological machines at the molecular- and nanoscale. In addition, it covers far-reaching progress in the design and synthesis of nanoscale materials, thus enabling the construction of integrated systems in which the component blocks are comparable in size to the chemical and biological entities under investigation.

  10. The 23rd Stirling Physics Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    derived from a standard Tesla coil with a high-Q secondary. This is capable of delivering around a million volts, which produce fantastic lightning flashes. A volunteer from the audience was invited to enter a huge Faraday Cage which was then subjected to these high voltage sparks! For a while the door of the cage jammed but eventually the victim emerged unscathed! This is, of course, not just an entertainment. The Gusto show is taken into schools and targeted at lower secondary pupils about to make their subject choices. The team also gives large scale physics demonstration lectures and could play to 10 000 children in a month. So physics is fun and physics is relevant to everyday life! Support for physics teachers Lesley Glasser chaired the afternoon session, which she opened by introducing the Institute's Education Officer. The Stirling Meeting would not be the same without the `commercial slot' presented again so ably by Catherine Wilson. Physics teachers are an endangered species and the Institute is determined to do whatever it can to support them. Plans are afoot to make sure the Schools Lectures are modified, if necessary, to take account of the educational differences in Scotland. The London-based `Physics in Perspective' course not only introduces sixth-formers to some of the frontiers of physics but gives enough free time for them to visit places of interest in the city - from the Science Museum to Soho. `So they associate physics with enjoyment!' Another Scottish Update Course is planned for teachers, and a brand new glossy booklet, sent free to all schools, will show pupils that choosing physics is a `Smart Move'. Finally the Institute has just started a major post-16 curriculum project which will include a variety of support materials to keep teachers abreast of continuing developments in physics. Each year, IoP Teacher of Physics Awards are given to `outstanding teachers of physics who inspire others to continue with and enjoy their physics'. Ann Jarvie

  11. The Physics behind Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Radde Nicole E.; Hütt Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Systems Biology is a young and rapidly evolving research field, which combines experimental techniques and mathematical modeling in order to achieve a mechanistic understanding of processes underlying the regulation and evolution of living systems. Systems Biology is often associated with an Engineering approach: The purpose is to formulate a data-rich, detailed simulation model that allows to perform numerical (‘in silico’) experiments and then draw conclusions about the biologica...

  12. Semantic Web meets Integrative Biology: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huajun; Yu, Tong; Chen, Jake Y

    2013-01-01

    Integrative Biology (IB) uses experimental or computational quantitative technologies to characterize biological systems at the molecular, cellular, tissue and population levels. IB typically involves the integration of the data, knowledge and capabilities across disciplinary boundaries in order to solve complex problems. We identify a series of bioinformatics problems posed by interdisciplinary integration: (i) data integration that interconnects structured data across related biomedical domains; (ii) ontology integration that brings jargons, terminologies and taxonomies from various disciplines into a unified network of ontologies; (iii) knowledge integration that integrates disparate knowledge elements from multiple sources; (iv) service integration that build applications out of services provided by different vendors. We argue that IB can benefit significantly from the integration solutions enabled by Semantic Web (SW) technologies. The SW enables scientists to share content beyond the boundaries of applications and websites, resulting into a web of data that is meaningful and understandable to any computers. In this review, we provide insight into how SW technologies can be used to build open, standardized and interoperable solutions for interdisciplinary integration on a global basis. We present a rich set of case studies in system biology, integrative neuroscience, bio-pharmaceutics and translational medicine, to highlight the technical features and benefits of SW applications in IB.

  13. Intermediate physics for medicine and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbie, Russell K

    2015-01-01

    This classic text has been used in over 20 countries by advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in biophysics, physiology, medical physics, neuroscience, and biomedical engineering. It bridges the gap between an introductory physics course and the application of physics to the life and biomedical sciences. Extensively revised and updated, the fifth edition incorporates new developments at the interface between physics and biomedicine. New coverage includes cyclotrons, photodynamic therapy, color vision, x-ray crystallography, the electron microscope, cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation, nanomedicine, and other topics highlighted in the National Research Council report BIO2010. As with the previous edition, the first half of the text is primarily biological physics, emphasizing the use of ideas from physics to understand biology and physiology, and the second half is primarily medical physics, describing the use of physics in medicine for diagnosis (mainly imaging) and therapy. Among the m...

  14. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  15. 78 FR 25309 - Proposal Review Panel Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Proposal Review Panel Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub..., 2013 8:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Place: University of Maryland, College Park, MD. Type of Meeting: Partially Closed. Contact Person: Jean Cottam-Allen, Program Director for Physics Frontier Center; National...

  16. Chemistry meets biology in colitis-associated carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mangerich, Aswin; Dedon, Peter C.; Fox, James G.; Steven R. Tannenbaum; Wogan, Gerald N.

    2013-01-01

    The intestine comprises an exceptional venue for a dynamic and complex interplay of numerous chemical and biological processes. Here, multiple chemical and biological systems, including the intestinal tissue itself, its associated immune system, the gut microbiota, xenobiotics, and metabolites meet and interact to form a sophisticated and tightly regulated state of tissue homoeostasis. Disturbance of this homeostasis can cause inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – a chronic disease of multifacto...

  17. Brownian machinery in physics and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Hänggi, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Brownian machinery in physics and biology. - In: Noise in physical systems and 1/f fluctuations : proceedings of the 16th internat. conference, Gainesville, Fl., 22-25 Oct. 2001 / Ed.: Gijs Bosman. - New Jersey u.a. : World Scientific, 2001. - S. 397-399

  18. Protection against radiation (biological, pharmacological, chemical, physical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksonov, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological protection for astronauts from penetrating radiation on long-term space flights is discussed. The status of pharmacochemical protection, development of protective substances, medical use of protective substances, protection for spacecraft ecologic systems, adaptogens and physical conditioning, bone marrow transplants and local protection are discussed. Combined use of local protection and pharmacochemical substances is also briefly considered.

  19. Protection against radiation (biological, pharmacological, chemical, physical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksonov, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological protection for astronauts from penetrating radiation on long-term space flights is discussed. The status of pharmacochemical protection, development of protective substances, medical use of protective substances, protection for spacecraft ecologic systems, adaptogens and physical conditioning, bone marrow transplants and local protection are discussed. Combined use of local protection and pharmacochemical substances is also briefly considered.

  20. Meeting report from the first meetings of the Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Novère, Nicolas; Hucka, Michael; Anwar, Nadia; Bader, Gary D; Demir, Emek; Moodie, Stuart; Sorokin, Anatoly

    2011-11-30

    The Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE), is an initiative to coordinate the development of the various community standards and formats in computational systems biology and related fields. This report summarizes the activities pursued at the first annual COMBINE meeting held in Edinburgh on October 6-9 2010 and the first HARMONY hackathon, held in New York on April 18-22 2011. The first of those meetings hosted 81 attendees. Discussions covered both official COMBINE standards-(BioPAX, SBGN and SBML), as well as emerging efforts and interoperability between different formats. The second meeting, oriented towards software developers, welcomed 59 participants and witnessed many technical discussions, development of improved standards support in community software systems and conversion between the standards. Both meetings were resounding successes and showed that the field is now mature enough to develop representation formats and related standards in a coordinated manner.

  1. PREFACE: First International Meeting on Applied Physics (APHYS-2003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vilas, A.; Chacón, R.

    2005-01-01

    This special issue of Physica Scripta contains papers presented at the 1st International Meeting on Applied Physics (APHYS-2003), held in Badajoz (Spain), from 13th to 18th October 2003, and more specifically, selected papers presented during the conference sessions mainly on Applied Optics, Laser Physics, Ultrafast Phenomena, Optical Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Optoelectronics, Quantum Electronics and Applied Solid State Physics-Chemistry. APHYS-2003 was born as an attempt to create a new international forum on Applied Physics in Europe. Since Applied Physics is not really a branch of Physics, but the application of all the branches of Physics to the broad realms of practical problems in Science, Engineering and Industry, this conference was a truly multi and inter-disciplinary event. The organizers called for papers relating Physics with other sciences such as Biology, Chemistry, Information Science, Medicine, etc, or relating different Physics areas, and aimed at solving practical problems. In other words, the Conference was specifically interested in reports applying the techniques, the training, and the culture of Physics to research areas usually associated with other scientific and engineering disciplines. It was extremely rewarding that over 800 researchers, from over 65 countries, attended the conference, where more than 1000 research papers were presented. We feel really proud of this excellent response obtained (in number and quality), for this first edition of the conference. We are very grateful to all the members of the Organizing Committee, for the hard work done for the preparation of the Conference (which began one year before the conference start), and to the members of the International Advisory Committee, for the valuable contribution to the evaluation of submitted works. Also thank to the referees for the excellent work done in the revision of submitted papers. Finally, we would like to thank the Department of Physics of the

  2. Bridging Physics and Biology Teaching through Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskinson, Anne-Marie; Zwickl, Benjamin M; Hinko, Kathleen; Caballero, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    As the frontiers of biology become increasingly interdisciplinary, the physics education community has engaged in ongoing efforts to make physics classes more relevant to life sciences majors. These efforts are complicated by the many apparent differences between these fields, including the types of systems that each studies, the behavior of those systems, the kinds of measurements that each makes, and the role of mathematics in each field. Nonetheless, physics and biology are both fundamental sciences that rely on observations and measurements to construct models of the natural world. In the present theoretical article, we propose that efforts to bridge the teaching of these two disciplines must emphasize shared scientific practices, particularly scientific modeling. We define modeling using language common to both disciplines and highlight how an understanding of the modeling process can help reconcile apparent differences between physics and biology. We elaborate how models can be used for explanatory, pre...

  3. Perspective: Reaches of chemical physics in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruebele, Martin; Thirumalai, D

    2013-09-28

    Chemical physics as a discipline contributes many experimental tools, algorithms, and fundamental theoretical models that can be applied to biological problems. This is especially true now as the molecular level and the systems level descriptions begin to connect, and multi-scale approaches are being developed to solve cutting edge problems in biology. In some cases, the concepts and tools got their start in non-biological fields, and migrated over, such as the idea of glassy landscapes, fluorescence spectroscopy, or master equation approaches. In other cases, the tools were specifically developed with biological physics applications in mind, such as modeling of single molecule trajectories or super-resolution laser techniques. In this introduction to the special topic section on chemical physics of biological systems, we consider a wide range of contributions, all the way from the molecular level, to molecular assemblies, chemical physics of the cell, and finally systems-level approaches, based on the contributions to this special issue. Chemical physicists can look forward to an exciting future where computational tools, analytical models, and new instrumentation will push the boundaries of biological inquiry.

  4. 78 FR 29780 - Proposal Review Panel Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... Proposal Review Panel Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... for Nuclear Physics; National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230. Telephone..., Operations, Upgrades and Commissioning Overview 10:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Open--Accelerator Physics Research,...

  5. Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbie, Russell K

    2007-01-01

    Intended for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in biophysics, physiology, medical physics, cell biology, and biomedical engineering, this wide-ranging text bridges the gap between introductory physics and its application to the life and biomedical sciences. This extensively revised and updated fourth edition reflects new developments at the burgeoning interface between physics and biomedicine. Among the many topics treated are: forces in the skeletal system; fluid flow, with examples from the circulatory system; the logistic equation; scaling; transport of neutral particles by diffusion and by solvent drag; membranes and osmosis; equipartition of energy in statistical mechanics; the chemical potential and free energy; biological magnetic fields; membranes and gated channels in membranes; linear and nonlinear feedback systems; nonlinear phenomena, including biological clocks and chaotic behavior; signal analysis, noise and stochastic resonance detection of weak signals; image formation and...

  6. 76 FR 8381 - Proposal Review for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal Review for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces the following meeting:...

  7. Biology is more theoretical than physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2013-06-01

    The word "theory" is used in at least two senses--to denote a body of widely accepted laws or principles, as in "Darwinian theory" or "quantum theory," and to suggest a speculative hypothesis, often relying on mathematical analysis, that has not been experimentally confirmed. It is often said that there is no place for the second kind of theory in biology and that biology is not theoretical but based on interpretation of data. Here, ideas from a previous essay are expanded upon to suggest, to the contrary, that the second kind of theory has always played a critical role and that biology, therefore, is a good deal more theoretical than physics.

  8. Strange Bedfellows; Physical and Biological Oceanographers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, W. S.

    2002-12-01

    When I started graduate study at Scripps in 1947, both the text, "The Oceans", and the curriculum - all students took the introductory courses in physics, chemistry, biology, and geology - conspired to create awareness of the interactions among these fields. In their preface, the authors spoke of the book as "an aid to the beginner and specialist alike in the coordination of the various fields of oceanography." Harald Sverdrup, perhaps the best known physical oceanographer of his day, introduced us to the interdisciplinary organization, ICES, wrote an important paper (1953) on "the vernal blooming of phytoplankton", and together with fishery biologist O.E.Sette, launched the world renowned CalCOFI program. Another noted physical oceanographer, Henry Stommel, 1949, teamed up with biologist Gordon Riley in a major study of the quantitative ecology of plankton. At the time, physical and biological oceanographers often seemed to be engaged in the same mission. The curriculum format, with its four basic courses, spread to most other graduate programs in oceanography, but the forces of specialization also spread. While the biological oceanographers have always seen the need to understand the milieu within which their creatures function, the physicists often seemed to chafe against wasting their time on squishy subjects like biology when there were so many more important and fascinating things to study. Interactions were further complicated by the confusion between "biological oceanography" and "marine biology", and by the status of "fishery biology" which was often disdained by oceanographers of all stripes. I propose to discuss the evolution of the relationship among these fields during the 60 years since "The Oceans" was first published, concluding with the present marriage of convenience, or at least amicable co-habitation, forced by the widespread concern over the threat of global warming and the need to understand its consequences. It has become clear that

  9. Physics and applications of microfluidics in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J; Mensing, Glennys A; Walker, Glenn M

    2002-01-01

    Fluid flow at the microscale exhibits unique phenomena that can be leveraged to fabricate devices and components capable of performing functions useful for biological studies. The physics of importance to microfluidics are reviewed. Common methods of fabricating microfluidic devices and systems are described. Components, including valves, mixers, and pumps, capable of controlling fluid flow by utilizing the physics of the microscale are presented. Techniques for sensing flow characteristics are described and examples of devices and systems that perform bioanalysis are presented. The focus of this review is microscale phenomena and the use of the physics of the scale to create devices and systems that provide functionality useful to the life sciences.

  10. The Intersection of Physics and Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liphardt, Jan (University of California, Berkeley)

    2010-05-26

    In April 1953, Watson and Crick largely defined the program of 20th century biology: obtaining the blueprint of life encoded in the DNA. Fifty years later, in 2003, the sequencing of the human genome was completed. Like any major scientific breakthrough, the sequencing of the human genome raised many more questions than it answered. I'll brief you on some of the big open problems in cell and developmental biology, and I'll explain why approaches, tools, and ideas from the physical sciences are currently reshaping biological research. Super-resolution light microscopies are revealing the intricate spatial organization of cells, single-molecule methods show how molecular machines function, and new probes are clarifying the role of mechanical forces in cell and tissue function. At the same time, Physics stands to gain beautiful new problems in soft condensed matter, quantum mechanics, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  11. Getting the measure of things: the physical biology of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Sally

    2013-10-01

    In July 2013, the diverse fields of biology, physics and mathematics converged to discuss 'The Physical Biology of Stem Cells', the subject of the third annual symposium of the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, UK. Two clear themes resonated throughout the meeting: the new insights gained from advances in the acquisition and interpretation of quantitative data; and the importance of 'thinking outside the nucleus' to consider physical influences on cell fate.

  12. Quantum optics. Gravity meets quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bernhard W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity is a classical formulation but a quantum mechanical description of gravitational forces is needed, not only to investigate the coupling of classical and quantum systems but simply to give a more complete description of our physical surroundings. In this issue of Nature Photonics, Wen-Te Liao and Sven Ahrens reveal a link between quantum and gravitational physics. They propose that in the quantum-optical effect of superradiance, the world line of electromagnetic radiation is changed by the presence of a gravitational field.

  13. Physical biology of human brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eBudday

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodevelopment is a complex, dynamic process that involves a precisely orchestrated sequence of genetic, environmental, biochemical, and physical events. Developmental biology and genetics have shaped our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms during neurodevelopment. Recent studies suggest that physical forces play a central role in translating these cellular mechanisms into the complex surface morphology of the human brain. However, the precise impact of neuronal differentiation, migration, and connection on the physical forces during cortical folding remains unknown. Here we review the cellular mechanisms of neurodevelopment with a view towards surface morphogenesis, pattern selection, and evolution of shape. We revisit cortical folding as the instability problem of constrained differential growth in a multi-layered system. To identify the contributing factors of differential growth, we map out the timeline of neurodevelopment in humans and highlight the cellular events associated with extreme radial and tangential expansion. We demonstrate how computational modeling of differential growth can bridge the scales-from phenomena on the cellular level towards form and function on the organ level-to make quantitative, personalized predictions. Physics-based models can quantify cortical stresses, identify critical folding conditions, rationalize pattern selection, and predict gyral wavelengths and gyrification indices. We illustrate that physical forces can explain cortical malformations as emergent properties of developmental disorders. Combining biology and physics holds promise to advance our understanding of human brain development and enable early diagnostics of cortical malformations with the ultimate goal to improve treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia.

  14. Physical biology of human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, Silvia; Steinmann, Paul; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopment is a complex, dynamic process that involves a precisely orchestrated sequence of genetic, environmental, biochemical, and physical events. Developmental biology and genetics have shaped our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms during neurodevelopment. Recent studies suggest that physical forces play a central role in translating these cellular mechanisms into the complex surface morphology of the human brain. However, the precise impact of neuronal differentiation, migration, and connection on the physical forces during cortical folding remains unknown. Here we review the cellular mechanisms of neurodevelopment with a view toward surface morphogenesis, pattern selection, and evolution of shape. We revisit cortical folding as the instability problem of constrained differential growth in a multi-layered system. To identify the contributing factors of differential growth, we map out the timeline of neurodevelopment in humans and highlight the cellular events associated with extreme radial and tangential expansion. We demonstrate how computational modeling of differential growth can bridge the scales-from phenomena on the cellular level toward form and function on the organ level-to make quantitative, personalized predictions. Physics-based models can quantify cortical stresses, identify critical folding conditions, rationalize pattern selection, and predict gyral wavelengths and gyrification indices. We illustrate that physical forces can explain cortical malformations as emergent properties of developmental disorders. Combining biology and physics holds promise to advance our understanding of human brain development and enable early diagnostics of cortical malformations with the ultimate goal to improve treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia.

  15. Qigong meets quantum physics experiencing cosmic oneness

    CERN Document Server

    Bock-Möbius, Imke

    2012-01-01

    Quantum physicists have reached a point commonly only attained by mystics: they understand something with amazing clarity yet can only talk about it in parables and metaphors. In this context, qigong with its Daoist background is a powerful way to integrate these apparently opposing ways of apperception and understanding. It allows us to realise cosmic oneness in the activities of daily life. This book succeeds in presenting both an easily accessible outline of quantum physics and also an appreciation of mysticism beyond vagueness and obscurity. From here it describes the physical and mental movements of qigong as a way of integrating body and mind, head and heart, detailing specific exercises and outlining their rationale and effects.

  16. Pragmatic information in biology and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Juan G

    2016-03-13

    I will show how an objective definition of the concept of information and the consideration of recent results about information processing in the human brain help clarify some fundamental aspects of physics and biology. Rather than attempting to define information ab initio, I introduce the concept of interaction between material bodies as a primary concept. Two distinct categories can be identified: (i) interactions which can always be reduced to a superposition of physical interactions (forces) between elementary constituents; and (ii) interactions between complex bodies which cannot be expressed as a superposition of interactions between parts, and in which patterns and forms (in space and/or time) play the determining role. Pragmatic information is then defined as the link between a given pattern and the ensuing pattern-specific change. I will show that pragmatic information is a biological concept; it plays no active role in the purely physical domain-it only does so when a living organism intervenes. The consequences for physics (including foundations of quantum mechanics) and biology (including brain function) will be discussed. This will include speculations about three fundamental transitions, from the quantum to the classical domain, from natural inanimate to living systems, and from subhuman to human brain information-processing operations, introduced here in their direct connection with the concept of pragmatic information.

  17. Meet the Next Generation's Physics Teachers at Physics on Stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Physics on Stage is an international festival held at CERN where physics teachers from 22 countries will gather to invent new ways of making physics more interesting to students. From 6 to 11 November CERN will be flooded by 450 high school physics teachers from 22 European countries! So don't be surprised if you can't find a place to sit down in the cafeteria! People from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, The Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, The Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom will come here to show, discuss, and invent new ways of teaching physics and making the subject more interesting for school children and the general public. Indeed the lack of interest in Physics is a worrying concern ­ for example in Germany the number of first year physics students has dropped more than 30 percent in the last ten years! In the UK the number of physics graduates training to be ...

  18. Number theory meets high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Feynman amplitudes in perturbative quantum field theory are being expressed in terms of an algebra of functions, extending the familiar logarithms, and associated numbers— periods. The study of these functions (including hyperlogarithms) and numbers (like the multiple zeta values), that dates back to Leibniz and Euler, has attracted anew the interest of algebraic geometers and number theorists during the last decades. The two originally independent developments are recently coming together in an unlikely collaboration between particle physics and what were regarded as the most abstruse branches of mathematics.

  19. Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines and Musculoskeletal Injury: The WIN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James R.; DeFina, Laura F.; Leonard, David; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine; Custodio, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The United States Department of Health and Human Services disseminated physical activity guidelines for Americans in 2008. The guidelines are based on appropriate quantities of moderate-to-vigorous aerobic physical activity and resistance exercise associated with decreased morbidity and mortality risk and increased health benefits. However, increases in physical activity levels are associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal injuries. We related the amount and type of physical activity conducted on a weekly basis with the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Methods Prospective, observational study using weekly Internet tracking of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and resistance exercise behaviors and musculoskeletal injuries in 909 community-dwelling women for up to 3 years. Primary outcome was self-reported musculoskeletal injuries (total, physical activity-related, and non physical activity-related) interrupting typical daily work and/or exercise behaviors for ≥2 days or necessitating health care provider visit. Results Meeting versus not meeting physical activity guidelines was associated with more musculoskeletal injuries during physical activity (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05 – 1.85, P = 0.02), but was not associated with musculoskeletal injuries unrelated to physical activity (HR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.75 – 1.29, P = 0.92), or with musculoskeletal injuries overall (HR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.95 – 1.39, P = 0.14). Conclusions Results illustrate the risk of musculoskeletal injury with physical activity. Musculoskeletal injury risk rises with increasing physical activity. Despite this modest increase in musculoskeletal injuries, the known benefits of aerobic and resistance physical activities should not hinder physicians from encouraging patients to meet current physical activity guidelines for both moderate-to-vigorous exercise and resistance exercise behaviors with the intent of achieving health benefits

  20. Chemistry meets biology in colitis-associated carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangerich, Aswin; Dedon, Peter C.; Fox, James G.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Wogan, Gerald N.

    2015-01-01

    The intestine comprises an exceptional venue for a dynamic and complex interplay of numerous chemical and biological processes. Here, multiple chemical and biological systems, including the intestinal tissue itself, its associated immune system, the gut microbiota, xenobiotics, and metabolites meet and interact to form a sophisticated and tightly regulated state of tissue homoeostasis. Disturbance of this homeostasis can cause inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – a chronic disease of multifactorial etiology that is strongly associated with increased risk for cancer development. This review addresses recent developments in research into chemical and biological mechanisms underlying the etiology of inflammation-induced colon cancer. Beginning with a general overview of reactive chemical species generated during colonic inflammation, the mechanistic interplay between chemical and biological mediators of inflammation, the role of genetic toxicology and microbial pathogenesis in disease development are discussed. When possible, we systematically compare evidence from studies utilizing human IBD patients with experimental investigations in mice. The comparison reveals that many strong pathological and mechanistic correlates exist between mouse models of colitis-associated cancer, and the clinically relevant situation in humans. We also summarize several emerging issues in the field, such as the carcinogenic potential of novel inflammation-related DNA adducts and genotoxic microbial factors, the systemic dimension of inflammation-induced genotoxicity, and the complex role of genome maintenance mechanisms during these processes. Taken together, current evidence points to the induction of genetic and epigenetic alterations by chemical and biological inflammatory stimuli ultimately leading to cancer formation. PMID:23926919

  1. Gravitational Biology Facility on Space Station: Meeting the needs of space biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katherine; Wade, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The Gravitational Biology Facility (GBF) is a set of generic laboratory equipment needed to conduct research on Space Station Freedom (SSF), focusing on Space Biology Program science (Cell and Developmental Biology and Plant Biology). The GBF will be functional from the earliest utilization flights through the permanent manned phase. Gravitational biology research will also make use of other Life Sciences equipment on the space station as well as existing equipment developed for the space shuttle. The facility equipment will be developed based on requirements derived from experiments proposed by the scientific community to address critical questions in the Space Biology Program. This requires that the facility have the ability to house a wide variety of species, various methods of observation, and numerous methods of sample collection, preservation, and storage. The selection of the equipment will be done by the members of a scientific working group (5 members representing cell biology, 6 developmental biology, and 6 plant biology) who also provide requirements to design engineers to ensure that the equipment will meet scientific needs. All equipment will undergo extensive ground based experimental validation studies by various investigators addressing a variety of experimental questions. Equipment will be designed to be adaptable to other space platforms. The theme of the Gravitational Biology Facility effort is to provide optimal and reliable equipment to answer the critical questions in Space Biology as to the effects of gravity on living systems.

  2. Bridging Physics and Biology Using Resistance and Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    When teaching physics, it is often difficult to get biology-oriented students to see the relevance of physics. A complaint often heard is that biology students are required to take physics for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as part of a "weeding out" process, but that they don't feel like they need physics for biology.…

  3. Bridging Physics and Biology Using Resistance and Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    When teaching physics, it is often difficult to get biology-oriented students to see the relevance of physics. A complaint often heard is that biology students are required to take physics for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as part of a "weeding out" process, but that they don't feel like they need physics for biology. Despite…

  4. Bridging Physics and Biology Using Resistance and Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    When teaching physics, it is often difficult to get biology-oriented students to see the relevance of physics. A complaint often heard is that biology students are required to take physics for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as part of a "weeding out" process, but that they don't feel like they need physics for biology. Despite…

  5. External Meeting: Geneva University - Particle physics seminar

    CERN Document Server

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 22 June 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Indication of νμ→νe appearance in the T2K experiment Indication de la transition νμ→νe dans l’expérience T2K Par Prof. Alain Blondel - DPNC, Université de Genève The T2K neutrino experiment in Japan has searched for νμ → νe appearance in data taken since the start-up in 2010 till11 March 2011. Six events pass all selection criteria at the far detector situated at 295 km while 1.5±0.3(syst.) would be expected if θ13=0 . This is equivalent to an indication of a non zero value of θ13 at a significance of 2.5σ. This process is particu...

  6. Modelling biological complexity: a physical scientist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, Peter V; Fowler, Philip W

    2005-09-22

    We discuss the modern approaches of complexity and self-organization to understanding dynamical systems and how these concepts can inform current interest in systems biology. From the perspective of a physical scientist, it is especially interesting to examine how the differing weights given to philosophies of science in the physical and biological sciences impact the application of the study of complexity. We briefly describe how the dynamics of the heart and circadian rhythms, canonical examples of systems biology, are modelled by sets of nonlinear coupled differential equations, which have to be solved numerically. A major difficulty with this approach is that all the parameters within these equations are not usually known. Coupled models that include biomolecular detail could help solve this problem. Coupling models across large ranges of length- and time-scales is central to describing complex systems and therefore to biology. Such coupling may be performed in at least two different ways, which we refer to as hierarchical and hybrid multiscale modelling. While limited progress has been made in the former case, the latter is only beginning to be addressed systematically. These modelling methods are expected to bring numerous benefits to biology, for example, the properties of a system could be studied over a wider range of length- and time-scales, a key aim of systems biology. Multiscale models couple behaviour at the molecular biological level to that at the cellular level, thereby providing a route for calculating many unknown parameters as well as investigating the effects at, for example, the cellular level, of small changes at the biomolecular level, such as a genetic mutation or the presence of a drug. The modelling and simulation of biomolecular systems is itself very computationally intensive; we describe a recently developed hybrid continuum-molecular model, HybridMD, and its associated molecular insertion algorithm, which point the way towards the

  7. Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet

  8. Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet

  9. Russian science readings (chemistry, physics, biology)

    CERN Document Server

    Light, L

    1949-01-01

    Some years' experience in teaching Russian to working scientists who had already acquired the rudiments of the grammar convinced me of the need for a reader of the present type that would smooth the path of those wishing to study Russian scientific literature in the original. Although the subject matter comprises what I have described for convenience as chemistry, physics and biology, it could be read with equal profit by those engaged in any branch of pure or applied science. All the passages are taken from school textbooks, and acknowledgements are due to the authors of the works listed at the foot of the contents page.

  10. 75 FR 62891 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee ( 66). Date...: Dr. Morris L. Aizenman, Senior Science Associate, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences...

  11. 75 FR 29369 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee ( 66). Date..., Senior Science Associate, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Room 1005, National Science...

  12. 77 FR 16076 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee (66). Date.... Aizenman, Senior Science Associate, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Room 1005, National...

  13. 77 FR 42768 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee (MPSAC). 66..., Senior Science Associate, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Room 1005, National Science...

  14. 76 FR 64123 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee (66). Date... Associate, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Room 1005, National Science Foundation, 4201...

  15. Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We invite you to the Town Meeting on the role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in supporting basic and applied research in Plasma Physics in the U.S. The overarching goal of NSF is to promote the progress of science and to enable training of the next generation of scientists and engineers at US colleges and universities. In this context, the role of the NSF Physics Division in leading the nearly 20 year old NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering serves as an example of the long history of NSF support for basic plasma physics research. Yet, the NSF interest in maintaining a healthy university research base in plasma sciences extends across the Foundation. A total of five NSF Divisions are participating in the most recent Partnership solicitation, and a host of other multi-disciplinary and core programs provide opportunities for scientists to perform research on applications of plasma physics to Space & Solar Physics, Astrophysics, Accelerator Science, Material Science, Plasma Medicine, and many sub-disciplines within Engineering. This Town Meeting will provide a chance to discuss the full range of relevant NSF funding opportunities, and to begin a conversation on the present and future role of NSF in stewarding basic plasma science and engineering research at US colleges and universities. We would like to particularly encourage early career scientists and graduate students to participate in this Town Meeting, though everyone is invited to join what we hope to be a lively discussion.

  16. Fractal landscapes in physics and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene Stanley, H.

    1992-07-01

    This article is based upon the Thirtieth Saha Memorial Lecture (delivered on 4 January 1992) and the Fourth Bose Memorial Lecture (delivered on 5 January 1992). I felt deeply touched to have been so honored by invitations to deliver these lectures, especially in view of the list of illustrious predecessors who have held this honor. At the outset I wish to acknowledge that almost all of my work is connected in one way or another to random walks, a topic about which I learned most from the classic 1943 review of the great Indian physicist S. Chandrasekar. I also wish to acknowledge my personal debt to the great culture and music of India, and to the many Indian scholars who have taught me their unique insights into the mysteries of physics. In particular, I wish to dedicate this work to the late Bengali genius Satyajit Ray, whose recent passing has left the world immeasurably poorer. It was my dream while in Calcutta to have the opportunity of meeting this hero of mine, but his ill health at that time prevented our meeting.

  17. Physical properties of biological entities: an introduction to the ontology of physics for biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Cook

    Full Text Available As biomedical investigators strive to integrate data and analyses across spatiotemporal scales and biomedical domains, they have recognized the benefits of formalizing languages and terminologies via computational ontologies. Although ontologies for biological entities-molecules, cells, organs-are well-established, there are no principled ontologies of physical properties-energies, volumes, flow rates-of those entities. In this paper, we introduce the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB, a reference ontology of classical physics designed for annotating biophysical content of growing repositories of biomedical datasets and analytical models. The OPB's semantic framework, traceable to James Clerk Maxwell, encompasses modern theories of system dynamics and thermodynamics, and is implemented as a computational ontology that references available upper ontologies. In this paper we focus on the OPB classes that are designed for annotating physical properties encoded in biomedical datasets and computational models, and we discuss how the OPB framework will facilitate biomedical knowledge integration.

  18. The common extremalities in biology and physics maximum energy dissipation principle in chemistry, biology, physics and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This book is the first unified systemic description of dissipative phenomena, taking place in biology, and non-dissipative (conservative) phenomena, which is more relevant to physics. Fully updated and revised, this new edition extends our understanding of nonlinear phenomena in biology and physics from the extreme / optimal perspective. The first book to provide understanding of physical phenomena from a biological perspective and biological phenomena from a physical perspectiveDiscusses emerging fields and analysisProvides examples

  19. Physics and Biology Collaborate to Color the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis W. C.

    2013-01-01

    To understand how life works, it is essential to understand physics and chemistry. Most biologists have a clear notion of where chemistry fits into their life sciences research and teaching. Although we are physical beings, physics does not always find a place in the biology curriculum. Physics informs and enlightens biology in myriad dimensions,…

  20. Physics and Biology Collaborate to Color the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis W. C.

    2013-01-01

    To understand how life works, it is essential to understand physics and chemistry. Most biologists have a clear notion of where chemistry fits into their life sciences research and teaching. Although we are physical beings, physics does not always find a place in the biology curriculum. Physics informs and enlightens biology in myriad dimensions,…

  1. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  2. "Physics and Life" - Teachers Meet Scientists at Major EIROforum Event [

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    More than 400 selected delegates from 22 European countries will take part in "Physics on Stage 3" , organised by the EIROforum [1] research organisations (CERN, EFDA, EMBL, ESA, ESO, ESRF, ILL) at the ESA ESTEC site (Noordwijk, The Netherlands). It is the culmination of a year-long educational programme and is a central event during the EC-sponsored European Science and Technology Week (November 8-15, 2003). Following the vastly successful preceeding events in 2000 and 2002, the main theme this year is "Physics and Life", reflecting the decision to broaden the Physics on Stage activities to encompass more of the natural sciences within an interdisciplinary approach. As before, European teachers, scientists, curricula organisers and others connected to the national education systems in Europe will gather with the main goal of exploring solutions to stimulate the interest of young people in science, by means of exciting and innovative teaching methods and materials. The rich one-week programme has many components: spectacular and original performances by students and professional actors, intensive encounters at a central fair where each country will present the latest developments from its teaching community at their stands, workshops about a host of crucial themes related to the central mission of this programme, seminars where EIROforum scientists and experienced high school teachers get together to discuss new teaching opportunities based on the latest results from front-line research projects at Europe's leading science centres, as well as a publishers fair that will also serve as an international exchange for new educational materials. A mystery cultural event will surprise everyone with its originality. And last but not least, the annual European Science Teaching Awards - the highest distinction in this field - will be presented at the end of the meeting. "Physics on Stage" is a joint project organised by EIROforum, together with the European Physical Society

  3. Biological Movement and Laws of Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latash, Mark L

    2017-07-01

    Living systems may be defined as systems able to organize new, biology-specific, laws of physics and modify their parameters for specific tasks. Examples include the force-length muscle dependence mediated by the stretch reflex, and the control of movements with modification of the spatial referent coordinates for salient performance variables. Low-dimensional sets of referent coordinates at a task level are transformed to higher-dimensional sets at lower hierarchical levels in a way that ensures stability of performance. Stability of actions can be controlled independently of the actions (e.g., anticipatory synergy adjustments). Unintentional actions reflect relaxation processes leading to drifts of corresponding referent coordinates in the absence of changes in external load. Implications of this general framework for movement disorders, motor development, motor skill acquisition, and even philosophy are discussed.

  4. Biological Physics : Poincaré seminar

    CERN Document Server

    Bio-physique : séminaire Poincaré

    2011-01-01

    This new volume in the Poincaré Seminar Series, describing recent developments at the interface between physics and biology, is directed towards a broad audience of physicists, biologists, and mathematicians. Both the theoretical and experimental aspects are covered, and particular care is devoted to the pedagogical nature of the presentations. The first survey article, by Jean-Francois Joanny and Jacques Prost, describes the theoretical advances made in the study of "active gels", with applications to liquid crystals and cell motility. Jasper van der Gucht and Cécile Sykes then report on recent advances made with biomimetic model systems in the understanding of cytokinesis. The next article, by Jonathon Howard, presents several molecular models for motor proteins, which are compared with experimental results for kinesin. David Lacoste and Kirone Mallick then show theoretically that similar ratchet models of motor proteins naturally satisfy a fundamental time-reversal symmetry, the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuat...

  5. The universal numbers. From Biology to Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    I will explain how the mathematicians have discovered the universal numbers, or abstract computer, and I will explain some abstract biology, mainly self-reproduction and embryogenesis. Then I will explain how and why, and in which sense, some of those numbers can dream and why their dreams can glue together and must, when we assume computationalism in cognitive science, generate a phenomenological physics, as part of a larger phenomenological theology (in the sense of the greek theologians). The title should have been "From Biology to Physics, through the Phenomenological Theology of the Universal Numbers", if that was not too long for a title. The theology will consist mainly, like in some (neo)platonist greek-indian-chinese tradition, in the truth about numbers' relative relations, with each others, and with themselves. The main difference between Aristotle and Plato is that Aristotle (especially in its common and modern christian interpretation) makes reality WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get: reality is what we observe, measure, i.e. the natural material physical science) where for Plato and the (rational) mystics, what we see might be only the shadow or the border of something else, which might be non physical (mathematical, arithmetical, theological, …). Since Gödel, we know that Truth, even just the Arithmetical Truth, is vastly bigger than what the machine can rationally justify. Yet, with Church's thesis, and the mechanizability of the diagonalizations involved, machines can apprehend this and can justify their limitations, and get some sense of what might be true beyond what they can prove or justify rationally. Indeed, the incompleteness phenomenon introduces a gap between what is provable by some machine and what is true about that machine, and, as Gödel saw already in 1931, the existence of that gap is accessible to the machine itself, once it is has enough provability abilities. Incompleteness separates truth and provable, and machines can

  6. Some physics problems in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialek, William

    2007-03-01

    Most of the interesting things that happen in living organisms require interactions among many components, and it is convenient to think of these as a ``network'' of interactions. We use this language at the level of single molecules (the network of interactions among amino acids that determine protein structure), single cells (the network of protein-DNA interactions responsible for the regulation of gene expression) and complex multicellular organisms (the networks of neurons in our brain). In this talk I'll try to look at two very different kinds of theoretical physics problems that arise in thinking about such networks. The first problems are phenomenological: Given what our experimentalists friends can measure, can we generate a global view of network function and dynamics? I'll argue that maximum entropy methods can be useful here, and show how such methods have been used in very recent work on networks of neurons, enzymes, genes and (in disguise) amino acids. In this line of reasoning there are of course interesting connections to statistical mechanics, and we'll see that natural statistical mechanics questions about the underlying models actually teach us something about how the real biological system works, in ways that will be tested through new experiments. In the second half of the talk I'll ask if there are principles from which we might actually be able to predict the structure and dynamics of biological networks. I'll focus on optimization principles, in particular the optimization of information flow in transcriptional regulation. Even setting up these arguments forces us to think critically about our understanding of the signals, specificity and noise in these systems, all current topics of research. Although we don't know if we have the right principles, trying to work out the consequences of such optimization again suggests new experiments.

  7. 1st Karl Schwarzschild Meeting on Gravitational Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, Matthias; Mureika, Jonas; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings collect the selected contributions of participants of the First Karl Schwarzschild Meeting on Gravitational Physics, held in Frankfurt, Germany to celebrate the 140th anniversary of Schwarzschild's birth. They are grouped into 4 main themes: I. The Life and Work of Karl Schwarzschild; II. Black Holes in Classical General Relativity, Numerical Relativity, Astrophysics, Cosmology, and Alternative Theories of Gravity; III. Black Holes in Quantum Gravity and String Theory; IV. Other Topics in Contemporary Gravitation. Inspired by the foundational principle ``By acknowledging the past, we open a route to the future",  the week-long meeting, envisioned as a forum for exchange between scientists from all locations and levels of education, drew participants from 15 countries across 4 continents. In addition to plenary talks from leading researchers, a special focus on young talent was provided, a feature underlined by the Springer Prize for the best student and junior presentations.

