WorldWideScience

Sample records for physics experiment evaluation

  1. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/ 2 /q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs

  2. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  3. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project aims to provide the nuclear community with qualified benchmark data sets by collecting reactor physics experimental data from nuclear facilities, worldwide. More specifically the objectives of the expert group are as follows: - maintaining an inventory of the experiments that have been carried out and documented; - archiving the primary documents and data released in computer-readable form; - promoting the use of the format and methods developed and seek to have them adopted as a standard. For those experiments where interest and priority is expressed by member countries or working parties and executive groups within the NEA provide guidance or co-ordination in: - compiling experiments into a standard international agreed format; - verifying the data, to the extent possible, by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by consulting with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimenters or the experimental facility; - analysing and interpreting the experiments with current state-of-the-art methods; - publishing electronically the benchmark evaluations. The expert group will: - identify gaps in data and provide guidance on priorities for future experiments; - involve the young generation (Masters and PhD students and young researchers) to find an effective way of transferring know-how in experimental techniques and analysis methods; - provide a tool for improved exploitation of completed experiments for Generation IV reactors; - coordinate closely its work with other NSC experimental work groups in particular the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), the Shielding Integral Benchmark Experiment Data Base (SINBAD) and others, e.g. knowledge preservation in fast reactors of the IAEA, the ANS Joint Benchmark Activities; - keep a close link with the working parties on scientific issues of reactor systems (WPRS), the expert

  4. Overview of Experiments for Physics of Fast Reactors from the International Handbooks of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, J. D.; Briggs, J. B.; Gulliford, J.; Ivanova, T.; Rozhikhin, E. V.; Semenov, M. Yu.; Tsibulya, A. M.; Koscheev, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    Overview of Experiments to Study the Physics of Fast Reactors Represented in the International Directories of Critical and Reactor Experiments John D. Bess Idaho National Laboratory Jim Gulliford, Tatiana Ivanova Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development E.V.Rozhikhin, M.Yu.Sem?nov, A.M.Tsibulya Institute of Physics and Power Engineering The study the physics of fast reactors traditionally used the experiments presented in the manual labor of the Working Group on Evaluation of sections CSEWG (ENDF-202) issued by the Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974. This handbook presents simplified homogeneous model experiments with relevant experimental data, as amended. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development coordinates the activities of two international projects on the collection, evaluation and documentation of experimental data - the International Project on the assessment of critical experiments (1994) and the International Project on the assessment of reactor experiments (since 2005). The result of the activities of these projects are replenished every year, an international directory of critical (ICSBEP Handbook) and reactor (IRPhEP Handbook) experiments. The handbooks present detailed models of experiments with minimal amendments. Such models are of particular interest in terms of the settlements modern programs. The directories contain a large number of experiments which are suitable for the study of physics of fast reactors. Many of these experiments were performed at specialized critical stands, such as BFS (Russia), ZPR and ZPPR (USA), the ZEBRA (UK) and the experimental reactor JOYO (Japan), FFTF (USA). Other experiments, such as compact metal assembly, is also of interest in terms of the physics of fast reactors, they have been carried out on the universal critical stands in Russian institutes (VNIITF and VNIIEF) and the US (LANL, LLNL, and others.). Also worth mentioning

  5. Evaluation guide for the international reactor physics experiments evaluation project (IRPhEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, Akifumi

    2013-01-01

    At present, there is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data including separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated as a pilot activity in 1999 by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. This document outlines the general presentation guidelines that evaluators should follow for the description of the experiments and all relevant experimental data in order to ensure the consistency between the evaluations published in the final Handbook. Publication templates will be used to ensure this consistency and will follow the general scheme below: 1 - Experiment identification number; 2- Date; 3 - Name of experiment (Purpose of experiment, Phenomena measured and scope); 4 - Name or designation of experimental programme; 5 - Description of facility; 6 - Description of test or experiment (Experimental configuration, Core life cycle, Experimental limitations or shortcomings); 7 - Phenomena measured (Description of results and analysis, Special features and characteristics of experiment, Measurement systems/methods and uncertainties); 8 - Duplicate or complementary experiments / other related experiments; 9 - Status of completion of the evaluation; 10 - References (pointer to evaluation, archive if available, otherwise generic bibliographic reference); 11 - Authors/ organisers 12 - Material available

  6. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project. IRPhE Handbook - 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Gullifor, Jim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. This work of the IRPhE Project is formally documented in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments', a single source of verified and extensively peer-reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The evaluation process entails the following steps: Identify a comprehensive set of reactor physics experimental measurements data, Evaluate the data and quantify overall uncertainties through various types of sensitivity analysis to the extent possible, verify the data by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimental facility, Compile the data into a standardized format, Perform calculations of each experiment with standard reactor physics codes where it would add information, Formally document the work into a single source of verified and peer reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculation techniques and data. Example calculations are presented; these do not constitute a validation or endorsement of the codes or cross-section data. The 2015 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains data from 143 experimental series that were

  7. IRPhEP-handbook, International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Blair Briggs, J.

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description: The purpose of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. This work of the IRPhEP is formally documented in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments,' a single source of verified and extensively peer-reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The IRPhE Handbook is available on DVD. You may request a DVD by completing the DVD Request Form available at: http://irphep.inl.gov/handbook/hbrequest.shtml The evaluation process entails the following steps: 1. Identify a comprehensive set of reactor physics experimental measurements data, 2. Evaluate the data and quantify overall uncertainties through various types of sensitivity analysis to the extent possible, verify the data by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimental facility, 3. Compile the data into a standardized format, 4. Perform calculations of each experiment with standard reactor physics codes where it would add information, 5. Formally document the work into a single source of verified and peer reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear experimental facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor physics personal to validate calculational techniques. The 2008 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Experiments contains data from 25 different

  8. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the

  9. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project. IRPhE Handbook - 2017 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The International Reactor Physics Evaluation (IRPhE) Project was initiated as a pilot in 1999 by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June 2003. While the NEA co-ordinates and administers the IRPhE Project at the international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The information and data included in this handbook are available to NEA member countries, to all contributing countries and to others on a case-by-case basis. The IRPhE Project is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP). It closely co-ordinates with the ICSBEP to avoid duplication of efforts and publication of conflicting information. Some benchmark data are applicable to both nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics technology. Some have already been evaluated and published by the ICSBEP, but have been extended to include other types of measurements in addition to the critical configuration. Through this effort, the IRPhE Project will be able to 1) consolidate and preserve the existing worldwide information base; 2) retrieve lost data; 3) identify areas where more data are needed; 4) draw upon the resources of the international reactor physics community to help fill knowledge gaps; 5) identify discrepancies between calculations and experiments due to deficiencies in reported experimental data, cross-section data, cross-section processing codes and neutronics codes; 6) eliminate a large amount of redundant research and processing of reactor physics experiment data, and 7) improve future experimental planning, execution and reporting. This handbook contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by

