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Sample records for physics facility lampf

  1. Seismic vulnerability study Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, M.; Goen, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), located at TA-53 of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), features an 800 MeV proton accelerator used for nuclear physics and materials science research. As part of the implementation of DOE Order 5480.25 and in preparation for DOE Order 5480.28, a seismic vulnerability study of the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) supporting the beam line from the accelerator building through to the ends of die various beam stops at LAMPF has been performed. The study was accomplished using the SQUG GIP methodology to assess the capability of the various SSCs to resist an evaluation basis earthquake. The evaluation basis earthquake was selected from site specific seismic hazard studies. The goals for the study were as follows: (1) identify SSCs which are vulnerable to seismic loads; and (2) ensure that those SSCs screened during die evaluation met the performance goals required for DOE Order 5480.28. The first goal was obtained by applying the SQUG GIP methodology to those SSCS represented in the experience data base. For those SSCs not represented in the data base, information was gathered and a significant amount of engineering judgment applied to determine whether to screen the SSC or to classify it as an outlier. To assure the performance goals required by DOE Order 5480.28 are met, modifications to the SQUG GIP methodology proposed by Salmon and Kennedy were used. The results of this study ire presented in this paper

  2. Recent LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility] research using muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to the core programs in nuclear and particle physics, diverse experiments have been carried out that address interdisciplinary and applied topics at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). These include muon-spin-relaxation experiments to study magnetic dynamics in spin glasses and electronic structure in heavy-fermion superconductors; muon channeling experiments to provide information on pion stopping sites in crystals; tomographic density reconstruction studies using proton energy loss; and radiation-effects experiments to explore microstructure evolution and to characterize materials for fusion devices and high-intensity accelerators. Finally, the catalysis of the d-t fusion reaction using negative muons has been extensively investigated with some surprising results including a stronger than linear dependence of the mesomolecular formation rate on target density and the observation of 150 fusions per muon under certain conditions. Recent results in those programs involving pions and muons interacting with matter are discussed

  3. Progress at LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility], January--December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelakker, K.

    1990-12-01

    This report contains brief papers on research conducted at the lampf facility in the following areas: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects and radioisotope production

  4. Progress at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility), January--December 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelakker, K. (ed.)

    1990-12-01

    This report contains brief papers on research conducted at the lampf facility in the following areas: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects and radioisotope production.

  5. Progress at LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility]: Progress report, January-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B.

    1987-05-01

    Activities at LAMPF during the year of 1986 are summarized, including brief summaries of experiments in nuclear and particle physics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science, radiation-effects studies, biomedical research and instrumentation, nuclear chemistry, radioisotope production, and theory. The status of an advanced hadron facility currently under study is reported, as well as facility development and accelerator operations

  6. Progress at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility): Progress report, January-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (eds.)

    1987-05-01

    Activities at LAMPF during the year of 1986 are summarized, including brief summaries of experiments in nuclear and particle physics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science, radiation-effects studies, biomedical research and instrumentation, nuclear chemistry, radioisotope production, and theory. The status of an advanced hadron facility currently under study is reported, as well as facility development and accelerator operations. (LEW)

  7. Data analysis facility at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.G.; Amann, J.F.; Butler, H.S.; Hoffman, C.J.; Mischke, R.E.; Shera, E.B.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1977-11-01

    This report documents the discussions and conclusions of a study held in July 1977 to develop the requirements for a data analysis facility to support the experimental program in medium-energy physics at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). 2 tables

  8. Status of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, M.; Rosen, L.

    1975-01-01

    A brief history and a description of the LAMPF Linac is given, followed by a discussion of the experimental areas, some selected experimental results, and some practical applications. Differential cross section data for n-p charge exchange scattering near 640 MeV are compared with data taken on other machines, and data on pion scattering are presented. The application of negative pions to the treatment of cancer is discussed

  9. LAMPF: a nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, M.S.

    1977-09-01

    A description is given of the recently completed Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) which is now taking its place as one of the major installations in this country for the support of research in nuclear science and its applications. Descriptions are given of the organization of the Laboratory, the Users Group, experimental facilities for research and for applications, and procedures for carrying on research studies

  10. Progress at LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility], January-December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelakker, K.

    1988-09-01

    This report is the annual progress report of MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Included are brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and other Los Alamos Divisions. These reports included the following topics: Nuclear and particle physics; Atomic and molecular physics; Materials science; Radiation-effects studies; Biomedical research and instrumentation; Nuclear chemistry; Radioisotope production and accelerator facilities development and operation

  11. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    CT: Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 20 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  12. Measurement and modeling of external radiation during 1985 from LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility] emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, B.M.; Olsen, W.A.; Chen, Ili; Van Etten, D.M.

    1987-11-01

    An array of three portable, pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) continued to measure external radiation levels during 1985 caused by radionuclides emitted from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). A Gaussian-type atmospheric dispersion model, using onsite meteorological and stack release data, was tested during this study. A more complex finite model, which takes into account the contribution of radiation at a receptor from different locations of the passing plume, was also tested. Monitoring results indicate that, as in 1984, a persistent wind up the Rio Grande Valley during the evening and early morning hours is largely responsible for causing the highest external radiation levels to occur to the northeast and north-northeast of LAMPF. However, because of increased turbulent mixing during the day, external radiation levels are generally much less during the day than at night. External radiation levels during 1985 show approximately a 75% reduction over 1984 levels. This resulted from a similar percentage reduction in LAMPF emissions caused by newly implemented emission controls. Comparison of predicted and measured daily external radiation levels indicates a high degree of correlation. The model also gives accurate estimates of measured concentrations over longer time periods. Comparison of predicted and measured hourly values indicates that the model generally tends to overpredict during the day and underpredict at night. 9 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  13. Major facility overhauls at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Sommer, W.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) is a linear proton accelerator designed to operate at 800 MeV and 1.0 mA. It has been operating at power levels above 200 microamperes since February of 1976 and now routinely operates near the design level. This paper outlines the problems encountered with the original target cell components, the repairs required since 1976, and specifically details the steps involved in the complete replacement of the vital target cell components. These components include target boxes, collimators, main beam line magnets, and the front-end magnets of the secondary beam lines. The A-2 target cell was replaced in the spring of 1983 and the A-1 target cell was replaced in the spring of 1984. Both have operated satisfactorily since their completion, with only minor difficulties. The overhaul and total component replacement in the beam stop area (A-6) was completed in early May 1985 and has just been placed in operation. The upgrade, in addition to the replacement of the beam stop and the vacuum-to-air window with state-of-the-art designs, provides a greatly increased capability of both proton and neutron irradiation of materials

  14. Progress at LAMPF. Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility, July-December 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1982-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions

  15. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions

  16. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions

  17. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  18. Neutrino physics at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    There are three neutrino experiments at LAMPF in various stages of completion or development. E225, the study of electron-neutrino electron scattering, which completed data taking in December 1986 and has just about completed all its analysis. E645, a search for /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/ oscillation, is in its third and final year of data taking. The Large Cerenkov Detector (LCD), associated with E1015, has undergone extensive scientific and technical review and we are presently trying to obtain the necessary funds to build the detector, beam line, and target. In the following, each of these experiments will be briefly discussed. Before doing so, it is useful to show the characteristics of the neutrino spectrum resulting from the decay of π + at rest. It is also useful to realize that, on average, an 800-MeV proton from LAMPF produces about 0.1 π + decaying at rest. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Progress at LAMPF, Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility, January-December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the annual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions. Abstracts of separate sections of the report were prepared separately for the data base

  20. Status of PILAC: A pion linac facility for 1-GeV pion physics at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    A Pion Linac (PILAC) is being designed for LAMPF. Together with its high resolution beam line and spectrometer, the system is optimized to provide 10 9 pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the (π + ,K + ) reaction at 920, MeV. There will also be an achromatic beam line capable of utilizing the maximum energy available, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is being discussed at this workshop. 12 figs

  1. The comparative uptake and interaction of several radionuclides in the trophic levels surrounding the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) waste water ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, G.H. Jr.

    1989-08-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the uptake, distribution, and interaction of five activation products (Co-57, Be-7, Cs-134, Rb-83, and Mn-54) within the biotic and abiotic components surrounding the waste treatment lagoons of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The study attempted to ascertain where, and what specific interactions were taking place among the isotopes and the biotic/abiotic components. A statistical approach, utilizing Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA), was conducted testing the radioisotopic concentrations by (1) the trophic levels (TROPLVL) in each position sampled on the grid, (2) where sampled on the grid (TRAN), (3) where sampled with-in each grid line (PLOT), and (4) the side with which sampled (SIDE). This provided both the dependent and independent variables that would be tested. The Null Hypothesis (Ho) tested the difference in the mean values of the isotopes within/between each of the four independent variables. The Rb-83 statistic indicated an accumulation within the TRAN and PLOT variables within the sampled area. The Co-57 test statistic provided a value which indicated that accumulation of this isotope within TROPLVL was taking place. Mn-54 test values indicated that accumulation was also taking place at the higher trophic levels within the PLOT, TRAN, and SIDE positions. Cs-134 was found to accumulate to third level in this trophic level structure (TROPLVL-(vegetation)), and then decrease from there. The Be-7 component provided no variance from known compartmental transfers. 210 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The comparative uptake and interaction of several radionuclides in the trophic levels surrounding the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) waste water ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, G.H. Jr.

    1989-08-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the uptake, distribution, and interaction of five activation products (Co-57, Be-7, Cs-134, Rb-83, and Mn-54) within the biotic and abiotic components surrounding the waste treatment lagoons of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The study attempted to ascertain where, and what specific interactions were taking place among the isotopes and the biotic/abiotic components. A statistical approach, utilizing Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA), was conducted testing the radioisotopic concentrations by (1) the trophic levels (TROPLVL) in each position sampled on the grid, (2) where sampled on the grid (TRAN), (3) where sampled with-in each grid line (PLOT), and (4) the side with which sampled (SIDE). This provided both the dependent and independent variables that would be tested. The Null Hypothesis (Ho) tested the difference in the mean values of the isotopes within/between each of the four independent variables. The Rb-83 statistic indicated an accumulation within the TRAN and PLOT variables within the sampled area. The Co-57 test statistic provided a value which indicated that accumulation of this isotope within TROPLVL was taking place. Mn-54 test values indicated that accumulation was also taking place at the higher trophic levels within the PLOT, TRAN, and SIDE positions. Cs-134 was found to accumulate to third level in this trophic level structure [TROPLVL-(vegetation)], and then decrease from there. The Be-7 component provided no variance from known compartmental transfers. 210 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Proceedings of the seventeenth LAMPF Users Group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1984-04-01

    The seventeenth annual LAMPF Users Group meeting was held November 7-8, 1983, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF. A panel discussion on the LAMPF II concept provided an exchange of views among an advisory group, Users, and LAMPF staff. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for each of the secondary beam lines

  4. The status of LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagerman, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    LAMPF, the Los Alamos Physics Facility, is a significant advance in the art of linac design, with high duty factor, new types of accelerator structure, and computer control. Operations to date are described. (E.C.B.)

  5. What is LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The present conception of LAMPF II is a high-intensity 16-GeV synchrotron injected by the LAMPF 800-MeV H - beam. The proton beam will be used to make secondary beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons, and hyperons more intense than those of any existing or proposed accelerator. For example, by taking maximum advantage of a thick target, modern beam optics, and the LAMPF II proton beam, it will be possible to make a negative muon beam with nearly 100% duty factor and nearly 100 times the flux of the existing Stopped Muon Channel (SMC). Because the unique features of the proposed machine are most applicable to beams of the same momentum as LAMPF (that is, < 2 GeV/c), it may be possible to use most of the experimental areas and some of the auxiliary equipment, including spectrometers, with the new accelerator. The complete facility will provide improved technology for many areas of physics already available at LAMPF and will allow expansion of medium-energy physics to include kaons, antiprotons, and hyperons. When LAMPF II comes on line in 1990 LAMPF will have been operational for 18 years and a major upgrade such as this proposal will be reasonable and prudent

  6. What is LAMPF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The present conception of LAMPF II is a high-intensity 16-GeV synchrotron injected by the LAMPF 800-MeV H/sup -/ beam. The proton beam will be used to make secondary beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons, and hyperons more intense than those of any existing or proposed accelerator. For example, by taking maximum advantage of a thick target, modern beam optics, and the LAMPF II proton beam, it will be possible to make a negative muon beam with nearly 100% duty factor and nearly 100 times the flux of the existing Stopped Muon Channel (SMC). Because the unique features of the proposed machine are most applicable to beams of the same momentum as LAMPF (that is, < 2 GeV/c), it may be possible to use most of the experimental areas and some of the auxiliary equipment, including spectrometers, with the new accelerator. The complete facility will provide improved technology for many areas of physics already available at LAMPF and will allow expansion of medium-energy physics to include kaons, antiprotons, and hyperons. When LAMPF II comes on line in 1990 LAMPF will have been operational for 18 years and a major upgrade such as this proposal will be reasonable and prudent.

  7. Eighteenth LAMPF users group meeting: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1985-03-01

    The Eighteenth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 29-30, 1984, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities

  8. Progress at LAMPF, January--December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelakker, K.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses research at the LAMPF accelerator in the following areas: Nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; radiation effects; radioisotope production; theory; facility development; accelerator computer control system; radioactive beam facility - a new initiative; development of polarized 7 Li target material; LAMPF data analysis center (DAC); RF system development; environment, safety, and health; and accelerator operations

  9. Research at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, both the science program and the experimental facilities at LAMPF have undergone some significant changes. This report is a concise description of the current research initiatives and of new directions being proposed for the future research program at LAMPF. Traditionally the LAMPF physics program has explored nuclear systems with hadronic probes: pions, protons, and neutrons. In recent years the exploitation of the intense lepton beams -- neutrinos and muons -- at LAMPF has received increasing emphasis. Explorations of issues in electroweak physics and precision tests of quantum electrodynamics have been significant areas of experimentation. A new concept of the program is an increased emphasis on the role of weak interactions in hadronic systems. Here the electroweak force is treated as a well-understood interaction, which can be used to reveal the wave functions and properties of hadronic systems. The manifestations of the electroweak force may be discussed either in the language of quarks interacting through the exchange of W and Z bosons or in terms of nucleons interacting through the exchange of mesons described by both strong and weak coupling constants. Taken together, these topics provide a rich and vital program of fundamental interest in nuclear physics. Atomic physics, astrophysics, materials research, among others, are additional components of the LAMPF-LANSCE experimental activities. Research highlights of this broad program and the research tools available at LAMPF are described briefly in this report

  10. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D)

  11. Progress at LAMPF, January--December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelakker, K.

    1990-01-01

    This report briefly discusses research conducted at the Lampf facility in the following areas: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects; radioisotopes production; accelerator operations and facility development

  12. Proceedings of the twentieth LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinuzzi, R.

    1987-04-01

    The Twentieth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 27-28, 1986, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  13. Proceedings of the twenty-first LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The Twenty-First Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 9-10, 1987, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities

  14. Proceedings of the twenty-second LAMPF users groupd meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinuzzi, R.

    1989-04-01

    The Twenty-Second Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 17--18, 1988, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities

  15. Proceedings of the twentieth LAMPF users group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinuzzi, R. (comp.)

    1987-04-01

    The Twentieth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 27-28, 1986, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  16. Spallation radiation damage and the radiation damage facility at the LAMPF A-6 target station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1984-05-01

    A redesign of the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) A-6 Target Station is underway that will permit materials irradiations to be conducted in the proton beam and in the spallation neutron environment under more controlled conditions than has been possible heretofore. The protons of energy near 800 MeV and beam current approaching one mA are able to produce radiation damage rates (displacement production rates) as high as can be achieved in fission reactors, and the damage is uniform over macroscopic dimensions. The spallation neutrons have a degraded fission spectrum energy distribution, with the important admixture of a high energy tail up to 800 MeV. Irradiations in these radiation environments can be used to address important problems in the development of materials for fusion reactors. The redesign of the A-6 Target Station is described and plans for its use are discussed.

  17. A search for bar νe appearance from stopped π+ and μ+ decay at LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    We report on a recent search for bar ν e appearance from stopped π + → μ + ν μ and μ + → e + ν e bar ν μ decay made by the LAMPF experiment E645. The appearance of bar ν e may occur from bar ν μ → bar ν e , ν e → bar ν eL , or ν μ → bar ν eL oscillations. Appearance may also occur from rare μ + → e + bar ν e ν μ decay, which is allowed by a multiplicative lepton charge conservation law. The neutrino energies range from E ν = 0 to 52.8MeV. The neutrino detector, which is located 26.1 meters from the neutrino source, consists of a segmented liquid scintillator and proportional drift tube central detector surrounded by both active and passive shielding. The central detector detects bar ν e through the bar ν e p → ne + Charge Current (CC) reaction, which is signaled by the direct detection of the final state positron and neutron. The hydrogen-rich liquid scintillators act as free proton targets for the bar ν e p CC reaction. The neutrons are detected through radiative neutron capture on gadolinium. We find no evidence for bar ν e appearance in the first year of running. New limits on the bar ν μ ,ν e ,ν μ → bar ν e oscillation parameters and the rare μ + → e + bar ν e ν μ decay branching ratio are presented. 87 refs., 45 figs., 17 tabs

  18. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the LAMPF irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at LAMPF. The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 40 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  19. Status of LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagerman, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    LAMPF is a successful facility serving a wide variety of users at the 100-μA level. The availability of beam is satisfactory and a very large amount of scientific and applied investigation can be carried out with the facility in its present form. The engineering and applied physics problems in increasing the current another factor of ten are formidable but seem amenable to eventual solution

  20. Progress at LAMPF. Progress report, January-December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B.

    1986-05-01

    Research performed at LAMPF during 1985 is reported in the areas of: nuclear and particle physics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; radiation-effects studies; biomedical research and instrumentation; nuclear chemistry; radioisotope production; and physics theory. Also reported are the status of LAMPF-II, facility development work, and accelerator operations

  1. Progress at LAMPF. Progress report, January-December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Research performed at LAMPF during 1985 is reported in the areas of: nuclear and particle physics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; radiation-effects studies; biomedical research and instrumentation; nuclear chemistry; radioisotope production; and physics theory. Also reported are the status of LAMPF-II, facility development work, and accelerator operations. (LEW)

  2. Review of Physics Research Programs at LAMPF. Progress report, January-December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1984-04-01

    Research and development summaries are presented under the main headings: research, proton storage ring construction and research program development, status of LAMPF II, facility and experimental development, and accelerator operations. Complete lists are given for experiments run in 1983, new prospects, and active and complete experiments by channel

  3. Review of Physics Research Programs at LAMPF. Progress report, January-December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1984-04-01

    Research and development summaries are presented under the main headings: research, proton storage ring construction and research program development, status of LAMPF II, facility and experimental development, and accelerator operations. Complete lists are given for experiments run in 1983, new prospects, and active and complete experiments by channel. (WHK)

  4. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  5. Waste management at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.E.; Grisham, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Future major improvements at the Clinto P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) will require replacement of many large radioactive components. Proper disposal of the components presents special waste management problems caused by component size, weight, geometry, and activity level. A special, large cask trailer (54 metric tons gross) is being constructed for transporting the material to the disposal site. The cask trailer is designed so that the amount of shielding may be individually tailored to suit the geometry and activity level of eah item transported. Special handling techniques and methods of stabilizing loose contamination are being developed to facilitate transport of large radioactive components across open areas. A special Monitor remote-handling system is being constructed to perform the various preparation and rigging operations. Implementation of this equipment will expedite future improvements at LAMPF with minimum impact and/or interference with other ongoing activities

  6. Tenth LAMPF users meeting, November 7--9, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.

    1977-03-01

    The text of a brief talk given before the Tenth LAMPF Users Meeting is presented. Progress made at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility is reported, and the schedule for current upgrading and typical operating cost increases are given

  7. Progress at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelakker, K.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses project experiments done at Lampf under the following topics: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects; radioisotope production; and theory

  8. Progress at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelakker, K.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses project experiments done at Lampf under the following topics: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects; radioisotope production; and theory.

  9. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, D.R.F.

    1982-03-01

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base

  10. LAMPF II capabilities from an experimenter's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    LAMPF II has been proposed to extend the intensity frontier of nuclear and particle physics from about 1 GeV to 45 GeV. It is reviewed here with emphasis on capabilities of the experimental facilities. Major accelerator features, costs, and the choice of energy and current are also discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs

  11. Overview of LAMPF and its accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.

    1978-04-01

    The report presented is from a talk given at a Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory colloquium on October 4, 1977, in which the history, technological accomplishments, present status, and scientific program at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) were reviewed

  12. Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility and its operational safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnam, T.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory consists of/ (1) a medium-energy, high-intensity linear proton accelerator; (2) experimental areas designed to support a multidisciplined program of research and practical applications; and (3) support facilities for accelerator operations and the experimental program. The high-intensity primary and secondary beams at LAMPF and the varied research program create many interesting and challenging problems for the Health Physics staff. A brief overview of LAMPF is presented, and the Operational Safety Program is discussed, with emphasis on the radiological safety and health physics aspects

  13. Proceedings of the nineteenth LAMPF Users Group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for eight invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. Also included in these proceedings are the minutes of the working groups for: energetic pion channel and spectrometer; high resolution spectrometer; high energy pion channel; neutron facilities; low-energy pion work; nucleon physics laboratory; stopped muon physics; solid state physics and material science; nuclear chemistry; and computing facilities. Recent LAMPF proposals are also briefly summarized

  14. Neutron metrology in LAMPF, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketema, D.J.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1990-08-01

    The characterization of appropriate materials for fusion reactors requires a high intensity neutron source which simulates the neutron spectrum and the radiation conditions at the positions of interest in a fusion reactor (first wall). A neutron spectrum of interest is found in the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Various ceramic materials and some polycrystalline graphites were irradiated in this facility during two intervals of time in 1986 and 1987. The specimens were accompanied by several sets with activation detectors. This report presents the saturation activities per atom obtained from these sets. (author). 3 refs.; 8 figs.; 10 tabs

  15. In-situ cyclic stress experiment at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) for determining the effect of dislocation vibration on void growth in metals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.V.; Sommer, W.F.; Coulter, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Experience is reported with the first in-situ cyclic-stress irradiation at LAMPF. A proton beam ion current of 3 to 6 μA of 800 MeV protons was utilized for 24 days irradiation. Radiation damage effects of 800 MeV protons incident on a 1-cm thick Cu target were calculated using the nucleon-meson transport code to determine the nuclear reactions produced by the protons, the theory of Lindhard to evaluate the resultant damage energy deposited in the target. These calculations have been extended to Al. Damage effects were nearly uniform through a 1-cm target thickness, and the results obtained can be expressed in cross section form. The calculation yielded a damage energy cross section of about 63 barn-keV, a nuclear transmutation cross section of 0.44 barns, and indicated copious hydrogen, helium, and neutron production. Analysis of the effect of dislocation vibration on the efficiency of a dislocation line as a sink for point defects predicted that dislocation vibration should suppress void growth. The effect results from the fact that the dislocation will sweep up vacancies, which diffuse less rapidly than interstitials. The growth rate of voids in Al under simultaneous proton irradiation and cyclic stressing are compared to that of samples irradiated at the same time but without any stressing. The samples are placed one behind the other along the proton path so that identical irradiation histories can be achieved. The temperature of the samples is controlled, known and uniform. The initial preirradiation state is a prestrained state of a few hundred stress cycles. The samples are irradiated without stress through the incubation period for void nucleation before the cyclic stress is applied

  16. Remote handling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental area A at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) encompasses a large area. Presently there are four experimental target cells along the main proton beam line that have become highly radioactive, thus dictating that all maintenance be performed remotely. The Monitor remote handling system was developed to perform in situ maintenance at any location within area A. Due to the complexity of experimental systems and confined space, conventional remote handling methods based upon hot cell and/or hot bay concepts are not workable. Contrary to conventional remote handling which require special tooling for each specifically planned operation, the Monitor concept is aimed at providing a totally flexible system capable of remotely performing general mechanical and electrical maintenance operations using standard tools. The Monitor system is described

  17. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the LAMPF irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Differential and total displacement and helium-production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760-MeV protons at LAMPF. The calculations are performed using the SPECTOR and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation-damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in the experimental breeder reactor (EBR-II) at the Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho, and in the rotating target neutron source (RTNS-II) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The neutron energy spectra for LAMPF, EBR-II, and RTNS-II and the displacement and helium-production cross sections are shown

  18. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at LAMPF and KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, G.

    1988-01-01

    A review of current measurements of spin-dependent observables in p-p and n-p scattering is given for experiments done at two laboratories, Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos (LAMPF) and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). 18 refs., 12 figs

  19. A CAMAC based knob controller for the LAMPF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.; Bjorklund, E.

    1987-01-01

    The control computer for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) has been recently upgraded from an SEL-840 to a VAX 11/780 running the VMS operating system. As part of this upgrade, a CAMAC-based knob controller was developed for the new control system. The knobs allow the facility operators to have slew control over software selectable accelerator devices. An alphanumeric display associated with each knob monitors the progress of the selected device. This paper describes the system requirements for the new LAMPF knob controller, and the resulting hardware and software design

  20. Water-cooled beam line components at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The beam line components that comprise the main experimental beam at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) have been operating since February 1976. This paper will define the functions of the primary water-cooled elements, their design evolution, and our operating experience to the present time

  1. Water-cooled target-box design at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.; Lambert, J.

    1983-01-01

    The target boxes in the main experimental beam line (Line A) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) have operated since 1976. A program of replacing the boxes is underway. This paper will present past history, design considerations, calculational results and the final box design

  2. The status of the LAMPF control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G.P.; Schaller, S.C.; Bjorklund, E.A.; Burns, M.J.; Harrison, J.F.; Rose, P.A.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The upgraded Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) control system is now operational. The SEL-840 computer has been removed, and all application programs are now running on VAXes. We are continuing to upgrade the control system network. We are using MicroVMS systems for distributed local control and have introduced VAXELN systems for dedicated real-time situations. Communications with both systems is based on a standardized remote procedure call interface. We have also begun to integrate the Proton Storage Ring controls with the LAMPF control system, to experiment with VAX/GPX-based workstation operator interfaces, and to investigate possible applications of artificial intelligence technology. 13 refs

  3. The PILAC project at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Plans for a new pion linear accelerator (PILAC) facility at LAMPF are discussed. A reference design to take intense pion beams produced at LAMPF and to accelerate them up to 1.2 GeV/c in a new superconducting linac is reported. A new experimental facility is planned to utilize the high intensity (10 9 π/sec), high-resolution (200-keV) beams provided by PILAC. The major components of the scientific program made possible by this new facility are discussed

  4. Status of LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.

    1979-01-01

    Crucial aspects of the LAMPF operation and its scientific programs during 1978 are discussed and evaluated. This report is from a talk given at the Twelfth LAMPF Users Meeting, Novermber 13 and 14, 1978

  5. Progress at LAMPF, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, C.M. [ed.

    1994-07-25

    This Progress Report describes the operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the research programs carried out there for the years 1992 and 1993. The accelerator operated for over 100 days in 1992, providing beams of H{sup +}, H{sup {minus}}, and polarized H{sup {minus}} for a rich and varied research program in nuclear physics. The accelerator had only fair beam availability in 1992 (for example, the average H{sup +} beam availability was 72%), caused largely by problems in the 201-MHz rf system. A major effort was expended to address these problems before the 1993 run. These efforts were rewarded by good beam availability in 1993 and few problems with the 201-MHz system. LAMPF operated remarkably smoothly during 1993, in the midst of a period of great uncertainty in the future of the facility and the downsizing of MP Division, which led to the loss of a large number of key people to positions elsewhere in the Laboratory. The H{sup +} intensity had to be held to no more than {approximately} 800{mu}A because of a vacuum leak in the A2 target. Nevertheless, the accelerator operated very.reliably and the summer run in 1993 proved to be extremely productive. This report discusses the research conducted on: Nuclear and particle physics; atomic physics; radiation effects; materials science; astrophysics; and theoretical physics.

  6. Progress at LAMPF, 1992--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This Progress Report describes the operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the research programs carried out there for the years 1992 and 1993. The accelerator operated for over 100 days in 1992, providing beams of H + , H - , and polarized H - for a rich and varied research program in nuclear physics. The accelerator had only fair beam availability in 1992 (for example, the average H + beam availability was 72%), caused largely by problems in the 201-MHz rf system. A major effort was expended to address these problems before the 1993 run. These efforts were rewarded by good beam availability in 1993 and few problems with the 201-MHz system. LAMPF operated remarkably smoothly during 1993, in the midst of a period of great uncertainty in the future of the facility and the downsizing of MP Division, which led to the loss of a large number of key people to positions elsewhere in the Laboratory. The H + intensity had to be held to no more than ∼ 800μA because of a vacuum leak in the A2 target. Nevertheless, the accelerator operated very.reliably and the summer run in 1993 proved to be extremely productive. This report discusses the research conducted on: Nuclear and particle physics; atomic physics; radiation effects; materials science; astrophysics; and theoretical physics

  7. Recent advances in remote handling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.E.; Grisham, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) has operated at beam currents above 200 microamperes since 1976. As a result, the main experimental beam line (Line A) has become increasingly radioactive over the years. Since 1976 the radiation levels have steadily increased from 100 mR/hr to levels that exceed 10,000 R/hr in the components near the pion production targets. During this time the LAMPF remote handling system, Monitor, has continued to operate successfully in the ever-increasing radiation levels, as well as with more complex remote-handling situations. This paper briefly describes the evolution of Monitor and specifically describes the complete rebuild of the A-6 target area, which is designated as the beam stop, but also includes isotope production capabilities and a primitive neutron irradiation facility. The new facility includes not only the beam stop and isotope production, but also facilities for proton irradiation and a ten-fold expansion in neutron irradiation facilities

  8. Summary of the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility at LAMPF (LASREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the components and procedures in place at LASREF. It also lists the irradiation experiments performed. Active experiments, major results, and future plans are briefly described. The papers covering theoretical aspects, facility characterization/description and experiments at LASREF are listed

  9. Additional measurements of the radiation environment at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.R.; Reedy, R.C.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Foil activation dosimetry experiments were conducted in a ''rabbit'' system at the completed Los Alamos Spallation Effects Facility(LASREF). The ''rabbit'' system contains four test tubes spaced radially outward 0.12, 0.18, 0.27, and 0.38 m off beam centerline. Foils were irradiated for 3 to 62 h to measure the neutron flux and energy spectrum radially from beam centerline, along the beamline, and the effect of isotope production (IP) target loadings on the neutron flux in the neutron irradiation locations. Irradiations showed a decrease in the radial flux by a factor of 6 in 0.15 m of iron outside the IP targets. An enhancement was seen in the 24-keV energy region outside 0.15m. There was little difference in the shape of the spectra outside the IP targets and the beam stop with the exception of the high energy tail (energies above 20 MeV). The decrease in the high energy tail outside the beam stop is due to the degradation of the energy of the proton beam in the IP targets. Irradiations outside the beam stop with zero and eight IP targets gave the same spectral shape with the exception of the high energy tail. The magnitude of the integral flux decreased by a factor of two when eight IP targets were present. Irradiations with five ''rabbits'' stacked on top of each other showed no difference in the integral flux below, on and above beam centerline

  10. Additional measurements of the radiation environment at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.R.; Reedy, R.C.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    Foil activation dosimetry experiments were conducted in a ''rabbit'' system at the completed Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF). The ''raffit'' system contains four tubes spaced radially outward 0.12, 0.18, 0.27, and 0.38 meters off beam centerline. Foils were irradiated for 3 to 62 hours to measure the neutron flux and energy spectrum radially from beam centerline, along the beamline, and the effect of the Isotope Production (IP) target loadings on the neutron flux in the neutron irradiation locations. Irradiations showed a decrease in the radial flux by a factor of 6 in 0.15 meters of iron outside the IP targets. An enchancement was seen in the 24-keV energy region outside 0.15 meters. There was little difference in the shape of the spectra outside the IP targets and the beam stop with the exception of the high energy tail (energies above 20 MeV). The decrease in the high energy tail outside the beam stop is due to the degradation of the energy of the proton beam in the IP targets. Irradiations outside the beam stop with zero and eight IP targets gave the same spectral shape with the exception of the high energy tail. The magnitude of the integral flux decreased by a factor of 2 when eight IP targets were present. Irradiations with five ''rabbits'' stacked on top of each other showed no difference in the integral flux below, on and above beam centerline

  11. Proceedings of the LAMPF workshop on photon and neutral meson physics at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.; Crannell, H.; Peterson, R.J.

    1987-12-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Workshop on ''Photon and Neutral-Meson, Physics at Intermediate Energies,'' held at Los Alamos, New Mexico, January 7 to 9, 1987. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together scientists working in the areas of electromagnetic, heavy-ion, and light hadron physics to discuss both the physics that could be addressed and potential capabilities of new, large intermediate-energy photon detectors. Based on the papers contained in these proceedings, it appears clear that there are a number of important areas that could be addressed with a much higher resolution neutral meson detector. It is also clear that the technical capability for building a neutral meson detector for energies up to 4 GeV with solid angle of approximately 10 mrs and resolution of a few hundred keV now exists. It also appears entirely reasonable to construct such a detector to be easily transportable so that it would become a national facility, available for use at a number of different laboratories. From the many interesting papers presented and from the broad representation of physicists from laboratories in Asia, Canada, Europe, Japan, and the United States, there appears to be a strong case for proceeding with the construction of such a detector

  12. Precision measurements of pion nucleon elastic scattering in the P3 energy region at LAMPF. 1984 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the pion-nucleon program at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Previous measurements, in chronological order, have included differential cross sections for π/sup +-/p elastic scattering at P/sub π/ = 378 - 687 MeV/c (LAMPF experiment 363), π - p charge exchange for P/sub π/ = 247 - 687 MeV/c (LAMPF experiment 120), and measurements of the polarization asymmetry for π/sup +-/p -> π/sup +-/p and π - p -> π 0 n for P/sub π/ = 471 - 687 MeV/c (LAMPF experiments 120* and 120**, respectively). Two experiments were initiated in the past year, forward-angle differential cross sections for π - p -> π 0 n at P/sub π/ = 96 - 150 MeV/c (LAMPF experiment 809) and polarization asymmetry for π - p - > γn (LAMPF experiment 804). Approved experiments which will be scheduled in the future are spin rotation measurements for π/sup +-/p -> π/sup +-/p (LAMPF experiments 806 and 807) and differential cross sections for π - p -> π 0 n near 0 0 and 180 0 at P/sub π/ = 471-687 MeV/c (LAMPF experiment 849). Another experiment, differential cross section measurements for π/sup +-/ elastic scattering on 3 He and 3 H (LAMPF experiment 546), has also been completed. The 3 He and 3 H targets form an isospin doublet analogous to the proton and neutron. The I 3 = -1/2 member ( 3 H) of the multiplet can be utilized as a target in this case, allowing a direct test of charge symmetry not achievable in the πN system due to the impossibility of a pure neutron target

  13. Neutron experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of the nucleon-nucleon force is the most fundamental in nuclear physics and is basic to particle physics. However, in the energy range from pion production threshold to 1 GeV, the N-N interaction is rather poorly determined. In general, at these energies, there is no unique set of phase shifts and coupling parameters; the I = 1 parameters are known at least quantitatively, but the I = 0 parameters are not even known qualitatively. This is illustrated by the variation of 3 S 1 phase shift from -17 to 35 0 in the three solutions of the energy-independent nucleon-nucleon phase shift analysis of Glonti. In addition, these results are in considerable disagreement with the analyses of MacGregor. This is due to the paucity of the n-p scattering data including polarization and triple scattering parameters. Furthermore, as will be shown later, there is considerable disagreement between the results from different groups in the intermediate energy region of even so basic an observable as the n-p differential cross section. Therefore, a long range program was started for the definitive determination of the n-p interaction at LAMPF energies (300 to 800 MeV). This is an ambitious project which will ultimately require the performance of many experiments. Each successive set of measurements will clarify our understainding of the n-p system to some degree and simplify the problems of the subsequent measurements. In this communication a general description of the experimental setup and the various neutron experiments performed at LAMPF is given

  14. New intelligent magnet power supplies for LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Sturrock, J.

    1991-01-01

    New magnet power supplies are scheduled to be installed in the proton linac at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The control and interface design of these power supplies represents a departure from all others onsite. A high-level ASCII control protocol has been designed. The supplies have sophisticated microprocessor control onboard and communicate with the accelerator control system via RS-422 (serial communications). The low-level software used by the accelerator control system is currently being rewritten to accommodate these new devices. They will communicate with the control system through a terminal server port connected to the site-wide ethernet backbone. This means that each supply will, for all intents and purposes, be a network object. Details of the design strategies for the analog and digital control for these supplies as well as the control protocol interface will be presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Measurement and modeling of gamma-absorbed doses due to atmospheric releases from Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, B.M.; Chen, A.I.; Olsen, W.A.; Van Etten, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Short-term gamma-absorbed doses were measured by one high-pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) at an azimuth of 12 0 from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) stack during the January 1 through February 8 operating cycle. Two HPICs were in the field during the September 8 through December 31 operating cycle, one north and the other north-northeast of the LAMPF stack, but they did not provide reliable data. Meteorological data were also measured at both East Gate and LAMPF. Airborne emission data were taken at the stack. Daily model predictions, based on the integration of modeled 15-min periods, were made for the first LAMPF operating cycle and were compared with the measured data. A comparison of the predicted and measured daily gamma doses due to LAMPF emissions is presented. There is very good correlation between measured and predicted values. During 39-day operating cycles, the model predicted an absorbed dose of 10.3 mrad compared with the 8.8 mrad that was measured, an overprediction of 17%

  16. A proposal to extend the intensity frontier of nuclear and particle physics to 45 GeV (LAMPF 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    It is proposed to construct and operate a high-intensity, medium energy synchrotron addition to the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The addition is to consist of a 6-GeV, 170-μA booster and a 45-GeV, 34-μA, 3-Hz main synchrotron with 50% duty factor. The physics of strong and electroweak interactions to be studied at the facility is discussed, as well as accelerator design, scope of experimental area facilities, and cost estimates and schedule

  17. Neutrino oscillations at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.; Choi, C.; Donohue, J.

    1985-01-01

    Work at Argonne continues on the construction of the neutrino oscillation experiment (E645). Construction of detector supports and active shield components were completed at the Provo plant of the principal contractor for the project (the Pittsburgh-Des Moines Corporation). Erection of the major experimental components was completed at the LAMPF experimental site in mid-March 1985. Work continues on the tunnel which will house the detector. Construction of detector components (scintillators and proportional drift tubes) is proceeding at Ohio State University and Louisiana State University. Consolidation of these components into the 20-ton neutrino detector is beginning at LAMPF

  18. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  19. Probabilistic risk assessment for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility worst-case design-basis accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharirli, M.; Butner, J.M.; Rand, J.L.; Macek, R.J.; McKinney, S.J.; Roush, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results from a Los Alamos National Laboratory Engineering and Safety Analysis Group assessment of the worse-case design-basis accident associated with the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)/Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. The primary goal of the analysis was to quantify the accident sequences that result in personnel radiation exposure in the WNR Experimental Hall following the worst-case design-basis accident, a complete spill of the LAMPF accelerator 1L beam. This study also provides information regarding the roles of hardware systems and operators in these sequences, and insights regarding the areas where improvements can increase facility-operation safety. Results also include confidence ranges to incorporate combined effects of uncertainties in probability estimates and importance measures to determine how variations in individual events affect the frequencies in accident sequences

  20. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  1. Measurement and modeling of external radiation during 1984 from LAMPF atmospheric emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, B.M.; Olsen, W.A.; Van Etten, D.; Chen, I.