  8. 77 FR 21812 - Biological Science Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting: Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Biological Science Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting: Correction Summary: The National Science Foundation... Biological Sciences Advisory Committee, 1110. This notice is to correct the year of the meeting...

  9. 76 FR 72724 - Advisory Committee For Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee For Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory... meeting: Name: Biological Sciences Advisory Committee ( 1110). Date and Time: December 15, 2011; 8 a.m....

  10. Physics with illustrative examples from medicine and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Benedek, George B

    Physics: with illustrative examples from medicine and biology is a three-volume set of textbooks in introductory physics written at the calculus level and designed primarily for students with career objectives in the life sciences.

  11. To Meet or Not To Meet Physical vs. Virtual Configuration Control Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will define the CCB, discuss its functions and members. We will look into traditional processes of managing change control via the CCB meeting and advanced practices utilizing enhanced product tools and technologies. Well step through a summary of the feedback from the community of CM professionals at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center of best practices as well as pros and cons for facilitating both a physical CCB and managing stakeholder approvals in a virtual environment. Attendees will come away with current industry strategies to determine if process for managing change control and approvals can be streamlined within their local work environments.

  12. The Physics of Proteins An Introduction to Biological Physics and Molecular Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chan, Winnie S

    2010-01-01

    Physics and the life sciences have established new connections within the past few decades, resulting in biological physics as an established subfield with strong groups working in many physics departments. These interactions between physics and biology form a two-way street with physics providing new tools and concepts for understanding life, while biological systems can yield new insights into the physics of complex systems. To address the challenges of this interdisciplinary area, The Physics of Proteins: An Introduction to Biological Physics and Molecular Biophysics is divided into three interconnected sections. In Parts I and II, early chapters introduce the terminology and describe the main biological systems that physicists will encounter. Similarities between biomolecules, glasses, and solids are stressed with an emphasis on the fundamental concepts of living systems. The central section (Parts III and IV) delves into the dynamics of complex systems. A main theme is the realization that biological sys...

  13. BOOK REVIEW Handbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology Handbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakov, Slavik

    2010-11-01

    This is a multi-author handbook (66 authors) aiming to describe various applications of physics to medicine and biology, from anatomy and physiology to medical equipment. This unusual reference book has 44 chapters organized in seven sections: 1. Anatomical physics; 2. Physics of perception; 3. Biomechanics; 4. Electrical physics; 5. Diagnostic physics; 6. Physics of accessory medicine; 7. Physics of bioengineering. Each chapter has separate page numbering, which is inconvenient but understandable with the number of authors. Similarly there is some variation in the emphasis of chapters: for some the emphasis is more technical and for others clinical. Each chapter has a separate list of references. The handbook includes hundreds of diagrams, images and tables, making it a useful tool for both medical physicists/engineers and other medical/biology specialists. The first section (about 40 pages) includes five chapters on physics of the cell membrane; protein signaling; cell biology and biophysics of the cell membrane; cellular thermodynamics; action potential transmission and volume conduction. The physics of these is well explained and illustrated with clear diagrams and formulae, so it could be a suitable reference for physicists/engineers. The chapters on cellular thermodynamics and action potential transmission have a very good balance of technical/clinical content. The second section (about 85 pages) includes six chapters on medical decision making; senses; somatic senses: touch and pain; hearing; vision; electroreception. Again these are well illustrated and a suitable reference for physicists/engineers. The chapter on hearing stands out with good balance and treatment of material, but some other chapters contain less physics and are close to typical physiological explanations. One could query the inclusion of the chapter on medical decision making, which also needs more detail. The third section (about 80 pages) includes eight chapters on biomechanics

  14. Human activities to meet the diverse needs in the use of physical exercises - the basis of the mechanism of self-development of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutula Vasilij Afanas'evich

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The features of social activities to meet the needs of people. A scheme for self-regulatory process of the people to respond to biological, social and biosocial needs. It is shown that the diversity of human needs is divided into three groups: biologically and socially determined needs, the needs-based biosocial nature. It is shown that in a society based on competitive interaction of people, a system of relations. These relationships are the basis for the development of physical culture. It is noted that this process acts as a public evaluation mechanism for the selection of the variety of social phenomena. At the heart of the process of competitive interactions between them reflects the process of emergence and development of socially significant events. These phenomena are different forms of social manifestations of physical culture (physical education, sport, physical recreation, physical rehabilitation and adaptive physical education.

  15. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation...

  16. 75 FR 47605 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to...

  17. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. In the...

  18. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... DNA Viruses, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  19. Joint annual meeting of the Swiss Physical and the Society Austrian Physical Society

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The next annual meeting, hosted by CERN, will take place from 21 - 25 August 2017 in Genève at two different locations. Starting at CERN on 21st with internal meetings of some of the participating societies, the 22nd will be dedicated to plenary and invited talks and more (see below). We will then move to the Centre International de Conférences de Genève (CICG) on 23 - 25 August where further plenary talks and all topical sessions will take place. The meeting is organised - as every two years - as a joint meeting with the Austrian Physical Society (ÖPG) and the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy (SSAA). The Swiss Institute of Particle Physics (CHIPP) will participate additionally to their usual 2-year rhythm. We also welcome for the first time the NCCR MARVEL (Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials). They all together guarantee an exciting conference covering physics at its best. Many thanks go to CERN for their generous help and support with the organisation.

  20. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Stirling Physics Meeting 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Michael

    1999-09-01

    The 25th Annual Stirling Physics meeting took place on Thursday 20 May on a warm sunny day when the country setting of Stirling Campus could be seen at its best. A total of 225 participants from all sectors of physics education attended. There was an opportunity to view and discuss with exhibitors a wide range of state-of-the-art equipment and teaching materials both before and after the meeting. The theme of the meeting was `Maintaining Standards'. Gemmel Millar, Scottish Branch Secretary acting as Chairperson for the morning session and in anticipation of the first speaker, wondered if a new unit qualification, the `Planck' might be introduced. Half units would then be `Short Plancks' and how many Short Plancks must there be in a unit? Great stuff. Scottish Qualifications Authority Hugh McGill began with a brief history and description of the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Born on 1 April 1997 (a light frisson of amusement swept through the audience) it was a unification between SEB and SCOTVEC and has a range of responsibilities covering schools, further and higher education. It oversees Standard and Higher grades, HNC and HND and SVQs, and it has 500 full-time employees as well as some 13500 appointees who act as examiners, assessors and verifiers etc, without whom its remit could not be carried out. The committee structure of the Board was outlined, one each for national and higher national qualifications and a third for Scottish vocational qualifications. These will be served by a proposed 19 Advisory Groups. The Science Advisory Group will be the key body for advising SQA on strategic developments to ensure that qualifications meet the needs of both client groups and end users. A consultation paper `Added Value To Learning' was referred to, in which all qualifications available in Scotland are given parity of esteem on a rising 11-point scale. Mr McGill stated that standards would be best maintained by ensuring continuity in procedures developed over

  1. Minutes of meeting of Biology Division members concerning P-10 problems, July 18, 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getzendaner, M.E.

    1950-08-08

    This document discusses a meeting held to inform members of the Biology Division of the status of P-10 problems, to exchange ideas on methods of attacking these problems, and to consider new problems.

  2. 78 FR 17234 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical Sciences and Physical Sciences #66; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical Sciences and Physical Sciences 66; Notice of Meeting In accordance with... announces the following meeting. Name: Advisory Committee for Mathematical Sciences and Physical Sciences... Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230...

  3. 78 FR 37590 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences #66; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences 66; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the... the following meeting. Name: Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences ( 66). Dates..., Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington...

  4. 76 FR 14996 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee ( 66). Date/Time: April 7... Science Associate, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Room 1005, National Science...

  5. 77 FR 64831 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee (66). Date/Time: November 8.... Suskin, Acting Deputy Assistant Director, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Room 1005...

  6. IFPA meeting 2016 workshop report I: Genomic communication, bioinformatics, trophoblast biology and transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Christiane; Baker, Julie C; Blundell, Cassidy; Chavez, Shawn L; Carbone, Lucia; Chamley, Larry; Hannibal, Roberta L; Illsley, Nick; Kurre, Peter; Laurent, Louise C; McKenzie, Charles; Morales-Prieto, Diana; Pantham, Priyadarshini; Paquette, Alison; Powell, Katie; Price, Nathan; Rao, Balaji M; Sadovsky, Yoel; Salomon, Carlos; Tuteja, Geetu; Wilson, Samantha; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2017-01-11

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2016 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered innovative technologies applied to new and traditional areas of placental research: 1) genomic communication; 2) bioinformatics; 3) trophoblast biology and pathology; 4) placental transport systems.

  7. Stochastic Physics, Complex Systems and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In complex systems, the interplay between nonlinear and stochastic dynamics gives rise to an evolution process in Darwinian sense with punctuated equilibrium, random "mutations" and "adaptations". The emergent discrete states in such a system, i.e., attractors, have natural robustness against both internal and external perturbations. Epigenetic states of a biological cell, a mesoscopic nonlinear stochastic open biochemical system, could be understood through such a framework.

  8. Physical aspects of biological activity and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are organelles at the boundary between chemical-genetic and physical processes in living cells. Mitochondria supply energy and provide conditions for physical mechanisms. Protons transferred across the inner mitochondrial membrane diffuse into cytosol and form a zone of a strong static electric field changing water into quasi-elastic medium that loses viscosity damping properties. Mitochondria and microtubules form a unique cooperating system in the cell. Microtubules are electrical polar structures that make possible non-linear transformation of random excitations into coherent oscillations and generation of coherent electrodynamic field. Mitochondria supply energy, may condition non-linear properties and low damping of oscillations. Electrodynamic activity might have essential significance for material transport, organization, intra- and inter-cellular interactions, and information transfer. Physical processes in cancer cell are disturbed due to suppression of oxidative metabolism in mitochodria (Warburg effect). Water ordering level in the cell is decreased, excitation of microtubule electric polar oscilations diminished, damping increased, and non-linear energy transformation shifted towards the linear region. Power and coherence of the generated electrodynamic field are reduced. Electromagnetic activity of healthy and cancer cells may display essential differences. Local invasion and metastastatic growth may strongly depend on disturbed electrodynamic activity. Nanotechnological measurements may disclose yet unknown properties and parameters of electrodynamic oscillations and other physical processes in healthy and cancer cells.

  9. 76 FR 55397 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... the Laboratory of Method Development, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and...

  10. 78 FR 60884 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... of Retroviruses and Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines...

  11. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center...

  12. 75 FR 59729 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... for protective antigen-based anthrax vaccines for a post-exposure prophylaxis indication using the...

  13. 75 FR 55617 - Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory...: Name: Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences ( 1110). Date and Time: October 6, 2010; 8:30 a.m....

  14. 75 FR 10507 - Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal Advisory Committee...: Name: Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences (1110). Date/Time: March 17, 2010; 8:30 a.m. to 5...

  15. 78 FR 19492 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Formal Meetings Between FDA and Biosimilar Biological Product...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... and Biosimilar Biological Product Sponsors or Applicants; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Formal Meetings Between the FDA and Biosimilar... biosimilar biological products regulated by the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) and the...

  16. Free Will, Physics, Biology, and the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christof

    This introduction reviews the traditionally conceived question of free will from the point of view of a physicist turned neurobiologist. I discuss the quantum mechanic evidence that has brought us to the view that the world, including our brains, is not completely determined by physics and that even very simple nervous systems are subject to deterministic chaos. However, it is unclear how consciousness or any other extra-physical agent could take advantage of this situation to effect a change in the world, except possibly by realizing one quantum possibility over another. While the brain is a highly nonlinear and stochastic system, it remains unclear to what extent individual quantum effects can affect its output behavior. Finally, I discuss several cognitive neuroscience experiments suggesting that in many instances, our brain decides prior to our conscious mind, and that we often ignorant of our brain's decisions.

  17. Nuclear Physics meets Medicine and Biology: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    F. Ballarini, F; S. Bortolussi, S; P. Bruschi, P; A.M. Clerici, A M; A. De Bari, A; P. Dionigi, P; C. Ferrari, C; M.A. Gadan, M A; N. Protti, N; S. Stella, S; C. Zonta, C; A. Zonta, A; S. Altieri, S

    2010-01-01

    BNCT is a tumour treatment based on thermal-neutron irradiation of tissues enriched with 10B, which according to the 10B(n, )7Li reaction produces particles with high Linear Energy Transfer and short range. Since this treatment can deliver a therapeutic tumour dose sparing normal tissues, BNCT represents an alternative for diffuse tumours and metastases, which show poor response to surgery and photontherapy. In 2001 and 2003, in Pavia BNCT was applied to an isolated liver, which was infused with boron, explanted, irradiated and re-implanted. A new project was then initiated for lung tumours, developing a protocol for Boron concentration measurements and performing organ-dose Monte Carlo calculations; in parallel, radiobiology studies are ongoing to characterize the BNCT effects down to cellular level. After a brief introduction, herein we will present the main activities ongoing in Pavia including the radiobiological ones, which are under investigation not only experimentally but also theoretically, basing on...

  18. When Biology & Physics Meet Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    Politicians have come to realize the necessity of uniting the efforts of scientists. This is clear from the address of the President of Georgia E Shevardnadze to the JINR scientists : "The idea of collective participation in fundamental research is not only valuable per se. It is another opportunity for harmonious co-operation of representatives of different peoples and scientific schools in the single process of evolution of the world civilisation".

  19. When Biology & Physics Meet Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    Politicians have come to realize the necessity of uniting the efforts of scientists. This is clear from the address of the President of Georgia Eduard Shevardnadze to the JINR scientists: "The idea of collective participation in fundamental research is not only valuable per se. It is another opportunity for harmonious co-operation of representatives of different peoples and scientific schools in the single process of evolution of the world civilization."

  20. Robotics and Biology: Lets get Physical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choset, Howie

    Our research group investigates the core fundamentals of locomotion as it exists in biology and as it applies to locomoting robotic systems. Initially, our work advanced techniques found in geometric mechanics to design cyclic controllers, often called gaits, for snake robots, highly articulated mechanisms that can thread through tightly packed spaces to access locations people cannot. We had considerable success in designing snake robot gaits, but found our systems stymied in terrains characterized by sandy substrates. Sandy terrains and other granular media pose a challenge to snake robots because it is unclear how the mechanism interacts with environment: we cannot simply assume the robot is on hard-ground nor in a fluid. Simulating granular interactions can prove to be computationally intractable for real-time use on the robots. Therefore, we developed experimental tools that allowed us to sieve out models of the locomoting systems operating on granular media. We were then able to bring these models into harmony with the elegant formulation of our geometric mechanics approach. This allowed us to derive adaptive controllers for our snake robots in sandy terrains, and enabled us to gain deeper insight into of how biological systems move over similar terrains as well.

  1. Brownian ratchets in physics and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Martin

    1997-06-01

    Thirty years ago Feynman et al. presented a paradox in the Lectures on Physics: an imagined device could let Brownian motion do work by allowing it in one direction and blocking it in the opposite direction. In the chapter Feynman et al. eventually show that such ratcheting can only be achieved if there is, in compliance with the basic conservation laws, some energy input from an external source. Now that technology is going into ever smaller dimensions, ratcheting Brownian motion seems to be a real possibility in nanotechnological applications. Furthermore, Brownian motion plays an essential role in the action of motor proteins (individual molecules that convert chemical energy into motion).

  2. Integrated modelling of physical, chemical and biological weather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurganskiy, Alexander

    Integrated modelling of physical, chemical and biological weather has been widely considered during the recent decades. Such modelling includes interactions of atmospheric physics and chemical/biological aerosol concentrations. Emitted aerosols are subject to atmospheric transport, dispersion...... and deposition, but in turn they impact the radiation as well as cloud and precipitation formation. The present study focuses on birch pollen modelling as well as on physical and chemical weather with emphasis on black carbon (BC) aerosol modelling. The Enviro-HIRLAM model has been used for the study...

  3. Hydraulic fracturing in cells and tissues: fracking meets cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-12-06

    The animal body is largely made of water. A small fraction of body water is freely flowing in blood and lymph, but most of it is trapped in hydrogels such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), the cytoskeleton, and chromatin. Besides providing a medium for biological molecules to diffuse, water trapped in hydrogels plays a fundamental mechanical role. This role is well captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which explains how any deformation applied to a hydrogel causes pressure gradients and water flows, much like compressing a sponge squeezes water out of it. Here we review recent evidence that poroelastic pressures and flows can fracture essential biological barriers such as the nuclear envelope, the cellular cortex, and epithelial layers. This type of fracture is known in engineering literature as hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking'.

  4. TRIENNIAL LACTATION SYMPOSIUM: Nutrigenomics in livestock: Systems biology meets nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loor, J J; Vailati-Riboni, M; McCann, J C; Zhou, Z; Bionaz, M

    2015-12-01

    The advent of high-throughput technologies to study an animal's genome, proteome, and metabolome (i.e., "omics" tools) constituted a setback to the use of reductionism in livestock research. More recent development of "next-generation sequencing" tools was instrumental in allowing in-depth studies of the microbiome in the rumen and other sections of the gastrointestinal tract. Omics, along with bioinformatics, constitutes the foundation of modern systems biology, a field of study widely used in model organisms (e.g., rodents, yeast, humans) to enhance understanding of the complex biological interactions occurring within cells and tissues at the gene, protein, and metabolite level. Application of systems biology concepts is ideal for the study of interactions between nutrition and physiological state with tissue and cell metabolism and function during key life stages of livestock species, including the transition from pregnancy to lactation, in utero development, or postnatal growth. Modern bioinformatic tools capable of discerning functional outcomes and biologically meaningful networks complement the ever-increasing ability to generate large molecular, microbial, and metabolite data sets. Simultaneous visualization of the complex intertissue adaptations to physiological state and nutrition can now be discerned. Studies to understand the linkages between the microbiome and the absorptive epithelium using the integrative approach are emerging. We present examples of new knowledge generated through the application of functional analyses of transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data sets encompassing nutritional management of dairy cows, pigs, and poultry. Published work to date underscores that the integrative approach across and within tissues may prove useful for fine-tuning nutritional management of livestock. An important goal during this process is to uncover key molecular players involved in the organismal adaptations to nutrition.

  5. Synthetic toxicology: where engineering meets biology and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Markus; Pei, Lei

    2011-03-01

    This article examines the implications of synthetic biology (SB) for toxicological sciences. Starting with a working definition of SB, we describe its current subfields, namely, DNA synthesis, the engineering of DNA-based biological circuits, minimal genome research, attempts to construct protocells and synthetic cells, and efforts to diversify the biochemistry of life through xenobiology. Based on the most important techniques, tools, and expected applications in SB, we describe the ramifications of SB for toxicology under the label of synthetic toxicology. We differentiate between cases where SB offers opportunities for toxicology and where SB poses challenges for toxicology. Among the opportunities, we identified the assistance of SB to construct novel toxicity testing platforms, define new toxicity-pathway assays, explore the potential of SB to improve in vivo biotransformation of toxins, present novel biosensors developed by SB for environmental toxicology, discuss cell-free protein synthesis of toxins, reflect on the contribution to toxic use reduction, and the democratization of toxicology through do-it-yourself biology. Among the identified challenges for toxicology, we identify synthetic toxins and novel xenobiotics, biosecurity and dual-use considerations, the potential bridging of toxic substances and infectious agents, and do-it-yourself toxin production.

  6. DEGRO 2009. Radiation oncology - medical physics - radiation biology. Abstracts; DEGRO 2009. Radioonkologie - Medizinische Physik - Strahlenbiologie. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    The special volume of the journal covers the abstracts of the DEGRO 2009 meeting on radiation oncology, medical physics, and radiation biology, covering the following topics: seldom diseases, gastrointestinal tumors, radiation reactions and radiation protection, medical care and science, central nervous system, medical physics, the non-parvicellular lung carcinomas, ear-nose-and throat, target-oriented radiotherapy plus ''X'', radio-oncology - young academics, lymphomas, mammary glands, modern radiotherapy, life quality and palliative radiotherapy, radiotherapy of the prostate carcinoma, imaging for planning and therapy, the digital documentation in clinics and practical experiences, NMR imaging and tomography, hadrons - actual status in Germany, urinal tract oncology, radiotoxicity.

  7. The 'atom-splitting' moment of synthetic biology: Nuclear physics and synthetic biology share common features

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Alex J; Kleinert, Aleysia; Verdier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology and nuclear physics share many commonalities in terms of public perception and funding. Synthetic biologists could learn valuable lessons from the history of the atomic bomb and nuclear power.

  8. Toward university modeling instruction--biology: adapting curricular frameworks from physics to biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthey, Seth; Brewe, Eric

    2013-06-01

    University Modeling Instruction (UMI) is an approach to curriculum and pedagogy that focuses instruction on engaging students in building, validating, and deploying scientific models. Modeling Instruction has been successfully implemented in both high school and university physics courses. Studies within the physics education research (PER) community have identified UMI's positive impacts on learning gains, equity, attitudinal shifts, and self-efficacy. While the success of this pedagogical approach has been recognized within the physics community, the use of models and modeling practices is still being developed for biology. Drawing from the existing research on UMI in physics, we describe the theoretical foundations of UMI and how UMI can be adapted to include an emphasis on models and modeling for undergraduate introductory biology courses. In particular, we discuss our ongoing work to develop a framework for the first semester of a two-semester introductory biology course sequence by identifying the essential basic models for an introductory biology course sequence.

  9. Introductory physics in biological context: An approach to improve introductory physics for life science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Catherine H.; Heller, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    We describe restructuring the introductory physics for life science students (IPLS) course to better support these students in using physics to understand their chosen fields. Our courses teach physics using biologically rich contexts. Specifically, we use examples in which fundamental physics contributes significantly to understanding a biological system to make explicit the value of physics to the life sciences. This requires selecting the course content to reflect the topics most relevant to biology while maintaining the fundamental disciplinary structure of physics. In addition to stressing the importance of the fundamental principles of physics, an important goal is developing students' quantitative and problem solving skills. Our guiding pedagogical framework is the cognitive apprenticeship model, in which learning occurs most effectively when students can articulate why what they are learning matters to them. In this article, we describe our courses, summarize initial assessment data, and identify needs for future research.

  10. Physical factors influence for biologic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piruzyan, L. A.

    2005-08-01

    Physical methods are widely spread in diagnostics and therapy of different pathologies, especially in oncology. The application of lasers occurred to be the perspective approach for combined methods application in medicine. Our work is devoted to investigation of thermal effect of focused laser beam in the model of Garding-Passi melanoma and also to the study of free radicals activity after the radiation with non-focused laser beam. The histologic alterations correlated with theoretical calculations of temperature distribution in irradiated tissue for energies 30-60 J attracted our interest. The values of maximal temperatures in depths of tissue for energies 30-60 J were carried out. In the model of permanent magnetic field (PMF) effect for mice ascites sarcoma 37 we have showed the linear dependence of tumor growth inhibition from the period of PMF treatment. Simultaneously we investigated PMF influence for free radical"s (FR) concentrations in mice organs and tissues and potentially appearing questions of PMF effect for biopotential in connection with FR formation. We have also studied the alterations of K, Na and Ca ions concentrations in ascetic fluids after animal"s PMF treatment. We revealed some reasons of biopotential generation and concluded that biopotential is not the result of specific ions gradient only but its generation can be followed by free radicals states appearance and occurrence of semi-conductivity in biostructures.

  11. Embryology meets molecular biology: Deciphering the apical ectodermal ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Jamie M; Sun, Xin

    2017-09-15

    More than sixty years ago, while studying feather tracks on the shoulder of the chick embryo, Dr. John Saunders used Nile Blue dye to stain the tissue. There, he noticed a darkly stained line of cells that neatly rims the tip of the growing limb bud. Rather than ignoring this observation, he followed it up by removing this tissue and found that it led to a striking truncation of the limb skeletons. This landmark experiment marks the serendipitous discovery of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), the quintessential embryonic structure that drives the outgrowth of the limb. Dr. Saunders continued to lead the limb field for the next fifty years, not just through his own work, but also by inspiring the next generation of researchers through his infectious love of science. Together, he and those who followed ushered in the discovery of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) as the AER molecule. The seamless marriage of embryology and molecular biology that led to the decoding of the AER serves as a shining example of how discoveries are made for the rest of the developmental biology field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Too Early for Physics? Effect of Class Meeting Time on Student Evaluations of Teaching in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, R. G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports observations that show a significant effect of class meeting time on student evaluations of teaching for an introductory college physics class. Students in a lecture section with an early-morning meeting time gave the class and instructors consistently lower ratings than those in an otherwise nearly identical section that met an…

  13. Intrapersonal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with meeting recommended physical activity among rural Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cynthia K; Saelens, Brian E; Thompson, Beti

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to identify intrapersonal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with engaging in recommended levels of physical activity among rural Latino middle school youth. Data were from an anonymous survey of 773 Latino youth (51% female) about level of and barriers and motivators to physical activity, risk behaviors, and park use. Logistic regression models identified factors correlated with meeting recommended levels of physical activity (5 days or more 3 60 min/day). Thirty-four percent of girls and 41% of boys reported meeting this physical activity recommendation. Participation in an organized after school activity (p physical education (PE) classes 5 days a week (p physical activity level. Making PE available 5 days a week and creating opportunities for organized after school physical activity programs may increase the number of rural Latino middle school youth who meet recommended physical activity level.

  14. Neutrons in Biology. A satellite meeting of the IUPAB/EBSA biophysics congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koji, Yoshida; Longeville, St.; Motomu, Tanaka; Blackledge, M.; Ebel, Ch.; Cooper, J.B.; Curmi, P.; Ferrand, M.; Gutberlet, T.; Huang, Huey Hang; Haub, T.; Mitsuhiro, Hirai; Geoff, Kneale; Langan, P.; Masahisa, Wada; Junji, Sugiyama; Yoshiharu, Nishiyama; Chanzy, H.; Leckband, D.; Meilleur, F.; Nawroth, Th.; Paciaroni, A.; Parak, F.; Gaede, H.C.; Soubias, O.; Luckett, K.M.; Polozov, I.V.; Wong, K.K.Y.; Yeliseev, A.A.; Gawrisch, K.; Deme, B.; Marchal, D.; Hanson, L.; Podjarny, A.; Mitschler, A.; Hazemann, I.; Blakeley, M.; Dauvergne, M.T.; Meilleur, F.; Budayova-Spano, M.; Van Zandt, M.; Ginell, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Myles, D.; Timmins, P.A.; Pebay-Peyroula, E; Welte, W.; Prince, S.M.; Howard, T.D.; Myles, D.A.A.; Wilkinson, C.; Papiz, M.Z.; Freer, A.A.; Cogdell, R.J.; Isaacs, N.W.; Papiz, M.Z.; Prince, S.M.; Howard, T.D.; Cogdell, R.J.; Isaacs, N.W.; Rheinstaedter, M.; Sapede, D.; Svergun, D.; Tarek, M.; Tehei, M.; Trewhella, J.; Watts, A.; Zaccai, G.J

    2005-07-01

    This meeting focussed on the study of the structure and dynamics of biological molecules, with particular emphasis on neutron and complementary methods as well as related enabling technologies. The program covered biological problems that are being addressed by neutron scattering and those where there is the potential to do so in the future. This document provides the abstracts of the different presentations. (A.L.B.)

  15. PREFACE: Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    , about 15 years after the original reports, it is clear that amyloids are special structures that occur in nature under several different guises, some good, some evil [3]. The number of diseases associated with misfolding and fibrillogenesis has steadily increased. Examples of fairly common pathologies associated with fibre formation include Alzheimer's disease (currently one of the major threats for human health in our increasingly aging world), Parkinson's disease and several rare, but not less severe, pathologies. On the other hand, it is also clear that amyloid formation is a convenient mechanism for storing peptides and/or proteins in a compact and resistant way. The number of organisms/tissues in which amyloid deposits are found is thus increasing. It is also not too far-fetched to expect that the mechanical properties of amyloids could be used in biotechnology to design new materials. Because of the importance of this topic in so many scientific fields, we have dedicated this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter to the topic of protein aggregation and disease. In the following pages we have collected two reviews and five articles that explore new and interesting developments in the field. References [1] Olby R 1994 The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (New York: Dover) [2] Dobson C M 2004 Principles of protein folding, misfolding and aggregation Semin. Cell Dev. Biol. 15 3-16 [3] Hammer N D, Wang X, McGuffie B A, Chapman M R 2008 Amyloids: friend or foe? J. Alzheimers Dis. 13 407-19 Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases contents Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?Annalisa Pastore and Pierandrea Temussi Alzheimer's disease: biological aspects, therapeutic perspectives and diagnostic toolsM Di Carlo, D Giacomazza and P L San Biagio Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregatesC Corsale, R Carrotta, M R Mangione, S Vilasi, A Provenzano, G Cavallaro, D Bulone and P L San Biagio Elemental micro

  16. Particle Physics Meets Cosmology -- The Search for Decaying Neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of neutrino decay may have profound consequences for both particle physics and cosmology, providing a deep connection between physics of the very large and physics of the very small. Describes this link and discusses the nature and status of the search for decaying neutrinos. (Author/JN)

  17. Physics for Medicine and Biology: Determining Body Fat Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Ronald; Altman, Albert

    2011-04-01

    Hydrostatic weighing is a technique for determining body fat content that is based on Archimedes principle and varied applications of the ideal gas law. We use this procedure as an example of the types of physics material which should be presented in an introductory course for students that are interested in careers in biology and medicine.

  18. Working together at the interface of physics and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Bonnie L.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2014-10-01

    Good communication, whether it is between quorum-sensing bacteria or the different scientists studying those critters, is the key to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration, Bonnie Bassler and Ned Wingreen provide a personal perspective on working at the interface between the physical and biological sciences.

  19. Subject Didactic Studies of Research Training in Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybeck, Leif

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and design of a 3-year study of research training and supervision in biology and physics are discussed. Scientific problems arising from work on the thesis will be a focus for the postgraduate students and their supervisors. Attention will be focused on supervisors' and students' conceptions of science, subject range, research,…

  20. Milkweed Seed Dispersal: A Means for Integrating Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbee, Gregory D.; Kaiser, Cheryl A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that integrates biology and physics concepts by experimenting with the seed dispersal of common milkweed or similar wind-dispersed seeds. Student teams collect seeds and measure several parameters, review principles of trajectory motion, perform experiments, and graph data. Students examine the ideas of…

  1. Milkweed Seed Dispersal: A Means for Integrating Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbee, Gregory D.; Kaiser, Cheryl A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that integrates biology and physics concepts by experimenting with the seed dispersal of common milkweed or similar wind-dispersed seeds. Student teams collect seeds and measure several parameters, review principles of trajectory motion, perform experiments, and graph data. Students examine the ideas of…

  2. 78 FR 42111 - Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences #66; Notice of Meeting; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Advisory Committee for Mathematical and Physical Sciences 66; Notice of Meeting; Correction SUMMARY: The... Mathematical and Physical Sciences in the Federal Register on June 21, 2013. This notice corrects the operated..., Staff Associate and MPSAC Designated Federal Officer, Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences...

  3. 77 FR 14441 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: LIGO Annual Review Site Visit at Hanford Observatory for Physics, 1208. Date and Time: Wednesday, April...: Thomas Carruthers, Program Director, Division of Physics, National Science Foundation, (703)...

  4. 75 FR 57298 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: University of Notre Dame Site Visit in Physics (1208). Date and Time: Tuesday, October 19, 2010; 8 a.m.-6 p.m...: Partially Closed. Contact Person: Dr. Kathleen McCloud, Program Director for Physics Education...

  5. 75 FR 63865 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Michigan State University Site Visit in Physics (1208). Date and Time: Tuesday, November 9, 2010; 8 a.m.-6... Elementary Particle Physics, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230....

  6. 76 FR 19147 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: LIGO Laboratory Annual Review at Livingston Observatory for Physics. Date and Time: Monday, April 25...: Thomas Carruthers, Program Director, Division of Physics, National Science Foundation, (703)...

  7. 75 FR 3493 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... FOUNDATION Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory.... Name: University of Nebraska Site Visit in Physics (1208). Date and Time: Monday, February 1, 2010; 8 a... Particle Physics, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230. Telephone: (703)...

  8. 76 FR 66998 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: LIGO Annual Review Site Visit at Hanford Observatory for Physics (1208). Date and Time: Wednesday...: Thomas Carruthers, Program Director, Division of Physics, National Science Foundation, (703)...

  9. 75 FR 70951 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: LIGO Laboratory Annual Review at Hanford Observatory for Physics (1208). Date and Time: Tuesday.... Contact Person: Thomas Carruthers, Program Director, Division of Physics, National Science...

  10. 75 FR 67142 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Site Visit to the Center for the Physics of Living Cells 1208. Dates/Time: November 8, 2010, 9 a.m.- 4... advice and recommendations concerning progress of the Center for the Physics of Living Cells...

  11. 78 FR 16301 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: LIGO Annual Review Site Visit at Hanford Observatory for Physics (1208). Date and Time: Tuesday, April.... Contact Person: Mark Coles, Director of Large Facilities, Division of Physics, National Science...

  12. 78 FR 25101 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics, Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: AdvLIGO Construction Review Site Visit at Livingston Observatory for Physics, 1208 Date and Time.... Contact Person: Mark Coles, Director of Large Facilities, Division of Physics, National Science...

  13. Perspectives on theory at the interface of physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Bialek, William

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical physics is the search for simple and universal mathematical descriptions of the natural world. In contrast, much of modern biology is an exploration of the complexity and diversity of life. For many, this contrast is prima facie evidence that theory, in the sense that physicists use the word, is impossible in a biological context. For others, this contrast serves to highlight a grand challenge. I'm an optimist, and believe (along with many colleagues) that the time is ripe for the emergence of a more unified theoretical physics of biological systems, building on successes in thinking about particular phenomena. In this essay I try to explain the reasons for my optimism, through a combination of historical and modern examples.

  14. From physics to biology by extending criticality and symmetry breakings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, G; Montévil, M

    2011-08-01

    Symmetries play a major role in physics, in particular since the work by E. Noether and H. Weyl in the first half of last century. Herein, we briefly review their role by recalling how symmetry changes allow to conceptually move from classical to relativistic and quantum physics. We then introduce our ongoing theoretical analysis in biology and show that symmetries play a radically different role in this discipline, when compared to those in current physics. By this comparison, we stress that symmetries must be understood in relation to conservation and stability properties, as represented in the theories. We posit that the dynamics of biological organisms, in their various levels of organization, are not "just" processes, but permanent (extended, in our terminology) critical transitions and, thus, symmetry changes. Within the limits of a relative structural stability (or interval of viability), variability is at the core of these transitions.

  15. Microfluidics meet cell biology: bridging the gap by validation and application of microscale techniques for cell biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paguirigan, Amy L; Beebe, David J

    2008-09-01

    Microscale techniques have been applied to biological assays for nearly two decades, but haven't been widely integrated as common tools in biological laboratories. The significant differences between several physical phenomena at the microscale versus the macroscale have been exploited to provide a variety of new types of assays (such as gradient production or spatial cell patterning). However, the use of these devices by biologists seems to be limited by issues regarding biological validation, ease of use, and the limited available readouts for assays done using microtechnology. Critical validation work has been done recently that highlights the current challenges for microfluidic methods and suggest ways in which future devices might be improved to better integrate with biological assays. With more validation and improved designs, microscale techniques hold immense promise as a platform to study aspects of cell biology that are not possible using current macroscale techniques.

  16. New insights into an old organelle: meeting report on biology of cilia and flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Piali; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The rising interest of the scientific community in cilia biology was evident from the fact that registration for the third FASEB conference on 'The Biology of Cilia and Flagella' closed out before the early bird deadline. Cilia and flagella are organelles of profound medical importance; defects in their structure or function result in a plethora of human diseases called ciliopathies. 240 clinicians and basic scientists from around the world gathered from 23 June 2013 to 28 June 2013 at Sheraton at the Falls, Niagara Falls, NY to present and discuss their research on this intensely studied subcellular structure. The meeting was organized by Gregory Pazour (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Bradley Yoder (University of Alabama-Birmingham), and Maureen Barr (Rutgers University) and was sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Here, we report highlights, points of discussion, and emerging themes from this exciting meeting.

  17. Physics in cell biology: on the physics of biopolymers and molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Erwin

    2002-03-12

    "What is Life?" is the title of a book by Erwin Schrödinger, first published in 1944. This book is a bold attempt to try to understand some of the wonders of life in terms of physics, in particular statistical mechanics. Since the publication of this visionary book, we have seen a revolution in molecular biology complemented by the development of new physical tools like single-molecule spectroscopy. The goal of this article is to highlight some examples where physics can contribute to questions in cell biology. One might hope that through interdisciplinary research one can get closer to answering Schrödinger's fundamental question.

  18. The physical characteristics of human proteins in different biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tengjiao; Tang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of gene products are the foundation of their biological functions. In this study, we systematically explored relationships between physical properties and biological functions. The physical properties including origin time, evolution pressure, mRNA and protein stability, molecular weight, hydrophobicity, acidity/alkaline, amino acid compositions, and chromosome location. The biological functions are defined from 4 aspects: biological process, molecular function, cellular component and cell/tissue/organ expression. We found that the proteins associated with basic material and energy metabolism process originated earlier, while the proteins associated with immune, neurological system process etc. originated later. Tissues may have a strong influence on evolution pressure. The proteins associated with energy metabolism are double-stable. Immune and peripheral cell proteins tend to be mRNA stable/protein unstable. There are very few function items with double-unstable of mRNA and protein. The proteins involved in the cell adhesion tend to consist of large proteins with high proportion of small amino acids. The proteins of organic acid transport, neurological system process and amine transport have significantly high hydrophobicity. Interestingly, the proteins involved in olfactory receptor activity tend to have high frequency of aromatic, sulfuric and hydroxyl amino acids.

  19. The association between meeting physical activity guidelines and chronic diseases among Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Shirley N; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of chronic disease. This study describes the relationship between meeting the guidelines for physical activity described in Canada's Physical Activity Guide and heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and low levels of general health. Leisure-time energy expenditure (LTEE) was calculated from leisure-time physical activities reported by adults who participated in the 2007 Canadian Community Health Survey. Respondents were classified as meeting the guidelines for physical activity or not, and were stratified by sex into quartiles of LTEE. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds for all conditions associated with not meeting the guidelines and by quartile of LTEE, adjusting for covariates. The odds of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and fair/poor health were significantly higher among those not meeting the guidelines for both sexes and for high blood pressure among women. Significantly higher odds were seen between the lowest and highest quartiles of LTEE for type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure and across all quartiles for obesity and fair/poor health for both sexes. Canadian adults meeting the physical activity guidelines have lower odds of chronic diseases and fair/poor health than those not meeting the guidelines. ©2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  20. 75 FR 76472 - Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009; Meetings on User Fee Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ...; Meetings on User Fee Program for Biosimilar and Interchangeable Biological Product Applications; Request... participate in consultation meetings relating to the development of a user fee program for biosimilar and... review of biosimilar and interchangeable biological product applications for fiscal years (FYs)...

  1. News Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

  2. Charge Migration in DNA Perspectives from Physics, Chemistry, and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Tapash

    2007-01-01

    Charge migration through DNA has been the focus of considerable interest in recent years. A deeper understanding of the nature of charge transfer and transport along the double helix is important in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. It has also important implications in biology, in particular in DNA damage and repair. This book presents contributions from an international team of researchers active in this field. It contains a wide range of topics that includes the mathematical background of the quantum processes involved, the role of charge transfer in DNA radiation damage, a new approach to DNA sequencing, DNA photonics, and many others. This book should be of value to researchers in condensed matter physics, chemical physics, physical chemistry, and nanoscale sciences.