  10. Particle physics experiments 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The report describes work carried out in 1983 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  11. Particle physics experiments 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1989 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  12. Particle physics experiments 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1987 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel (United Kingdom). The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  13. Particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    The report of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory describes the work carried out in 1985 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  14. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-01-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR-06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed

  15. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  16. Evaluating the soil physical quality under long-term field experiments in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Mirko; Stellacci, Anna Maria; Iovino, Massimo; Rinaldi, Michele; Ventrella, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    Long-term field experiments performed in experimental farms are important research tools to assess the soil physical quality (SPQ) given that relatively stable conditions can be expected in these soils. However, different SPQ indicators may sometimes provide redundant or conflicting results, making difficult an SPQ evaluation (Castellini et al., 2014). As a consequence, it is necessary to apply appropriate statistical procedures to obtain a minimum set of key indicators. The study was carried out at the Experimental Farm of CREA-SCA (Foggia) in two long-term field experiments performed on durum wheat. The first long-term experiment is aiming at evaluating the effects of two residue management systems (burning, B or soil incorporation of crop residues, I) while the second at comparing the effect of tillage (conventional tillage, CT) and sod-seeding (direct drilling, DD). In order to take into account both optimal and non-optimal soil conditions, five SPQ indicators were monitored at 5-6 sampling dates during the crop season (i.e., between November and June): soil bulk density (BD), macroporosity (PMAC), air capacity (AC), plant available water capacity (PAWC) and relative field capacity (RFC). Two additional data sets, collected on DD plot in different cropping seasons and in Sicilian soils differing for texture, depth and land use (N=140), were also used with the aim to check the correlation among indicators. Impact of soil management was assessed by comparing SPQ evaluated under different management systems with optimal reference values reported in literature. Two techniques of multivariate analysis (principal component analysis, PCA and stepwise discriminant analysis, SDA) were applied to select the most suitable indicator to facilitate the judgment on SPQ. Regardless of the considered management system, sampling date or auxiliary data set, correlation matrices always showed significant negative relationships between RFC and AC. Decreasing RFC at increasing AC is

  17. Experiences of Teacher Evaluation Systems on High School Physical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon R.; Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Primary objective: Teacher evaluation is being revamped by policy-makers. The marginalized status of physical education has protected this subject area from reform for many decades, but in our current era of system-wide, data-based decision-making, physical education is no longer immune. Standardized and local testing, together with structured…

  18. Particle physics experiments 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory report describes work carried out in 1984 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics selection panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  19. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  20. Particle physics experiments 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, M.D.; Stuart, G.

    1983-01-01

    Work carried out in 1982 on 52 experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel is described. Each experiment is listed under title, collaboration, technique, accelerator, year of running, status and spokesman. Unedited contributions are given from each experiment. (U.K.)

  1. Particle physics experiments 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents research work carried out in 1986 on 52 elementary particle experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. Most of the experiments were collaborative and involved research groups from different countries. About half of the experiments were conducted at CERN, the remaining experiments employed the accelerators: LAMPT, LEP, PETRA, SLAC, and HERA. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (U.K.)

  2. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  3. Particle physics experiments 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1988 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. More than forty projects at different accelerators (SPS, ISIS, PETRA, LAMPF, LEP, HERA, BNL, ILL, LEAR) are listed. Different organisations collaborate on different projects. A brief progress report is given. References to published articles are given. (author)

  4. Particle physics experiments 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    The research programs described here were carried out in 1992 at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and funded by the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The area covered in these experiments is particle physics. Unedited contributions from over forty experimental programs are included. Experiments are listed according to their current status, the accelerator used and its years of operation. (UK)

  5. Flow Experience as a Quality Measure in Evaluating Physically Activating Collaborative Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian J. M. Kiili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the subjective playing experience is important part of the game development process. The enjoyment level that a serious game offers is a key factor in determining whether a player will be engaged in the gameplay and achieve the objectives of the game. In this paper we report the results of a game design process in which two prototypes of a collaborative exergame were studied. The main aim of the paper is to explore to what extend the measurement of flow experience can facilitate the game evaluation and design process. Alltogether 102 junior high school students participated in two user experience studies and played collaborative exergames designed to teach soft skills. Playing experience was measured with a flow questionnaire, playing behavior was observed and some of the players were interviewed. The results showed that flow experience can be used to evaluate the overall quality of the gameplay and it provides a structured approach to consider the quality of the game. However, flow does not provide detailed information about the shortages of the game and thus complementary methods is needed to identify the causes. The results also indicated that flow experience was independent of gender that supports its use in quality measurement.

  6. Experiments in high energy elementary particle physics and processing of photographically filed data with the aid of a measuring and evaluating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirst, H [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin-Zeuthen. Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik

    1977-01-01

    The measuring and evaluating system includes pattern recognition and measuring instruments as well as a processor for data evaluation and checking procedures. The program chart and the application to evaluating photographs of particle tracks from high energy physics experiments are mentioned. The time-sharing effect of such systems in data evaluation is emphasized.

  7. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    2001-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e >100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  8. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    1999-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e > 100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  9. Physical experience enhances science learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontra, Carly; Lyons, Daniel J; Fischer, Susan M; Beilock, Sian L

    2015-06-01

    Three laboratory experiments involving students' behavior and brain imaging and one randomized field experiment in a college physics class explored the importance of physical experience in science learning. We reasoned that students' understanding of science concepts such as torque and angular momentum is aided by activation of sensorimotor brain systems that add kinetic detail and meaning to students' thinking. We tested whether physical experience with angular momentum increases involvement of sensorimotor brain systems during students' subsequent reasoning and whether this involvement aids their understanding. The physical experience, a brief exposure to forces associated with angular momentum, significantly improved quiz scores. Moreover, improved performance was explained by activation of sensorimotor brain regions when students later reasoned about angular momentum. This finding specifies a mechanism underlying the value of physical experience in science education and leads the way for classroom practices in which experience with the physical world is an integral part of learning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-01-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm/shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm/shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the ''International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'' have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency

  11. Advancing Physics evaluated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogborn, Jon

    2003-07-01

    The first phase of an evaluation of the new AS/A-level course Advancing Physics, sponsored by the Institute of Physics, is now complete. It shows that the course has achieved very high satisfaction ratings from teachers of the course, and that a majority of these teachers see it as achieving its main aims. The first phase of the evaluation was designed to pinpoint aspects of Advancing Physics that offer scope for improvement. Two such aspects have been identified: course planning and use of the CD-ROM material, and arrangements for coursework in the examination.