    1986-07-01

    An array of three portable, pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) measured short-term external radiation levels produced by air activation products from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The monitoring was at the closet offsite location, 700-900 m north and northeast of the source, and across a large, deep canyon. A Gaussian-type atmospheric dispersion model, using onsite meteorological and stack release data, was tested during their study. Monitoring results indicate that a persistent, local up-valley wind during the evening and early morning hours is largely responsible for causing the highest radiation levels to the northeast and north-northeast of LAMPF. Comparison of predicted and measured daily external radiation levels indicates a high degree of correlation. The model also gives accurate estimates of measured concentrations over longer periods of time

  2. Surveying and optical tooling technologies combined to align a skewed beamline at the LAMPF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauke, W.; Clark, D.A.; Trujillo, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Optical Tooling evolved from traditional surveying, and both technologies are sometimes used interchangeably in large industrial installations, since the instruments and their specialized adapters and supports complement each other well. A unique marriage of both technologies was accomplished in a novel application at LAMPF, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. LAMPF consists of a linear accelerator with multiple target systems, one of which had to be altered to accommodate a new beamline for a neutrino experiment. The new line was to be installed into a crowded beam tunnel and had to be skewed and tilted in compound angles to avoid existing equipment. In this paper we describe how Optical Tooling was used in conjunction with simple alignment and reference fixtures to set fiducials on the magnets and other mechanical components of the beamline, and how theodolites and sight levels were then adapted to align these components along the calculated skew planes. Design tolerances are compared with measured alignment results

  3. LAMPF experimental-area beam current monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and operational performance of a wide- range current monitor system used to measure charged-particle currents in the experimental areas of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a proton accelerator. The major features of the system are high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and the ability to withstand high levels of radiation. The current pulses detected are from 50 μs to 1 ms in duration at repetition rates of from 1 to 120 Hz. The pulse amplitude varies from 1 μA to 17 mA of protons or H - ions. Both real-time and integrated outputs are available, and the minimum detectable currents are 1 μA at the video output and 50 nA at the integrated output. The basic system is comprised of toroids, preamplifiers, signal conditioners, voltage-to-frequency converters, and digital accumulators. The entire system is spread out over 1 km of beam pipe. Provision is made for calibration and for sending the outputs to remote users. The system is normally controlled by a small digital computer, which allows the system to be quite flexible in operation. The design features of the toroids and the associated electronics are discussed in detail, with emphasis on the steps taken to reduce noise and make the toroids temperature and radiation resistant

  4. LAMPF operations at 500 μA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagerman, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    LAMPF now operates reliably producing 500 μA of H + beam and a few μA of H - beam or 10 nA polarized H - beam. Beam loss in the accelerator is quite acceptable at these currents. This level of performance has been achieved through solution of a wide variety of accelerator problems and a continuous evolution of the experimental areas. The future of the facility is promising both in terms of the existing experimental programs and the opportunities for significant facility improvement projects

  5. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  6. LAMPF: its origins, history, and accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The main vehicle for bringing the pion to bear on a vast array of problems, has been the meson factories. Today there exist such facilities in Switzerland (SIN), in Canada (TRIUMF), and in the USA (LAMPF). A fourth is just now being completed in the Soviet Union. They are enormous enterprises - the current replacement value of LMPF is $350 million, not including the part devoted to national security problems. But they accommodate hundreds of scientists from around the world and by so doing generate political as well as intellectual and economic capital. Proton facilities, together with heavy-ion accelerators and electron facilities, form a triad on which stands the present edifice of experimental nuclear science. Each leg of this triad is dependent, to a greater or lesser extent, on the other two. However, in terms of versatility, the size of the community it serves, and the relatively short-term application of the knowledge base and people base for which nuclear science is responsible, the meson factory part of the above triad is by no means the least important component. I discuss this component from the standpoint of the facility I know best, namely LAMPF. 33 refs., 36 figs

  7. [Pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon transfer reactions primarily at LAMPF, TRIUMF, and IUCF]: Technical progress report, [October 1, 1986-October 1, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraushaar, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out between October 1, 1986 and October 1, 1987 in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Department of Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Other efforts in the laboratory, such as development of an R.F. cavity for an advanced hadron facility accelerator, beam pickoff devices, a buncher for the LAMPF proton beam, and the US-Brazil Cooperative Science Program are described

  8. LAMPF nuclear chemistry data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesler, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The LAMPF Nuclear Chemistry Data Acquisition System (DAS) is designed to provide both real-time control of data acquisition and facilities for data processing for a large variety of users. It consists of a PDP-11/44 connected to a parallel CAMAC branch highway as well as to a large number of peripherals. The various types of radiation counters and spectrometers and their connections to the system will be described. Also discussed will be the various methods of connection considered and their advantages and disadvantages. The operation of the system from the standpoint of both hardware and software will be described as well as plans for the future

  9. Large facilities in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.; Schopper, H.

    1995-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference dealt with the following topics: particle physics, computing and data transmission, nuclear and atomic physics and their new facets, condensed matter physics, fusion and plasma physics, astrophysics and astroparticle physics. The proceedings include the review talks, a report on the OECD Megascience Forum and summaries of the round-table discussions. figs., tabs., refs

  10. LAMPF: the meson factory. A LASL monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    A general and simplified introduction to the entire concept of LAMPF is given in terms of its experimental capabilities. Parts of the current experimental program are used as illustrative examples. Topics discussed include: (1) the evolution of the meson factory; (2) accelerator construction; (3) strong focusing; (4) accelerator innovations at LAMPF; (5) photons and pions; (6) muons as nuclear probes; (7) nuclear chemistry; (8) radiobiology and medical applications; (9) radioisotope production; (10) materials testing; and (11) LAMPF management and users group. (PMA)

  11. LAMPF: the meson factory. A LASL monograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    A general and simplified introduction to the entire concept of LAMPF is given in terms of its experimental capabilities. Parts of the current experimental program are used as illustrative examples. Topics discussed include: (1) the evolution of the meson factory; (2) accelerator construction; (3) strong focusing; (4) accelerator innovations at LAMPF; (5) photons and pions; (6) muons as nuclear probes; (7) nuclear chemistry; (8) radiobiology and medical applications; (9) radioisotope production; (10) materials testing; and (11) LAMPF management and users group

  12. Plans for LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    A high-intensity 16- to 32-GeV proton accelerator is proposed. Several major areas of physics would benefit, including muons, neutrino physics, rare kaon decays, hypernuclei, and antiproton physics. The possibilities for constructing such a machine on the Los Alamos site and a preliminary cost estimate are discussed

  13. Potential capabilities at LAMPF to study nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, W.L.; Bunker, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Feasibility studies have shown that a He-jet activity transport line, with a target chamber placed in the LAMPF main beam line, will provide access to short-lived isotopes of a number of elements that cannot be extracted efficiently for study at any other type of on-line facility. The He-jet technique requires targets thin enough to allow a large fraction of the reaction products to recoil out of the target foils; hence, a very intense incident beam current, such as that uniquely available at LAMPF, is needed to produce yields of individual radioisotopes sufficient for detailed nuclear studies. We present the results of feasibility experiments on He-jet transport efficiency and timing. We also present estimates on availability of nuclei far from stability from both fission and spallation processes. Areas of interest for study of nuclear properties far from stability will be outlined. 17 refs

  14. Possibilities at LAMPF for studying nuclei of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Bunker, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear data needs in astrophysics range from neutron capture cross sections of a number of stable or near-stable nuclei to decay and neutron binding-energy data for highly neutron-rich nuclei. LAMPF has the potential to contribute significantly to these needs. The new Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE, aka WNR/PSR) offers world-class capabilities for neutron capture studies up to an MeV or so. The study of nuclei far from stability could be extended into some regions of astrophysical interest using a proposed He-jet coupled mass separator system with a target/production chamber in the LAMPF beam stop area. Specific examples of possible studies at each facility are presented

  15. Present and future neutrino physics research at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility is currently the site of two neutrino experiments. A measurement of elastic scattering of electron-neutrinos on electrons is providing confirmation of the destructive interference between the weak neutral and charged currents predicted in the standard electroweak theory. A search for the appearance of /bar/ν//sub e/ is being carried out at the LAMPF beam stop, as well. The status of this experiment is described. A major new initiative is being undertaken to measure neutrino-electron scattering in a large water Cerenkov detector. This meaurement will be precise enough to provide, in combination with the meaurements to be performed at the new generation of high-energy electron-positron colliers, the first experimental study of the standard electrowak theory at the level of one-loop radiative corrections. The detector will also be a vehicle for neutrino-oscillation searches, measurement of neutrinos from supernovae, and other fundamental physics. The apparatus will consist of a neutrino production target and shield surrounded by a water Cerenkov detector. The fiducial volume of water will be approximately 7000 tons, viewed by approximately 13000 20 cm diameter photomultiplier tubes. 11 refs., 6 figs

  16. Modulation improvements in the 201 MHZ RF generators at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, W.M.; Lyles, J.T.M.; Harris, H.W.

    1992-01-01

    Radio-frequency generators, operating at 201 MHz, power the first four stages of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator. Each generator consists of four stages of seriesconnected, vacuum-tube amplifiers. The modulation scheme for each stage is different. The fist amplifier is a grid-modulated tetrode that produces 500 W peak-power. The second amplifier is a drive-modulated tetrode that produces 5 kill peak-power. The third stage is a grid- and plate-modulated tetrode that produces 130 kill peak-power. The last stage is a plate-modulated triode that produces 2.5 MW peak power. A modernization program has been initiated to improve the reliability of each of these stages. The first two stages of each generator are being replaced with a single, drive-modulated, solid-state amplifier. Specifications for the amplifier design, and requirements for integration into the system are presented. The third stage will be converted to a drive-modulated system using the current tetrode. This modification involves the development of a 17-kV, 15-A switching supply to replace the present plate-modulator. Design requirements for this switching supply are presented. The final stage will remain plate-modulated but will contain a new driver unit for the modulator tube

  17. Reference design for LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    A reference design for the 32-GeV LAMPF II proton accelerator is proposed. This design consists of a 30-Hz rapid-cycling synchrotron with a dc stretcher. A superiodicity 5 design with dispersion-free straight sections is suggested for both machines. Beam-dynamics calculations are partially complete and rf requirements are given. Apertures are calculated for 2 x 10 13 protons per pulse (100 μA average current). No significant problems are observed at any time in the cycle in a longitudinal beam-dynamics simulation including space charge

  18. Operation of the optically pumped polarized H- source at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, R.L.; Tupa, D.; Swenson, D.R.; van Dyck, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    We report on the first five months of operation of the Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS) for the nuclear physics research program at LAMPF. The LAMPF OPPIS is unique in using Ti: Sapphire lasers to polarize the potassium charge-exchange medium, and until recently was unique in using a superconducting magnet in the ECR source and polarizer regions. The ECR extraction electrode biasing arrangement is also unique. Typical performance was 25 microamps of peak current (measured at 750 keV) with 55% beam polarization or 15 microamps at 62%. Ion source availability was greater than 90%. We also report our planned improvements in preparation for research operation in May of 1991. 3 refs., 4 figs

  19. Beam chopper development at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, R.L.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Schillaci, M.E.; Dodds, S.A.; Gist, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to reduce pileup limitations on μSR data rates, a fast chopper for surface muon beams was built and tested at LAMPF. The system allowed one muon at a time to be stopped in a μSR sample in the following way: A surface beam from the LAMPF Stopped Muon Channel was focused through a crossed-field beam separator and onto a chopper slit. With the separator E and B fields adjusted properly, the beam could pass through the slit. The beam to the μSR sample was turned on or off (chopped) rapidly by switching the high voltage applied to the separator plates on or off within approximately 500 ns; with the E field off, the B field deflected the beam, dumping it near the slit. We demonstrated that, with improved electronics, we will be able to stop a single muon in a μSR sample as frequently as once every 20 μs and that data rates for the system can be a factor of five higher than is attainable with unchopped beams. The observed positron contamination of the beam was less than five percent, and the ratio of the muon rate with beam on to the rate with beam off was 1540

  20. Beam chopper development at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, R.L.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Schillaci, M.E.; Dodds, S.A.; Gist, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to reduce pileup limitations on μSR data rates, a fast chopper for surface muon beams was built and tested at LAMPF. The system allowed one muon at a time to be stopped in a μSR sample in the following way: A surface beam from the LAMPF Stopped Muon Channel was focused through a crossed-field beam separator and onto a chopper slit. With the separator E and B fields adjusted properly, the beam could pass through the slit. The beam to the μSR sample was turned on or off (chopped) rapidly by switching the high voltage applied to the separator plates on or off within approximately 500 ns; with the E field off, the B field deflected the beam, dumping it near the slit. We demonstrated that, with improved electronics, we will be able to stop a single muon in a μSR sample as frequently as once every 20 μs and that data rates for the system can be a factor of five higher than is attainable with unchopped beams. The observed positron contamination of the beam was less than five percent, and the ratio of the muon rate with beam on to the rate with beam off was 1540. (orig.)

  1. Operating experience with LAMPF main beam lines instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dyck, O.B.; Harvey, A.; Howard, H.H.; Roeder, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Instrumentation and control (I and C) for the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) main beam line is based upon central computer control through remote stations which provide input and output to most devices. Operating experience shows that the ability of the computer to give high-quality graphical presentation of the measurements enhances operator performance and instrument usefulness. Experience also shows that operator efficiency degrades rapidly with increasing instrument response time, that is, with increasing delay between the time a control is changed and the result can be observed. For this reason, instrumentation upgrade includes speeding up data acquisition and display times to under 10 s. Similarly, television-viewed phosphors are being retained where possible since their instantaneous response is very useful. Other upgrading of the instrumentation system is planned to improve data accuracy, reliability, redundancy, and instrument radiation tolerance. Past experience is being applied in adding or relocating devices to simplify tuning procedures. (U.S.)

  2. Beam position monitor multiplexer controller upgrade at the LAMPF proton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarborough, W.K.; Cohen, S.

    1992-01-01

    The beam position monitor (BPM) is one of the primary diagnostic tools used for the tuning of the proton storage ring (PSR) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). A replacement for the existing, monolithic, wire-wrapped microprocessor-based BPM multiplexer controller has been built. The controller has been redesigned as a modular system retaining the same functionality of the original system built in 1981. Individual printed circuit cards are used for each controller function to insure greater maintainability and ease of keeping a spare parts inventory. Programmable logic device technology has substantially reduced the component count of the new controller. Diagnostic software was written to support the development of the upgraded controller. The new software actually uncovered some flaws in the original CAMAC interface. (author)

  3. Operational health physics at the Los Alamos meson physics proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The operational health physics practices and procedures at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a medium energy, high intensity proton accelerator are reviewed. The operational philosophy used for the control of personnel exposures and radioactive materials is discussed. A particular operation involving the removal of a radioactive beam stop reading in excess of 1000 R/h is described

  4. Radiological engineering evaluation of the delay time line air scrubber located at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huneycutt, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the addition of an air scrubber to an already existing delay line and whether it would scrub 11 CO 2 . There were three main objectives of this study. The first objective was to determine the scrubbing efficiency of the scrubber. The scrubbing efficiency was then used to predict the dose rates in the scrubber area and compare those values with measurements from radiological surveys. The third objective was to determine if the shield blocks were effective in reducing the dose rates in the scrubber area. The activities were measured before and during scrubber operation and this information was used to calculate the scrubbing efficiency and the efficiency of 11 CO 2 removal was determined to be around 50%. Microshield was then used to predict dose rates and compared those values with measurements from radiological surveys. This was also used to determine the that the shield blocks around the scrubber were effective in reducing the dose rates from the radiation field produced by the radionuclides in the scrubber

  5. Developments and directions in 200 MHz very high power RF at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, R.; Bush, E.D.; DeHaven, R.A.; Harris, H.W.; Parsons, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), is a linear particle accelerator a half-mile long. It produces an 800 million electron- volt hydrogen-ion beam at an average current of more than one milliamp. The first RF section of the accelerator consists of four Alvarez drift-tube structures. Each of these structures is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 201.25 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of 13 percent or more and at peak pulsed power levels of about 2.5 million watts. The second RF accelerator section consists of forty-four side-coupled-cavity structures. Each of these is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 805 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of up to 12 percent and at peak pulsed power levels of about 1.2 million watts. The relatively high average beam current in the accelerator places a heavy demand upon components in the RF systems. The 201-MHz modules have always required a large share of maintenance efforts. In recent years, the four 201.25 MHz modules have been responsible for more than twice as much accelerator down-time as have the forty-four 805 MHz modules. This paper reviews recent, ongoing, and planned improvements in the 201-MHz systems. The Burle Industries 7835 super power triode is used in the final power amplifiers of each of the 201-MHz modules. This tube has been modified for operation at LAMPF by the addition of Penning ion vacuum''pumps.'' This has enabled more effective tube conditioning and restarting. A calorimetry system of high accuracy is in development to monitor tube plate-power dissipation

  6. Simulation of transition crossing in LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.L.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    LAMPF II is the proposed rapid-cycling synchrotron that will take 0.8-GeV protons from the LAMPF linear accelerator and raise them to 32 GeV. Early design models were based on a 60-Hz cycle with 10 13 protons to be accelerated per cycle. Any reasonable magnetic lattice results in the proton beam going through a phase transition. A general accelerator-simulation code that includes the effect of longitudinal space charge, ARCHSIM, has been used to study the transition in a typical achromatic lattice. The beam remains stable through the transition

  7. Rare kaon decays at LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    At LAMPF II, intense beams of kaons will be available that will enable the rare kaon-decay processes to be investigated. This note explores some of the possibilities, which divide into two classes: (1) those that test the standard model of Weinberg and Salam and (2) those that are sensitive to new interactions. For both classes, experiments have been limited not by systematic errors but rather by statistical ones. LAMPF II with its intense flux of kaons thus will enable the frontier of rare kaon decay to be realistically probed

  8. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine

  9. ATW neutron spectrum measurements at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Littleton, P.E.; Morgan, G.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) is a proposal to use a high flux of accelerator-produced thermalized neutrons to transmute both fission product and higher actinide commercial nuclear waste into stable or short-lived radioactive species in order to avoid long-term storage of nuclear waste. At LAMPF the authors recently performed experiments that were designed to measure the spectrum of neutrons produced per incident proton for full-scale proposed ATW targets of lead and lithium. The neutrons produced in such targets have a spectrum of energies that extends up to the energy of the incident proton beam, but the distribution peaks between 1 and 5 MeV. Transmutation reactions and fission of actinides are most efficient when the neutron energy is below a few eV, so the target must be surrounded by a non-absorbing material (blanket) to produce additional neutrons and reduce the energy of high energy neutrons without loss. The experiments with the lead target, 25 cm diameter by 40 cm long, were conducted with 800 MeV protons, while those with the lithium target, 25 cm diameter by 175 cm long, were conducted with 400 MeV protons. The blanket in both sets of experiments was a 60 cm diameter by 200 cm long annulus of lead that surrounded the target. Surrounding the blanket was a steel water tank with dimensions of 250 cm diameter by 300 cm long that simulated the transmutation region. A small sample pipe penetrated the length of the lead blanket and other sample pipes penetrated the length of the water tank at different radii from the beam axis so that the neutron spectra at different locations could be measured by foil activation. After irradiation the activated foil sets were extracted and counted with calibrated high resolution germanium gamma ray detectors at the Los Alamos nuclear chemistry counting facility.

  10. Experience at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility with the use of alloy Inconel 718 as an enclosure for a beam degrader and as a proton beam entry window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Brown, R.D.; Cedillo, C.M.; Zimmerman, E.

    1994-01-01

    Operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) began in 1972 and continues at present. An injector delivers protons to a 0.8 kin long linear accelerator which produces a particle energy of 800 MeV; the protons are then transported to a variety of experimental areas. The proton beam is transported in a vacuum tube, controlled and bent by electromagnets. The highest intensity beam, at a maximum level of 1 mA, is delivered to the experimental area designated as Area A. At the end of the experimental area, the beam is transported through an interface between beamline vacuum and one atmosphere air pressure. This interface is made of metal and is generally referred to as a beam entry window. At LAMPF, after the beam has exited the vacuum tube, it becomes incident on a number of experiments or ''targets.'' These include capsules for radiation damage studies, a beam ''degrader'' for the long-term neutrino experiment, and as many nine targets in the Isotope Production (IP) stringer system used to produce medically significant isotopes. Following the IP system is a beam stop used for the purpose its name implies. The beam stop also contains a beam entry window, whose purpose is to separate the 250 psig water cooling environment from I atmosphere of air. The beam entry window, the beam degrader, and the beam stop window are made of alloy Inconel 718, have endured a lengthy irradiation service time at LAMPF, and are the subject of this report

  11. Annotated bibliography of LAMPF research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.; Roybal, E.U.

    1978-08-01

    A bibliography on published and in-house technical material written on LAMPF activities since its inception is presented. Subject and author concordances provide cross-reference to detailed citations, which include an abstract and notes on the material. The bibliography resides in a computer database that can be searched for key words and phrases.

  12. LAMPF II - also a hyperon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    The possibility of generating large numbers of hyperons via an intense 4.5 GeV/c K - beam at LAMPF II is explored. The advantage of using a K - beam over that of using a π beam is examined. Hyperon fluxes and backgrounds are estimated and compared with those available from existing hyperon beams. Production mechanisms are briefly discussed

  13. Spectroscopy of gluonic states at LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1983-08-01

    The properties of QCD which imply the existence of gluonic states are reviewed. The problem of discovering the spectrum of gluonic states is discussed in general and illustrated with examples from current data. Higher statistics fixed target experiments, such as could be performed at LAMPF II, are essential for further progress

  14. Annotated bibliography of LAMPF research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.; Roybal, E.U.

    1978-08-01

    A bibliography on published and in-house technical material written on LAMPF activities since its inception is presented. Subject and author concordances provide cross-reference to detailed citations, which include an abstract and notes on the material. The bibliography resides in a computer database that can be searched for key words and phrases

  15. Radiation-resistant beamline components at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.e.; Werbeck, R.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of highly radiation-resistant beamline components have been successfully developed at LAMPF primarily for use in the target cells and beam stop area of the intense proton beamline. Design features and operating experience are reviewed for magnets, instrumentation, targets, vacuum seals, vacuum windows, collimators, and beam stops

  16. Physical security of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, H.

    1987-01-01

    A serious problem with present security systems at nuclear facilities is that the threats and standards prepared by the NRC and DOE are general, and the field offices are required to develop their own local threats and, on that basis, to prepared detailed specifications for security systems at sites in their jurisdiction. As a result, the capabilities of the systems vary across facilities. Five steps in particular are strongly recommended as corrective measures: 1. Those agencies responsible for civil nuclear facilities should jointly prepare detailed threat definitions, operational requirements, and equipment specifications to protect generic nuclear facilities, and these matters should be issued as policy. The agencies should provide sufficient detail to guide the design of specific security systems and to identify candidate components. 2. The DOE, NRC, and DOD should explain to Congress why government-developed security and other military equipment are not used to upgrade existing security systems and to stock future ones. 3. Each DOE and NRC facility should be assessed to determine the impact on the size of the guard force and on warning time when personnel-detecting radars and ground point sensors are installed. 4. All security guards and technicians should be investigated for the highest security clearance, with reinvestigations every four years. 5. The processes and vehicles used in intrafacility transport of nuclear materials should be evaluated against a range of threats and attack scenarios, including violent air and vehicle assaults. All of these recommendations are feasible and cost-effective. The appropriate congressional subcommittees should direct that they be implemented as soon as possible

  17. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  18. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    this report is intended to provide a convenient summary of the world's major nuclear physics accelerator facility with emphasis on those facilities supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Previous editions of this report have contained only DOE facilities. However, as the extent of global collaborations in nuclear physics grows, gathering summary information on the world's nuclear physics accelerator facilities in one place is useful. Therefore, the present report adds facilities operated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as the leading foreign facilities, with emphasis on foreign facilities that have significant outside user programs. The principal motivation for building and operating these facilities is, of course, basic research in nuclear physics. The scientific objectives for this research were recently reviewed by the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, who developed a long range plan, Nuclei, Nucleons, and Quarks -- Nuclear Science in the 1990's. Their report begins as follows: The central thrust of nuclear science is the study of strongly interacting matter and of the forces that govern its structure and dynamics; this agenda ranges from large- scale collective nuclear behavior through the motions of individual nucleons and mesons, atomic nuclei, to the underlying distribution of quarks and gluons. It extends to conditions at the extremes of temperature and density which are of significance to astrophysics and cosmology and are conducive to the creation of new forms of strongly interacting matter; and another important focus is on the study of the electroweak force, which plays an important role in nuclear stability, and on precision tests of fundamental interactions. The present report provides brief descriptions of the accelerator facilities available for carrying out this agenda and their research programs

  19. Design for a second-generation proton storage ring at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a second-generation proton storage ring complex at LAMPF. The facility would consist of two stacked racetrack-shaped machines. These machines would deliver a 1.2-mA beam of 1.6-GeV protons at 48 Hz. The pulse length would be 1.75 μsec which represents a time compression of 570. 1 ref., 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. Versatile H+ beam chopper system at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsford, J.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Bentley, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The H + chopper system at LAMPF provides two modes (A and B) of beam chopping. Mode A provides single micropulses separated by 1 μs or more. Mode B provides a single pulse 50-ns to 10-μs long at the LAMPF repetition rate of 12 Hz. The mode of operation is selected with coaxial relays which can switch during the dead time between LAMPF macropulses. The chopper consists of 1-m-long push-pull helical-wound slow-wave deflecting structures having an axial pulse velocity of 0.04c, which matches the velocity of the proton beam. The helix ground-planes are biased by a pulser providing push-pull 500-V pulses to deflect the H + beam from the injection channel. In chopping mode A, the helical windings are driven by push-pull, 1000-V, 5-ns pulses delivered by a circuit utilizing avalanche transistors and planar triodes. In mode B, the helical windings are driven by push-pull, 1000-V, 50-ns to 10-μs long pulses, produced by a circuit utilizing beam-power tetrodes and fast SCRs. In both modes, these pulses cancel the ground-plane bias and permit beam pulses to be delivered to the linac

  1. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, August 1--October 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyck, O.B.; Dunn, E.D. (comps.)

    1978-05-01

    A report is given of the medium-energy physics program at the LAMPF linac for the period from August 1 through October 31, 1977. Topics discussed include: (1) accelerator facilities and development; (2) the main beam lines; (3) experimental areas; (4) research; (5) nuclear chemistry; (6) practical applications; (7) linac technology; and (8) management. (PMA)

  2. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, August 1--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dyck, O.B.; Dunn, E.D.

    1978-05-01

    A report is given of the medium-energy physics program at the LAMPF linac for the period from August 1 through October 31, 1977. Topics discussed include: (1) accelerator facilities and development; (2) the main beam lines; (3) experimental areas; (4) research; (5) nuclear chemistry; (6) practical applications; (7) linac technology; and (8) management

  3. Nuclear structure studies using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility: Progress report, [1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.W.

    1986-12-01

    A major part of the work done this past year was associated with research conducted at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) and the External Proton Beam (EPB). The research focussed on (1) providing p + nucleus data which test nonrelativistic and relativistic models of the medium energy proton + nucleus interaction, (2) providing (p,p) and (p,n) data which are to be analyzed to provide new nuclear structure information (both ground state and excited state), (3) providing nucleon + nucleon data to aid in the systematic study of the fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction, (4) developing and improving the pA models themselves, and (5) initiating new experimental programs whose goals are to search for new phenomena in nuclear physics

  4. An introduction to LAMPF data acquisition system introduce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Saihong

    1993-01-01

    LAMPF Data Acquisition Systems are divided into general DAQ system and advanced MEGA DAQ system. The construct and future plan of general system are described. The second stage trigger has been implemented at LAMPF using a commercially available workstation and VME interface. The implementation is described and measurements of data transfer speeds are presented

  5. Biomedical applications of medium energy particle beams at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    At LAMPF an 800-MeV proton accelerator is used to produce intense beams of secondary protons, pi mesons, and muons which are being employed in several areas of biomedical research. The primary proton beam is used to produce short-lived radioisotopes of clinical interest. Carefully tailored secondary proton beams are used to obtain density reconstructions of samples with a dose much less than that required by x-ray CT scanners. The elemental composition of tissue samples is being determined non-destructively with muonic x-ray analysis. Finally, an extensive program, with physical, biological, and clinical components, is underway to evaluate negative pi mesons for use in cancer radiotherapy. The techniques used in these experiments and recent results are described

  6. Need for an intense polarized source at LAMPF. Report on a workshop held at Los Alamos, November 9, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNaughton, M.W.; Silbar, R.R.; van Dyck, O.B.

    1984-04-01

    We report on a workshop to consider the need for an intense polarized source at LAMPF. The primary justification for such a source comes from the nucleon-nucleon program; neutron-proton scattering is seriously underdetermined and cannot be satisfactorily completed without such an intense source. Further justification comes from nuclear (vector n,p) and (vector p, vector n) reactions, as well as from traditional nuclear physics at the LAMPF high resolution spectrometer. We recommend that a source capable of providing a few μA beam on target be built as soon as possible

  7. [Studies in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out between October 1, 1992 and September 30, 1993 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder. The experimental program in intermediate-energy nuclear physics is very broadly based; it includes pion-nucleon and pion-nucleus studies at LAMPF and TRIUMF, kaon-nucleus scattering at the AGS, and equipment development for experiments at the next generation of accelerator facilities

  8. Polarized photon facilities - windows to new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandorfi, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The status of new and proposed sources of intermediate-energy polarized photons is reviewed. The N → δ transition is discussed as an example of new physics that can be addressed at these facilities through precision measurements of polarization observables

  9. Possibilities for a neutron-proton bremsstrahlung experiment at WNR/LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, S.A.; Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Schillaci, M.; Gibson, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    The high energy and high intensity of the continuous energy (white) neutron source at the WNR target area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) may make possible a direct measurement of the neutron-proton bremsstrahlung (NPB) cross section. Several recent papers have discussed the operation of the WNR white neutron source in detail so we will just include a short description of the relevant properties of the source in this article. Next the authors will describe one possible method of measuring the NPB cross section which is based on two calorimetric detectors that measure the energies of the scattered neutrons and the recoil protons. Although there are many other possible experimental approaches and geometries, such as measuring the bremsstrahlung gamma ray directly with a multi-element possibilities in this paper. There are several advantages in using a white neutron source for this type of measurement. First, a wide range of incident neutron energies may be covered. In the case of the WNR, the energy range is from below 50 MeV to over 400 MeV which is above the pion production threshold. Second, all incident neutron energies are measure simultaneously. 6 refs., 5 figs

  10. Computing in support of experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.F.; Amann, J.F.; Butler, H.S.

    1976-10-01

    This report documents the discussions and conclusions of a study, conducted in August 1976, of the requirements for computer support of the experimental program in medium-energy physics at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. 1 figure, 1 table

  11. Performance of the LAMPF particle separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.; Dauelsberg, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    The electrostatic beam separator in the EPICS channel at LAMPF is now nearly fully operational. Improvements to the high voltage transmission system and the electronic controls as well as a higher quality channel vacuum have allowed the unit to be operated at its design field strengths. The bias electrode has proven to be useful in reducing ion-exchange currents and associated electrode heating. The detachable shielding and other apparatus for removing the separator from the activated channel was perfected and its application is described

  12. Transitionless lattices for LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franczak, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    Some techniques are described for the design of synchrotron lattices that have zero dispersion in the straight sections and/or imaginary transition energy (negative momentum-compaction factor) but no excessive amplitudes of the dispersion function. Included as an application is a single-stage synchrotron, with variable optics, that has different ion-optical properties at injection and extraction but requires a complex way of programming the quadrupoles. In addition, a two-stage facility consisting of a 45-GeV synchrotron of 1100-m circumference and a 9-GeV booster of half that size is presented. As alternates to these separated-function lattices, some combined-function modules are given that can be used to construct a synchrotron with similar properties

  13. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs. (LEW)

  14. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs

  15. Simulation studies of the LAMPF proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Rybarcyk, L.J.; Wangler, T.P.

    1995-01-01

    The LAMPF accelerator consists of two 0.75-MeV injectors, one for H + and the other for H - , a separate low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line for each beam species, a 0.75 to 100-MeV drift-tube linac (DTL) operating at 201.25-MHz, a 100-MeV transition region (TR), and a 100 to 800-MeV side-coupled linac (SCL) operating at 805-MHz. Each LEBT line consists of a series of quadrupoles to transport and transversely match the beam. The LEBT also contains a prebuncher, a main buncher, and an electrostatic deflector. The deflector is used to limit the fraction of a macropulse which is seen by the beam diagnostics throughout the linac. The DTL consists of four rf tanks and uses singlet FODO transverse focusing. The focusing period is doubled in the last two tanks by placing a quadrupole only in every other drift-tube. Doublet FDO transverse focusing is used in the SCL. The TR consists of separate transport lines for the H + and H - beams. The pathlengths for the two beams differ, by introducing bends, so as to delay arrival of one beam relative to the other and thereby produce the desired macropulse time structure. Peak beam currents typically range from 12 to 18-mA for varying macropulse lengths which give an average beam current of 1-mA. The number of particles per bunch is of the order 10 8 . The work presented here is an extension of previous work. The authors have attempted to do a more complete simulation by including modeling of the LEBT. No measurements of the longitudinal structure of the beam, except phase-scans, are performed at LAMPF. The authors show that, based on simulation results, the primary causes of beam spill are inefficient longitudinal capture and the lack of longitudinal matching. Measurements to support these claims are not presently made at LAMPF. However, agreement between measurement and simulation for the transverse beam properties and transmissions serve to benchmark the simulations

  16. Time-resolved beam energy measurements at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudgings, D.W.; Clark, D.A.; Bryant, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    A narrow atomic photodetachment resonance is used to measure the LAMPF beam energy. Energy and time resolution are adequate to permit the use of this method in studying transient changes in accelerated beam energy

  17. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated

  18. Physics detector simulation facility system software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Estep, P.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Marquez, M.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Traversat, B.

    1991-12-01

    Large and costly detectors will be constructed during the next few years to study the interactions produced by the SSC. Efficient, cost-effective designs for these detectors will require careful thought and planning. Because it is not possible to test fully a proposed design in a scaled-down version, the adequacy of a proposed design will be determined by a detailed computer model of the detectors. Physics and detector simulations will be performed on the computer model using high-powered computing system at the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF). The SSCL has particular computing requirements for high-energy physics (HEP) Monte Carlo calculations for the simulation of SSCL physics and detectors. The numerical calculations to be performed in each simulation are lengthy and detailed; they could require many more months per run on a VAX 11/780 computer and may produce several gigabytes of data per run. Consequently, a distributed computing environment of several networked high-speed computing engines is envisioned to meet these needs. These networked computers will form the basis of a centralized facility for SSCL physics and detector simulation work. Our computer planning groups have determined that the most efficient, cost-effective way to provide these high-performance computing resources at this time is with RISC-based UNIX workstations. The modeling and simulation application software that will run on the computing system is usually written by physicists in FORTRAN language and may need thousands of hours of supercomputing time. The system software is the ''glue'' which integrates the distributed workstations and allows them to be managed as a single entity. This report will address the computing strategy for the SSC

  19. Muon-catalyzed fusion experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Anderson, A.N.; Van Siclen, C.D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Our collaboration has conducted a series of muon-catalysis experiments over broad temperature and density ranges at the LAMPF accelerator in Los Alamos. We have discovered surprising effects on the normalized muon-catalysis cycling rate, λ/sub c/, and the apparent alpha-particle sticking coefficient, ω/sub s/, that depend on the d-t mixture density. This paper reviews our experimental approach, analysis methods, and results for tests with targets varying in density from 0.12 to 1.30, normalized to liquid hydrogen density, and in temperature from 15K to 800K. In particular, results will be presented on the cycling rate, sticking coefficient, and 3 He scavenging rate, as functions of temperature, mixture density, or tritium concentration

  20. LAMPF transition-region mechanical fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.; Gallegos, J.D.F.; Harrison, R.; Hart, V.E.; Hunter, W.T.; Rislove, S.E.; Sims, J.R.; Van Dyke, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The primary purpose of the new Transition Region (TR-II) is to optimize the phase matching of the H + and H - beams during simultaneous transport. TR-II incorporates several design improvements that include larger aperture, a straight beam track, greater beam-path length adjustments, and utility lines integrated with the support system. The close pack density of magnets and beam-line hardware required innovative solutions to magnet design and mounting, vacuum manifolding, and utility routing. Critical magnet placement was accomplished using a new three-dimensional alignment system that does real-time vector calculations on a computer with input from two digital theodolites. All assembly and a large fraction of the mechanical fabrication were done by LAMPF personnel. The TR-II has been operational since September 1983 and routinely transports production beams up to 900-μA current with no major problems

  1. Physical protection nuclear facilities against sabotage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: INFCIRC 225 Rev. 4 has introduced the Design Basis Threat, DBT, as a key element of the states physical protection system. The DBT is a definition which determines the level of physical protection of nuclear material during use, storage, transport and of nuclear facilities. It the basis for physical protection concepts and for the design of measures the operator or licensee has to provide. By this means it is also a definition of the responsibility for the physical protection which the operator accepts with the license. The new chapter designated to the physical protection against sabotage which has resulted also in the amendment of the title in INFCIRC 225 demonstrates the grown international concern about the potential consequences of sabotage. More than the physical protection against unauthorized removal the physical protection against sabotage has interfaces with the nuclear safety field. The basis of protection against sabotage therefore is much more based on the facility design-the safety design of the facility. Using the DBT the competent authority is in the position to determine the level of protection against sabotage and the remaining risk which has to be accepted. This risk of course depends on the real threat which is not known in advance. The acceptance of the remaining risk depends on both the assessment of the threat, its credibility and the potential consequences. There has been no serious act of sabotage in the past nor an attempt of. Despite of this the Harnun attack of the Japanese underground and some other recent terrorist activities could have given reasons to reconsider what threat might be credible. The German physical protection system has been developed since the increasing terrorist activities in the 1970s. From the beginning the protection against sabotage played an important role in the German system of physical protection. The requirements for the physical protection against unauthorized removal and against sabotage were

  2. Transport of radionuclides from the LAMPF lagoons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Purtymun, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the discharge water from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility lagoons continued during June and December of 1983. The list of radionuclides being monitoring includes 7 Be, 57 Co, 134 Cs, 3 H, 54 Mn, 22 Na, and 83 Rb. The sampling locations and the data obtained to date are presented. Movement of radionuclides around the lagoons has been described in a previous report. 1 reference, 1 table

  3. Physics and a plan for a 45 GeV facility that extends the high-intensity capability in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    A proposed program of physics research to be carried out at a 45 GeV high-intensity proton accelerator is discussed. In addition to a general discussion of the potentially most productive research directions, specific experiments in strong and flavor physics are presented. The proposed strong interaction physics deals with investigation of nonperturbative QCD through the study of exotic hadrons and measurement of nuclear medium effects on flavor-specific quark momentum distribution. The major part of the proposed program in flavor interaction physics probes possible physics beyond the minimal standard model. A design using two synchrotrons produces a 45 GeV proton beam by increasing the energy of the present LAMPF 800 MeV beam. A booster operating at 60 Hz accelerates 144 μA from 800 MeV to 6 GeV while the main ring operating at 3.33 Hz accelerates 32 μA from 6 GeV to 45 GeV. The 112 μA at 6 GeV which is not further accelerated is used to create intense beams of neutrinos and pulsed muons. The 32 μA of 45 GeV beam is slow extracted into an existing experimental area in which a large number of high-intensity, high-purity kaon and other secondary beams will be produced. A proposed layout of the experimental areas along with the characteristics of the secondary beams is also presented. The report concludes with a cost estimate to construct such a facility at Los Alamos

  4. Space Physics Data Facility Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, Robert M.; Harris, Bernard T.; Chimiak, Reine A.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Web services provides a distributed programming interface to a portion of the SPDF software. (A general description of Web services is available at http://www.w3.org/ and in many current software-engineering texts and articles focused on distributed programming.) The SPDF Web services distributed programming interface enables additional collaboration and integration of the SPDF software system with other software systems, in furtherance of the SPDF mission to lead collaborative efforts in the collection and utilization of space physics data and mathematical models. This programming interface conforms to all applicable Web services specifications of the World Wide Web Consortium. The interface is specified by a Web Services Description Language (WSDL) file. The SPDF Web services software consists of the following components: 1) A server program for implementation of the Web services; and 2) A software developer s kit that consists of a WSDL file, a less formal description of the interface, a Java class library (which further eases development of Java-based client software), and Java source code for an example client program that illustrates the use of the interface.