  3. Toward efficient riparian restoration: integrating economic, physical, and biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Michio; Adams, Richard M; Wu, Junjie; Bolte, John P; Cox, Matt M; Johnson, Sherri L; Liss, William J; Boggess, William G; Ebersole, Joseph L

    2005-04-01

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to explore the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts to protect water quality and increase salmonid populations in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. We focus on the effects of shade on water temperatures and the subsequent impacts on endangered juvenile salmonid populations. The integrated modeling system consists of a physical model that links riparian conditions and hydrological characteristics to water temperature; a biological model that links water temperature and riparian conditions to salmonid abundance, and an economic model that incorporates both physical and biological models to estimate minimum cost allocations of conservation efforts. Our findings indicate that conservation alternatives such as passive and active riparian restoration, the width of riparian restoration zones, and the types of vegetation used in restoration activities should be selected based on the spatial distribution of riparian characteristics in the basin. The relative effectiveness of passive and active restoration plays an important role in determining the efficient allocations of conservation efforts. The time frame considered in the restoration efforts and the magnitude of desired temperature reductions also affect the efficient combinations of restoration activities. If the objective of conservation efforts is to maximize fish populations, then fishery benefits should be directly targeted. Targeting other criterion such as water temperatures would result in different allocations of conservation efforts, and therefore are not generally efficient.

  4. 46. Annual meeting of the German Society for Medical Physics. Abstracts; 46. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik. Abstractband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebich, Martin [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Zink, Klemens (ed.) [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Universitaetsklinikum Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2015-07-01

    The abstracts volume of the 46th annual meeting of the German Society for Medical Physics includes abstracts on the following issues: audiology; particle therapy: dosimetric and biological aspects; functional and molecular imaging; computerized tomography; dosimetry: 2D dosimetry and clinical dosimetry; MR imaging: cardio and lungs imaging; quality assurance in radiation therapy; brachytherapy/IORT; irradiation planning; functional and molecular imaging: methodic principles; dosimetry: dosimetric base data and Monte Carlo; adaptive and guided radiation therapy; irradiation planning; laser accelerated protons; brachytherapy/IORT: dosimetry; particle therapy: irradiation planning and imaging; stereotaxis and radiosurgery; radiation protection; dosimetry: detectors and small photon fields; MRT and MRS - neuroimaging; particle therapy: in vivo verification.

  5. Emerging from the fog: hypotheses and paradigms in developmental biology--the Society for Developmental Biology 2005 Annual Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Barolo, Scott; Bilder, David; Montgomery, Mary; Sinha, Neelima

    2006-01-15

    The Society for Developmental Biology 64th annual meeting took place by the beautiful San Francisco Bay from July 27th to August 1st, 2005. Organized under the leadership of Judith Kimble (SDB President, U. Wisconsin-Madison), the meeting attracted over one thousand developmental biologists from all over the world. They gathered to present data, exchange ideas and enjoy basking in the warm sun on the piers. Strong themes emerged from the diverse subjects discussed at the meeting, demonstrating exciting trends towards the unifying goal of understanding the progression from a single cell to an adult organism. Cell and Tissue Polarity was a recurring topic at the meeting. Questions like "is there polarity", "how is it achieved" and "how is it linked to stem cell maintenance" were discussed. Post-transcriptional regulation involving protein degradation and microRNA (miRNA) modulation of gene expression was featured in the context of transition between meiosis to mitosis and asymmetries in the embryo. It is apparent that Evolutionary Developmental Biology, once a major driving influence in the early days of the field, continues to enjoy a renaissance as researchers familiar with traditional model organisms are increasingly attracted to the field and as modern genetic and molecular approaches are applied to an increasingly varied assortment of organisms. The attention is beginning to pay off as laboratories are starting to generate significant results shedding light into how developmental programs are altered to generate morphological diversity. In the Satellite Symposium on Plant Development held on July 27th, 2005, the overriding theme was on the identity and maintenance of Stem Cells in Plants. Finally, researchers working on diverse organisms have shown a strong effort to address Developmental Coordination: on the subcellular, cellular and tissue levels. Advanced imaging techniques are combined with traditional genetic methods to scrutinize and compare dynamic

  6. Optimizing Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences: Placing Physics in Biological Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Physics is a critical foundation for today's life sciences and medicine. However, the physics content and ways of thinking identified by life scientists as most important for their fields are often not taught, or underemphasized, in traditional introductory physics courses. Furthermore, such courses rarely give students practice using physics to understand living systems in a substantial way. Consequently, students are unlikely to recognize the value of physics to their chosen fields, or to develop facility in applying physics to biological systems. At Swarthmore, as at several other institutions engaged in reforming this course, we have reorganized the introductory course for life science students around touchstone biological examples, in which fundamental physics contributes significantly to understanding biological phenomena or research techniques, in order to make explicit the value of physics to the life sciences. We have also focused on the physics topics and approaches most relevant to biology while seeking to develop rigorous qualitative reasoning and quantitative problem solving skills, using established pedagogical best practices. Each unit is motivated by and culminates with students analyzing one or more touchstone examples. For example, in the second semester we emphasize electric potential and potential difference more than electric field, and start from students' typically superficial understanding of the cell membrane potential and of electrical interactions in biochemistry to help them develop a more sophisticated understanding of electric forces, field, and potential, including in the salt water environment of life. Other second semester touchstones include optics of vision and microscopes, circuit models for neural signaling, and magnetotactic bacteria. When possible, we have adapted existing research-based curricular materials to support these examples. This talk will describe the design and development process for this course, give examples of

  7. Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in Active College Students: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farren, G. L.; Zhang, T.; Martin, S. B.; Thomas, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relations of sex, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and social support with meeting physical activity guidelines (PAGs). Participants: Three hundred ninety-six college students participated in this study in the summer 2013. Methods: Students completed online questionnaires that assessed physical activity…

  8. Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in Active College Students: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farren, G. L.; Zhang, T.; Martin, S. B.; Thomas, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relations of sex, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and social support with meeting physical activity guidelines (PAGs). Participants: Three hundred ninety-six college students participated in this study in the summer 2013. Methods: Students completed online questionnaires that assessed physical activity…

  9. 77 FR 69505 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: LIGO Operations Proposal and Annual Review in Physics (1208). Date and Time: Tuesday, December 4,...

  10. 75 FR 15460 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Proposal Review Panel for Physics, LIGO Site Visit in Louisiana (1208). Date and Time: Wednesday, April...

  11. 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology, San Francisco, California, USA, 14–18 December 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Paraic A; Rizki, Aylin

    2003-01-01

    The Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) is a diverse conference covering all topics in cell biology. While all of the basic biology presented at this meeting may potentially contribute to breast cancer research, there were a significant number of presentations and posters directly pertinent to this field. Here we have summarized the research that is of greatest immediate relevance to breast cancer, with particular emphasis on mammary gland development and tumorigene...

  12. Workshop Report on the European Bone Sarcoma Networking Meeting: Integration of Clinical Trials with Tumor Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David M; Wilhelm, Miriam; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Dirksen, Uta; Entz-Werlé, Natacha; Gelderblom, Hans; Hassan, Bass; Jürgens, Heribert; Koster, Jan; Kovar, Heinrich; Lankester, Arjan C; Lewis, Ian J; Myklebost, Ola; Nathrath, Michaela H M; Picci, Piero; Whelan, Jeremy S; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Bielack, Stefan S

    2011-09-01

    A key workshop was held in The Netherlands in June 2011, hosted by several European bone sarcoma networks and with a broad range of stakeholders from Europe and Australia. The purpose of the meeting was to identify the strengths and weaknesses in current clinical trials for bone sarcomas and to make recommendations as to how to accelerate progress in this field. Two areas of particular interest were discussed. First, all participants agreed upon the importance of tumor biology to understanding clinical responses for all types of bone sarcoma. Various barriers to biobanking tumor and germline specimens were canvassed and are outlined in this paper. Second, there was consideration of the particular challenges of dealing with adolescent and young adult cancers, exemplified by bone sarcomas. Participants recommended greater engagement of both pediatric and adult sarcoma trial organizations to address this issue. Specific opportunities were identified to develop biological sub-studies within osteosarcoma, focused on understanding germ line risk and pharmacogenomics defining toxicity and biological responses. In Ewing sarcoma, it was harder to define opportunities for biological insights. There was agreement that the results for insulin-like growth factor pathway inhibition in Ewing family tumors were disappointing, but represented a clear indication of the need for companion biologic studies to develop predictive biomarkers. The meeting ended with broad commitment to working together to make progress in this rare but important subgroup of cancers.

  13. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 39th annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jennifer L; Albertson, Craig; Harris, Matthew P; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph S; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2017-02-07

    The Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) aims to promote education, research, and communication, about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. Membership of the SCGDB is broad and diverse-including clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academics-but with all members sharing an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year, the SCGDB hosts a meeting where members can share their latest research, exchange ideas and resources, and build on or establish new collaborations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Walter; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Austin, Robert H.

    2012-10-01

    DNA is the central storage molecule of genetic information in the cell, and reading that information is a central problem in biology. While sequencing technology has made enormous advances over the past decade, there is growing interest in platforms that can readout genetic information directly from long single DNA molecules, with the ultimate goal of single-cell, single-genome analysis. Such a capability would obviate the need for ensemble averaging over heterogeneous cellular populations and eliminate uncertainties introduced by cloning and molecular amplification steps (thus enabling direct assessment of the genome in its native state). In this review, we will discuss how the information contained in genomic-length single DNA molecules can be accessed via physical confinement in nanochannels. Due to self-avoidance interactions, DNA molecules will stretch out when confined in nanochannels, creating a linear unscrolling of the genome along the channel for analysis. We will first review the fundamental physics of DNA nanochannel confinement—including the effect of varying ionic strength—and then discuss recent applications of these systems to genomic mapping. Apart from the intense biological interest in extracting linear sequence information from elongated DNA molecules, from a physics view these systems are fascinating as they enable probing of single-molecule conformation in environments with dimensions that intersect key physical length-scales in the 1 nm to 100 µm range.

  15. [From physics to biology: the intrinsic dynamics of the cosmos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Posada, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    The History of Universe is described in an extremely summarized manner through the use of graphics, from Big bang until today. This is done according to the most recent standard models of Cosmology and Physics of elementary particles; in other words, according to those fields in Physics of a presupposed universal reference. The History of Life is immersed in this universal physical context, in a frame where our knowledge from Geology and Biology can be only terrestrial. The underlying ideas we try to arise are: 1) the transition from a relatively elementary structure to a posterior and a relatively more complex one requires some very special "environmental" conditions; and 2) the new structure can not be described only through its materic constituents, because in cosmic dynamicity new structures and new relationships (of intrinsic respectivity) arise, together with new laws (of extrinsic respectivity). Consequently and as an objective, physical knowledge (for example, elementary particles or atoms) alone in no way can explain biological reality (for example, cell or man).

  16. Human Nature and Research Paradigms: Theory Meets Physical Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plack, Margaret M.

    2005-01-01

    Human nature is a very complex phenomenon. In physical therapy this complexity is enhanced by the need to understand the intersection between the art and science of human behavior and patient care. A paradigm is a set of basic beliefs that represent a worldview, defines the nature of the world and the individual's place in it, and helps to…

  17. The 18th Annual Condensed Matter Physics Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Don; Hutchinson, Wayne; Yazidjoglou, Nick; Stewart, Glen

    The Handbook contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations covering various aspects of condensed matter physics such as magnetism, superconductivity, semiconductor materials and their properties, as well as the use of nuclear techniques in studies of these materials. 162 contributions have been considered to be in the INIS subject scope and were indexed separately.

  18. Twentieth ANZIP condensed matter physics meeting. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Theoretical and experimental short communications included in these proceedings cover recent achievements in high temperatures superconductivity, superconducting devices, nuclear techniques in studies of the structure of solids, lattice models and dynamics, physics studies of surfaces, interfaces and thin films. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 180 items in INIS scope

  19. Space- and ground-based particle physics meet at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The fourth international conference on Particle and Fundamental Physics in Space (SpacePart12) will take place at CERN from 5 to 7 November. The conference will bring together scientists working on particle and fundamental physics in space and on ground, as well as space policy makers from around the world.   One hundred years after Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays using hot air balloons, the experimental study of particle and fundamental physics is still being pursued today with extremely sophisticated techniques: on the ground, with state-of-the-art accelerators like the LHC; and in space, with powerful observatories that probe, with amazing accuracy, the various forms of cosmic radiation, charged and neutral, which are messengers of the most extreme conditions of matter and energy. SpacePart12 will be the opportunity for participants to exchange views on the progress of space-related science and technology programmes in the field of particle and fundamental physics in space. SpacePar...

  20. Competency-based reforms of the undergraduate biology curriculum: integrating the physical and biological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Katerina V; Chmielewski, Jean; Gaines, Michael S; Hrycyna, Christine A; LaCourse, William R

    2013-06-01

    The National Experiment in Undergraduate Science Education project funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute is a direct response to the Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians report, which urged a shift in premedical student preparation from a narrow list of specific course work to a more flexible curriculum that helps students develop broad scientific competencies. A consortium of four universities is working to create, pilot, and assess modular, competency-based curricular units that require students to use higher-order cognitive skills and reason across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Purdue University; the University of Maryland, Baltimore County; and the University of Miami are each developing modules and case studies that integrate the biological, chemical, physical, and mathematical sciences. The University of Maryland, College Park, is leading the effort to create an introductory physics for life sciences course that is reformed in both content and pedagogy. This course has prerequisites of biology, chemistry, and calculus, allowing students to apply strategies from the physical sciences to solving authentic biological problems. A comprehensive assessment plan is examining students' conceptual knowledge of physics, their attitudes toward interdisciplinary approaches, and the development of specific scientific competencies. Teaching modules developed during this initial phase will be tested on multiple partner campuses in preparation for eventual broad dissemination.

  1. Synthetic biology and regulatory networks: where metabolic systems biology meets control engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Murabito, Ettore; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways can be engineered to maximize the synthesis of various products of interest. With the advent of computational systems biology, this endeavour is usually carried out through in silico theoretical studies with the aim to guide and complement further in vitro and in vivo experimental efforts. Clearly, what counts is the result in vivo, not only in terms of maximal productivity but also robustness against environmental perturbations. Engineering an organism towards an increased production flux, however, often compromises that robustness. In this contribution, we review and investigate how various analytical approaches used in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are related to concepts developed by systems and control engineering. While trade-offs between production optimality and cellular robustness have already been studied diagnostically and statically, the dynamics also matter. Integration of the dynamic design aspects of control engineering with the more diagnostic aspects of metabolic, hierarchical control and regulation analysis is leading to the new, conceptual and operational framework required for the design of robust and productive dynamic pathways.

  2. The Gravity of Regenerative Medicine; Physics, Chemistry & Biology behind it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedeepiya V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-vitro expansion of cells of the organs/tissues and their re-implantation into the affected region/ tissue for treating cell/organ failure have been in practice for long, but in limited specialties. The in-vitro cell culture protocols use variety of biological reagents derived from animal sources and recombinant technologies. However, the optimal quantity of such biological components such as growth factors, cytokines etc.,needed for such cells to be grown in a non-physiological environment is still unknown. The use of such biological components have started to stir a controversy of late, due to the recognition of its potential hazards such as spread of prion diseases and contamination with non-human sialic acid proteins. Therefore synthetic reproducible biomaterials are gaining popularity in cell culture and tissue engineering. The biomaterials made of several chemical components based on physical parameters are starting to change certain concepts about the niche of cell culture and that of stem cell expansion and differentiation to specific lineages. Engler et al have already proven that a simple change in the matrix elasticity alone could change the lineage of the cells. Spencer et al have reported that a change in bioelectricity could change the morphogenesis during development. NCRM has been involved in cell culture and tissue engineering using approximately 240 different materials ranging from polymer hydrogel, gel with adherent inserts, nano composite materials, nano-coating technologies, nano-sheets and nano-films. These materials are used in cell culture in different hybrid combinations such as Floating 3D cell culture without adherent components in a homogenous hydrogel. Floating 3D cell culture with anchorage inserts. Flat surface- 2D adherent cell culture. Combined flat surface 2D cell culture (for differentiating cells and floating 3D culture (for undifferentiated cells. These combinations have started yielding several

  3. Abstracts of the 26. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Resumos da 26. reuniao anual da Sociedade Brasileira de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology. It was discussed topics related to bio energetic, channels, transports, biotechnology, metabolism, cellular biology, immunology, toxicology, photobiology and pharmacology.

  4. Abstracts of the 27. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Resumos da 27. reuniao anual da Sociedade Brasileira de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology. It was discussed topics related to bio energetic, channels, transports, biotechnology, metabolism, cellular biology, immunology, toxicology, photobiology and pharmacology.

  5. Abstracts of the 10. Annual meeting of the Federation of the Experimental Biological Societies; Resumos da 10. Reuniao anual da Federacao de Sociedades de Biologia Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The meeting was about experimental biology and it was discussed topics related to medicine, pharmacology, cellular biology, biophysics, toxicology, physiology, immunology, radiobiology, photobiology, natural products and environment.

  6. Spring Meeting of the German Physical Society : Arbeitskreis FestkÖrperphysik

    CERN Document Server

    the German Physical Society : Arbeitskreis FestkÖrperphysik

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains the invited papers of the Spring meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft, which has been held in Münster in 1997. The meeting has been attended by roughly 4000 participants from all areas of solid state physics. This book covers the current status of the fileds and shows the excitement which has been felt by the speakers when presenting their results.

  7. External meeting - Geneva University: Precision measurements in spin physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél: 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 March 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements in spin physics by Dr. Steven Bass / CERN - Innsbruck The proton spin problem has been challenging experimentalists and theorists alike for the last 20 years. Polarized deep inelastic scattering experiments at CERN, DESY and SLAC have told us that quark partons contribute only about 30% of the proton's spin whereas relativistic quark models predict 60%. Where is the missing spin and why is the quark spin contribution so small? In this talk I will give an overview of the proton spin problem and what it may be telling us about QCD, the vacuum and dynamical symmetry breaking. A precise measurement of neutrino-proton elastic scattering would make a vital contribution to resolving many of the outstanding issues. Information: http://dpnc...

  8. Thermonuclear burst oscillations: where firestorms meet fundamental physics.

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Neutron stars offer a unique environment in which to develop and test theories of the strong force. Densities in neutron star cores can reach up to ten times the density of a normal atomic nucleus, and the stabilising effect of gravitational confinement permits long-timescale weak interactions. This generates matter that is neutron-rich, and opens up the possibility of stable states of strange matter, something that can only exist in neutron stars. Strong force physics is encoded in the Equation of State (EOS), the pressure-density relation, which links to macroscopic observables such as mass M and radius R via the stellar structure equations. By measuring and inverting the M-R relation we can recover the EOS and diagnose the underlying dense matter physics. One very promising technique for simultaneous measurement of M and R exploits hotspots (burst oscillations) that form on the neutron star surface when material accreted from a companion star undergoes a thermonuclear explosion (a Type I X-ray burst). As ...

  9. CANCELLED External meeting - Geneva University: The Physics of Graphene

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE Tél : 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Lundi 19 mars 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE 17:00 - Auditoire Stueckelberg The Physics of Graphene Prof. Andre Geim / University of Manchester When one writes with a pencil, thin crystallites of graphite are left on the surface. Some of them are only one atom thick and can be viewed as individual atomic planes pulled out from bulk graphite. Until two years ago, this strictly 2D material called graphene was presumed not to exist in the free state. I will overview our experimental work concentrating on its electronic properties, which are governed by equations of the relativistic quantum physics rather than the standard Schrödinger equation. Most unusual phenomena found in graphene include two new types of the quantum Hall effect, a finite conductivity \\approx e^2/h in the limit of vanishing carrier concentrations, the suppression ...

  10. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  11. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  12. PREFACE: Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, David; de Jager, Kees; Roberts, Craig; Sheldon, Paul; Swanson, Eric

    2007-06-01

    The Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics was held on 22-24 October 2006 at the Opryland Resort in Nashville, Tennessee. Keeping with tradition, the meeting was held in conjunction with the Fall meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. Approximately 90 physicists participated in the meeting, presenting 25 talks in seven plenary sessions and 48 talks in 11 parallel sessions. These sessions covered a wide range of topics related to strongly interacting matter. Among these were charm spectroscopy, gluonic exotics, nucleon resonance physics, RHIC physics, electroweak and spin physics, lattice QCD initiatives, and new facilities. Brad Tippens and Brad Keister provided perspective from the funding agencies. The organisers are extremely grateful to the following institutions for financial and logistical support: the American Physical Society, Jefferson Lab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Vanderbilt University. We thank the following persons for assisting in organising the parallel sessions: Ted Barnes, Jian-Ping Chen, Ed Kinney, Krishna Kumar, Harry Lee, Mike Leitch, Kam Seth, and Dennis Weygand. We also thank Gerald Ragghianti for designing the conference poster, Will Johns for managing the audio-visual equipment and for placing the talks on the web, Sandy Childress for administrative expertise, and Vanderbilt graduate students Eduardo Luiggi and Jesus Escamillad for their assistance. David Ernst, Kees de Jager, Craig Roberts (Chair), Paul Sheldon and Eric Swanson Editors

  13. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashinsky, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus ( Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat ( Triticum aestivum) and Pea ( Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis ( Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  14. Foundations of anticipatory logic in biology and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Jesse S; Eastman, Timothy E

    2017-09-20

    Recent advances in modern physics and biology reveal several scenarios in which top-down effects (Ellis, 2016) and anticipatory systems (Rosen, 1980) indicate processes at work enabling active modeling and inference such that anticipated effects project onto potential causes. We extrapolate a broad landscape of anticipatory systems in the natural sciences extending to computational neuroscience of perception in the capacity of Bayesian inferential models of predictive processing. This line of reasoning also comes with philosophical foundations, which we develop in terms of counterfactual reasoning and possibility space, Whitehead's process thought, and correlations with Eastern wisdom traditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Dynamic light scattering with applications to chemistry, biology, and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, Bruce J

    2000-01-01

    Lasers play an increasingly important role in a variety of detection techniques, making inelastic light scattering a tool of growing value in the investigation of dynamic and structural problems in chemistry, biology, and physics. Until the initial publication of this work, however, no monograph treated the principles behind current developments in the field.This volume presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles underlying laser light scattering, focusing on the time dependence of fluctuations in fluid systems; it also serves as an introduction to the theory of time correlation f

  16. Operator Semigroups meet Complex Analysis, Harmonic Analysis and Mathematical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chill, Ralph; Tomilov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings volume originates from a conference held in Herrnhut in June 2013. It provides unique insights into the power of abstract methods and techniques in dealing successfully with numerous applications stemming from classical analysis and mathematical physics. The book features diverse topics in the area of operator semigroups, including partial differential equations, martingale and Hilbert transforms, Banach and von Neumann algebras, Schrödinger operators, maximal regularity and Fourier multipliers, interpolation, operator-theoretical problems (concerning generation, perturbation and dilation, for example), and various qualitative and quantitative Tauberian theorems with a focus on transfinite induction and magics of Cantor. The last fifteen years have seen the dawn of a new era for semigroup theory with the emphasis on applications of abstract results, often unexpected and far removed from traditional ones. The aim of the conference was to bring together prominent experts in the field of modern...

  17. Biology and physics of cell shape changes in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch, Ewa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2009-09-15

    Together with cell growth, division and death, changes in cell shape are of central importance for tissue morphogenesis during development. Cell shape is the product of a cell's material and active properties balanced by external forces. Control of cell shape, therefore, relies on both tight regulation of intracellular mechanics and the cell's physical interaction with its environment. In this review, we first discuss the biological and physical mechanisms of cell shape control. We next examine a number of developmental processes in which cell shape change - either individually or in a coordinated manner - drives embryonic morphogenesis and discuss how cell shape is controlled in these processes. Finally, we emphasize that cell shape control during tissue morphogenesis can only be fully understood by using a combination of cellular, molecular, developmental and biophysical approaches.

  18. Surface treatments for biological, chemical and physical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karaman, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    A step-by-step guide to the topic with a mix of theory and practice in the fields of biology, chemistry and physics. Straightforward and well-structured, the first chapter introduces fundamental aspects of surface treatments, after which examples from nature are given. Subsequent chapters discuss various methods to surface modification, including chemical and physical approaches, followed by the characterization of the functionalized surfaces. Applications discussed include the lotus effect, diffusion barriers, enzyme immobilization and catalysis. Finally, the book concludes with a look at future technology advances. Throughout the text, tutorials and case studies are used for training purposes to grant a deeper understanding of the topic, resulting in an essential reference for students as well as for experienced engineers in R&D.

  19. Particle physics meets cosmology - The search for decaying neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental physical implications of the possible detection of massive neutrinos are discussed, with an emphasis on the Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) of matter. The Newtonian and general-relativistic pictures of the fundamental forces are compared, and the reduction of electromagnetic and weak forces to one force in the GUTs is explained. The cosmological consequences of the curved-spacetime gravitation concept are considered. Quarks, leptons, and neutrinos are characterized in a general treatment of elementary quantum mechanics. The universe is described in terms of quantized fields, the noninteractive 'particle' fields and the force fields, and cosmology becomes the study of the interaction of gravitation with the other fields, of the 'freezing out' of successive fields with the expansion and cooling of the universe. While the visible universe is the result of the clustering of the quark and electron fields, the distribution of the large number of quanta in neutrino field, like the mass of the neutrino, are unknown. Cosmological models which attribute anomalies in the observed motions of galaxies and stars to clusters or shells of massive neutrinos are shown to be consistent with a small but nonzero neutrino mass and a universe near the open/closed transition point, but direct detection of the presence of massive neutrinos by the UV emission of their decay is required to verify these hypotheses.

  20. Discovery Garden -- Physics and Architecture Meet Outside to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor-Morris, Anne; Briles, Timothy; Froriep, Kathleen; McGuire, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of Georgian Court University's "Discovery Garden" is to create an experience of the physical sciences for students, both science and non-science majors, in a place of serenity: an outdoor garden. Why a garden? Consider that the traditional laboratory experience for students is one of stark rooms ventilated with noisy hoods and endemic with lab coats and safety glasses, an alien environment that can be a source of anxiety for some students studying science, while the idea of a garden excites the imagination and conjures peace. The garden also serves as a reminder that ideas learned in the classroom apply to the everyday world. In addition, the garden is a model of informal learning, which can be especially interesting for pre-service teachers. Outlined here are some general suggestions for the design of a science garden, applicability of educational philosophy to full-body experiences, and activities suggested for students and future teachers in such a garden, as well as a mini-tour of our garden.

  1. The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) Meeting: observations and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigin, Colleen M; Rodgers, Mary M; Wolf, Steven L

    2010-11-01

    The construct of delivering high-quality and cost-effective health care is in flux, and the profession must strategically plan how to meet the needs of society. In 2006, the House of Delegates of the American Physical Therapy Association passed a motion to convene a summit on "how physical therapists can meet current, evolving, and future societal health care needs." The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) meeting on February 27-28, 2009, in Leesburg, Virginia, sent a clear message that for physical therapists to be effective and thrive in the health care environment of the future, a paradigm shift is required. During the PASS meeting, participants reframed our traditional focus on the physical therapist and the patient/client (consumer) to one in which physical therapists are an integral part of a collaborative, multidisciplinary health care team with the health care consumer as its focus. The PASS Steering Committee recognized that some of the opportunities that surfaced during the PASS meeting may be disruptive or may not be within the profession's present strategic or tactical plans. Thus, adopting a framework that helps to establish the need for change that is provocative and potentially disruptive to our present care delivery, yet prioritizes opportunities, is a critical and essential step. Each of us in the physical therapy profession must take on post-PASS roles and responsibilities to accomplish the systemic change that is so intimately intertwined with our destiny. This article offers a perspective of the dynamic dialogue and suggestions that emerged from the PASS event, providing further opportunities for discussion and action within our profession.

  2. Coupled model of physical and biological processes affecting maize pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arritt, R.; Westgate, M.; Riese, J.; Falk, M.; Takle, E.

    2003-04-01

    Controversy over the use of genetically modified (GM) crops has led to increased interest in evaluating and controlling the potential for inadvertent outcrossing in open-pollinated crops such as maize. In response to this problem we have developed a Lagrangian model of pollen dispersion as a component of a coupled end-to-end (anther to ear) physical-biological model of maize pollination. The Lagrangian method is adopted because of its generality and flexibility: first, the method readily accommodates flow fields of arbitrary complexity; second, each element of the material being transported can be identified by its source, time of release, or other properties of interest. The latter allows pollen viability to be estimated as a function of such factors as travel time, temperature, and relative humidity, so that the physical effects of airflow and turbulence on pollen dispersion can be considered together with the biological aspects of pollen release and viability. Predicted dispersion of pollen compares well both to observations and to results from a simpler Gaussian plume model. Ability of the Lagrangian model to handle complex air flows is demonstrated by application to pollen dispersion in the vicinity of an agricultural shelter belt. We also show results indicating that pollen viability can be quantified by an "aging function" that accounts for temperature, humidity, and time of exposure.

  3. Physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet radiation sterilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrentera, L.; Rodriguez, R.R. (Unidad Merida (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV)); Uribe, R.M. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States)); Carrillo, R.E. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1994-03-01

    The physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer is described. The physical characterization was performed using radiochromic dye films by evaluating the uniformity of the radiant exposure along each lamp, the effect of the radiation from one lamp on the array of adjacent lamps, and by measuring the UV radiation absorption of seawater with respect to distilled water. The biological characterization was performed by measuring the amount of reduction of bacteria in stored seawater after different filtration and UV treatments. Among the filtration methods tested, differential filtration (5, 3 and 0.45 [mu]m filters connected in series) caused the highest bacterial reduction factor of 60%. UV radiant exposures of 212, 424, 636 and 848 J m[sup -2] yielded bacteria reduction factors of 99.86, 99.969, 99.997 and 100%, respectively, for populations of Vibrio and Pseudomonas bacteria present in stored seawater. It is concluded that the system is useful for water disinfection when 1, 2 or 3 lamps are on; when 4 lamps are used the treated water becomes sterile. (author).

  4. Physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet radiation sterilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrentera, Laura; Uribe, Roberto M.; Rodríguez, Romana R.; Carrillo, Ricardo E.

    1994-03-01

    The physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer is described. The physical characterization was performed using radiochromic dye films by evaluating the uniformity of the radiant exposure along each lamp, the effect of the radiation from one lamp on the array of adjacent lamps, and by measuring the UV radiation absorption of seawater with respect to distilled water. The biological characterization was performed by measuring the amount of reduction of bacteria in stored seawater after different filtration and UV treatments. Among the filtration methods tested, differential filtration (5, 3 and 0.45 μm filters connected in series) caused the highest bacterial reduction factor of 60%. UV radiant exposures of 212, 424, 636 and 848 J m -2 yielded bacteria reduction factors of 99.86, 99.969, 99.997 and 100%, respectively, for populations of Vibrio and Pseudomonas bacteria present in stored seawater. It is concluded that the system is useful for water disinfection when 1, 2 or 3 lamps are on; when 4 lamps are used the treated water becomes sterile.

  5. How biological vision succeeds in the physical world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Dale; Monson, Brian B; Sundararajan, Janani; Wojtach, William T

    2014-04-01

    Biological visual systems cannot measure the properties that define the physical world. Nonetheless, visually guided behaviors of humans and other animals are routinely successful. The purpose of this article is to consider how this feat is accomplished. Most concepts of vision propose, explicitly or implicitly, that visual behavior depends on recovering the sources of stimulus features either directly or by a process of statistical inference. Here we argue that, given the inability of the visual system to access the properties of the world, these conceptual frameworks cannot account for the behavioral success of biological vision. The alternative we present is that the visual system links the frequency of occurrence of biologically determined stimuli to useful perceptual and behavioral responses without recovering real-world properties. The evidence for this interpretation of vision is that the frequency of occurrence of stimulus patterns predicts many basic aspects of what we actually see. This strategy provides a different way of conceiving the relationship between objective reality and subjective experience, and offers a way to understand the operating principles of visual circuitry without invoking feature detection, representation, or probabilistic inference.

  6. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report III: nanomedicine applications and exosome biology, xenobiotics and endocrine disruptors and pregnancy, and lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, C; Caniggia, I; Clifton, V; Göhner, C; Harris, L; Hemmings, D; Jawerbaum, A; Johnstone, E; Jones, H; Keelan, J; Lewis, R; Mitchell, M; Murthi, P; Powell, T; Saffery, R; Smith, R; Vaillancourt, C; Wadsack, C; Salomon, C

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting, as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops were related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of pregnancy pathologies and placental metabolism: 1) nanomedicine applications and exosome biology; 2) xenobiotics and endocrine disruptors and pregnancy; 3) lipid mediators and placental function.

  7. The Colorado Plateau: cultural, biological, and physical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth L.; van Riper, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Stretching from the four corners of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, the Colorado Plateau is a natural laboratory for a wide range of studies. This volume presents 23 original articles drawn from more than 100 research projects presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau. This scientific gathering revolved around research, inventory, and monitoring of lands in the region. The book's contents cover management techniques for cultural, biological, and physical resources, representing collaborative efforts among federal, university, and private sector scientists and land managers. Chapters on cultural concerns cover benchmarks of modern southwestern anthropological knowledge, models of past human activity and impact of modern visitation at newly established national monuments, challenges in implementing the 1964 Wilderness Act, and opportunities for increased federal research on Native American lands. The section on biological resources comprises sixteen chapters, with coverage that ranges from mammalian biogeography to responses of elk at the urban-wildland interface. Additional biological studies include the effects of fire and grazing on vegetation; research on bald eagles at Grand Canyon and tracking wild turkeys using radio collars; and management of palentological resources. Two final chapters on physical resources consider a proposed rerouting of the Rio de Flag River in urban Flagstaff, Arizona, and an examination of past climate patterns over the Plateau, using stream flow records and tree ring data. In light of similarities in habitat and climate across the Colorado Plateau, techniques useful to particular management units have been found to be applicable in many locations. This volume highlights an abundance of research that will prove useful for all of those working in the region, as well as for others seeking comparative studies that integrate research into land management actions.

  8. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report III : nanomedicine applications and exosome biology, xenobiotics and endocrine disruptors and pregnancy, and lipid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, C.; Caniggia, I.; Clifton, V.; Göhner, C; Harris, L.; Hemmings, D.; Jawerbaum, A.; Johnstone, E.; Jones, H.; Keelan, J.; Lewis, R.; Mitchell, M.; Murthi, P.; Powell, T.; Saffery, R.; Smith, R.; Vaillancourt, C.; Wadsack, C.; Salomon, C.

    2016-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting, as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops were related to various aspects of placental biology but collecti

  9. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Biological particle mixing (bioturbation and solute transfer (bio-irrigation contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator and Abra alba (bioturbator compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1 microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2 microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3 control microcosms and (4 microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13C of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2, which included TO(13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food

  10. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical, biological, and physical... FILL MATERIAL Evaluation and Testing § 230.61 Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing... appropriate physical and chemical environmental characteristics. (d) Physical tests and evaluation. The...

  11. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  12. ``Physical Concepts in Cell Biology,'' an upper level interdisciplinary course in cell biophysics/mathematical biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2009-03-01

    I will describe my experience in developing an interdisciplinary biophysics course addressed to students at the upper undergraduate and graduate level, in collaboration with colleagues in physics and biology. The students had a background in physics, biology and engineering, and for many the course was their first exposure to interdisciplinary topics. The course did not depend on a formal knowledge of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Instead, the approach was based on dynamics. I used diffusion as a universal ``long time'' law to illustrate scaling concepts. The importance of statistics and proper counting of states/paths was introduced by calculating the maximum accuracy with which bacteria can measure the concentration of diffuse chemicals. The use of quantitative concepts and methods was introduced through specific biological examples, focusing on model organisms and extremes at the cell level. Examples included microtubule dynamic instability, the search and capture model, molecular motor cooperativity in muscle cells, mitotic spindle oscillations in C. elegans, polymerization forces and propulsion of pathogenic bacteria, Brownian ratchets, bacterial cell division and MinD oscillations.

  13. Life as physics and chemistry: A system view of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baverstock, Keith

    2013-04-01

    Cellular life can be viewed as one of many physical natural systems that extract free energy from their environments in the most efficient way, according to fundamental physical laws, and grow until limited by inherent physical constraints. Thus, it can be inferred that it is the efficiency of this process that natural selection acts upon. The consequent emphasis on metabolism, rather than replication, points to a metabolism-first origin of life with the adoption of DNA template replication as a second stage development. This order of events implies a cellular regulatory system that pre-dates the involvement of DNA and might, therefore, be based on the information acquired as peptides fold into proteins, rather than on genetic regulatory networks. Such an epigenetic cell regulatory model, the independent attractor model, has already been proposed to explain the phenomenon of radiation induced genomic instability. Here it is extended to provide an epigenetic basis for the morphological and functional diversity that evolution has yielded, based on natural selection of the most efficient free energy transduction. Empirical evidence which challenges the current genetic basis of cell and molecular biology and which supports the above proposal is discussed.

  14. Marriages of mathematics and physics: A challenge for biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Arezoo; Longo, Giuseppe

    2017-09-05

    The human attempts to access, measure and organize physical phenomena have led to a manifold construction of mathematical and physical spaces. We will survey the evolution of geometries from Euclid to the Algebraic Geometry of the 20th century. The role of Persian/Arabic Algebra in this transition and its Western symbolic development is emphasized. In this relation, we will also discuss changes in the ontological attitudes toward mathematics and its applications. Historically, the encounter of geometric and algebraic perspectives enriched the mathematical practices and their foundations. Yet, the collapse of Euclidean certitudes, of over 2300 years, and the crisis in the mathematical analysis of the 19th century, led to the exclusion of "geometric judgments" from the foundations of Mathematics. After the success and the limits of the logico-formal analysis, it is necessary to broaden our foundational tools and re-examine the interactions with natural sciences. In particular, the way the geometric and algebraic approaches organize knowledge is analyzed as a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural issue and will be examined in Mathematical Physics and Biology. We finally discuss how the current notions of mathematical (phase) "space" should be revisited for the purposes of life sciences. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Physics, biology and the origin of life: the physicians' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Geoffrey; Gershwin, M Eric

    2011-12-01

    Physicians have a great interest in discussions of life and its origin, including life's persistence through successive cycles of self-replication under extreme climatic and man-made trials and tribulations. We review here the fundamental processes that, contrary to human intuition, life may be seen heuristically as an ab initio, fundamental process at the interface between the complementary forces of gravitation and quantum mechanics. Analogies can predict applications of quantum mechanics to human physiology in addition to that already being applied, in particular to aspects of brain activity and pathology. This potential will also extend eventually to, for example, autoimmunity, genetic selection and aging. We present these thoughts in perspective against a background of changes in some physical fundamentals of science, from the earlier times of the natural philosophers of medicine to the technological medical gurus of today. Despite the enormous advances in medical science, including integration of technological changes that have led to the newer clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging and PET scans and of computerized drug design, there is an intellectual vacuum as to how the physics of matter became translated to the biology of life. The essence and future of medicine continue to lie in cautious, systematic and ethically bound practice and scientific research based on fundamental physical laws accepted as true until proven false.

  16. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Greek Physical Society Annual Student Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    In a continuation of last years` efforts, The Hellenic Union of Physicists organises for the 5th consecutive year its annual meeting for high-performing students across Greece. In this creative thinking meeting, students will have an excellent opportunity to acquire an in-depth understanding in contemporary physics issues and topics as well as in modern scientific knowledge and thinking in general. Moreover, they will be introduced to modern scientific methods and will practice critical thinking via live interaction with distinctive physicists. During this meeting, students will also connect live to the ATLAS control room to talk to a Greek physicist and learn about latest developments from the world`s largest physics laboratory.

  17. Electrically assisted cycling: A new mode for meeting physical activity guidelines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, M.; Es, E. van; Hendriksen, I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of the electrically assisted bicycle (EAB) as a novel tool for meeting the physical activity guidelines in terms of intensity. METHODS: Twelve habitually active adult subjects were requested to cycle a track of 4.3 km at an intensity the

  18. Papers presented at the IAEA technical committee meeting on H-mode physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TCV team [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1995-11-01

    The two papers contained in this report deal with ohmic H-modes and effect on confinement of edge localized modes in the TCV tokamak. They were presented by the TCV team at the 1995 IAEA technical committee meeting on H-mode physics. figs., tabs., refs.

  19. Peer Tutoring: Meeting the "Demands of Inclusion in Physical Education Today"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Carlos M.; Lieberman, Lauren J.; Magnesio, Betsy; Wood, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effects of peer tutoring as a strategy for teaching and including students with disabilities in general physical education (GPE). Different teaching strategies allow teachers to meet the needs of students, whether in a classroom or gym setting. Research has been conducted on various teaching strategies in physical…

  20. 75 FR 70952 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal Review Panel for Physics; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Partially Closed. Contact Person: Dr. Marvin Goldberg, Program Director for Elementary Particle...