  12. Experiments in Fundamental Neutron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Nico, J. S.; Snow, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments using slow neutrons address a growing range of scientific issues spanning nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. The field of fundamental physics using neutrons has experienced a significant increase in activity over the last two decades. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in the field and outlines some of the prospects for future research.

  13. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  14. Simulated experiments in modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirnini, Mahmud Hasan

    1981-01-01

    Author.In this thesis a number of the basic experiments of atomic and nuclear physics are simulated on a microcomputer interfaced to a chart recorder and CRT. These will induce the student to imagine that he is actually performing the experiments. He will collect data to be worked out. The thesis covers the relevant material to set up such experiments in the modern physics laboratory

  15. Particle physics experiments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Data taking for this experiment was completed in December 1983. The samples include approximately 19,000 (ν) and 11,000 (ν-bar) charged current events. These constitute the largest data set of interactions on free protons. Work published to date includes studies of inclusive structure functions and final state properties, exclusive final states, neutral current cross sections and production of strange and charmed particles. During the past year results have been published on the production of f 2 (1270) and ν 0 (770) mesons in ρp and ρ-barp charged current interactions. In the case of the f 2 this represents the first observation of such production. It is found that the multiplicities are 0.047±0.017 in ρp and 0.17±0.018 in ρ-barp. The f 2 mesons are mostly produced at large hadronic invariant mass W and in the forward hemisphere. The production of ν 0 mesons can be observed with high statistics in both ρp and ρ-barp interactions and the differential cross section studied. The observations are compared with LUND Monte Carlo predictions, which are generally found to be too high. However qualitative features of the data are reproduced. Work continues on a precise determination of the neutral current/charged current ratio, on the study of charged and neutral current structure functions and on the production of strange particles. (author)

  16. Nuclear physics experiment at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo.

    1981-02-01

    Present activities at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS) are presented. Selected topics are from recent experiments by use of the INS cyclotron, experiments at the Bevalac facility under the INS-LBL collaboration program, and preparatory works for the Numatron project, a new project for the high-energy heavy-ion physics. (author)

  17. Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment is proposed for experimental studies of spheromak confinement issues in a controlled way: in steady state relative to the confinement timescale and at low collisionality. Experiments in a flux - conserver will provide data on transport in the presence of resistive modes in shear-stabilized systems and establish operating regimes which pave the way for true steady-state experiments with the equilibrium field supplied by external coils. The proposal is based on analysis of past experiments, including the achievement of T e = 400 eV in a decaying spheromak in CTX. Electrostatic helicity injection from a coaxial ''''gun'''' into a shaped flux conserver will form and sustain the plasma for several milliseconds. The flux conserver minimizes fluxline intersection with the walls and provides MHD stability. Improvements from previous experiments include modem wall conditioning (especially boronization), a divertor for density and impurity control, and a bias magnetic flux for configurational flexibility. The bias flux will provide innovative experimental opportunities, including testing helicity drive on the large-radius plasma boundary. Diagnostics include Thomson scattering for T e measurements and ultra-short pulse reflectrometry to measure density and magnetic field profiles and turbulence. We expect to operate at T e of several hundred eV, allowing improved understanding of energy and current transport due to resistive MHD turbulence during sustained operation. This will provide an exciting advance in spheromak physics and a firm basis for future experiments in the fusion regime

  18. An experiment in diffractive physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this talk is to show one of the next future experiment in diffractive Physics which will be installed at the DO experiment at Tevatron/Fermilab for run II, and the importance for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) as the theory of the strong interactions. The apparatus that we have developed is the Forward Proton Detector (FPD) to be introduced on the beam line of the Tevatron at both sides of the DO detector. The FPD is composed by a set of Roman Pots as we will see in the text below

  19. Game user experience evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhaupt, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating interactive systems for their user experience (UX) is a standard approach in industry and research today. This book explores the areas of game design and development and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as ways to understand the various contributing aspects of the overall gaming experience. Fully updated, extended and revised this book is based upon the original publication Evaluating User Experience in Games, and provides updated methods and approaches ranging from user- orientated methods to game specific approaches. New and emerging methods and areas explored include physiologi

  20. The evaluation and planning method of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors: A comparative study across gender, age, level of studies and work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, Beatriz; González-Rivera, María Dolores; Campos-Izquierdo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the planning and the evaluation of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors as well as to analyze and compare the two variables in terms of their gender, age, level of studies and work experience. This research falls inside the quantitative type methodology of descriptive cut through standardized interview using the standardized questionnaire: "Human resources of sport and physical activity". It analyses the situation and performance of people working in functions of sport and physical activity. The questionnaire was completed by 600 sport and physical activity instructors from Spain. Key results revealed that 48.0% of them plan their classes and 58.17% assess. The study also found male university graduates between the ages of 60 and 70, with 10 years of experience or more spend the most time on planning and assessment. Daily classroom observation was the tool which physical activity and sport instructors used the most, followed by execution tests. The lesser used tools were theoretical knowledge exams, diaries and the personally created tests, across all of the variables.

  1. The evaluation and planning method of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors: A comparative study across gender, age, level of studies and work experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Bernabé

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the planning and the evaluation of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors as well as to analyze and compare the two variables in terms of their gender, age, level of studies and work experience. This research falls inside the quantitative type methodology of descriptive cut through standardized interview using the standardized questionnaire: "Human resources of sport and physical activity". It analyses the situation and performance of people working in functions of sport and physical activity. The questionnaire was completed by 600 sport and physical activity instructors from Spain. Key results revealed that 48.0% of them plan their classes and 58.17% assess. The study also found male university graduates between the ages of 60 and 70, with 10 years of experience or more spend the most time on planning and assessment. Daily classroom observation was the tool which physical activity and sport instructors used the most, followed by execution tests. The lesser used tools were theoretical knowledge exams, diaries and the personally created tests, across all of the variables.

  2. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  3. MRI Experiments for Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Sanaz; Lincoln, James

    2018-01-01

    The introductory physics classroom has long educated students about the properties of the atom and the nucleus. But absent from these lessons has been an informed discussion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its parent science nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Physics teachers should not miss the opportunity to instruct upon this highly…

  4. MRI experiments for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Sanaz; Lincoln, James

    2018-04-01

    The introductory physics classroom has long educated students about the properties of the atom and the nucleus. But absent from these lessons has been an informed discussion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its parent science nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Physics teachers should not miss the opportunity to instruct upon this highly relevant application of modern physics, especially with so many of our students planning to pursue a career in medicine. This article provides an overview of the physics of MRI and gives advice on how physics teachers can introduce this topic. Also included are some demonstration activities and a discussion of a desktop MRI apparatus that may be used by students in the lab or as a demo.