  5. Physical security of cut-and-cover underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    To aid designers, generic physical security objectives and design concepts for cut-and-cover underground facilities are presented. Specific aspects addressing overburdens, entryways, security doors, facility services, emergency egress, security response force, and human elements are discussed

  6. Nuclear structure studies using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility: Annual progress report, [1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This document constitutes the (1987 to 1988) progress report for the ongoing medium energy nuclear physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy with the University of Texas at Austin. A major part of the work has been and will continue to be associated with research done at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS), the External Proton Beam (EPB), and the new Neutron Time of Flight Facility (NTOF). Other research is done at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The research focuses on (1) providing proton + nucleus data which test nonrelativistic and relativistic models of the medium energy proton + nucleus interaction, (2) providing (p,p) and (p,n) data which are to be analyzed to provide new nuclear structure information (both ground state and excited state), (3) providing nucleon + nucleon data to aid in the systematic study of the fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction, (4) developing and improving the proton + nucleus theoretical models themselves, and (5) initiating new experimental programs whose goals are to search for new phenomena in nuclear physics. 182 refs., 71 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1990-01-01

    The irradiation facilities for testing SSC components and detector systems are described. Very high intensity proton, neutron, and pion fluxes are available with beam kinetic energies of up to 800 MeV. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  8. NTES laser facility for physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, D.J.; Foley, R.J.; Frank, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on the NTES laser facility: Mission Statement and Project Description; Experiment Area; High-Energy, Double-Pass Laser; Facilities; Laser Control and Data Acquisition; and Auxiliary Lasers

  9. Some beam-loading problems in LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.S.F.; Warren, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some beam-loading problems are investigated for the proposed LAMPF II synchrotron main ring and booster. Estimations for the feedback control requirements to reduce the power consumption, by accelerating protons beyond the Robinson stability limit, are provided. The results indicate that it is technically feasible to realize this kind of power-saving idea

  10. Experiment to study K+ → π+ + ''nothing'' at LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    An experiment to measure K + → π + + ''nothing'' (where ''nothing'' denotes unobservable neutral particles) at LAMPF II is described. This experiment is capable of measuring one K + → π + nu anti nu event for branching ratio of 10 -12 . 12 refs

  11. Evaluation of physical facilities and processing operations of major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of these abattoirs were evaluated based on their presence and functional status. ... of safe and wholesome meat and meat products for human consumption. Keywords: Abattoir, Butcher, Meat, Physical facilities, Public health, Standard ...

  12. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, E

    2015-01-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR. (paper)

  13. A Regulators Systematic Approach to Physical Protection for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Stephan; Doulgeris, Nicholas; Leask, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the framework for a physical protection regime which needs to be incorporated into the design and construction phases of nuclear facility. The need for physical protection considerations at the outset of the design of nuclear facilities is explained. It also discusses about the consequences of malicious activity and the management of risk. Various risk and consequences evaluations are undertaken, notably using design basis threat methodology. (author)

  14. Science driving facilities for particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    This week, CERN played host to the 10th ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators) seminar, which brought together some 200 scientists, government agency representatives and lab directors from around the world to take the pulse of our field. ICFA seminars take place every three years, and this time the emphasis was on science as the driving force for facilities.   The theme of this year’s seminar could not have been more timely. With austerity the global norm, it is more important than ever for science to point the way to the facilities we need, and for the global community to ensure that those facilities are planned at the global level. The LHC is already a machine for the world, and although CERN’s Member States have carried the bulk of the cost, it would not have been possible without contributions from around the globe. In the US, Fermilab’s focus has moved away from the high-energy frontier to the intensity frontier, which is every bit as impor...

  15. (Development of Bromine-77 from the LAMPF facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the work was to conduct the necessary studies required to evaluate the efficacy, potential benefit and role of bromine-77 labeled steroids in the detection and evaluation of treatment for hormone-dependent tumors. This report presents progress on the following tasks: An initial investigation concentrating on the radiobromination at carbon-6 or carbon-7 in selected simple steroids utilizing the nuclides, bromine-82 and bromine-77, analytical spectroscopy of radiolabeled compounds, and investigating the biodistribution, toxicology and tumor affinity of labeled agents.

  16. Study of physical resistance of the disposal facility for accidental artificial event in LLW disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Suihei; Irie, Masaaki; Uchida, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    This report refer to results of examine what follows for structural stability evaluation for the LLW disposal facility in depth over general human activity in underground. Study of physically resistance on the facility for accidental artificial event, namely tunneling an operation facing the disposal facility in future. Physically resistance to excavation of tunneling etc. in disposal facility is studied based on supposing of Tunnel Boring Machine as an excavator, paying attention to reinforcement bar in concrete and steel plate of waste package, as feature of strength in these material differs from rock strength. And it is examined not only resistibility on excavation but also about hard situations of excavation in tunneling works, and namely give thorough consideration to critical quantity of cutting to reinforcement bar and steel plate that could keep resistibility on excavation based on tunneling velocity and limits time furthermore. It requests necessity of evaluation in consider with metal corrosion that status alteration on disposal facility is considered with on timescale. Period of keep on the physically resistance is estimated by velocity of metal corrosion consequently. The physically resistance is kept until metal corrosion reach remaining its material, giving a limits of the physically resistance on inside of facility. Main point of physically resistance in the report will be made the good use of a practice to physically resistance evaluation of in safety assessment. (author)

  17. Confinement Physics Research Facility/ZTH: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.; Thullen, P.

    1989-01-01

    In October 1985 the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) Division began the design and construction of the Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) and the ZTH toroidal, reversed-field-pinch (RFP), plasma physics experiment. The CPRF is a facility which will provide the buildings, utilities, pulsed power system, control system and diagnostics needed to operate a magnetically confined fusion experiment, and ZTH will be the first experiment operated in the facility. The construction of CPRF/ZTH is scheduled for completion in the first quarter of 1993. 5 figs

  18. Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) architecture/utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scipioni, B.

    1993-05-01

    The current systems architecture for the SSCL's Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) is presented. Systems analysis data is presented and discussed. In particular, these data disclose the effectiveness of utilization of the facility for meeting the needs of physics computing, especially as concerns parallel architecture and processing. Detailed design plans for the highly networked, symmetric, parallel, UNIX workstation-based facility are given and discussed in light of the design philosophy. Included are network, CPU, disk, router, concentrator, tape, user and job capacities and throughput

  19. Number of detectable kaon decays at LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-04-01

    The maximum number of kaon decays detectable at LAMPF II is estimated for both in-flight and stopping decays. Under reasonable assumptions, the momentum of the kaon beam that optimizes the decay yield occurs at about 6 GeV/c and 600 MeV/c for in-flight and stopping decays, respectively. K + decay yields are fo the order of 7 x 10 7 per 10 14 interacting with K - yields being typically 5 times less. By measuring decays from such beams, a statistical limit of 10 -15 on a branching ratio to a particular channel can be placed in a 100-day run. The large number of kaon decays available at LAMPF II thus provides a powerful tool for sensitively examining rare-decay processes of the kaon

  20. LAMPF first-fault identifier for fast transient faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, A.R.; Hill, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The LAMPF accelerator is presently producing 800-MeV proton beams at 0.5 mA average current. Machine protection for such a high-intensity accelerator requires a fast shutdown mechanism, which can turn off the beam within a few microseconds of the occurrence of a machine fault. The resulting beam unloading transients cause the rf systems to exceed control loop tolerances and consequently generate multiple fault indications for identification by the control computer. The problem is to isolate the primary fault or cause of beam shutdown while disregarding as many as 50 secondary fault indications that occur as a result of beam shutdown. The LAMPF First-Fault Identifier (FFI) for fast transient faults is operational and has proven capable of first-fault identification. The FFI design utilized features of the Fast Protection System that were previously implemented for beam chopping and rf power conservation. No software changes were required

  1. Pion beam development for the LAMPF biomedical project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paciotti, M.; Amols, H.; Bradbury, J.; Rivera, O.; Hogstrom, K.; Smith, A.; Inoue, H.; Laubacher, D.; Sandford, S.

    1979-01-01

    Common to both static and dynamic patient irradiations at the LAMPF linac is the problem of maintaining good quality control of beams form a secondary channel. A major contributor to therapy beam variation has been change in electron contamination due to the change in target geometry and proton beam steering. The electron variation problem is described and a solution is presented that has been realized as a result o a new target geometry that allows some control of the electron fraction

  2. Design of a π0 spectrometer at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffner, R.

    1976-01-01

    A discussion is given of the salient features for the design of a π 0 spectrometer being constructed at LAMPF. The basic concepts of π 0 detection are explained, and the expected performance and mechanical design of the instrument are discussed. A list of intended experiments to be undertaken is given. The spectrometer is intended to be used for pion-charge-exchange and production reactions with nuclear targets

  3. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  4. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [es

  5. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  6. Computerized health physics record system at a Canadian fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thind, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    This poster session will describe the types of Health Physics data input into a Hewlett-Packard 3000 computer. The Health Physics data base at this facility includes the following: employee hours data, airborne uranium concentrations, external dosemetry (badge readings), internal dosemetry (bioassay) and environmental health physics (stack sample results) data. It will describe the types of outputs achievable in the form of various reports, such as: individual employee health physics report for a given period, a general health physics summary report for a given period, individual urinalysis report, local air concentration report and graphs. The use of this computerized health physics record system in the overall radiation protection program at this facility is discussed

  7. Physical security technologies for weapons complex reconfiguration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was a member of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Safeguards and Security (S ampersand S) team providing assistance to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration. The physical security systems in the new and upgraded facilities being considered for the WCR had to meet DOE orders and other requirements set forth in the WCR Programmatic Design Criteria (PDC), incorporate the latest physical security technologies using proven state-of-the-art systems and meet fundamental security principles. The outcome was to avoid costly retrofits and provide effective and comprehensive protection against current and projected threats with minimal impact on operations, costs and schedule. Physical security requirements for WCR facilities include: (1) reducing S ampersand S life-cycle costs, (2) where feasible automating S ampersand S functions to minimize operational costs, access to critical assets and exposure of people to hazardous environments, (3) increasing the amount of delay to outsider adversary attack, (4) compartmentalizing the facility to minimize the number of personnel requiring access to critical areas and (5) having reliable and maintainable systems. To be most effective against threats physical security must be integrated with facility operations, safety and other S ampersand S activities, such as material control and accountability, nuclear measurements and computer and information security. This paper will discuss the S ampersand S issues, requirements, technology opportunities and needs. Physical security technologies and systems considered in the design effort of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration facilities will be reviewed

  8. Physics and detector simulation facility Type O workstation specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartrand, G.; Cormell, L.R.; Hahn, R.; Jacobson, D.; Johnstad, H.; Leibold, P.; Marquez, M.; Ramsey, B.; Roberts, L.; Scipioni, B.; Yost, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    This document specifies the requirements for the front-end network of workstations of a distributed computing facility. This facility will be needed to perform the physics and detector simulations for the design of Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors, and other computations in support of physics and detector needs. A detailed description of the computer simulation facility is given in the overall system specification document. This document provides revised subsystem specifications for the network of monitor-less Type 0 workstations. The requirements specified in this document supersede the requirements given. In Section 2 a brief functional description of the facility and its use are provided. The list of detailed specifications (vendor requirements) is given in Section 3 and the qualifying requirements (benchmarks) are described in Section 4

  9. Nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The important contributions Multi-GeV hadron beam facilities can make to the field of Nuclear Physics have been recognized by the community for a decade. Such a facility has featured prominently in each NSAC planning exercise in this period. As Nuclear Physicists realize they must become more concerned with the quark structure of nuclei and the applications of Quantum Chromodynamics to many body systems, the need for experiments at such facilities has become more urgent. In this talk, I will present a personal view of some of the significant recent Nuclear Physics results with multi-GeV hadron facilities, the most important opportunities which can open up to us in the future, and demonstrate how our field must take advantage of these opportunities to progress. I will also report on the recent discussions in the community to make this possible

  10. Physical protection of facilities and special nuclear materials in france

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanpierre, G.

    1980-01-01

    Physical protection of nuclear facilities and special nuclear materials is subject in France to a national governmental regulation which provides for the basic principles to be taken into account and the minimal level of protection deemed necessary. But the responsibility of implementation is left to the facility management and the resulting decentralization allows for maximum efficiency. All safeguards measures comply with the commitments taken at the international level by the French government

  11. Advanced physical protection systems for facilities and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1976-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing advanced physical protection safeguards in order to improve the security of special nuclear materials, facilities, and transportation. Computer models are being used to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative systems for protecting facilities against external attack which may include internal assistance, and against internal theft or sabotage. Physical protection elements such as admittance controls, portals and detectors, perimeter and interior intrusion alarms, fixed and remotely activated barriers, and secure communications are being evaluated, adapted, and where required, developed. New facilities safeguards concepts which involve ''control loops'' between physical protection and materials control elements are being evolved jointly between Sandia Laboratories and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Special vehicles and digital communications equipment have been developed for the ERDA safe-secure transportation system. The current status and direction of these activities are surveyed

  12. Advanced physical protection systems for facilities and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1976-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing advanced physical protection safeguards in order to improve the security of special nuclear materials, facilities, and transportation. Computer models are being used to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative systems for protecting facilities against external attack which may include internal assistance, and against internal theft or sabotage. Physical protection elements such as admittance controls, portals and detectors, perimeter and interior intrusion alarms, fixed and remotely-activated barriers, and secure communications are being evaluated, adapted, and where required, developed. New facilities safeguards concepts which involve (control loops) between physical protection and materials control elements are being evolved jointly between Sandia Laboratories and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Special vehicles and digital communications equipment have been developed for the ERDA safe-secure transportation system. The current status and direction of these activities are surveyed

  13. Optimization of a He-jet activity transport system to use at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Bunker, M.E.; Starner, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    As part of an assessment of the feasibility for a He-jet coupled on-line mass separator at LAMPF, we have studied performance characteristics of a gas activity transport system under conditions simulating those expected on the main LAMPF beam line. In experiments utilizing a side beam at LAMPF, we have measured absolute transport efficiencies, transit times, aerosol properties, and dependences on beam intensity. Further experiments with a He-jet system at the Omega West Reactor have indicated an optimum configuration of a target chamber to be placed in the LAMPF main beam. The results of these studies suggest that a He-jet activity transport system should work well at LAMPF in the 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam that is spread over ∼40 cm 2 near the beam stop. 19 refs., 8 figs

  14. Data bank for nuclear-physical studies in educational facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Kapitonov, I.M.; Lenskaya, N.A.; Surgutanov, V.V.; Khoronenko, A.A.; Chernyaev, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Purposes and tasks of nuclear data Centers of the USSR Ministry of Education are discussed in short. Files of both bibliographic and factographic nuclear-physical data widely used with the Centres to provide the state organizations and scientists, first of all educational facilities, with nuclear data to increase effectiveness of fundamental and applied investigations and educational process are described

  15. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  16. Centralization and Decentralization of Schools' Physical Facilities Management in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoya, Peter O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the difference in the availability, adequacy and functionality of physical facilities in centralized and decentralized schools districts, with a view to making appropriate recommendations to stakeholders on the reform programmes in the Nigerian education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Principals,…

  17. Optimizing data access in the LAMPF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, S.C.; Corley, J.K.; Rose, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The LAMPF control system data access software offers considerable power and flexibility to application programs through symbolic device naming and an emphasis on hardware independence. This paper discusses optimizations aimed at improving the performance of the data access software while retaining these capabilities. The only aspects of the optimizations visible to the application programs are ''vector devices'' and ''aggregate devices.'' A vector device accesses a set of hardware related data items through a single device name. Aggregate devices allow run-time optimization of references to groups of unrelated devices. Optimizations not visible on the application level include careful handling of: network message traffic; the sharing of global resources; and storage allocation

  18. Beam intensity monitoring for the external proton beam at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.; Anderson, B.D.; Willard, H.B.; Anderson, A.N.; Jarmie, N.

    1975-07-01

    Three different intensity monitors were tested in the external proton beam at LAMPF, and together cover the entire range of beam currents available. A 800 kg Faraday cup was installed and used to measure the absolute intensity to better than 1 percent for beam currents up to several nanoamperes. A high gain ion chamber was used as part of the calibration procedure for the Faraday cup, and was found to be useful when monitoring very small beam intensities, being reliable down to the few picoampere level. A secondary emission monitor was also tested, calibrated, and found to be trustworthy only for beams of greater than 50 pA intensity. (auth)

  19. Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design

  20. Medium energy elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: muon beam development at LAMPF; muon physics; a new precision measurement of the muon g-2 value; measurement of the spin-dependent structure functions of the neutron and proton; and meson factories

  1. International physical protection self-assessment tool for chemical facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewell, Craig R.; Burdick, Brent A.; Stiles, Linda L.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2010-09-01

    This report is the final report for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project No.130746, International Physical Protection Self-Assessment Tool for Chemical Facilities. The goal of the project was to develop an exportable, low-cost, computer-based risk assessment tool for small to medium size chemical facilities. The tool would assist facilities in improving their physical protection posture, while protecting their proprietary information. In FY2009, the project team proposed a comprehensive evaluation of safety and security regulations in the target geographical area, Southeast Asia. This approach was later modified and the team worked instead on developing a methodology for identifying potential targets at chemical facilities. Milestones proposed for FY2010 included characterizing the international/regional regulatory framework, finalizing the target identification and consequence analysis methodology, and developing, reviewing, and piloting the software tool. The project team accomplished the initial goal of developing potential target categories for chemical facilities; however, the additional milestones proposed for FY2010 were not pursued and the LDRD funding therefore was redirected.

  2. Dusty Plasma Physics Facility for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John; Hahn, Inseob

    2015-09-01

    The Dusty Plasma Physics Facility (DPPF) is an instrument planned for the International Space Station (ISS). If approved by NASA, JPL will build and operate the facility, and NASA will issue calls for proposals allowing investigators outside JPL to carry out research, public education, and outreach. Microgravity conditions on the ISS will be useful for eliminating two unwanted effects of gravity: sedimentation of dust particles to the bottom of a plasma chamber, and masking weak forces such as the ion drag force that act on dust particles. The DPPF facility is expected to support multiple scientific users. It will have a modular design, with a scientific locker, or insert, that can be exchanged without removing the entire facility. The first insert will use a parallel-plate radio-frequency discharge, polymer microspheres, and high-speed video cameras. This first insert will be designed for fundamental physics experiments. Possible future inserts could be designed for other purposes, such as engineering applications, and experimental simulations of astrophysical or geophysical conditions. The design of the facility will allow remote operation from ground-based laboratories, using telescience.

  3. Design features and performance of the LAMPF high-intensity beam area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnew, L.; Grisham, D.; Macek, R.J.; Sommer, W.F.; Werbeck, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    LAMPF is a multi-purpose high-intensity meson factory capable of producing a 1 mA beam of 800-MeV protons. The three target cells and the beam stop facilities in the high intensity area have many special design features that are required for operation in the presence of high heat loads and intense radiation fields where accessibility is extremely limited. Reliable targets, beam windows, beam stops, beam transport and diagnostic components, vacuum enclosures, and auxiliary systems have been developed. Sophisticated remote-handling systems are employed for maintenance. Complex protection systems have been developed to guard against damage caused by errant beam. Beam availability approaching 90% has been achieved at currents of 600 to 700 μA. A new facility for direct proton and neutron radiation effects studies will be installed in 1985. The new facility will provide an integrated spallation neutron flux of up to 5 x 10 17 m -2 s -1 and will anable proton irradiation studies in the primary beam

  4. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment

  5. Status of the new high intensity H- injector at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.R. Jr.; York, R.L.; McConnell, J.R.; Kandarian, R.

    1984-04-01

    The requirement for higher intensity H - ion beams for the proton storage ring now being constructed at LAMPF necessitated the development of a new H - ion source and the rebuilding of the original H - injector and its associated beam transport lines. The goal of the ion source development program was to produce an H - beam with a peak intensity of 20 mA at 10% duty factor and with a beam emittance of less than 0.08 cm-mrad normalized at 95% beam fraction. The ion source concept which was best suited to our requirements was the multicusp, surface-production source developed for neutral beam injectors at Berkeley by Ehlers and Leung. An accelerator version of this source has been subsequently developed at Los Alamos to meet these storage ring requirements. The use of these higher intensity H - beams, together with the more stringent chopping and bunching requirements entailed in the operation of the storage ring, now requires rebuilding the entire H - injector at LAMPF. This construction is in progress. It is anticipated that the new injector will be fully operational by the end of 1984 and that the required H - beams will be available for the operation of the storage ring in early 1985

  6. Handbook on interdisciplinary use of European nuclear physics facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This handbook is intended to collect together, in an accessible way, the most pertinent information which might be needed by anyone contemplating the use of nuclear physics accelerators for research in other disciplines, or for industrial, biomedical, solid-state or other applications. Information for the publication was supplied by each laboratory represented here, and this was edited and supplemented where it was thought necessary, by additional material, often derived from the facilities' web-sites. The reader will find for each facility a technical description concerning the accelerator itself and its experimental equipment, followed by a 'what can be made there' section. 'at a glance' page contains a summary of contact names and addresses, transport, access and accommodation offered that will be of a great use for prospective user. 26 facilities in 12 European countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and The Netherlands) are presented.

  7. Handbook on interdisciplinary use of European nuclear physics facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This handbook is intended to collect together, in an accessible way, the most pertinent information which might be needed by anyone contemplating the use of nuclear physics accelerators for research in other disciplines, or for industrial, biomedical, solid-state or other applications. Information for the publication was supplied by each laboratory represented here, and this was edited and supplemented where it was thought necessary, by additional material, often derived from the facilities' web-sites. The reader will find for each facility a technical description concerning the accelerator itself and its experimental equipment, followed by a 'what can be made there' section. 'at a glance' page contains a summary of contact names and addresses, transport, access and accommodation offered that will be of a great use for prospective user. 26 facilities in 12 European countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and The Netherlands) are presented

  8. Security Culture in Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susyanta-Widyatmaka; Koraag, Venuesiana-Dewi; Taswanda-Taryo

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear related field, there are three different cultures: safety, safeguards and security culture. Safety culture has established mostly in nuclear industries, meanwhile safeguards and security culture are relatively new and still developing. The latter is intended to improve the physical protection of material and nuclear facility. This paper describes concept, properties and factors affecting security culture and interactions among these cultures. The analysis indicates that anybody involving in nuclear material and facility should have strong commitment and awareness of such culture to establish it. It is concluded that the assessment of security culture outlined in this paper is still preliminary for developing and conduction rigorous security culture implemented in a much more complex facility such as nuclear power plant

  9. Handbook on interdisciplinary use of European nuclear physics facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This handbook is intended to collect together, in an accessible way, the most pertinent information which might be needed by anyone contemplating the use of nuclear physics accelerators for research in other disciplines, or for industrial, biomedical, solid-state or other applications. Information for the publication was supplied by each laboratory represented here, and this was edited and supplemented where it was thought necessary, by additional material, often derived from the facilities' web-sites. The reader will find for each facility a technical description concerning the accelerator itself and its experimental equipment, followed by a 'what can be made there' section. 'at a glance' page contains a summary of contact names and addresses, transport, access and accommodation offered that will be of a great use for prospective user. 26 facilities in 12 European countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and The Netherlands) are presented.

  10. [Safeguards for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1975-01-01

    Testimony is given on the subject of safeguards for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities, particularly during transportation. The ERDA nation-wide safe-secure transportation system and the Safe-Secure Trailer are described. The nationwide ERDA voice communication system is also described. Development of hardware and systems is discussed. The use of adversary simulation for evaluating protection systems is mentioned

  11. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  12. Design and evaluation of physical protection systems of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jin Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Kwack, Eun Ho; Choi, Yung Myung

    2001-06-01

    Nuclear material and safety equipment of nuclear facilities are required to be protected against any kind of theft or sabotage. Physical protection is one of the measures to prevent such illegally potential threats for public security. It should cover all the cases of use, storage, and transportation of nuclear material. A physical protection system of a facility consists of exterior intrusion sensors, interior intrusion sensors, an alarm assessment and communication system, entry control systems, access delay equipment, etc. The design of an effective physical protection system requires a comprehensive approach in which the designers define the objective of the system, establish an initial design, and evaluate the proposed design. The evaluation results are used to determine whether or not the initial design should be modified and improved. Some modelling techniques are commonly used to analyse and evaluate the performance of a physical protection system. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) has developed a prototype of software as a part of a full computer model for effectiveness evaluation for physical protection systems. The input data elements for the prototype, contain the type of adversary, tactics, protection equipment, and the attributes of each protection component. This report contains the functional and structural requirements defined in the development of the evaluation computer model.

  13. The ELI–NP facility for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ur, C.A.; Balabanski, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Gales, S.; Morjan, I.; Tesileanu, O.; Ursescu, D.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure–Nuclear Physics (ELI–NP) is aiming to use extreme electromagnetic fields for nuclear physics research. The facility, currently under construction at Magurele–Bucharest, will comprise a high power laser system and a very brilliant gamma beam system. The technology involved in the construction of both systems is at the limits of the present-day’s technological capabilities. The high power laser system will consist of two 10 PW lasers and it will produce intensities of up to 10 23 –10 24 W/cm 2 . The gamma beam, produced via Compton backscattering of a laser beam on a relativistic electron beam, will be characterized by a narrow bandwidth (<0.5%) and tunable energy of up to almost 20 MeV. The research program of the facility covers a broad range of key topics in frontier fundamental physics and new nuclear physics. A particular attention is given to the development of innovative applications. In the present paper an overview of the project status and the overall performance characteristics of the main research equipment will be given. The main fundamental physics and applied research topics proposed to be studied at ELI–NP will also be briefly reviewed

  14. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States.

  15. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States

  16. Integration of radiation and physical safety in large radiator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, P.P.M.; Benedito, A.M.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Growing international concern about radioactive sources after the Sept. 11, 2001 event has led to a strengthening of physical safety. There is evidence that the illicit use of radioactive sources is a real possibility and may result in harmful radiological consequences for the population and the environment. In Brazil there are about 2000 medical, industrial and research facilities with radioactive sources, of which 400 are Category 1 and 2 classified by the - International Atomic Energy Agency - AIEA, where large irradiators occupy a prominent position due to the very high cobalt-60 activities. The radiological safety is well established in these facilities, due to the intense work of the authorities in the Country. In the paper the main aspects on radiological and physical safety applied in the large radiators are presented, in order to integrate both concepts for the benefit of the safety as a whole. The research showed that the items related to radiation safety are well defined, for example, the tests on the access control devices to the irradiation room. On the other hand, items related to physical security, such as effective control of access to the company, use of safety cameras throughout the company, are not yet fully incorporated. Integration of radiation and physical safety is fundamental for total safety. The elaboration of a Brazilian regulation on the subject is of extreme importance

  17. Engineering, maintenance, and initiatives to improve LAMPF beam availability and system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, H.W.; DeHaven, R.A.; Hart, V.E.; Parsons, W.M.; Sturrock, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Two different requirements are driving engineering studies and hardware development to improve LAMPF. The first is concerned with component and system improvements to increase beam availability during the LAMPF production cycle. Hardware changes in RF, power supplies, and magnets are being implemented to increase mean time between failure and reduce time to replace or repair failed units. A joint LAMPF-Industry project is on-going to improve reliability of RF components. A component test stand is being refurbished to include significant development capability. The second approach includes several changes that will increase the duty factor of the existing accelerator. Major changes are being evaluated for replacing the front end of the accelerator. Other changes improving the high brightness capability could result in a new performance plateau for LAMPF. 2 refs., 2 figs

  18. Engineering, maintenance, and new initiatives to improve LAMPF beam availability and system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, H.W.; DeHaven, R.A.; Hart, V.E.; Parsons, W.M.; Sturrock, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Two different requirements are driving engineering studies and hardware development to improve LAMPF. The first is concerned with component and system improvements to increase beam availability during the LAMPF production cycle. Hardware changes in RF, power supplies, and magnets are being implemented to increase mean time between failure and reduce time to replace or repair failed units. A joint LAMPF-Industry project is on-going to improve reliability of RF components. A component test stand is being refurbished to include significant development capability. The second approach includes several changes that will increase the duty factor of the existing accelerator. Major changes are being evaluated for replacing the front end of the accelerator. Other changes improving high brightness capability could result in a new performance plateau for LAMPF

  19. Non-European facilities for elementary particle physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The facilities we now employ in high energy physics cover a broad spectrum of particle energies and intensities and provide therefore a multiplicity of probes with which to study the behavior of elementary particles. In general, the goal has been to achieve ever higher particle energies and intensities, with emphasis on energy, and to develop more versatile and more sensitive detectors with which to study the resultant particle-particle interactions. Most energy regimes that have been explored have yielded new, fundamental information which often becomes clearer and more easily developed when particle energies are further increased. In this talk I shall try to delineate the nature of those facilities in Canada, Japan and the U.S.A. It is useful, I believe, to begin with a brief discussion of the funding and management of facilities in those countries and a short summary of recent history. The main body of the talk concentrates on the present, planned and contemplated facilities of the major non-European accelerator laboratories, and address briefly the status of accelerator development. The concluding section will summarize the salient features of the discussion. (author)

  20. Secondary beam line phase space measurement and modeling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, R.; Harrison, J.; Macek, R.; Sanders, G.

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and software have been developed for precision on-line measurement and fitting of secondary beam line phase space parameters. A system consisting of three MWPC planes for measuring particle trajectories, in coincidence with a time-of-flight telescope and a range telescope for particle identification, has been interfaced to a computer. Software has been developed for on-line track reconstruction, application of experimental cuts, and fitting of two-dimensional phase space ellipses for each particle species. The measured distributions have been found to agree well with the predictions of the Monte Carlo program DECAY TURTLE. The fitted phase space ellipses are a useful input to optimization routines, such as TRANSPORT, used to search for superior tunes. Application of this system to the LAMPF Stopped Muon Channel is described

  1. Stereo: cylindrical drift chamber for muon decay experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, R.D.; Carlini, R.D.; Cooper, M.D.; Frank, J.S.; Hart, V.E.; Matis, H.S.; Mischke, R.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Sennhauser, U.

    1983-01-01

    A stereo, cylindrical drift chamber has been built for use in a search for rare decay modes of the muon at LAMPF. This chamber (part of the Crystal Box detector) has 728 cells on 8 concentric annuli at alternating angles of 10 0 to 16 0 from the chamber axis and with radii from 105 to 220 mm. The basic cell cross section is (9 x 10) mm 2 and the inter-layer spacing is 4.7 mm. Preliminary results show the single-wire efficiencies to be greater than 99%. Based on results obtained from prototype chambers, we hope to achieve 170-μm resolution (including multiple scattering) when TDC offsets and sense-wire locations found in a careful inspection of the endplates are added to the track-finding algorithm

  2. The Physics Perspectives at the Future Accelerator Facility FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Stroth, J

    2004-01-01

    The physics perspective of the approved future international accelerator Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) near Darmstadt, Germany will be outlined. The physics programme will comprise many body aspects of matter ranging from macroscopic system like highly correlated plasmas down to the properties of baryons and nuclear matter at high baryon densities. Through fragmentation of intense ion beams investigations with beams of short-lived radioactive nuclei far from stability will be possible. The addressed physics questions concern nuclear structure at the drip-lines, areas of astrophysics and nucleo-synthesis in supernovae and other stellar processes, as well as tests of fundamental symmetry. The structure of baryons and their limits of their existence is the interest of the two large experimental set-ups PANDA and CBM. Finally QED will be studied in extremely strong field effects and also the interaction of ions with matter. The future facility will feature a double-ring synchrotron SIS100/300 a...

  3. Future neutrino oscillation facilities: physics priorities and open issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, Alain

    2006-01-01

    The recent discovery that neutrinos have masses opens a wide new field of experimentation. Accelerator-made neutrinos are essential in this program. Ideas for future facilities include Superbeam, Beta-beam, or Neutrino Factory, each associated with one or several options for detector systems. We now begin a 'scoping study' aimed at determining a set of key R and D projects enabling the community to propose an ambitious accelerator neutrino program at the turn of this decade. As an introduction to this study, a set of physics priorities, a summary of the perceived virtues and shortcomings of the various options, and a number of open questions are presented

  4. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, February 1--April 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, E.

    1976-09-01

    A quarterly report on the medium-energy physics program at LAMPF is given. Topics covered include: (1) engineering support; (2) accelerator support; (3) accelerator systems development; (4) injector systems; (5) electronic instrumentation and computer systems; (6) accelerator operations; (7) experimental areas; (8) beam line development; (9) large-spectrometer systems; (10) research; (11) nuclear chemistry; (12) practical applications of LAMPF; and (13) management

  5. Physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities in CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Gratia, M.-H.; Jorda, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), as nuclear operator, is responsible for the control and protection of their nuclear materials. Inside CEA, DCS (Central Security Division) is in charge of the security matters, DCS defines the CEA strategy in this field, especially in physical protection. The paper will present the physical protection strategy of CEA. DCS defines the rules and methods; the operators have to apply in order to fulfill the security objectives of CEA. CEA has to provide the regulatory authority with documents proving that it is in accordance with the requirements of the 25th July 1980 law and 12th May 1981 decree. It has to implement all the necessary means in order to achieve the results requested by the regulatory authority. All these arrangements are described in the 'license and control file'. This file should specify the facility safeguards and physical protection system. Accounting measures are also described. In this file, the petitioner has to justify its capacity for holding nuclear materials and for exercising authorized activities on them. So the organization and the installed means have to be described in this authorization file. For physical protection, containment, surveillance and physical protection measures are presented: Containment measures must prevent the unauthorized or unjustified movements of nuclear material in the framework of the authorized activities; Surveillance measures must guarantee the integrity of the containment, check that no material is exiting by an abnormal channel; Physical protection measures for the materials, the premises and the facilities are intended to protect them against malevolent actions by means of security systems. The Central Security Division has established guidelines to provide guidance to the nuclear materials holders in writing such files. Each holding unit has to establish a 'license and control file' and each CEA site establishes a 'site license and control file

  6. Neutron-proton bremsstrahlung studies using the white neutron source at the LAMPF/WNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, S.A.; Nelson, R.O.; Schillaci, M.E.; Blann, M.

    1990-01-01

    Nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung is a few-body radiative process that provides insight into several areas of nuclear physics. It is one of the simplest systems for studying the off-shell behavior of the nucleon-nucleon potential. The physics involved in neutron-proton bremsstrahlung (NPB) is significantly different from that of proton-proton bremsstrahlung (PPB). In particular, NPB cross sections are much larger than PPB cross sections because NPB allows E1 radiation, and the contribution to the cross section from the meson exchange currents has been calculated to be as large as the contributions from external radiation. To date there have been essentially four NPB experiments. These measurements have covered only a small part of the available phase space. A major experimental problem in performing these measurements has been the lack of a suitable intense, high-energy neutron beam. We are planning a measurement of the NPB cross section using the white neutron source at the WNR target area at the LAMPF accelerator. We plant to implement the experiment in three phases. In this first state, we shall measure inclusive hard-photon production using a multi-element gamma-ray telescope that is insensitive to neutrons. In the second phase, we shall measure the bremsstrahlung gamma-rays in coincidence with recoil protons. In the last phase, we shall detect the scattered neutrons in coincidence with the recoil protons and gamma rays. 8 refs., 6 figs

  7. Advancement adopted for physical protection system at BARC facilities Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroli, Manish; Ameta, Rohit; Patil, V.H.; Dubey, K.

    2015-01-01

    Considering the prevailing security situation and threat perception to the nuclear installations in particular, it has become essential to strengthen security system at BARC Tarapur in an effective manner to avert any attempt of sabotage and to ensure smooth functioning of security and safety of the nuclear installations. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) have provided various security guides for the physical protection system (PPS) for nuclear installations and there has been advancement in physical and personnel protection system due to evolution of new technologies. In line with this, latest technologies have been adopted in PPS for BARC facilities, Tarapur recently. This includes state of art RFID card based access control, visitor and contractor management system, electronic key management system. Digital signature based biometric visitor and contractor management system; Digital signature based leave management system; Distress alarm system (DAS); Guard tour monitoring system (GTMS); Secure network access system (SNAS) as well as multilayered access control system at plant level. This will strengthen the surveillance and monitoring of personnel and visitors at BARC facilities. (author)

  8. Vulnerability Analysis of Physical Protection System at Hypothetical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won Moog; Lee, Ho Jin; Yu, Dong Han; Min, Gyung Sik

    2006-01-01

    Since the 9/11 event in the U.S.A, International terror possibilities has been increasing for nuclear facilities including nuclear power plants(NPPs). It is necessary to evaluate the performance of an existing physical protection system(PPS) at nuclear facilities based on such malevolent acts. A PPS is a complex configuration of detection, delay, and response elements. Detection, delay, and response elements are all important to the analysis and evaluation of a PPS and its effectiveness. Methods are available to analyze a PPS and evaluate its effectiveness. Sandia National Laboratory(SNL) in the U.S.A was developed a System Analysis of Vulnerability to Intrusion (SAVI) computer code for evaluating the effectiveness of PPS against outsider threats. This study presents the vulnerability analysis of the PPS at hypothetical facility using SAVI code that the basic input parameters are from PPS of Hanaro Research Reactor at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institution. It is understand that PPS of research reactor and critical assemblies are deficient that that of NPP and nuclear materials of RRCAS are compact to transport For analysis, first, the site-specific Adversary Sequence Diagrams(ASDs) of the PPS is constructed. It helps to understand the functions of the existing PPS composed of physical areas and Protection Elements(PEs). Then, the most vulnerable path of an ASD as a measure of effectiveness is determined. The results in the analysis can used to suggest the possible PPS upgrades to the most vulnerable paths for the system like research reactor

  9. The liquid scintillator neutrino detector and LAMPF neutrino source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanassopoulos, C.; Auerbach, L.B.; Bauer, D.; Bolton, R.D.; Burman, R.L.; Cohen, I.; Caldwell, D.O.; Dieterle, B.D.; Donahue, J.B.; Eisner, A.M.; Fazely, A.; Federspiel, F.J.; Garvey, G.T.; Gray, M.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Highland, V.; Imlay, R.; Johnston, K.; Kim, H.J.; Louis, W.C.; Lu, A.; Margulies, J.; Mills, G.B.; McIlhany, K.; Metcalf, W.; Reeder, R.A.; Sandberg, V.; Schillaci, M.; Smith, D.; Stancu, I.; Strossman, W.; Tayloe, R.; VanDalen, G.J.; Vernon, W.; Wang, Y.-X.; White, D.H.; Whitehouse, D.; Works, D.; Xiao, Y.; Yellin, S. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States)]|[University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States)]|[University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)]|[University of California, Intercampus Institute for Research at Particle Accelerators, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)]|[Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ 86301 (United States)]|[Linfield College, McMinnville, OR 97128 (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]|[Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)]|[Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)]|[University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)]|[Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 (United States)]|[Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States)

    1997-03-21

    A search for neutrino oscillations of the type {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} has been conducted at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility using {nu}{sub {mu}} from muon decay at rest. Evidence for this transition has been reported previously. This paper discusses in detail the experimental setup, detector operation and neutrino source, including aspects relevant to oscillation searches in the muon decay-at-rest and pion decay in flight channels. (orig.).

  10. UCLA intermediate energy nuclear physics and relativistic heavy ion physics. Annual report, February 1, 1983-January 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In this contract year the UCLA Intermediate Energy Group has continued to pursue a general set of problems in intermediate energy physics using new research tools and theoretical insights. Our program to study N-N scattering and proton-light nucleus scattering has been enhanced by a new polarized target facility (both hydrogen and deuterium) at the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). This facility has been constructed by our group in collaboration with physicists from KEK, LAMPF and the University of Minnesota; and the first set of experiments studying polarized beam-polarized target scattering at the HRS were completed this summer and early fall. The HRS mode of operation has led to some unique design features which are described. At the Bevalac, a new beam line spectrometer will be constructed for us during this year and next to significantly enhance our capability to study subthreshold k + , k - and anti p production in relativistic heavy ion collisions and to search for fractionally charged particles. During this period a proposal is being prepared for a very large acceptance spectrometer and its associated beam line which will be used to detect dilepton pairs produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In concert with these experimental projects, theoretical advances in the understanding of new data from the HRS, particularly spin transfer data, have been made by the UCLA group and are described

  11. Perceptions of Important Characteristics of Physical Activity Facilities: Implications for Engagement in Walking, Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Katie M; Haddock, Christopher K; Jitnarin, Natinee; Hughey, Joseph; Berkel, LaVerne A; Poston, Walker S C

    2017-01-01

    Although few United States adults meet physical activity recommendations, those that do are more likely to access to physical activity facilities. Additionally, vigorous exercisers may be more likely to utilize a nearby physical activity facility, while light-to-moderate exercisers are less likely to do so. However, it is unclear what characteristics of those facilities are most important as well as how those characteristics are related to activity intensity. This study examined relationships between self-reported leisure-time physical activities and the use of and perceived characteristics of physical activity facilities. Data were from a cross-sectional study in a major metropolitan area. Participants ( N  = 582; ages 18-74, mean age = 45 ± 14.7 years) were more likely to be female (69.9%), Caucasian (65.6%), married (51.7%), and have some college education (72.8%). Household surveys queried leisure-time physical activity, regular physical activity facility use, and importance ratings for key facility characteristics. Leisure-time physical activity recommendations were met by 41.0% of participants and 50.9% regularly used a physical activity facility. Regular facility use was positively associated with meeting walking ( p  = 0.036), moderate ( p  importance on facility quality ( p  = 0.022), variety of physical activity options offered ( p  = 0.003), and availability of special equipment and resources ( p  = 0.01). The facility characteristics of low or free cost ( p  = 0.02) and offering childcare ( p  = 0.028) were barriers for walking, and being where friends and family like to go were barriers for moderate leisure-time physical activity ( p  = 0.013). Findings offer insights for structuring interventions using the social ecological model as well as for improving existing physical activity facilities.