  1. [Chemical, physical and biological risks in law enforcement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Andrea; Grana, Mario; Vicentini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chemical, physical and biological risks among public safety and security forces. Law enforcement personnel, involved in routine tasks and in emergency situations, are exposed to numerous and several occupational hazards (chemical, physical and biological) whith likely health and security consequences. These risks are particularly high when the organization and preparation are inadequate, there is a lacking or insufficient coordination, information, education and communication and safety and personal protective equipment are inadequate or insufficient. Despite the objective difficulties, caused by the actual special needs related to the service performed or the organizational peculiarities, the risk identification and assessment is essential for worker health and safety of personnel, as provided for by Legislative Decree no. 81/2008. Chemical risks include airborne pollutants due to vehicular traffic (carbon monoxide, ultrafine particles, benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, nitrogen and sulfur oxides, lead), toxic gases generated by combustion process following fires (aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, dioxins and furans, biphenyls, formaldehyde, metals and cyanides), substances emitted in case of chemical accidents (solvents, pesticides, toxic gases, caustics), drugs (methylamphetamine), riot control agents and self-defence spray, lead at firing ranges, and several materials and reagents used in forensic laboratory. The physical hazards are often caused by activities that induce biomechanical overload aid the onset of musculoskeletal disorders, the use of visual display terminals and work environments that may expose to heat stress and discomfort, high and low pressure, noise, vibrations, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The main biological risks are blood-borne diseases (viral hepatitis, AIDS), airborne diseases (eg, tuberculosis, meningitis, SARS, anthrax), MRSA, and vector-borne diseases. Many of these risk factors are unavoidable or are not

  2. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahl, Linda J. [BioBricks Foundation

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when “Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity” and design-led considerations for “Connecting People and Technologies” to discussions on “Engineering Biology for New Materials,” “Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment,” and “New Directions for Energy and Sustainability.” The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset

  3. Quantum Processes and Dynamic Networks in Physical and Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Martin Joseph

    Quantum theory since its earliest formulations in the Copenhagen Interpretation has been difficult to integrate with general relativity and with classical Newtonian physics. There has been traditionally a regard for quantum phenomena as being a limiting case for a natural order that is fundamentally classical except for microscopic extrema where quantum mechanics must be applied, more as a mathematical reconciliation rather than as a description and explanation. Macroscopic sciences including the study of biological neural networks, cellular energy transports and the broad field of non-linear and chaotic systems point to a quantum dimension extending across all scales of measurement and encompassing all of Nature as a fundamentally quantum universe. Theory and observation lead to a number of hypotheses all of which point to dynamic, evolving networks of fundamental or elementary processes as the underlying logico-physical structure (manifestation) in Nature and a strongly quantized dimension to macroscalar processes such as are found in biological, ecological and social systems. The fundamental thesis advanced and presented herein is that quantum phenomena may be the direct consequence of a universe built not from objects and substance but from interacting, interdependent processes collectively operating as sets and networks, giving rise to systems that on microcosmic or macroscopic scales function wholistically and organically, exhibiting non-locality and other non -classical phenomena. The argument is made that such effects as non-locality are not aberrations or departures from the norm but ordinary consequences of the process-network dynamics of Nature. Quantum processes are taken to be the fundamental action-events within Nature; rather than being the exception quantum theory is the rule. The argument is also presented that the study of quantum physics could benefit from the study of selective higher-scale complex systems, such as neural processes in the brain

  4. Biological and physical conditions of macroinvertebrates in reference lowland streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brouwer, Jan; Eekhout, Joris; Verdonschot, Piet

    2016-04-01

    Channelisation measures taken halfway the 20th century have had destructive consequences for the diversity of the ecology in the majority of the lowland streams in countries such as the Netherlands. Currently, stream restoration measures are being implemented in these degraded lowland streams, where design principles are often based on outdated relationships between biological and physical conditions. Little is known about the reference conditions in these streams. Therefore, the aim of this research is to quantify the relationships between biological and physical conditions of macroinvertebrates in reference lowland streams. The research was conducted in four near-natural lowland streams in Central Poland. Field data were obtained during a field campaign in 2011. The following data were obtained in a 50-m reach in each of the four streams: macroinvertebrate sampling, spatial habitat patterns, bathymetry, and flow-velocity. Furthermore, water level, light sensitivity and temperature sensors were installed to obtain the temporal dynamic of these streams. Macroinvertebrates were sampled in 9 different habitat types, i.e. sand, gravel, fine organic matter, stones, branches, leaves, silt, vegetation, and wood. Macroinvertebrates were determined to the highest taxonomic level possible. Data from the bathymetrical surveys were interpolated on a grid and bathymetrical metrics were determined. Flow velocity measurements were related to habitats and flow velocity metrics were determined. Analysis of the data shows that flow conditions vary among the different habitat, with a gradient from hard substrates towards soft substrates. Furthermore, the data show that stream as a unit best explains species composition, but also specific habitat conditions, such as substrate type and flow velocity, correlate with species composition. More specific, the data shows a strong effect of wood on species composition. These findings may have implications for stream restoration design, which

  5. Estuary-ocean connectivity: Fast physics, slow biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Cloern, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical, and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1–3 years, by 3- to 19-fold increased abundances of five ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary–ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure, and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the timescale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to

  6. 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Biological Therapy. 26-29 October 2000, Seattle, Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, R O

    2001-01-01

    The 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Biological Therapy (SBT) was held at the Four Seasons Olympic Hotel in Seattle, USA. The meeting was organised on behalf of the society by John A Thompson from the University of Washington (Seattle, USA), Michael B Widmer of Immunex Corp. (Seattle, USA) and Bernard A Fox from the Earle A Chiles Research Institute (Portland, Oregon, USA). The purpose of the organisation, which was founded in 1984 and currently has 300 members, is to bring together those diverse individuals actively investigating biologicals and biological response modifiers in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, including clinicians and basic scientists from industry, government and academia.

  7. Physics of transport and traffic phenomena in biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-12-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukaryotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Novel efforts have been made to utilize some uni-cellular organisms as “micro-transporters”. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In this review we critically examine the current status of our understanding, expose the limitations of the existing methods, mention open challenging questions and speculate on the possible future directions of research in this interdisciplinary area where physics meets not only chemistry and biology but also (nano-)technology.

  8. Circulatory bubble dynamics: from physical to biological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Virginie; Tang, Meng-Xing; Balestra, Costantino; Eckersley, Robert J; Karapantsios, Thodoris D

    2014-04-01

    Bubbles can form in the body during or after decompression from pressure exposures such as those undergone by scuba divers, astronauts, caisson and tunnel workers. Bubble growth and detachment physics then becomes significant in predicting and controlling the probability of these bubbles causing mechanical problems by blocking vessels, displacing tissues, or inducing an inflammatory cascade if they persist for too long in the body before being dissolved. By contrast to decompression induced bubbles whose site of initial formation and exact composition are debated, there are other instances of bubbles in the bloodstream which are well-defined. Gas emboli unwillingly introduced during surgical procedures and ultrasound microbubbles injected for use as contrast or drug delivery agents are therefore also discussed. After presenting the different ways that bubbles can end up in the human bloodstream, the general mathematical formalism related to the physics of bubble growth and detachment from decompression is reviewed. Bubble behavior in the bloodstream is then discussed, including bubble dissolution in blood, bubble rheology and biological interactions for the different cases of bubble and blood composition considered.

  9. Meetings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUGuowen; QINPeng; FENGYilun

    1994-01-01

    The International Workshop on Rice Sheath Bright Management was held in the Experimental Farm of CNRRI from Oct 10 to 15, 1993. The workshop was sponsored by IRRI and co-hosted by CNRRI. About 38 scientists from IRRI, Indonesia, South Korea, Thailand, Vietnam,Japan, Great Britain, France, Malaysia and P. R. China attended the meeting.

  10. MEETINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Events Calendar 2012 January 10, 2012 Annual Symposium-Frontiers in Biological Catalysis Cambridge, United Kingdom February 1-2, 2012 World Cancer Metabolism Summit Washington DC, WA 33601,United States

  11. MEETINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Events Calendar 2012 January 10, 2012Annual Symposium-Frontiers in Biological Catalysis Cambridge, United Kingdom February 1-2, 2012 World Cancer Metabolism Summit Washington DC, WA 33601,United States

  12. Estuary-ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Cloern, James E

    2017-06-01

    Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical, and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1-3 years, by 3- to 19-fold increased abundances of five ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary-ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure, and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the timescale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to changing

  13. When physics is not "just physics": complexity science invites new measurement frames for exploring the physics of cognitive and biological development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelty-Stephen, Damian; Dixon, James A

    2012-01-01

    The neurobiological sciences have struggled to resolve the physical foundations for biological and cognitive phenomena with a suspicion that biological and cognitive systems, capable of exhibiting and contributing to structure within themselves and through their contexts, are fundamentally distinct or autonomous from purely physical systems. Complexity science offers new physics-based approaches to explaining biological and cognitive phenomena. In response to controversy over whether complexity science might seek to "explain away" biology and cognition as "just physics," we propose that complexity science serves as an application of recent advances in physics to phenomena in biology and cognition without reducing or undermining the integrity of the phenomena to be explained. We highlight that physics is, like the neurobiological sciences, an evolving field and that the threat of reduction is overstated. We propose that distinctions between biological and cognitive systems from physical systems are pretheoretical and thus optional. We review our own work applying insights from post-classical physics regarding turbulence and fractal fluctuations to the problems of developing cognitive structure. Far from hoping to reduce biology and cognition to "nothing but" physics, we present our view that complexity science offers new explanatory frameworks for considering physical foundations of biological and cognitive phenomena.

  14. The Proceedings of the 53rd International Meeting of Physical Chemistry Organic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, P. [Institut de Topologie et de Dynamique des Systemes de l`Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, associe au CNRS,1,rue Guy de la Brosse, 75005 Paris (France)

    1996-07-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 53rd international meeting on physical chemistry held in Paris. The main topics discussed include theoretical and experimental aspects of adhesion, electrochemical techniques, plasma techniques, spin{minus}coating, coil{minus}coating, organosilane grafting and other techniques of film deposition, physicochemical characterization of films and interfaces and applications of organic coatings. There were 58 papers presented and all have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  15. Proceedings of the 4th Australian experimental high energy physics meeting and workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 4th Annual Meeting of the Australian High Energy Physics Consortium was held at ANSTO on the 11th and 12th of December, with a workshop on software development and applications held at the University f Sydney on the 13th. A wide range of talks on the progress of NOMAD and ATLAS experiments and related research were presented, plus talks on heavy ion physics which is also carried out in collaboration with CERN. Extended abstracts of the presentations are included in this volume.

  16. Biologic: Gene circuits and feedback in an introductory physics sequence for biology and premedical students

    CERN Document Server

    Cahn, S B

    2013-01-01

    Two synthetic gene circuits -- the genetic toggle switch and the repressilator -- are analyzed quantitatively and discussed in the context of an educational module on gene circuits and feedback that constitutes the final topic of a year-long introductory physics sequence, aimed at biology and premedical undergraduate students. The genetic toggle switch consists of two genes, each of whose protein product represses the other's expression, while the repressilator consists of three genes, each of whose protein product represses the next gene's expression. Analytic, numerical, and electronic treatments of the genetic toggle switch shows that this gene circuit realizes bistability. A simplified treatment of the repressilator reveals that this circuit can realize sustained oscillations. In both cases, a "phase diagram" is obtained, that specifies the region of parameter space in which bistability or oscillatory behavior, respectively, occurs.

  17. Incontri di Fisica delle Alte Energie Italian Meeting on High Energy Physics Napoli

    CERN Document Server

    Carlino, Gianpaolo; Merola, Leonardo; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Ricciardi, Giulia; IFAE 2007

    2008-01-01

    This book collects the Proceedings of the Workshop "Incontri di Fisica delle Alte Energie (IFAE) 2007, Napoli, 11-13 April 2007". This is the sixth edition of a series of meetings on fundamental research in particle physics and was attended by about 160 researchers. Presentations, both theoretical and experimental, addressed the status of Physics of the Standard Model and beyond, Flavour phyisc, Neutrino and Astroparticle physics, new technology in high energy physics. Special emphasis was given to the expectations of the forthcoming Large Hadron Collider, due in operation at the end of 2007. The venue of plenary sessions interleaved with parallel ones allowed for a rich exchange of ideas, presented in these Proceedings, that form a coherent picture of the findings and of the open questions in this extremely challenging cultural field. The venue of plenary sessions interleaved with parallel ones allowed for a rich exchange of ideas, presented in these Proceedings, that form a coherent picture of the findings ...

  18. La Rábida 2015 International Scientific Meeting on Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Clara; Andrés, María; Pérez-Bernal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This volume covers invited papers presented during the La Rábida 2015 International Scientific Meeting on Nuclear Physics, which can be considered heir of a well known series of triennial international summer schools on Nuclear Physics organized from 1982 till 2003 by the Basic Nuclear Physics group in the University of Sevilla. The La Rábida 2015 meeting offered to graduate students and young researchers a broad view of the field of Nuclear Physics. The first invited speaker presented the state-of-the-art of Relativistic Mean Field calculations. The second set of notes covers selected topics in gamma ray spectroscopy with exotic nuclei. The third speaker presented an introduction to the subject of severe accidents in nuclear power plants. In the forth set of notes, the author illustrated how to use laser spectroscopy to determine very important observables of atomic nuclei. The fifth speaker devoted its notes to explain several aspects of neutrino physics. Finally, the sixth speaker presented an overview o...

  19. Nuclear physics detector technology applied to plant biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Lee, Seung Joo [JLAB; McKisson, John E. [JLAB; Xi, Wenze [JLAB; Zorn, Carl J. [JLAB; Howell, Calvin [DUKE; Crowell, A.S. [DUKE; Reid, C.D. [DUKE; Smith, Mark [MARYLAND U.

    2013-08-01

    The ability to detect the emissions of radioactive isotopes through radioactive decay (e.g. beta particles, x-rays and gamma-rays) has been used for over 80 years as a tracer method for studying natural phenomena. More recently a positron emitting radioisotope of carbon: {sup 11}C has been utilized as a {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer for plant ecophysiology research. Because of its ease of incorporation into the plant via photosynthesis, the {sup 11}CO{sub 2} radiotracer is a powerful tool for use in plant biology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using {sup 11}CO{sub 2}. Presently there are several groups developing and using new PET instrumentation for plant based studies. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with the Duke University Phytotron and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is involved in PET detector development for plant imaging utilizing technologies developed for nuclear physics research. The latest developments of the use of a LYSO scintillator based PET detector system for {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer studies in plants will be briefly outlined.

  20. Students' Energy Understanding Across Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, S. T.; Neumann, K.; Bernholt, S.; Harms, U.

    2017-07-01

    Energy is considered both as a disciplinary core idea and as a concept cutting across science disciplines. Most previous approaches studied progressing energy understanding in specific disciplinary contexts, while disregarding the relation of understanding across them. Hence, this study provides a systematic analysis of cross-disciplinary energy learning. On the basis of a cross-sectional study with n = 742 students from grades 6, 8, and 10, we analyze students' progression in understanding energy across biology, chemistry, and physics contexts. The study is guided by three hypothetical scenarios that describe how the connection between energy understanding in the three disciplinary contexts changes across grade levels. These scenarios are compared using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The results suggest that, from grade 6 to grade 10, energy understanding in the three disciplinary contexts is highly interrelated, thus indicating a parallel progression of energy understanding in the three disciplinary contexts. In our study, students from grade 6 onwards appeared to have few problems to apply one energy understanding across the three disciplinary contexts. These findings were unexpected, as previous research concluded that students likely face difficulties in connecting energy learning across disciplinary boundaries. Potential reasons for these results and the characteristics of the observed cross-disciplinary energy understanding are discussed in the light of earlier findings and implications for future research, and the teaching of energy as a core idea and a crosscutting concept are addressed.

  1. Energy and Matter: Differences in Discourse in Physical and Biological Sciences Can Be Confusing for Introductory Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Laurel M.; Momsen, Jennifer; Maskiewicz, April; D'Avanzo, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    Biology majors often take introductory biology, chemistry, and physics courses during their first two years of college. The various and sometimes conflicting discourse about and explanations of matter and energy in these courses may contribute to confusion and alternative conceptions (those that differ from scientific consensus) in biology…

  2. Energy and Matter: Differences in Discourse in Physical and Biological Sciences Can Be Confusing for Introductory Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Laurel M.; Momsen, Jennifer; Maskiewicz, April; D'Avanzo, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    Biology majors often take introductory biology, chemistry, and physics courses during their first two years of college. The various and sometimes conflicting discourse about and explanations of matter and energy in these courses may contribute to confusion and alternative conceptions (those that differ from scientific consensus) in biology…

  3. Non-exercise Estimation of V02max Using a Dichotomy of Meeting or Not Meeting DHHS Physical Activity Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Larry T.; Jackson, Allen W.; Jackson, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    The physical activity guidelines (PAG) established by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services in 2008 is consistent with a rating of >/= 6 on the 11-point NASA Physical Activity Status Scale (PASS). Wier, et. al. developed non-exercise models for estimating VO2(sub max) from a combination of PASS, age, gender and either waist girth (WG) (R = 0.810, SEE= 4.799 ml/kg/min), %Fat (R = 0. 817, SEE = 4.716 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.802, SEE = 4.900 ml . kg-1. min -1 ). PURPOSE: to develop non-exercise models to estimate VO2max from age, gender, body composition (WG, %Fat, BMI) and PASS dichotomized at meets or does not meet the PAG (PAG-PASS), and to compare the accuracy of the PAG-PASS models with the models using the 11-point PASS. METHODS: 2417 men and 384 women were measured for VO2max by indirect calorimetry (RER >1.1); age (yr), gender by M = 1, W = 0; WG at the umbilicus; %fat by skin-folds, BMI by weight (kg) divided by height squared (m 2 ) , and PAGPASS by PASS 6 = 1. RESULTS: Three models were developed by multiple regression to estimate VO2(sub max) from age, gender, PAG-PASS and either WG (R = 0.790, SEE=5.019 ml/kg/min), %FAT (R= 0.080, SEE = 4.915 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.777, SEE = 5.162ml/kg/min). Cross-validation by the PRESS technique confirmed these statistics. Simple correlations between measured VO2(sub max) and estimates from the PAG-PASS models with WG, %Fat and BMI were 0.790, 0.800 and 0.777, minimally different from the correlations obtained with the PASS models (0.810, 0.810, and 0.802). PAG-PASS and PASS model constant errors were also similar: VO2(sub max) between 30 and 50 ml/kg/min (70% of the sample) but > 1 ml/kg/min for VO2(sub max) 50 ml/kg/min. CONCLUSIONS: Non-exercise models using the combined effects of age, gender, body composition and the dichotomized PAG-PASS provide estimates of VO2(sub max) that are accurate for most adults, and the accuracy of these models are similar to previously published models using the 11-point PASS.

  4. Non-exercise Estimation of V02max Using a Dichotomy of Meeting or Not Meeting DHHS Physical Activity Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Larry T.; Jackson, Allen W.; Jackson, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    The physical activity guidelines (PAG) established by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services in 2008 is consistent with a rating of >/= 6 on the 11-point NASA Physical Activity Status Scale (PASS). Wier, et. al. developed non-exercise models for estimating VO2(sub max) from a combination of PASS, age, gender and either waist girth (WG) (R = 0.810, SEE= 4.799 ml/kg/min), %Fat (R = 0. 817, SEE = 4.716 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.802, SEE = 4.900 ml . kg-1. min -1 ). PURPOSE: to develop non-exercise models to estimate VO2max from age, gender, body composition (WG, %Fat, BMI) and PASS dichotomized at meets or does not meet the PAG (PAG-PASS), and to compare the accuracy of the PAG-PASS models with the models using the 11-point PASS. METHODS: 2417 men and 384 women were measured for VO2max by indirect calorimetry (RER >1.1); age (yr), gender by M = 1, W = 0; WG at the umbilicus; %fat by skin-folds, BMI by weight (kg) divided by height squared (m 2 ) , and PAGPASS by PASS 6 = 1. RESULTS: Three models were developed by multiple regression to estimate VO2(sub max) from age, gender, PAG-PASS and either WG (R = 0.790, SEE=5.019 ml/kg/min), %FAT (R= 0.080, SEE = 4.915 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.777, SEE = 5.162ml/kg/min). Cross-validation by the PRESS technique confirmed these statistics. Simple correlations between measured VO2(sub max) and estimates from the PAG-PASS models with WG, %Fat and BMI were 0.790, 0.800 and 0.777, minimally different from the correlations obtained with the PASS models (0.810, 0.810, and 0.802). PAG-PASS and PASS model constant errors were also similar: 1 ml/kg/min for VO2(sub max) 50 ml/kg/min. CONCLUSIONS: Non-exercise models using the combined effects of age, gender, body composition and the dichotomized PAG-PASS provide estimates of VO2(sub max) that are accurate for most adults, and the accuracy of these models are similar to previously published models using the 11-point PASS.

  5. MEETINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Events Calendar 2012 January 10,2012 Annual Symposium-Frontiers in Biological Catalysis Cambridge,United Kingdom February 1-2,2012 World Cancer Metabolism Summit Washington DC,WA 33601,United States February 10-11,2012 2012-Indo-Korean Conference on

  6. Dielectric relaxation in biological systems physical principles, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    This title covers the theoretical basis and practical aspects of the study of dielectric properties of biological systems, such as water, electrolyte and polyelectrolytes, solutions of biological macromolecules, cells suspensions and cellular systems.

  7. MEETINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Events Calendar 2012 January 10, 2012 Annual Symposium-Frontiers in Biological Catalysis Cambridge, United Kingdom February 1-2, 2012 World Cancer Metabolism Summit Washington DC, WA 33601, United States February 10-11, 2012 2012-Indo-Korean Conference on Integrative Bioscience Research-Opportunities and Challenges Coimbatore, India February 12, 2012 4th International Conference on Drug Discovery and Therapy Dubai, United Arab Emirates

  8. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  9. Attosecond physics at a nanoscale metal tip: strong field physics meets near-field optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M.; Thomas, S.; Förster, M.; Maisenbacher, L.; Wachter, G.; Lemell, Chr.; Burgdörfer, J.; Hommelhoff, P.

    2013-03-01

    Attosecond physics, centering on the control of electronic matter waves within a single cycle of the optical laser's driving field, has led to tremendously successful experiments with atoms and molecules in the gas phase. We show that pivotal phenomena such as elastic electron rescattering at the parent matter, a strong carrier-evenlope phase sensitivity and electronic matter wave intereference also show up in few-cycle laser driven electron emission from nanometric sharp metal tips. Furthermore, we utilize spectral signatures to measure the enhanced near-field with a spatial resolution of 1nm.

  10. A Course in Biophysics: An Integration of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancoli, Douglas C.

    1971-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary course for advanced undergraduates in the physical and biological sciences. The goal is to understand a living cell from the most basic standpoint possible. The ideas of physics, chemistry, and molecular biology are all essential to the course, which leads to a unified view of the sciences. (PR)

  11. Systems Biology and Clinical Practice in Respiratory Medicine. The Twain Shall Meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamrin, Cindy; Frey, Urs; Kaminsky, David A; Reddel, Helen K; Seely, Andrew J E; Suki, Béla; Sterk, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory diseases are highly complex, being driven by host-environment interactions and manifested by inflammatory, structural, and functional abnormalities that vary over time. Traditional reductionist approaches have contributed vastly to our knowledge of biological systems in health and disease to date; however, they are insufficient to provide an understanding of the behavior of the system as a whole. In this Pulmonary Perspective, we discuss systems biology approaches, especially but not limited to the study of the lung as a complex system. Such integrative approaches take into account the large number of dynamic subunits and their interactions found in biological systems. Borrowing methods from physics and mathematics, it is possible to study the collective behavior of these systems over time and in a multidimensional manner. We first examine the physiological basis for complexity in the respiratory system and its implications for disease. We then expand on the potential applications of systems biology methods to study complex systems, within the context of diagnosis and monitoring of respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and critical illness. We summarize the significant advances made in recent years using systems approaches for disease phenotyping, applied to data ranging from the molecular to clinical level, obtained from large-scale asthma and COPD networks. We describe new studies using temporal complexity patterns to characterize asthma and COPD and predict exacerbations as well as predict adverse outcomes in critical care. We highlight new methods that are emerging with this approach and discuss remaining questions that merit greater attention in the field.

  12. Suitability of Gray Water for Hydroponic Crop Production Following Biological and Physical Chemical and Biological Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Harper, Lynn D.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Greene, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    The water present in waste streams from a human habitat must be recycled in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) to limit resupply needs and attain self-sufficiency. Plants play an important role in providing food, regenerating air, and producing purified water via transpiration. However, we have shown that the surfactants present in hygiene waste water have acute toxic effects on plant growth (Bubenheim et al. 1994; Greene et al., 1994). These phytotoxic affects can be mitigated by allowing the microbial population on the root surface to degrade the surfactant, however, a significant suppression (several days) in crop performance is experienced prior to reaching sub-toxic surfactant levels and plant recovery. An effective alternative is to stabilize the microbial population responsible for degradation of the surfactant on an aerobic bioreactor and process the waste water prior to utilization in the hydroponic solution (Wisniewski and Bubenheim, 1993). A sensitive bioassay indicates that the surfactant phytotoxicity is suppressed by more than 90% within 5 hours of introduction of the gray water to the bioreactor; processing for more than 12 hours degrades more than 99% of the phytotoxin. Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is a physical / chemical method for water purification which employees sequential distillation steps to separate water from solids and to volatilize contaminants. The solids from the waste water are concentrated in a brine and the pure product water (70 - 90% of the total waste water volume depending on operating conditions) retains non of the phytotoxic effects. Results of the bioassay were used to guide evaluations of the suitability of recovered gray water following biological and VCD processing for hydroponic lettuce production in controlled environments. Lettuce crops were grown for 28 days with 100% of the input water supplied with recovered water from the biological processor or VCD. When compared with the growth of plants

  13. Suitability of Gray Water for Hydroponic Crop Production Following Biological and Physical Chemical and Biological Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Harper, Lynn D.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Greene, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    The water present in waste streams from a human habitat must be recycled in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) to limit resupply needs and attain self-sufficiency. Plants play an important role in providing food, regenerating air, and producing purified water via transpiration. However, we have shown that the surfactants present in hygiene waste water have acute toxic effects on plant growth (Bubenheim et al. 1994; Greene et al., 1994). These phytotoxic affects can be mitigated by allowing the microbial population on the root surface to degrade the surfactant, however, a significant suppression (several days) in crop performance is experienced prior to reaching sub-toxic surfactant levels and plant recovery. An effective alternative is to stabilize the microbial population responsible for degradation of the surfactant on an aerobic bioreactor and process the waste water prior to utilization in the hydroponic solution (Wisniewski and Bubenheim, 1993). A sensitive bioassay indicates that the surfactant phytotoxicity is suppressed by more than 90% within 5 hours of introduction of the gray water to the bioreactor; processing for more than 12 hours degrades more than 99% of the phytotoxin. Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is a physical / chemical method for water purification which employees sequential distillation steps to separate water from solids and to volatilize contaminants. The solids from the waste water are concentrated in a brine and the pure product water (70 - 90% of the total waste water volume depending on operating conditions) retains non of the phytotoxic effects. Results of the bioassay were used to guide evaluations of the suitability of recovered gray water following biological and VCD processing for hydroponic lettuce production in controlled environments. Lettuce crops were grown for 28 days with 100% of the input water supplied with recovered water from the biological processor or VCD. When compared with the growth of plants

  14. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  15. Leveraging a relationship with biology to expand a relationship with physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    This work examines how experiences in one disciplinary domain (biology) can impact the relationship a student builds with another domain (physics). We present a model for disciplinary relationships using the constructs of identity, affect, and epistemology. With these constructs we examine an ethnographic case study of a student who experienced a significant shift in her relationship with physics. We describe how this shift demonstrates (i) a stronger identification with physics, (ii) a more mixed affective stance towards physics, and (iii) more expertlike ways of knowing in physics. We argue that recruiting the student's relationship with biology into experiences of learning physics impacted her relationship with physics as well as her sense of how physics and biology are linked.

  16. Carbonate Beaches: A Balance Between Biological and Physical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, R.; Risk, M.

    2004-12-01

    Carbonate beaches are a unique example of the interaction between biological processes, creating the sediments, and physical processes, moving and often removing the sediments. On the sediment supply side, carbonate sediments are born, not made. They exist in dynamic equilibrium between production and destruction. Following the creation of carbonate sediment in coral reef and lagoon environments, the sediments are moved shoreward to the beach, transport along the shore and sometimes, eventually lost offshore, often as the result of tropical storms. Comprehensive studies of the balance between the supply and loss of carbonate sediments and beach dynamics have been completed for the islands of Mauritius and Barbados. Field studies and remote sensing (Compact Airborne Spectrometry Imaging) have been applied to develop carbonate sediment production rates for a range of reef and lagoon conditions. Using GIS, these production rates have been integrated to determine sediment supply rates for different segments of the coastline. 1-D and 2-D models of waves, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and morphodynamics were set-up and tested against observed beach response to storm events or a sequence of storm events. These complex deterministic models are not suitable for application over periods of decades. However, it was possible to characterize storm events by the extent of sand loss, and relate this to key descriptive factors for groups of storm events, thereby encapsulating the erosion response. A long-term predictive tool for evaluating beach erosion and accretion response, over a period of several decades, was developed by combining the supply rates for carbonate sediment and the encapsulated representation of the loss rates through physical processes. The ability of this predictive tool was successfully tested against observed long term beach evolution along sections of the coast in Barbados and Mauritius using air photo analysis in GIS for shoreline change over periods

  17. PREFACE: FLUIDOS 2010: XI Meeting on Recent Advances in the Physics of Fluids and their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Italo; Cabeza, Cecilia; Martí, Arturo C.; Sarasúa, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    The papers published in this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series were selected from the manuscripts submitted to the XI Meeting on Recent Advances in the Physics of Fluids and their Applications (FLUIDOS2010), which was held in Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay, 3-5 November 2010. FLUIDOS takes place every two years, usually in November, with the aim of gathering together researchers from all areas of the Physics of Fluids, to update themselves on the latest technical developments and applications, share knowledge and stimulate new ideas. This 11th meeting continues the successful experience of the previous ones which were held in different Argentinian cities. For the first time, the meeting was celebrated in Uruguay, more specifically, in the peaceful town of Colonia del Sacramento, designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The conference presented an outstanding program of papers covering the most recent advances in Physics of Fluids in the following areas: General Fluid Dynamics General and non-Newtonian Flows Magnetohydrodynamics Electrohydrodynamics and Plasmas Hydraulics, Thermohydraulics and Multiple Phase Flows A website with full details of the conference program, abstracts and other information can be found at http://fluidos2010.fisica.edu.uy. We would like to thank all the participants, especially those who contributed with talks, posters and manuscripts, for making FLUDOS2010 such a successful conference. Our thanks also go to our colleagues for their support and encouragement, particularly in the refereeing of papers. We would like to acknowledge additional financial support from Comisión Sectorial de Investigación Científica (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), Programa de Desarrollo de las Ciencias Básicas (Uruguay) and the Centro Latinoamericano de Física (CLAF). Our thanks are extended to the local government of Colonia del Sacramento. The next FLUIDOS conference will be held in November 2013, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. We

  18. Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion, Indianapolis American Chemical Society Meetings, Fall 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan [PI, Emory Univ.

    2013-09-20

    The Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion at the Fall ACS Meeting in Indianapolis, IN (Sept. 8-12) featured the following sessions (approx. 6 speakers per session): (1) Quantum Dots and Nanorods for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (2) Artificial Photosynthesis: Water Oxidation; (3) Artificial Photosynthesis: Solar Fuels (2 half-day sessions); (4) Organic Solar Cells; (5) Novel Concepts for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (6) Emerging Techniques for Solar Energy Conversion; (7) Interfacial Electron Transfer

  19. PREFACE: X Meeting on Recent Advances in the Physics of Fluids and their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Fernando Adolfo; Giavedoni, María Delia

    2009-07-01

    The X Meeting on Recent Advances in Physics of Fluids and Related Applications (Fluids 2008) was held in Santa Fe, Argentina, on 19-21 November 2008. It belongs to a series of meetings that started in 1989 and has continued - except for just one occasion - every other year. Thus, the first meeting took place in the city of Tandil in 1989 followed by three events in the city of La Plata (1991-93-95), Tunuyán (Mendoza) in 1997, Paraná (Entre Rios) in 1999, Buenos Aires in 2001, Tandil in 2003 and Mendoza in 2006. These meetings gather together most of the people working in Fluid Mechanics and related problems in Argentina. The objective of the meetings is to provide a forum to facilitate the interactions between participants in a friendly academic atmosphere. This goal is achieved by means of lectures and technical presentations on different subjects and from different points of view, the only constraint being the current academic/technical interest. Applications usually deal with problems of local interest. In the present meeting a variety of lecture topics were presented, among them we might mention Capillary Hydrodynamics, Wetting, Density Currents, Instabilities, Elastic-Dynamics, Flows in Porous Media, Sediment Transport, Plasma Dynamics, etc. In particular, we would like to highlight the specially invited lectures given by Dr Ramon Cerro (Chemical and Material Engineering Department University of Alabama in Huntsville, USA), Dr David Quéré (Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes ESPCI, FRANCE), Dr Marcelo García (College of Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) and Dr Víctor Calo (Earth and Environmental Science and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin). In addition, we had 18 invited talks and more than fifty contributions that were presented in poster sessions. On behalf of both the Honorary

  20. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  1. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD2 verification with pair t-test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D90%, 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D2cc, and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p-values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  2. Development of a General Modeling Framework for Investigating Complex Interactions among Biological and Physical Ecosystem Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C.; Poole, G. C.; Kimball, J. S.; Stanford, J. A.; O'Daniel, S. J.; Mertes, L. A.

    2005-05-01

    Historically, physical scientists have developed models with highly accurate governing equations, while biologists have excelled at abstraction (the strategic simplification of system complexity). These different modeling paradigms yield biological (e.g. food web) and physical (e.g. hydrologic) models that can be difficult to integrate. Complex biological dynamics may be impossible to represent with governing equations. Conversely, physical processes may be oversimplified in biological models. Using agent-based modeling, a technique applied widely in social sciences and economics, we are developing a general modeling system to integrate accurate representations of physical dynamics such as water and heat flux with abstracted biological processes such as nutrient transformations. The modeling system represents an ecosystem as a complex integrated network of intelligent physical and biological "agents" that store, transform, and trade ecosystem resources (e.g., water, heat, nutrients, carbon) using equations that describe either abstracted concepts and/or physical laws. The modular design of the system allows resource submodels to be developed independently and installed into the simulation architecture. The modeling system provides a useful heuristic tool to support integrated physical and biological research topics, such as the influence of hydrologic dynamics and spatio-temporal physical heterogeneity on trophic (food web) dynamics and/or nutrient cycling.

  3. XXIV Biannual meeting of Spanish Physics Royal Society. XXIV reunion bianual de la Sociedad Espaola de Fisica Jaca, Huesca, 27 sept-1 oct 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Lagos Rogla, R.; Carrion Sanjuan, J.A.; Rodriguez Vallejo, S.; Virto Medina, A. (eds.)

    1993-01-01

    The XXIV biannual meeting of Spanish Physics Royal Society was articulated in 21 sessions. The topics of these sessions are: High Energy, Astronomy, Acoustic, Astrophysics, Electromagnetism, electronics, Energy and Environment, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Fusion, Condensed mater, Metrology, Reology, Spectroscopy, Nuclear Physics, Theoric Physics, Atmospheric Physics, Earth Physics, Meteorolgy, Polymers, Physical Chemistry and thermodynamics.

  4. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  5. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  6. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  7. Fluorescent oligo and poly-thiophenes and their utilization for recording biological events of diverse origin—when organic chemistry meets biology

    OpenAIRE

    Åslund, Andreas; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Konradsson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The technique of using luminescent oligo-thiophenes and luminescent conjugated poly-thiophenes to monitor biological processes has gained increased interest from scientists within different research areas, ranging from organic chemistry and photo-physics to biology since its introduction. The technique is generally straightforward and requires only standard equipment, and the result is available within minutes from sample preparation. In this review, the syntheses of oligo and polythiophenes ...

  8. Resource Letter TPB-1: Theoretical Physics and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, N.

    1974-01-01

    This is one of a series of Resource Letters on different topics, intended to guide college physicists to some of the literature and other teaching aids. This bibliography is designed to help physicists identify literature related to mathematical biology. (Author/RH)

  9. Student views of macroscopic and microscopic energy in physics and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Redish, Edward F.; Watkins, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    Energy concepts are fundamental across the sciences, yet these concepts can be fragmented along disciplinary boundaries, rather than integrated into a coherent whole. To teach physics effectively to biology students, we need to understand students' disciplinary perspectives. We present interview data from an undergraduate student who displays multiple stances towards the concept of energy. At times he views energy in macroscopic contexts as a separate entity from energy in microscopic (particularly biological) contexts, while at other times he uses macroscopic physics phenomena as productive analogies for understanding energy in the microscopic biological context, and he reasons about energy transformations between the microscopic and macroscopic scales. This case study displays preliminary evidence for the context dependence of students' ability to translate energy concepts across scientific disciplines. This points to challenges that must be taken into account in developing curricula for biology students that integrate physics and biology concepts.

  10. Dynamics of marine ecosystems: biological-physical interactions in the oceans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mann, K.H; Lazier, J.R.N

    2006-01-01

    .... Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems considers the influence of physical forcing on biological processes in a wide range of marine habitats including coastal estuaries, shelf-break fronts, major ocean gyres...

  11. PREFACE: Third IAEA Technical Meeting on ECRH Physics and Technology in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirant, S.

    2005-01-01

    This meeting belongs to a series of topical events which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna) organizes in a regular basis on crucial aspects of nuclear fusion research, or related in particular to ITER physics or a technological application relevant to the nuclear fusion reactor. Each Technical Meeting series has a specific object; the events are called on a two-three years basis and are recommended by the IAEA advisory body for Fusion, the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) . The object of the IAEA-TM held in Como, Italy, 2-5 May 2005, was the application in ITER of powerful Electron Cyclotron waves in the millimeter wave frequency range for plasma Heating and noninductive Current Drive. The meeting was the third on this subject. There were 42 presentations to an audience of about 60 delegates from 16 countries. The main goal of this series of IAEA-TM is to bring together specialists of the different branches involved in the project, in the effort of the best understanding of the limits and capabilities of each one of the different fields of research and development. Millimeter-wave source developers, millimeter-wave system designers and plasma physicists, theoreticians and experimentalists in all of the fields, exposed their way of addressing the problem in plenary sessions attended by all participants. Discussions on the different topics of gyrotron development, launcher options and physics application were continued in forums following the presentations. The specialist reader will find in this volume in particular the latest developments concerning the frequency, the output power and the efficiency of the gyrotrons which are now being considered the preferred type of high power millimeter wave generators for ECH/ECCD applications in the fusion reactor. The debate on the launcher of the EC waves, in the form of Gaussian beams, is presently very active, with a few options on the table to be merged in one optimized and integrated design

  12. Metrology in physics, chemistry, and biology: differing perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Venkatesh

    2007-04-01

    The association of physics and chemistry with metrology (the science of measurements) is well documented. For practical purposes, basic metrological measurements in physics are governed by two components, namely, the measure (i.e., the unit of measurement) and the measurand (i.e., the entity measured), which fully account for the integrity of a measurement process. In simple words, in the case of measuring the length of a room (the measurand), the SI unit meter (the measure) provides a direct answer sustained by metrological concepts. Metrology in chemistry, as observed through physical chemistry (measures used to express molar relationships, volume, pressure, temperature, surface tension, among others) follows the same principles of metrology as in physics. The same basis percolates to classical analytical chemistry (gravimetry for preparing high-purity standards, related definitive analytical techniques, among others). However, certain transition takes place in extending the metrological principles to chemical measurements in complex chemical matrices (e.g., food samples), as it adds a third component, namely, indirect measurements (e.g., AAS determination of Zn in foods). This is a practice frequently used in field assays, and calls for additional steps to account for traceability of such chemical measurements for safeguarding reliability concerns. Hence, the assessment that chemical metrology is still evolving.