  5. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  7. Physics and experiments at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will be the site of a series of experiments seeking to discover the quark-gluon plasma and elucidate its properties. Several observables should exhibit characteristic behaviors if a quark-gluon plasma is indeed created in the laboratory. Four experiments are now under construction for RHIC to measure certain of these observables over kinematic ranges where effects due to quark-gluon plasma formation should be manifest

  8. Experiences of Scientific Thinking in Physics Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fagundes Faria

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a contemporary demand on STEM education to support learning experiences in which students use scientific thinking to solve tasks. Scientific thinking involves domain-specific knowledge and general domain strategies of thinking. The object of interest in this research was the set of students’ experiences of scientific thinking in which they articulate domain-general strategies and domain-specific knowledge to solve physics tasks. Our goal was to characterize the experiences of scientific thinking of two groups of four students engaged in tasks about Newtonian Mechanics. The volunteers were 19 students, 15-17 years old, enrolled in electronics or computer science courses (11th grade of a Brazilian vocational high school at Belo Horizonte/Minas Gerais. All class activities proposed to the students have been regularly used since 2010, therefore, we made no special intervention to conduct the study. Data collection occurred during the classes and involved audio and video recordings of students working in group; field notes; and photographs of students’ notebooks and of the posters they made to conduct oral presentations. The choice of the groups was based on how assiduous the members were. We have transcribed episodes in which we identified experiences of scientific thinking. These transcriptions, the field notes and the photographs were analyzed together, in interaction with each other. Data analysis is based upon John Dewey’s Theory of Experience. Our results show that the experiences of scientific thinking of the two groups were educative experiences, although qualitatively different. This difference was due to the way students interacted with the conditions given to solve the tasks. Additional information is given about the school circumstances in which the study was conducted to allow a better evaluation of results quality.

  9. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-01-01

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers

  10. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  11. Accelerator physics experiments at Aladdin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Cornacchia, M.; Jackson, A.; Zisman, M.S.

    1985-07-01

    The Aladdin accelerator is a 1 GeV synchrotron light source located at the University of Wisconsin. The results of experimental studies of the Aladdin accelerator are described. The primary purpose of the experiments reported was to investigate reported anomalies in the behavior of the linear lattice, particularly in the vertical plane. A second goal was to estimate the ring broadband impedance. Experimental observations and interpretation of the linear properties of the Aladdin ring are described, including the beta function and dispersion measurements. Two experiments are described to measure the ring impedance, the first a measurement of the parasitic mode loss, and the second a measurement of the beam transfer function. Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse emittance at 100 and 200 MeV are described and compared with predictions. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Exploding metallic fuse physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goforth, J.H.; Hackett, K.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Lopez, E.A.; McCullough, W.F.; Dona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ultimate practicality of inductive pulse compression systems as drivers for energetic plasma implosions hinges on the development of a suitable opening switch capable of interrupting tons of megamp currents in time scales of a few hundred nanoseconds while withstanding L(dI/dt) voltages of a megavolt or more. 1. Exploding metallic foils (fuses) are a candidate for switching elements in the inductive store pulsed power systems used in the Los Alamos and Air Force Weapons Laboratory foil implosion X-ray source generation programs. To verify or modify new theoretical and computational predictions about the electrical and hydrodynamic behavior of exploding metallic foils used as fuses. The authors have initiated a new series of small scale capacitor bank driven fuse experiments. The experiments represent an extension of previous experiments, but in the new series a foil geometry more amenable to theoretical and computational analysis is used. The metallic foil (aluminum or copper) is laminated between two thin layers of insulating material (mylar or kaptan). Adjacent to one layer of insulation is a much heavier backing insulator (polyethylene) whereas air is adjacent to the other layer. Because of the differing masses on the two sides of the foil, the foil expansion and hydrodynamic motion is essentially one-sided and the layer of insulation on the expanding side becomes a readily-characterizable ''flyer'' which provides a controlled amount of hydrodynamic tamping. In addition to the usual voltage, current, and dI/dt electrical measurements, time-resolved spectrometer measurements are used to determine the temperature of the expanding metallic foil. Post-shot examination of the flyer and the insulation impacted by the flyer gives insight into the experimental behavior

  13. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  14. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated

  15. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  16. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    TPX is a national project involving a large number of US fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. The element of the TPX requirements that is a primary driver for the hardware design is the fact that TPX tokamak hardware is being designed to accommodate steady state operation if the external systems are upgraded from the 1,000 second initial operation. TPX not only incorporates new physics, but also pioneers new technologies to be used in ITER and other future reactors. TPX will be the first tokamak with fully superconducting magnetic field coils using advanced conductors, will have internal nuclear shielding, will use robotics for machine maintenance, and will remove the continuous, concentrated heat flow from the plasma with new dispersal techniques and with special materials that are actively cooled. The Conceptual Design for TPX was completed during Fiscal Year 1993. The Preliminary Design formally began at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1994. Industrial contracts have been awarded for the design, with options for fabrication, of the primary tokamak hardware. A large fraction of the design and R and D effort during FY94 was focused on the tokamak and in turn on the tokamak magnets. The reason for this emphasis is because the magnets require a large design and R and D effort, and are critical to the project schedule. The magnet development is focused on conductor development, quench protection, and manufacturing R and D. The Preliminary Design Review for the Magnets is planned for fall, 1995

  17. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  18. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  19. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Olin, A.; Klumov, I.A.

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  20. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  1. Experience in exercise evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickerton, George E [Office of Emergency Planning, Food Safety and Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States)

    1989-09-01

    This summary outline presents environmental ingestion exposure pathways exercise evaluations that should be followed by state and local governments. It includes environmental monitoring, food, feeds and monitoring of organisms as well as emergency planning and execution exercises.

  2. Experience in exercise evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, George E.

    1989-01-01

    This summary outline presents environmental ingestion exposure pathways exercise evaluations that should be followed by state and local governments. It includes environmental monitoring, food, feeds and monitoring of organisms as well as emergency planning and execution exercises

  3. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  4. Chain Experiment competition inspires learning of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziob, Daniel; Górska, Urszula; Kołodziej, Tomasz

    2017-05-01

    The Chain Experiment is an annual competition which originated in Slovenia in 2005 and later expanded to Poland in 2013. For the purpose of the event, each participating team designs and builds a contraption that transports a small steel ball from one end to the other. At the same time the constructed machine needs to use a number of interesting phenomena and physics laws. In the competition’s finale, all contraptions are connected to each other to form a long chain transporting steel balls. In brief, they are all evaluated for qualities such as: creativity and advance in theoretical background, as well as the reliability of the constructed machine to work without human help. In this article, we present the contraptions developed by students taking part in the competition in order to demonstrate the advance in theoretical basis together with creativity in design and outstanding engineering skills of its participants. Furthermore, we situate the Chain Experiment in the context of other group competitions, at the same time demonstrating that—besides activating numerous group work skills—it also improves the ability to think critically and present one’s knowledge to a broader audience. We discussed it in the context of problem based learning, gamification and collaborative testing.