  12. Health physics manual of good practices for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, W.R.; Miller, A.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Coulson, L.V.

    1988-04-01

    It is hoped that this manual will serve both as a teaching aid as well as a useful adjunct for program development. In the context of application, this manual addresses good practices that should be observed by management, staff, and designers since the achievement of a good radiation program indeed involves a combined effort. Ultimately, radiation safety and good work practices become the personal responsibility of the individual. The practices presented in this manual are not to be construed as mandatory rather they are to be used as appropriate for the specific case in the interest of radiation safety. As experience is accrued and new data obtained in the application of this document, ONS will update the guidance to assure that at any given time the guidance reflects optimum performance consistent with current technology and practice.The intent of this guide therefore is to: define common health physics problems at accelerators; recommend suitable methods of identifying, evaluating, and managing accelerator health physics problems; set out the established safety practices at DOE accelerators that have been arrived at by consensus and, where consensus has not yet been reached, give examples of safe practices; introduce the technical literature in the accelerator health physics field; and supplement the regulatory documents listed in Appendix D. Many accelerator health physics problems are no different than those at other kinds of facilities, e.g., ALARA philosophy, instrument calibration, etc. These problems are touched on very lightly or not at all. Similarly, this document does not cover other hazards such as electrical shock, toxic materials, etc. This does not in any way imply that these problems are not serious. 160 refs

  13. [Intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes work in experimental Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics carried out between October 1, 1988 and October 1, 1989 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under grant DE-FG02-86ER-40269 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental program is very broadly based, including pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/WNR. In addition, a number of other topics related to accelerator physics are described in this report

  14. Associations between Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity and Neighbourhood Recreational Facilities: The Features of the Facilities Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Yiu Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the associations between objectively-assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA and perceived/objective measures of neighbourhood recreational facilities categorized into indoor or outdoor, public, residential or commercial facilities. The associations between facility perceptions and objectively-assessed numbers of recreational facilities were also examined. Method: A questionnaire was used on 480 adults to measure local facility perceptions, with 154 participants wearing ActiGraph accelerometers for ≥4 days. The objectively-assessed number of neighbourhood recreational facilities were examined using direct observations and Geographical Information System data. Results: Both positive and negative associations were found between MVPA and perceived/objective measures of recreational facilities. Some associations depended on whether the recreational facilities were indoor or outdoor, public or residential facilities. The objectively-assessed number of most public recreational facilities was associated with the corresponding facility perceptions, but the size of effect was generally lower than for residential recreational facilities. Conclusions: The objectively-assessed number of residential outdoor table tennis courts and public indoor swimming pools, the objectively-assessed presence of tennis courts and swimming pools, and the perceived presence of bike lanes and swimming pools were positive determinants of MVPA. It is suggested to categorize the recreational facilities into smaller divisions in order to identify unique associations with MVPA.

  15. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given

  16. Analytic evaluation of LAMPF II Booster Cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichs, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Through the past few decades, a great deal of sophistication has evolved in the numeric codes used to evaluate electromagnetically resonant structures. The numeric methods are extremely precise, even for complicated geometries, whereas analytic methods require a simple uniform geometry and a simple, known mode configuration if the same precision is to be obtained. The code SUPERFISH, which is near the present state-of-the-art of numeric methods, does have the following limitations: No circumferential geometry variations are permissible; there are no provisions for magnetic or dielectric losses; and finally, it is impractical (because of the complexity of the code) to modify it to extract particular bits of data one might want that are not provided by the code as written. This paper describes how SUPERFISH was used as an aid in derivating an analytic model of the LAMPF II Booster Cavity. Once a satisfactory model was derived, simple FORTRAN codes were generated to provide whatever data was required. The analytic model is made up of TEM- and radial-mode transmission-line sections, as well as lumped elements where appropriate. Radial transmission-line equations, which include losses, were not found in any literature, and the extension of the lossless equations to include magnetic and dielectric losses are included in this paper

  17. GENIUS - a new facility of non-accelerator particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.

    2001-01-01

    The GENIUS (Germanium in Liquid Nitrogen Underground Setup) project has been proposed in 1997 [1] as first third generation double beta decay project, with a sensitivity aiming down to a level of an effective neutrino mass of ∼ 0.01 - 0.001 eV. Such sensitivity has been shown to be indispensable to solve the question of the structure of the neutrino mass matrix which cannot be solved by neutrino oscillation experiments alone [2]. It will allow broad access also to many other topics of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics at the multi-TeV scale. For search of cold dark matter GENIUS will cover almost the full range of the parameter space of predictions of SUSY for neutralinos as dark matter [3,4]. Finally, GENIUS has the potential to be the first real-time detector for low-energy (pp and 7 Be) solar neutrinos [6,5]. A GENIUS-Test Facility has just been funded and will come into operation by end of 2001

  18. Fusion plasma physics research on the H-1 national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Australia has a highly leveraged fusion plasma research program centred on the H-1 National Facility device at the ANU. H-1 is a heliac, a novel helical axis stellarator that was experimentally pioneered in Australia, but has a close correlation with the worldwide research program on toroidal confinement of fusion grade plasma. Experiments are conducted on H-1 by university researchers from the Australian Fusion Research Group (comprising groups from the ANU, the Universities of Sydney, Western Sydney, Canberra, New England, and Central Queensland University) under the aegis of AINSE; the scientists also collaborate with fusion researchers from Japan and the US. Recent experiments on H-1 have focused on improved confinement modes that can be accessed at very low powers in H-1, but allow the study of fundamental physics effects seen on much larger machines at higher powers. H-1 is now being upgraded in magnetic field and heating power, and will be able to confine hotter plasmas beginning in 1999, offering greatly enhanced research opportunities for Australian plasma scientists and engineers, with substantial spillover of ideas from fusion research into other areas of applied physics and engineering

  19. LOS ALAMOS: the future of medium energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A 'Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate Energy Physics' was recently held at LAMPF and the topics discussed there are summarized. The purpose of the meeting was to establish priorities for experimental research at intermediate energies. (W.D.L.).

  20. Research in elementary particle physics. Progress report, March 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Lai-Him; Haymaker, R.; Imlay, R.; McNeil, R.; Metcalf, W.; Svoboda, R.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Low-energy particle dynamics; QCD dynamics on the lattice; lattice QCD Vacuum; phenomenology ampersand cosmology; the ZEUS Experiment at HERA; neutrino physics at LAMPF; non-accelerator physics; and SSC activity

  1. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Romano, F. P.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Massimi, C.

    2017-07-01

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as 7Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment ( e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and 7Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Landé factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry.

  2. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  3. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, D.; Gammino, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania (Italy); Leone, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania (Italy); INAF-OACT, Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM, Catania (Italy); Galata, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Massimi, C. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as {sup 7}Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment (e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and {sup 7}Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Lande factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry. (orig.)

  4. Physics at the proposed National Underground Science Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The scientific, technical, and financial reasons for building a National Underground Science Facility are discussed. After reviewing examples of other underground facilities, we focus on the Los Alamos proposal and the national for its choice of site

  5. High temperature facility for atomic physics studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop a laser heated plasma sample for atomic physics studies in the 30 to 100 eV range of electron temperature and the 3 x 10 17 to 10 18 cm -3 range in electron density are presented. The approach used was discussed in detail in Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., (MSNW) Proposal 1660, that is, the laser breakdown mode of heating in a slow solenoid. An extensive rework of the plasma sample facility was done in order to use this mode of heating. Specifically, a new solenoid magnet was constructed to allow higher field operation and the plasma chamber was modified to allow the use of puff filling orifices and small bore tube liners. The vacuum system and focussing optics were changed to allow the use of an on-axis Cassagranian system capable of focussing the laser radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot as is necessary when heating through a small aperture. The 10 liter CO 2 laser optics were charged to an unstable oscillator configuration and additional windows were provided into the optical cavity for alignment purposes

  6. Physics and engineering assessments of spherical torus component test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.-K.M.; Neumeyer, C.A.; Kessel, C.; Rutherford, P.; Mikkelsen, D.; Bell, R.; Menard, J.; Gates, D.; Schmidt, J.; Synakowski, E.; Grisham, L.; Fogarty, P.J.; Strickler, D.J.; Burgess, T.W.; Tsai, J.; Nelson, B.E.; Sabbagh, S.; Mitarai, O.; Cheng, E.T.; El-Guebaly, L.

    2005-01-01

    A broadly based study of the fusion engineering and plasma science conditions of a Component Test Facility (CTF), using the Spherical Torus or Spherical Tokamak (ST) configuration, have been carried out. The chamber systems testing conditions in a CTF are characterized by high fusion neutron fluxes Γ n > 4.4x10 13 n/s/cm 2 , over size scales > 10 5 cm 2 and depth scales > 50 cm, delivering > 3 accumulated displacement per atom (dpa) per year. The desired chamber conditions can be provided by a CTF with R 0 1.2 m, A = 1.5, elongation ∼ 3.2, I p ∼ 9 MA, B T ∼ 2.5 T, producing a driven fusion burn using 36 MW of combined neutral beam and RF power. Relatively robust ST plasma conditions are adequate, which have been shown achievable [4] without active feedback manipulation of the MHD modes. The ST CTF will test the single-turn, copper alloy center leg for the toroidal field coil without an induction solenoid and neutron shielding, and require physics data on solenoid-free plasma current initiation, ramp-up, and sustainment to multiple MA level. A new systems code that combines the key required plasma and engineering science conditions of CTF has been prepared and utilized as part of this study. The results show high potential for a family of lowercost CTF devices to suit a variety of fusion engineering science test missions. (author)

  7. User's guide for evaluating physical security capabilities of nuclear facilities by the EASI method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, H.A.

    1977-06-01

    This handbook is a guide for evaluating physical security of nuclear facilities using the ''Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI)'' method and a hand-held programmable calculator. The handbook is intended for use by personnel at facilities where special nuclear materials are used, processed, or stored. It may also be used as a design aid for such facilities by potential licensees

  8. Designing a Physical Security System for Risk Reduction in a Hypothetical Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, A.A.; Abd Elaziz, M.

    2017-01-01

    Physical security in a nuclear facility means detection, prevention and response to threat, the ft, sabotage, unauthorized access and illegal transfer involving radioactive and nuclear material. This paper proposes a physical security system designing concepts to reduce the risk associated with variant threats to a nuclear facility. This paper presents a study of the unauthorized removal and sabotage in a hypothetical nuclear facility considering deter, delay and response layers. More over, the study involves performing any required upgrading to the security system by investigating the nuclear facility layout and considering all physical security layers design to enhance the weakness for risk reduction

  9. A superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the phase space of pion beams at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, J.M.; Davis, J.; DeHaven, R.A.; Gray, E.; Johnson, R.; Lomax, R.E.; McCloud, B.J.; McGill, J.A.; Morris, C.L.; Novak, J.; Rusnak, B.; Tubb, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Applegate, J.M.; Averett, T.D.; Beck, J.; Ritchie, B.G. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)); Haebel, E. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Kiehlmann, D.; Klein, U.; Peniger, M.; Schaefer, P.; Vogel, H. (Siemens AG, Accelerator and Magnet Technology, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)); Ward, H.; Moore, C.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

    1992-07-15

    The SCRUNCHER is a superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the longitudinal phase space of the secondary pion beam from the low energy pion channel at LAMPF. Test results of the cavity performance and initial results from in-beam tests are presented. (orig.).

  10. A superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the phase space of pion beams at LAMPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; Davis, J.; DeHaven, R. A.; Gray, E.; Johnson, R.; Lomax, R. E.; McCloud, B. J.; McGill, J. A.; Morris, C. L.; Novak, J.; Rusnak, B.; Tubb, G.; Applegate, J. M.; Averett, T. D.; Beck, J.; Ritchie, B. G.; Haebel, E.; Kiehlmann, D.; Klein, U.; Peiniger, M.; Schäfer, P.; Vogel, H.; Ward, H.; Fred Moore, C.

    1992-07-01

    The SCRUNCHER is a superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the longitudinal phase space of the secondary pion beam from the low energy pion channel at LAMPF. Test results of the cavity performance and initial results from in-beam tests are presented.

  11. Monitor: a short-cut approach to remote-handling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, R.A.; Ekberg, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The monitor, constructed from relatively cheap commercial components, is a straightforward, totally remotely operated handling system intended to work on components in the LAMPF external beam line or elsewhere. It can be towed or lifted into position, then hard-wire controlled from a distance by using television. (auth)

  12. Experimental investigations in particle physics at intermediate energies. Progress report, December 1, 1981-November 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, L.B.; Highland, V.L.; McFarlane, W.K.

    1982-08-01

    The analysis of the pion-beta decay experiment is complete, with an improvement in accuracy of a factor of two over previous work. Preparations for the search for bound states in anti pp at CERN using the LEAR facility are well advanced. The proposal to use the Crystal Box at LAMPF for a new pi-zero-to-three-gamma experiment has been approved. Work on the neutrino experiment proposal (No. 638) at LAMPF has continued. We expect to make some contributions to the proposal for LAMPF II in the coming months

  13. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, C. H.; Miller, J.; Cowan, M.; Martinez, M.; Whitcomb, B.

    2003-01-01

    The JASPER Facility utilizes a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state(EOS) experiments on plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and control interfaces and containment. The containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented

  14. Planning Facilities for Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This revised edition includes new material recommended by a panel of experts in the field of recreational planning. The following topics are covered: (1) the planning process; (2) indoor facilities; (3) outdoor facilities; (4) indoor and outdoor swimming pools; (5) encapsulated spaces and stadiums; (6) service areas; (7) recreation and park…

  15. Perceptions of Important Characteristics of Physical Activity Facilities: Implications for Engagement in Walking, Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie M. Heinrich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough few United States adults meet physical activity recommendations, those that do are more likely to access to physical activity facilities. Additionally, vigorous exercisers may be more likely to utilize a nearby physical activity facility, while light-to-moderate exercisers are less likely to do so. However, it is unclear what characteristics of those facilities are most important as well as how those characteristics are related to activity intensity.PurposeThis study examined relationships between self-reported leisure-time physical activities and the use of and perceived characteristics of physical activity facilities.MethodsData were from a cross-sectional study in a major metropolitan area. Participants (N = 582; ages 18–74, mean age = 45 ± 14.7 years were more likely to be female (69.9%, Caucasian (65.6%, married (51.7%, and have some college education (72.8%. Household surveys queried leisure-time physical activity, regular physical activity facility use, and importance ratings for key facility characteristics.ResultsLeisure-time physical activity recommendations were met by 41.0% of participants and 50.9% regularly used a physical activity facility. Regular facility use was positively associated with meeting walking (p = 0.036, moderate (p < 0.001, and vigorous (p < 0.001 recommendations. Vigorous exercisers were more likely to use a gym/fitness center (p = 0.006 and to place higher importance on facility quality (p = 0.022, variety of physical activity options offered (p = 0.003, and availability of special equipment and resources (p = 0.01. The facility characteristics of low or free cost (p = 0.02 and offering childcare (p = 0.028 were barriers for walking, and being where friends and family like to go were barriers for moderate leisure-time physical activity (p = 0.013.ConclusionFindings offer insights for structuring interventions using the social ecological

  16. Review of proposed kaon factory facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A number of proton accelerator facilities, popularly called ''Kaon Factories,'' have been proposed to extend the intensity frontier from about 1 GeV to higher energies in the range of 15 to 45 GeV. Seven proposed facilities - LAMPF II, TRIUMF II, SIN II, AGS II, KEK, MUNICH, and KYOTO - are reviewed with emphasis on capabilities of the experimental facilities. Costs and the choice of energy and current are also discussed. 7 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Evaluation of physical facilities and processing operations of major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    abattoirs were as a result of failure to enforce the use of standard facilities in carrying out abattoir operations and general maintenance ... incinerator, chemical treatment and disposal. Sub- .... Veterinary laboratory .... sustainable food security.

  18. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, C.H.; Braddy, R.W.; Martinez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The JASPER Facility will utilize a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state (EOS) experiments of plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and mission. The primary and secondary containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented. Primary gun diagnostics and timing will also be discussed

  19. The environment and urban adolescents' use of recreational facilities for physical activity: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Amy V; Gittelsohn, Joel; Voorhees, Carolyn C; Roche, Kathleen M; Clifton, Kelly J; Astone, Nan M

    2008-01-01

    Investigate environmental factors influencing the use of recreational facilities for physical activity by urban African-American adolescents. Qualitative in-depth interviews and direct observation. Two public high schools and 24 public recreational facilities in Baltimore, Maryland. Forty-eight African-American adolescents aged 14 to 18 years. Data from 48 in-depth interviews and 26 observations were coded using NVivo software and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Facility use is influenced by characteristics of the physical, social, organizational, and economic environments. Adolescents are attracted to low-cost, well-maintained facilities that offer preferred activities and that are within close proximity to home. Adolescents with limited access to facilities use alternative play spaces, like the streets or vacant lots, where they risk injury from falling or being hit by a car. They are drawn to facilities where they find active adolescents, and they avoid those where young people are engaged in drug or gang activity. Concerns about facility safety largely determine use, particularly for adolescent girls. Previous research points to the importance of increasing facility availability as a means of promoting physical activity, particularly in minority communities in which availability is disproportionately limited. This study shows that, while availability is important, additional facility characteristics should be considered when using environmental change to promote facility use for physical activity.

  20. Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of physical activity facilities by area-level deprivation in Scotland, adjusting for differences in urbanicity, and exploring differences between and within the four largest Scottish cities. Methods We obtained a list of all recreational physical activity facilities in Scotland. These were mapped and assigned to datazones. Poisson and negative binomial regression models were used to investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities relative to population size and quintile of area-level deprivation. Results The results showed that prior to adjustment for urbanicity, the density of all facilities lessened with increasing deprivation from quintiles 2 to 5. After adjustment for urbanicity and local authority, the effect of deprivation remained significant but the pattern altered, with datazones in quintile 3 having the highest estimated mean density of facilities. Within-city associations were identified between the number of physical activity facilities and area-level deprivation in Aberdeen and Dundee, but not in Edinburgh or Glasgow. Conclusions In conclusion, area-level deprivation appears to have a significant association with the density of physical activity facilities and although overall no clear pattern was observed, affluent areas had fewer publicly owned facilities than more deprived areas but a greater number of privately owned facilities.

  1. The relationship between sports facility accessibility and physical activity among Korean adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ah Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of physical activity on physical and mental health are well known. The accessibility of sports facilities is reported to have considerable association with the amount of physical activity a person participates in. Therefore, we investigated the association between subjectively assessed accessibility of sports facilities and physical activity among Korean adults. Methods We obtained data from the 2012 Community Health Survey. Physical activity was measured based on weekly metabolic equivalent task (MET hours according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. Sociodemographic, economic, and health variables were used as covariates in a logistic regression model. Results A total 201,723 participants were included in this study. Participants with easy access to sports facilities participated in physical activity more often than those without easy access (OR = 1.16, 95 % CI 1.13–1.20. More physical activity was generally observed if participants had a history of depression or if participants were among the white-collar or urban subgroups. Conclusion Our results showed that the accessibility of sports facilities is associated with physical activity. Therefore, it is crucial to consider the accessibility of sports facilities when promoting an environment conducive to physical activity or designing programs for enhancing physical activity.

  2. Physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. Safeguards and the role of the IAEA in physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolej, M.

    1999-01-01

    The physical protection and security of nuclear facilities and materials concerns utilities, manufactures, the general public, and those who are responsible for licensing and regulating such facilities. The requirements and process to ensure an acceptable physical protection and security system have been evolutionary in nature. This paper reviews the first step of such process: the State's safeguards system and the international safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), including the relationship between these two safeguards systems. The elements of these systems that are reviewed include the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material, physical protection measures, and containment and surveillance measures. In addition, the interactions between the State, the facility operator, and the IAEA are described. The paper addresses the IAEA safeguards system, including material accountancy and containment and surveillance; the State safeguards system, including material control and accountancy, and physical protection; the role of the IAEA in physical protection; a summary of safeguards system interactions.(author)

  3. Study of neutrino-electron scattering at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Using a beam stop source of ν e from stopped μ + A decay located at the Clinton B. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a measurement of the reaction ν e + e - → ν e +e - was performed. In the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow model of electroweak interactions, the above reaction is mediated both by the exchange of a Z boson (neutral-current) and the exchange of a W boson (charged-current), and is thus sensitive to the interference between these two exchanges. A total of 304 ± 49 ν x e events are identified of which 254 ± 50 are attributed to ν e e elastic scattering. The observed event rate rules out the opposite sign of the interference by 4.6σ and is consistent with the interference predicted by the WSG model. The measured cross-section is σ(ν e e) = |11.8 ± 2.5(stat) ± 1.2(syst)| x 10 -42 cm 2 x E ν (GeV) with a measured Weinberg angle of sin 2 Θ ω = 0.31 ± 0.08 (stat) ±0.03(syst)

  4. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A open-quotes good practiceclose quotes is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations

  5. Overview of spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-01-01

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, π-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible πp resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy

  6. Particle physics experiments 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1988 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. More than forty projects at different accelerators (SPS, ISIS, PETRA, LAMPF, LEP, HERA, BNL, ILL, LEAR) are listed. Different organisations collaborate on different projects. A brief progress report is given. References to published articles are given. (author)

  7. 42 CFR 9.4 - Physical facility policies and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....edu; or view it online at http://oacu.od.nih.gov/regs/guide/guidex.htm. You may inspect a copy at NIH... required to develop disaster and escaped animal contingency plans? The sanctuary facility must prepare disaster and escaped animal contingency plans outlining simple and easy to follow plans for dealing with...

  8. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumberidze, A

    2013-01-01

    The new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is currently under construction in Darmstadt has key features that offer a wide range of exciting new opportunities in the field of atomic physics and related fields. The facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei, in combination with the strong electromagnetic fields generated by high-power lasers, thus allowing to widen atomic physics research into completely new domains. In the current contribution, a short overview of the SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration) research programme at the FAIR facility is given. Furthermore, we present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned SPARC physics programme at the modularized start version of the FAIR facility. (paper)

  9. Intervention to promote physical health in staff within mental health facilities and the impact on patients' physical health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, Annette S; Kilian, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    of an intervention programme for improving physical health in staff working in longtermpsychiatric treatment facilities. Furthermore, the paper measured the association betweenstaff’s changes in physical health and the patients’ changes in physical health. Methods: Thestudy was a cluster randomized controlled 12......-month intervention study, and the interventionwas active awareness on physical health. Results: In the intervention group the staff reducedtheir waist circumference by 2.3 cm (95% CI: 0.3–4.4) when controlling for gender, age andcigarette consumption. In the control group, the staff changed their waist...... blood pressure was seen. Indications that staff acted aspositive role models for the patients’ physical health were seen....

  10. Status of the Tau-Charm Facility and highlights of its physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1990-02-01

    In this paper I will first discuss the history and current status of the Tau-Charm Facility. I will then focus on the unique aspects of the heavy meson and tau physics program of such a facility, which motivates its construction and operation in the mid-1090's

  11. Health physics considerations at a neutron therapy facility cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleck, J.H.; Krueger, D.J.; Mc Laughlin, J.E.; Smathers, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The U.C.L.A. Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) is one of four such facilities in the United States currently involved in NCI sponsored trials of neutron therapy and reflects the present interest in the use of high energy neutron beams for treating certain types of human cancers. The NTF houses a CP-45 negative ion cyclotron which accelerates a 46 MeV proton beam for production of neutrons from a beryllium target. In addition to patient treatment, the NTF is involved in the production of positron emitting radioisotopes for diagnostic use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The activation of therapy treatment collimators, positron and neutron target systems, and a high and rapidly varying external radiation environment in a clinical setting have contributed to the need for a comprehensive radiation control program in which patient care is balanced with the maintenance of occupational exposures to ALARA levels

  12. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T. [and others

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

  13. Direct mass and lifetime measurements of neutron-rich nuclei up to A∼100 using the TOFI spectrometer at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    This project was directed toward the study of neutron-rich nuclei using the experimental facilities at LAMPF, which is a part of LANL. The principal results of the investigation include the discovery of many new isotopes along with a measurement of their masses and in particular those nuclides in the Z = 7--19 and 14 --26 regions of the chart of the nuclides.Thirty-four new nuclides were detected and studied with their masses being measured with relatively high accuracy, and an additional twenty-six that were previously known and measured were remeasured to an improved accuracy. Besides providing new information about the mass surface in new and extended redons of the chart of the nuclides, this investigation enabled properties and previously unknown structure of some of the nuclei to be determined such as nuclear deformation among some of the nuclides. Also a study of the neutron pairing gaps and the proton pairing gaps among these nuclides was made. Other developments also achieved included instrument (TOFI) improvements and upgrades and theoretical investigations into the masses of the hadrons

  14. Development of a high current H- injector for the proton storage ring at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, R.L.; Stevens, R.R.; DeHaven, R.A.; McConnell, J.R.; Chamberlin, E.P.; Kandarian, R.

    1984-01-01

    A new high-current H - injector has been installed at LAMPF for the Proton Storage Ring. The injector is equipped with a multicusp surface-production H - ion source that was developed at LAMPF. The ion source is capable of long-term operation at 20 mA of H - current at 10% duty factor and with normalized beam emittance of 0.08 cm-mrad (95% beam fraction). Details of the development program, the injector design, and initial operating experience are discussed. Included in the discussion is a comparison of intensity and emittance measurements of the same H - beam at 100 keV and 750 keV. 4 references, 6 figures

  15. Antineutrino detector for anti ν oscillation studies at fission weapon tests and at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, H.W.; Loncoski, R.; Mack, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two anti ν oscillation experiments are planned, incorporating large volume (4200 l) liquid scintillation detectors 1) at large distances (450 to 800 m) from fission weapon tests and 2) at 12 to 50 m from LAMPF beam dump where significant anti ν/sub e/ events are detected only if some oscillation operates, such as ν/sub μ/ → ν/sub e/. Design criteria, detector characteristics, and experimental considerations are given

  16. Δt tuneup procedure for the LAMPF 805-MHz linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, K.R.

    1976-05-01

    An important part of tuning the LAMPF accelerator is the adjustment of the phases and amplitudes in the 805-MHz linac. The technique used is called the Δt procedure because of the time-of-flight measurements that are required. The theory behind the Δt procedure, a brief description of the hardware, and a description of the many computer programs that have been written to implement the procedure are presented

  17. Recent operating experience with the H- ion injector at LAMPF/LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingalls, W.B.; Stelzer, J.E.; Williams, H.E. III.

    1996-01-01

    A cusp-field cesium conversion ion source has provided H - beams at LAMPF/LANSCE since 1984. three interchangeable sources are now used during beam production cycles to minimize down time during scheduled source change-outs. Ion source change-outs are scheduled to prevent unscheduled loss of beam time due to finite filament lifetime. Ion source operating parameters and filament lifetime data are presented

  18. Status of physical protection systems of nuclear facilities; survey report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In Koo; Kwack, Eun Ho; Ahn, Jin Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2002-02-01

    This report presents a survey on the physical protection equipment for a nuclear power plant. This survey was conducted by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a part of the project, 'Development of Technologies for National Control of and Accountancy for Nuclear Material,' funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Korea. A physical protection system of a nuclear plant includes outer and inner fences, intrusion detection sensors, alarm generation system, illumination equipment, central monitoring and control station, entry control and management system, etc. The outermost fence indicates the boundary of the plant area and prevents a simple or unintentional intrusion. The inner fence area of each plant unit associated with intrusion detection sensors, illuminators, monitoring cameras, serves the key role for physical protection function for the nuclear plant

  19. Beam tomography or ART in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.

    1978-11-01

    Projections of charged particle beam current density have been used for many years as a measure of beam position and size. The conventional practice of obtaining only two projections, usually in the horizontal and vertical planes, puts a severe limit on the detail that can be recovered from the projections. A third projection provides sufficient improvement to justify the addition of a wire to the conventional wire scanner in certain cases. A group of programs using algebraic reconstruction techniques was written to reconstruct beam current density from beam projections obtained at three or more specific or arbitrary angles around the beam. A generalized program, which makes use of arbitrary 2 x 2 transfer matrices between projections, can be used to reconstruct transverse or longitudinal emittance from appropriate projections. Reconstruction examples of beam current density and transverse and longitudinal emittance using experimental data from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator beam are given

  20. Research in experimental nuclear physics: Progress report, April 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.F.

    1988-11-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel from the University of Texas at Austin at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) during the calendar year 1987 under grant AS05-87ER40343 between The University of Texas at Austin and the United States Department of Energy. The research activities involved experiments done with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS), the Low Energy Pion Channel (LEP), the Pion and Particle Physics Channel (P 3 ), and the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS). A brief overview of work supported by this grant is given. This report contains a list of abstracts of papers reported at scientific meetings, a list of invited papers, and a list of published papers and preprints. These papers summarize experiments undertaken in this grant period and indicate the work accomplished by the participants in this program of medium energy nuclear physics research. Much of the experimental work that has been attempted during the period covered by this report has either been published or submitted for publication. Also included is a list of the recent proposals on which we have participation at LAMPF, and a list of personnel who have participated in this research program

  1. Future directions in intermediate energy heavy ion physics. A proposed expansion of the Holifield Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    A proposal is presented for a major accelerator addition to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. The expanded facility will provide ion beams of mass 1 to 238 amu with a combination of energy, intensity, momentum resolution, and beam quality not currently available at any other facility in North America. The physics motivation for such an addition is discussed, and involves physics dominated by meson-exchange forces, Coulomb-force dominated physics, and possibly a regime where the quark and gluon degrees of freedom are significant. The physics research would include topics in atomic and interdisciplinary areas as well as nuclear physics. Some remarks are made on the merits of Oak Ridge as a site for this facility, placing the proposal in some historical perspective. The accelerator system is then described, giving the required beam properties, and the parameters of the synchrotron ring components, injection, ring magnets, RF systems, vacuum system, and electron cooling system and stochastic cooling system requirements. Also described are such facilities as buildings, beam transport and shielding, and experimental facilities, including target areas. (LEW)

  2. Future directions in intermediate energy heavy ion physics. A proposed expansion of the Holifield Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    A proposal is presented for a major accelerator addition to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. The expanded facility will provide ion beams of mass 1 to 238 amu with a combination of energy, intensity, momentum resolution, and beam quality not currently available at any other facility in North America. The physics motivation for such an addition is discussed, and involves physics dominated by meson-exchange forces, Coulomb-force dominated physics, and possibly a regime where the quark and gluon degrees of freedom are significant. The physics research would include topics in atomic and interdisciplinary areas as well as nuclear physics. Some remarks are made on the merits of Oak Ridge as a site for this facility, placing the proposal in some historical perspective. The accelerator system is then described, giving the required beam properties, and the parameters of the synchrotron ring components, injection, ring magnets, RF systems, vacuum system, and electron cooling system and stochastic cooling system requirements. Also described are such facilities as buildings, beam transport and shielding, and experimental facilities, including target areas

  3. Legal Aspects of international cooperation in the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herron, L.W.

    1981-10-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of developments in the number field having led the IAEA to promote international cooperation in ensuring adequate physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. This work resulted in the establishment of recommendations and guidelines in this respect and culminated in the development of the 1980 Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. (NEA) [fr

  4. Studies in medium energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.; Hoffmann, G.W.; McDonough, J.; Purcell, M.J.; Ray, R.L.; Read, D.E.; Worn, S.D.

    1991-12-01

    This document constitutes the (1991--1992) technical progress report and continuation proposal for the ongoing medium energy nuclear physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant DE-FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics; (2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind ''exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics

  5. Database design for Physical Access Control System for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathishkumar, T., E-mail: satishkumart@igcar.gov.in; Rao, G. Prabhakara, E-mail: prg@igcar.gov.in; Arumugam, P., E-mail: aarmu@igcar.gov.in

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Database design needs to be optimized and highly efficient for real time operation. • It requires a many-to-many mapping between Employee table and Doors table. • This mapping typically contain thousands of records and redundant data. • Proposed novel database design reduces the redundancy and provides abstraction. • This design is incorporated with the access control system developed in-house. - Abstract: A (Radio Frequency IDentification) RFID cum Biometric based two level Access Control System (ACS) was designed and developed for providing access to vital areas of nuclear facilities. The system has got both hardware [Access controller] and software components [server application, the database and the web client software]. The database design proposed, enables grouping of the employees based on the hierarchy of the organization and the grouping of the doors based on Access Zones (AZ). This design also illustrates the mapping between the Employee Groups (EG) and AZ. By following this approach in database design, a higher level view can be presented to the system administrator abstracting the inner details of the individual entities and doors. This paper describes the novel approach carried out in designing the database of the ACS.

  6. Database design for Physical Access Control System for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathishkumar, T.; Rao, G. Prabhakara; Arumugam, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Database design needs to be optimized and highly efficient for real time operation. • It requires a many-to-many mapping between Employee table and Doors table. • This mapping typically contain thousands of records and redundant data. • Proposed novel database design reduces the redundancy and provides abstraction. • This design is incorporated with the access control system developed in-house. - Abstract: A (Radio Frequency IDentification) RFID cum Biometric based two level Access Control System (ACS) was designed and developed for providing access to vital areas of nuclear facilities. The system has got both hardware [Access controller] and software components [server application, the database and the web client software]. The database design proposed, enables grouping of the employees based on the hierarchy of the organization and the grouping of the doors based on Access Zones (AZ). This design also illustrates the mapping between the Employee Groups (EG) and AZ. By following this approach in database design, a higher level view can be presented to the system administrator abstracting the inner details of the individual entities and doors. This paper describes the novel approach carried out in designing the database of the ACS.

  7. The ISAC RIB Facility and physics programme at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmor, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    ISAC (Isotope Separator and Accelerator) at TRIUMF uses the ISOL (On Line Isotope Separator) technique with up to 100 μA of 500 MeV protons from the TRIUMF cyclotron driver to produce exotic isotopes in a thick target. The exotic nuclei are ionized, formed into beams, mass separated and transported at energies up to 60 keY to various experimental stations. Singly charged isotopes with nuclear masses below 31 can be further accelerated in ISAC I up to 1.8 MeV/u for Nuclear Astrophysics studies by a series of linear accelerators consisting of a RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) and DTL (Drift Tube Linace). Super conducting RF cavities are presently being added to the Iinac chain to permit a further increase in the maximum energy of the exotic beams to 6.5 MeV/u and an ECR-based charge state booster is being added in front of the RFQ to increase the available mass range of the accelerated isotopes from 30 to about added in front of the RFQ to increase the available mass range of the accelerated isotopes from 30 to about 150. This talk will describe the status of the facility and its experimental programme. (author)

  8. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, February 1--April 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, E. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    A quarterly report on the medium-energy physics program at LAMPF is given. Topics covered include: (1) engineering support; (2) accelerator support; (3) accelerator systems development; (4) injector systems; (5) electronic instrumentation and computer systems; (6) accelerator operations; (7) experimental areas; (8) beam line development; (9) large-spectrometer systems; (10) research; (11) nuclear chemistry; (12) practical applications of LAMPF; and (13) management. (PMA)

  9. Adolescents' physical activity: competition between perceived neighborhood sport facilities and home media resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Bonny Yee-Man; Cerin, Ester; Ho, Sai-Yin; Mak, Kwok-Kei; Lo, Wing-Sze; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2010-04-01

    To examine the independent, competing, and interactive effects of perceived availability of specific types of media in the home and neighborhood sport facilities on adolescents' leisure-time physical activity (PA). Survey data from 34 369 students in 42 Hong Kong secondary schools were collected (2006-07). Respondents reported moderate-to-vigorous leisure-time PA, presence of sport facilities in the neighborhood and of media equipment in the home. Being sufficiently physically active was defined as engaging in at least 30 minutes of non-school leisure-time PA on a daily basis. Logistic regression and post-estimation linear combinations of regression coefficients were used to examine the independent and competing effects of sport facilities and media equipment on leisure-time PA. Perceived availability of sport facilities was positively (OR(boys) = 1.17; OR(girls) = 1.26), and that of computer/Internet negatively (OR(boys) = 0.48; OR(girls) = 0.41), associated with being sufficiently active. A significant positive association between video game console and being sufficiently active was found in girls (OR(girls) = 1.19) but not in boys. Compared with adolescents without sport facilities and media equipment, those who reported sport facilities only were more likely to be physically active (OR(boys) = 1.26; OR(girls) = 1.34), while those who additionally reported computer/Internet were less likely to be physically active (OR(boys) = 0.60; OR(girls) = 0.54). Perceived availability of sport facilities in the neighborhood may positively impact on adolescents' level of physical activity. However, having computer/Internet may cancel out the effects of active opportunities in the neighborhood. This suggests that physical activity programs for adolescents need to consider limiting the access to computer-mediated communication as an important intervention component.

  10. The experimental program at the WNR neutron source at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    There are two white neutron sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory which are used in broad scientific program over the energy range from thermal to about seven hundred MeV. Largely because of the increased intensity over such an unprecedented energy range, use of these two facilities for nuclear science research has grown from 36 experimenters in 1987 to 118 in 1990. This paper focuses on research underway or recently completed at the high-energy neutron source of the WNR facility. 18 refs., 6 figs

  11. Progress in hohlraum physics for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. D., E-mail: moody4@llnl.gov; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Amendt, P. A.; Baker, K. L.; Bradley, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D.; Hopkins, L. B.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kilkenny, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Advances in hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were made this past year in hohlraum efficiency, dynamic shape control, and hot electron and x-ray preheat control. Recent experiments are exploring hohlraum behavior over a large landscape of parameters by changing the hohlraum shape, gas-fill, and laser pulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling, which uses measured backscatter, shows that gas-filled hohlraums utilize between 60% and 75% of the laser power to match the measured bang-time, whereas near-vacuum hohlraums utilize 98%. Experiments seem to be pointing to deficiencies in the hohlraum (instead of capsule) modeling to explain most of the inefficiency in gas-filled targets. Experiments have begun quantifying the Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) rate at several points in time for hohlraum experiments that utilize CBET for implosion symmetry. These measurements will allow better control of the dynamic implosion symmetry for these targets. New techniques are being developed to measure the hot electron energy and energy spectra generated at both early and late time. Rugby hohlraums offer a target which requires little to no CBET and may be less vulnerable to undesirable dynamic symmetry “swings.” A method for detecting the effect of the energetic electrons on the fuel offers a direct measure of the hot electron effects as well as a means to test energetic electron mitigation methods. At higher hohlraum radiation temperatures (including near vacuum hohlraums), the increased hard x-rays (1.8–4 keV) may pose an x-ray preheat problem. Future experiments will explore controlling these x-rays with advanced wall materials.

  12. Physical startup of the first stage of the IREN facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.V.; Boettcher, Yu.; Bulycheva, Yu.K.

    2010-01-01

    It is reported on the startup of the first stage of the Intense REsonance Neutron source installation (IREN) at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The general scheme and current status of the electron linear accelerator with accelerating structure on an S-band traveling wave (f = 2856 MHz) are presented. Results of adjustment of the basic functional systems of the linac and the measured parameters of the beam (pulse current of the beam 1.5 A, electron energy 30 MeV; duration of a pulse current 100 ns; rep. rate 25 Hz) are reported. The integral neutron yield from a nonmultiplying target reaches (3-5)·10 10 s -1

  13. methodological and technical aspects to be considered in the location of physical recreational sports facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús I. Benítez Llanes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes we wonder. Why practitioners of recreational physical activities do not make systematic use of a particular sports facility ?, Why some sports facility remains almost always empty? Why it is continued unnecessarily reversed large sums of material resources for maintenance? For the simple reason that sports facilities were from the beginning that were not well conceived and designed architecturally, where among other things, not sporting habits and population size of the place properly examined. Similarly, we have witnessed criteria issued regarding the performance of a specific sports field, far from contributing to the extension and improvement of the practice of recreational physical and sports activities in its various manifestations, its null or poor continuous maintenance contributing negatively to limit the sporting life and lacerate mental and physical welfare of the inhabitants of the environment. Justifications that led the author of this research to the development of methodological technical aspects regarding the location of recreational physical sports infrastructure, content which also form part of the subject and / or curricular unit "Spaces and Sports Facilities" currently teaches future professionals and managers of Physical Culture for the last two academic years at the University of the Sciences of Physical Culture and Sport Nancy Uranga Romagoza in Pinar del Río Cuba and the Iberoamerican University of Sport in Venezuela.