  13. DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, Walter; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Austin, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    in nanochannels, creating a linear unscrolling of the genome along the channel for analysis. We will first review the fundamental physics of DNA nanochannel confinement—including the effect of varying ionic strength—and then discuss recent applications of these systems to genomic mapping. Apart from the intense...

  14. Radiologic science for technologists: physics, biology, and protection. [Textbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The second edition of a textbook primarily for students in radiologic technology is presented. Separate chapters discuss mammography, computed tomography, diagnostic ultrasound, and design of radiologic physics. Radiation protection is specifically presented in two chapters as well as being integrated throughout the text. The fundamentals of radiobiology, molecular and cellular effects of irradiation, and early and late radiation effects comprise four chapters. (JMT)

  15. Physical Improvement and Biological Maturity of Young Athletes (11-12 Years) with Systematic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilkeridis, Konstantinos E; Theodorou, Evaggelos F; Papathanasiou, Jannis V; Chloropoulou, Pelagia A; Trypsianis, Grigorios A; Tokmakidis, Savvas P; Kazakos, Konstantinos I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of systematic training in physical growth and biological maturity in prepubertal males and estimate how this affects the physical growth and skeletal maturity. 177 primary school students of the fifth and sixth grade, from schools in Alexandroupolis, participated voluntarily in our study. Questionnaires were used in order to measure physical activity levels. The subjects were subdivided into two groups; control group (prepubertal, whose physical activity was the physical education of their school and which had never participated in systematic training, n = 95) and experimental group (prepubertal, whose weekly physical activity included physical education in their schools and additionally 3-4 training units organized training in various sports clubs in the city, n = 82). The following parameters were recorded: biological age measured by determination of skeletal age; bone density measured by ultrasound methods; anthropometric and morphological features such as height, body composition, selected diameters, circumferences and skinfolds; motor ability features. The experimental group exhibited older biological age (p = 0.033), higher bone density (p physical activity has a positive effect on both the physical and biological maturity of pre-pubertal children. This effect is mainly expressed in bone strengthening as a result of the increased bone density and in improvement of the kinetic skills of pupils who participated in organized extracurricular sport-activities.

  16. Analyzing Students' Understanding of Models and Modeling Referring to the Disciplines Biology, Chemistry, and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Reinisch, Bianca; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    In this study, secondary school students' (N?=?617; grades 7 to 10) understanding of models and modeling was assessed using tasks which explicitly refer to the scientific disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics and, as a control, to no scientific discipline. The students' responses are interpreted as their biology-, chemistry-, and…

  17. From Gene to Protein: A 3-Week Intensive Course in Molecular Biology for Physical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so…

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  19. Meeting Children's Mental and Physical Health Needs in Child Welfare: The Importance of Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Janet U; Villagrana, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Caregivers in the child welfare system are an important element in ensuring that mental and pediatric health services for their children are utilized appropriately. The high prevalence of mental and physical health problems of children in the child welfare system along with the inadequate utilization of health services make the role of caregivers essential for improving health outcomes. This article explores the barriers to meeting the health needs of this vulnerable population of children and how different types of caregivers (unrelated foster, kinship foster, and birth parents) utilize mental and pediatric health services. Child welfare caseworkers need to increase their communication with caregivers, assess adherence to health care recommendations, and help alleviate barriers to care.

  20. [Protein concentrate from Amaranthus mantegazzianus. Physical, chemical and biological characterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luquez, N; Fernández, S; de Arellano, M L; de Mucciarelli, S I

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this study was the obtainment of a protein concentrate (PC) from A. mantegazzianus seed powder and the evaluation of its percentual chemical composition, functional properties and biological protein quality. For this purpose, the optimal PC conditions assessed were: pH values for maximal and minimal solubility 11.5 and 5 respectively; flour/solvent ratio 1:20, stirring time 1.30 h at room temperature. A product exhibiting a protein content value of 55.3 g/ 100 g was obtained. The functional properties were evaluated by means of the following indexes Nitrogen Solubility Index (NSI) 94.9% at pH 11.5; emulsification activity (EA) 47 +/- 4.8; water absorption capacity (WAC) 2.1 +/- 0.3 and oil absorption capacity (AOAC) 0.8 +/- 0.1. The water and oil absorption index (WOAI) expressed as WAI/OAI was 2.6. These results render the product useful for bread baking due its high solubility, water absorption capacity and the OAI value which shows hydrophilic characteristics. The PC biological quality were calculated determining the net protein utilization (NPU): 64 +/- 7.4, true digestibility (tD): 88 +/- 7.6, biological value (BV): 73, intake: (I) 74 +/- 8.9 and weight gain (delta P) 23 +/- 4.5. The results of this study show a good nitrogen utilization, which plus the functional characterization let us infer that the A. mantegazzianus PC constitutes a good resource for the enrichment of bread baking products, preparing of diets for special regimens and protein complement for deficient foods.

  1. Group behaviour in physical, chemical and biological systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cihan Saçlioğlu; Önder Pekcan; Vidyanand Nanjundiah

    2014-04-01

    Groups exhibit properties that either are not perceived to exist, or perhaps cannot exist, at the individual level. Such `emergent’ properties depend on how individuals interact, both among themselves and with their surroundings. The world of everyday objects consists of material entities. These are, ultimately, groups of elementary particles that organize themselves into atoms and molecules, occupy space, and so on. It turns out that an explanation of even the most commonplace features of this world requires relativistic quantum field theory and the fact that Planck’s constant is discrete, not zero. Groups of molecules in solution, in particular polymers (`sols’), can form viscous clusters that behave like elastic solids (`gels’). Sol-gel transitions are examples of cooperative phenomena. Their occurrence is explained by modelling the statistics of inter-unit interactions: the likelihood of either state varies sharply as a critical parameter crosses a threshold value. Group behaviour among cells or organisms is often heritable and therefore can evolve. This permits an additional, typically biological, explanation for it in terms of reproductive advantage, whether of the individual or of the group. There is no general agreement on the appropriate explanatory framework for understanding group-level phenomena in biology.

  2. Application of the selected physical methods in biological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Tlačbaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of acoustic emission (AE, which is a part of the non-destructive methods, currently having an extensive application. This method is used for measuring the internal defects of materials. AE has a high potential in further research and development to extend the application of this method even in the field of process engineering. For that matter, it is the most elaborate acoustic emission monitoring in laboratory conditions with regard to external stimuli. The aim of the project is to apply the acoustic emission recording the activity of bees in different seasons. The mission is to apply a new perspective on the behavior of colonies by means of acoustic emission, which collects a sound propagation in the material. Vibration is one of the integral part of communication in the community. Sensing colonies with the support of this method is used for understanding of colonies biological behavior to stimuli clutches, colony development etc. Simulating conditions supported by acoustic emission monitoring system the illustrate colonies activity. Collected information will be used to represent a comprehensive view of the life cycle and behavior of honey bees (Apis mellifera. Use of information about the activities of bees gives a comprehensive perspective on using of acoustic emission in the field of biological research.

  3. Analysis of High School Physics, Chemistry and Biology Curriculums in Terms of Scientific Literacy Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Melek Nur; Koseoglu, Fitnat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze 9th grade physics, chemistry and biology curriculums, which were implemented by the Ministry of Education since the academic year 2008-2009, in terms of scientific literacy themes and the balance of these themes and also to examine the quality of statements about objectives. Physics, chemistry, and biology…

  4. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  5. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge in the Physics, Chemistry, and Biology Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge in the physics, chemistry, and biology topics. These topics were the light and sound, the physical and chemical changes, and reproduction, growth, and evolution. Qualitative research design was utilized. Data were collected from 33 pre-service science teachers…

  6. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  8. Independent Benefits of Meeting the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines to Insulin Resistance in Obese Latino Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazrat Mirza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the independent association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA and insulin resistance (IR among obese Latino children (N=113; 7–15 years who were enrolled in a community-based obesity intervention. Baseline information on physical activity was gathered by self-report. Clinical assessments of body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE, as well as glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT were performed after an overnight fast. Insulin resistance was defined as a 2 h insulin concentration >57 μU·mL-1. We observed that those obese children who met the 2008 Guidelines for MVPA (≥60 min/day experienced a significantly lower odds of IR compared with those not meeting the Guidelines (OR=0.29; 95% CI: (0.10–0.92 and these findings were independent of age, sex, pubertal stage, acculturation, fasting insulin, and 2 h glucose concentrations. Efforts to promote 60 min or more of daily MVPA among children from ethnic minority and high-risk communities should assume primary public health importance.

  9. Physical activity and cancer prevention: awareness and meeting the recommendations among adult Saudis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al-Hammam, Abudllah Mohammed; AlMulhim, Nasser Abdullah; Al-Hayan, Mohammed Ibrahim; Al-Mulhim, Mona Mohammed; Al-Mosabeh, Modhahir Jawad; Al-Subaie, Mohammed Ali; Al-Hmmad, Qassem Ahmed; Al-Omran, Ahmed Adi

    2014-01-01

    There is a scarcity of information about the proportion of the adult Saudi population that meet the recommended guidelines of physical activity (PA) to reduce cancer risk. Moreover, their awareness about the role of PA in cancer prevention is unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed at estimating the proportion of adult Saudis meeting the PA guidelines, specifically those recommended by American Cancer Society (ACS) for cancer prevention, and to assess the public awareness about the role of PA in cancer prevention. Using a multistage sampling method, 2,127 adult Saudis of both genders were recruited from 6 urban and 4 rural primary health care centers in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Participants were personally interviewed to gather information about their sociodemographic characteristics, searching activity about PA and cancer, and the time spent in leisure time PA (moderate and vigorous)/week using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire with show cards. Finally, items about the role of PA in cancer risk reduction were inquired. Of the included participants, 11.6% met the recommendations for cancer prevention (≥ 45 minutes of moderate-vigorous PA activity/≥ 5 days/week or 225 minutes/week). Multivariate regression showed that being male (AOR=1.49, CI=1.09-2.06), cancer prevention. Only 11.4% of the sample indicated correctly the frequency and duration of PA required for an average adult to be physically active and while >70% of them indicated the role of PA in prevention of hypertension, coronary heart disease and lowering elevated blood cholesterol, only 18.6% and 21.7% correctly mentioned the role of PA in reducing colon and breast cancer risk, respectively. Poor knowledge was found among those with less than college education and aged ≥ 50 years. The level of knowledge was significantly positively correlated with total leisure time PA of the participants. A minority of adult Saudis in Al Hassa was aware about the role of PA in cancer prevention and

  10. Physics and the molecular revolution in plant biology: union needed for managing the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lüttge

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The question was asked if there is still a prominent role of biophysics in plant biology in an age when molecular biology appears to be dominating. Mathematical formation of theory is essential in systems biology, and mathematics is more inherent in biophysics than in molecular biology. A survey is made identifying and briefly characterizing fields of plant biology where approaches of biophysics remain essential. In transport at membranes electrophysiology and thermodynamics are biophysical topics. Water is a special molecule. Its transport follows the physical laws of osmosis and gradients of water potential on the background of physics of hydraulic architecture. Photobiology needs understanding of the physics of electro-magnetic radiation of quantitative nature in photosynthesis and of qualitative nature in perception by the photo-sensors cryptochromes, phototropins and phytochrome in environmental responses and development. Biophysical oscillators can play a role in biological timing by the circadian clock. Integration in the self-organization of modules, such as roots, stems and leaves, for the emergence of whole plants as unitary organisms needs storage and transport of information where physical modes of signaling are essential with cross talks between electrical and hydraulic signals and with chemical signals. Examples are gravitropism and root-shoot interactions in water relations. All of these facets of plant biophysics overlie plant molecular biology and exchange with it. It is advocated that a union of approaches of plant molecular biology and biophysics needs to be cultivated. In many cases it is already operative. In bionics biophysics is producing output for practical applications linking biology with technology. Biomimetic engineering intrinsically uses physical approaches. An extreme biophysical perspective is looking out for life in space. Sustained and increased practice of biophysics with teaching and research deserves strong

  11. Electrically assisted cycling: a new mode for meeting physical activity guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Monique; Van Es, Eline; Hendriksen, Ingrid

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of the electrically assisted bicycle (EAB) as a novel tool for meeting the physical activity guidelines in terms of intensity. Twelve habitually active adult subjects were requested to cycle a track of 4.3 km at an intensity they would normally choose for commuter cycling, using three different support settings: no support (NO), eco support (ECO), and power support (POW). For estimating the intensity, the oxygen consumption was measured by using a portable gas-analyzing system, and HR was simultaneously measured. The bicycle was equipped with the SRM Training System to measure subjects' power output, pedaling rate, and the cycle velocity. Mean intensity was 6.1 MET for NO, 5.7 MET for ECO, and 5.2 MET for POW. Intensity was significantly lower in POW compared with that in NO. No differences were found between NO and ECO and between ECO and POW. Mean HR was significantly higher in NO compared with that in ECO and POW. The cycling speed with electrical support settings was significantly higher than cycling in the NO condition. Mean power output during cycling was significantly different among all three conditions. Most power outputs were supplied in the NO condition, and the lowest power output was supplied in the POW condition. Intensity during cycling on an EAB, in all three measured conditions, is sufficiently high to contribute to the physical activity guidelines for moderate-intensity health-enhancing physical activity for adults (cutoff, 3 MET). Further study is needed to conclude whether these results still hold when using the EAB in regular daily life and in subjects with other fitness level.

  12. Biochemical physics modeling of biological nano-motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaría-Holek, I.; López-Alamilla, N. J. [UMDI-Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, 76230 Querétaro (Mexico)

    2014-01-14

    We present a biochemical physics model accounting for the dynamics and energetics of both translational and rotational protein motors. A modified version of the hand-over-hand mechanism considering competitive inhibition by ADP is presented. Transition state-like theory is used to reconstruct the time dependent free-energy landscape of the cycle catalyst process that allows to predicting the number of steps or rotations that a single motor can perform. In addition, following the usual approach of chemical kinetics, we calculate the average translational velocity and also the stopping time of processes involving a collectivity of motors, such as exocytosis and endocytosis processes. Finally, we formulate a stochastic model reproducing very well single realizations of kinesin and rotary ATPases.

  13. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 38th annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneyhill, Lisa A; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    The mission of the Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) is to promote education, research, and communication about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. The SCGDB welcomes as members undergraduate students, graduate students, post doctoral researchers, clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academicians who share an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year our members come together to share their novel findings, build upon, and challenge current knowledge of craniofacial biology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Natively unfolded proteins: a point where biology waits for physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2002-04-01

    The experimental material accumulated in the literature on the conformational behavior of intrinsically unstructured (natively unfolded) proteins was analyzed. Results of this analysis showed that these proteins do not possess uniform structural properties, as expected for members of a single thermodynamic entity. Rather, these proteins may be divided into two structurally different groups: intrinsic coils, and premolten globules. Proteins from the first group have hydrodynamic dimensions typical of random coils in poor solvent and do not possess any (or almost any) ordered secondary structure. Proteins from the second group are essentially more compact, exhibiting some amount of residual secondary structure, although they are still less dense than native or molten globule proteins. An important feature of the intrinsically unstructured proteins is that they undergo disorder-order transition during or prior to their biological function. In this respect, the Protein Quartet model, with function arising from four specific conformations (ordered forms, molten globules, premolten globules, and random coils) and transitions between any two of the states, is discussed.

  15. Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology at Yale University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Diego; Noble, Dorottya; Pollard, Thomas; Mochrie, Simon; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2014-03-01

    Quantitative, integrated approaches are necessary to solve biology's grand challenges. Yale's Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology (IGPPEB) prepares students to excel at applying physics and engineering approaches, whilst also ensuring that they are sufficiently biologically sophisticated that they can readily identify and tackle cutting-edge problems. Students enter the program through a ``home'' department but also take a set of IGPPEB core courses with students from other departments. The IGPPEB curriculum is co-taught by faculty from a wide array of departments and motivates students to work together and learn from each other. The curriculum complements those of the home departments and includes primer courses to rapidly bring all students to a level where they ``speak each others language.'' The program is a member of the NSF's Physics of Living Systems: Student Research Network, which connects graduate students from different institutions that are engaged in research at the interface of physics and biology. Convergent research thrusts at Yale include Cellular Shape and Motion; Mechanical Force Generation and Sensing; Biomaterials and Bioinspired Design; Systems and Synthetic Biology; Modeling Biological Processes and Methods Development.

  16. Diagnosis of Physical and Biological Controls on Phytoplankton Distribution in the Sargasso Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Caixia; Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli

    2014-01-01

    The linkage between physical and biological processes is studied by applying a one-dimensional physical-biological coupled model to the Sargasso Sea. The physical model is the Princeton Ocean Model and the biological model is a five-component system including phytoplankton, zooplankton, nitrate, ammonium, and detritus. The coupling between the physical and biological model is accomplished through vertical mixing which is parameterized by the level 2.5 Mellor and Yamada turbulence closure scheme. The coupled model investigates the annual cycle of ecosystem production and the response to external forcing, such as heat flux, wind stress, and surface salinity, and the relative importance of physical processes in affecting the ecosystem. Sensitivity ex-periments are also carried out, which provide information on how the model bio-chemical parameters affect the biological system. The computed seasonal cycles compare reasonably well with the observations of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS). The spring bloom of phytoplankton occurs in March and April, right after the weakening of the winter mixing and before the estab-lishment of the summer stratification. The bloom of zooplankton occurs about two weeks after the bloom of phytoplankton. The sen-sitivity experiments show that zooplankton is more sensitive to the variations of biochemical parameters than phytoplankton.

  17. Simulations in statistical physics and biology: some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Monsivais-Alonso, M P

    2006-01-01

    One of the most active areas of physics in the last decades has been that of critical phenomena, and Monte Carlo simulations have played an important role as a guide for the validation and prediction of system properties close to the critical points. The kind of phase transitions occurring for the Betts lattice (lattice constructed removing 1/7 of the sites from the triangular lattice) have been studied before with the Potts model for the values q=3, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regime. Here, we add up to this research line the ferromagnetic case for q=4 and 5. In the first case, the critical exponents are estimated for the second order transition, whereas for the latter case the histogram method is applied for the occurring first order transition. Additionally, Domany's Monte Carlo based clustering technique mainly used to group genes similar in their expression levels is reviewed. Finally, a control theory tool --an adaptive observer-- is applied to estimate the exponent parameter involved in the wel...

  18. 77 FR 42319 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... lines derived from human tumors for vaccine manufacture. FDA intends to make background material...

  19. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends to...

  20. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... circovirus type 1 (PCV 1) in Rotarix, a U.S. licensed vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and indicated...

  1. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season. The...

  2. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season. FDA...

  3. 77 FR 63839 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... immunogenicity of an Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Monovalent Vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. On November 15...

  4. Annual rhythms that underlie phenology : biological time-keeping meets environmental change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, Barbara; Ben-Shlomo, Rachel; Sheriff, Michael J; Hut, Roelof A; Foster, Russell; Barnes, Brian M; Dominoni, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal recurrence of biological processes (phenology) and its relationship to environmental change is recognized as being of key scientific and public concern, but its current study largely overlooks the extent to which phenology is based on biological time-keeping mechanisms. We highlight the rel

  5. Statistical analysis of highly correlated systems in biology and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hector Garcia

    In this dissertation, I present my work on the statistical study of highly correlated systems in three fields of science: ecology, microbial ecology and physics. I propose an explanation for how the highly correlated distribution of species individuals, and an abundance distribution commonly observed in ecological systems, give rise to a power law dependence between a given area and the number of unique species it harbors. This is one of the oldest known ecological patterns: the power-law Species Area Rule. As a natural extension of my studies in ecology, I have undertaken both theoretical research and field work in the developing field of microbial ecology. In particular, I participated in a multidisciplinary study of the impact of microbes on the formation of macroscopic calcium carbonate terraces at Yellowstone National Park Hot Springs. I have used ecological techniques to characterize the biodiversity of our study site and developed a new bootstrap method for extracting abundance information from clone libraries. This has singled out the most abundant microorganisms and paved the way for future studies of the possible non-passive role of microorganisms in carbonate precipitation. The third part of my thesis uses statistical techniques to explore the correlations in rotating Bose-Einstein condensates. I have used finite difference techniques to solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in order to obtain the structure of a vortex in a lattice. Surprisingly, I have found that, in order to understand this structure, it is necessary to add a correction to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation which introduces a dependence on the particle scattering length. I have also used Path Integral Monte Carlo techniques to explore the limit of rapid rotations, where the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is no longer valid. Interestingly, the Gross-Pitaevskii equation seems to be valid for much higher densities than expected if properly renormalized. I show that, in accord with the prediction of

  6. 76 FR 12996 - Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...., Arlington, VA 22230. Type of Meeting: Open. Contact Person: Chuck Liarakos, National Science Foundation..., and a progress report on BIO's ongoing experiments in innovation. In addition, the BIO AC will...

  7. Biology and physics competencies for pre-health and other life sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert C; Friedlander, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    The recent report on the Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (SFFP) and the revised Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) reframe the preparation for medical school (and other health professional schools) in terms of competencies: what students should know and be able to do with that knowledge, with a strong emphasis on scientific inquiry and research skills. In this article, we will describe the thinking that went into the SFFP report and what it says about scientific and quantitative reasoning, focusing on biology and physics and the overlap between those fields. We then discuss how the SFFP report set the stage for the discussion of the recommendations for the revised MCAT, which will be implemented in 2015, again focusing the discussion on biology and physics. Based on that framework, we discuss the implications for undergraduate biology and physics education if students are to be prepared to demonstrate these competencies.

  8. Students' Views of Macroscopic and Microscopic Energy in Physics and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W; Watkins, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Energy concepts are fundamental across the sciences, yet these concepts can be fragmented along disciplinary boundaries, rather than integrated into a coherent whole. To teach physics effectively to biology students, we need to understand students' disciplinary perspectives. We present interview data from an undergraduate student who displays multiple stances towards the concept of energy. At times he views energy in macroscopic contexts as a separate entity from energy in microscopic (particularly biological) contexts, while at other times he uses macroscopic physics phenomena as productive analogies for understanding energy in the microscopic biological context, and he reasons about energy transformations between the microscopic and macroscopic scales. This case study displays preliminary evidence for the context dependence of students' ability to translate energy concepts across scientific disciplines. This points to challenges that must be taken into account in developing curricula for biology students th...

  9. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffee Elizabeth M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN. In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Teaching Emergence and Collective Behavior in Physics and Biology to Non-majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Emergence and collective behavior form one of the most fertile intersections of physics and biology in current research. Unfortunately, modern and interdisciplinary concepts such as these are often neglected in physics courses for non-majors. A team of four graduate students and a faculty advisor recently redesigned our department's course for non-majors (Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science Students) to focus on emergence and collective behavior along with three other major themes in modern physics. In the course we developed basic concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics to understand a variety of emergent phenomena in physics and biology, including bird flocking, superconductivity, and protein folding. We discussed the notion of life itself as an inherently emergent phenomenon arising from the collective behavior of molecules. The students also wrote their own blog posts on emergent phenomena and interactively explored emergence through workshops on Foldit (the protein folding game) and Conway's Game of Life. We believe our course demonstrates some possibilities and challenges for teaching non-majors at the intersection of physics and biology. I gratefully acknowledge my collaboration with Aatish Bhatia, Deepak Iyer, Simon Knapen, and Saurabh Jha.

  11. The impact of biologic and conventional therapy on physical function in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Callhoff, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: For patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, preservation of functional capacity is an important issue. This work investigates the effect on physical function of biologics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the effect of TNFα inhibitors on patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and that of oral prednisolone in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Two meta-analyses were conducted to assess the efficacy of biologics resp. TNFα inhibitors in RA and axSpA. These co...

  12. Meeting Classroom Needs: Designing Space Physics Educational Outreach for Science Education Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M.

    2008-12-01

    As with all NASA missions, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) is required to have an education and public outreach program (E/PO). Through our partnership between the University of Texas at Dallas William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences and Department of Science/Mathematics Education, the decision was made early on to design our educational outreach around the needs of teachers. In the era of high-stakes testing and No Child Left Behind, materials that do not meet the content and process standards teachers must teach cannot be expected to be integrated into classroom instruction. Science standards, both state and National, were the fundamental drivers behind the designs of our curricular materials, professional development opportunities for teachers, our target grade levels, and even our popular informal educational resource, the "Cindi in Space" comic book. The National Science Education Standards include much more than content standards, and our E/PO program was designed with this knowledge in mind as well. In our presentation we will describe how we came to our approach for CINDI E/PO, and how we have been successful in our efforts to have CINDI materials and key concepts make the transition into middle school classrooms. We will also present on our newest materials and high school physics students and professional development for their teachers.

  13. Where mathematics, computer science, linguistics and biology meet essays in honour of Gheorghe Păun

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrana, Victor

    2001-01-01

    In the last years, it was observed an increasing interest of computer scientists in the structure of biological molecules and the way how they can be manipulated in vitro in order to define theoretical models of computation based on genetic engineering tools. Along the same lines, a parallel interest is growing regarding the process of evolution of living organisms. Much of the current data for genomes are expressed in the form of maps which are now becoming available and permit the study of the evolution of organisms at the scale of genome for the first time. On the other hand, there is an active trend nowadays throughout the field of computational biology toward abstracted, hierarchical views of biological sequences, which is very much in the spirit of computational linguistics. In the last decades, results and methods in the field of formal language theory that might be applied to the description of biological sequences were pointed out.

  14. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of biological agents: when modeling meets reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Frame, Bill

    2010-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of many biological agents (biologics) have inherent complexities requiring specialized approaches to develop reliable, unbiased models. Three cases are covered: preponderance of zero values, nonresponder subpopulations, and adaptive dosing. Engineered biologics exhibit high affinity for target receptors. Biologics can saturate receptors, abolishing free receptor levels for protracted periods. Consequently, the distribution of observations can be heavy at, and near, the boundary. A 2-part model (ie, a truncated δ log-normal distribution) may be appropriate. Mixture models identify subpopulations based on bimodal or multimodal distributions of η values. With biologics, PD may be compromised because of lack of receptors, or the PD may be affected because of other events resulting in erratic excursions. Nonresponders exhibit a random walk-around placebo trajectory, resulting in high residual variability. The distributions of etas are often badly skewed or polymodal. An indescribable mixture model separates subjects who are nonresponders, providing diagnostic pharmacologic information on the drug. Many biologics use PD-based adaptive dosing. During model development, data used for model development include adaptive dosing. For simulation, adaptive dosing must be implemented. Failure to account for dose adjustments results in biased or inflated prediction intervals because subjects in the simulated data undergo inappropriate dose adjustments.

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  16. Evidence that women meeting physical activity guidelines do not sit less: An observational inclinometry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craft Lynette L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inactivity physiology paradigm proposes that sedentary behaviors, including sitting too much, are independent of the type of physical activity delineated for health in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Thus, we hypothesized that, when accounting for behaviors across the entire day, variability in the amount of time spent sitting would be independent of the inter-and intra-individual time engaged in sustained moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA. Methods Ninety-one healthy women, aged 40–75 years, completed a demographic questionnaire and assessment of height and weight. Participants wore the activPAL activity monitor for one week and time (minutes/day spent sitting, standing, stepping, and in sustained bouts (bouts ≥10 minutes of MVPA were quantified. The women were then stratified into groups based on weekly sustained MVPA. Additionally, each day of data collection for each participant was classified as either a “sufficient” MVPA day (≥ 30 min of MVPA or an “insufficient” MVPA day for within-participant analyses. Results Time spent sitting, standing, and in incidental non-exercise stepping averaged 64, 28, and 11 hrs/week, respectively, and did not differ between groups with individuals meeting/exceeding the current exercise recommendation of 150 min/week of sustained MVPA in ≥10 minutes bouts (M = 294 min/week, SD = 22 compared to those with none or minimal levels (M= 20min/week, SD = 4. Time spent sitting (M = 9.1 hr/day, SD = 0.19 vs. M = 8.8 hr/day, SD = 0.22, standing (M = 3.9 hr/day, SD = 0.16 vs. M = 3.9 hr/day, SD = 0.15, and in intermittent stepping (M = 1.6 hr/day, SD = 0.07 vs. M = 1.6 hr/day, SD = 0.06 did not differ between days with (~55 min/day and without recommended MVPA. Conclusions This study provides the first objective evidence that participation in sustained MVPA is unrelated to daily sitting duration in relatively healthy, middle and older-aged women. More

  17. 4D-Var data assimilation system for a coupled physical biological model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J M Lellouche; M Ouberdous; W Eifler

    2000-12-01

    A 3-compartment model of phytoplankton growth dynamics has been coupled with a primitive-equation circulation model to better understand and quantify physical and biological processes in the Adriatic Sea. This paper presents the development and application of a data assimilation procedure based on optimal control theory. The aim of the procedure is to identify a set of model coefficient values that ensures the best fit between data and model results by minimizing a function that measures model and data discrepancies. In this sense, twin experiments have been successfully implemented in order to have a better estimation of biological model parameters and biological initial conditions.

  18. After the Greeting: Realizing the Potential of Physical Models in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch, Ewa K

    2015-12-01

    Biophysics is increasingly taking center stage in cell biology as the tools for precise quantifications of cellular behaviors expand. Interdisciplinary approaches, combining quantitative physical modeling with cell biology, are of growing interest to journal editors, funding agencies, and hiring committees. However, despite an ever-increasing emphasis on the importance of interdisciplinary research, the student trained in biology may still be at a loss as to what it actually means. I discuss here some considerations on how to achieve meaningful and high-quality interdisciplinary work.

  19. From Molecules to Living Organisms : an Interplay between Biology and Physics : Lecture Notes of the Les Houches School of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nury, Hughes; Parcy, François; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Ziegler, Christine; Cugliandolo, Leticia F; Session CII

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide new ideas for studying living matter by a simultaneous understanding of behavior from molecules to the cell, to the whole organism in the light of physical concepts. Indeed, forces guide most biological phenomena. In some cases these forces can be well-described and thus used to model a particular biological phenomenon. This is exemplified here by the study of membranes, where their shapes and curvatures can be modeled using a limited number of parameters that are measured experimentally. The growth of plants is another example where the combination of physics, biology and mathematics leads to a predictive model. The laws of thermodynamics are essential, as they dictate the behavior of proteins, or more generally biological molecules, in an aqueous environment. Integrated studies from the molecule to a larger scale need a combination of cutting-edge approaches, such as the use of new X-ray sources, in-cell NMR, cryo-electron microscopy or single-molecule microscopy. Some are...

  20. How can we improve problem-solving in undergraduate biology? Applying lessons from 30 years of physics education research

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskinson, Anne-Marie; Knight, Jennifer K

    2012-01-01

    Modern biological problems are complex. If students are to successfully grapple with such problems as scientists and citizens, they need to have practiced solving authentic, complex problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem-solving for the last three decades. Although the surface features and content of biology problems differ from physics problems, teachers of both sciences want students to learn to explain patterns and processes in the natural world and to make predictions about system behaviors. After surveying literature on problem-solving in physics and biology, we propose how biology education researchers could apply research-supported pedagogical techniques from physics to enhance biology students' problem-solving. First, we characterize the problems that biology students are typically asked to solve. We then describe the development of research-validated physics problem-solving curricula. Finally, we propose how biology scholars can appl...

  1. Inaugural meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology report: the importance of diversity in a multidisciplinary field

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the interdisciplinary state of evolutionary developmental biology based on the diversity of themes, taxa, levels of organization and scientists at the first meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology (2015). We first highlight selected presentations representative of three themes: gene regulatory control, developmental patterning mechanisms, and ecological-evolutionary-developmental interactions. We summarize the questions, approaches, and taxonomic ...

  2. proceedings of the 11. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology; Anais da 11. Reuniao anual da Federacao de Sociedades de Biologia Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The proceedings of the 11. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology contains 1850 abstracts, which include the following topics: neuroscience and behaviour; biophysics; pharmacology; comparative physiology; nervous regulation; endocrinology; nefrology; vascular biology; toxicity; molecular biophysics; radiobiology and others. Among these, 169 abstracts have been indexed separately for the INIS database

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological and Physical Research Enterprise Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, NASA's new Vision and Mission focuses the Agency's Enterprises toward exploration and discovery.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise has a unique and enabling role in support of the Agency's Vision and Mission. Our strategic research seeks innovations and solutions to enable the extension of life into deep space safely and productively. Our fundamental research, as well as our research partnerships with industry and other agencies, allow new knowledge and tech- nologies to bring improvements to life on Earth. Our interdisciplinary research in the unique laboratory of microgravity addresses opportunities and challenges on our home planet as well as in space environments. The Enterprise maintains a key role in encouraging and engaging the next generation of explorers from primary school through the grad- uate level via our direct student participation in space research.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise encompasses three themes. The biological sciences research theme investigates ways to support a safe human presence in space. This theme addresses the definition and control of physiological and psychological risks from the space environment, including radiation,reduced gravity, and isolation. The biological sciences research theme is also responsible for the develop- ment of human support systems technology as well as fundamental biological research spanning topics from genomics to ecologies. The physical sciences research theme supports research that takes advantage of the space environment to expand our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. This theme also supports applied physical sciences research to improve safety and performance of humans in space. The research partnerships and flight support theme establishes policies and allocates space resources to encourage and develop entrepreneurial partners access to space research.Working together across research disciplines, the Biological and Physical

  4. Essential concepts and underlying theories from physics, chemistry, and mathematics for "biochemistry and molecular biology" majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics that all Biochemistry or Molecular Biology majors must understand to complete their major coursework. The allied fields working group created a survey to validate foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics identified from participant feedback at various workshops. One-hundred twenty participants responded to the survey and 68% of the respondents answered yes to the question: "We have identified the following as the core concepts and underlying theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics that Biochemistry majors or Molecular Biology majors need to understand after they complete their major courses: 1) mechanical concepts from Physics, 2) energy and thermodynamic concepts from Physics, 3) critical concepts of structure from chemistry, 4) critical concepts of reactions from Chemistry, and 5) essential Mathematics. In your opinion, is the above list complete?" Respondents also delineated subcategories they felt should be included in these broad categories. From the results of the survey and this analysis the allied fields working group constructed a consensus list of allied fields concepts, which will help inform Biochemistry and Molecular Biology educators when considering the ASBMB recommended curriculum for Biochemistry or Molecular Biology majors and in the development of appropriate assessment tools to gauge student understanding of how these concepts relate to biochemistry and molecular biology.

  5. News Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

  6. Nanobiotechnology meets plant cell biology: Carbon nanotubes as organelle targeting nanocarriers

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2013-01-01

    For years, nanotechnology has shown great promise in the fields of biomedical and biotechnological sciences and medical research. In this review, we demonstrate its versatility and applicability in plant cell biology studies. Specifically, we discuss the ability of functionalized carbon nanotubes to penetrate the plant cell wall, target specific organelles, probe protein-carrier activity and induce organelle recycling in plant cells. We also, shed light on prospective applications of carbon nanomaterials in cell biology and plant cell transformation. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Biology of childhood osteogenic sarcoma and potential targets for therapeutic development : Meeting summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorlick, R; Anderson, P; Andrulis, [No Value; Arndt, C; Beardsley, GP; Bernstein, M; Bridge, J; Cheung, NK; Dome, JS; Ebb, D; Gardner, T; Gebhardt, M; Grier, H; Hansen, M; Healey, J; Helman, L; Hock, J; Houghton, J; Houghton, P; Huvos, A; Khanna, C; Kieran, M; Kleinerman, E; Ladanyi, M; Lau, C; Malkin, D; Marina, N; Meltzer, P; Meyers, P; Schofield, D; Schwartz, C; Smith, MA; Toretsky, J; Tsokos, M; Wexler, L; Wigginton, J; Withrow, S; Schoenfeldt, M; Anderson, B

    2003-01-01

    Childhood osteogenic sarcoma (OS) is a rare bone cancer occurring primarily in adolescents. The North American pediatric cooperative groups have performed a series of clinical treatment trials in this disease over the past several decades, and biology studies of tumor tissue have been an important

  8. The 1956 Qingdao Meeting on Genetics: an important turning point of Chinese biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Le Kang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Lysenkoism once was a popular word in the middle of the last century, but is now long forgotten by most people.Many young Chinese have never heard of T.D.Lysenko or Lysenkoism, neither do they know the impact Lysenkoism had on the history of biology in the former Soviet Union, in Eastem Europe, and in China.

  9. Using Metaphor Theory to Examine Conceptions of Energy in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important unifying themes in science. Yet the way energy is conceptualized varies depending on context. In this paper, the discourse used to explain the role of energy in systems from biology, chemistry, and physics is examined from the perspective of metaphor theory. Six substance metaphors for energy are identified in…

  10. What Are the Effects of Implementing Learning-Focused Strategies in Biology and Physical Science Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if Learning-Focused Strategies (LFS) implemented in high school science courses would affect student achievement and the pass rate of biology and physical science Common District Assessments (CDAs). The LFS, specific teaching strategies contained in the Learning-Focused Strategies Model (LFSM) Program…

  11. Preservice Teachers' Epistemological Beliefs in Physics, Chemistry, and Biology: A Mixed Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Mustafa Sami

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to assess preservice teachers' domain-specific epistemological beliefs and to investigate whether preservice teachers distinguish disciplinary differences (physics, chemistry, and biology) in domain-specific epistemological beliefs. Mixed-method research design guided the present research. The researcher explored…

  12. Leveraging a Relationship with Biology to Expand a Relationship with Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    This work examines how experiences in one disciplinary domain (biology) can impact the relationship a student builds with another domain (physics). We present a model for disciplinary relationships using the constructs of identity, affect, and epistemology. With these constructs we examine an ethnographic case study of a student who experienced a…

  13. Resource Letter TTSM-1: Teaching thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in introductory physics, chemistry, and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W; Meltzer, David E; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2014-01-01

    This Resource Letter draws on discipline-based education research from physics, chemistry, and biology to collect literature on the teaching of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in the three disciplines. While the overlap among the disciplinary literatures is limited at present, we hope this Resource Letter will spark more interdisciplinary interaction.

  14. Job Satisfaction Levels of Secondary School Physics, Chemistry and Biology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskan, A. Kadir

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the job satisfaction levels of the teachers participating in the study and to investigate whether their job satisfaction levels differ with respect to certain variables. The participants of the study were 297 science teachers (physics: 104, chemistry: 105, biology: 87 and 1 N/A) from secondary schools in…

  15. Essential Concepts and Underlying Theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics for "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry,…

  16. Differences in biological maturation, anthropometry and physical performance between playing positions in youth team handball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthys, S.P.; Fransen, J.; Vaeyens, R.; Lenoir, M.; Philippaerts, R.

    2013-01-01

    It was the goal of this cross-sectional study to examine differences in maturity, anthropometry and physical performance between youth handball players across different playing positions (i.e. goalkeeper, back, pivot and wing). Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), accounting for biological

  17. Physical and biological changes of suspended particles in a free surface flow constructed wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulling, B.T.M.; van den Boomen, R.M.; Claassen, T.H.L.; van der Geest, H.G.; Kappelhof, J.W.N.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Suspended particles are considered as contaminants in treated wastewater and can have profound effects on the biological, physical and chemical properties of receiving aquatic ecosystems, depending on the concentration, type and nature of the suspended particles. Constructed wetlands are known to

  18. The Reproduction of Biological "Race" through Physical Education Textbooks and Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Brent

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the usage of "race" in high school physical education textbooks in Australia. In particular, it examines the concept of biological "race" in connection with human performance in sport. DNA studies do not indicate that separate classifiable subspecies (races) exist within modern humans. A content analysis of…

  19. What Are the Effects of Implementing Learning-Focused Strategies in Biology and Physical Science Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if Learning-Focused Strategies (LFS) implemented in high school science courses would affect student achievement and the pass rate of biology and physical science Common District Assessments (CDAs). The LFS, specific teaching strategies contained in the Learning-Focused Strategies Model (LFSM) Program…

  20. The College Commissions - Agriculture, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, Joyce Lane

    Information concerning the eight science college commissions now in existence is provided. These commissions encompass the fields of agriculture, biology, chemistry, engineering, geography, geology, mathematics and physics. An overview of the primary functions and commitments of the commissions and consulting services offered is presented. Also…

  1. Resource Letter TTSM-1: Teaching Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics in Introductory Physics, Chemistry, and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Geller, Benjamin D.; Meltzer, David E.; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2015-01-01

    This Resource Letter draws on discipline-based education research from physics, chemistry, and biology to collect literature on the teaching of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in the three disciplines. While the overlap among the disciplinary literatures is limited at present, we hope this Resource Letter will spark more interdisciplinary interaction.