  5. Evaluation of Saxton critical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Jung, Hyung Guk; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As a part of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), SAXTON critical experiments were reevaluated. The effects of k{sub eff} of the uncertainties in experiment parameters, fuel rod characterization, soluble boron, critical water level, core structure, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu isotope number densities, random pitch error, duplicated experiment, axial fuel position, model simplification, etc., were evaluated and added in benchmark-model k{sub eff}. In addition to detailed model, the simplified model for Saxton critical experiments was constructed by omitting the top, middle, and bottom grids and ignoring the fuel above water. 6 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of Saxton critical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Jung, Hyung Guk; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    As a part of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), SAXTON critical experiments were reevaluated. The effects of k{sub eff} of the uncertainties in experiment parameters, fuel rod characterization, soluble boron, critical water level, core structure, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu isotope number densities, random pitch error, duplicated experiment, axial fuel position, model simplification, etc., were evaluated and added in benchmark-model k{sub eff}. In addition to detailed model, the simplified model for Saxton critical experiments was constructed by omitting the top, middle, and bottom grids and ignoring the fuel above water. 6 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  7. Cometary nucleus release experiments and ice physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    Some physical and chemical processes involved in the evaporation and sublimation of mixtures of frozen gases are discussed. Effects of zero gravity, vacuum and solar radiation are emphasized. Relevant experiments that can be carried out with the aid of the space shuttle are proposed. The ice surface and the space just above the surface, i.e., the physics and chemistry of ice sublimation are mainly considered

  8. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  9. DIRAC in Large Particle Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Arrabito, L.; Sailer, A.; Hara, T.; Zhang, X.; Consortium, DIRAC

    2017-10-01

    The DIRAC project is developing interware to build and operate distributed computing systems. It provides a development framework and a rich set of services for both Workload and Data Management tasks of large scientific communities. A number of High Energy Physics and Astrophysics collaborations have adopted DIRAC as the base for their computing models. DIRAC was initially developed for the LHCb experiment at LHC, CERN. Later, the Belle II, BES III and CTA experiments as well as the linear collider detector collaborations started using DIRAC for their computing systems. Some of the experiments built their DIRAC-based systems from scratch, others migrated from previous solutions, ad-hoc or based on different middlewares. Adaptation of DIRAC for a particular experiment was enabled through the creation of extensions to meet their specific requirements. Each experiment has a heterogeneous set of computing and storage resources at their disposal that were aggregated through DIRAC into a coherent pool. Users from different experiments can interact with the system in different ways depending on their specific tasks, expertise level and previous experience using command line tools, python APIs or Web Portals. In this contribution we will summarize the experience of using DIRAC in particle physics collaborations. The problems of migration to DIRAC from previous systems and their solutions will be presented. An overview of specific DIRAC extensions will be given. We hope that this review will be useful for experiments considering an update, or for those designing their computing models.

  10. Physics Experiments at the UNEDLabs Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan pedro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UNEDLabs is a web portal based on a free, modern, open source, and well-known learning management system: Moodle. This portal joins two theme networks of virtual and remote laboratories (one for Control Engineering and another one for Physics, named AutomatL@bs and FisL@bs, respectively together. AutomatL@bs has been operative for five years now. Following AutomatL@bs’ scheme, FisL@bs was created as a network of remote and virtual laboratories for physics university education via the Internet to offer students the possibility of performing hands-on experiences in different fields of physics in two ways: simulation and real remote operation. Now, both FisL@bs and AutomatL@bs join together (while maintaining their independency into an unique new web portal called UNEDLabs. This work focuses on this new web environment and gives a detailed account of a novel way in Physics to let distance learning students gain practical experience autonomously. This paper explains how the new portal works and the software tools used for creating it. In addition, it also describes the physics experiments which are already operative.

  11. Brahms Experiment at RHIC Day-1 Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    The BRAHMS experiment is designed to measure semi-inclusive spectra of charged hadron over a wide range of rapidity. It will yield information on particle production, both at central rapidity and in the baryon rich fragmentation region. The physics plans for measurements in the first year of running at RHIC are discussed

  12. Nuclear physics experiments with low cost instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Bastos, Rodrigo; Adelar Boff, Cleber; Melquiades, Fábio Luiz

    2016-11-01

    One of the difficulties in modern physics teaching is the limited availability of experimental activities. This is particularly true for teaching nuclear physics in high school or college. The activities suggested in the literature generally symbolise real phenomenon, using simulations. It happens because the experimental practices mostly include some kind of expensive radiation detector and an ionising radiation source that requires special care for handling and storage, being subject to a highly bureaucratic regulation in some countries. This study overcomes these difficulties and proposes three nuclear physics experiments using a low-cost ion chamber which construction is explained: the measurement of 222Rn progeny collected from the indoor air; the measurement of the range of alpha particles emitted by the 232Th progeny, present in lantern mantles and in thoriated welding rods, and by the air filter containing 222Rn progeny; and the measurement of 220Rn half-life collected from the emanation of the lantern mantles. This paper presents the experimental procedures and the expected results, indicating that the experiments may provide support for nuclear physics classes. These practices may outreach wide access to either college or high-school didactic laboratories, and the apparatus has the potential for the development of new teaching activities for nuclear physics.

  13. Simulations and Experiments in Astronomy and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, F. P.; Maurone, P. A.; Dewarf, L. E.

    1998-12-01

    There are new approaches to teaching astronomy and physics in the laboratory setting, involving the use of computers as tools to simulate events and concepts which can be illuminated in no other reasonable way. With the computer, it is possible to travel back in time to replicate the sky as Galileo saw it. Astronomical phenomena which reveal themselves only after centuries of real time may be compressed in the computer to a simulation of several minutes. Observations simulated on the computer do not suffer from the vagaries of weather, fixed time or geographic position, or non-repeatability. In physics, the computer allows us to secure data for experiments which, by their nature, may not be amenable to human interaction. These could include experiments with very fast or very slow timescales, large number of data samples, complex or tedious manipulation of the data which hides the fundamental nature of the experiment, or data sampling which would need a specialized probe, such as for acid rain. This innovation has become possible only recently, due to the availability and affordability of sophisticated computer hardware and software. We have developed a laboratory experience for non-scientists who need an introductory course in astronomy or physics. Our approach makes extensive use of computers in this laboratory. Using commercially available software, the students use the computer as a time machine and a space craft to explore and rediscover fundamental science. The physics experiments are classical in nature, and the computer acts as a data collector and presenter, freeing the student from the tedium of repetitive data gathering and replotting. In this way, the student is encouraged to explore, to try new things, to refine the measurements, and to discover the principles underlying the observed phenomena.