  14. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-01-01

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers

  15. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  16. Accelerator facilities and development of physics in Kazakhstan (1992-2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkol'nik, V.S.; Arzumanov, A.A.; Borisenko, A.N.; Gorlachev, I.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Kuterbekov, K.A.; Lysukhin, S.N.; Tuleushev, A.Zh.

    2003-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the use both the isochronous cyclotron U-150M and the accelerator of the heavy ions UKP-2-1, which are the base facilitates of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan (INP NNC RK) for scientific researches in the field of nuclear physics of low and middle energies, radiation solid state physics and applied nuclear physics. The history of creation of facilities, some archival documents are given The use of the accelerators of INP NNC RK for the last ten years (1992-2002) is described in detail. The parameters of facilities, photos of the main functional units of the accelerators as well as nuclear and physical methods realized on these basic facilities have been presented. The appendixes present copies of some important historical documents as well as the following materials: a list of on accelerator themes, a list of dissertation works, a list of publications of the Nuclear Physics Department within the period of 1972-2002 and the Solid State Department within the period of 1995-2002 carried out using the accelerators of INP NNC RK. The book is intended for scientists studying actual problems of nuclear physics of low and middle energies, radiation solid state physics as well as students specializing in this field (author)

  17. Correlates of distances traveled to use recreational facilities for physical activity behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulsara Max

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information regarding how far people are willing to travel to use destinations for different types of recreational physical activity behaviors is limited. This study examines the demographic characteristics, neighborhood opportunity and specific-physical activity behaviors associated with distances traveled to destinations used for recreational physical activity. Methods A secondary analysis was undertaken of data (n = 1006 from a survey of Western Australian adults. Road network distances between respondents' homes and 1 formal recreational facilities; 2 beaches and rivers; and 3 parks and ovals used for physical activity were determined. Associations between distances to destinations and demographic characteristics, neighborhood opportunity (number of destinations within 1600 meters of household, and physical activity behaviors were examined. Results Overall, 56.3% of respondents had used a formal recreational facility, 39.9% a beach or river, and 38.7% a park or oval. The mean distance traveled to all destinations used for physical activity was 5463 ± 5232 meters (m. Distances traveled to formal recreational facilities, beaches and rivers, and parks and ovals differed depending on the physical activity undertaken. Younger adults traveled further than older adults (7311.8 vs. 6012.6 m, p = 0.03 to use beaches and rivers as did residents of socio-economically disadvantaged areas compared with those in advantaged areas (8118.0 vs. 7311.8 m, p = 0.02. Club members traveled further than non-members to use parks and ovals (4156.3 vs. 3351.6 meters, p = 0.02. The type of physical activity undertaken at a destination and number of neighborhood opportunities were also associated with distance traveled for all destination types. Conclusion The distances adults travel to a recreational facility depends on the demographic characteristics, destination type, physical activity behavior undertaken at that destination, and number of

  18. Licensing of spent fuel storage facility including its physical protection in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajman, V.; Sedlacek, J.

    1992-01-01

    The current spent fuel management policies as practised in the Czech Republic are described, and the conception of the fuel cycle back end is outlined. The general principles and the legislative framework are explained of the licensing process concerning spent fuel interim storage facilities, including the environmental impact assessment component. The history is outlined of the licensing process for the spent fuel storage facility at the Dukovany NPP site, including the licensing of the transport and storage cask. The basic requirements placed on the physical safeguarding of the facility and on the licensing process are given. (J.B.). 13 refs

  19. Health physics and quality control management of a cyclotron-based PET facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerabek, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the operation and management of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) facility at the University of Texas. The facility components are discussed from an operations perspective with an emphasis on devices, and on practices and procedures which are implemented to ensure that personnel exposures are as low as reasonably achievable. The cyclotron-based PET facility uses in-house production of PET radioisotopes for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. A combination of specially designed cyclotron equipped devices, radiopharmaceutical preparation devices, and shielded devices along with health physics practices have helped to make PET operations become routine

  20. Health physics experience with nondestructive X-radiation facilities in the US Air Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.; Piltingsrud, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation safety experience in the construction and use of enclosed nondestructive inspection (NDI) facilities in the US Air Force, has reaffirmed the constant need for the health physicist to continually monitor and assit in upgrading these facilities. Health physics contributions include evaluation of initial shielding requirements, proper selection of construction material, insuring that adequate safety devices are installed and adequate personnel dosimetry devices are available, surveying the facility, and assisting in the safety education program. There is a need to better define NDI warning/safety devices, using the National Bureau of Standards, (NBS) Handbook 107 as the most applicable guide

  1. Strengthened implementation of physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, H.-W.; Lee, J.-U.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Since the 9.11 terror, strengthening physical protection has been an accelerated trend internationally. IAEA has been requesting that member states implement a strengthened physical protection of nuclear facilities on the basis of threat assessments. In order to cope with this demand, the Korean government promulgated the 'Law for Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency Preparedness (LPPRE)' as a substantial countermeasure against possible threats. Pursuant to LPPRE, which entered into force on February 16, 2004, nuclear enterprisers are obliged to implement an effective physical protection of nuclear materials, get approval for its physical protection system, and be constantly inspected on. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) approved physical protection regulations of 24 domestic facilities operated by 14 enterprisers. National Nuclear management and Control Agency (NNCA) is entrusted with physical protection related duty and has been conducting physical protection inspection on nuclear materials in use, storage and transport. In addition, NNCA has established the methodology of threat assessment that entails organizing the threat assessment working group to develop a design basis threat (DBT). Korea is putting its best efforts to construct the threat assessment system and strengthen domestic physical protection regime in cooperation with competent authorities. (author)

  2. Use of the project management methodology to establish physical protection system at nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramotkin, F.; Kuzmyak, I.; Kravtsov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility of using the project management methodology developed by the Project Management Institute (USA) in nuclear security in terms of modernization or development of physical protection system at nuclear facility. It was demonstrated that this methodology allows competent and flexible management of the projects on physical protection, ensuring effective control of their timely implementation in compliance with the planned budget and quality

  3. 0.8-GeV/c kaon channel for LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobb, D.E.

    1986-07-01

    The design for a 0.8-GeV/c charged-kaon channel suitable for LAMPF II features a two-dipole extraction system in the primary proton-beam line, a section to define the phase-space acceptance of the channel, a separator section before a mass slit, and a quadrupole triplet to transmit the kaon beam to an experimental target. A novel feature of this channel is a shaped slit to remove the tail of the pion-beam spot that would be adjacent to the kaon-beam spot at the mass slit

  4. [A high sensitivity search for mu gamma: The mega experiment at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    During the past 12 month period the Valparaiso University group has been active on LAMPF experiment 969, known as the MEGA experiment. This experiment is a search for the decay μ -> e γ, a decay which would violate lepton number conservation and which is strictly forbidden by the standard model for electroweak interactions. Previous searches for this decay mode have set limit the present day limit of 4.9 x 10 -11 . The MEGA experiment is designed to test the standard model predictions to one part in 10 +13

  5. Track reconstruction of normal muon decays in the LAMPF TPC: one working scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A working scheme for track reconstruction of normal muon decays in the LAMPF TPC is here outlined. Muon tracks stopping in the TPC and helical electron tracks from muon decay are both identified and fitted for complete event reconstruction. Because of certain geometrical characteristics of the TPC, novel techniques are deployed to find the tracks. Normal road tracing methods do not work reliably; they are replaced by, among other things, a random search technique that locates the helix's planar projection and a carefully worked-out method for correctly putting each coordinate on its proper turn in the helix

  6. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  7. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  8. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Chihiro; Fujine, Shigenori; Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1986-01-01

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Microscope-Based Fluid Physics Experiments in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.; Malarik, Diane C.

    2000-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program is planning to conduct a large number of experiments on the International Space Station in both the Fluid Physics and Combustion Science disciplines, and is developing flight experiment hardware for use within the International Space Station's Fluids and Combustion Facility. Four fluids physics experiments that require an optical microscope will be sequentially conducted within a subrack payload to the Fluids Integrated Rack of the Fluids and Combustion Facility called the Light Microscopy Module, which will provide the containment, changeout, and diagnostic capabilities to perform the experiments. The Light Microscopy Module is planned as a fully remotely controllable on-orbit microscope facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of experiments within International Space Station resources. This paper will focus on the four microscope-based experiments, specifically, their objectives and the sample cell and instrument hardware to accommodate their requirements.

  10. Analysis of impact of noncompliance with physical-security requirements at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.N.

    1982-03-01

    Inspectors are required to analyze the impact of instances of noncompliance with physical security requirements at licensed nuclear facilities. A scoring procedure for components and a method for evaluating the effectiveness of the subsystems involved are proposed to reinforce an inspector's judgment about the remaining level of safeguards

  11. Evaluating physical protection systems of licensed nuclear facilities using systems engineered inspection guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.T.; Olson, A.W.; Rogue, F.; Scala, S.; Richard, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) have applied a systems engineering approach to provide the NRC Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE) with improved methods and guidance for evaluating the physical protection systems of licensed nuclear facilities

  12. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  13. Evaluation of effectiveness of physical protection systems at nuclear facilities in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefulova, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper contains a short presentation of the state supervision in approach to the evaluation of physical protection systems at the nuclear facilities as one kind of measure used to prevent combat illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials in the Slovak Republic. (author)

  14. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material

  15. Physical Facilities for Holistic Education: Lessons from Secondary Schools in Kiambu and Samburu Counties, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndirangu, Waweru Peter; Thinguri, Ruth; Chui, Mary Mugwe

    2016-01-01

    This paper is premised on the background that the majority of researchers and educationists who have contributed to the discourse on education for sustainability seem to be in agreement that management of physical facilities are critical ingredients in achieving holistic and sustainable education. The study examined the application of physical…

  16. An e-p facility for Europe. Weak interactions in e-p physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlay, R.

    1979-01-01

    We first present the recent development on an e-p collider in Europe occuring in the last year. Then a review of physics motivations for an e-p ring is discussed and developed with the latest work presented at the meeting on 'Study for an e-p Facility for Europe' held at Hamburg on April 2-3, 1979

  17. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandyopadhyay, A.; Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Bouchez, J.; Antoniadis, I.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G. F.; Schwetz, T.; Umasankar, S.; Karagiorgi, G.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Pascoli, S.; Geer, S.; Campagne, J. E.; Rolinec, M.; Blondel, A.; Campanelli, M.; Kopp, J.; Lindner, M.; Peltoniemi, J.; Dornan, P. J.; Long, K.; Matsushita, T.; Rogers, C.; Uchida, Y.; Dracos, M.; Whisnant, K.; Casper, D.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B.; Aysto, J.; Marfatia, D.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Jungmann, K.; Lesgourgues, J.; Zisman, M.; Tortola, M. A.; Friedland, A.; Davidson, S.; Antusch, S.; Biggio, C.; Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Gavela, B.; Maltoni, M.

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and

  18. Overview of new, upgraded, or proposed high energy physics facilities in the United States and Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews six new, proposed, or upgraded accelerator facilities in the United States and Canada. All of the accelerators that are presented here in one form or fashion challenge the validity of the Standard Model of high energy physics which ''currently explains'' all experimentally know phenomena. These facilities include the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia, the Kaon Factory at TRIUMF in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, the Asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in Palo Alto, California, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, the injector upgrade project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois, and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in Waxachachie, Texas

  19. Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. A simulated test of physical starting and reactor physics on zero power facility of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zewu; Ji Huaxiang; Chen Zhicheng; Yao Zhiquan; Chen Chen; Li Yuwen

    1995-01-01

    The core neutron economics has been verified through experiments conducted at a zero power reactor with baffles of various thickness. A simulated test of physical starting of Qinshan PWR has been introduced. The feasibility and safety of the programme are verified. The research provides a valuable foundation for developing physical starting programme

  1. τ physics using the TPC/2γ facility at HiLum PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Plans for a TPC/2γ facility program using HiLum PEP for τ physics are presented. The detector and its performance are described in some detail. The possibilities for a τ physics program with an integrated luminosity of 1 fb -1 are discussed. The physics issues are reviewed, particularly the τ'1-prong' problem, and preliminary results on τ → ν τ K +- X + X - + ≥ 0 Neutrals are shown. The performance of HiLum PEP is also presented, and expectations for the future are discussed. (R.P.) 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This contract supports broadly based experimental work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The program includes pion- nucleon studies at TRIUMF and LAMPF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF. The first results of spin-transfer observables in the isovector (rvec p,rvec n) reaction are included in this report. Our data confirm the tentative result from (rvec p,rvec p) reactions that the nuclear isovector spin response shows neither longitudinal enhancement nor transverse quenching. Our program in quasifree scattering of high energy pions shows solid evidence of isoscalar enhancement of the nuclear nonspin response. We include several comparisons of the quasifree scattering of different probes. Results from our efforts in the design of accelerator RF cavities are also included in this report

  3. A Road map for Establishing the Physical Protection Regime of Nuclear Materials and Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Ho-Sik; Kwak, Sung-Woo; Jang, Sung-Soon; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Jung-Soo; Yoon, Wan-Ki

    2007-01-01

    The importance of physical protection for nuclear materials and facilities that can be an objective for terrorists has never been more stressed. The responsibility for physical protection within a State does not rest entirely with that state because cross-border transactions related to nuclear materials increase as nuclear related industries expand. The international community has prepared measures to strengthen the regime of physical protection such as the IAEA's proposal of the 'Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009' and UN's resolution on 'the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism'. In order to cope with this, Korea has also made efforts to establish the implementation system for physical protection in the field of nuclear industries since the law for Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facility and Radiological Emergency Preparedness (LPPREP) was promulgated in 2004. The detailed plans should be prepared to accomplish this. This study has been performed to derive the items for establishing the regime of physical protection. The items derived were classified as short, mid and long-term depending on their characteristics and environmental circumstances. The regime of national physical protection will be established if the studies on these items are carried out successfully and tangible results are obtained

  4. Spatial accessibility to physical activity facilities and to food outlets and overweight in French youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, R; Chaix, B; Weber, C; Schweitzer, B; Charreire, H; Salze, P; Badariotti, D; Banos, A; Oppert, J-M; Simon, C

    2012-07-01

    Some characteristics of the built environment have been associated with obesity in youth. Our aim was to determine whether individual and environmental socio-economic characteristics modulate the relation between youth overweight and spatial accessibility to physical activity (PA) facilities and to food outlets. Cross-sectional study. 3293 students, aged 12 ± 0.6 years, randomly selected from eastern France middle schools. Using geographical information systems (GIS), spatial accessibility to PA facilities (urban and nature) was assessed using the distance to PA facilities at the municipality level; spatial accessibility to food outlets (general food outlets, bakeries and fast-food outlets) was calculated at individual level using the student home address and the food outlets addresses. Relations of weight status with spatial accessibility to PA facilities and to food outlets were analysed using mixed logistic models, testing potential direct and interaction effects of individual and environmental socio-economic characteristics. Individual socio-economic status modulated the relation between spatial accessibility to PA facilities and to general food outlets and overweight. The likelihood of being overweight was higher when spatial accessibility to urban PA facilities and to general food outlets was low, but in children of blue-collar-workers only. The odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) for being overweight of blue-collar-workers children compared with non-blue-collar-workers children was 1.76 (1.25-2.49) when spatial accessibility to urban PA facilities was low. This OR was 1.86 (1.20-2.86) when spatial accessibility to general food outlets was low. There was no significant relationship of overweight with either nature PA facilities or other food outlets (bakeries and fast-food outlets). These results indicate that disparities in spatial accessibility to PA facilities and to general food outlets may amplify the risk of overweight in socio

  5. Prototype high current, high duty factor negative hydrogen ion source for LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, G.P.; Hayward, T.D.; Jackson, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Present plans for the high current proton storage ring at LAMPF incorporate charge changing (stripping) injection of H - ions in all modes of operation. Achievable stored current levels in this device will be strongly dependent on the maximum H - beam intensity which can be accelerated by the linac, consistent with acceptable beam spill. This requirement has stimulated a program to develop an H - ion source capable of providing a suitably high peak current (up to 25 mA) at high duty factor (up to 12 percent), with a normalized x,x' or y,y' emittance acceptable to the accelerating system. There are presently two main approaches which could lead to H - ion sources providing this kind of performance. These are (a) the charge exchange method, in which an intense proton beam is fractionally converted to H - beam in a suitable charge adding medium, and (b) the direct extraction method, in which H - ions are obtained by a surface emission process associated with a gas discharge plasma. While both approaches may eventually find optimum application in different situations, it is not obvious, at present, which scheme will turn out to be the most satisfactory for LAMPF. A prototype charge exchange H - ion source has been constructed as a first step in the development program and is presently being evaluated. Work on surface emission direct extraction techniques is in the planning stages. (U.S.)

  6. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  7. Summary of informal meeting on ''facilities for atomic physics research with highly ionized atoms''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocke, C.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984. The meeting was motivated by the realization that the status of facilities for studies of highly ionized atoms is unsettled and that it might be desirable to take action to ensure adequate resources for research over the whole range of charge states and energies of interest. It was assumed that the science to be done with these beams has been amply documented in the literature

  8. Physics design of fast reactor safety test facilities for in-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Shaftman, D.H.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lam, S.K.; Pennington, E.M.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    A determined effort to identify and resolve current Fast Breeder Reactor safety testing needs has recently resulted in a number of conceptual designs for FBR safety test facilities which are very complex and diverse both in their features and in their purpose. The paper discusses the physics foundations common to most fast reactor safety test facilities and the constraints which they impose on the design. The logical evolution, features, and capabilities of several major conceptual designs are discussed on the basis of this common background

  9. Discussion of the use of the Dragon reactor as a facility for integral reactor physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmann, H

    1972-06-05

    The purpose and use of the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE) has changed considerably during the years of its operation. The original purpose was to show that the principle of a High Temperature Reactor is sound and demonstrate its operation. After this achievement, the purpose of the Dragon reactor changed to the use as a fuel testing facility. During recent years, a new use of the DRE has been added to its use as a fuel testing facility, namely Fuel Element Design Testing. The current report covers reactor physics experiments aspects.

  10. Perspectives for photonuclear research at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D.L.; Constantin, P.; Gales, S.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C.A.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Anzalone, A.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Belyshev, S.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Camera, F. [Departement of Physics, University of Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN section of Milano, Milano (Italy); Csige, L.; Krasznahorkay, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki), Institute of Nuclear Research, Post Office Box 51, Debrecen (Hungary); Cuong, P.V. [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw, Warszawa (Poland); Derya, V.; Zilges, A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne (Germany); Gai, M. [University of Connecticut, LNS at Avery Point, Connecticut, Groton (United States); Gheorghe, I. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ishkhanov, B.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A.A.; Orlin, V.N.; Stopani, K.A.; Varlamov, V.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Sin, M. [University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Utsunomiya, H. [Konan University, Department of Physics, Kobe (Japan); University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Saitama (Japan); Weller, H.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, North Carolina, Durham (United States); Duke University, Department of Physics, North Carolina, Durham (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The perspectives for photonuclear experiments at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the need to accumulate novel and more precise nuclear data. The parameters of the ELI-NP gamma beam system are presented. The emerging experimental program, which will be realized at ELI-NP, is presented. Examples of day-one experiments with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, photonuclear reaction measurements, photofission experiments and studies of nuclear collective excitation modes and competition between various decay channels are discussed. The advantages which ELI-NP provides for all these experiments compared to the existing facilities are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  12. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehlker, Th.; Beier, T.; Beyer, H.F.; Bosch, F.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kuehl, Th.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.; Quint, W.; Schuch, R.; Warczak, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the current report a short overview about the envisioned program of the atomic physics research collaboration SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic Research Collaboration, at the new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI is given. In addition, a condensed description of the planned experimental areas devoted to atomic physics research at the new facility is presented

  13. Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (Implementation of INFCIRC/225/Revision 5). Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This publication is the lead Implementing Guide in a suite of guidance on implementing the Nuclear Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5), IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 13. It provides guidance and suggestions to assist States and their competent authorities in establishing, strengthening and sustaining their national physical protection regime and implementing the associated systems and measures, including operators’ physical protection systems. The structure of this publication is as follows. After this introduction, Section 2 describes the objectives of physical protection and the overall approach to managing the risks of the unauthorized removal of nuclear material and the sabotage of nuclear facilities. Section 3 provides guidance for the State and its competent authorities on the physical protection elements of the nuclear security regime; this guidance is based on the fundamental principles set out in the Recommendations publication. Section 4 provides guidance on the operator’s physical protection system and describes a systematic, integrated approach. Appendix I gives an annotated outline of the typical contents of an operator’s security plan. Appendix II provides similar guidance for the contingency plan. Appendix III provides a description of nuclear material aggregation that can be used to categorize nuclear material and determine the appropriate level of protection against unauthorized removal. Appendix IV presents a table of paragraph cross-references between the Recommendations publication and this Implementing Guide.

  14. Demountable toroidal fusion core facility for physics optimization and fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Krall, N.A.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Weggel, C.F.; Lund, K.O.; Sedehi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Following a successful compact ignition tokamak (CIT) experiment, a fusion facility will be required for physics optimization (POF) and fusion engineering research (FERF). The POF will address issues such as high-beta operation, current drive, impurity control, and will test geometric and configurational variations such as the spherical torus or the reversed-field pinch (RFP). The FERF will be designed to accumulate rapidly a large neutron dose in prototypical fusion subsystems exposed to radiation. Both facilities will require low-cost replacement cores and rapid replacement times. The Demountable Toroidal Fusion Core (DTFC) facility is designed to fulfill these requirements. It would be a cost-effective stepping stone between the CIT and a demonstration fusion reactor

  15. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design

  16. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  17. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiser, Prisca; Becker, Thomas; Losert, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a) stakeholder analysis, (b) international literature reviews, (c) Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d) focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities.Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network...... by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. METHODS AND DESIGN: HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii) identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet...... consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well...

  18. Identification of potential recovery facilities for designing a reverse supply chain network using physical programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochampally, Kishore K.; Gupta, Surendra M.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.

    2004-02-01

    Although there are many quantitative models in the literature to design a reverse supply chain, every model assumes that all the recovery facilities that are engaged in the supply chain have enough potential to efficiently re-process the incoming used products. Motivated by the risk of re-processing used products in facilities of insufficient potentiality, this paper proposes a method to identify potential facilities in a set of candidate recovery facilities operating in a region where a reverse supply chain is to be established. In this paper, the problem is solved using a newly developed method called physical programming. The most significant advantage of using physical programming is that it allows a decision maker to express his preferences for values of criteria (for comparing the alternatives), not in the traditional form of weights but in terms of ranges of different degrees of desirability, such as ideal range, desirable range, highly desirable range, undesirable range, and unacceptable range. A numerical example is considered to illustrate the proposed method.

  19. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: status report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumberidze, A; Stöhlker, Th; Litvinov, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, a brief overview of the Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration scientific program at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is given. The program comprises a very broad range of research topics addressing atomic structure and dynamics in hitherto unexplored regimes, light–matter interactions, lepton pair production phenomena, precision tests of quantum electrodynamics and standard model in the regime of extreme fields and many more. We also present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned physics program within the modularized start version (MSV) of FAIR. (paper)

  20. An alternative format for Category I fuel cycle facility physical protection plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    This document provides an alternative format for physical protection plans designed to meet the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Sections 73.20, 73.45, and 73.46. These requirements apply to licensees who operate Category I fuel cycle facilities. Such licensees are authorized to use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material. The format described is an alternative to that found under Regulatory Guide 5.52, Rev. 2 ''Standard Format and Content of a Licensee Physical Protection Plan for Strategic Special Nuclear Material at Fixed Sites (Other than Nuclear Power Plants).''

  1. Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility high-resolution-spectrometer dipole magnets: a summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.; Madland, D.G.; Rolfe, R.; Smith, W.E.; Spencer, J.E.; Tanaka, N.; Thiessen, H.A.; Varghese, P.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1982-12-01

    This report explains the design, fabrication, measurement, optimization, and installation of two 122 metric ton electromagnets for the High Resolution Proton Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. These two magnets are the principal components of the proton spectrometer, which has an energy resolution of less than or equal to 10 - 4 FWHM. Many technical problems occurred during fabrication, measurement, and optimization, and the majority have been successfully solved. We hope that this report will help others planning similar projects

  2. Simulated physical inventory verification exercise at a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, D.; Augustson, R.

    1985-01-01

    A physical inventory verification (PIV) was simulated at a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility. Safeguards inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducted the PIV exercise to test inspection procedures under ''realistic but relaxed'' conditions. Nondestructive assay instrumentation was used to verify the plutonium content of samples covering the range of material types from input powders to final fuel assemblies. This paper describes the activities included in the exercise and discusses the results obtained. 5 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  3. Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories Reactor Physics Mk. III Experimental Programme. Description of facility and programme for 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, R M; Waterson, R H; Young, J D

    1971-01-15

    Reactor physics experiments have been carried out at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories during the past few years in support of the Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (Mk. II) the Generating Board is building. These experiments are part of an overall programme whose objective is to assess the accuracy of the calculational methods used in the design and operation of these reactors. This report provides a description of the facility for the Mk. III experimental programme and the planned programme for 1971.

  4. Validation of secondary commercial data sources for physical activity facilities in urban and nonurban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Euna; Powell, Lisa; Slater, Sandy; Quinn, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    Secondary data are often necessary to assess the availability of commercial physical activity (PA) facilities and examine its association with individual behaviors and outcomes, yet the validity of such sources has been explored only in a limited number of studies. Field data were collected on the presence and attributes of commercial PA facilities in a random sample of 30 urban, 15 suburban, and 15 rural Census tracts in the Chicago metropolitan statistical area and surrounding area. Approximately 40% of PA establishments in the field data were listed for both urban and nonurban tracts in both lists except for nonurban tracts in D&B (35%), which was significantly improved in the combined list of D&B and InfoUSA. Approximately one-quarter of the PA facilities listed in D&B were found on the ground, whereas 40% to 50% of PA facilities listed in InfoUSA were found on the ground. PA establishments that offered instruction programs or lessons or that had a court or pool were less likely to be listed, particularly in the nonurban tracts. Secondary commercial business lists on PA facilities should be used with caution in assessing the built environment.

  5. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  6. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Choubey, S; Gandhi, R; Goswami, S; Roberts, B L; Bouchez, J; Antoniadis, I; Ellis, J; Giudice, G F; Schwetz, T; Umasankar, S; Karagiorgi, G; Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H; Pascoli, S; Geer, S; Campagne, J E; Rolinec, M; Blondel, A

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Super-beams, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome, 21-26 June 2005) and NuFact06 (Ivine, CA, 24-30 August 2006). The physics case for an extensive experimental programme to understand the properties of the neutrino is presented and the role of high-precision measurements of neutrino oscillations within this programme is discussed in detail. The performance of second-generation super-beam experiments, beta-beam facilities and the Neutrino Factory are evaluated and a quantitative comparison of the discovery potential of the three classes of facility is presented. High-precision studies of the properties of the muon are complementary to the study of neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory has the potential to provide extremely intense muon beams and the physics potential of such beams is discussed in the final section of the report.

  7. Naturally occurring workplace facilities to increase the leisure time physical activity of workers: A propensity-score weighted population study

    OpenAIRE

    Aviroop Biswas; Peter M. Smith; Monique A.M. Gignac

    2018-01-01

    The benefit of providing access to physical activity facilities at or near work to support the leisure time physical activity (LTPA) of workers is uncertain. We examined the association between access to physical activity facilities at or near work and the LTPA of workers after adjusting for a range of individual and occupational characteristics. Data was obtained from 60,650 respondents to the 2007–2008 Canadian Community Health Survey. Participants were employed adults ≥18 years of age who ...

  8. Hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.

    1984-01-01

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain

  9. Future directions in controlling the LAMPF-PSR Accelerator Complex at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuewe, R.; Schaller, S.; Bjorklund, E.; Burns, M.; Callaway, T.; Carr, G.; Cohen, S.; Kubicek, D.; Harrington, M.; Poore, R.; Schultz, D.

    1991-01-01

    Four interrelated projects are underway whose purpose is to migrate the LAMPF-PSR Accelerator Complex control systems to a system with a common set of hardware and software components. Project goals address problems in performance, maintenance and growth potential. Front-end hardware, operator interface hardware and software, computer systems, network systems and data system software are being simultaneously upgraded as part of these efforts. The efforts are being coordinated to provide for a smooth and timely migration to a client-sever model-based data acquisition and control system. An increased use of the distributed intelligence at both the front-end and operator interface is a key element of the projects. 2 refs., 2 figs

  10. Future directions in controlling the LAMPF-PSR accelerator complex at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuewe, R.; Schaller, S.; Bjorklund, E.

    1992-01-01

    Four interrelated projects are underway whose purpose is to migrate the LAMPF-PSR Accelerator Complex control systems to a system with a common set of hardware and software components. Project goals address problems in performance, maintenance and growth potential. Front-end hardware, operator interface hardware and software, computer systems, network systems and data system software are being simultaneously upgraded as part of these efforts. The efforts are being coordinated to provide for a smooth and timely migration to a client-server model-based data acquisition and control system. An increased use of distributed intelligence at both the front-end and the operator interface is a key element of the projects. (author)

  11. High intensity beam profile monitors for the LAMPF primary beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; van Dyck, O.; Lee, D.; Harvey, A.; Bridge, J.; Cainet, J.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitors are in use at LAMPF to measure the properties of the 800 MeV, 500 μA proton beam external to the linac. Both types use secondary electron emission from a wire to produce a current signal proportional to the amount of proton beam that intercepts the wire. The wire scanner system uses a pair of orthogonal wires which are passed through the beam and the harp system uses two fixed planes of parallel wires. Most of the harps are not retractable and are exposed continuously to the primary beam. The high beam intensities available lead to a number of technical problems for instruments that intercept the beam or are close to primary beam targets. The thermal, electrical, radiation-damage, and material selection problems encountered, and some solutions which have been implemented are discussed

  12. The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, B.; Petzold, M.; Schnohr, Christina Warrer

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child...... facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village). Results: High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0......, gender and FAS but positively associated if also adjusted for indoor sports facilities. Conclusions: Access to indoor sports facilities itself had a positive association with high VPA, but was persistently negatively associated with high MVPA. Presence of sports clubs with child members was positively...

  13. Naturally occurring workplace facilities to increase the leisure time physical activity of workers: A propensity-score weighted population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviroop Biswas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of providing access to physical activity facilities at or near work to support the leisure time physical activity (LTPA of workers is uncertain. We examined the association between access to physical activity facilities at or near work and the LTPA of workers after adjusting for a range of individual and occupational characteristics. Data was obtained from 60,650 respondents to the 2007–2008 Canadian Community Health Survey. Participants were employed adults ≥18 years of age who had no long-term health condition which reduced their participation in physical activity. Latent class analysis determined naturally occurring combinations of physical activity facilities at or near work. Each combination was balanced by 19 individual and occupational covariate characteristics using inverse probability of treatment weights derived from propensity scores. The association between combinations of physical activity facilities at or near work on LTPA level was estimated by multinomial logistic regression. Five different combinations of physical activity facilities were available to respondents at or near work. Data were analyzed in 2017. All possible physical facilities increased the likelihood for LTPA (OR, 2.08, 95% CI, 1.03–4.20 and other combinations were also positively associated. Respondents with no physical activity facilities were characterized as having a low education, low income, high physically demanding work, poor health and mental health, non-white racial background, and being an immigrant. Access to supportive workplace environments can help workers be physically active. Future research should assess a range of personal, social and environmental factors that may be driving this relationship. Keywords: Physical activity, Workplace, Built environment, Health promotion, Exercise

  14. Planetary physics research programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at Darmstadt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V. [Department of Plasma Physics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Lomonosov, I.V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Tomsk University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Borm, B. [Department of Physics, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A.R.; Piriz, S.A. [E.T.S.I. Industrials, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    Planetary physics research is an important part of the high energy density (HED) physics programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of a proposed experiment named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS). These simulations show that in such experiments, an Fe sample can be imploded to extreme physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of the Earth and in the interior of more massive rocky planets named, super-Earths. The LAPLAS experiments will thus provide very valuable information on the equation-of-state (EOS) and transport properties of HED Fe, which will help the scientists to understand the structure and evolution of the planets in our solar system and of the extrasolar system planets. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Planetary physics research programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Borm, B.; Piriz, A.R.; Piriz, S.A.; Shutov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Planetary physics research is an important part of the high energy density (HED) physics programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of a proposed experiment named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS). These simulations show that in such experiments, an Fe sample can be imploded to extreme physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of the Earth and in the interior of more massive rocky planets named, super-Earths. The LAPLAS experiments will thus provide very valuable information on the equation-of-state (EOS) and transport properties of HED Fe, which will help the scientists to understand the structure and evolution of the planets in our solar system and of the extrasolar system planets. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5): Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication, Revision 5 of Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225), is intended to provide guidance to States and their competent authorities on how to develop or enhance, implement and maintain a physical protection regime for nuclear material and nuclear facilities, through the establishment or improvement of their capabilities to implement legislative and regulatory programmes. The recommendations presented in this publication reflect a broad consensus among IAEA Member States on the requirements which should be met for the physical protection of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities.

  17. Increasing the effectiveness of the physical protection system on a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Conti, Thadeu N.

    2017-01-01

    The malicious use of radioactive material could be devastating, particularly in the case of a nuclear explosive device, it could be unpredictably disruptive resulting in the dispersal of radioactive material, like it was in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. Physical Protection System (PPS) plays an important role in ensuring that individuals, organizations and institutions remain vigilant and that sustained measures are taken to prevent and combat the threat of sabotage or of using radioactive material for malicious acts. PPS is an integrated system of people, equipment and procedures used to protect nuclear facilities and radioactive sources against threat, theft or sabotage. In the operator's perspective, this paper study factors influencing the performance of a PPS in a nuclear facility suggesting ways to increase the system effectiveness. The human factor, the physical and the psychological work environment has a large impact on how personnel perform their work and comply with nuclear security requirements. Apathy and corporatism are two human behaviors that collaborate negatively and make decrease the effectiveness of any PPS. Job satisfaction reduces the probability that personnel will become less reliable and/or obstructive in extreme cases an insider threat. Managers must recognize individual and group needs and the relationship among personnel so that they may motivate personnel by creating a supportive working environment that reduces workplace stress. An effective PPS can result in a significant increase in the effectiveness of the security of radioactive material and associated facilities. (author)

  18. Increasing the effectiveness of the physical protection system on a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Conti, Thadeu N., E-mail: acavaz@ipen.br, E-mail: tnconti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The malicious use of radioactive material could be devastating, particularly in the case of a nuclear explosive device, it could be unpredictably disruptive resulting in the dispersal of radioactive material, like it was in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. Physical Protection System (PPS) plays an important role in ensuring that individuals, organizations and institutions remain vigilant and that sustained measures are taken to prevent and combat the threat of sabotage or of using radioactive material for malicious acts. PPS is an integrated system of people, equipment and procedures used to protect nuclear facilities and radioactive sources against threat, theft or sabotage. In the operator's perspective, this paper study factors influencing the performance of a PPS in a nuclear facility suggesting ways to increase the system effectiveness. The human factor, the physical and the psychological work environment has a large impact on how personnel perform their work and comply with nuclear security requirements. Apathy and corporatism are two human behaviors that collaborate negatively and make decrease the effectiveness of any PPS. Job satisfaction reduces the probability that personnel will become less reliable and/or obstructive in extreme cases an insider threat. Managers must recognize individual and group needs and the relationship among personnel so that they may motivate personnel by creating a supportive working environment that reduces workplace stress. An effective PPS can result in a significant increase in the effectiveness of the security of radioactive material and associated facilities. (author)

  19. Vulnerability Analysis for Physical Protection System at Hypothetical Facility of a Different Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won-Moog; Kim, Jung-Soo; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Yoo, Ho-Sik; Kwak, Sung-Ho; Jang, Sung-Soon

    2007-01-01

    Since the 9/11 event in the U.S.A, International terror possibilities has been increased for nuclear facilities including nuclear power plants(NPPs). It is necessary to evaluate the performance of an existing physical protection system(PPS) at nuclear facilities based on such malevolent acts. Detection, delay, and response elements are all important to PPS. They are used for the analysis and evaluation of a PPS and its effectiveness. Methods are available to analyze a PPS and evaluate its effectiveness. Sandia National Laboratory(SNL) in the U.S.A developed a System Analysis of Vulnerability to Intrusion (SAVI) computer code for evaluating the effectiveness of PPS against outsider threats. This study presents the vulnerability analysis of the PPS at hypothetical facility of a different type using SAVI code that the basic input parameters are from PPS of a different type. For analysis, first, the site-specific Adversary Sequence Diagrams(ASDs) of the PPS is designed. It helps to understand the functions of the existing PPS composed of physical areas and Protection Elements(PEs). Then, the most vulnerable path of an ASD as a measure of effectiveness is determined. The results in the analysis can compare with the most vulnerable paths at a different type

  20. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Gandhi, R; Goswami, S; Roberts, B L; Bouchez, J; Antoniadis, I; Ellis, J; Giudice, G F; Schwetz, T; Umansankar, S; Karagiorgi, G; Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H; Pascoli, Silvia; Geer, S; Rolinec, M; Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Kopp, J; Lindner, M; Peltoniemi, J; Dornan, P J; Long, K; Matsushita, T; Rogers, C; Uchida, Y; Dracos, M; Whisnant, K; Casper, D; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B; Aysto, J; Marfatia, D; Okada, Y; Sugiyama, H; Jungmann, K; Lesgourgues, J; Murayama, France H; Zisman, M; Tortola, M A; Friedland, A; Antusch, S; Biggio, C; Donini, A; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Gavela, B; Maltoni, M; Lopez-Pavon, J; Rigolin, S; Mondal, N; Palladino, V; Filthaut, F; Albright, C; de Gouvea, A; Kuno, Y; Nagashima, Y; Mezzetoo, M; Lola, S; Langacker, P; Baldini, A; Nunokawa, H; Meloni, D; Diaz, M; King, S F; Zuber, K; Akeroyd, A G; Grossman, Y; Farzan, Y; Tobe, K; Aoki, Mayumi; Kitazawa, N; Yasuda, O; Petcov, S; Romanino, A; Chimenti, P; Vacchi, A; Smirnov, A Yu; Couce, Italy E; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Hernandez, P; Sorel, M; Valle, J W F; Harrison, P F; Lundardini, C; Nelson, J K; Barger, V; Everett, L; Huber, P; Winter, W; Fetscher, W; van der Schaaf, A

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the international scoping study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Superbeams, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome, June 21-26, 2005) and NuFact06 (Ivine, California, 24{30 August 2006). The physics case for an extensive experimental programme to understand the properties of the neutrino is presented and the role of high-precision measurements of neutrino oscillations within this programme is discussed in detail. The performance of second generation super-beam experiments, beta-beam facilities, and the Neutrino Factory are evaluated and a quantitative comparison of the discovery potential of the three classes of facility is presented. High-precision studies of the properties of the muon are complementary to the study of neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory has the potential to provide ...