  2. The biological and physical role of mulch in the rehabilitation of custed soil in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mando, A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    1999-01-01

    During three consecutive years (1993–1995) a split-plot design with three replications was used to study the biological and physical role of mulch in the improvement of crusted soil water balance and its productivity in the north of Burkina Faso. The main treatment was the use of an insecticide, to

  3. Job Satisfaction Levels of Secondary School Physics, Chemistry and Biology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskan, A. Kadir

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the job satisfaction levels of the teachers participating in the study and to investigate whether their job satisfaction levels differ with respect to certain variables. The participants of the study were 297 science teachers (physics: 104, chemistry: 105, biology: 87 and 1 N/A) from secondary schools in…

  4. The biological and physical role of mulch in the rehabilitation of custed soil in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mando, A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    1999-01-01

    During three consecutive years (1993–1995) a split-plot design with three replications was used to study the biological and physical role of mulch in the improvement of crusted soil water balance and its productivity in the north of Burkina Faso. The main treatment was the use of an insecticide, to

  5. Molecules and grains in space: 50th International meeting of physical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenner, I. [ed.] [LURE, Orsay (France)

    1994-12-31

    These proceedings represent papers presented at a meeting on molecular and grains in space. Among the varied topics discussed were observational data from diffuse clouds, structure and dynamics of molecular systems, collisions and reactivity, ices and carbonaceous materials in grains etc.. There were ninety three papers presented at the meeting and one has been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. (AIP)

  6. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Després, V.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Psenner, R.; Ariya, P. A.; Pósfai, M.; Ahern, H. E.; Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2009-04-01

    The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques) required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  7. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Georgakopoulos

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  8. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Georgakopoulos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  9. BIO2010 and beyond: What undergraduate physics does the next generation of molecular biology researchers need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jonathon

    2004-03-01

    What fundamental skills in mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science and engineering are required at the undergraduate level to prepare the next generation of biology majors who will become research scientists? To address this question, Bruce Alberts, President of the National Academy of Sciences, established BIO2010, a committee of the National Research Council (USA), chaired by Lubert Stryer. The report of the committee was published in 2003 as BIO2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists (National Academies Press, Washington DC, www.national-academies.com). I will summarize the recommendations of the Physics and Engineering Panel that was chaired by John Hopfield and give my own views of what physics is essential for researchers in cell and molecular biology.

  10. Scientific session of the General meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (7 December 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    A scientific session of the General meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 7 December 2015. The papers collected in this issue were written based on talks given at the session (the program of the session is available on the RAS Physical Sciences Division website http://www.gpad.ac.ru). (1) Loshchenov V B (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Pharmacodynamics of a nanophotosensitizer under irradiation by an electromagnetic field: from THz to Cherenkov radiation"; (2) Zhuikov B L (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Successes and problems in the development of medical radioisotope production in Russia"; (3) Tikhonov Yu A (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk) "Applying nuclear physics methods in healthcare"; (4) Turchin I V (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs"; (5) Breus T K, Petrukovich A A (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow), Binhi V N (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow; Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Magnetic factor in solar-terrestrial relations and its impact on the human body: physical problems and prospects for research"; (6) Makarov D I (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Nizhnii Arkhyz, Zelenchukskii region, Karachai-Cherkessian Republic) "Studying the Local University". Papers based on oral reports 2, 4, and 5 are presented below. • Successes and problems in the development of medical radioisotope production in Russia, B L Zhuikov Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 5, Pages 481-486 • Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs, I V Turchin Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 5, Pages 487-501 • Magnetic factor in solar-terrestrial relations and its impact on the human body: physical problems and

  11. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can We Listen for Open Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    disappear as these mammals begin their annual migration to the Arctic Ocean. The soundscape shows loud floe-banging conditions mixed with periods of...Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for...research effort is to enhance the understanding of how variability in physical, biological, and acoustic signals impact marine mammal habitat use. This is

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  14. Coordinating an IPLS class with a biology curriculum: NEXUS/Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redish, Edward

    2014-03-01

    A multi-disciplinary team of scientists has been reinventing the Introductory Physics for Life Scientists (IPLS) course at the University of Maryland. We focus on physics that connects elements common to the curriculum for all life scientists - molecular and cellular biology - with building general scientific competencies, such as mathematical modeling, reasoning from core principles, and multi-representation translation. The prerequisites for the class include calculus, chemistry, and biology. In addition to building the basic ideas of the Newtonian framework, electric currents, and optics, our prerequisites allow us to include topics such as atomic interactions and chemical bonding, random motion and diffusion, thermodynamics (including entropy and free energy), and spectroscopy. Our chemical bonding unit helps students link the view of energy developed in traditional macroscopic physics with the idea of chemical bonding as a source of energy presented in their chemistry and biology classes. Education research has played a central role in our design, as has a strong collaboration between our Discipline-Based Education and the Biophysics Research groups. These elements permit us to combine modern pedagogy with cutting-edge insights into the physics of living systems. Supported in part by a grant from HHMI and the US NSF grant #1122818/.

  15. A physical-biological coupled model for algal dynamics in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, U; Hutter, K; Jöhnk, K

    1999-03-01

    A coupled model is presented for simulating physical and biological dynamics in fresh water lakes. The physical model rests upon the assumption that the turbulent kinetic energy in a water column of the lake is fully contained in a mixed layer of variable depth. Below this layer the mechanical energy content is assumed to vanish. Additionally, the horizontal currents are ignored. This one-dimensional two-layered model describes the internal conversion of the mechanical and thermal energy input from the atmosphere into an evolution of the mixed layer depth by entrainment and detrainment mechanisms. It is supposed to form the physical domain in which the simulation of the biological processes takes place. The biological model describes mathematically the typical properties of phyto- and zooplankton, their interactions and their response to the physical environment. This description then allows the study of the behaviour of Lagrangian clusters of virtual plankton that are subjected to such environments. The essence of the model is the dynamical simulation of an arbitrary number of nutrient limited phytoplankton species and one species of zooplankton. The members of the food web above and below affect the model only statically. The model is able to reproduce the typical progression of a predator-prey interaction between phyto- and zooplankton as well as the exploitative competition for nutrients between two phytoplankton species under grazing pressure of Daphnia. It suggests that the influence of the biological system on the physical system results in a weak increase of the surface temperature for coupled simulations, but a considerably higher seasonal thermocline in spring and a lower one in autumn.

  16. Synthetic biology meets bioprinting: enabling technologies for humans on Mars (and Earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration off planet is severely limited by the cost of launching materials into space and by re-supply. Thus materials brought from Earth must be light, stable and reliable at destination. Using traditional approaches, a lunar or Mars base would require either transporting a hefty store of metals or heavy manufacturing equipment and construction materials for in situ extraction; both would severely limit any other mission objectives. Long-term human space presence requires periodic replenishment, adding a massive cost overhead. Even robotic missions often sacrifice science goals for heavy radiation and thermal protection. Biology has the potential to solve these problems because life can replicate and repair itself, and perform a wide variety of chemical reactions including making food, fuel and materials. Synthetic biology enhances and expands life's evolved repertoire. Using organisms as feedstock, additive manufacturing through bioprinting will make possible the dream of producing bespoke tools, food, smart fabrics and even replacement organs on demand. This new approach and the resulting novel products will enable human exploration and settlement on Mars, while providing new manufacturing approaches for life on Earth. PMID:27528764

  17. Tiny cells meet big questions: a closer look at bacterial cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goley, Erin D

    2013-04-01

    While studying actin assembly as a graduate student with Matt Welch at the University of California at Berkeley, my interest was piqued by reports of surprising observations in bacteria: the identification of numerous cytoskeletal proteins, actin homologues fulfilling spindle-like functions, and even the presence of membrane-bound organelles. Curiosity about these phenomena drew me to Lucy Shapiro's lab at Stanford University for my postdoctoral research. In the Shapiro lab, and now in my lab at Johns Hopkins, I have focused on investigating the mechanisms of bacterial cytokinesis. Spending time as both a eukaryotic cell biologist and a bacterial cell biologist has convinced me that bacterial cells present the same questions as eukaryotic cells: How are chromosomes organized and accurately segregated? How is force generated for cytokinesis? How is polarity established? How are signals transduced within and between cells? These problems are conceptually similar between eukaryotes and bacteria, although their solutions can differ significantly in specifics. In this Perspective, I provide a broad view of cell biological phenomena in bacteria, the technical challenges facing those of us who peer into bacterial cells, and areas of common ground as research in eukaryotic and bacterial cell biology moves forward.

  18. Synthetic biology meets bioprinting: enabling technologies for humans on Mars (and Earth).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J

    2016-08-15

    Human exploration off planet is severely limited by the cost of launching materials into space and by re-supply. Thus materials brought from Earth must be light, stable and reliable at destination. Using traditional approaches, a lunar or Mars base would require either transporting a hefty store of metals or heavy manufacturing equipment and construction materials for in situ extraction; both would severely limit any other mission objectives. Long-term human space presence requires periodic replenishment, adding a massive cost overhead. Even robotic missions often sacrifice science goals for heavy radiation and thermal protection. Biology has the potential to solve these problems because life can replicate and repair itself, and perform a wide variety of chemical reactions including making food, fuel and materials. Synthetic biology enhances and expands life's evolved repertoire. Using organisms as feedstock, additive manufacturing through bioprinting will make possible the dream of producing bespoke tools, food, smart fabrics and even replacement organs on demand. This new approach and the resulting novel products will enable human exploration and settlement on Mars, while providing new manufacturing approaches for life on Earth.

  19. Cancer metabolism meets systems biology: Pyruvate kinase isoform PKM2 is a metabolic master regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian V Filipp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase activity is controlled by a tightly woven regulatory network. The oncofetal isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2 is a master regulator of cancer metabolism. PKM2 engages in parallel, feed-forward, positive and negative feedback control contributing to cancer progression. Besides its metabolic role, non-metabolic functions of PKM2 as protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator for c-MYC and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha are essential for epidermal growth factor receptor activation-induced tumorigenesis. These biochemical activities are controlled by a shift in the oligomeric state of PKM2 that includes acetylation, oxidation, phosphorylation, prolyl hydroxylation and sumoylation. Metabolically active PKM2 tetramer is allosterically regulated and responds to nutritional and stress signals. Metabolically inactive PKM2 dimer is imported into the nucleus and can function as protein kinase stimulating transcription. A systems biology approach to PKM2 at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome level reveals how differences in biomolecular structure translate into a global rewiring of cancer metabolism. Cancer systems biology takes us beyond the Warburg effect, opening unprecedented therapeutic opportunities.

  20. The Biology Of Physics: What The Brain Reveals About Our Understanding Of The Physical World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Kevin Niall

    2009-11-01

    Fundamental concepts in physics such as Newtonian mechanics are surprisingly difficult to learn and discover. Over the past decade have been using an educational neuroscience approach to science education using a combination of ecologically naturalistic situations, classroom settings, and neuroimaging methodologies to investigate the different ways that scientific concepts are invoked or activated in different contexts. In particular, we have sought to determine how networks of brain regions that are highly sensitive to features of the context in which they are used are involved in the use of scientific concepts. We have found that some concepts in physics that are highly tuned to perception are often inhibited in experts (with increased activations in error detection and inhibitory networks of the prefrontal cortex) rather than having undergone a wholesale conceptual reorganization. Other, concepts, such as those involved in perceptual causality can activate highly diverse brain regions, depending on task instructions. For example, when students are shown movies of balls colliding, we find increased activation in the right parietal lobe, yet when the students see the exact same movies and are told that these are positively charged particles repulsing we find increased activations in the temporal lobe that is consistent with the students retrieving semantic information. We also see similar see similar changes in activation patterns in students learning about phase shifts in chemistry classes. A key component of both students and scientists' discourse and reasoning is analogical thinking. Our recent fMRI work indicates that categorization is a key component of this type of reasoning that helps bind superficially different concepts together in the service of reasoning about the causes of unexpected findings. Taken together, these results are allowing us to make insights into the contextually relevant networks of knowledge that are activated during learning. This work

  1. Program and abstracts of the 25. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Programa e resumos da 25. Reuniao anual da Sociedade Brasileira de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The meeting was about biochemistry and molecular biology.In this meeting it was also discussed the following subjects: biotechnology, metabolism, enzymes, proteins, immunology, drugs and others related topics.

  2. A census of cells in time: quantitative genetics meets developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitwood, Daniel H; Sinha, Neelima R

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative genetics has become a popular method for determining the genetic basis of natural variation. Combined with genomic methods, it provides a tool for discerning the genetic basis of gene expression. So-called genetical genomics approaches yield a wealth of genomic information, but by necessity, because of cost and time, fail to resolve the differences between organs, tissues, and/or cell types. Similarly, quantitative approaches in development that might potentially address these issues are seldom applied to quantitative genetics. We discuss recent advances in cell type-specific isolation methods, the quantitative analysis of phenotype, and developmental modeling that are compatible with quantitative genetics and, with time, promise to bridge the gap between these two powerful disciplines yielding unprecedented biological insight.

  3. Advantages and challenges of using physics curricula as a model for reforming an undergraduate biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, D A; Atkins, L J; Salter, I Y; Gallagher, D J; Kratz, R F; Rousseau, J V; Nelson, G D

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of a life sciences curriculum, targeted to undergraduate students, which was modeled after a commercially available physics curriculum and based on aspects of how people learn. Our paper describes the collaborative development process and necessary modifications required to apply a physics pedagogical model in a life sciences context. While some approaches were easily adapted, others provided significant challenges. Among these challenges were: representations of energy, introducing definitions, the placement of Scientists' Ideas, and the replicability of data. In modifying the curriculum to address these challenges, we have come to see them as speaking to deeper differences between the disciplines, namely that introductory physics--for example, Newton's laws, magnetism, light--is a science of pairwise interaction, while introductory biology--for example, photosynthesis, evolution, cycling of matter in ecosystems--is a science of linked processes, and we suggest that this is how the two disciplines are presented in introductory classes. We illustrate this tension through an analysis of our adaptations of the physics curriculum for instruction on the cycling of matter and energy; we show that modifications of the physics curriculum to address the biological framework promotes strong gains in student understanding of these topics, as evidenced by analysis of student work.

  4. Combined physical-chemical and biological treatment of poorly biodegradable industrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Patricia; Zaror, Claudio; Carrasco, Virginia; Mondaca, Maria Angelica; Mansilla, Hector

    2003-01-01

    Effluents from small and medium sized chemical plants may contain significant amounts of poorly biodegradable aromatic compounds, which could negatively affect water quality and public health. This is a key environmental issue, particularly in areas where effluents are discharged into drinking water sources. Unfortunately, conventional biological treatment may not be able to meet discharge standards, and combined systems should be implemented. In this context, this paper presents experimental results on the application of a combined sequential ozonation-activated carbon-biological system to treat effluents containing chlorinated aromatic contaminants from chlorine based pulp bleaching. The experimental system consisted of an ozone bubble column reactor (0.3 dm3), an activated carbon fixed bed reactor (0.2 dm3), and an aerobic bioreactor (20 dm3). Ozone was produced from pure O2 using a generator rated at 2 mmol O3 h(-1). The bleaching effluent was pretreated and fed into the aerated sequencing batch bioreactor containing preconditioned biological sludge (3-4 g VSS dm(-3)), and cultured for 24 h. Samples of raw and treated effluents were assayed for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), total phenols, and adsorbable organic halogens (AOX), using standard techniques. The presence of potential genotoxic activity in untreated and treated samples was assessed using the Ames tests. Results show that biological treatment of raw samples could not remove mutagenic activity on its own. On the other hand, ozonation followed by activated carbon treatment and biological treatment successfully removed genotoxicity in all cases. Reductions in BOD, COD, TOC, AOX, and phenols by biological treatment increased when samples were pretreated with ozone/activated carbon.

  5. From physiology to physics: are we recognizing the flexibility of biologging tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Nicholas L; Taylor, Matthew D; Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-02-01

    The remote measurement of data from free-ranging animals has been termed 'biologging' and in recent years this relatively small set of tools has been instrumental in addressing remarkably diverse questions--from 'how will tuna respond to climate change?' to 'why are whales big?'. While a single biologging dataset can have the potential to test hypotheses spanning physiology, ecology, evolution and theoretical physics, explicit illustrations of this flexibility are scarce and this has arguably hindered the full realization of the power of biologging tools. Here we present a small set of examples from studies that have collected data on two parameters widespread in biologging research (depth and acceleration), but that have interpreted their data in the context of extremely diverse phenomena: from tests of biomechanical and diving-optimality models to identifications of feeding events, Lévy flight foraging strategies and expanding oxygen minimum zones. We use these examples to highlight the remarkable flexibility of biologging tools, and identify several mechanisms that may enhance the scope and dissemination of future biologging research programs.

  6. Modelling the Influence of Shielding on Physical and Biological Organ Doses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Scannicchio, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of "physical" and "biological" dose in different organs were calculated by coupling the FLUKA MC transport code with a geometrical human phantom inserted into a shielding box of variable shape, thickness and material. While the expression "physical dose" refers to the amount of deposited energy per unit mass (in Gy), "biological dose" was modelled with "Complex Lesions" (CL), clustered DNA strand breaks calculated in a previous work based on "event-by-event" track-structure simulations. The yields of complex lesions per cell and per unit dose were calculated for different radiation types and energies, and integrated into a version of FLUKA modified for this purpose, allowing us to estimate the effects of mixed fields. As an initial test simulation, the phantom was inserted into an aluminium parallelepiped and was isotropically irradiated with 500 MeV protons. Dose distributions were calculated for different values of the shielding thickness. The results were found to be organ-dependent. In most ...

  7. The relative role of "A" level chemistry, physics and biology in the medical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilson, R W; Clack, G B; Pettingale, K W; Anderson, J; Ryan, K C

    1977-03-01

    The performance of 209 students in the 2nd MBBS, first clinical year and final MBBS examinations has been compared retrospectively with their grades in chemistry, physics and biology at "A" level. The mean grade has also been determined for students from different social classes and secondary education. Significant differences in marks for biology were found between successful and not so successful students, especially in the pre-clinical part of the course. Significnat differences in marks and significant correlations were also found for physics but not to any great extent for chemistry. The relative role of these three basic sciences in the medical course is discussed. The suggestion is made that there is a need for a re-appraisal of the privleged position of chemistry and an unquestioned science requirement for entry to medical school.

  8. Physical, chemical, and biological data for selected streams in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1995-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.

    2000-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected at 51 sampling sites in Chester County, Pa., from 1970 through 1997 as part of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program. This report presents data collected from 43 sites from 1995 through 1997 that constitute a continuation of the program. Physical data include water temperature, instantaneous stream discharge, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen. Chemical data collected include laboratory determinations of nutrients and major ions in whole water samples and selected metals, pesticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), gross polychlorinated napthalenes (PCN's), and total carbon in stream-sediment samples. The biological data include benthic-macroinvertebrate populations. The data are presented without interpretation. Chester County is undergoing urbanization as agricultural land is converted to residential developments, commercial areas, and industrial and corporate parks. The major goal of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program is to further the understanding of stream changes in response to urbanization.

  9. Physical, chemical, and biological data for selected streams in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1981-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.

    1999-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected at 51 sampling sites in Chester County, Pa., from 1970 through 1994 as part of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program. This report presents data collected from 1981 through 1994. Physical data include water temperature, instantaneous stream discharge, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen. Chemical data include laboratory determinations of nutrients, major ions, and selected metals in whole water samples and selected metals, pesticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s), gross polychlorinated napthalenes (PCN?s), and total carbon in stream-bottom sediment samples. The biological data consists of benthic macroinvertebrate population analyses and diversity indices. Chester County is undergoing rapid urbanization as agricultural lands are converted to residential, commercial, and industrial areas. The purpose of the Stream Conditions of Chester County Program is to further the understanding of stream habitat and chemical changes in response to this urbanization.

  10. Research Data in Core Journals in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Womack

    Full Text Available This study takes a stratified random sample of articles published in 2014 from the top 10 journals in the disciplines of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, as ranked by impact factor. Sampled articles were examined for their reporting of original data or reuse of prior data, and were coded for whether the data was publicly shared or otherwise made available to readers. Other characteristics such as the sharing of software code used for analysis and use of data citation and DOIs for data were examined. The study finds that data sharing practices are still relatively rare in these disciplines' top journals, but that the disciplines have markedly different practices. Biology top journals share original data at the highest rate, and physics top journals share at the lowest rate. Overall, the study finds that within the top journals, only 13% of articles with original data published in 2014 make the data available to others.

  11. Research Data in Core Journals in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Ryan P.

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a stratified random sample of articles published in 2014 from the top 10 journals in the disciplines of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, as ranked by impact factor. Sampled articles were examined for their reporting of original data or reuse of prior data, and were coded for whether the data was publicly shared or otherwise made available to readers. Other characteristics such as the sharing of software code used for analysis and use of data citation and DOIs for data were examined. The study finds that data sharing practices are still relatively rare in these disciplines’ top journals, but that the disciplines have markedly different practices. Biology top journals share original data at the highest rate, and physics top journals share at the lowest rate. Overall, the study finds that within the top journals, only 13% of articles with original data published in 2014 make the data available to others. PMID:26636676

  12. Research Data in Core Journals in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Ryan P

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a stratified random sample of articles published in 2014 from the top 10 journals in the disciplines of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, as ranked by impact factor. Sampled articles were examined for their reporting of original data or reuse of prior data, and were coded for whether the data was publicly shared or otherwise made available to readers. Other characteristics such as the sharing of software code used for analysis and use of data citation and DOIs for data were examined. The study finds that data sharing practices are still relatively rare in these disciplines' top journals, but that the disciplines have markedly different practices. Biology top journals share original data at the highest rate, and physics top journals share at the lowest rate. Overall, the study finds that within the top journals, only 13% of articles with original data published in 2014 make the data available to others.

  13. Meeting the Challenge of Students' Understanding of Formulae in High-School Physics: A Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagno, Esther; Berger, Hana; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a diagnostic study to investigate students' understanding of two basic formulae in physics. Based on the findings of the study, we have developed a classroom activity focused on the interpretation of formulae. The activity was developed cooperatively by physics education researchers and high-school physics teachers and…

  14. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics transport and rate processes in physical, chemical and biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Demirel, Yasar

    2014-01-01

    Natural phenomena consist of simultaneously occurring transport processes and chemical reactions. These processes may interact with each other and may lead to self-organized structures, fluctuations, instabilities, and evolutionary systems. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, 3rd edition emphasizes the unifying role of thermodynamics in analyzing the natural phenomena. This third edition updates and expands on the first and second editions by focusing on the general balance equations for coupled processes of physical, chemical, and biological systems. The new edition contains a new chapte

  15. Physical and Biological Effects on Tide Flat Sediment Stability and Strength - Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    forcings, such as insolation, rainfall, benthic microalgae and seagrass (Zostera japonica) abundance, these variations did not always result in...m2 in the winter to a high of >3000 shoots/m2 in late summer. (B) Is chlorophyll a content in mg/g dry sediment (a proxy for benthic microalgae ...Another area of insight regarding physical/biological interactions involves the impact of microphytobenthos (MPB) or benthic microalgae on the

  16. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    seasonal breakup of the ice has begun. The bowhead whales detections finally disappear as these mammals begin their annual migration to the Arctic Ocean...Final Report Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Jeffrey A Nystuen...signals impact marine mammal habitat use. This is especially critical in areas like the Bering Sea where global climate change can lead to rapid changes

  17. RENEB : running the European network of biological dosimetry and physical retrospective dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kulka, Ulrike; Abend, Michael; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Badie, Christophe; Francesc Barquinero, Joan; Barrios, Lleonard; Beinke, Christina; Bortolin, Emanuela; Cucu, Alexandra; De Amicis, Andrea; Domínguez, Inmaculada; Fattibene, Paola; Frøvig, Anne Marie; Gregoire, Eric; Guogyte, Kamile

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: A European network was initiated in 2012 by 23 partners from 16 European countries with the aim to significantly increase individualized dose reconstruction in case of large-scale radiological emergency scenarios. Results: The network was built on three complementary pillars: (1) an operational basis with seven biological and physical dosimetric assays in ready-to-use mode, (2) a basis for education, training and quality assurance, and (3) a basis for further network development r...

  18. Biological Modulation of Upper Ocean Physics: Simulating the Biothermal Feedback Effect in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-08

    and S. C. Doney (1994), Oceanic vertical mixing: A review and a model with a nonlocal boundary layer para- meterization, Rev. Geophys., 32(4), 363–403...integrated ocean-atmosphere-biological modeling system. Ourmodel simulations show that a local phytoplankton bloommay impact upper ocean physics in such a way...perturbations in the local surface pressure gradients also arise as a result of the simulated biothermal warming of surface waters. The model evidence

  19. InfInformation Theory and Computational Thermodynamics: Lessons for Biology from Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Zenil

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We survey a few aspects of the thermodynamics of computation, connecting information, thermodynamics, computability and physics. We suggest some lines of research into how information theory and computational thermodynamics can help us arrive at a better understanding of biological processes. We argue that while a similar connection between information theory and evolutionary biology seems to be growing stronger and stronger, biologists tend to use information simply as a metaphor. While biologists have for the most part been influenced and inspired by information theory as developed by Claude Shannon, we think the introduction of algorithmic complexity into biology will turn out to be a much deeper and more fruitful cross-pollination.

  20. Quantum formalism as an optimisation procedure of information flows for physical and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladrón, Carlos; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    The similarities between biological and physical systems as respectively defined in quantum information biology (QIB) and in a Darwinian approach to quantum mechanics (DAQM) have been analysed. In both theories the processing of information is a central feature characterising the systems. The analysis highlights a mutual support on the thesis contended by each theory. On the one hand, DAQM provides a physical basis that might explain the key role played by quantum information at the macroscopic level for bio-systems in QIB. On the other hand, QIB offers the possibility, acting as a macroscopic testing ground, to analyse the emergence of quantumness from classicality in the terms held by DAQM. As an added result of the comparison, a tentative definition of quantum information in terms of classical information flows has been proposed. The quantum formalism would appear from this comparative analysis between QIB and DAQM as an optimal information scheme that would maximise the stability of biological and physical systems at any scale.

  1. Integration of physics and biology: synergistic undergraduate education for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Terry; Vasaly, Helen; McBride, Duncan; White, Gary

    2013-06-01

    This is an exciting time to be a biologist. The advances in our field and the many opportunities to expand our horizons through interaction with other disciplines are intellectually stimulating. This is as true for people tasked with helping the field move forward through support of research and education projects that serve the nation's needs as for those carrying out that research and educating the next generation of biologists. So, it is a pleasure to contribute to this edition of CBE-Life Sciences Education. This column will cover three aspects of the interactions of physics and biology as seen from the viewpoint of four members of the Division of Undergraduate Education of the National Science Foundation. The first section places the material to follow in context. The second reviews some of the many interdisciplinary physics-biology projects we support. The third highlights mechanisms available for supporting new physics-biology undergraduate education projects based on ideas that arise, focusing on those needing and warranting outside support to come to fruition.

  2. Biological and physical dosimeters for monitoring solar UV-B light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Y; Suzuki, K; Sasaki, M

    1990-06-01

    A biological dosimetry system for measuring solar UV-B light was established using bacteriophage T1 with E. coli Bs-1 as the host cell. Also a new physical UV-B dosimeter was developed which can specifically detect the UV spectral region related to inactivation of phage T1. Phage T1 is very stable in liquid suspension and it has adequate sensitivity to measure the intensity of solar UV-B. In addition, the survival of phage T1 responded linearly to UV fluences when plotted semi-logarithmic ally. Thus T1 seemed to have characteristic features making it suitable material as a biological dosimeter for sunlight. Outdoor experiments throughout one year showed that the mean amount of solar UV light in summer was about 6 fold larger than that in winter at Isehara (139.5 degrees E, 35.5 degrees N), Japan. A novel physical dosimeter which responds faithfully to UV-B light under atmospheric conditions on the ground was developed as well. The spectral response was very close to that of biological materials. Readings of this UV-B dosimeter could be converted into the efficiency of sunlight upon biological materials. This instrument is compact; it can also be used as an erythemal dosimeter.

  3. Ecology meets cancer biology: the cancer swamp promotes the lethal cancer phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Sarah R; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    As they grow, tumors fundamentally alter their microenvironment, disrupting the homeostasis of the host organ and eventually the patient as a whole. Lethality is the ultimate result of deregulated cell signaling and regulatory mechanisms as well as inappropriate host cell recruitment and activity that lead to the death of the patient. These processes have striking parallels to the framework of ecological biology: multiple interacting ecosystems (organ systems) within a larger biosphere (body), alterations in species stoichiometry (host cell types), resource cycling (cellular metabolism and cell-cell signaling), and ecosystem collapse (organ failure and death). In particular, as cancer cells generate their own niche within the tumor ecosystem, ecological engineering and autoeutrophication displace normal cell function and result in the creation of a hypoxic, acidic, and nutrient-poor environment. This "cancer swamp" has genetic and epigenetic effects at the local ecosystem level to promote metastasis and at the systemic host level to induce cytokine-mediated lethal syndromes, a major cause of death of cancer patients.

  4. A four-dimensional validation of a coupled physical-biological model of the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Raleigh R.; Kohler, Kevin E.; McCreary, Julian P.; Smith, Sharon L.

    2003-11-01

    In this paper, we use a coupled biological/physical model to synthesize and understand observations taken during the US JGOFS Arabian Sea Process Study (ASPS). Its physical component is a variable-density, 4 1/2-layer model; its biological component consists of a set of advective-diffusive equations in each layer that determine nitrogen concentrations in four compartments, namely, nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and detritus. Solutions are compared to time series and cruise sections from the ASPS data set, including observations of mixed-layer thickness, chlorophyll concentrations, inorganic nitrogen concentrations, particulate nitrogen export flux, zooplankton biomass, and primary production. Through these comparisons, we adjust model parameters to obtain a "best-fit" main-run solution, identify key biological and physical processes, and assess model strengths and weaknesses. Substantial improvements in the model/data comparison are obtained by: (1) adjusting the turbulence-production coefficients in the mixed-layer model to thin the mixed layer; (2) increasing the detrital sinking and remineralization rates to improve the timing and amplitude of the model's export flux; and (3) introducing a parameterization of particle aggregation to lower phytoplankton concentrations in coastal upwelling regions. With these adjustments, the model captures many key aspects of the observed physical and biogeochemical variability in offshore waters, including the near-surface DIN and phytoplankton P concentrations, mesozooplankton biomass, and primary production. Nevertheless, there are still significant model/data discrepancies of P for most of the cruises. Most of them can be attributed to forcing or process errors in the physical model: inaccurate mixed-layer thicknesses, lack of mesoscale eddies and filaments, and differences in the timing and spatial extent of coastal upwelling. Relatively few are clearly related to the simplicity of the biological model, the model

  5. FOREWORD: Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, K.; Salomaa, M.

    1990-01-01

    These are Proceedings of the Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Mathematics, held August 25-26, 1989, at Lahti (Finland). The Symposium belongs to an annual series of Meetings, the first one of which was arranged in 1987 at Lund (Sweden) and the second one in 1988 at Kolle-Kolle near Copenhagen (Denmark). Although these Symposia have thus far been essentially Nordic events, their international character has increased significantly; the trend is vividly reflected through contributions in the present Topical Issue. The interdisciplinary nature of Computational Science is central to the activity; this fundamental aspect is also responsible, in an essential way, for its rapidly increasing impact. Crucially important to a wide spectrum of superficially disparate fields is the common need for extensive - and often quite demanding - computational modelling. For such theoretical models, no closed-form (analytical) solutions are available or they would be extremely difficult to find; hence one must rather resort to the Art of performing computational investigations. Among the unifying features in the computational research are the methods of simulation employed; methods which frequently are quite closely related with each other even for faculties of science that are quite unrelated. Computer simulation in Natural Sciences is presently apprehended as a discipline on its own right, occupying a broad region somewhere between the experimental and theoretical methods, but also partially overlapping with and complementing them. - Whichever its proper definition may be, the computational approach serves as a novel and an extremely versatile tool with which one can equally well perform "pure" experimental modelling and conduct "computational theory". Computational studies that have earlier been made possible only through supercomputers have opened unexpected, as well as exciting, novel frontiers equally in mathematics (e.g., fractals

  6. Big biology meets microclimatology: defining thermal niches of ectotherms at landscape scales for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Daniel J; Wenger, Seth J; Young, Michael K

    2017-04-01

    Temperature profoundly affects ecology, a fact ever more evident as the ability to measure thermal environments increases and global changes alter these environments. The spatial structure of thermalscapes is especially relevant to the distribution and abundance of ectothermic organisms, but the ability to describe biothermal relationships at extents and grains relevant to conservation planning has been limited by small or sparse data sets. Here, we combine a large occurrence database of >23 000 aquatic species surveys with stream microclimate scenarios supported by an equally large temperature database for a 149 000-km mountain stream network to describe thermal relationships for 14 fish and amphibian species. Species occurrence probabilities peaked across a wide range of temperatures (7.0-18.8°C) but distinct warm- or cold-edge distribution boundaries were apparent for all species and represented environments where populations may be most sensitive to thermal changes. Warm-edge boundary temperatures for a native species of conservation concern were used with geospatial data sets and a habitat occupancy model to highlight subsets of the network where conservation measures could benefit local populations by maintaining cool temperatures. Linking that strategic approach to local estimates of habitat impairment remains a key challenge but is also an opportunity to build relationships and develop synergies between the research, management, and regulatory communities. As with any data mining or species distribution modeling exercise, care is required in analysis and interpretation of results, but the use of large biological data sets with accurate microclimate scenarios can provide valuable information about the thermal ecology of many ectotherms and a spatially explicit way of guiding conservation investments. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Designing and testing a classroom curriculum to teach preschoolers about the biology of physical activity: The respiration system as an underlying biological causal mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Tracy S.

    The present study examined young children's understanding of respiration and oxygen as a source of vital energy underlying physical activity. Specifically, the purpose of the study was to explore whether a coherent biological theory, characterized by an understanding that bodily parts (heart and lungs) and processes (oxygen in respiration) as part of a biological system, can be taught as a foundational concept to reason about physical activity. The effects of a biology-based intervention curriculum designed to teach preschool children about bodily functions as a part of the respiratory system, the role of oxygen as a vital substance and how physical activity acts an energy source were examined. Participants were recruited from three private preschool classrooms (two treatment; 1 control) in Southern California and included a total of 48 four-year-old children (30 treatment; 18 control). Findings from this study suggested that young children could be taught relevant biological concepts about the role of oxygen in respiratory processes. Children who received biology-based intervention curriculum made significant gains in their understanding of the biology of respiration, identification of physical and sedentary activities. In addition these children demonstrated that coherence of conceptual knowledge was correlated with improved accuracy at activity identification and reasoning about the inner workings of the body contributing to endurance. Findings from this study provided evidence to support the benefits of providing age appropriate but complex coherent biological instruction to children in early childhood settings.

  8. Physical Chemistry for the Chemical and Biological Sciences (by Raymond Chang)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, Andrew

    2001-05-01

    This book does offer an alternative approach to physical chemistry that is particularly well suited for those who want to pursue a course of study more focused on the biological sciences. It could also be an excellent choice for schools that mainly serve preprofessional programs or for schools that have split physical chemistry tracks to independently serve the B.S. and B.A. degrees. Since the book focuses on single-variable mathematics, schools that require only one year of calculus for their chemistry degree could also think about adopting it. However, in general, the use of the text as a drop-in replacement for physical chemistry for the B.S. degree is questionable owing to its lack of focus on quantum mechanics and its implications for spectroscopy.

  9. Urban Biomining Meets Printable Electronics: End-To-End at Destination Biological Recycling and Reprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J. (Principal Investigator); Koehne, Jessica; Gandhiraman, Ram; Navarrete, Jesica; Spangle, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    this concept on Mars, and additional opportunities it could offer mission design from the biological and printing technologies. In addition, we will do an analysis of the impact of this technology for terrestrial applications addressing in particular environmental concerns and availability of metals.

  10. Interactions of physical, chemical, and biological weather calling for an integrated approach to assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Thomas; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Dahl, Aslög; Bossioli, Elissavet; Baklanov, Alexander; Vik, Aasmund Fahre; Agnew, Paul; Karatzas, Kostas D; Sofiev, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews interactions and health impacts of physical, chemical, and biological weather. Interactions and synergistic effects between the three types of weather call for integrated assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality. Today's air quality legislation falls short of addressing air quality degradation by biological weather, despite increasing evidence for the feasibility of both mitigation and adaptation policy options. In comparison with the existing capabilities for physical and chemical weather, the monitoring of biological weather is lacking stable operational agreements and resources. Furthermore, integrated effects of physical, chemical, and biological weather suggest a critical review of air quality management practices. Additional research is required to improve the coupled modeling of physical, chemical, and biological weather as well as the assessment and communication of integrated air quality. Findings from several recent COST Actions underline the importance of an increased dialog between scientists from the fields of meteorology, air quality, aerobiology, health, and policy makers.

  11. How can we improve problem solving in undergraduate biology? Applying lessons from 30 years of physics education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, A-M; Caballero, M D; Knight, J K

    2013-06-01

    If students are to successfully grapple with authentic, complex biological problems as scientists and citizens, they need practice solving such problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem solving for the past three decades. Although physics and biology problems differ in structure and content, the instructional purposes align closely: explaining patterns and processes in the natural world and making predictions about physical and biological systems. In this paper, we discuss how research-supported approaches developed by physics education researchers can be adopted by biologists to enhance student problem-solving skills. First, we compare the problems that biology students are typically asked to solve with authentic, complex problems. We then describe the development of research-validated physics curricula emphasizing process skills in problem solving. We show that solving authentic, complex biology problems requires many of the same skills that practicing physicists and biologists use in representing problems, seeking relationships, making predictions, and verifying or checking solutions. We assert that acquiring these skills can help biology students become competent problem solvers. Finally, we propose how biology scholars can apply lessons from physics education in their classrooms and inspire new studies in biology education research.

  12. Comparison of Career Concerns among College Women and Men Enrolled in Biological and Physical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Maria

    The underrepresentation of women enrolled in the physical sciences continues to challenge academic leaders despite over 40 years of programming to promote gender equity within these curricula. This study employed a quantitative, causal comparative method to explore if and to what extent career concerns differed among female and male undergraduate physical and biological science students. The theory of planned behavior and life-span, life-space theory served as the theoretical framework for the study. Quantitative survey data were collected from 43 students at four institutions across the United States. The findings indicated that undergraduate women in physical science programs of study had a significantly different level of concern about the Innovating sub-category of the third stage of career development, Maintenance, as compared to undergraduate women in biological science curricula [F(1,33) = 6.244, p = 0.018]. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference between female undergraduate physical science students and undergraduate male science students in the sub-categories of Implementation [F(1,19) = 7.228, p = 0.015], Advancing [F(1,19) = 11.877, p = 0.003], and Innovating [F(1,19) = 11.782, p = 0.003] within the first three stages of career development (Exploration, Establishment, and Maintenance). The comparative differences among the study groups offers new information about undergraduate career concerns that may contribute to the underrepresentation of women enrolled in the physical sciences. Suggestions for future research and programs within higher education targeted at reducing the career concerns of current and prospective female students in physical science curricula are discussed.

  13. Meeting the Discipline-Culture Framework of Physics Knowledge: A Teaching Experience in Italian Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Olivia; Bertozzi, Eugenio; Gagliardi, Marta; Tomasini, Nella Grimellini; Pecori, Barbara; Tasquier, Giulia; Galili, Igal

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with physics teaching/learning in high school. An investigation in three upper secondary school classes in Italy explored the reactions of students to a structuring lecture on optics within the discipline-culture (DC) framework that organises physics knowledge around four interrelated fundamental theories of light. The lecture…

  14. Fundamental and functional aspects of mesoscopic architectures with examples in physics, cell biology, and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2011-08-01

    How small can a macroscopic object be made without losing its intended function? Obviously, the smallest possible size is determined by the size of an atom, but it is not so obvious how many atoms are required to assemble an object so small, and yet that performs the same function as its macroscopic counterpart. In this review, we are concerned with objects of intermediate nature, lying between the microscopic and the macroscopic world. In physics and chemistry literature, this regime in-between is often called mesoscopic, and is known to bear interesting and counterintuitive features. After a brief introduction to the concept of mesoscopic systems from the perspective of physics, we discuss the functional aspects of mesoscopic architectures in cell biology, and supramolecular chemistry through many examples from the literature. We argue that the biochemistry of the cell is largely regulated by mesoscopic functional architectures; however, the significance of mesoscopic phenomena seems to be quite underappreciated in biological sciences. With this motivation, one of our main purposes here is to emphasize the critical role that mesoscopic structures play in cell biology and biochemistry.