  14. Connecting High School Physics Experiences, Outcome Expectations, Physics Identity, and Physics Career Choice: A Gender Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how students' physics identities are shaped by their experiences in high school physics classes and by their career outcome expectations. The theoretical framework focuses on physics identity and includes the dimensions of student performance, competence, recognition by others, and interest. Drawing data from the Persistence…

  15. Neutrino physics with short baseline experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, E.D.

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino physics with low- to medium-energy beams has progressed steadily over the last several years. Neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline (defined as 2 - -> 0.1eV 2 . One positive signal, from the LSND collaboration, exists and is being tested by the MiniBooNE experiment. Neutrino cross-section measurements are being made by MiniBooNE and K2K, which will be important for reducing systematic errors in present and future oscillation measurements. In the near future, dedicated cross- section experiments will begin operating at Fermilab. (author)

  16. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche

  17. Introductory Physics Experiments Using the Wiimote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, William; Rooney, Frank; Ochoa, Romulo

    2009-03-01

    The Wii, a video game console, is a very popular device with millions of units sold worldwide over the past two years. Although computationally it is not a powerful machine, to a physics educator its most important components can be its controllers. The Wiimote (or remote) controller contains three accelerometers, an infrared detector, and Bluetooth connectivity at a relatively low price. Thanks to available open source code, any PC with Bluetooth capability can detect the information sent out by the Wiimote. We have designed several experiments for introductory physics courses that make use of the accelerometers and Bluetooth connectivity. We have adapted the Wiimote to measure the: variable acceleration in simple harmonic motion, centripetal and tangential accelerations in circular motion, and the accelerations generated when students lift weights. We present the results of our experiments and compare them with those obtained when using motion and/or force sensors.

  18. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  19. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...

  20. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed online. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans. (orig.)

  1. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed on line. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans

  2. Laser experiments for chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Compton, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are employed throughout science and technology, in fundamental research, the remote sensing of atmospheric gases or pollutants, communications, medical diagnostics and therapies, and the manufacturing of microelectronic devices. Understanding the principles of their operation, which underlie all of these areas, is essential for a modern scientific education. This text introduces the characteristics and operation of lasers through laboratory experiments designed for the undergraduate curricula in chemistry and physics. Introductory chapters describe the properties of light, the history of laser invention, the atomic, molecular, and optical principles behind how lasers work, and the kinds of lasers available today. Other chapters include the basic theory of spectroscopy and computational chemistry used to interpret laser experiments. Experiments range from simple in-class demonstrations to more elaborate configurations for advanced students. Each chapter has historical and theoretical background, as well...

  3. Factors Influencing Physical Fitness Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarer, Barbara G.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on works that examine areas in which the physical educator can improve the administration of physical fitness tests in the elementary and secondary schools. The first part contains annotations that examine modifications of existing components which measure aspects of muscular and cardiovascular endurance. The…

  4. A submersible physics laboratory experiment. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972, NOAA (OOE and MUSandT) and the University of Washington Physics Department, have been associated in the underwater detection and analysis of cosmic radiation flux. The purpose of experiments described in this paper has been to take advantage of the nuclear cosmic-ray related qualities of the ocean water mass by allowing the experimenter(s) to work in situ on the sea floor, rather than attempting to try an impractical alternative: lowering a prepared photoemulsion detector to the bottom from a surface vessel, a method that would yield an unacceptably surface-radiation-cluttered emulsion. This report describes briefly the four elements that motivated or comprised the subject experiment: basic physics which motivated the mission; applied physics, including particle detection, emulsion chemistry, calibration, and scanning; engineering, including design and fabrication of supporting apparatus, use of a submersible (JSL was modified slightly to permit lock-on to the bottom chamber), and a bottom lockout chamber; and operations, including submersible dives, ship support, emulsion preparation, deployment, recovery, and development

  5. Physics Potential of Long-Baseline Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of neutrino mixing and oscillations over the past decade provides firm evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Recently, θ13 has been determined to be moderately large, quite close to its previous upper bound. This represents a significant milestone in establishing the three-flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has opened up exciting prospects for current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments towards addressing the remaining fundamental questions, in particular the type of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible presence of a CP-violating phase. Another recent and crucial development is the indication of non-maximal 2-3 mixing angle, causing the octant ambiguity of θ23. In this paper, I will review the phenomenology of long-baseline neutrino oscillations with a special emphasis on sub-leading three-flavor effects, which will play a crucial role in resolving these unknowns. First, I will give a brief description of neutrino oscillation phenomenon. Then, I will discuss our present global understanding of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters and will identify the major unknowns in this sector. After that, I will present the physics reach of current generation long-baseline experiments. Finally, I will conclude with a discussion on the physics capabilities of accelerator-driven possible future long-baseline precision oscillation facilities.

  6. Reactor physics experiment plan using TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Shoichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors, which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. This report is to plan critical experiments using TCA in JAERI. Critical Experiments performed so far in Europe and Japan are reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX-fuel rods used in the experiments is obtained by calculations and modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. New MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel rods are necessary for the RMWR critical experiments. Number of MOX fuel rods is 1000 for Plutonium fissile enrichment of 5 wt%, 1000 for 10 wt%, 1500 for 15 wt% and 500 for 20 wt%, respectively. Depleted UO{sub 2} fuel rods for blanket/buffer region are 4000. Driver fuel rods of 4.9 wt% UO{sub 2} are 3000. Modification of TCA facility is requested to treat the large amount of MOX fuels from safety point of view. Additional shielding device at the top of the tank for loading the MOX fuels and additional safety plates to ensure safety are requested. The core is divided into two regions by inserting an inner tank to avoid criticality in MOX region only. The test region is composed by MOX fuel rods in the inner tank. Criticality is established by UO{sub 2} driver fuel rods outside of the inner tank. (Tsuchihashi, K.)

  7. The basic physics of neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1999-01-01

    The basic physical principles behind the well-established but also developing practice of neutron scattering experiments are presented. A few examples are given either to illustrate the physical principles or to give an idea of the variety, importance or magnitude of various phenomena. The evolution of neutron scattering experimental techniques is investigated from a special aspect: the increasing capability of taking into account more and more important and sometimes decisive finer details by using more and more realistic mathematical models of the evolution of the neutrons from birth do death, eventually passing by the sample and being scattered more than one times. Working with such numerical 'virtual instruments' one will have to go far beyond notions like resolution function, convolution etc, and actually eliminate a large number of approximations currently in use. (K.A.)