  1. The physics basis for ignition using indirect-drive targets on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindl, John D.; Amendt, Peter; Berger, Richard L.; Glendinning, S. Gail; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Haan, Steven W.; Kauffman, Robert L.; Landen, Otto L.; Suter, Laurence J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1990 National Academy of Science final report of its review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the 10-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the highest-priority prerequisite for proceeding with construction of an ignition-scale laser facility, now called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These objectives were chosen to demonstrate that there was sufficient understanding of the physics of ignition targets that the laser requirements for laboratory ignition could be accurately specified. This research on Nova, as well as additional research on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester, is the subject of this review. The objectives of the U.S. indirect-drive target physics program have been to experimentally demonstrate and predictively model hohlraum characteristics, as well as capsule performance in targets that have been scaled in key physics variables from NIF targets. To address the hohlraum and hydrodynamic constraints on indirect-drive ignition, the target physics program was divided into the Hohlraum and Laser-Plasma Physics (HLP) program and the Hydrodynamically Equivalent Physics (HEP) program. The HLP program addresses laser-plasma coupling, x-ray generation and transport, and the development of energy-efficient hohlraums that provide the appropriate spectral, temporal, and spatial x-ray drive. The HEP experiments address the issues of hydrodynamic instability and mix, as well as the effects of flux asymmetry on capsules that are scaled as closely as possible to ignition capsules (hydrodynamic equivalence). The HEP program also addresses other capsule physics issues associated with ignition, such as energy gain and energy loss to the fuel during implosion in the absence of alpha-particle deposition. The results from the Nova and Omega experiments approach the NIF requirements for most of the important ignition capsule parameters, including

  2. Sport facility proximity and physical activity: Results from the Study of Community Sports in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiujin; Dai, Jian; Xun, Pengcheng; Jamieson, Lynn M; He, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Increased sport facility proximity is associated with higher likelihood of meeting physical activity (PA) recommendations in western studies, but it is uncertain whether the findings can be generalized to the Chinese population. From September 2012 to December 2012, 3926 participants drawn from China using a multi-stage sampling strategy were invited to participate in the Study of Community Sports in China. Participants' demographics, commuting time to the nearest sport facility and PA levels were assessed. Among 3926 participants included (51.2% female) in the final analysis, 878 (22.4%) of them met the PA recommendation. Participants who spent ≥30 minutes in commuting time had 80% odds [odds ratio (OR): 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.98)] of meeting the PA recommendation compared to those who spent less than 10 minutes. For every 10-minute increment in commuting time, the odds reduced by 6% [OR = 0.94 (0.88-0.99)]. The observed associations were not appreciably modified by age, gender or education level. In this cross-sectional community-based study, we found that residents in China were less likely to meet the PA recommendation if they needed more commuting time to the nearest sport facility. Increasing sport facility proximity may be effective in improving the PA levels in the Chinese population.

  3. Naturally occurring workplace facilities to increase the leisure time physical activity of workers: A propensity-score weighted population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Aviroop; Smith, Peter M; Gignac, Monique A M

    2018-06-01

    The benefit of providing access to physical activity facilities at or near work to support the leisure time physical activity (LTPA) of workers is uncertain. We examined the association between access to physical activity facilities at or near work and the LTPA of workers after adjusting for a range of individual and occupational characteristics. Data was obtained from 60,650 respondents to the 2007-2008 Canadian Community Health Survey. Participants were employed adults ≥18 years of age who had no long-term health condition which reduced their participation in physical activity. Latent class analysis determined naturally occurring combinations of physical activity facilities at or near work. Each combination was balanced by 19 individual and occupational covariate characteristics using inverse probability of treatment weights derived from propensity scores. The association between combinations of physical activity facilities at or near work on LTPA level was estimated by multinomial logistic regression. Five different combinations of physical activity facilities were available to respondents at or near work. Data were analyzed in 2017. All possible physical facilities increased the likelihood for LTPA (OR, 2.08, 95% CI, 1.03-4.20) and other combinations were also positively associated. Respondents with no physical activity facilities were characterized as having a low education, low income, high physically demanding work, poor health and mental health, non-white racial background, and being an immigrant. Access to supportive workplace environments can help workers be physically active. Future research should assess a range of personal, social and environmental factors that may be driving this relationship.

  4. Associations between access to recreational physical activity facilities and body mass index in Scottish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Anne; Lamb, Karen E; Ferguson, Neil S; Ogilvie, David

    2016-08-09

    The aim of this country-wide study was to link individual health and behavioural data with area-level spatial data to examine whether the body mass index (BMI) of adults was associated with access to recreational physical activity (PA) facilities by different modes of transport (bus, car, walking, cycling) and the extent to which any associations were mediated by PA participation. Data on individual objectively-measured BMI, PA (number of days of (a) ≥20 min of moderate-to-vigorous PA, and (b) ≥15 min of sport or exercise, in previous 4 weeks), and socio-demographic characteristics were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 6365 adults. The number of accessible PA facilities per 1,000 individuals in each small area (data zones) was obtained by mapping a representative list of all fixed PA facilities throughout mainland Scotland. A novel transport network was developed for the whole country, and routes on foot, by bike, by car and by bus from the weighted population centroid of each data zone to each facility were calculated. Separate multilevel models were fitted to examine associations between BMI and each of the 24 measures of accessibility of PA facilities and BMI, adjusting for age, gender, longstanding illness, car availability, social class, dietary quality and urban/rural classification. We found associations (p < 0.05) between BMI and 7 of the 24 accessibility measures, with mean BMI decreasing with increasing accessibility of facilities-for example, an estimated decrease of 0.015 BMI units per additional facility within a 20-min walk (p = 0.02). None of these accessibility measures were found to be associated with PA participation. Our national study has shown that some measures of the accessibility of PA facilities by different modes of transport (particularly by walking and cycling) were associated with BMI; but PA participation, as measured here, did not appear to play a part in this relationship. Understanding the multi

  5. Modern computer hardware and the role of central computing facilities in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharov, V.

    1981-01-01

    Important recent changes in the hardware technology of computer system components are reviewed, and the impact of these changes assessed on the present and future pattern of computing in particle physics. The place of central computing facilities is particularly examined, to answer the important question as to what, if anything, should be their future role. Parallelism in computing system components is considered to be an important property that can be exploited with advantage. The paper includes a short discussion of the position of communications and network technology in modern computer systems. (orig.)

  6. ANKE, a new facility for medium energy hadron physics at COSY-Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsov, S.; Bechstedt, U.; Bothe, W.; Bongers, N.; Borchert, G.; Borgs, W.; Braeutigam, W.; Buescher, M.; Cassing, W.; Chernyshev, V.; Chiladze, B.; Dietrich, J.; Drochner, M.; Dymov, S.; Erven, W.; Esser, R.; Franzen, A.; Golubeva, Ye.; Gotta, D.; Grande, T.; Grzonka, D.; Hardt, A.; Hartmann, M.; Hejny, V.; Horn, L. van; Jarczyk, L.; Junghans, H.; Kacharava, A.; Kamys, B.; Khoukaz, A.; Kirchner, T.; Klehr, F.; Klein, W.; Koch, H.R.; Komarov, V.I.; Kondratyuk, L.; Koptev, V.; Kopyto, S.; Krause, R.; Kravtsov, P.; Kruglov, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lang, N.; Langenhagen, N.; Lepges, A.; Ley, J.; Maier, R.; Martin, S.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Meyer, K.; Mikirtychiants, S.; Mueller, H.; Munhofen, P.; Mussgiller, A.; Nekipelov, M.; Nelyubin, V.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Petrus, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Prietzschk, B.; Probst, H.J.; Pysz, K.; Rathmann, F.; Rimarzig, B.; Rudy, Z.; Santo, R.; Paetz Schieck, H.; Schleichert, R.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, Chr.; Schneider, H.; Schwarz, U.; Seyfarth, H.; Sibirtsev, A.; Sieling, U.; Sistemich, K.; Selikov, A.; Stechemesser, H.; Stein, H.J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Watzlawik, K.-H.; Wuestner, P.; Yashenko, S.; Zalikhanov, B.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zwoll, K.; Zychor, I.; Schult, O.W.B.; Stroeher, H.

    2001-01-01

    ANKE is a new experimental facility for the spectroscopy of products from proton-induced reactions on internal targets. It has recently been implemented in the accelerator ring of the cooler synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZ-Juelich), Germany. The device consists of three dipole magnets, various target installations and dedicated detection systems. It will enable a variety of hadron-physics experiments like meson production in elementary proton-nucleon processes and studies of medium modifications in proton-nucleus interactions

  7. Systematic approach to the conceptual design of physical protection systems for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    A three-step approach is described which includes (1) facility characterization, (2) development and evaluation of hardware-based safeguards systems configurations, and (3) hardware and response force trade-off analysis. The purpose of the report is to establish a vehicle for initial examination and discussion by potential industry and government users of a formal sequence of activities for the conceptual design of physical protection systems and to identify currently available design tools, such as application reports, handbooks, and computer codes which might support these activities. 17 figs

  8. Prophylaxis of asymmetric carriage of schoolboys of middle age by facilities of physical rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbani R.Sh.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The questions of violation of carriage are considered in a frontal plane for schoolboys of middle age. In research took part 20 schoolboys (girls and boys of 12-14 years old. The estimation of the state of carriage is executed. Violations of carriage are exposed with predominance of right-side asymmetry of trunk. The complexes of facilities of physical rehabilitation, the basic component of which are correctings exercises, are offered. Positive influence of complexes, directed on the prophylaxis of asymmetric carriage of schoolboys is certain.

  9. Physics constraints on the design of fast reactor safety test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.; Meneghetti, D.; Matos, J.; Snelgrove, J.; Shaftman, D.H.; Tzanos, C.; Lam, S.K.; Pennington, E.M.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics foundations common to all fast reactor safety test facilities and the constraints which they impose on the design. While detailed design discussions are confined to the experience with six ANL designs, available data from other designs are used to confirm the validity of the considerations and to broaden the scope of the discussion. This helps to view the various designs as a unified effort, to define their potential capabilities, and to assess how they could best complement each other

  10. Developing an expert system to control a beam line at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearwater, S.H.; Papcun, G.; Clark, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    High energy particle experiments require an accelerator as a source of high energy particles. To increase the productivity of an accelerator facility, we wish to develop an expert system to control beam lines. Expert Systems are a branch of Artificial Intelligence where a computer program performs tasks requiring human expertise. Unlike most expert systems we have a physical model underlying our beam line and this model can be used with the expert system to improve performance. The development of the expert system will lead to an increased understanding of the beam line as well as the possibility of state-of-the-art expert system building

  11. Radiation and physical protection challenges at advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges and opportunities for radiation protection in advanced nuclear reactors and fuel facilities proposed under the Generation IV (GEN IV) initiative which is examining and pursuing the exploration and development of advanced nuclear science and technology; and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which seeks to develop worldwide consensus on enabling expanded use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet growing energy demand. The International Energy Agency projects nuclear power to increase at a rate of 1.3 to 1.5 percent a year over the next 20 years, depending on economic growth. Much of this growth will be in Asia, which, as a whole, currently has plans for 40 new nuclear power plants. Given this increase in demand for new nuclear power facilities, ranging from light water reactors to advanced fuel processing and fabrication facilities, it is necessary for radiation protection and physical protection technologies to keep pace to ensure both worker and public health. This paper is based on a review of current initiatives and the proposed reactors and facilities, primarily the nuclear fuel cycle facilities proposed under the GEN IV and GNEP initiatives. Drawing on the Technology Road map developed under GEN IV, this work examines the potential radiation detection and protection challenges and issues at advanced reactors, including thermal neutron spectrum systems, fast neutron spectrum systems and nuclear fuel recycle facilities. The thermal neutron systems look to improve the efficiency of production of hydrogen or electricity, while the fast neutron systems aim to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel. While there are components of these advanced systems that can draw on the current and well-developed radiation protection practices, there will inevitably be opportunities to improve the overall quality of radiation

  12. Associations between access to recreational physical activity facilities and body mass index in Scottish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Ellaway

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this country-wide study was to link individual health and behavioural data with area-level spatial data to examine whether the body mass index (BMI of adults was associated with access to recreational physical activity (PA facilities by different modes of transport (bus, car, walking, cycling and the extent to which any associations were mediated by PA participation. Methods Data on individual objectively-measured BMI, PA (number of days of (a ≥20 min of moderate-to-vigorous PA, and (b ≥15 min of sport or exercise, in previous 4 weeks, and socio-demographic characteristics were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 6365 adults. The number of accessible PA facilities per 1,000 individuals in each small area (data zones was obtained by mapping a representative list of all fixed PA facilities throughout mainland Scotland. A novel transport network was developed for the whole country, and routes on foot, by bike, by car and by bus from the weighted population centroid of each data zone to each facility were calculated. Separate multilevel models were fitted to examine associations between BMI and each of the 24 measures of accessibility of PA facilities and BMI, adjusting for age, gender, longstanding illness, car availability, social class, dietary quality and urban/rural classification. Results We found associations (p < 0.05 between BMI and 7 of the 24 accessibility measures, with mean BMI decreasing with increasing accessibility of facilities—for example, an estimated decrease of 0.015 BMI units per additional facility within a 20-min walk (p = 0.02. None of these accessibility measures were found to be associated with PA participation. Conclusions Our national study has shown that some measures of the accessibility of PA facilities by different modes of transport (particularly by walking and cycling were associated with BMI; but PA participation, as measured here, did not appear to

  13. Safety of sports facilities and training of graduates in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano Spica, V; Giampaoli, S; Di Onofrio, V; Liguori, G

    2015-01-01

    Post-industrial societies have to face the problem of physical inactivity and inappropriate lifestyles. Programs to promote physical activity are strongly supported by supranational, national and local institutions and organizations. These programs can be developed in sport facilities but also in places that are not institutionally dedicated to sport. The use of urban and working sites has the advantage of better reach the various segments of the population, but at the same time requires coordination between various professionals in structuring an effective intervention. Bibliographical research in the historical archives of the library of the University of Rome Foro Italico, online databases, paleoigiene (wikigiene), documents archives (GSMS-SItI, WHO, ISS, OsEPi, INAIL, ISTAT, national laws). Several guidelines and regulations face the problem of safety in sport environments. The context is in rapid evolution and directions are provided by public health authorities. Graduates in Sport and Physical Activity, represent an additional resource in terms of: prevention and safety in the workplace, health education, application of preventive and adapted physical activities in the territory. These tasks can be integrated in all prevention stages: e.g. childhood and primary prevention programs in school, adapted physical activity for the elderly. The contribution of public health specialists is strategic in the surveillance and coordination of integrated projects. At the same time, graduates in Physical Education appear to be pivots for health promotion and qualified resources for institutions in the territory. Their training should always include contents related to prevention and safety, regulations on sport and working environments, along with bases of preventive medicine related to the context of physical activity.

  14. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): facility and experimental beam physics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Edstrom, D.; Harms, E.; Lebedev, V.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Park, C. S.; Piekarz, H.; Piot, P.; Prebys, E.; Romanov, A.; Ruan, J.; Sen, T.; Stancari, G.; Thangaraj, C.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Valishev, A.; Shiltsev, V.

    2017-03-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning and research. The physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.

  15. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): Facility and experimental beam physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, Sergei; Broemmelsiek, Daniel; Bruhwiler, David; Edstrom, Dean; Harms, Elvin

    2017-01-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning and research. Finally, the physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.

  16. Proceedings of the workshop on nuclear and particle physics at energies up to 31 GeV: new and future aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.D.; Kisslinger, L.S.; Silbar, R.R.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Workshop on Nuclear and Particle Physics at Energies up to 31 GeV, New and Future Aspects, held in Los Alamos, January 5 to 8, 1981. Included are invited talks and contributed papers covering recent developments in (a) weak and unified interactions (including discussions of neutrino oscillations), (b) the hadronic description of strong interactions, (c) the quark description of strong interactions, (d) hypernuclei, and (e) new facilities and proposed experiments. One of the motivations for the Workshop was to explore physics justifications for a future high-intensity proton accelerator in this energy regime. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers from this meeting. Six papers were previously included in the data base

  17. Physical activity opportunities in Canadian childcare facilities: a provincial/territorial review of legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderloo, Leigh M; Tucker, Patricia; Ismail, Ali; van Zandvroort, Melissa M

    2012-05-01

    Preschoolers spend a substantial portion of their day in childcare; therefore, these centers are an ideal venue to encourage healthy active behaviors. It is important that provinces'/territories' childcare legislation encourage physical activity (PA) opportunities. The purpose of this study was to review Canadian provincial/territorial childcare legislation regarding PA participation. Specifically, this review sought to 1) appraise each provincial/territorial childcare regulation for PA requirements, 2) compare such regulations with the NASPE PA guidelines, and 3) appraise these regulations regarding PA infrastructure. A review of all provincial/territorial childcare legislation was performed. Each document was reviewed separately by 2 researchers, and the PA regulations were coded and summarized. The specific provincial/territorial PA requirements (eg, type/frequency of activity) were compared with the NASPE guidelines. PA legislation for Canadian childcare facilities varies greatly. Eight of the thirteen provinces/territories provide PA recommendations; however, none provided specific time requirements for daily PA. All provinces/territories did require access to an outdoor play space. All Canadian provinces/territories lack specific PA guidelines for childcare facilities. The development, implementation, and enforcement of national PA legislation for childcare facilities may aid in tackling the childhood obesity epidemic and assist childcare staff in supporting and encouraging PA participation.

  18. Conceptual design of technical security systems for Russian nuclear facilities physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmailov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Conceptual design of technical security systems (TSS) used in the early stages of physical protection systems (PPS) design for Russia nuclear facilities is discussed. The importance of work carried out in the early stages was noted since the main design solutions are being made within this period (i.e. selection of a structure of TSS and its components). The methods of analysis and synthesis of TSS developed by ''Eleron'' (MINATOM of Russia) which take into account the specific conditions of Russian nuclear facilities and a scope of equipment available are described in the review. TSS effectiveness assessment is based on a probability theory and a simulation. The design procedure provides for a purposeful choice of TSS competitive options including a ''cost-benefit'' criterion and taking into account a prechosen list of design basis threats to be used for a particular facility. The attention is paid to a practical aspect of the methods application as well as to the bilateral Russian-American scientific and technical co-operation in the PPS design field

  19. Physical Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S. M.; Novelo Casanova, D.

    2010-12-01

    Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their

  20. Using virtual reality in the training of security staff and evaluation of physical protection barriers in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Mol, Pedro C.; Sales, Douglas S.

    2009-01-01

    The physical security of facilities containing radioactive objects, an already important matter, now has a new aggravating factor: the existence of groups intending to obtain radioactive materials for the purpose of intentionally induce radioactive contamination incidents, as for example the explosion of dirty bombs in populated regions, damaging both people and environment. In this context, the physical security of such facilities must be reinforced so to reduce the possibilities of such incidents. This paper presents a adapted game engine used as a virtual reality system, enabling the modeling and simulation of scenarios of nuclear facilities containing radioactive objects. In these scenarios, the physical protection barriers, as fences and walls, are simulated along with vigilance screens. Using a computer network, several users can participate simultaneously in the simulation, being represented by avatars. Users can play the roles of both invaders and security staff. The invaders have as objective to surpass the facility's physical protection barriers to steal radioactive objects and flee. The security staff have as objective to prevent and stop the theft of radioactive objects from the facility. The system can be used to analysis simulated scenarios and train vigilance/security staff. A test scenario was already developed and used, and the preliminary tests had satisfactory results, as they enabled the evaluation of the physical protection barriers of the virtual facility, and the training of those who participated in the simulations in the functions of a security staff. (author)

  1. Using virtual reality in the training of security staff and evaluation of physical protection barriers in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Mol, Pedro C.; Sales, Douglas S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: silas@ien.gov.br, e-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, e-mail: pedro98@gmail.com, e-mail: dsales@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical security of facilities containing radioactive objects, an already important matter, now has a new aggravating factor: the existence of groups intending to obtain radioactive materials for the purpose of intentionally induce radioactive contamination incidents, as for example the explosion of dirty bombs in populated regions, damaging both people and environment. In this context, the physical security of such facilities must be reinforced so to reduce the possibilities of such incidents. This paper presents a adapted game engine used as a virtual reality system, enabling the modeling and simulation of scenarios of nuclear facilities containing radioactive objects. In these scenarios, the physical protection barriers, as fences and walls, are simulated along with vigilance screens. Using a computer network, several users can participate simultaneously in the simulation, being represented by avatars. Users can play the roles of both invaders and security staff. The invaders have as objective to surpass the facility's physical protection barriers to steal radioactive objects and flee. The security staff have as objective to prevent and stop the theft of radioactive objects from the facility. The system can be used to analysis simulated scenarios and train vigilance/security staff. A test scenario was already developed and used, and the preliminary tests had satisfactory results, as they enabled the evaluation of the physical protection barriers of the virtual facility, and the training of those who participated in the simulations in the functions of a security staff. (author)

  2. Interaction physics in the context of ICF with the LIL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.; Riazuelo, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Stenz, C.; Nicolai, P.; Borisenko, N.G.; Hueller, S.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Laser-plasma interaction physics is one of the main challenges of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Experiments in large-scale, high temperature, plasmas are needed to understand the physics of parametric instabilities, mainly the stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering and filamentation. Experimental results obtained with well-defined interaction conditions are needed to test the numerical simulations still under development and to improve the target design. To be carried out with long length and high temperature plasmas, the experiments require multikilojoule laser beams, a careful choice of targets and sophisticated diagnostics. The LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser) facility has been used with foam layer targets to study interaction physics in underdense plasma, in the millimeter scale, at temperature around 2 keV. The LIL facility delivers 12 kJ of 3σ light in pulses of 2.7 ns in a quadruplet. Low-density foams (3 to 10 mg/cc) with lengths in the range (300 μm, 1 mm) and very small microstructures (∼ μm) have been used. The plasma parameters, electron density, velocity, temperature profiles, were obtained from hydrodynamics simulations with the code CHIC and HERA. The numerical results were compared with the experimental measurements of longitudinal X-ray images at different times, the temporal evolution of the transmitted light through the foam, and the overall energy balance. Results will be presented on the beam propagation through the foam, plasma induced smoothing, the reduction of the imprint and stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering. The interpretation of these results is achieved by means of various interaction codes, PARAX, HARMONY and HERA.

  3. Guidance and considerations for the implementation of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4, the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This publication is intended to provide guidance and considerations for a State's competent authority to better understand and prescribe appropriate requirements, consistent with INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 for the protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities which are compatible with accepted international practice. This report, together with a more detailed report, Handbook on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facilities, which addresses to the licencee or designer of physical protection systems who has specific implementation and compliance responsibilities, should be used in conjunction to each other to provide better and comprehensive guidance on physical protection

  4. Guidance and considerations for the implementation of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4, the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    This publication is intended to provide guidance and considerations for a State's competent authority to better understand and prescribe appropriate requirements, consistent with INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 for the protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities which are compatible with accepted international practice. This report, together with a more detailed report, Handbook on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facilities, which addresses to the licensee or designer of physical protection systems who has specific implementation and compliance responsibilities, should be used in conjunction to each other to provide better and comprehensive guidance on physical protection

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, [August 15, 1991--October 1, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out between August 15, 1991 and October 1, 1992 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG02-86ER-40269 and DE-FG02-87ER-40335 with the United States Department of Energy. These contracts support experimental and theoretical work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The experimental program is very broadly based; it includes pion-nucleon and pion-nucleus studies at Los Alamos and TRIUMF inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, kaon-nucleus scattering at the AGS, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF

  6. Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamb Karen E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People living in neighbourhoods of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher rates of obesity and a lower likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations than their more affluent counterparts. This study examines the sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland and whether such access differs by the mode of transport available and by Urban Rural Classification. Methods A database of all fixed physical activity facilities was obtained from the national agency for sport in Scotland. Facilities were categorised into light, moderate and vigorous intensity activity groupings before being mapped. Transport networks were created to assess the number of each type of facility accessible from the population weighted centroid of each small area in Scotland on foot, by bicycle, by car and by bus. Multilevel modelling was used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities by small area deprivation within urban, small town and rural areas separately, adjusting for population size and local authority. Results Prior to adjustment for Urban Rural Classification and local authority, the median number of accessible facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity activity increased with increasing deprivation from the most affluent or second most affluent quintile to the most deprived for all modes of transport. However, after adjustment, the modelling results suggest that those in more affluent areas have significantly higher access to moderate and vigorous intensity facilities by car than those living in more deprived areas. Conclusions The sociospatial distributions of access to facilities for both moderate intensity and vigorous intensity physical activity were similar. However, the results suggest that those living in the most affluent neighbourhoods have poorer access to facilities of either type that can be reached on foot

  7. A search for bar νe appearance from stopped π+ and μ+ decay at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    The author reports on a recent search for bar ν e appearance from stopped π + → μ + ν μ and μ + → e + ν e bar ν μ decay made by the LAMPF experiment E645. The appearance of bar ν e may occur from bar ν μ → bar ν e , ν e → bar ν eL , or ν μ → bar ν eL oscillations. Appearance may also occur from rare μ + → e + bar ν e ν μ decay, which is allowed by a multiplicative lepton charge conservation law. The neutrino energies range from E ν = 0 to 52.8MeV. The neutrino detector, which is located 26.1 meters from the neutrino source, consists of a segmented liquid scintillator and proportional drift tube central detector surrounded by both active and passive shielding. The central detector detects bar ν e through the bar ν e p → ne + Charge Current (CC) reaction, which is signaled by the direct detection of the final state positron and neutron. The hydrogen-rich liquid scintillators act as free proton targets for the bar ν e p CC reaction. The neutrons are detected through radiative neutron capture on gadolinium. He finds no evidence for bar ν e appearance in the first year of running. New limits on the bar ν μ , ν e , ν μ yields bar ν e oscillation parameters and the rare μ + → e + bar ν e ν μ decay branching ratio are presented

  8. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams (ν factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both ± μ. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider

  9. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  10. Automation of the radiation measuring facilities for samples in health physics - MA 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, M.

    1980-12-01

    Routine radation measurements of samples are performed by the HMI health physics department by means of test stations for individual samples and multiple samples (using a changing equipment). The basic device of these test stations is a SCALER/TIMER system (BF 22/25, BERTHOLD Corp.). This measuring facility has been extended by a CAMAC intrumentation which incorporates an autonomous CAMAC processor (CAPRO-1, INCAA B.V.) for monitoring an automatic control of the system. The programming language is BASIC. A DECwriter (LA 34) is used for user interaction and for printing the measurement results. This report describes the features of this system and present some examples of, the dialogue with the system and the printout of data. (orig.) [de

  11. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. The MOVE study: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial assessing interventions to maximise attendance at physical activity facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Joshua D; Klein, Ruth; Bauman, Adrian; Newton, Fiona J; Mahal, Ajay; Gilbert, Kara; Piterman, Leon; Ewing, Michael T; Donovan, Robert J; Smith, Ben J

    2015-04-18

    Physical activity is associated with a host of health benefits, yet many individuals do not perform sufficient physical activity to realise these benefits. One approach to rectifying this situation is through modifying the built environment to make it more conducive to physical activity, such as by building walking tracks or recreational physical activity facilities. Often, however, modifications to the built environment are not connected to efforts aimed at encouraging their use. The purpose of the Monitoring and Observing the Value of Exercise (MOVE) study is to evaluate the effectiveness of two interventions designed to encourage the ongoing use of a new, multi-purpose, community-based physical activity facility. A two-year, randomised controlled trial with yearly survey points (baseline, 12 months follow-up, 24 months follow-up) will be conducted among 1,300 physically inactive adult participants aged 18-70 years. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, intervention 1 (attendance incentives), or intervention 2 (attendance incentives and tailored support following a model based on customer relationship management). Primary outcome measures will include facility usage, physical activity participation, mental and physical wellbeing, community connectedness, social capital, friendship, and social support. Secondary outcome measures will include stages of change for facility usage and social cognitive decision-making variables. This study will assess whether customer relationship management systems, a tool commonly used in commercial marketing settings, can encourage the ongoing use of a physical activity facility. Findings may also indicate the population segments among which the use of such systems are most effective, as well as their cost-effectiveness. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12615000012572 (registered 9 January 2015).

  13. European facilities for accelerator neutrino physics: Perspectives for the decade to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, R.; Mezzetto, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Terranova, F.

    2010-01-01

    Very soon a new generation of reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments -Double Chooz, Daya Bay, Reno and T 2 K- will seek for oscillation signals generated by the mixing parameter θ13. The knowledge of this angle is a fundamental milestone to optimize further experiments aimed at detecting C P violation in the neutrino sector. Leptonic C P violation is a key phenomenon that has profound implications in particle physics and cosmology but it is clearly out of reach for the aforementioned experiments. Since late 90s', a world-wide activity is in progress to design facilities that can access C P violation in neutrino oscillation and perform high-precision measurements of the lepton counterpart of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. In this paper the status of these studies will be summarized, focusing on the options that are best suited to exploit existing European facilities (firstly CERN and the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratories) or technologies where Europe has a world leadership. Similar considerations will be developed in more exotic scenarios -beyond the standard framework of flavor oscillation among three active neutrinos- that might appear plausible in the occurrence of anomalous results from post-MiniBooNE experiments or the CNGS.

  14. The current status and possible future of the Los Alamos spallation radiation effects facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borden, M.J.; Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has been configured for both proton and spallation neutron irradiations since 1985. The facility makes use of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility 1 mA 800 MeV proton beam. Environment controlled proton and neutron irradiations have been demonstrated over the past nine years. The current copper beam stop configuration produces a maximum measured neutron flux of 4.6 x 10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for energies greater than 1 KeV. The maximum proton flux at the center of Gaussian shaped beam is 1.2 x 10{sup 14} protons cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} with beam spot diameter of 3.5 cm at 2{sigma}. Previously published work has shown that the neutron flux can be increased by a factor of ten by changing the beam stop to tungsten and decreasing the diameter. Expertise exists at Los Alamos to further optimize this design to tailor neutron production and spectrum. Consideration and preliminary planning has also been done for increasing the LAMPF proton current from 1 mA to a few mA with a possible maximum of 10 mA. An upgrade of this type would produce current densities comparable to those proposed for the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) programs.

  15. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, P.B. (ed.)

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility.

  16. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrington, P.B.

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility

  17. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  18. Can motivational signs prompt increases in incidental physical activity in an Australian health-care facility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, A L; Bauman, A E; Patch, C; Wilson, J; Chen, J

    2002-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether a stair-promoting signed intervention could increase the use of the stairs over the elevator in a health-care facility. A time-series design was conducted over 12 weeks. Data were collected before, during and after displaying a signed intervention during weeks 4-5 and 8-9. Evaluation included anonymous counts recorded by an objective unobtrusive motion-sensing device of people entering the elevator or the stairs. Self-report data on stair use by hospital staff were also collected. Stair use significantly increased after the first intervention phase (P = 0.02), but after the intervention was removed stair use decreased back towards baseline levels. Moreover, stair use did not significantly change after the re-introduction of the intervention. Lastly, stair use decreased below the initial baseline level during the final weeks of evaluation. Furthermore, there was no significant change in self-reported stair use by hospital staff. Therefore, the signed intervention aimed at promoting an increase in incidental physical activity produced small brief effects, which were not maintained. Further research is required to find more effective 'point of choice' interventions to increase incidental physical activity participation with more sustainable impact.

  19. Shared use of school facilities with community organizations and afterschool physical activity program participation: a cost-benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanters, Michael A; Bocarro, Jason N; Filardo, Mary; Edwards, Michael B; McKenzie, Thomas L; Floyd, Myron F

    2014-05-01

    Partnerships between school districts and community-based organizations to share school facilities during afterschool hours can be an effective strategy for increasing physical activity. However, the perceived cost of shared use has been noted as an important reason for restricting community access to schools. This study examined shared use of middle school facilities, the amount and type of afterschool physical activity programs provided at middle schools together with the costs of operating the facilities. Afterschool programs were assessed for frequency, duration, and type of structured physical activity programs provided and the number of boys and girls in each program. School operating costs were used to calculate a cost per student and cost per building square foot measure. Data were collected at all 30 middle schools in a large school district over 12 months in 2010-2011. Policies that permitted more use of school facilities for community-sponsored programs increased participation in afterschool programs without a significant increase in operating expenses. These results suggest partnerships between schools and other community agencies to share facilities and create new opportunities for afterschool physical activity programs are a promising health promotion strategy. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  20. Hypernuclear physics with a neutral meson spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The (K - , π degrees) reaction, which complements the (K - , π - ) and the (π + , K + ) reactions, offers another means to study hypernuclear physics. The physics motivation for measuring the (K - , π degrees) reaction is discussed. The feasibility for detecting π degrees using the LAMPF Neutral Meson Spectrometer is studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. We conclude that the (K - , π degrees) reaction can be well measured at existing kaon beam lines

  1. The Halland model - An innovative model for the physical protection of a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boode, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Halland - Halland is situated on the west coast of Sweden. The entire west coast borders on the sea - the Kattegatt and Skagerack. The local population is about 280,000, and is considerably larger during the summer. The county comprises six municipalities - Falkenberg, Halmstad, Hylte, Kungsbacka, Laholm and Varberg). Halmstad is the seat of the county administration. Ringhals - Ringhals is Sweden's largest nuclear facility with four reactors. The facility is located near to the sea, several kilometres north of Varberg. Physical Protection - The Police Authority of Halland County is responsible for physical protection at Ringhals. Officers have been appointed to ensure that there is adequate preparedness and competence within the Police Authority. The Police Authority works in close co-operation with the County Administrative Board and the municipalities involved as well as with the management of Ringhals. An extensive set of plans exists for work at Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant. The plans relate to physical protection, emergency standby and incident response in connection with technical problems. The plans for physical protection are formulated so that they coincide with Ringhals' status with respect to threats. Emergency alerts and measures exist in order to cope with the following events: Demonstrations - Peaceful demonstrations concern offsite activities that do not have a significant impact on Ringhals' activities and which mainly aim at influencing external opinion. Threatening demonstrations that concern offsite activities that have a significant impact on Ringhals' activities or which involve masked or armed participants as well as any form of demonstration where the participants enter the Ringhals site. Assault - Threats that arise if an armed individual or a group of people enter the Ringhals site and/or congregate on the site. Bomb Threats - The bomb threat must be directed to Ringhals or to Ringhals' activities. Dangerous Objects - Unknown

  2. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Bum Moon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  3. European Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR): the new international center for fundamental physics and its research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Sharkov, Boris Yu; Stöker, H

    2012-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany, will provide the international scientific community with unique experimental opportunities of a scope and scale out of reach for any other large-scale facility in the world. With its staff of over 2500, it is expected to fundamentally expand our knowledge of hadron, nuclear, and atomic physics and their application to cosmology, astrophysics, and technology. In this review, the design details of the accelerator complex are discussed and the experimental research program for FAIR is presented. Particular attention is paid to experiments on the extreme state of matter arising from the isochoric heating of a material by heavy-ion beams. One of the largest facilities of its kind in Europe, FAIR is a part of the strategic development roadmap for the European Strategic Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). (physics of our days)

  4. Requirements of radiation protection and physical protection for facilities of petroleum well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goessa, Eunícia João

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum is generated from the transformation of the organic matter accumulated in the sedimentary rocks, when submitted to the appropriate thermal conditions and is found both in the marine and terrestrial subsoil. In order to determine the volume of petroleum existing in a deposit oil wells technique is used which consists of a set of operations in which are recorded as a function of the depth, some characteristics of the geological layers along the well, such as permeability and porosity with the use of radioactive sources. The sources used in this practice belong to category 3, among five categories of categorization considered dangerous and in case of accident represents a higher level of radiological risk. The present work aims to present the main requirements of radiological safety and physical security to be applied in the licensing of an oil well profiling plant. In this work, the author supported the bibliographical review, which consisted in the collection of the essential literature related to the theme. The literature is composed of theoretical references published in books, theses, Brazilian norms, Mozambican laws, IAEA manuals and some published on the internet. The methodology used in this work was the bibliographical review with the objective of obtaining information on the formation of oil, oil well profiling concept, the radioactive sources used in this practice, for information on the main applicable radiological security and safety requirements radioactive sources and oil well profiling facilities. The inventory of radioactive sources, the use of shielding and the smear tests in radioactive sources are technical requirements that integrate the radiological safety and physical safety that must be followed by the licensees of the oil well profiling. (author). (author)

  5. Conventional Gymnasium vs. Geodesic Field House. A Comparative Study of High School Physical Education and Assembly Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    A description is presented of the design features of a high school's geodesic dome field house. Following consideration of various design features and criteria for the physical education facility, a comprehensive analysis is given of comparative costs of a geodesic dome field house and conventional gymnasium. On the basis of the study it would…

  6. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  7. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  8. The Atlas pulsed power facility for high energy density physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, R B; Barr, G W; Bowman, D W; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Elizondo, J M; Gribble, R F; Griego, J R; Hicks, R D; Hinckley, W B; Hosack, K W; Nielsen, K E; Parker, J V; Parsons, M O; Rickets, R L; Salazar, H R; Sánchez, P G; Scudder, D W; Shapiro, C; Thompson, M C; Trainor, R J; Valdez, G A; Vigil, B N; Watt, R G; Wysocki, F J; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. Here, the authors describe how the primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently- removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the Marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-ys risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line compo...

  9. Challenges for embedded electronics in systems used in future facilities dedicated to international physics programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flament, O.; Bazzoli, S.; Girard, S.; Raimbourg, J.; Sauvestre, J. E. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Baggio, J. [CEA, CESTA, F33830, Le Barp (France); Leray, J. L. [CEA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2009-07-01

    The implementation of equipment with embedded electronic to monitor, control, measure and operate future large facilities dedicated to high energy physics or nuclear fusion are necessary. Reliable operation of these equipment will be achieved through availability and reliability analysis. In several cases, the equipment selection or development approach has to be done by considering a harsh environment in terms of radiations. In order to implement these systems in such environments shielding, location and distance from the source must be considered to reduce, to protect and to avoid radiation effects. People in charge of the choice of the equipment have to take into account and mitigate radiation effects from subsystem to system level. It is beyond the scope of this paper to address all the radiation effects: the electromagnetic effects are not dealt with. This paper is organised as follows: we describe the electronics and semiconductor trends in today applications, then we present the radiation effects and their impact on the device response and eventually we review different ways to mitigate these impacts

  10. Challenges for embedded electronics in systems used in future facilities dedicated to international physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, O.; Bazzoli, S.; Girard, S.; Raimbourg, J.; Sauvestre, J. E.; Baggio, J.; Leray, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of equipment with embedded electronic to monitor, control, measure and operate future large facilities dedicated to high energy physics or nuclear fusion are necessary. Reliable operation of these equipment will be achieved through availability and reliability analysis. In several cases, the equipment selection or development approach has to be done by considering a harsh environment in terms of radiations. In order to implement these systems in such environments shielding, location and distance from the source must be considered to reduce, to protect and to avoid radiation effects. People in charge of the choice of the equipment have to take into account and mitigate radiation effects from subsystem to system level. It is beyond the scope of this paper to address all the radiation effects: the electromagnetic effects are not dealt with. This paper is organised as follows: we describe the electronics and semiconductor trends in today applications, then we present the radiation effects and their impact on the device response and eventually we review different ways to mitigate these impacts

  11. The NASA Heliophysics Active Final Archive at the Space Physics Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 NASA Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy re-defined and extended the responsibilities of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project. Building on SPDF's established capabilities, the new policy assigned the role of active "Final Archive" for non-solar NASA Heliophysics data to SPDF. The policy also recognized and formalized the responsibilities of SPDF as a source for critical infrastructure services such as VSPO to the overall Heliophysics Data Environment (HpDE) and as a Center of Excellence for existing SPDF science-enabling services and software including CDAWeb, SSCWeb/4D Orbit Viewer, OMNIweb and CDF. We will focus this talk to the principles, strategies and planned SPDF architecture to effectively and efficiently perform these roles, with special emphasis on how SPDF will ensure the long-term preservation and ongoing online community access to all the data entrusted to SPDF. We will layout our archival philosophy and what we are advocating in our work with NASA missions both current and future, with potential providers of NASA and NASA-relevant archival data, and to make the data and metadata held by SPDF accessible to other systems and services within the overall HpOE. We will also briefly review our current services, their metrics and our current plans and priorities for their evolution.

  12. The CERN analysis facility-a PROOF cluster for day-one physics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F

    2008-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at the LHC plans to use a PROOF cluster at CERN (CAF - CERN Analysis Facility) for analysis. The system is especially aimed at the prototyping phase of analyses that need a high number of development iterations and thus require a short response time. Typical examples are the tuning of cuts during the development of an analysis as well as calibration and alignment. Furthermore, the use of an interactive system with very fast response will allow ALICE to extract physics observables out of first data quickly. An additional use case is fast event simulation and reconstruction. A test setup consisting of 40 machines is used for evaluation since May 2006. The PROOF system enables the parallel processing and xrootd the access to files distributed on the test cluster. An automatic staging system for files either catalogued in the ALICE file catalog or stored in the CASTOR mass storage system has been developed. The current setup and ongoing development towards disk quotas and CPU fairshare are described. Furthermore, the integration of PROOF into ALICE's software framework (AliRoot) is discussed

  13. The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclasen, Birgit; Petzold, Max; Schnohr, Christina W

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child members) in Greenlandic adolescents. Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey including 2,430 children aged 11-17 years was used. Logistic regression models were developed with dichotomous measures on VPA and MVPA as outcomes, number of indoor sports facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village). High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0.42-0.70)) if indoor sports facilities were present, both unadjusted and adjusted. Access to a local sports club increased OR for high VPA both unadjusted and adjusted to about 2.3 for five or more clubs, while access to sports clubs was not associated with unadjusted MVPA, negatively associated if adjusted for age, gender and FAS but positively associated if also adjusted for indoor sports facilities. Access to indoor sports facilities itself had a positive association with high VPA, but was persistently negatively associated with high MVPA. Presence of sports clubs with child members was positively associated with high VPA while the association with high MVPA was more complex. The findings have implications for public health planning.