  15. Biogeomorphology of tidal landforms: physical and biological processes shaping the tidal landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marani, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Da Lio, C.

    2011-12-01

    The equilibrium states and transient dynamics of tidal landforms are the result of many concurring physical and biological forcings, such as tidal range, wind climate, sediment supply, vegetation and microphytobenthos development, and rates of relative sea level rise (RSLR). A 0D model of the coupled elevation-vegetation dynamics is used to explore the relative role of the physical and biological factors shaping these systems. We find that salt marshes exposed to large tidal ranges are more stable, and therefore more resilient to increasing rates of RSLR, than marshes subjected to low tidal ranges and that subtidal platforms in macrotidal systems are less exposed to wind-induced erosion processes than their counterparts in systems with smaller tidal fluctuations. Notably, we find that vegetation crucially affects both the equilibrium marsh elevation, through dissipation of wind waves and organic accumulation, and marsh resilience to accelerations in RSLR rates, important differences being associated with different vegetation types. Furthermore, our results show that the existence and stability of equilibrium states fundamentally depend on the local wind and tidal regime, even within the same tidal system. Finally, we propose a modelling framework to study how biological evolution lead to the emergence of tidal landforms as we know them.

  16. A coupled physical-biological-chemical model for the Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P S Swathi; M K Sharada; K S Yajnik

    2000-12-01

    A coupled physical-biological-chemical model has been developed at C-MMACS. for studying the time- variation of primary productivity and air-sea carbon-dioxide exchange in the Indian Ocean. The physical model is based on the Modular Ocean Model, Version 2 (MOM2) and the biological model describes the nonlinear dynamics of a 7-component marine ecosystem. The chemical model includes dynamical equation for the evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity. The interaction between the biological and chemical model is through the Redfield ratio. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide pCO2 of the surface layer is obtained from the chemical equilibrium equations of Peng et al 1987. Transfer coefficients for air-sea exchange of CO2 are computed dynamically based on the wind speeds. The coupled model reproduces the high productivity observed in the Arabian Sea off the Somali and Omani coasts during the Southwest (SW) monsoon. The entire Arabian Sea is an outgassing region for CO2 in spite of high productivity with transfer rates as high as 80 m-mol C/m2/day during SW monsoon near the Somali Coast on account of strong winds.

  17. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  18. A global analysis of ENSO synchrony: The oceans' biological response to physical forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messié, Monique; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2012-09-01

    A global-scale Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of physical (sea surface temperatures, sea level height anomalies, atmospheric sea level pressure, photosynthetically active radiation, zonal surface currents and wind-driven upwelling velocities) and biological (surface chlorophyll concentrations and primary production) variables shows synchronous variations from 1993 to 2010 in the first mode of variability associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The first EOF of vertical temperature structure along the equatorial Pacific shows identical temporal patterns. The ENSO-driven biological changes are explained both qualitatively and quantitatively from a subset of the physical variables. During the strong 1997-1998 El Niño a global new production decrease of ˜0.6-0.9 PgC yr-1 is estimated from changes in the depth of the nutricline and wind-driven upwelling. This is consistent with the 3.0 PgC yr-1 decrease in global primary production observed by satellite remote sensing. A simple two-layer model of chlorophyll and primary production driven by changes in nitrate and light reproduces the patterns and magnitude of changes observed by satellite. Changes in the depth of the nutricline are found to be the primary driver of the biological anomalies. The ENSO mode of zonal currents in the equatorial Pacific shows that horizontal advection is responsible for changes in chlorophyll in the central Pacific not explained by the two-layer model.

  19. Open water processes of the San Francisco Estuary: From physical forcing to biological responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Kimmerer

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the open waters of the San Francisco Estuary. This estuary is well known for the extent to which it has been altered through loss of wetlands, changes in hydrography, and the introduction of chemical and biological contaminants. It is also one of the most studied estuaries in the world, with much of the recent research effort aimed at supporting restoration efforts. In this review I emphasize the conceptual foundations for our current understanding of estuarine dynamics, particularly those aspects relevant to restoration. Several themes run throughout this paper. First is the critical role physical dynamics play in setting the stage for chemical and biological responses. Physical forcing by the tides and by variation in freshwater input combine to control the movement of the salinity field, and to establish stratification, mixing, and dilution patterns throughout the estuary. Many aspects of estuarine dynamics respond to interannual variation in freshwater flow; in particular, abundance of several estuarine-dependent species of fish and shrimp varies positively with flow, although the mechanisms behind these relationships are largely unknown. The second theme is the importance of time scales in determining the degree of interaction between dynamic processes. Physical effects tend to dominate when they operate at shorter time scales than biological processes; when the two time scales are similar, important interactions can arise between physical and biological variability. These interactions can be seen, for example, in the response of phytoplankton blooms, with characteristic time scales of days, to stratification events occurring during neap tides. The third theme is the key role of introduced species in all estuarine habitats; particularly noteworthy are introduced waterweeds and fishes in the tidal freshwater reaches of the estuary, and introduced clams there and in brackish water. The

  20. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  1. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Mixed-Valence Compounds : Theory and Applications in Chemistry, Physics, Geology, and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    It has been a decade since two seminal reviews demonstrated that mixed-valence compounds share many unique and fascinating features. The insight pro­ vided by those early works has promoted a great deal of both experimental and theoretical study. As a result of extensive efforts, our understanding of the bonding and properties of mixed-valence compounds has advanced substantially. There has been no compre­ hensive treatment of mixed-valence compounds since 1967, and the meeting convened at Oxford in September, 1979, provided a unique opportunity to examine the subject and its many ramifications. Mixed-valence compounds play an important role in many fields. Although the major impact of the subject has been in chemistry, its importance has become increasingly clear in solid state physics, geology, and biology. Extensive interest and effort in the field of molecular metals has demonstrated that mixed-valency is a prerequisite for high elec­ trical conductivity. The intense colors of many minerals have been s...

  2. Eco-friendly process combining physical-chemical and biological technics for the fermented dairy products waste pretreatment and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmi, Mariam; Hamdi, Moktar; Trabelsi, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Residual fermented dairy products resulting from process defects or from expired shelf life products are considered as waste. Thus, dairies wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) suffer high input effluents polluting load. In this study, fermented residuals separation from the plant wastewater is proposed. In the aim to meet the municipal WWTP input limits, a pretreatment combining physical-chemical and biological processes was investigated to reduce residual fermented dairy products polluting effect. Yoghurt (Y) and fermented milk products (RL) were considered. Raw samples chemical oxygen demand (COD) values were assessed at 152 and 246 g.L(-1) for Y and RL products, respectively. Following the thermal coagulation, maximum removal rates were recorded at 80 °C. Resulting whey stabilization contributed to the removal rates enhance to reach 72% and 87% for Y and RL samples; respectively. Residual whey sugar content was fermented using Candida strains. Bacterial growth and strains degrading potential were discussed. C. krusei strain achieved the most important removal rates of 78% and 85% with Y and RL medium, respectively. Global COD removal rates exceeded 93%.

  3. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-09-29

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface—are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. Although there has been long-standing concern over impacts of physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, we examined the effects of 10 y of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical disturbance (>10 y of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increases in cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects on lichens. Although the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed as treatments in our study.

  4. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface—are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. While there has been long-standing concern over impacts of 5 physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is also increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, USA, we examined the effects of 10 years of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities, and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical 10 disturbance (>10 years of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increased cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects 15 on lichens. While the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed by the climate treatments used in our study.

  5. Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior or Evolutionary Genomic Analyses of Insect Society: Eat, Drink, and Be Scary (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Gene

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gene Robinson of the University of Illinois on "Genomic and Systems Biology Analyses of Social Behavior" at the 6th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  6. Physical mechanisms and biological significance of supramolecular protein self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentsis, Alex; Borden, Katherine L B

    2004-04-01

    In living cells, chemical reactions of metabolism, information processing, growth and development are organized in a complex network of interactions. At least in part, the organization of this network is accomplished as a result of physical assembly by supramolecular scaffolds. Indeed, most proteins function in cells within the context of multimeric or supramolecular assemblies. With the increasing availability of atomic structures and molecular thermodynamics, it is possible to recast the problem of non-covalent molecular self-assembly from a unified perspective of structural thermodynamics and kinetics. Here, we present a generalized theory of self-assembly based on Wegner's kinetic model and use it to delineate three physical mechanisms of self-assembly: as limited by association of assembly units (nucleation), by association of monomers (isodesmic), and by conformational reorganization of monomers that is coupled to assembly (conformational). Thus, we discuss actin, tubulin, clathrin, and the capsid of icosahedral cowpea chlorotic mottle virus with respect to assembly of architectural scaffolds that perform largely mechanical functions, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, and RING domain proteins PML, arenaviral Z, and BRCA1:BARD1 with regard to assembly of supramolecular enzymes with metabolic and chemically directive functions. In addition to the biological functions made possible by supramolecular self-assembly, such as mesoscale mechanics of architectural scaffolds and metabolic coupling of supramolecular enzymes, we show that the physical mechanisms of self-assembly and their structural bases are biologically significant as well, having regulatory roles in both formation and function of the assembled structures in health and disease.

  7. Physical descriptions of the bacterial nucleoid at large scales, and their biological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benza, Vincenzo G.; Bassetti, Bruno; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Scolari, Vittore F.; Bromek, Krystyna; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical approaches have attempted to quantify the physical organization (compaction and geometry) of the bacterial chromosome with its complement of proteins (the nucleoid). The genomic DNA exists in a complex and dynamic protein-rich state, which is highly organized at various length scales. This has implications for modulating (when not directly enabling) the core biological processes of replication, transcription and segregation. We overview the progress in this area, driven in the last few years by new scientific ideas and new interdisciplinary experimental techniques, ranging from high space- and time-resolution microscopy to high-throughput genomics employing sequencing to map different aspects of the nucleoid-related interactome. The aim of this review is to present the wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical findings coherently, from a physics viewpoint. In particular, we highlight the role that statistical and soft condensed matter physics play in describing this system of fundamental biological importance, specifically reviewing classic and more modern tools from the theory of polymers. We also discuss some attempts toward unifying interpretations of the current results, pointing to possible directions for future investigation.

  8. Physical activity, weight status and diet in adolescents: are children meeting the guidelines?

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Spencer; Jones, Georgina; Walters, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity is on the increase and maintaining regular physical activity and consuming a healthy diet have become essential tools to combat the condition. The United Kingdom government has recommended guidelines for optimal levels of diet and activity in children. The aim of this paper is to describe and compare self-reported physical activity levels, diet, and Body Mass Indices (BMI) amongst adolescent children, aged 11-15, in the South West (SW) and North West (NW) regions of England ...

  9. Teleology in biology, chemistry and physics education: what primary teachers should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSTAS KAMPOURAKIS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in cognitive psychology suggests that children develop intuitions that may clash with what is accepted by scientists, thus making certain scientific concepts difficult to understand. Children possess intuitions about design and purpose that make them provide teleological explanations to many different sorts of tasks. One possible explanation for the origin of the bias to view objects as made for something derives from an early sensitivity to intentional agents and to their behavior as intentional object users and object makers. What is important is that teleological explanations may not be exclusively restricted in biological phenomena, as commonly assumed. Consequently, primary school teachers should take that into account when teaching biology, chemistry or physics concepts and try to refrain from enforcing students’ teleological intuitions.

  10. Biological, chemical and physical drinking water quality from shallow wells in Malawi: Case study of Blantyre, Chiradzulu and Mulanje

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M.; Mkandawire, T.; O'Neill, J. G.

    A study was conducted in Blantyre, Chiradzulu and Mulanje districts in Malawi to determine the biological, chemical and physical drinking water quality from shallow wells. An in situ membrane filtration test kit (Paqualab 50) was used to determine the microbiological quality of water and a photometer was used for the chemical analyses. Water samples were collected from 21 covered/protected and five open/unprotected shallow wells at four different times in a year to determine the change in quality with different seasons. The results of microbiological analysis show that the drinking water quality is very poor, i.e. grossly polluted with faecal matter. Total coliform (TC) and faecal coliform (FC) values in the wet season (February and April, 2006) were much higher than those in the dry season (August and October, 2005). In terms of total coliform, the results show that approximately 80% of the shallow wells tested in the dry season and 100% of the wells in the wet season did not meet the drinking water quality temporary guidelines, set by the Ministry of Water Development - MoWD (2003) [Ministry of Water Development - MoWD, 2003. Government of Malawi, Devolution of functions of assemblies, Guidelines and standards], of a maximum of 50 TC/100 ml for untreated water. Approximately 50% of the wells failed to meet the faecal coliform drinking water guideline of 50 FC/100 ml in the dry season while this figure had increased to 94% of the wells failing to meet the standard in the wet season. Covered wells were not as grossly contaminated as open wells but all of the wells tested failed the MoWD standards in at least one sample. Chemical analyses results were within the drinking water guideline and variations during seasons were insignificant. pH values were within the guidelines in the dry season except for Mulanje district where on average 45% of the wells had pH values below the lower limit of 6.0. In the wet season 50% of the samples had pH values below 6.0. Turbidity

  11. Shifting to structures in physics and biology: a prophylactic for promiscuous realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Steven

    2011-06-01

    Within the philosophy of science, the realism debate has been revitalised by the development of forms of structural realism. These urge a shift in focus from the object oriented ontologies that come and go through the history of science to the structures that remain through theory change. Such views have typically been elaborated in the context of theories of physics and are motivated by, first of all, the presence within such theories of mathematical equations that allow straightforward representation of the relevant structures; and secondly, the implications of such theories for the individuality and identity of putative objects. My aim in this paper is to explore the possibility of extending such views to biological theories. An obvious concern is that within the context of the latter it is typically insisted that we cannot find the kinds of highly mathematised structures that structural realism can point to in physics. I shall indicate how the model-theoretic approach to theories might help allay such concerns. Furthermore, issues of identity and individuality also arise within biology. Thus Dupré has recently noted that there exists a 'General Problem of Biological Individuality' which relates to the issue of how one divides 'massively integrated and interconnected' systems into discrete components. In response Dupré advocates a form of 'Promiscuous Realism' that holds, for example, that there is no unique way of dividing the phylogenetic tree into kinds. Instead I shall urge serious consideration of those aspects of the work of Dupré and others that lean towards a structuralist interpretation. By doing so I hope to suggest possible ways in which a structuralist stance might be extended to biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical Growth, Biological Age, and Nutritional Transitions of Adolescents Living at Moderate Altitudes in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Gómez Campos, Rossana; Andruske, Cynthia Lee; Flores, Antonio Viveros; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Olivares, Pedro R.; Garcia-Rubio, Javier; de Arruda, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peru is experiencing a stage of nutritional transition where the principal characteristics are typical of countries undergoing development. Objectives: The objectives of this study were the following: (a) compare physical growth patterns with an international standard; (b) determine biological age; and (c) analyze the double nutritional burden of adolescents living at a moderate altitude in Peru. Design: Weight, standing height, and sitting height were measured in 551 adolescents of both sexes (12.0 to 17.9 years old) from an urban area of Arequipa, Peru (2328 m). Physical growth was compared with the international standard of the CDC-2000. Biological age was determined by using a non-invasive transversal technique based on years from age at peak height velocity (APHV). Nutritional state was determined by means of weight for age and height for age. Z scores were calculated using international standards from the CDC-2000. Results: Body weight for both sexes was similar to the CDC-2000 international standards. At all ages, the girls’ height (p < 0.05) was below the standards. However, the boys’ height (p < 0.05) was less at ages, 15, 16, and 17. Biological age showed up in girls at age 12.7 years and for boys at 15.2 years. Stunted growth (8.7% boys and 18.0% girls) and over weight (11.3% boys and 8.8% girls) occurred in both groups. A relationship existed in both sexes between the categories of weight for the age and stunted growth by sex. Conclusions: Adolescents living at a moderate altitude exhibited stunted linear growth and biological maturation. Furthermore, adolescents of both sexes showed the presence of the double nutritional burden (stunted growth and excessive weight). PMID:26404334

  13. Physical Growth, Biological Age, and Nutritional Transitions of Adolescents Living at Moderate Altitudes in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cossio-Bolaños

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peru is experiencing a stage of nutritional transition where the principal characteristics are typical of countries undergoing development. Objectives: The objectives of this study were the following: (a compare physical growth patterns with an international standard; (b determine biological age; and (c analyze the double nutritional burden of adolescents living at a moderate altitude in Peru. Design: Weight, standing height, and sitting height were measured in 551 adolescents of both sexes (12.0 to 17.9 years old from an urban area of Arequipa, Peru (2328 m. Physical growth was compared with the international standard of the CDC-2000. Biological age was determined by using a non-invasive transversal technique based on years from age at peak height velocity (APHV. Nutritional state was determined by means of weight for age and height for age. Z scores were calculated using international standards from the CDC-2000. Results: Body weight for both sexes was similar to the CDC-2000 international standards. At all ages, the girls’ height (p < 0.05 was below the standards. However, the boys’ height (p < 0.05 was less at ages, 15, 16, and 17. Biological age showed up in girls at age 12.7 years and for boys at 15.2 years. Stunted growth (8.7% boys and 18.0% girls and over weight (11.3% boys and 8.8% girls occurred in both groups. A relationship existed in both sexes between the categories of weight for the age and stunted growth by sex. Conclusions: Adolescents living at a moderate altitude exhibited stunted linear growth and biological maturation. Furthermore, adolescents of both sexes showed the presence of the double nutritional burden (stunted growth and excessive weight.

  14. Physical-chemical determinant properties of biological communities in continental semi-arid waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Francisco Cleiton; de Andrade, Eunice Maia; Lopes, Fernando Bezerra; de Paula Filho, Francisco José; Filho, José Hamilton Costa; da Silva, Merivalda Doroteu

    2016-08-01

    Throughout human history, water has undergone changes in quality. This problem is more serious in dry areas, where there is a natural water deficit due to climatic factors. The aims of this study, therefore, were (i) to verify correlations between physical attributes, chemical attributes and biological metrics and (ii) from the biological attributes, to verify the similarity between different points of a body of water in a tropical semi-arid region. Samples were collected every 2 months, from July 2009 to July 2011, at seven points. Four physical attributes, five chemical attributes and four biological metrics were investigated. To identify the correlations between the physicochemical properties and the biological metrics, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were applied. Nine classes of phytoplankton were identified, with the predominance of species of cyanobacteria, and ten families of macroinvertebrates. The use of HCA resulted in the formation of three similar groups, showing that it was possible to reduce the number of sampling points when monitoring water quality with a consequent reduction in cost. Group I was formed from the waters at the high end of the reservoir (points P1, P2 and P3), group II by the waters from the middle third (points P4 and P5), and group III by the waters from the lower part of the reservoir (points P6 and P7). Richness of the phytoplanktons Cyanophyceae, Chorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae was the attribute which determined dissimilarity in water quality. Using CCA, it was possible to identify the spatial variability of the physicochemical attributes (TSS, TKN, nitrate and total phosphorus) that most influence the metrics of the macroinvertebrates and phytoplankton present in the water. Low macroinvertebrate diversity, with a predominance of indicator families for deterioration in water quality, and the composition of phytoplankton showing a predominance of cyanobacteria, suggests greater

  15. Wind erodibility response of physical and biological crusts to rain and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubault, H.; Bullard, J. E.; Strong, C. L.; Ghadiri, H.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil surface crusts are important controllers of the small-scale wind entrainment processes that occur across all dust source regions globally. The crust type influences water and wind erosion by impacting infiltration, runoff, threshold wind velocity and surface storage capacity of both water and loose erodible material. The spatial and temporal patterning of both physical and biological crusts is known to change with rainfall and flooding. However, little is known about the impact of differing water quantity (from light rainfall through to flooding) on soil crusting characteristics (strength, roughness, sediment loss). This study compares the response of two soil types (loamy sand - LS, sandy loam - SL) with and without BSCs to three different rainfall events (2mm, 8mm, 15mm). Two BSC treatments were used one that simulated a young cyanobacteria dominated crust and an older flood induced multi species biological crust. For both soil types, soil surface strength increased with increasing rainfall amount with LS having consistently higher resistance to rupture than SL. Regardless of texture, soils with BSCs were more resistant and strength did not change in response to rainfall impact. Soil loss due to wind erosion was substantially higher on bare LS (4 times higher) and SL (3 times higher) soils compared with those with BSCs. Our results also show that young biological crust (formed by the rainfall event) have reduced soil erodibility with notably greater strength, roughness and reduced sediment losses when compared to soils with physical crust. Interestingly though, the erodibility of the old BSC did not differ greatly from that of the young BSC with respect to strength, roughness and sediment loss. This raises questions regarding the rapid soil surface protection offered by young colonising cyanobacteria crusts. Further analyses exploring the role of biological soil crusts on surface response to rainfall and wind saltation impact are ongoing.

  16. Physical and biological response of the Arabian sea to tropical cyclone Phyan and its implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Byju, P.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    version: Mar. Environ. Res.: 71(5); 2011; 325-330. Physical and biological response of the Arabian Sea to tropical cyclone Phyan and its implications P. Byju and S. Prasanna Kumar* National Institute of Oceanography (CSIR), Dona Puala, Goa-403 004... fort-night of November 2009 in the box ABCD (see Figure 1 for location). A major drawback of such a study is the lack of data during the peak of the cyclone activity over the ocean due to thick cloud associated with it. Since in situ measurements...

  17. Estimating Escherichia coli loads in streams based on various physical, chemical, and biological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Dipankar; Mohanty, Binayak P; Lesikar, Bruce J

    2013-05-01

    Microbes have been identified as a major contaminant of water resources. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a commonly used indicator organism. It is well recognized that the fate of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by multiple physical, chemical, and biological factors. The aim of this work is to provide insight into the physical, chemical, and biological factors along with their interactions that are critical in the estimation of E. coli loads in surface streams. There are various models to predict E. coli loads in streams, but they tend to be system or site specific or overly complex without enhancing our understanding of these factors. Hence, based on available data, a Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) is presented for estimating E. coli loads based on physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams. The BNN has the dual advantage of overcoming the absence of quality data (with regards to consistency in data) and determination of mechanistic model parameters by employing a probabilistic framework. This study evaluates whether the BNN model can be an effective alternative tool to mechanistic models for E. coli loads estimation in streams. For this purpose, a comparison with a traditional model (LOADEST, USGS) is conducted. The models are compared for estimated E. coli loads based on available water quality data in Plum Creek, Texas. All the model efficiency measures suggest that overall E. coli loads estimations by the BNN model are better than the E. coli loads estimations by the LOADEST model on all the three occasions (three-fold cross validation). Thirteen factors were used for estimating E. coli loads with the exhaustive feature selection technique, which indicated that six of thirteen factors are important for estimating E. coli loads. Physical factors included temperature and dissolved oxygen; chemical factors include phosphate and ammonia; biological factors include suspended solids and chlorophyll. The results highlight that the LOADEST model

  18. Dynamics and thermodynamics in hierarchically organized systems applications in physics, biology and economics

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, P

    2013-01-01

    One of the most fundamental and efficient ways of conceptualizing complex systems is to organize them hierarchically. A hierarchically organized system is represented by a network of interconnected subsystems, each of which has its own network of subsystems, and so on, until some elementary subsystems are reached that are not further decomposed. This original and important book proposes a general mathematical theory of a hierarchical system and shows how it can be applied to very different topics such as physics (Hamiltonian systems), biology (coupling the molecular and the cellular levels), e

  19. Correlating Multimodal Physical Sensor Information with Biological Analysis in Ultra Endurance Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles D.Warrington

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The sporting domain has traditionally been used as a testing ground for new technologies which subsequently make their way into the public domain. This includes sensors. In this article a range of physical and biological sensors deployed in a 64 hour ultra-endurance non-stop cycling race are described. A novel algorithm to estimate the energy expenditure while cycling and resting during the event are outlined. Initial analysis in this noisy domain of “sensors in the field” are very encouraging and represent a first with respect to cycling.

  20. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Weeks Bay, Alabama (June 1990 - May 2000) (NODC Accession 0116469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: This dataset contains ten years of physical, chemical, and biological data collected during shipboard surveys in Weeks Bay, Alabama, between June 1990 and...

  1. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Mobile Bay, Alabama in May 1989-December 1999 (NODC Accession 0116496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains physical, chemical, and biological data collected during ten years of near-monthly shipboard surveys carried out in Mobile Bay between May 1989...

  2. The effect of shape on drag: a physics exercise inspired by biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerut, Jonathan; Johnson, Nicholas; Mongeau, Eric; Habdas, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    As part of a biomechanics course aimed at upper-division biology and physics majors, but applicable to a range of student learning levels, this laboratory exercise provides an insight into the effect of shape on hydrodynamic performance, as well an introduction to computer aided design (CAD) and 3D printing. Students use hydrodynamic modeling software and simple CAD programs to design a shape with the least amount of drag based on strategies gleaned from the study of natural forms. Students then print the shapes using a 3D printer and test their shapes against their classmates in a friendly competition. From this exercise, students gain a more intuitive sense of the challenges that organisms face when moving through fluid environments, the physical phenomena involved in moving through fluids at high Reynolds numbers and observe how and why certain morphologies, such as streamlining, are common answers to the challenge of swimming at high speeds.

  3. Physical descriptions of the bacterial nucleoid at large scales, and their biological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Benza, Vincenzo G; Dorfman, Kevin D; Scolari, Vittore F; Bromek, Krystyna; Cicuta, Pietro; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical approaches have attempted to quantify the physical organization (compaction and geometry) of the bacterial chromosome with its complement of proteins (the nucleoid). The genomic DNA exists in a complex and dynamic protein-rich state, which is highly organised at various length scales. This has implications on modulating (when not enabling) the core biological processes of replication, transcription, segregation. We overview the progress in this area, driven in the last few years by new scientific ideas and new interdisciplinary experimental techniques, ranging from high space- and time-resolution microscopy to high-throughput genomics employing sequencing to map different aspects of the nucleoid-related interactome. The aim of this review is to present the wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical findings coherently, from a physics viewpoint. We also discuss some attempts of interpretation that unify different results, highlighting the role that statistical and soft co...

  4. Nature's longest threads new frontiers in the mathematics and physics of information in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Sreekantan, B V

    2014-01-01

    Organisms endowed with life show a sense of awareness, interacting with and learning from the universe in and around them. Each level of interaction involves transfer of information of various kinds, and at different levels. Each thread of information is interlinked with the other, and woven together, these constitute the universe — both the internal self and the external world — as we perceive it. They are, figuratively speaking, Nature's longest threads. This volume reports inter-disciplinary research and views on information and its transfer at different levels of organization by reputed scientists working on the frontier areas of science. It is a frontier where physics, mathematics and biology merge seamlessly, binding together specialized streams such as quantum mechanics, dynamical systems theory, and mathematics. The topics would interest a broad cross-section of researchers in life sciences, physics, cognition, neuroscience, mathematics and computer science, as well as interested amateurs, familia...

  5. Fluctuations and correlations in physical and biological nanosystems: the tale is in the tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-04-26

    The inherently small system sizes involved imply that, in the absence of large applied fields designed to overwhelm them, fluctuations will play a major role in determining the response and functionality of nanoscale systems. Theoretical advances over the past two decades have provided fresh insight into fluctuations and their role at the nanoscale, even in the presence of arbitrarily large applied external fields. In contrast to traditional engineered systems, Nature's approach to nanotechnology is to embrace and to exploit fluctuations and noise to create adaptable, persistent, optimized functional architectures. We describe some of the mechanisms by which Nature exploits noise, with the goal of applying these lessons to engineered physical and chemical nanosystems. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of the tails of distributions of properties in both physical and biological nanosystems and their impact on system behavior.

  6. Sixth coordination meeting of the Division of Nuclear Physics Program to meet high-priority nuclear data needs of the Office of Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    The Sixth Coordination Meeting of the Program to Meet Nuclear Data Needs for Fusion Energy was held in Athens, September 19--21, 1989. The principal change from the previous meeting at Argonne was the larger international participation. One scientist from Japan represented the only non-US participation at Argonne. The present meeting included about 20% non-US participants. This change is a welcome one since the data needs are international and the limited availability of manpower and facilities will likely make international cooperation increasingly important in the future. The organization of the meeting involved collecting and distributing to all participants progress reports from the Department of Energy laboratories in advance of the meeting. Twenty-five oral presentations were made at the meeting, including many from non-DOE labs. The meeting then divided into experimental and theoretical task force groups, which carried out assigned agenda items. The reports of these groups, abstracts of the talks presented at the meeting, and the progress reports are included in this report. The topics discussed will be very familiar to participants in past meetings, but continued progress in most areas was reported. One discussion topic which reflects continuing and perhaps worsening problems was the aging of facilities and personnel, coupled with a lack of programs to renew.

  7. Biochar and hydrochar reactivity assessed by chemical, physical and biological methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naisse, Christophe; Alexis, Marie; Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; pozzi, Alessandro; Carcaillet, Christopher; Criscuoli, Irene; Miglietta, Franco; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    Field application of biochar is intended to increase soil carbon (C) storage. The assessment of C storage potential of biochars lacks methods and standard materials. In this study, we compared the chemical reactivity of biochars and hydrochars and their potential mineralisation before and after physical weathering as one possibility to evaluate their environmental stability. We used biochars produced by gasification (GSs) and hydrochars produced by hydrothermal carbonisation (HTCs) produced from three different feedstocks as well as Holocene charcoals (150 and 2000 yr old). Their chemical reactivity was analysed after acid dichromate oxidation and their mineralisation potential after laboratory incubations before and after physical weathering. Our results showed that use of acid dichromate oxidation may allow for differentiation of the reactivity of modern biochars but that chemical reactivity of biochars is poorly suited to assess their environmental residence time because it may change with exposure time in soil. Physical weathering induced a carbon loss and increased biological stability of biochar, while reducing its positive priming effect on native soil organic matter. Model extrapolations based on our data showed that decadal C sequestration potential of GS and HTC is globally equivalent when all losses including those due to priming and physical weathering were taken into account. However, at century scale only GS may have the potential to increase soil C storage.

  8. Association of physical activity and sedentary behavior with biological markers among U.S. pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Woekel, Erica; Cardinal, Bradley J

    2013-11-01

    To examine the association between objectively measured light-intensity and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), sedentary behaviors, and biological markers in a national sample of U.S. pregnant women, as few studies have examined these relationships among this population. The sample of noninstitutionalized U.S. civilians was selected by a complex, multistage probability design. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Examination Survey were used. Two hundred six pregnant women were included in the data analysis. Physical activity and sedentary data were objectively measured via accelerometry (ActiGraph 7164). Biomarker data was obtained in the mobile examination center from urine, blood samples, blood pressure, and anthropometric measurements. Urine and blood samples were obtained to determine pregnancy status, C-reactive protein (CRP), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, and cotinine as well as fasting glucose, fasting triglycerides, and fasting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol data. Multivariable regression was employed to examine the association between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and biomarker levels. There was a positive association between sedentary behavior and CRP levels (beta coefficient [b]=0.001, p=0.02) and LDL cholesterol (b=0.12, p=0.02). There was an inverse association between light-intensity physical activity and CRP (b=-0.003; p=0.008) and diastolic blood pressure (b=-0.03; p=0.02), with those engaging in higher levels of MVPA having higher HDL cholesterol (b=6.7; p=0.01). Physical activity and sedentary behavior were favorably associated with various biomarkers among pregnant women, suggesting that healthcare providers should encourage pregnant women to participate in safe forms of physical activity behaviors while also reducing their amount of time spent in sedentary behaviors.

  9. Meeting the Discipline-Culture Framework of Physics Knowledge: A Teaching Experience in Italian Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Olivia; Bertozzi, Eugenio; Gagliardi, Marta; Tomasini, Nella Grimellini; Pecori, Barbara; Tasquier, Giulia; Galili, Igal

    2014-09-01

    The paper deals with physics teaching/learning in high school. An investigation in three upper secondary school classes in Italy explored the reactions of students to a structuring lecture on optics within the discipline-culture (DC) framework that organises physics knowledge around four interrelated fundamental theories of light. The lecture presented optics as an unfolding conceptual discourse of physicists regarding the nature of light. Along with the knowledge constructed in a school course of a scientific lyceum, the students provided epistemological comments, displaying their perception of physics knowledge presented in the classroom. Students' views and knowledge were investigated by questionnaires prior to and after the lecture and in special discussions held in each class. They revealed a variety of attitudes and views which allowed inferences about the potential of the DC framework in an educational context. The findings and interpretation indicate the positive and stimulating impact of the lecture and the way in which DC-based approach to knowledge organization makes physics at school cultural and attractive.

  10. Identifying Strategies Programs Adopt to Meet Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Standards in Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert G.; Moore, Justin B.; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Saunders, Ruth; Beighle, Aaron; Khan, M. Mahmud; Chandler, Jessica; Brazendale, Keith; Randell, Allison; Webster, Collin; Beets, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The YMCA of USA has adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for its afterschool programs (ASPs). Little is known about strategies YMCA ASPs are implementing to achieve Standards and these strategies' effectiveness. Aims: (1) Identify strategies implemented in YMCA ASPs and (2) evaluate the relationship between…

  11. Pre-Town Meeting on Spin Physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Brodsky, Stanley J; Burkardt, Matthias; Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Deshpande, Abhay; Diehl, Markus; Gamberg, Leonard; Perdekamp, Matthias Grosse; Huang, Jin; Hyde, Charles; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Kubarovsky, Valery; Lajoie, John; Liu, Keh-Fei; Liu, Ming; Liuti, Simonetta; Melnitchouk, Wally; Mulders, Piet; Prokudin, Alexei; Tarasov, Andrey; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Radyushkin, Anatoly; Richards, David; Sichtermann, Ernst; Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner; Yuan, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A polarized $ep/eA$ collider (Electron--Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center--of--mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\sim 20$ to $\\sim100$~GeV (upgradable to $\\sim 150$ GeV) and a luminosity up to $\\sim 10^{34} \\, \\textrm{cm}^{-2} \\textrm{s}^{-1}$, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three--dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini--review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper~\\cite{Accardi:2012qut}.

  12. IBPRO - A Novel Short-Duration Teaching Course in Advanced Physics and Biology Underlying Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Michael C; Tracey, Monica W; Kacin, Sara E; Burmeister, Jay W

    2017-03-22

    This article provides a summary and status report of the ongoing advanced education program IBPRO - Integrated course in Biology and Physics of Radiation Oncology. IBPRO is a five-year program funded by NCI. It addresses the recognized deficiency in the number of mentors available who have the required knowledge and skill to provide the teaching and training that is required for future radiation oncologists and researchers in radiation sciences. Each year, IBPRO brings together 50 attendees typically at assistant professor level and upwards, who are already qualified/certified radiation oncologists, medical physicists or biologists. These attendees receive keynote lectures and activities based on active learning strategies, merging together the clinical, biological and physics underpinnings of radiation oncology, at the forefront of the field. This experience is aimed at increasing collaborations, raising the level and amount of basic and applied research undertaken in radiation oncology, and enabling attendees to confidently become involved in the future teaching and training of researchers and radiation oncologists.

  13. Darwin's legacy: why biology is not physics, or why evolution has not become a common sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rama S

    2011-10-01

    Cosmology and evolution together have enabled us to look deep into the past and comprehend evolution-from the big bang to the cosmos, from molecules to humans. Here, I compare the nature of theories in biology and physics and ask why physical theories get accepted by the public without necessarily comprehending them but biological theories do not. Darwin's theory of natural selection, utterly simple in its premises but profound in its consequences, is not accepted widely. Organized religions, and creationists in particularly, have been the major critic of evolution, but not all opposition to evolution comes from organized religions. A great many people, between evolutionary biologists on one hand and creationists on the other, many academics included, who may not be logically opposed to evolution nevertheless do not accept it. This is because the process of and the evidence for evolution are invisible to a nonspecialist, or the theory may look too simple to explain complex traits to some, or because people compare evolution against God and find evolutionary explanations threatening to their beliefs. Considering how evolution affects our lives, including health and the environment to give just two examples, a basic course in evolution should become a required component of all our college and university educational systems.

  14. Interest in STEM is contagious for students in biology, chemistry, and physics classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Godwin, Allison; Scott, Tyler D.; Klotz, Leidy

    2017-01-01

    We report on a study of the effect of peers’ interest in high school biology, chemistry, and physics classes on students’ STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)–related career intentions and course achievement. We define an interest quorum as a science class where students perceive a high level of interest for the subject matter from their classmates. We hypothesized that students who experience such an interest quorum are more likely to choose STEM careers. Using data from a national survey study of students‘ experiences in high school science, we compared the effect of five levels of peer interest reported in biology, chemistry, and physics courses on students‘ STEM career intentions. The results support our hypothesis, showing a strong, positive effect of an interest quorum even after controlling for differences between students that pose competing hypotheses such as previous STEM career interest, academic achievement, family support for mathematics and science, and gender. Smaller positive effects of interest quorums were observed for course performance in some cases, with no detrimental effects observed across the study. Last, significant effects persisted even after controlling for differences in teaching quality. This work emphasizes the likely importance of interest quorums for creating classroom environments that increase students’ intentions toward STEM careers while enhancing or maintaining course performance. PMID:28808678

  15. Predicting Salmonella populations from biological, chemical, and physical indicators in Florida surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEgan, Rachel; Mootian, Gabriel; Goodridge, Lawrence D; Schaffner, Donald W; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2013-07-01

    Coliforms, Escherichia coli, and various physicochemical water characteristics have been suggested as indicators of microbial water quality or index organisms for pathogen populations. The relationship between the presence and/or concentration of Salmonella and biological, physical, or chemical indicators in Central Florida surface water samples over 12 consecutive months was explored. Samples were taken monthly for 12 months from 18 locations throughout Central Florida (n = 202). Air and water temperature, pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), turbidity, and conductivity were measured. Weather data were obtained from nearby weather stations. Aerobic plate counts and most probable numbers (MPN) for Salmonella, E. coli, and coliforms were performed. Weak linear relationships existed between biological indicators (E. coli/coliforms) and Salmonella levels (R(2) Salmonella levels (R(2) Salmonella levels. The lack of good correlations between biological indicators and Salmonella levels and between physicochemical indicators and Salmonella levels shows that the relationship between pathogens and indicators is complex. However, Escherichia coli provides a reasonable way to predict Salmonella levels in Central Florida surface water through logistic regression.

  16. Summary of Technical Meeting To Compare US/French Approaches for Physical Protection Test Beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, Thomas Kimball [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Ruben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thomas, Gerald [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Palut, Jean-Michel [French Alternative and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Fontenay Aux Roses (France)

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, representatives of the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration, including test bed professionals from Sandia National Laboratories, and representatives of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission participated in a one-week workshop to share best practices in design, organization, operations, utilization, improvement, and performance testing of physical protection test beds. The intended workshop outcomes were to (1) share methods of improving respective test bed methodologies and programs and (2) prepare recommendations for standards regarding creating and operating testing facilities for nations new to nuclear operations. At the workshop, the French and American subject matter experts compared best practices as developed at their respective test bed sites; discussed access delay test bed considerations; and presented the limitations/ constraints of physical protection test beds.

  17. Integrating Distributed Physical and Biological Marine data using OGC Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, A. L.; Blower, J. D.; Haines, K.; Price, M.; Millard, K.; Harpham, Q.