  8. Physics with Photons at the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Reale, V.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of photons in the ATLAS experiment is crucial for the study of a number of physics channels, including the search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs, and measurements of direct production of single photons and photon pairs. The photon-photon and photon-jet channels are interesting in their own right, allowing the study of QCD at the new energy range of the LHC. The photon-identification strategy in ATLAS will be presented along with photon-jet cross section measurements and the potential ATLAS constrains on the gluon structure function

  9. Tokamak physics experiment: Diagnostic windows study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.; Wurden, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    We detail the study of diagnostic windows and window thermal stress remediation in the long-pulse, high-power Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) operation. The operating environment of the TPX diagnostic windows is reviewed, thermal loads on the windows estimated, and cooling requirements for the windows considered. Applicable window-cooling technology from other fields is reviewed and its application to the TPX windows considered. Methods for TPX window thermal conditioning are recommended, with some discussion of potential implementation problems provided. Recommendations for further research and development work to ensure performance of windows in the TPX system are presented

  10. Safeguards and physical protection - The Belarus experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krevsun, E.

    1999-01-01

    Taking into account the new initiatives of the IAEA Belarus indented to continue activity on improving the Material Protection, Control and Accounting system in various directions. The significant ones are: electronic transmission of information to the IAEA, measurement standards of nuclear materials, upgraded Wiegard cards with photographs of their holders, preventive measures (threat, evaluation of safety for objects, sabotage from the staff etc.). The Belarus experience testifies that there is a unique way for increasing nuclear and radiation safety: cooperation and exchange of experience on a global scale

  11. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; hide

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  12. Evaluation of technologies of parallel computers. Communication networks for a real-time triggering application for a high-energy physics experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoertnagl, Ch.

    1997-12-01

    Experiments at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be faced with an extraordinary challenge of event selection in real time. The primary event rate, equal to the bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz, will have to be reduced by a factor of almost one-in-a-million in order to reveal traces of rare physics processes from an abundant background. This work presents various contributions to ongoing feasibility studies concerning the possible use of commercial technologies from the proximities of parallel computers and their communication networks for the second trigger stage, which faces an average data input rate of 100 kHz. Studies in this thesis apply a combination of methodologies, namely the build-up of lab-scale prototype implementations (including their exposition to test beam runs), algorithm development, technology tracking and benchmarking, as well as discrete event simulation. The main contribution consists of several technology case studies, which are based on the exploration of a set of standard benchmark programs for revealing simple parameters for characterizing delays during communication. Studied technologies include the communication sub-system of the Meiko CS-2, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), MEMORY CHANNEL, and Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI); all could be considered typical for candidate technologies. The discussion sheds light on the relative benefits and costs associated with different parallel programming models, in general, and with the use of message-passing libraries, such as Message Passing Interface (MPI), in particular. Best observed end-user-to-end-user latencies were ∼ 10 μs, best asymptotic bandwidths were ∼ 70 MByte/s. Typical sub-patterns of communication that have to be applied in the second trigger stage were sustained at ∼ 13 kHz, using today's technologies in realistic embeddings. (author)

  13. [The evaluation of physical development of students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The article demonstrates that physical health of university students is conditioned by the aggregate of morpho-functional indices and depends on the development of physical qualities of students. The evaluation of mass/height indicators of female students demonstrates the increase of total body size and weakness of body build. The testing of physical readiness testified the ambiguity of high-speed and high-speed/power qualities and results of stamina evaluation.

  14. Physics capabilities of the SNO+ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arushanova, E.; Back, A. R.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    SNO+ will soon enter its first phase of physics data-taking. The Canadian-based detector forms part of the SNOLAB underground facility, in a Sudbury nickel mine; its location providing more than two kilometres of rock overburden. We present an overview of the SNO+ experiment and its physics capabilities. Our primary goal is the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, where our expected sensitivity would place an upper limit of 1.9 × 1026 y, at 90% CL, on the half-life of neutrinoless double-beta decay in 130Te. We also intend to build on the success of SNO by studying the solar neutrino spectrum. In the unloaded scintillator phase SNO+ has the ability to make precision measurements of the fluxes of low-energy pep neutrinos and neutrinos from the CNO cycle. Other physics goals include: determining the spectrum of reactor antineutrinos, to further constrain Δ {m}122; detecting neutrinos produced by a galactic supernova and investigating certain modes of nucleon decay.

  15. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how work-site health promotion intervention, by involving group-based physical coordination training, may increase participants’ social awareness of new ways to use the body. Purpose: We investigated cleaners’ experiences with a one-year health promotion intervention...... involving group-based physical coordination training (PCT) during working hours. Design: We conducted a qualitative evaluation using method triangulation; continuous unfocused participant observation during the whole intervention, semi-structured focus group interview, and individual written evaluations one...... for implementation seem to be important for sustained effects of health-promotion interventions in the workplace. Originality: The social character of the physical training facilitated a community of practice, which potentially supported the learning of new competencies, and how to improve the organization...

  16. Integrated circuits for particle physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W; Campbell, M; Cantatore, E; Faccio, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, Pierre; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Marchioro, A; Moreira, P; Toifl, Thomas H; Wyllie, Ken H

    2000-01-01

    High energy particle physics experiments investigate the nature of matter through the identification of subatomic particles produced in collisions of protons, electrons, or heavy ions which have been accelerated to very high energies. Future experiments will have hundreds of millions of detector channels to observe the interaction region where collisions take place at a 40 MHz rate. This paper gives an overview of the electronics requirements for such experiments and explains how data reduction, timing distribution, and radiation tolerance in commercial CMOS circuits are achieved for these big systems. As a detailed example, the electronics for the innermost layers of the future tracking detector, the pixel vertex detector, is discussed with special attention to system aspects. A small-scale prototype (130 channels) implemented in standard 0.25 mu m CMOS remains fully functional after a 30 Mrad(SiO/sub 2/) irradiation. A full-scale pixel readout chip containing 8000 readout channels in a 14 by 16 mm/sup 2/ ar...

  17. Other physics experiments at the Homestake Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, M.L.; Davidson, I.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Marshall, E.; Steinberg, R.I.

    1982-01-01

    The Homestake Gold Mine presently houses the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment and a 300-ton water Cerenkov detector at a depth of 4200 meters water equivalent. The Cerenkov detector has been used to study nucleon decay, multiple muons, and neutrino bursts. An array of liquid scintillator, with surface area of 130 m 2 , is presently being constructed to measure magnetic monopoles, neutrino oscillations, underground muons, and neutrino bursts. At the same time, a 1 km 2 extensive air shower array is being built on the surface in order to measure the high energy cosmic ray composition with simultaneous surface and underground shower measurements. Future plans call for a 1406-ton liquid scintillator Tracking Spectrometer to measure nucleon decay, n-anti n transitions, and the low energy cosmic ray neutrino spectrum. We describe the present results and the possibilities for physics other than nucleon decay in the nucleon decay detectors

  18. Automatically processing physical data from LHD experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M., E-mail: emoto.masahiko@nifs.ac.jp; Ida, K.; Suzuki, C.; Yoshida, M.; Akiyama, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2014-05-15

    Physical data produced by large helical device (LHD) experiments is supplied by the Kaiseki server, and registers more than 200 types of diagnostic data. Dependencies exist amongst the data; i.e., in many cases, the calculation of one data requires other data. Therefore, to obtain unregistered data, one needs to calculate not only the diagnostic data itself but also the dependent data; however, because the data is registered by different scientists, each scientist must separately calculate and register their respective data. To simplify this complicated procedure, we have developed an automatic calculation system called AutoAna. The calculation programs of AutoAna are distributed on a network, and the number of such programs can be easily increased dynamically. Our system is therefore scalable and ready for substantial increases in the size of the target data.