  14. Reactor physics experiments in PURNIMA sub critical facility coupled with 14 MeV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Degweker, S.B.; Patel, Tarun; Bishnoi, Saroj; Adhikari, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems (ADSS) are attracting increasing worldwide attention due to their superior safety characteristics and their potential for burning actinide and fission product waste and energy production. A number of countries around the world have drawn up roadmaps/programs for development of ADSS. Indian interest in ADSS has an additional dimension, which is related to the planned utilization of our large thorium reserves for future nuclear energy generation. A programme for development of ADSS is taken up at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in India. This includes R and D activities for high current proton accelerator development, target development and Reactor Physics studies. As part of the ADSS Reactor Physics research programme, a sub-critical facility is coming up in BARC which will be coupled with an existing D-D/D-T neutron generator. Two types of cores are planned. In one of these, the sub-critical reactor assembly consists of natural uranium moderated by high density polyethylene (HDP) and reflected by BeO. The other consists of natural uranium moderated by light water. The maximum neutron yield of the neutron source with tritium target is around 10 10 neutron per sec. Various reactor physics experiments like measurement of the source strength, neutron flux distribution, buckling estimation and sub-critical source multiplication are planned. Apart from this, measurement of the total fission power and neutron spectrum will also be carried out. Mainly activation detectors will be used in all in-core neutron flux measurement. Measurement of the degree of sub-criticality by various deterministic and noise methods is planned. Helium detectors with advanced data acquisition card will be used for the neutron noise experiments. Noise characteristics of ADSS are expected to be different from that of traditional reactors due to the non-Poisson statistical features of the source. A new theory incorporating these features has been

  15. A distributed design for monitoring, logging, and replaying device readings at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.

    1992-01-01

    As control of the Los Alamos Meson Physics linear accelerator and Proton Storage Ring moves to a more distributed system, it has been necessary to redesign the software which monitors, logs, and replays device readings throughout the facility. The new design allows devices to be monitored and their readings logged locally on a network of computers. Control of the monitoring and logging process is available throughout the network from user interfaces which communicate via remote procedure calls with server processes running on each node which monitors and records device readings. Similarly, the logged data can be replayed from anywhere on the network. Two major requirements influencing the final design were the need to reduce the load on the CPU of the control machines, and the need for much faster replay of the logged device readings. (author)

  16. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, S.A.; Venneri, F.; Bowman, C.D.; Arthur, E.D.; Heighway, E.A.; Beard, C.A.; Bracht, R.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Chavez, W.; DeVolder, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator and will be located in the Area-A experimental hall. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels up to 5 MW t

  17. A distributed design for monitoring, logging, and replaying device readings at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.

    1991-01-01

    As control of the Los Alamos Meson Physics linear accelerator and Proton Storage Ring moves to a more distributed system, it has been necessary to redesign the software which monitors, logs, and replays device readings throughout the facility. The new design allows devices to be monitored and their readings logged locally on a network of computers. Control of the monitoring and logging process is available throughout the network from user interfaces which communicate via remote procedure calls with server processes running on each node which monitors and records device readings. Similarly, the logged data can be replayed from anywhere on the network. Two major requirements influencing the final design were the need to reduce the load on the CPU of the control machines, and the need for much faster replay of the logged device readings. 1 ref., 2 figs

  18. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities - Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shao-Huan; Lu, Li-Chin; Lan, Shou-Jen; Chen, Jong-Chen; Wu, Wen-Jun; Chang, Shen-Peng; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-08-01

    "Physical restraint" formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education) group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002); instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: -0.07, p educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  19. The development and operation of the international solar-terrestrial physics central data handling facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is committed to the development of a comprehensive, multi-mission ground data system which will support a variety of national and international scientific missions in an effort to study the flow of energy from the sun through the Earth-space environment, known as the geospace. A major component of the ISTP ground data system is an ISTP-dedicated Central Data Handling Facility (CDHF). Acquisition, development, and operation of the ISTP CDHF were delegated by the ISTP Project Office within the Flight Projects Directorate to the Information Processing Division (IPD) within the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD). The ISTP CDHF supports the receipt, storage, and electronic access of the full complement of ISTP Level-zero science data; serves as the linchpin for the centralized processing and long-term storage of all key parameters generated either by the ISTP CDHF itself or received from external, ISTP Program approved sources; and provides the required networking and 'science-friendly' interfaces for the ISTP investigators. Once connected to the ISTP CDHF, the online catalog of key parameters can be browsed from their remote processing facilities for the immediate electronic receipt of selected key parameters using the NASA Science Internet (NSI), managed by NASA's Ames Research Center. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe how the ISTP CDHF was successfully implemented and operated to support initially the Japanese Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) mission and correlative science investigations, and (2) to describe how the ISTP CDHF has been enhanced to support ongoing as well as future ISTP missions. Emphasis will be placed on how various project management approaches were undertaken that proved to be highly effective in delivering an operational ISTP CDHF to the Project on schedule and

  20. Analysis Facility infrastructure (TIER3) for ATLAS High Energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; March, L.; Ros, E.; Sanchez, J.; Amoros, G.; Fassi, F.; Fernandez, A.; Kaci, M.; Lamas, A.; Salt, J.

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS project has been asked to define the scope and role of Tier-3 resources (facilities or centres) within the existing ATLAS computing model, activities and facilities. This document attempts to address these questions by describing Tier-3 resources generally, and their relationship to the ATLAS Software and Computing Project. Originally the tiered computing model came out of MONARC (see http://monarc.web.cern.ch/MONARC/) work and was predicated upon the network being a scarce resource. In this model the tiered hierarchy ranged from the Tier-0 (CERN) down to the desktop or workstation (Tier 3). The focus on defining the roles of each tiered component has evolved with the initial emphasis on the Tier-0 (CERN) and Tier-1 (National centres) definition and roles. The various LHC projects, including ATLAS, then evolved the tiered hierarchy to include Tier-2s (Regional centers) as part of their projects. Tier-3s, on the other hand, have (implicitly and sometime explicitly) been defined as whatever an institution could construct to support their Physics goals using institutional and otherwise leveraged resources and therefore have not been considered to be part of the official ATLAS Research Program computing resources nor under their control, meaning there is no formal MOU process to designate sites as Tier-3s and no formal control of the program over the Tier-3 resources. Tier-3s are the responsibility of individual institutions to define, fund, deploy and support. However, having noted this, we must also recognize that Tier-3s must exist and will have implications for how our computing model should support ATLAS physicists. Tier-3 users will want to access data and simulations and will want to enable their Tier-3 resources to support their analysis and simulation work. Tiers 3s are an important resource for physicists to analyze LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data. This document will define how Tier-3s should best interact with the ATLAS computing model, detail the

  1. The WNR facility - a pulsed spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Lisowski, P.W.; King, N.S.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is the first operating example of a new class of pulsed neutron sources using the X(p,n)Y spallation reaction. At present, up to 10 microamperes of 800-MeV protons from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) linear accelerator bombard a Ta target to produce an intense white-neutron spectrum from about 800 MeV to 100 keV. The Ta target can be coupled with CH 2 and H 2 O moderators to produce neutrons of lower energy. The time structure of the WNR proton beam may be varied to optimize neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements covering the energy range from several hundred MeV to a few meV. The neutronics of the WNR target and target/moderator configurations have been calculated from 800 MeV to 0.5 eV. About 11 neutrons per proton are predicted for the existing Ta target. Some initial neutron TOF data are presented and compared with calculations

  2. Establishing design basis threats for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetvergov, S.

    2001-01-01

    government troops of neighboring countries on the west and east of the Republic of Kazakhstan against extremist and terrorist groups that have a goal to come to power in separate regions and to establish terrorist regimes. This factor is an essential issue because of the high level of training and equipment of terrorist groups that repeatedly accomplish terrorist actions within the territory of Russia and Uzbekistan, with grave consequences for the population; High mercantile interest to the uranium pellets, including the production of Ulba metallurgical plant, of the groups that want to have high profit due to stealing of these materials and their resale to third parties. This tendency is confirmed by the recent statistic data, because only during the period from July 1999 to March 2000 three criminal groups were captured in the RK that had nuclear fuel pellets with enrichment of U-235 up to 4.4% for resale to third parties; As was registered by international agencies through the territory of the RK (because of its geographic location), the ways of illegal drugs transfer are passing. It is also possible with respect to illegal transit of nuclear and radioactive materials. Stages for Establishing of Design Basis Threat - Training: In 1998, jointly with Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the US, a training seminar on assessment of physical protection system of research nuclear reactor WWR-K of NNC was carried out; In 1999, jointly with the national security agencies, practical training on assessment of physical protection system of commercial nuclear plant BN-350 in Aktau was carried out; In May 2000, jointly with the German Society of Nuclear Reactors and Facilities Security, a training seminar was carried out on establishing a design threat for hypothetical research reactor and creation of physical protection conception; Seminar on establishing of design basis threat according to IAEA methods, with attraction of international expertise (USA, Germany, Great Britain, France) is

  3. Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed

  4. Central collisions of heavy ion physics: Supplemental annual report, October 1, 1987-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, S.Y.

    1988-02-01

    This report briefly describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside in the six months from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1988. During this period, our program continues to focus on correlation studies in central collisions at the Bevalac and AGS energies, and neutrino interactions and oscillation studies at LAMPF

  5. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility: Project status and physics outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear physics research program planning, accelerator tunnel construction, and accelerator component development, assembly, and testing are under way at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia. CEBAF's 4-GeV, 200-μA superconducting recirculating accelerator will provide cw beam to simultaneous experiments in three end stations for studies of the nuclear many-body system, its quark substructure, and the strong and electroweak interactions governing this form of matter. An experimental program is being defined in collaboration with the user community. The experimental halls have been designed, and preliminary experimental equipment conceptual designs have been prepared. Planned for Hall A are two 4-GeV/c high-resolution (δp/p ≤ 10 -4 ) spectrometers (HRS) with moderate acceptance (∼8 msr) for a program of completely exclusive experiments in which the nuclear final state has to be fully specified. A CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) is planned for the program of Hall B, which will include bias-free investigation of hadronic final states in inelastic electron scattering and detection of multiple-particle final states. The CLAS will be a multi-gap device based on a toroidal magnet with six superconducting coils arranged around the beamline to produce an essentially circular magnetic field. Hall C is envisioned as serving a diversity of interests, including form factor measurements, parity violation investigations, form factors of nucleon resonances, and a high-Q 2 baryon resonance program. A moderate-resolution, high-momentum, 6-GeV/c spectrometer (HMS) together with several specialized second arms -- in particular, a symmetric toroidal array spectrometer -- are being planned to carry out Hall C experimentation. 14 figs., 8 tabs

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  7. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  8. Lack of facilities rather than sociocultural factors as the primary barrier to physical activity among female Saudi university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Anastasia; Nistrup, Anne; Al-Rammah, Tamader Y; Aro, Arja R

    2015-01-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is experiencing a dramatic increase in physical inactivity, with women having higher levels of inactivity than men among all age groups. It is assumed that factors such as dress codes, restrictions on going outdoors, and conservative norms are the main reasons for women's low physical activity. Our aim was to explore the different parameters related to physical activity, including self-efficacy, as well as the perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity in young Saudi females. Ninety-four first-year female Saudi university students in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the present study in 2014. The students were from eight bachelor's programs in health and well-being, and each completed a questionnaire with questions divided into five parts as follows: 1) socioeconomic status, 2) physical activity, 3) self-efficacy 4) social factors, and 5) barriers and facilitators related to physical activity. The students exercised at home and alone, and there was low self-efficacy for physical activity (mean score =42±14). Among social factors, attending university was the only factor that hindered physical activity (32%). Physical activity was positively perceived overall (mean score =131±10). Students showed awareness of the benefits of physical activity for health and well-being. The most important barrier was the lack of designated areas available for physical activity. Students disagreed that family or the Islamic community were barriers to physical activity. The lack of facilities and lack of encouragement from the university, but not a lack of knowledge (a high level of knowledge is to be expected given their health and well-being studies backgrounds) and/or restrictions from families and society, seem to hinder female students' physical activity, at least young Saudi students.

  9. Healthscapes: the role of the facility and physical environment on consumer attitudes, satisfaction, quality assessments, and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, J D; Richardson, L D

    1995-01-01

    The role of the health care physical or tangible environment, including the facility, is essentially an unstudied area. This article identifies and defines components of "atmospherics" concerning health care (Healthscapes), to assess their strengths and predictiveness in the relationship between patient and other customer outcomes, satisfaction, quality assessments, intention to return, and willingness to recommend a health care provider to others and to propose much needed research in the area.

  10. Report of the 1983 HEPAP Subpanel on New Facilities for the US high-energy physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The 1983 Subpanel on New Facilities of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) was formed in February 1983 and completed its report in July 1983. During the intervening 5 months the Subpanel held site meetings at three major accelerator laboratories, heard formal presentations from a number of prominent physicists, received almost 200 letters from members of the high energy physics community, and studied in depth all of the relevant written material. The final recommendations were arrived at after two lengthy deliberative meetings held in June and July at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Study Center at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and at the Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University. The recommendations arrived at by the Subpanel are as follows: (1) the Subpanel unanimously recommends the immediate initiation of a multi-TeV high-luminosity proton-proton collider project with the goal of physics experiments at this facility at the earliest possible date; (2) the Subpanel recommends the rapid completion of current construction projects, Tevatron and the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the upgrading of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) and associated detectors, and the thorough utilization of all existing facilities; (3) the Subpanel recommends that Fermilab not proceed at this time with the Dedicated Collider (DC); (4) by a majority vote, the Subpanel recommends that the Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) project at Brookhaven not be approved; (5) the Subpanel recommends that technology research and development, particularly advanced accelerator research and development, be strongly supported

  11. The physical environment, activity and interaction in residential care facilities for older people: a comparative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Susanna; McKee, Kevin; Wallinder, Maria; von Koch, Lena; Wijk, Helle; Elf, Marie

    2017-12-01

    The physical environment is of particular importance for supporting activities and interactions among older people living in residential care facilities (RCFs) who spend most of their time inside the facility. More knowledge is needed regarding the complex relationships between older people and environmental aspects in long-term care. The present study aimed to explore how the physical environment influences resident activities and interactions at two RCFs by using a mixed-method approach. Environmental assessments were conducted via the Swedish version of the Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix (S-SCEAM), and resident activities, interactions and locations were assessed through an adapted version of the Dementia Care Mapping (DCM). The Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS) was used to assess residents' affective states. Field notes and walk-along interviews were also used. Findings indicate that the design of the physical environment influenced the residents' activities and interactions. Private apartments and dining areas showed high environmental quality at both RCFs, whereas the overall layout had lower quality. Safety was highly supported. Despite high environmental quality in general, several factors restricted resident activities. To optimise care for older people, the design process must clearly focus on accessible environments that provide options for residents to use the facility independently. © 2016 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Status and future program of reactor physics experiments in JAERI Critical facilities, FCA and TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shigeaki; Osugi, Toshitaka; Nakajima, Ken; Suzaki, Takenori; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    1999-01-01

    The critical facilities in JAERI, FCA (Fast Critical Assembly) and TCA (Tank-type Critical Assembly), have been used to provide integral data for evaluation of nuclear data as well as for development of various types of reactor since they went critical in 1960's. In this paper a review is presented on the experimental programs in both facilities. And the experimental programs in next 5 years are also shown. (author)

  13. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities – Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Huan Lan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available “Physical restraint” formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. Design: A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001 compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002; instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: −0.07, p < 0.001; β: −0.04, p = 0.056. The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers.

  14. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons

  15. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities; Proteccion Fisica De Los Materiales Y Las Instalaciones Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-15

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [Spanish] La proteccion fisica contra el robo o la desviacion no autorizada de materiales nucleares y contra el sabotaje de las instalaciones nucleares por parte de individuos o grupos es motivo de preocupacion nacional e internacional desde hace mucho tiempo. Aunque la obligacion de crear y hacer funcionar un sistema completo de proteccion fisica de las instalaciones y materiales nucleares en el territorio de un Estado determinado incumbe exclusivamente al Gobierno de dicho Estado, el que esa obligacion se cumpla o no, y si se cumple, en que medida o hasta que punto, son cosas que no dejan indiferentes a los demas Estados. Por ello, la proteccion fisica se ha convertido en motivo de interes y cooperacion internacional. La necesidad de la cooperacion internacional se hace evidente en los casos en que la eficacia de la proteccion fisica en el territorio de un Estado depende de que otros Estados tomen tambien medidas apropiadas para evitar o hacer fracasar los actos hostiles dirigidos contra instalaciones y

  16. Safeguards-by-Design: Early Integration of Physical Protection and Safeguardability into Design of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bean; S. DeMuth; P. Durst; M. Ehinger; M. Golay; D. Hebditch; J. Hockert; J. Morgan

    2009-09-01

    The application of a Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process for new nuclear facilities has the potential to minimize proliferation and security risks as the use of nuclear energy expands worldwide. This paper defines a generic SBD process and its incorporation from early design phases into existing design / construction processes and develops a framework that can guide its institutionalization. SBD could be a basis for a new international norm and standard process for nuclear facility design. This work is part of the U.S. DOE’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and is jointly sponsored by the Offices of Non-proliferation and Nuclear Energy.

  17. Public facilities accessibility for people with physical disabilities in major towns of the gorenjska region

    OpenAIRE

    Dovč, Tjaša

    2017-01-01

    People with physical disabilities represent a very diverse group of people with special needs. Physical disabilities differ according to the type and the degree of impairment. Some individuals are physically impaired to the extent that they need a wheelchair to cover the distance or for any kind of mobility. However, a wheelchair in and of itself does not suffice for their ability to cover the distance, successful integration into society and the fulfilling daily life. Adjustments and accessi...

  18. Barriers to physical activity in chronic hemodialysis patients: a single-center pilot study in an Italian dialysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaccadori, Enrico; Sabatino, Alice; Schito, Franco; Angella, Francesca; Malagoli, Martina; Tucci, Marco; Cupisti, Adamasco; Capitanini, Alessandro; Regolisti, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In patients on chronic dialysis a sedentary lifestyle is a strong, yet potentially modifiable, predictor of mortality. The present single-center pilot study evaluated social, psychological and clinical barriers that may hinder physical activity in this population. We explored the association between barriers to physical activity and sedentarism in adult patients at a chronic dialysis facility in Parma, Italy. We used different questionnaries exploring participation in physical activity, physical functioning, patient attitudes and preferences, and barriers to physical activity perceived by either patients or dialysis doctors and nurses. We enrolled 104 patients, (67 males, 65%), mean age 69 years (79% of patients older than 60 years); median dialysis vintage 60 months (range 8-440); mean Charlson score 5.55, ADL (Activities of Daily Living) score 5.5. Ninety-two participants (88.5%) reported at least one barrier to physical activity. At multivariable analysis, after adjusting for age and sex, feeling to have too many medical problems (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.27 to 7.07; P=0.012), chest pain (OR 10.78, 95% CI 1.28 to 90.28; P=0.029) and sadness (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.10 to 6.09; P=0.030) were independently associated with physical inactivity. Lack of time for exercise counseling and the firm belief about low compliance/interest by the patients toward exercise were the most frequent barriers reported by doctors and nurses. We identified a number of patient-related and health personnel-related barriers to physical activity in patients on chronic dialysis. Solutions for these barriers should be addressed in future studies aimed at increasing the level of physical activity in this population. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Lack of facilities rather than sociocultural factors as the primary barrier to physical activity among female Saudi university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anastasia Samara,1 Anne Nistrup,1 Tamader Y AL-Rammah,2 Arja R Aro11Unit for Health Promotion and Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark; 2Faculty of Rehabilitation and Health Sciences, Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaPurpose: The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is experiencing a dramatic increase in physical inactivity, with women having higher levels of inactivity than men among all age groups. It is assumed that factors such as dress codes, restrictions on going outdoors, and conservative norms are the main reasons for women’s low physical activity. Our aim was to explore the different parameters related to physical activity, including self-efficacy, as well as the perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity in young Saudi females.Patients and methods: Ninety-four first-year female Saudi university students in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the present study in 2014. The students were from eight bachelor’s programs in health and well-being, and each completed a questionnaire with questions divided into five parts as follows: 1 socioeconomic status, 2 physical activity, 3 self-efficacy 4 social factors, and 5 barriers and facilitators related to physical activity.Results: The students exercised at home and alone, and there was low self-efficacy for physical activity (mean score =42±14. Among social factors, attending university was the only factor that hindered physical activity (32%. Physical activity was positively perceived overall (mean score =131±10. Students showed awareness of the benefits of physical activity for health and well-being. The most important barrier was the lack of designated areas available for physical activity. Students disagreed that family or the Islamic community were barriers to physical activity.Conclusion: The lack of facilities and lack of encouragement from the university, but not a lack of knowledge (a high level of

  20. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO_2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different "1"3"7Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662 keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. - Highlights: • A gamma irradiation facility for chronic exposures of cells was set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. • The dose rate uniformity and the percentage of primary 662 keV photons on the sample are greater than 92% and 80%, respectively. • The GEANT4 code was used to design the facility. • Good agreement between simulation and experimental dose rate measurements has been obtained. • The facility will allow to safely investigate different issues about low dose rate effects on cultured cells.

  1. Design basis threat analysis and implementation of the physical protection system at Nuclear Facility of BATAN Yogyakarta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip

    2005-01-01

    An analysis to determine the design basis threat (DBT) and its follow-up through the implementation of physical protection system at the nuclear facility of BATAN Yogyakarta has been done. Methodology used for the analysis is based on the IAEA guidance for the development and maintenance of a DBT. Based on the analysis results, it can be concluded that the threat motivation is influenced by political situation (related to the government policy), criminal, sabotage and theft. The characteristics of threats are: not so well organized, terror, theft of materials information, involving insider (collusion), and intimidation to workers. Potential threat could from guests/students who take a practical job or laboratory exercise. Therefore, it is necessary to be anticipated the possibility and its impact of turmoil/demonstrators such as destruction of: lighting, road, fence, sabotage on the electric and communication lines, surrounding the Yogyakarta nuclear facility

  2. HUGS at CEBAF [Hampton University Graduate Studies at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] June 6--24, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Topics discussed in this paper are: Physics thru the last 80 years; low energy neutron physics at LAMPF; experiments on P-violation; nucleon structure structure and nucleon resonances; electro-excitation of nucleon resonances; electron scattering (e,e'p) experiments; quasielastic scattering of electron with nucleus (introduction to (e,e'P) experiment); CEBAF's machine; quantum hadrodynamics-QHD-1 the Walecka model; relativistic nuclear dynamics; hybrid models and QCD; and modeling confinement: poor man's version

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (comps.)

    1980-05-01

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B.

    1980-05-01

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I

  5. The relationship between physical activity, and physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootsman, Natalia J M; Skinner, Tina L; Lal, Ravin; Glindemann, Delma; Lagasca, Carmela; Peeters, G M E E Geeske

    2018-02-01

    Insight into modifiable factors related to falls risk in older adults living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) is necessary to tailor preventive strategies for this high-risk population. Associations between physical activity (PA), physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning have been understudied in aged care residents. This study investigated associations between PA, and both physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in RACFs. Cross-sectional study. Forty-four residents aged 85±8years were recruited from four RACFs located in Southeast Queensland. PA was assessed as the average time spent walking in hours/day using activPAL3™. Physical performance tests included balance, gait speed, dual-task ability, reaction time, coordination, grip strength, and leg strength and power. Psycho-cognitive questionnaires included quality of life, balance confidence, fear of falling and cognitive functioning. Associations between PA and each outcome measure were analysed using linear or ordinal regression models. The average time spent walking was 0.5±0.4h/day. Higher levels of PA were significantly associated with better balance (compared with low PA, medium: B=1.6; high: B=1.3) and dual-task ability (OR=7.9 per 0.5h/day increase). No statistically significant associations were found between PA and the other physical and psycho-cognitive measures. More physically active residents scored higher on balance and dual-task ability, which are key predictors of falls risk. This suggests that physical activity programs targeting balance and dual-task ability could help prevent falls in aged care residents. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  7. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS: background, aims and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marginean Roxana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a stakeholder analysis, (b international literature reviews, (c Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental

  8. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS): background, aims and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Prisca; Becker, Thomas; Losert, Carolin; Alptekin, Köksal; Berti, Loretta; Burti, Lorenzo; Burton, Alexandra; Dernovsek, Mojca; Dragomirecka, Eva; Freidl, Marion; Friedrich, Fabian; Genova, Aneta; Germanavicius, Arunas; Halis, Ulaş; Henderson, John; Hjorth, Peter; Lai, Taavi; Larsen, Jens Ivar; Lech, Katarzyna; Lucas, Ramona; Marginean, Roxana; McDaid, David; Mladenova, Maya; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Paziuc, Alexandru; Paziuc, Petronela; Priebe, Stefan; Prot-Klinger, Katarzyna; Wancata, Johannes; Kilian, Reinhold

    2009-01-01

    Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii) identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii) at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a) stakeholder analysis, (b) international literature reviews, (c) Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d) focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental disorders must take into

  9. Study of the calibration of the medical physics department - radon dosimeter in a radon facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikololpoulos, D.; Louizi, A.; Papadimitriou, D.; Proukakis, C.

    1997-01-01

    Several techniques have been developed to measure radon indoors.The use of a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector closed in a cup, has turned out to be the most appropriate for long term measurements. The Medical Physics Department of the Athens University is carrying out radon measurements in dwellings, apartments, outdoor air and mines since 1996. For this purpose a simple device, the so called Medical Physics Department radon dosimeter, has been constructed, which measures the radon concentration averaged over a long period of time. In the present paper the calibration technique introduced and the results of the calibration of the Medical Physics Department. (authors)

  10. Physics issues related to the confinement of ICF experiments in the US National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.; Anderson, A.; Latkowski, J.

    1995-04-01

    ICF experiments planned for the proposed US National Ignition Facility (NIF) will produce emissions of neutrons, x rays, debris, and shrapnel. The NIF Target Area (TA) must acceptably confine these emissions and respond to their effects to allow an efficient rate of experiments, from 600 to possibly 1500 per year, and minimal down time for maintenance. Detailed computer code predictions of emissions are necessary to study their effects and impacts on Target Area operations. Preliminary results show that the rate of debris shield transmission loss (and subsequent periodicity of change-out) due to ablated material deposition is acceptable, neutron effects on optics are manageable, and preliminary safety analyses show a facility rating of low hazard, non-nuclear. Therefore, NIF Target Area design features such as fused silica debris shields, refractory first wall coating, and concrete shielding are effective solutions to confinement of ICF experiment emissions

  11. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  12. A facility to search for hidden particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, Sergey; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristóbal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvêa, André; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P S; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Björn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F; Goodsell, Mark D; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Morrissey, David E; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Reno, Mary Hall; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (search for hidden particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, [Formula: see text] and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the standard model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals-scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the standard model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation.

  13. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  14. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  15. Contribution to the radiological Security in hospital facilities: The graduate in Physics Prescribes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, O.; Manso, M.V.; Gelen, A.; Alvarez, I.; Alfonso, R.; Borron, M.; Morales, J.A.; Jova, L.; Fraxedas, R.

    1998-01-01

    The graduate in Physics Prescribes, it allows the training, recalificacion and academic superacion he gives the technical staff that he works in the medical services he gives the different institutions he gives the National Health System

  16. Rehabilitation of teenagers of patients by a cerebral paralysis by facilities of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindiuk P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Influence of physical exercises is investigated in combination with mobile games on power supply of organism of teenagers of patients by a cerebral paralysis. In research took part 16 schoolchildren of teens with the spastic cerebral paralysis. For determination of their functional preparedness multivariable express diagnostics of S.A. Dushanin was utillized. It is recommended in the lessons of physical culture to include the specially organized mobile games, elements of cross-country race preparation and employment on exercise bicycle. It is set that an early and successive rehabilitation and physical education is instrumental in maximally complete renewal of the lost functions. It is marked that the index of maximal consumption of oxygen was increased on 7,4%, to the aerobic economy - on 3,1%. It is set that the lessons of physical culture in growth of indexes of functional preparation were instrumental.

  17. The Effect of New Shower Facilities on Physical Activity Behaviors of Employees: A Quasi-experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Eileen K; Pérez, Adriana; Ranjit, Nalini; Amick, Benjamin C; Kohl, Harold W

    2017-02-01

    This quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of new workplace showers on physical activity behaviors in a sample of downtown employees in Austin, TX. The study design was quasi-experimental with 2 comparison groups. Data were collected via internet-based surveys before and 4 months after shower installation at 1 worksite. Differences across study groups in the ranks of change in past-week minutes of physical activity from baseline to follow-up were assessed. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for reporting an increase of ≥10 min past-week physical activity and workday physical activity among those with new showers and existing showers relative to those with no showers were also assessed. No significant differences in changes in physical activity from baseline to follow-up across study groups were found. One-quarter of participants with new workplace showers and 46.9% of those with existing workplace showers at baseline reported ever using the showers. This prospective study did not find significant changes in employee physical activity 4 months after installation of worksite showers. Worksite shower users were highly active at baseline, suggesting a possible early adopter effect, with potential for diffusion. Future studies may benefit from longer exposure times and larger samples.

  18. Universal experimental facility for investigation in the field of radiation physics of solids and physics of atomic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtebaev, N.; Burminskii, V.; Dzhazairov-Kahramanov, V.; Zazulin, D.M.; Zarifov, R.; Berger, V.

    2001-01-01

    The modern experimental data concerning structure of atomic nuclei are insufficient for solving fundamental problems of physics. Lack of information is especially sensitive in the field of low-energy nuclear interactions, where a lot of uncertainties related to the processes of interaction between very low energy charged particles and nuclei, exist. Last time nuclear astrophysics has strongly developed, and astrophysicists need new reliable data on the cross-sections of the reactions involving low-energy light nuclei. The problems of controlled thermonuclear synthesis and medical practice suffer from lack of information of this sort too. One can obtain these data, provided the precision experiments, in particular, on measurement of the cross-sections of the reactions (p, g) and (p, a) on light nuclei, which accompany processes of star burning. In this work the beam of protons accelerated to 1.2 MeV is used

  19. Ensuring preservation of nuclear materials at RT plant storage facilities by upgrading physical protection, containment (TID) and TV surveillance measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The upgrading of nuclear material (NM) physical protection system of storage facilities for plutonium dioxide has been carried out in the frame of contract between Sandia National Laboratories and PA Mayak. The implementation of this project is of great importance for ensuring the preservation of NM in storage. The project envisages a complex approach to the solution of the task: the use of engineered fences, detection means, observation devices, access and control thereof for the personnel; the organization of security force in such way that to give a possibility to take adequate and purposeful actions towards possible adversaries. The design includes upgrading the system for physical protection through the introduction of modern, efficient engineering devices for security, integrated system for access control and security, the system for TV surveillance [ru

  20. Physics Physics Annual Review, 1 April 1981-31 March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    In medium-energy pion physics, considerable progress has been made in understanding the propagation and absorption of pions (deltas) in the nuclear medium. An experiment to study neutrino oscillations is being planned at LAMPF with substantial involvement from Argonne. A major effort is being devoted to the scientific and technical considerations involved in proposing to build a multi-GeV C.W. electron accelerator: GEM at Argonne. In heavy-ion physics, the superconducting linac booster is being used with increasing scientific profit. Construction of the ATLAS facility began in FY 1982 and all progress has been on schedule. The importance of the time component of the weak axial-vector current has been studied through the #betta# decay of 16 N. A precision measurement is under way of the 7 Be(p,#betta#) cross section, one of the key components in the solar neutrino anomaly. In nuclear theory, the coupled-channel code for treating heavy-ion inelastic scattering was completed and application to particular experiments began. Nuclear structure theory was applied to interpret decays of high-spin states and inelastic pion scattering. Results of particular interest were obtained in the nuclear force program where the inclusion of 3-body forces led to simultaneous improvement in the binding of 3 He and 4 He and saturation of nuclear matter. The atomic physics research consists of six experimental programs as follows: (1) dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets; (2) electron spectroscopy with fast atomic and molecular-ion beams; (3) beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions; (4) photoionization-photoelectron research; (5) high-resolution, laser-rf spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams; and (6) theoretical atomic physics

  1. Physics Physics Annual Review, 1 April 1981-31 March 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-12-01

    In medium-energy pion physics, considerable progress has been made in understanding the propagation and absorption of pions (deltas) in the nuclear medium. An experiment to study neutrino oscillations is being planned at LAMPF with substantial involvement from Argonne. A major effort is being devoted to the scientific and technical considerations involved in proposing to build a multi-GeV C.W. electron accelerator: GEM at Argonne. In heavy-ion physics, the superconducting linac booster is being used with increasing scientific profit. Construction of the ATLAS facility began in FY 1982 and all progress has been on schedule. The importance of the time component of the weak axial-vector current has been studied through the ..beta.. decay of /sup 16/N. A precision measurement is under way of the /sup 7/Be(p,..gamma..) cross section, one of the key components in the solar neutrino anomaly. In nuclear theory, the coupled-channel code for treating heavy-ion inelastic scattering was completed and application to particular experiments began. Nuclear structure theory was applied to interpret decays of high-spin states and inelastic pion scattering. Results of particular interest were obtained in the nuclear force program where the inclusion of 3-body forces led to simultaneous improvement in the binding of /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He and saturation of nuclear matter. The atomic physics research consists of six experimental programs as follows: (1) dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets; (2) electron spectroscopy with fast atomic and molecular-ion beams; (3) beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions; (4) photoionization-photoelectron research; (5) high-resolution, laser-rf spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams; and (6) theoretical atomic physics. (WHK)

  2. Physical protection of nuclear facilities. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, L.D. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    Major activities during the fourth quarter of FY78 included (1) the vital area analysis of operational reactors and characterization of the Standardized Nuclear Unit Power Plant System (SNUPPS), (2) the algorithm development of a new pathfinding computer code, (3) the completion of contractor-supported work for the component generic data base, (4) the refinement of tests related to human parameters modeling, and (5) the addition of improvements to and demonstration of the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP), and Fixed-Site Neutralization Model (FSNM) methodologies.

  3. Methods of correction of carriage of junior schoolchildren by facilities of physical exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagara V.F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of influence of methods of physical rehabilitation on the organism of children are resulted. In research took part 16 children of lower school with the scoliotic changes of pectoral department of spine. The complex of methods of physical rehabilitation included special correction and general health-improving exercises, medical gymnastics, correction position. Employments on a medical gymnastics during 30-45 minutes 3-4 times per a week were conducted. The improvement of indexes of mobility of spine and state of carriage of schoolchildren is marked. The absolute indexes of the state of carriage and flexibility of spine considerably got around physiology sizes. A rehabilitation complex which includes the elements of correction gymnastics is recommended, medical physical culture, correction, massage of muscles of trunk, position. It is also necessary to adhere to the rational mode of day and feed, provide the normative parameters of working furniture and self-control of the state of carriage.

  4. Physics design of the CIADS 25 MeV demo facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shu-Hui, E-mail: liush@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Huan [Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); He, Yuan, E-mail: hey@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dou, Wei-Ping; Qin, Yuan-Shuai; Chen, Wei-Long [Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan, Fang [Institute of High Energy Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-01-21

    A superconducting linac has been proposed and under constructed to demonstrate the key technology and the feasibility for CIADS(China Initiative Accelerator Driven System)linac. This linac will accelerate the 10 mA proton beam to 25 MeV. There are some challenges in the physics design for the high power superconducting accelerator. In this paper, we focus on the matching between different cryomodules (CMs) and the frequency jump. This paper presents the physics design study together with the design principles and the simulation results with machine errors.

  5. A facility to Search for Hidden Particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case

    CERN Document Server

    Alekhin, Sergey; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristobal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvea, Andre; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P.S.; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F.; Goodsell, Mark D.; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H.; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Morrissey, David E.; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Reno, Mary Hall; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W.; Zurek, Kathryn M.; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2016-10-24

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\\tau\\to 3\\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals - scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed....

  6. High energy density physics studies at the facility for antiprotons and ion research: the HEDgeHOB collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Stoehlker, T.; Geissel, H.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Piriz, A.R.; Redmer, R.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    The forthcoming Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, is going to be a unique accelerator facility that will deliver high quality, strongly bunched, well focused, intense beams of heavy ions that will lead to unprecedented specific power deposition in solid matter. This will generate macroscopic samples of High Energy Density (HED) matter with fairly uniform physical conditions. These samples can be used to study the thermophysical and transport properties of HED matter. Extensive theoretical work has been carried out over the past decade to design numerous dedicated experiments to study HED physics at the FAIR, which has provided the basis for the HEDgeHOB (High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams) scientific proposal. This work is still in progress as the feasibility studies for more experimental schemes are being carried out. Another, very important research area that will benefit tremendously from the FAIR facility, is the production of radioactive beams. A superconducting fragment separator, Super-FRS is being designed for the production and separation of rare radioactive isotopes. Unlike the HED targets, the Super-FRS production target should not be destroyed or damaged by the beam, but should remain intact during the long experimental campaign. However, the high level of specific power deposited in the production target by the high intensity ion beam at FAIR, could cause serious problems to the target survival. These HED issues related to the Super-FRS production target are also discussed in the present paper (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. The association between the physical environment and the well-being of older people in residential care facilities: A multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Susanna; McKee, Kevin; Wijk, Helle; Elf, Marie

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the associations between the quality of the physical environment and the psychological and social well-being of older people living in residential care facilities. Many older people in care facilities have cognitive and physical frailties and are at risk of experiencing low levels of well-being. High-quality physical environments can support older people as frailty increases and promote their well-being. Although the importance of the physical environment for residents' well-being is recognized, more research is needed. A cross-sectional survey of 20 care facilities from each of which 10 residents were sampled. As the individual resident data were nested in the facilities, a multilevel analysis was conducted. Data were collected during 2013 and 2014. The care facilities were purposely sampled to ensure a high level of variation in their physical characteristics. Residents' demographic and health data were collected via medical records and interviews. Residents' well-being and perceived quality of care were assessed via questionnaires and interviews. Environmental quality was assessed with a structured observational instrument. Multilevel analysis indicated that cognitive support in the physical environment was associated with residents' social well-being, after controlling for independence and perceived care quality. However, no significant association was found between the physical environment and residents' psychological well-being. Our study demonstrates the role of the physical environment for enhancing the social well-being of frail older people. Professionals and practitioners involved in the design of care facilities have a responsibility to ensure that such facilities meet high-quality specifications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Physical and Experimental Background of the Design of the ELISE Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Heinemann, B.; Nocentini, R.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 the IPP RF driven negative hydrogen ion source was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design of the Neutral Beam Test Facility in Padua and its commissioning and operating phases, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) for a large-scale extraction from a half-size ITER RF source. Plasma operation of up to one hour is foreseen; but due to the limits of the IPP HV system, pulsed extraction only is possible. The extraction system is designed for acceleration of negative ions of up to 60 kV. The start of the ELISE operation is planned for middle of 2010. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. The design was also supported by diagnostics and modeling efforts of the processes leading to negative ion production and extraction in a RF source.

  9. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  10. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  11. Physical inventory verification exercise at a light-water reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosler, G.E.; Menlove, H.O.; Halbig, J.K.