    2008-12-01

    Earth scientists use highly diverse sources of data, including in-situ measurements, remotely-sensed information and the results of numerical simulations. The ability to access, visualize, combine and compare these datasets is at the core of scientific investigation, but such tasks have hitherto been very difficult or impossible due to a fundamental lack of harmonization of data products. As a result, much valuable data remains underused. We present a web portal that visualizes and compares physical and biological marine data from both numerical models and in-situ observations. The model data are obtained via an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)-compatible Web Map Service (WMS), and the observed data are obtained via an OGC Web Feature Service (WFS). The physical model WMS, the biological model WMS and the WFS are located at three different institutes. This ability to display in-situ point observations alongside model data facilitates much valuable work on model validation. As models become increasingly complex, and sources of observed data become more numerous, it is important to be able to access and compare this growing amount of data efficiently, to ensure cross-checking and consistency between models and observations. The web portal is being applied in a large European operational oceanography project (ECOOP), where it is used to provide support to ecosystem modellers, and specifically to aid detection of potentially harmful algal blooms in coastal areas. The development of this system has been enabled by the conceptual framework of the Climate Science Modelling Language (CSML), which provides a common view onto all these datasets, independent of their storage format or physical location. CSML is based upon emerging international standards, enabling interoperability with other standards-based infrastructures. By creating a reusable Java library that embodies the CSML concepts we are able to apply these techniques to a number of other projects.

  18. Whole Class Dialogic Discussion Meets Taiwan's Physics Teachers: Attitudes and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-08-01

    There is a distance between the power that whole class dialogic discussions (WCDD) may offer to the science class and their use in practice. Teachers' attitudes toward WCDD are part of the problem. The aims of this study were twofold: (a) to examine Taiwanese physics teachers' attitudes toward WCDD by considering cultural perspectives and describe how these attitudes changed as a result of a special workshop designed for this purpose, and (b) to report on how these attitudes should be taken into account in designing such workshops in the future. Nine experienced physics teachers participated in the WCDD workshop. The workshop was based on the WCDD model developed by Eshach (2010). Inductive analyses were performed on interviews with the teachers and their students, which were composed of 36 questions and developed specially for the purpose of this study, yielded the following categories: (1) In-school reasons for opposing WCDD—reasons belonging to school ways/tradition of teaching that may cause barriers to WCDD implementation; (2) External Factors—cultural reasons relating to Taiwanese views concerning education in general, which cause barriers to WCDD implementation; and (3) Cognitive aspect—refers to what teachers know about WCDD. The paper concludes with a discussion on what should be done in order to successfully bring WCDD to the Taiwanese physics class.

  19. Grout to meet physical and chemical requirements for closure at Hanford grout vaults. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-21

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay, for the Hanford Grout Vault Program. The purpose of this grout was to fill the void between a wasteform containing 106-AN waste and the vault cover blocks. Following a successful grout development program, heat output, volume change, and compressive strength were monitored with time in simulated repository conditions and in full-depth physical models. This research indicated that the cold-cap grout could achieve and maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of a sealed vault. To determine if contact with 106-AN liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the cold-cap grout, cured specimens were immersed in simulated waste. Over a period of 21 days at 150 F, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. X-ray diffraction of reacted specimens revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. Scanning electron microscopy used with X-ray fluorescence showed that clusters if this phase had formed in grout pores, increasing grout density and decreasing its effective porosity. Physical and chemical tests collectively indicate a sealing component. However, the Hanford Grout Vault Program was cancelled before completion of this research. This report summarizes close-out Waterways Experiment Station when the Program was cancelled.

  20. Dose Response Association between Physical Activity and Biological, Demographic, and Perceptions of Health Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Loprinzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few population-based studies have examined the association between physical activity (PA and cardiovascular disease risk factors, demographic variables, and perceptions of health status, and we do not have a clear understanding of the dose-response relationship among these variables. Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to examine the dose-response relationship between objectively measured PA and metabolic syndrome (and its individual cardiovascular disease risk factors, demographic variables, and perceptions of health. After exclusions, 5,538 participants 18 years or older were included in the present study, with 2,538 participants providing fasting glucose and 2,527 providing fasting triglyceride data. PA was categorized into deciles. Results: Overall, the health benefits showed a general pattern of increase with each increasing levels of PA. Of the ten PA classifications examined, participants in the highest moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA category (at least 71 min/day had the lowest odds of developing metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: At a minimum, sedentary adults should strive to meet current PA guidelines (i.e., 150 min/week of MVPA, with additional positive benefits associated with engaging in three times this level of PA.

  1. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  2. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2016-05-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate – in analogy to sound – at velocities controlled by the interface’s compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  3. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2016-05-24

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate - in analogy to sound - at velocities controlled by the interface's compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  4. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Differences in Anthropometry, Biological Age and Physical Fitness Between Young Elite Kayakers and Canoeists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Plaza Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the anthropometric and physical characteristics of youth elite paddlers and to identify the differences between kayakers and canoeists. A total of 171 male paddlers (eighty-nine kayakers and eighty-two canoeists, aged 13.69 ± 0.57 years (mean ± SD volunteered to participate in this study. The participants completed basic anthropometric assessments (body mass, stretch stature, sitting height, body mass index, maturity level, sum of 6 skinfolds and fat mass percentage as well as a battery of physical fitness tests (overhead medicine ball throw, counter movement jump, sit-and-reach and 20 m multi-stage shuttle run tests. The anthropometric results revealed a significantly larger body size (stretch stature and sitting height and body mass in the kayakers (p < 0.01 as well as a more mature biological status (p = 0.003. The physical fitness level exhibited by the kayakers was likewise significantly greater than that of the canoeists, both in the counter movement jump and estimated VO2max (p < 0.05, as well as in the overhead medicine ball throw and sit-and-reach test (p < 0.01. These findings confirm the more robust and mature profile of youth kayakers that might be associated with the superior fitness level observed and the specific requirements of this sport discipline.

  6. Graphical methods and Cold War scientific practice: the Stommel Diagram's intriguing journey from the physical to the biological environmental sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Tiffany C; Doel, Ronald E

    2010-01-01

    In the last quarter of the twentieth century, an innovative three-dimensional graphical technique was introduced into biological oceanography and ecology, where it spread rapidly. Used to improve scientists' understanding of the importance of scale within oceanic ecosystems, this influential diagram addressed biological scales from phytoplankton to fish, physical scales from diurnal tides to ocean currents, and temporal scales from hours to ice ages. Yet the Stommel Diagram (named for physical oceanographer Henry Stommel, who created it in 1963) had not been devised to aid ecological investigations. Rather, Stommel intended it to help plan large-scale research programs in physical oceanography, particularly as Cold War research funding enabled a dramatic expansion of physical oceanography in the 1960s. Marine ecologists utilized the Stommel Diagram to enhance research on biological production in ocean environments, a key concern by the 1970s amid growing alarm about overfishing and ocean pollution. Before the end of the twentieth century, the diagram had become a significant tool within the discipline of ecology. Tracing the path that Stommel's graphical techniques traveled from the physical to the biological environmental sciences reveals a great deal about practices in these distinct research communities and their relative professional and institutional standings in the Cold War era. Crucial to appreciating the course of that path is an understanding of the divergent intellectual and social contexts of the physical versus the biological environmental sciences.

  7. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  8. Current topics in red cell biology: report on the Red Cell Special Interest Group meeting held at NHS Blood and Transplant Bristol on 30 October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, T; Bruce, L J; Ridgwell, K

    2016-08-01

    The Red Cell Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting, hosted by the British Blood Transfusion Society, provides an annual forum for the presentation of UK- and European-based red cell research. The 2015 meeting was held on Friday 30 October at the National Health Service Blood & Transplant (NHSBT) facility in Filton, Bristol and provided an exciting and varied programme on the themes of erythropoiesis, malaria biology and pathophysiology and red cells properties in stress and disease. Ten speakers presented on these topics over the course of one day. The meeting was well attended by over 90 delegates. Posters were presented during the lunch break, and abstracts from the posters are published at the end of this issue.

  9. Environmental parameters of the Tennessee River in Alabama. 2: Physical, chemical, and biological parameters. [biological and chemical effects of thermal pollution from nuclear power plants on water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological water quality data from five sites in the Tennessee River, two in Guntersville Reservoir and three in Wheeler Reservoir were correlated with climatological data for three annual cycles. Two of the annual cycles are for the years prior to the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant operations and one is for the first 14 months of Plant operations. A comparison of the results of the annual cycles indicates that two distinct physical conditions in the reservoirs occur, one during the warm months when the reservoirs are at capacity and one during the colder winter months when the reservoirs have been drawn-down for water storage during the rainy months and for weed control. The wide variations of physical and chemical parameters to which the biological organisms are subjected on an annual basis control the biological organisms and their population levels. A comparison of the parameters of the site below the Power plant indicates that the heated effluent from the plant operating with two of the three reactors has not had any effect on the organisms at this site. Recommendations given include the development of prediction mathematical models (statistical analysis) for the physical and chemical parameters under specific climatological conditions which affect biological organisms. Tabulated data of chemical analysis of water and organism populations studied is given.

  10. The DKIST Data Center: Meeting the Data Challenges for Next-Generation, Ground-Based Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, A. R.; Reardon, K.; Berukoff, S. J.; Hays, T.; Spiess, D.; Watson, F. T.; Wiant, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is under construction on the summit of Haleakalā in Maui, and scheduled to start science operations in 2020. The DKIST design includes a four-meter primary mirror coupled to an adaptive optics system, and a flexible instrumentation suite capable of delivering high-resolution optical and infrared observations of the solar chromosphere, photosphere, and corona. Through investigator-driven science proposals, the facility will generate an average of 8 TB of data daily, comprised of millions of images and hundreds of millions of metadata elements. The DKIST Data Center is responsible for the long-term curation and calibration of data received from the DKIST, and for distributing it to the user community for scientific use. Two key elements necessary to meet the inherent big data challenge are the development of flexible public/private cloud computing and coupled relational and non-relational data storage mechanisms. We discuss how this infrastructure is being designed to meet the significant expectation of automatic and manual calibration of ground-based solar physics data, and the maximization the data's utility through efficient, long-term data management practices implemented with prudent process definition and technology exploitation.

  11. What are the Effects of Implementing Learning-Focused Strategies in Biology and Physical Science Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Robin

    The objective of this study was to determine if Learning-Focused Strategies (LFS) implemented in high school science courses would affect student achievement and the pass rate of biology and physical science Common District Assessments (CDAs). The LFS, specific teaching strategies contained in the Learning-Focused Strategies Model (LFSM) Program were researched in this study. The LFSM Program provided a framework for comprehensive school improvement to those schools that implemented the program. The LFSM Program provided schools with consistent training in the utilization of exemplary practices and instruction. A high school located in the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia was the focus of this investigation. Twelve high school science classrooms participated in the study: six biology and six physical science classes. Up-to-date research discovered that the strategies contained in the LFSM Program were research-based and highly effective for elementary and middle school instruction. Research on its effectiveness in high school instruction was the main focus of this study. This investigation utilized a mixed methods approach, in which data were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Common District Assessment (CDA) quantitative data were collected and compared between those science classrooms that utilized LFS and those using traditional instructional strategies. Qualitative data were generated through classroom observations, student surveys, and teacher interviews. Individual data points were triangulated to determine trends of information reflecting the effects of implementing LFS. Based on the data collected in the research study, classrooms utilizing LFS were more successful academically than the classrooms using traditional instructional methods. Derived from the quantitative data, students in LFS classrooms were more proficient on both the biology and physical science Unit 1 CDAs, illustrating the effectiveness of LFS in the science classroom. Key terms

  12. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M., E-mail: WEMLmirapas@iqn.upv.e [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Ferrer, S. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Tortosa, R. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rodriguez, P. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Barrios, L.L. [Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Unit of Cellular Biology (UAB) (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the effects of direct and scattered radiation, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, cataracts, telangiectasia in nasal region, vasocellular epitelioms, hands depilation) and/or stochastic ones (cancer incidence). A methodology has been proposed for estimating the radiation risk or detriment from a group of six exposed interventional radiologists of the Hospital Universitario La Fe (Valencia, Spain), which had developed general exposition symptoms attributable to deterministic effects of ionizing radiation. Equivalent doses have been periodically registered using TLD's and wrist dosimeters, H{sub p}(10) and H{sub p}(0.07), respectively, and estimated through the observation of translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The software RADRISK has been applied for estimating radiation risks in these occupational radiation exposures. This software is based on transport models from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external sources of ionizing radiation, such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors [UNSCEAR, Sources and effects of ionizing radiation: 2006 report to the general assembly, with scientific annexes. New York: United Nations; 2006]. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for skin cancer has been, using wrist physical doses, of [1.03x10{sup -3}, 5.06x10{sup -2}], concluding that there is not an increased risk of skin cancer incidence. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for leukemia has been, using TLD physical doses, of [7.84x10{sup -2}, 3.36x10{sup -1}], and using biological doses, of [1.40x10{sup -1}, 1.51], which is considerably higher than incidence rates, showing an

  13. From the Physical World to the Biological Universe: Historical Developments Underlying SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    More than thirty years ago the French historian of science Alexandre Koyré (1957) wrote his classic volume, From the Closed World to the Infinite Universe, in which he argued that a fundamental shift in world view had taken place in 17th century cosmology. Between Nicholas of Cusa in the fifteenth century and Newton and Leibniz in the seventeenth, he found that the very terms in which humans thought about their universe had changed. These changes he characterized broadly as the destruction of the closed finite cosmos and the geometrization of space. The occasion of the Third International Bioastronomy Symposium in France is an especially appropriate time to argue that the SETI endeavor represents a test for a similar fundamental shift in cosmological world view, from the physical world to the biological universe. I define the biological universe, equivalent to what I have called before the biophysical cosmology (Dick, 1989), as the scientific world view which holds that life is widespread throughout the universe. In this case the biological universe does not necessarily supersede the physical universe, but a universe filled with life would certainly fundamentally alter our attitude toward the universe, and our place in it. Although Koyré mentioned life beyond the Earth as an adjunct to the revolution from the closed world to the infinite universe, only in the 1980s has the history of science begun to give full treatment to the subject. What follows is meant to be a contribution to that ongoing endeavor to understand where the extraterrestrial life debate fits in the history of science. The modern era in the extraterrestrial life debate is normally dated from Cocconi and Morrison's paper in 1959, and though one can always find precursors, this in my view is a valid perception. Cocconi and Morrison gave definite form to SETI, Frank Drake independently first carried out the experiment, a network of interested scientists began to form and met in Green Bank in

  14. Organizing physics teacher professional education around productive habit development: A way to meet reform challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia; Gregorcic, Bor; Vokos, Stamatis

    2017-06-01

    Extant literature on teacher preparation suggests that preservice teachers learn best when they are immersed in a community that allows them to develop dispositions, knowledge, and practical skills and share with the community a strong vision of what good teaching entails. However, even if the requisite dispositions, knowledge, and skills in pursuing the shared vision of good teaching are developed, the professional demands on a teacher's time are so great out of, and so complex during class time that if every decision requires multiple considerations and deliberations with oneself, the productive decisions might not materialize. We argue that the link between intentional decision making and actual teaching practice are teacher's habits (spontaneous responses to situational cues). Teachers unavoidably develop habits with practical experience and under the influence of knowledge and belief structures that in many ways condition the responses of teachers in their practical work. To steer new teachers away from developing unproductive habits directed towards "survival" instead of student learning, we propose that teacher preparation programs (e.g., in physics) strive to develop in preservice teachers strong habits of mind and practice that will serve as an underlying support structure for beginning teachers. We provide examples of physics teacher habits that are to be developed during the program, propose mechanisms for the development of such habits, and outline possible future research agendas around habits.

  15. Television viewing time is associated with overweight/obesity among older adults, independent of meeting physical activity and health guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Takemi; Takamiya, Tomoko; Oka, Koichiro; Owen, Neville; Shimomitsu, Teruichi

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown associations of sedentary behavior with cardiovascular risk, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). However, few studies have focused on older adults. This study examined the joint associations of television (TV) viewing time and MVPA with overweight/obesity among Japanese older adults. A population-based, cross-sectional mail survey was used to collect self-reported height, weight, time spent in TV viewing, and MVPA from 1806 older adults (age: 65-74 years, men: 51.1%). Participants were classified into 4 categories according to TV viewing time (dichotomized into high and low around the median) and MVPA level (dichotomized into sufficient and insufficient by the physical activity guideline level of ≥ 150 minutes/week). Odds ratios (ORs) for overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m²) were calculated according to the 4 TV/MVPA categories, adjusting for potential confounders. Of all participants, 20.1% were overweight/obese. The median TV viewing time (25th, 75th percentile) was 840 (420, 1400) minutes/week. As compared with the reference category (high TV/insufficient MVPA), the adjusted ORs (95% CI) of overweight/obesity were 0.93 (0.65, 1.34) for high TV/sufficient MVPA, 0.58 (0.37, 0.90) for low TV/insufficient MVPA, and 0.67 (0.47, 0.97) for low TV/sufficient MVPA. In this sample of older adults, spending less time watching TV, a predominant sedentary behavior, was associated with lower risk of being overweight or obese, independent of meeting physical activity guidelines. Further studies using prospective and/or intervention designs are warranted to confirm the presently observed effects of sedentary behavior, independent of physical activity, on the health of older adults.

  16. Nuclear Physics Meets the Sources of the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2017-07-07

    The determination of the injection composition of cosmic ray nuclei within astrophysical sources requires sufficiently accurate descriptions of the source physics and the propagation - apart from controlling astrophysical uncertainties. We therefore study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic ray astrophysics, which involves the photo-disintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that the impact of nuclear model uncertainties is potentially larger in environments with non-thermal radiation fields than in the cosmic microwave background. We also study the impact of nuclear models on the nuclear cascade in a gamma-ray burst radiation field, simulated at a level of complexity comparable to the most precise cosmic ray propagation code. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions in cosmic ray sources and propagation.

  17. Using Metaphor Theory to Examine Conceptions of Energy in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael

    2014-06-01

    Energy is one of the most important unifying themes in science. Yet the way energy is conceptualized varies depending on context. In this paper, the discourse used to explain the role of energy in systems from biology, chemistry, and physics is examined from the perspective of metaphor theory. Six substance metaphors for energy are identified in pedagogical discourse (i.e., textbooks and the science education literature): energy as a substance that can be accounted for, can flow, can be carried, can change forms, can be lost, and can be an ingredient, a product or stored in some way. Each of these conceptual metaphors highlight and obscure various characteristics of energy, and provide a set of frameworks that each afford a different understanding of the energy concept.

  18. Evaluation of physical-chemical and biological treatment of shale oil retort water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, B.W.; Mason, M.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Wakamiya, W.

    1982-09-01

    Bench scale studies were conducted to evaluate conventional physical-chemical and biological treatment processes for removal of pollutants from retort water produced by in situ shale oil recovery methods. Prior to undertaking these studies, very little information had been reported on treatment of retort water. A treatment process train patterned after that generally used throughout the petroleum refining industry was envisioned for application to retort water. The treatment train would consist of processes for removing suspended matter, ammonia, biodegradable organics, and nonbiodegradable or refractory organics. The treatment processes evaluated include anaerobic digestion and activated sludge for removal of biodegradable organics and other oxidizable substances; activated carbon adsorption for removal of nonbiodegradable organics; steam stripping for ammonia removal; and chemical coagulation, sedimentation and filtration for removal of suspended matter. Preliminary cost estimates are provided.

  19. Pushing the physical limits of spectroscopic imaging for new biology and better medicine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In vivo molecular spectroscopic imaging is not a simple addition of a spectrometer to a microscope. Innovations are needed to break the physical limits in sensitivity, depth, speed and resolution perspectives. I will present our most recent advances in modality development, biological application, and clinical translation. My talk will focus on the development of mid-infrared photothermal microscope for depth-resolved vibrational imaging of living cells (Science Advances, in press), the discovery of a metabolic signature in cancer stem cells by hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering imaging (Cell Stem Cell, in press), and the development of an intravascular vibrational photoacoustic catheter for label-free sensing of lipid laden plaques (Scientific Report 2016, 6:25236).

  20. Physics of Transport and Traffic Phenomena in Biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, D; Nishinari, K; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukayotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In particular, some of the methods of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, pioneered almost a hundred years ago by Einstein, Langevin and others, turned out to be powerful theoretical tools for quantitaive analysis of model...

  1. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach.

  2. Enhancing Student Success in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics by Transforming the Faculty Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Howard; Smith, Leigh; Koenig, Kathleen; Beyette, Jill; Kinkle, Brian; Vonderheide, Anne

    We present preliminary results of an effort to enhance undergraduate student success in the STEM disciplines. We explore a multistep approach that reflects recent literature and report initial results by each of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics of implementing several change strategies. The central elements of our approach involve identified departmental Teaching and Learning Liaisons, a unique faculty development component by our teaching center, a vertical integration of leadership across department heads, the Dean, and the Provost, and the explicit acknowledgement that change happens locally. Teaching and Learning lunches across the departments have attracted an attendance of ~65% of the faculty. The use of Learning Assistants in classrooms has also increased sharply. Modest changes in the student success rates have been observed. These efforts and others at the decanal and provostal levels promise changes in student success. We acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through DUE 1544001 and 1431350.

  3. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils in the city of Mariupol, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhovtseva, O. G.; Mal'tseva, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical and biological properties of urbanized soils in the city of Mariupol have been considered in comparison with the background soils. The parametrical characteristics (abundance and biomass) of soil algal groups, the content of humus, the reaction of soil solution, the content of heavy metals, and the particle size distributions of soils under different anthropogenic impacts have been assessed. The physicochemical properties of soils developing under urboecosystem conditions affect the number of structure-forming species, biomass, and proportions of soil algae. According to the particle size distribution, urban soils are classified among the medium and heavy loamy soils with the predominance of the clay and coarse silt fractions. The fractions of physical clay and clay are of highest importance for the existence of algae. The accumulation of heavy metals in the surface horizons of soils can stimulate or inhibit the development of algae depending on the metal concentration.

  4. Design in nature how the constructal law governs evolution in biology, physics, technology, and social organization

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    In this groundbreaking book, Adrian Bejan takes the recurring patterns in nature—trees, tributaries, air passages, neural networks, and lightning bolts—and reveals how a single principle of physics, the constructal law, accounts for the evolution of these and many other designs in our world. Everything—from biological life to inanimate systems—generates shape and structure and evolves in a sequence of ever-improving designs in order to facilitate flow. River basins, cardiovascular systems, and bolts of lightning are very efficient flow systems to move a current—of water, blood, or electricity. Likewise, the more complex architecture of animals evolve to cover greater distance per unit of useful energy, or increase their flow across the land. Such designs also appear in human organizations, like the hierarchical “flowcharts” or reporting structures in corporations and political bodies. All are governed by the same principle, known as the constructal law, and configure and reconfigure themselves...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  6. Temporal changes in physical, chemical and biological sediment parameters in a tropical estuary after mangrove deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Marianne; Nguyen, Ngoc Tuong Giang; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Michelsen, Anders; Nguyen, Ngoc Lam; Doan, Nhu Hai; Kristensen, Erik; Weckström, Kaarina; Son, Tong Phuoc Hoang; Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten

    2014-04-01

    Dated sediment cores taken near the head and mouth of a tropical estuary, Nha-Phu/Binh Cang, in south central Viet Nam were analyzed for changes over time in physical, chemical and biological proxies potentially influenced by removal of the mangrove forest lining the estuary. A time-series of satellite images was obtained, which showed that the depletion of the mangrove forest at the head of the estuary was relatively recent. Most of the area was converted into aquaculture ponds, mainly in the late 1990's. The sediment record showed a clear increase in sedimentation rate at the head of the estuary at the time of mangrove deforestation and a change in diatom assemblages in the core from the mouth of the estuary indicating an increase in the water column turbidity of the entire estuary at the time of the mangrove deforestation. The proportion of fine-grained sediment and the δ13C signal both increased with distance from the head of the estuary while the carbon content decreased. The nitrogen content and the δ15N signal were more or less constant throughout the estuary. The proportion of fine-grained material and the chemical proxies were more or less stable over time in the core from the mouth while they varied synchronously over time in the core from the head of the estuary. The sediment proxies combined show that mangrove deforestation had large effects on the estuary with regard to both the physical and chemical environment with implications for the biological functioning.

  7. Integrating writing into an introductory environmental science curriculum: Perspectives from biology and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkin, P. A.; Cline, E. T.; Beaufort, A.

    2008-12-01

    In the University of Washington, Tacoma's Environmental Science program, we are implementing a curriculum-wide, scaffolded strategy to teach scientific writing. Writing in an introductory science course is a powerful means to make students feel part of the scientific community, an important goal in our environmental science curriculum. Writing is already an important component of the UW Tacoma environmental science program at the upper levels: our approach is designed to prepare students for the writing-intensive junior- and senior-level seminars. The approach is currently being tested in introductory biology and physics before it is incorporated in the rest of the introductory environmental science curriculum. The centerpiece of our approach is a set of research and writing assignments woven throughout the biology and physics course sequences. The assignments progress in their degree of complexity and freedom through the sequence of introductory science courses. Each assignment is supported by a number of worksheets and short written exercises designed to teach writing and critical thought skills. The worksheets are focused on skills identified both by research in science writing and the instructors' experience with student writing. Students see the assignments as a way to personalize their understanding of basic science concepts, and to think critically about ideas that interest them. We find that these assignments provide a good way to assess student comprehension of some of the more difficult ideas in the basic sciences, as well as a means to engage students with the challenging concepts of introductory science courses. Our experience designing these courses can inform efforts to integrate writing throughout a geoscience or environmental science curriculum, as opposed to on a course-by-course basis.

  8. Integrated Ecological River Health Assessments, Based on Water Chemistry, Physical Habitat Quality and Biological Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yoon Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated integrative river ecosystem health using stressor-based models of physical habitat health, chemical water health, and biological health of fish and identified multiple-stressor indicators influencing the ecosystem health. Integrated health responses (IHRs, based on star-plot approach, were calculated from qualitative habitat evaluation index (QHEI, nutrient pollution index (NPI, and index of biological integrity (IBI in four different longitudinal regions (Groups I–IV. For the calculations of IHRs values, multi-metric QHEI, NPI, and IBI models were developed and their criteria for the diagnosis of the health were determined. The longitudinal patterns of the river were analyzed by a self-organizing map (SOM model and the key major stressors in the river were identified by principal component analysis (PCA. Our model scores of integrated health responses (IHRs suggested that mid-stream and downstream regions were impaired, and the key stressors were closely associated with nutrient enrichment (N and P and organic matter pollutions from domestic wastewater disposal plants and urban sewage. This modeling approach of IHRs may be used as an effective tool for evaluations of integrative ecological river health..

  9. Changes in biological anthropology: results of the 1998 American Association of Physical Anthropology Membership Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Trudy R

    2002-06-01

    In response to the results of the 1996 survey of the membership of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA), the Executive Committee of the Association sponsored a follow-up survey designed to assess gender and specialty differences in training, employment, academic status, mentoring, and research support. A total of 993 questionnaires was analyzed, representing approximately 62% of the 1998 membership of the Association. There has been a marked shift in the number of males and females in the discipline from the 1960s to the 1990s. While 51.2% of all respondents are female and 48.8% are male, 70% of the students are female. Chi-square tests indicate significant differences between males and females by highest degree, age, status, obtaining a tenure-track position, receiving tenure, and taking nontenure-track employment before receiving a tenure-track position. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of females in the ranks of assistant and associate professors; however, this is not true for the rank of professor. There are also significant differences between males and females by specialty within the discipline: researchers in primatology, human biological variation, skeletal biology, and paleopathology are primarily female, while researchers in human and primate evolution are increasingly female. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Human Development VII: A Spiral Fractal Model of Fine Structure of Physical Energy Could Explain Central Aspects of Biological Information, Biological Organization and Biological Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have made a draft of a physical fractal essence of the universe, a sketch of a new cosmology, which we believe to lay at the root of our new holistic biological paradigm. We present the fractal roomy spiraled structures and the energy-rich dancing “infinite strings” or lines of the universe that our hypothesis is based upon. The geometric language of this cosmology is symbolic and both pre-mathematical and pre-philosophical. The symbols are both text and figures, and using these we step by step explain the new model that at least to some extent is able to explain the complex informational system behind morphogenesis, ontogenesis, regeneration and healing. We suggest that it is from this highly dynamic spiraled structure that organization of cells, organs, and the wholeness of the human being including consciousness emerge. The model of ““dancing fractal spirals” carries many similarities to premodern cultures descriptions of the energy of the life and universe. Examples are the Native American shamanistic descriptions of their perception of energy and the old Indian Yogis descriptions of the life-energy within the body and outside. Similar ideas of energy and matter are found in the modern superstring theories. The model of the informational system of the organism gives new meaning to Bateson’s definition of information: “A difference that makes a difference”, and indicates how information-directed self-organization can exist on high structural levels in living organisms, giving birth to their subjectivity and consciousness.

  11. Big Data Meets Physics Education Research: From MOOCs to University-Led High School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) movement has catalyzed discussions of digital learning on campuses around the world and highlighted the increasingly large, complex datasets related to learning. Physics Education Research can and should play a key role in measuring outcomes of this most recent wave of digital education. In this talk, I will discuss big data and learning analytics through multiple modes of teaching and learning enabled by the open-source edX platform: open-online, flipped, and blended. Open-Online learning will be described through analysis of MOOC offerings from Harvard and MIT, where 2.5 million unique users have led to 9 million enrollments across nearly 300 courses. Flipped instruction will be discussed through an Advanced Placement program at Davidson College that empowers high school teachers to use AP aligned, MOOC content directly in their classrooms with only their students. Analysis of this program will be highlighted, including results from a pilot study showing a positive correlation between content usage and externally validated AP exam scores. Lastly, blended learning will be discussed through specific residential use cases at Davidson College and MIT, highlighting unique course models that blend open-online and residential experiences. My hope for this talk is that listeners will better understand the current wave of digital education and the opportunities it provides for data-driven teaching and learning.

  12. Psychotherapy, biological psychiatry, and the nature of matter: a view from physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, L S

    2001-01-01

    Biological psychiatry has marginalized psychotherapy, and it is difficult for psychotherapists to counter its hegemony. The reductionist/materialist position seems incontrovertible and self-evident. An important factor in maintaining this stance is the belief that the physical world is understandable, solid, unproblematic, especially when compared to the realm of the psychological. Developments in quantum and relativity theories, however, cast doubt on that belief. They show the fundamental nature of the material world to be problematic, enigmatic, paradoxical, impossible to understand or conceptualize in terms of everyday experience. This insight weakens the prima facie case for privileging the material over the psychological, and alternative (i.e., nonneurobiological) approaches to mental health matters should, therefore, be able to compete on an equal footing. However, the materialist-reductionist stance is kept in place by powerful forces and is well defended; rational arguments alone are unlikely to have an impact. This pervasive ideological resistance to rational, often well-founded critiques of physical reductionism continues to be a major impediment to changing the present materialist climate. That resistance has to be addressed before any significant shift in orientation can be expected to occur.

  13. Differences in biological maturation, anthropometry and physical performance between playing positions in youth team handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthys, Stijn P J; Fransen, Job; Vaeyens, Roel; Lenoir, Matthieu; Philippaerts, Renaat

    2013-01-01

    It was the goal of this cross-sectional study to examine differences in maturity, anthropometry and physical performance between youth handball players across different playing positions (i.e. goalkeeper, back, pivot and wing). Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), accounting for biological maturation, was used to assess positional differences in 472 male youth handball players from three age groups: U14, U15 and U16. Differences in age at peak height velocity were found in all age groups. Backs were significantly more mature than wings in U14 and U15 and than wings and pivots in U16. Furthermore, backs are overall taller, have a bigger arm span and perform best on tests for strength, agility and speed, especially in the U15 age group. Therefore, it can be concluded that youth players with the most advanced maturation status and the most favourable anthropometry and physical fitness scores, are consistently positioned in the back position. Players with a less advanced maturity status and an overall smaller stature are placed on the wing or pivot positions. In conclusion, it seems that anthropometrical and maturational characteristics are used by coaches to directly and/or indirectly select players for specific field positions. This strategy is risky since anthropometry and maturity status change over the years.

  14. Off flavours in large waterbodies: physics, chemistry and biology in synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S B; Charlton, M; Rao, Y R; Howell, T; Ridal, J; Brownlee, B; Marvin, C; Millard, S

    2007-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes of North America are a drinking water source for millions of Canadian and US consumers. These waterbodies have undergone extensive change over the past century as a result of widespread degradation and remediation. Many of the Lakes are prone to taste and odour (T&O), and although these outbreaks have been poorly monitored, evidence suggests that they are increasing in frequency. Tracing and controlling T&O in such large systems presents a challenging task, due to their physical size and complexity. This paper presents an overview of recent investigative and management approaches to T&O in Lake Ontario and its outflow, the St. Lawrence River. We have identified three distinct patterns of T&O in these source-waters, caused by geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol and differing in their planktonic and benthic sources, and temporal and spatial dynamics. Each pattern has required a different approach by scientists and management, in partnership with the water industry. We have shown these T&O outbreaks are caused and moderated by physical, chemical and biological mechanisms over a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. Canadian municipalities affected by these outbreaks have been key to the investigation of the links between T&O and ecosystem processes with the aim to develop more proactive water treatment and long-term management.

  15. Physical, chemical and biological characteristics of space flown tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esyanti, Rizkita R.; Dwivany, Fenny M.; Almeida, Maria; Swandjaja, Leonita

    2016-11-01

    Several research showed that space flown treated seeds had a different characteristic with that of ground treated seed, which eventually produced a different characteristic of growth and productivity. Research was conducted to study the physical, chemical and biological properties, such as the rate of germination and the growth of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) space flown seeds compared with that of control one. Observations of physical properties using a SEM showed that there were pores on the surface of some tomato space flown seeds. Observations using a stereo and inverted microscope showed that the coat layer of space flown seeds was thinner than control seeds. The total mineral content in the control seeds (22.88%) was averagely higher than space flown seeds (18.66%), but the average carbohydrate content in control seed was lower (15.2 ± 2.79%) than the space flown seeds (9.02 ± 1.87%). The level of auxin (IAA) of control seeds (142 ± 6.88 ppm) was averagely lower than the space flown seeds (414 ± 78.84 ppm), whereas the level of cytokinins (zeatin) for the control seeds (381 ± 68.86 ppm) was higher than the space flown seeds (68 ± 9.53 ppm), and the level of gibberellin (GA3) for the control seeds (335 ± 10.7 ppm) was higher than the space flown seeds (184 ± 7.4 ppm). The results of this study showed that the physical and chemical properties of tomato space flown seeds were generally different compare with that to control seeds, so that it might also be resulted in different germination and growth characteristic. The germination test showed that space flown seeds had lower germination rate compare to control. The growth pattern indicated that planted space flown seeds generally grew better than control. However, those data were more homogenous in control seeds compare to that in space flown tomato seeds.

  16. The new biological anthropology: bringing Washburn's new physical anthropology into 2010 and beyond--the 2008 AAPA luncheon lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Agustin

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 60 years ago, Sherwood Washburn issued a call for a "New Physical Anthropology," a transition from measurement and classification toward a focus on the processes and mechanisms of evolutionary change. He advocated multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the understanding of human behavior, biology, and history. Many interpret this as a call for a practice that is both biological and anthropological. Is this what we do? Are we biological anthropologists yet? In this essay, I explore what we, Physical Anthropologists, as a discipline are doing in the context of a New Physical Anthropology, where we might be headed, and why this discussion is crucial to our relevance. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  18. Are physical activity studies in Hispanics meeting reporting guidelines for continuous monitoring technology? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Charles S; Parker, Nathan H; Soltero, Erica G; Rosales Chavez, José; O'Connor, Daniel P; Gallagher, Martina R; Lee, Rebecca E

    2015-09-18

    Continuous monitoring technologies such as accelerometers and pedometers are the gold standard for physical activity (PA) measurement. However, inconsistencies in use, analysis, and reporting limit the understanding of dose-response relationships involving PA and the ability to make comparisons across studies and population subgroups. These issues are particularly detrimental to the study of PA across different ethnicities with different PA habits. This systematic review examined the inclusion of published guidelines involving data collection, processing, and reporting among articles using accelerometers or pedometers in Hispanic or Latino populations. English (PubMed; EbscoHost) and Spanish (SCIELO; Biblioteca Virtual en Salud) articles published between 2000 and 2013 using accelerometers or pedometers to measure PA among Hispanics or Latinos were identified through systematic literature searches. Of the 253 abstracts which were initially reviewed, 57 met eligibility criteria (44 accelerometer, 13 pedometer). Articles were coded and reviewed to evaluate compliance with recommended guidelines (N = 20), and the percentage of accelerometer and pedometer articles following each guideline were computed and reported. On average, 57.1 % of accelerometer and 62.2 % of pedometer articles reported each recommended guideline for data collection. Device manufacturer and model were reported most frequently, and provision of instructions for device wear in Spanish was reported least frequently. On average, 29.6 % of accelerometer articles reported each guideline for data processing. Definitions of an acceptable day for inclusion in analyses were reported most frequently, and definitions of an acceptable hour for inclusion in analyses were reported least frequently. On average, 18.8 % of accelerometer and 85.7 % of pedometer articles included each guideline for data reporting. Accelerometer articles most frequently included average number of valid days and least frequently

  19. Walking, biking or sport: how Spanish women attending breast cancer screening meet physical activity recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró-Pérez, Rosana; Salas, Dolores; Vallés, Guillermo; Abad-Fernandez, Ma Soledad; Vidal, Carmen; Sanchez-Contador Escudero, Carmen; Ascunce-Elizaga, Nieves; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Pedraz, Carmen; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva María; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2015-10-01

    The aim is to analyse physical activity (PA), the fulfillment recommendation of at least 150 min of moderate PA, through walking/biking (W&B), sport, both types of PA and the factors associated with inactivity by Spanish women who attended breast cancer screening programmes. The DDM-Spain is a multicentre cross-sectional study involving 3584 women, aged 45-68, attending screening in seven Spanish cities. Data were collected using a questionnaire, including age, socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, family burden and PA. PA was converted into metabolic equivalent of task (METs), categorized as low ≤ 600 METs min per week (m/w), moderate 600-3000 METs m/w and high ≥ 3000 METs m/w. A multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify variables associated with inactivity for each type of PA. No women achieved a high level of PA through sport. 79.2% achieved a high or moderate level of PA by W&B. Lack of sport was associated with being overweight (odds ratio OR = 1.31; 95% confidence interval CI: 1.06 to 1.62), body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 (OR = 1.85; 95% CI: 1.44 to 2.38), smoking (OR = 1.56; 95% CI: 1.22 to 2.00) and living with a disabled person (OR = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.0 to 2.81), whereas enough sport practice was associated with higher educational or socio-economic level (SEL). Regarding W&B, inactivity was associated with BMI ≥ 30 (OR = 1.91; 95% CI: 1.49 to 2.45) and living with someone >74 (OR = 1.96; 95% CI: 1.48 to 2.58). Inactivity for both types of exercise was associated with a BMI ≥ 30 (OR = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.63 to 2.8), smoking (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.81) and living with someone >74 (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.24 to 2.28). Family burden and BMI ≥ 30 are inversely associated with both types of PA. W&B is the most common type of PA regardless of educational and SEL. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. Somatic characteristics in relation to meeting recommended physical activity in overweight and obese women aged 30-60 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Sofková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity (PA can provide health benefits and thus reduce the risk of complications from obesity and improve mental well-being. We consider body composition as an acceptable indicator of the functional condition of the body. Aims: Our research objective was to analyse selected body composition fractions in relation to meeting recommended PA in overweight and obese women. Methods: 221 women participated in our study, divided in two age groups: 30 to 44.9 years (Maturus I, n = 118 and 45 to 60 years (Maturus II, n = 103. Each age group was further differentiated by sub-groups (adequate and inadequate PA according to the achieved PA level (medium PA: 3 to 6 MET; ≥ 150 min/week. To determine the PA parameters within one week the ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used. The InBody 720 body composition analyser was used to determine body composition parameters. Descriptive characteristics and data analysis were carried out using Statistica 10.0. Differences were compared by the Student's t-test. Statistical significance level was set at α < .05. Results: Younger women who achieved adequate PA reached lower average values of body fat mass and visceral fat area than women with inadequate PA. Higher average values of the fat-free mass, body cell mass and skeletal muscle mass were found in older women with adequate PA in comparison with women with inadequate PA. Conclusions: The research study verified a positive relationship between meeting the recommended PA level and its impact on body composition health risk indicators. A positive approach to the PA may lead to a decrease in health problems associated with excess weight and obesity.