    1986-04-01

    A simulated physical inventory verification exercise was performed at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 1 reactor. Inspectors from the Internatinal Atomic Energy Agency made measurements on fresh- and spent-fuel assemblies and verified the special nuclear material inventory at TMI. Simulated inspection log sheets and computerized inspection reports were prepared

  12. The HEPCloud Facility: elastic computing for High Energy Physics – The NOvA Use Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuess, S. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Holzman, B. [Fermilab; Kennedy, R. [Fermilab; Norman, A. [Fermilab; Timm, S. [Fermilab; Tiradani, A. [Fermilab

    2017-03-15

    The need for computing in the HEP community follows cycles of peaks and valleys mainly driven by conference dates, accelerator shutdown, holiday schedules, and other factors. Because of this, the classical method of provisioning these resources at providing facilities has drawbacks such as potential overprovisioning. As the appetite for computing increases, however, so does the need to maximize cost efficiency by developing a model for dynamically provisioning resources only when needed. To address this issue, the HEPCloud project was launched by the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division in June 2015. Its goal is to develop a facility that provides a common interface to a variety of resources, including local clusters, grids, high performance computers, and community and commercial Clouds. Initially targeted experiments include CMS and NOvA, as well as other Fermilab stakeholders. In its first phase, the project has demonstrated the use of the “elastic” provisioning model offered by commercial clouds, such as Amazon Web Services. In this model, resources are rented and provisioned automatically over the Internet upon request. In January 2016, the project demonstrated the ability to increase the total amount of global CMS resources by 58,000 cores from 150,000 cores - a 25 percent increase - in preparation for the Recontres de Moriond. In March 2016, the NOvA experiment has also demonstrated resource burst capabilities with an additional 7,300 cores, achieving a scale almost four times as large as the local allocated resources and utilizing the local AWS s3 storage to optimize data handling operations and costs. NOvA was using the same familiar services used for local computations, such as data handling and job submission, in preparation for the Neutrino 2016 conference. In both cases, the cost was contained by the use of the Amazon Spot Instance Market and the Decision Engine, a HEPCloud component that aims at minimizing cost and job interruption. This paper

  13. The HEPCloud Facility: elastic computing for High Energy Physics - The NOvA Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Holzman, B.; Kennedy, R.; Norman, A.; Timm, S.; Tiradani, A.

    2017-10-01

    The need for computing in the HEP community follows cycles of peaks and valleys mainly driven by conference dates, accelerator shutdown, holiday schedules, and other factors. Because of this, the classical method of provisioning these resources at providing facilities has drawbacks such as potential overprovisioning. As the appetite for computing increases, however, so does the need to maximize cost efficiency by developing a model for dynamically provisioning resources only when needed. To address this issue, the HEPCloud project was launched by the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division in June 2015. Its goal is to develop a facility that provides a common interface to a variety of resources, including local clusters, grids, high performance computers, and community and commercial Clouds. Initially targeted experiments include CMS and NOvA, as well as other Fermilab stakeholders. In its first phase, the project has demonstrated the use of the “elastic” provisioning model offered by commercial clouds, such as Amazon Web Services. In this model, resources are rented and provisioned automatically over the Internet upon request. In January 2016, the project demonstrated the ability to increase the total amount of global CMS resources by 58,000 cores from 150,000 cores - a 38 percent increase - in preparation for the Recontres de Moriond. In March 2016, the NOvA experiment has also demonstrated resource burst capabilities with an additional 7,300 cores, achieving a scale almost four times as large as the local allocated resources and utilizing the local AWS s3 storage to optimize data handling operations and costs. NOvA was using the same familiar services used for local computations, such as data handling and job submission, in preparation for the Neutrino 2016 conference. In both cases, the cost was contained by the use of the Amazon Spot Instance Market and the Decision Engine, a HEPCloud component that aims at minimizing cost and job interruption. This paper

  14. Physics goals for the planned next linear collider engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.; Michelotti, L.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Syphers, M.; Bluem, H.; Todd, A.; Gai, W.; Power, J.; Simpson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) Collaboration is planning to construct an Engineering Test Facility (ETF) at Fermilab. As presently envisioned, the ETF would comprise a fundamental unit of the NLC main linac to include X-band klystrons and modulators, a delay-line power-distribution system (DLDS), and NLC accelerating structures that serve as loads. The principal purpose of the ETF is to validate stable operation of the power-distribution system, first without beam, then with a beam having the NLC pulse structure. This paper concerns the possibility of configuring and using the ETF to accelerate beam with an NLC pulse structure, as well as of doing experiments to measure beam-induced wakefields in the rf structures and their influence back on the beam

  15. Physics Goals for the Planned Next Linear Collider Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) Collaboration is planning to construct an Engineering Test Facility (ETF) at Fermilab. As presently envisioned, the ETF would comprise a fundamental unit of the NLC main linac to include X-band klystrons and modulators, a delay-line power-distribution system (DLDS), and NLC accelerating structures that serve as loads. The principal purpose of the ETF is to validate stable operation of the power distribution system, first without beam, then with a beam having the NLC pulse structure. This paper concerns the possibility of configuring and using the ETF to accelerate beam with an NLC pulse structure, as well as of doing experiments to measure beam-induced wakefields in the rf structures and their influence back on the beam

  16. Inference of physical phenomena from FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.; Damiano, B.; Campbell, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    The source of features observed in noise spectra collected by an automated data collection system operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) can be identified using a methodology based on careful data observation and intuition. When a large collection of data is available, as in this case, automatic pattern recognition and parameter storage and retrieval using a data base can be used to extract useful information. However, results can be limited to empirical signature comparison monitoring unless an effort is made to determine the noise sources. This paper describes the identification of several FFTF noise data phenomena and suggests how this understanding may lead to new or enhanced monitoring. 13 refs., 4 figs

  17. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  18. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Burst Physics and Cosmology with Next Generation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weimin; Amati, Lorenzo; Cannizzo, John K.; Cordier, Bertrand; Gehrels, Neil; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Götz, Diego; Produit, Nicolas; Qiu, Yulei; Sun, Jianchao; Tanvir, Nial R.; Wei, Jianyan; Zhang, Chen

    2016-12-01

    High-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) beyond redshift {˜}6 are potentially powerful tools to probe the distant early Universe. Their detections in large numbers and at truly high redshifts call for the next generation of high-energy wide-field instruments with unprecedented sensitivity at least one order of magnitude higher than the ones currently in orbit. On the other hand, follow-up observations of the afterglows of high-redshift GRBs and identification of their host galaxies, which would be difficult for the currently operating telescopes, require new, extremely large facilities of at multi-wavelengths. This chapter describes future experiments that are expected to advance this exciting field, both being currently built and being proposed. The legacy of Swift will be continued by SVOM, which is equipped with a set of space-based multi-wavelength instruments as well as and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The established Lobster-eye X-ray focusing optics provides a promising technology for the detection of faint GRBs at very large distances, based on which the THESEUS, Einstein Probe and other mission concepts have been proposed. Follow-up observations and exploration of the reionization era will be enabled by large facilities such as SKA in the radio, the 30 m class telescopes in the optical/near-IR, and the space-borne WFIRST and JWST in the optical/near-IR/mid-IR. In addition, the X-ray and γ-ray polarization experiment POLAR is also introduced.

  19. A facile physical approach to make chitosan soluble in acid-free water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yinghao; Xiao, Congming

    2017-10-01

    We changed the situation that chitosan was only dissolved in diluted acid through mild physical treatment. In viewing of the usual methods to modify chitosan are chemical ones, we established the approach by using a water-soluble chitosan derivative as the model polymer. Its water-solubility was modulated via changing the concentration of solution and varying the precipitants. Such a physical method was adopted to treat chitiosan. One gram chitosan was dissolved in a mixture of 100mL 10% acetic acid and 50mL methanol, and then precipitated from a precipitant consisted of 10mL ethanol and 90mL acetate ester. The treated chitosan became soluble in acid-free water completely, and its solubility was 8.02mg/mL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. USA/FBR program fast flux test facility startup physics and reactor characterization methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.A.; Harris, R.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-09-01

    Final confirmation of much of the engineering mockup work has been achieved in FTR zero-power experiments in February, 1980, and in power demonstration performed in December, 1980, and March, 1981. Final in-core low-power and high-power irradiation of spatially distributed radioactivants will be completed late in 1981. This paper describes physics experiments and present summaries of the extensive results accumulated to date. 53 figures

  1. Hot cell chemistry for isotope production at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.W.; Bentley, G.E.; Ott, M.A.; DeBusk, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    A family of standardized glass and plastic ware has been developed for the unit processes of dissolution, volume reduction, ion exchange, extraction, gasification, filtration, centrifugation, and liquid transfer in the hot cells. Computerized data handling and gamma pulse analysis have been applied to quality control and process development in hot cell procedures for production of isotopes for research in physics and medicine. The above has greatly reduced the time needed to set up for and produce a new isotope

  2. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1985-31 March 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    The highlight of the Argonne Physics Division during the past year (1985/86) has been the completion and dedication of the final superconducting linac stages of the ATLAS system and the beginning of the research program that utilizes the full capabilities of that system. The transition to using the full ATLAS and the new experimental area has been a smooth one and the research program is beginning to bear fruit. The experimental facilities have also come into operation with three major components, consisting of the first stage of a gamma detection system incorporating an array of Compton-suppressed germanium detectors and BGO total energy detectors, a magnetic spectrograph of the Enge split-pole design, with a focal-plane detector system adapted to heavy ions, and a new scattering facility with a number of features. Interesting new data are emerging on quasi-elastic processes, on the transition between fission and quasi-fission and the study of nuclear structure at high spin. The past year has also seen the merging of the nuclear research in the Argonne Chemistry Division, mostly in heavy-ion and medium-energy nuclear physics, with the Physics Division. The merger is leading to full cooperation within the larger group and will help broaden and strengthen the total effort in nuclear physics. In medium-energy physics the year has seen the successful execution of an experiment at the SLAC NPAS station to study the delta resonance in nuclei. Progress is being made in the effort at Fermilab on deep inelastic muon scattering, on the development of a tensor polarized gas deuterium target for use with storage rings, and on the LAMPF neutrino oscillation experiment. In theoretical nuclear physics an effort is continuing on investigating the relevant degrees of freedom in the microscopic dynamics of nuclei and the importance of three-body forces. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1985-31 March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The highlight of the Argonne Physics Division during the past year (1985/86) has been the completion and dedication of the final superconducting linac stages of the ATLAS system and the beginning of the research program that utilizes the full capabilities of that system. The transition to using the full ATLAS and the new experimental area has been a smooth one and the research program is beginning to bear fruit. The experimental facilities have also come into operation with three major components, consisting of the first stage of a gamma detection system incorporating an array of Compton-suppressed germanium detectors and BGO total energy detectors, a magnetic spectrograph of the Enge split-pole design, with a focal-plane detector system adapted to heavy ions, and a new scattering facility with a number of features. Interesting new data are emerging on quasi-elastic processes, on the transition between fission and quasi-fission and the study of nuclear structure at high spin. The past year has also seen the merging of the nuclear research in the Argonne Chemistry Division, mostly in heavy-ion and medium-energy nuclear physics, with the Physics Division. The merger is leading to full cooperation within the larger group and will help broaden and strengthen the total effort in nuclear physics. In medium-energy physics the year has seen the successful execution of an experiment at the SLAC NPAS station to study the delta resonance in nuclei. Progress is being made in the effort at Fermilab on deep inelastic muon scattering, on the development of a tensor polarized gas deuterium target for use with storage rings, and on the LAMPF neutrino oscillation experiment. In theoretical nuclear physics an effort is continuing on investigating the relevant degrees of freedom in the microscopic dynamics of nuclei and the importance of three-body forces. 51 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 2. 3. Solid state physics and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  5. The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility Project. The Physics Programme for the Multi-Purpose Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraksiev, N. S.; MPD Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) is a new accelerator complex being constructed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The general objective of the project is to provide beams for the experimental study of hot and dense strongly interacting QCD matter. The heavy ion programme includes two planned detectors: BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron) a fixed target experiment with extracted Nuclotron beams; and MPD (MultiPurpose Detector) a collider mode experiment at NICA. The accelerated particles can range from protons and light nuclei to gold ions. Beam energies will span\\sqrt{s}=12-27 GeV with luminosity L ≥ 1 × 1030 cm‑2s‑1 and \\sqrt{{s}NN}=4-11 GeV and average luminosity L = 1 × 1027cm‑2 s ‑1(for 197Au79+), respectively. A third experiment for spin physics is planned with the SPD (Spin Physics Detector) at the NICA collider in polarized beams mode. A brief overview of the MPD is presented along with several observables in the MPD physics programme.

  6. Recommendations on Physical Activity and Exercise for Older Adults Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Taskforce Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Morley, John E; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; H Pitkala, Kaisu; Weening-Djiksterhuis, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Barbagallo, Mario; Rosendahl, Erik; Sinclair, Alan; Landi, Francesco; Izquierdo, Mikel; Vellas, Bruno; Rolland, Yves

    2016-05-01

    A taskforce, under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-Global Aging Research Network (IAGG-GARN) and the IAGG European Region Clinical Section, composed of experts from the fields of exercise science and geriatrics, met in Toulouse, in December 2015, with the aim of establishing recommendations of physical activity and exercise for older adults living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Due to the high heterogeneity in terms of functional ability and cognitive function that characterizes older adults living in LTCFs, taskforce members established 2 sets of recommendations: recommendations for reducing sedentary behaviors for all LTCF residents and recommendations for defining specific, evidence-based guidelines for exercise training for subgroups of LTCF residents. To promote a successful implementation of recommendations, taskforce experts highlighted the importance of promoting residents' motivation and pleasure, the key factors that can be increased when taking into account residents' desires, preferences, beliefs, and attitudes toward physical activity and exercise. The importance of organizational factors related to LTCFs and health care systems were recognized by the experts. In conclusion, this taskforce report proposes standards for the elaboration of strategies to increase physical activity as well as to prescribe exercise programs for older adults living in LTCFs. This report should be used as a guide for professionals working in LTCF settings. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. IRPhE/RRR-SEG, Reactor Physics Experiments from Fast-Thermal Coupled Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Frank-Peter; Dietze, Klaus; Jacqmin, Robert; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description: The RRR-SEG-experiments have been performed to check neutron data of the most important reactor materials, especially of fission product nuclides, fuel isotopes and structural materials. The measured central reactivity worths (CRW) of small samples were compared with calculated values. These C/E-ratios have been used then for data corrections or in adjustment procedures. The reactor RRG-SEG (at RC Rossendorf / Germany) was a fast-thermal coupled facility of zero power. The annular thermal drivers were filled by fuel assemblies and moderated by water. The inner insertion lattices were loaded with pellets of fuel and other materials producing the fast neutron flux. The characteristics of the neutron and adjoint spectra were obtained by special arrangements of these pellets in unit cells. In this way, a hard or soft neutron spectrum or a special energy behavior of the adjoint function could be reached. The samples were moved by means of tubes to the central position (pile-oscillation technique). The original information about the facility and measurements is compiled in Note Technique SPRC/LEPh/93-230 (SEG) The SEG experiments are considered 'clean' integral experiments, simple and clear in geometry and well suited for calculation. In all SEG configurations only a few materials were used, most of these were standards. Due to the designed adjoint function (energy-independent or monotonously rising), the capture or scattering effect was dominant, convenient to check separately capture or scattering data. At first, analyses of the experiments have been performed in Rossendorf. Newer analyses were done later in Cadarache / CEA France using the European scheme for reactor calculation JEF-2.2 / ECCO / ERANOS (see Note Techniques and JEF/DOC-746). Furthermore, re-analyses were performed in O-arai / JNC Japan with the JNC standard route JENDL-3.2 / SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. Results obtained with both code systems and different data evaluations (JEF-2.2 and

  8. IRPhE/STEK, Reactor Physics Experiments from Fast-Thermal Coupled Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, Klaus; Klippel, Henk Th.; Koning, Arjan; Jacqmin, Robert

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description: The STEK-experiments have been performed to check neutron data of the most important reactor materials, especially of fission product nuclides, fuel isotopes and structural materials. The measured central reactivity worths (CRW) of small samples were compared with calculated values. These C/E-ratios have been used then for data corrections or in adjustment procedures. The reactors STEK (ECN Petten/ Netherlands) was a fast-thermal coupled facility of zero power. The annular thermal drivers were filled by fuel assemblies and moderated by water. The inner insertion lattices were loaded with pellets of fuel and other materials producing the fast neutron flux. The characteristics of the neutron and adjoint spectra were obtained by special arrangements of these pellets in unit cells. In this way, a hard or soft neutron spectrum or a special energy behavior of the adjoint function could be reached. The samples were moved by means of tubes to the central position (pile-oscillation technique). The original information about the facility and measurements is compiled in RCN-209, ECN-10 The 5 STEK configurations cover a broad energy range due to their increasing softness. The experiments are very valuable because of the extensive program of sample reactivity measurements with many fission product nuclides important in reactor burn-up calculations. At first, analyses of the experiments have been performed in Petten. Newer analyses were done later in Cadarache / CEA France using the European scheme for reactor calculation JEF-2.2 / ECCO / ERANOS (see Note Techniques and JEF/DOC-746). Furthermore, re-analyses were performed in O-arai / JNC Japan with the JNC standard route JENDL-3.2 / SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. Results obtained with both code systems and different data evaluations (JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2) are compared in JEF/DOC-861. It contains the following documents: 31 Reports, 2 publications, 5 JEF documents, 4 conferences. 2 - Related or auxiliary programs

  9. FORMING OF EMOTIONAL FIRMNESS OF FUTURE PILOTS BY FACILITIES OF PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOPHYZIOLOGICAL PREPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Плачинда

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The main approaches regarding formation of mental stability of a future pilot and development of their psychophysiological qualities are suggested. The emotional stability indicators and the means of forming emotional firmness in special cases have been described. The author has paid  attention to the importance of psychological state recovery after the flight and the positive role  of physical training and psychophysiological preparation in the formation of professional efficiency of flight crew and professional longevity

  10. Physical and engineering aspects of a fusion engineering test facility based on mirror confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, T.; Hirayama, S.; Hojo, H.; Kozaki, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.

    1986-01-01

    Controlled fusion research has accomplished great progress in the field of confinement of high-density and high-temperature plasmas and breakeven experiments are expected before the end of the 1980s. Many experiments have been proposed as the next step for fusion research. Among them is the study of ignited plasmas and another is the study of fusion engineering. Some of the important studies in fusion engineering are the integrated test in a fusion reactor environment as well as tests of first-wall materials and of the reactor structures, and test for tritium breeding and blanket modules or submodules. An ideal neutron source for the study of fusion engineering is the deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasma itself. A neutron facility based on a D-T-burning plasma consists of all of the components that a real fusion power reactor would have, so eventually the integrated test for fusion reactor engineering can be done as well as the tests for each engineering component

  11. A facile method for preparation superhydrophobic paper with enhanced physical strength and moisture-proofing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yang, Jin; Li, Pan; Lan, Tianqing; Peng, Lincai

    2017-03-15

    We proposed a green and facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic paper in this study, which is layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of TiO 2 nanoparticles/sodium alginate (ALG) multilayers on paper surface followed by an adsorption treatment of colloidal carnauba wax. The formation of TiO 2 /ALG multilayers on paper surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), zeta potential measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The wetting property of modified paper was investigated by water contact angle (WCA) measurement. Moreover, the modified paper tensile strength has been evaluated. The results showed that WCA of paper modified with a wax-treated (TiO 2 /ALG) 3.5 multilayer reached up to 151.5°, and this obtained superhydrophobic paper exhibited improved tensile strength (increased by 4.1% compared to the pristine paper), excellent moisture-proofing property and high strength stability under high relative humidity condition, which might has a great potential for use in the liquid paper packaging and moisture-proof paper packaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preliminary reactor physics calculations for Exxon LWR fuel testing in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, W.O.; Nigg, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    The PFB reactor is being considered as an irradiation facility to test LWR fuel rods for Exxon Nuclear Company. Requested test conditions are 18 kW/ft axial peak steady state power in 2.5% initial enrichment, 20,000 MWd/Tu exposed rods. Multigroup transport theory calculations (S/sub n/ and Monte Carlo) showed that this was unattainable in the standard PBF test loop. Thus, a flux multiplier was developed in the form of a Zr-2-clad 0.15-inch thick cylindrical shell of 35% enriched, 88% T.D. UO 2 replacing the flow divider, surrounding the rod within the in-pile tube in PFB. With this flux multiplier installed and assuming an average water density of 0.86 g/cm 3 within the test loop, a Figure of Merit (FOM) for a single-rod test assembly of 0.86 kW/ft-MW +- 5% (at 95% confidence level) was calculated. This FOM is the axial peak linear test rod power per megawatt of reactor power. A reactor power of about 21 megawatts will therefore be required to supply the requested linear test rod axial peak heating rate of 18 kW/ft

  13. Analysis of core physics and thermal-hydraulics results of control rod withdrawal experiments in the LOFT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Chen, T.H.; Harvego, E.A.; Ollikkala, H.

    1983-01-01

    Two anticipated transient experiments simulating an uncontrolled control rod withdrawal event in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The scaled LOFT 50-MW(t) PWR includes most of the principal features of larger commercial PWRs. The experiments tested the ability of reactor analysis codes to accurately calculate core reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic phenomena in an integral reactor system. The initial conditions and scaled operating parameters for the experiments were representative of those expected in a commercial PWR. In both experiments, all four LOFT control rod assemblies were withdrawn at a reactor power of 37.5 MW and a system pressure of 14.8 MPa

  14. Research in experimental nuclear physics. Progress report, 1 April 1984-31 March 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel from the University of Texas at Austin at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) during the calendar year 1984. The research activities involved experiments done with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS), the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS), and some work has been done at Argonne National Laboratory and Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich, West Germany. A brief overview of work supported by this contract, a list of abstracts of papers reported at scientific meetings, and a list of published papers and preprints are given. These papers summarize experiments undertaken this year and in the proceeding year and indicate the work accomplished by the participants in this program of medium energy nuclear physics research. Studies include parameters of the neutron density distributions for the Ca isotopes for the analysis of π +- elastic scattering, the excitation of ΔS = 1 transitions via pion inelastic scattering in light nuclei, 12 C(π + ,π + ') inelastic scattering at very small angles, pion-induced double charge exchange reaction, and evidence for the population of a low-spin Δ-hole state at 248 MeV was found in 12 C via 13 C(p,d) 12 C* at 800 MeV

  15. AGOR: A superconducting cyclotron for light and heavy ions plans for experimental facilities and physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.

    1991-01-01

    The construction of the K600 superconducting cyclotron AGOR, a joint undertaking of the KVI Groningen and the Institut de Physique Nucleaire at Orsay, has reached the stage where the assembly of major subsystems is underway. Field measurements are scheduled to start in the fall of this year, beam tests should start at Orsay by the end of 1992 before AGOR final installation at Groningen. The beam guiding system, the location and equipments of the main experimental areas are currently being designed. Taking advantage of the broad range of ions and energies that AGOR will made available (from 200 MeV protons to 100 MeV/A α down to 6 MeV/A Pb ions), the first ideas about the physics research to be done will be presented. (author) 28 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Experiment to investigate anti ν/sub μ/ → anti ν/sub e/ oscillations at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, H.W.; Toevs, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment, being planned at LAMPF, aims to investigate a possible neutrino oscillation channel, anti ν/sub μ/ → anti ν/sub e/. If anti ν/sub μ/, produced in the LAMPF beam stop, oscillate to anti ν/sub e/, then interactions anti ν/sub e/ + p → e + + n, may be detected. A large volume liquid scintillator (4470 liter) emplaced at 33 m from the beam stop, detects e + and n, after moderation in the hydrogenous liquid and capture in Gd, loaded into the scintillator. Our anticipated signal rate is currently estimated at 1.67 (sigma m 2 ) 2 /day assuming full amplitude oscillation. The corresponding counting rate, assuming all anti ν/sub μ/ have oscillated to anti ν/sub e/ at the detector is 1.5/day. Cosmic rates are estimated at 0.033/day. Correlated backgrounds from the beam stop are calculated to be small in comparison to cosmic events, except for reactions of ν/sub e/ in Pb. These reactions may be reduced with an Fe shield within the detector. With the above rate, a limit on the sensitivity of our experiment for the value of sigma m 2 is estimated at 0.12 eV 2 with 70 days of counting. Detector features, estimated background rates, and sensitivity values are discussed

  17. Facilities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  18. Multisensory experiments and data acquisition systems on the meson facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes some of the multisensory experiments performed or being performed at the meson factories PSI (Switzerland), TRIUMF (Canada), LAMPF (USA), KEK (Japan), RAL (England) in order to investigate the fundamental processes in elementary particle physics. Designs of various detectors are briefly reviewed, the organizational ideology and the structure of the recording electronics and data acquisition systems for these experiments are considered. The ideology underlying the off-line analysis software is touched upon and the most important results of the investigations at meson factories are given

  19. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  20. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  1. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Olin, A.; Klumov, I.A.

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  2. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  3. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  4. A study on physics parameters and flux behaviour for a fast critical facility using ''Baker'' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Leilah, M.M.; Hussein, A.Z.; Gaafar, M.A.; Hamouda, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    Comparative study was performed to emphasize the effects of using different nuclear data systems and methods on the various parameters of the fast reactor. Multigroup libraries as 11 (ANL-5800) and 26 (BNAB-64) energy group systems of nuclear data constants were used in the present work. The calculations were carried out for both infinite dilution (self-shielding factor F= 1) and self-shielded cross sections. Various computer codes were elaborated and derived to meet the conditional requirements for such calculations. The important output of these calculations are the neutron spectra, neutron balance, fission and capture rate distributions, critical mass, breeding ratio in each region and total breeding ratio of the reactor. Five different cases of study were considered employing two systems of constants, infinite dilution and self-shielded cross-sections and treating stainless steel of the reactor as to be substituted by iron. Moreover, calculations have been concerned for averaged one group nuclear data constants which were condensed from the 11 and 26 group systems. Comparisons of the multigroup results with those of the group were made. The condensation process for averaging to one group was done to estimate the effect of such physical simplification on the calculated parameters. The present work results have been compared with many published works. Fair agreements are obtained, which varified the consistance and completeness of the methods implemented and used

  5. Armouring facility? Nuclear-weapon and reactor reseach at the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachtmann, R.; Walker, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics is best known as the place where Werner Heisenberg worked on nuclear weapons for Hitler. Although this is essentially true, there is more to the story. At the start of World War II this institute was taken over by the German Army Ordnance to be the central, but not exclusive site for a research project into the economic and military applications of nuclear fission. The Army physicist Kurt Diebner was installed in the institute as its commissarial director. Heisenberg was affiliated with the institute as an advisor at first, and became the director in 1942. Heisenberg and his colleagues, including in particular Karl-Heinz Hoecker, Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker, and Karl Wirtz, worked on nuclear reactors and isotope separation with the clear knowledge that these were two different paths to atomic bombs [Atombomben]. However, they were clearly ambivalent about what they were doing. New documents recently returned from Russian archives shed new light on this work and the scientists' motivations. (orig.)

  6. Facile approach to fabricate waterborne polyaniline nanocomposites with environmental benignity and high physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haihua; Wen, Huan; Hu, Bin; Fei, Guiqiang; Shen, Yiding; Sun, Liyu; Yang, Dong

    2017-03-01

    Waterborne polyaniline (PANI) dispersion has got extensive attention due to its environmental friendliness and good processability, whereas the storage stability and mechanical property have been the challenge for the waterborne PANI composites. Here we prepare for waterborne PANI dispersion through the chemical graft polymerisation of PANI into epichlorohydrin modified poly (vinyl alcohol) (EPVA). In comparison with waterborne PANI dispersion prepared through physical blend and in situ polymerisation, the storage stability of PANI-g-EPVA dispersion is greatly improved and the dispersion keeps stable for one year. In addition, the as-prepared PANI-g-EPVA film displays more uniform and smooth morphology, as well as enhanced phase compatibility. PANI is homogeneously distributed in the EPVA matrix on the nanoscale. PANI-g-EPVA displays different morphology at different aniline content. The electrical conductivity corresponds to 7.3 S/cm when only 30% PANI is incorporated into the composites, and then increases up to 20.83 S/cm with further increase in the aniline content. Simultaneously, the tensile strength increases from 35 MPa to 64 MPa. The as-prepared PANI-g-EPVA dispersion can be directly used as the conductive ink or coatings for cellulose fibre paper to prepare flexible conductive paper with high conductivity and mechanical property, which is also suitable for large scalable production.

  7. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  8. A Global Survey and Interactive Map Suite of Deep Underground Facilities; Examples of Geotechnical and Engineering Capabilities, Achievements, Challenges: (Mines, Shafts, Tunnels, Boreholes, Sites and Underground Facilities for Nuclear Waste and Physics R&D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, M. C.; Russell, G. P.; Perry, F.; Kelley, R.; Champenois, S. T.

    2017-12-01

    This global survey presents a synthesis of some notable geotechnical and engineering information reflected in four interactive layer maps for selected: 1) deep mines and shafts; 2) existing, considered or planned radioactive waste management deep underground studies, sites, or disposal facilities; 3) deep large diameter boreholes, and 4) physics underground laboratories and facilities from around the world. These data are intended to facilitate user access to basic information and references regarding deep underground "facilities", history, activities, and plans. In general, the interactive maps and database [http://gis.inl.gov/globalsites/] provide each facility's approximate site location, geology, and engineered features (e.g.: access, geometry, depth, diameter, year of operations, groundwater, lithology, host unit name and age, basin; operator, management organization, geographic data, nearby cultural features, other). Although the survey is not all encompassing, it is a comprehensive review of many of the significant existing and historical underground facilities discussed in the literature addressing radioactive waste management and deep mined geologic disposal safety systems. The global survey is intended to support and to inform: 1) interested parties and decision makers; 2) radioactive waste disposal and siting option evaluations, and 3) safety case development as a communication tool applicable to any mined geologic disposal facility as a demonstration of historical and current engineering and geotechnical capabilities available for use in deep underground facility siting, planning, construction, operations and monitoring.

  9. PROMILLE database as a part of JNC reactor physics analytical system for BFS-2 fast critical facility experiments analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, Sergey

    2000-12-01

    The PROMILLE database for experimental data from the BFS-2 fast critical facility (Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Russia) has been developed and embedded into the JNC reactor physics analytical system to provide a strict documentation format, a common data source for different analytical tools and a unique export interface with different reactor codes. PROMILLE should be considered not only as a database but also as a bank of interfaces because of its dynamic role in the analytical process. The database currently accepts data from the simulation materials (pellets, tubes and bars) as well as full cores descriptions. A core description involves all different unit cells forming loading elements, all types of the loading elements forming a layout and the layout itself. In fact it is a description of criticality experiments. Export interfaces for the CITATION-FBR code and the SLAROM and CASUP codes have been developed. The PROMILLE software was developed with MS Visual Basic 6.0 and the data is kept in the data tables generated with the MS Access database management system. Data for eight BFS-2 assembly configurations have been incorporated. They include BFS-58-1i1 uranium-free plutonium assembly with inert material included in its fuel matrix and also seven BFS-62 modifications simulating different stages of investigation of MOX fuel based BN-600 core. (author)

  10. The User Community and a Multi-Mission Data Project: Services, Experiences and Directions of the Space Physics Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Harris, B.; Johnson R.; King, J.; Kovalick, T.; hide

    2008-01-01

    From a user's perspective, the multi-mission data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project offer a unique range of important data and services highly complementary to other services presently available or now evolving in the international heliophysics data environment. The VSP (Virtual Space Physics Observatory) service is an active portal to a wide range of distributed data sources. CDAWeb (Coordinate Data Analysis Web) enables plots, listings and file downloads for current data cross the boundaries of missions and instrument types (and now including data from THEMIS and STEREO). SSCWeb, Helioweb and our 3D Animated Orbit Viewer (TIPSOD) provide position data and query logic for most missions currently important to heliophysics science. OMNIWeb with its new extension to 1- and 5-minute resolution provides interplanetary parameters at the Earth's bow shock as a unique value-added data product. SPDF also maintains NASA's CDF (common Data Format) standard and a range of associated tools including translation services. These capabilities are all now available through webservices-based APIs as well as through our direct user interfaces. In this paper, we will demonstrate the latest data and capabilities now supported in these multi-mission services, review the lessons we continue to learn in what science users need and value in this class of services, and discuss out current thinking to the future role and appropriate focus of the SPDF effort in the evolving and increasingly distributed heliophysics data environment.

  11. Parametric studies of target/moderator configurations for the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Seeger, P.A.; Fluharty, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    Parametric studies, using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, were done to optimize the neutronics of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) target and three possible target/moderator configurations: slab target/slab moderators, cylindrical target/cylindrical moderator, and cylindrical target/double-wing moderators. The energy range was 0.5 eV to 800 MeV. A general figure-of-merit (FOM) approach was used. The WNR facility performance can be doubled or tripled by optimizing the target and target/moderator configurations; this approach is more efficient than increasing the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator power by an equivalent factor. A bare target should be used for neutron energies above approximately 100 keV. The FOM for the slab target/slab moderator configuration is the best by a factor of at least 2 to 3 below approximately 1 keV. The total neutron leakage from 0.5 eV to 100 keV through a 100- by 100-mm area centered at the peak leakage is largest for the slab moderator, exceeding that of the cylindrical moderator and double-wing moderator by factors of 1.7 and 3.4, respectively. The neutron leakage at 1 eV from one 300- by 150-mm surface of a slab moderator is 1.5 times larger than that from one 155- by 150-mm surface of a cylindrical moderator. When compared with the 1-eV leakage from two 100- by 150-mm surfaces of a double-wing moderator, that from the slab moderator is 3.4 times larger. 107 figures, 13 tables

  12. Implementation of an Initial Training Program for New Employees in a Profoundly Mentally and Physically Handicapped Children and Adult Residential Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, Linda A.

    A project was designed to reduce the turnover of direct care staff in a community-based residential facility that provides a home and educational or adult day training services for 54 severely or profoundly mentally and physically handicapped children and adults. The project sought to reduce total staff turnover by 40%, reduce employee…

  13. Virtual reality in the creation of a tool to support planning of physical security at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santo, Andre Cotelli do E.; Mol, Antonio Carlos de A.; Goncalves, Deise Galvao de S.; Marins, Eugenio; Freitas, Victor Goncalves G.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years was observed the importance of improving the physical security of nuclear facilities, mainly due to the increasing advancement of brazilian nuclear program. The present work aims to develop a tool that allows the visualization and planning of action strategies in a virtual environment, in order to improve this security. To this end, was created a virtual model of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), which is located on Ilha do Fundao - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil. This environment is a three-dimensional model, with representations close to reality, where virtual characters (avatars) can move and interact in real time. In this virtual world, it was developed a dynamic weather system, where is possible to change between day and night, and climate changes such as: rain, storms, snow, among other features. Furthermore, the tool has a surveillance system using virtual cameras, allowing the monitoring of the environment. This way, making possible to simulate strategies approach, allowing an evaluation of the procedures performed, as well as assisting in the training of security installations subject to radiation. (author)

  14. Virtual reality in the creation of a tool to support planning of physical security at nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santo, Andre Cotelli do E.; Mol, Antonio Carlos de A.; Goncalves, Deise Galvao de S.; Marins, Eugenio; Freitas, Victor Goncalves G., E-mail: cotelli.andre@gmail.com, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: deise.galvao@gmail.com, E-mail: eugenio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: vgoncalves@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio De Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years was observed the importance of improving the physical security of nuclear facilities, mainly due to the increasing advancement of brazilian nuclear program. The present work aims to develop a tool that allows the visualization and planning of action strategies in a virtual environment, in order to improve this security. To this end, was created a virtual model of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), which is located on Ilha do Fundao - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil. This environment is a three-dimensional model, with representations close to reality, where virtual characters (avatars) can move and interact in real time. In this virtual world, it was developed a dynamic weather system, where is possible to change between day and night, and climate changes such as: rain, storms, snow, among other features. Furthermore, the tool has a surveillance system using virtual cameras, allowing the monitoring of the environment. This way, making possible to simulate strategies approach, allowing an evaluation of the procedures performed, as well as assisting in the training of security installations subject to radiation. (author)

  15. Strengthening the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Facilities Regime: A Path Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts-Kiefer, S.; Nalabandian, M.

    2017-01-01

    With entry into force of the 2005 Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM) on May 8, 2016, and the culmination of the Nuclear Security Summits (NSS), the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Facilities (CPP), as the amended convention is now known, can play an increasingly important role in efforts to strengthen the international nuclear security architecture. The CPP significantly enhances the international legal framework for nuclear security by expanding the scope of physical protection requirements and providing a direct linkage to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear security guidance through incorporation of the Fundamental Principles.The CPP’s entry into force requires states parties to submit reports to the IAEA under Article 14 informing the IAEA of its laws and regulations giving effect to the convention—states parties were required to do so under the original CPPNM, but the scope of the reports will need to expand to reflect the expanded scope of the convention. Reporting builds confidence in the effectiveness of states’ security. In addition, entry into force of the CPP requires the IAEA, under Article 16, to convene a review conference in five years to assess the implementation and adequacy of the convention “in light of the then prevailing situation.” The review conference will provide an opportunity for states parties to assess the status of nuclear security progress and will provide a forum for dialogue on how to strengthen the global architecture and address remaining gaps in the system. Article 16 also provides for additional review conferences at periods of at least five years if requested by a majority of states parties. Regular review conferences would be an important mechanism for sustaining attention on nuclear security and ensuring continued nuclear security progress. For the CPP to fulfill its potential to play an important role in

  16. Physiotherapists' perceived motivators and barriers for organizing physical activity for older long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Veerle; Gorus, Ellen; Guldemont, Nele; De Coster, Sofie; Bautmans, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    Information regarding factors that hinder or stimulate older adults in long-term care facilities (LTCF) for being physically active is available in the literature, but much less is known regarding perceived motivators and barriers among physiotherapists (PTs) to organize physical activity (PA) in LTCF. The main purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing PTs to organize PA in LTCF for older adults. A secondary goal was to examine the PTs' knowledge about and their barriers at the PA guidelines for older adults of the World Health Organization (WHO). A mixed qualitative and quantitative study was carried out using semistructured interviews (n = 24) followed by an online survey (n = 254). As a frame the social-ecological model (McLeroy) was used, distinguishing factors at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and community level. In the qualitative component the PTs reported 41 motivators and 35 barriers for organizing PA in LTCF. The survey revealed that although the majority of the respondents (71%) are convinced of the usefulness of PA in LTCF, 84% are not familiar with the WHO-guidelines. Seventy-five percent of the respondents believe that the WHO-guidelines are not feasible for LTCF-residents. The strongest motivators on the intrapersonal level were maintaining the independence of the residents (98%), reducing the risk of falling (98%), and improving the physical (93%) and psychological (90%) wellbeing of LTCF-residents. The social interaction among LTCF-residents (91%) during PA was the strongest motivator on the interpersonal level. Motivators on the community level are the belief that PA is the basis of their physiotherapeutic work (89%) and that offering varied activities avoids PA becoming monotonous (71%). Barriers on the intra- and interpersonal level were of less influence. On the community level, they felt hindered to organize PA because of lack of time (38%) and the overload of paperwork (33%). This study described different motivators

  17. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  18. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  19. University of Colorado at Boulder Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental work carried out between October 1, 1990, the closing of our Progress Report, and August 14, 1991 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contract DE-FG02-ER40269 with the United States Department of Energy. This contract supports broadly based experimental work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The program includes pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF and LAMPF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF. The first results of spin-transfer observables in the isovector (rvec p,rvec n) reaction are included in this report. Our data confirm the tentative result from (rvec p,rvec p') reactions that the nuclear isovector spin response shows neither longitudinal enhancement nor transverse queching. Our program in quasifree scattering of high energy pions shows solid evidence of isoscalar enhancement of the nuclear nonspin response. We include several comparisons of the quasifree scattering of different probes. Results from our efforts in the design of accelerator RF cavities are also included in this report

  20. The Effect of Dining Room Physical Environmental Renovations on Person-Centered Care Practice and Residents' Dining Experiences in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Lillian; Chaudhury, Habib; Rust, Tiana

    2016-12-01

    This qualitative study evaluated the effect of dining room physical environmental changes on staff practices and residents' mealtime experiences in two units of a long-term care facility in Edmonton, Canada. Focus groups with staff (n = 12) and individual interviews with unit managers (n = 2) were conducted. We also developed and used the Dining Environment Assessment Protocol (DEAP) to conduct a systematic physical environmental evaluation of the dining rooms. Four themes emerged on the key influences of the renovations: (a) supporting independence and autonomy, (b) creating familiarity and enjoyment, (c) providing a place for social experience, and (d) challenges in supporting change. Feedback from the staff and managers provided evidence on the importance of physical environmental features, as well as the integral nature of the role of the physical environment and organizational support to provide person-centered care for residents. © The Author(s) 2015.