  19. FPGA fault tolerance in particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebelein, Jano; Engel, Heiko; Kebschull, Udo [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of matter in physically extreme conditions is in focus of many high-energy-physics experiments. For this purpose, high energy charged particles (ions) are collided with each other and energy- or baryon densities are created similar to those at the beginning of the universe or to those which can be found in the center of neutron stars. In both cases a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP) is present, which immediately decomposes to hadrons within a short period of time. At this process, particles are formed, which allow statements about the beginning of the universe when captured by large detectors, but which also lead to the massive occurance of hardware failures within the detector's electronic devices. This contribution is about methods to mitigate radiation susceptibility for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), enabling them to be used within particle detector systems to directly gain valid data in the readout chain or to be used as detector-control-system.

  20. Industry roles in the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is the first major fusion project opportunity in many years for US industry. Both the TPX management and the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy are committed to creating industry roles that are integrated throughout the project and that appropriately use the capabilities they offer. To address industry roles in TPX it is first appropriate to describe the collaborative national approach taken for this program. The Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) was asked by DOE to set up this national team structure, and the current senior management positions and delegated responsibilities reflect that approach. While reporting lines and delegated roles are clear in the organization chart for TPX, one way to view, it, different from that of the individuals responsible upward through this management structure for various elements of the project, is through institutional responsibilities to the senior management team. In this view the management team relies on several national laboratories, each using industry contracts for major sub-systems and components, to execute the project. These responsibilities for design and for contracting are listed, showing that all major contracts will come through three national laboratories, forming teams for their responsible activities

  1. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  2. Physics Experiments at the Agesta Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelqvist, G.; Bliselius, P. Aa.; Blomberg, P.E.; Jonsson, E.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1966-09-01

    Part A. Dynamic measurements have been performed at the Aagesta reactor at power levels from 0.3 to 65 MW(th). The purposes of the experiments have been both to develop experimental methods and equipment for the dynamic studies and to measure the dynamic characteristics of the reactor in order to check the dynamic model. The experiments have been performed with four different perturbation functions: trapezoidal and step functions and two types of periodic multifrequency signals. Perturbations were introduced in the reactivity and in the load. The recordings were made of the responses of nuclear power, coolant inlet and outlet temperature and control rod position. The results are presented as step responses and transfer functions (Bode diagrams). Inmost cases the relative accuracy is ± 0.5 dB in amplitude and ± 5 deg in phase. The results from the experiments in general show rather good agreement with the results obtained from a dynamic model, which successively has been improved. Experience on reactor noise analysis based on measurements in the Agesta power reactor is discussed. It is shown that the noise measurements have given complementary dynamic information of the reactor. Part B. Static measurements of the physics parameters in the Agesta reactor are carried out to confirm theoretical methods for reactor calculations and to form a good basis for safe operation of the reactor. The reactivity worth of groups of control rods are determined with different methods and compared with calculations with the three-dimensional code HETERO. The excess reactivity as a function of burn up is obtained from the control rod positions. The temperature coefficient of the moderator is measured by lowering the moderator temperature at constant power and observing the change in control rod insertion. As burn up increases the experiments are repeated in order to follow the changes in the coefficient. The xenon poisoning effects are measured by changing the power level and

  3. Physics Experiments at the Agesta Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelqvist, G [State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden); Bliselius, P Aa; Blomberg, P E; Jonsson, E; Aakerhielm, F [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1966-09-15

    Part A. Dynamic measurements have been performed at the Aagesta reactor at power levels from 0.3 to 65 MW(th). The purposes of the experiments have been both to develop experimental methods and equipment for the dynamic studies and to measure the dynamic characteristics of the reactor in order to check the dynamic model. The experiments have been performed with four different perturbation functions: trapezoidal and step functions and two types of periodic multifrequency signals. Perturbations were introduced in the reactivity and in the load. The recordings were made of the responses of nuclear power, coolant inlet and outlet temperature and control rod position. The results are presented as step responses and transfer functions (Bode diagrams). Inmost cases the relative accuracy is {+-} 0.5 dB in amplitude and {+-} 5 deg in phase. The results from the experiments in general show rather good agreement with the results obtained from a dynamic model, which successively has been improved. Experience on reactor noise analysis based on measurements in the Agesta power reactor is discussed. It is shown that the noise measurements have given complementary dynamic information of the reactor. Part B. Static measurements of the physics parameters in the Agesta reactor are carried out to confirm theoretical methods for reactor calculations and to form a good basis for safe operation of the reactor. The reactivity worth of groups of control rods are determined with different methods and compared with calculations with the three-dimensional code HETERO. The excess reactivity as a function of burn up is obtained from the control rod positions. The temperature coefficient of the moderator is measured by lowering the moderator temperature at constant power and observing the change in control rod insertion. As burn up increases the experiments are repeated in order to follow the changes in the coefficient. The xenon poisoning effects are measured by changing the power level and

  4. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments.

  5. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments

  6. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Nigg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  7. In-Service Physical Educators' Experiences of Online Adapted Physical Education Endorsement Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Haegele, Justin A; Foot, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in-service physical education (PE) teachers' experiences during online adapted physical education (APE) graduate courses. Based on andragogy theory (adult learning theory) we employed a descriptive qualitative methodology using an explanatory case study design. The participants (6 female and 3 male) were in-service PE teachers enrolled in an online graduate APE endorsement program. Data collection included journal reflection reports and face-to-face interviews. A constant comparative method was used to interpret the data. Three interrelated themes emerged from the participants' narratives. The first theme, instructor communication, exposes the advantages and disadvantages the participants perceived regarding communication while enrolled in the online APE graduate courses. The second theme, bulletin board discussion experiences, described participants' perceptions of the use of the bulletin board discussion forum. Lastly, the final theme, assessment experiences, described how the participants learned knowledge and skills through online courses related to assessment and evaluation.

  8. Self-Consciousness, Evaluation of Physical Characteristics, and Physical Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert G.; Gilliland, LuNell

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between public self-consciousness and speed of processing information about self. Results indicated that high public self-conciousness subjects required less time to report evaluations of their physical features. In a second study high public self-conciousness was shown to be positively related to judged physical…

  9. Utilizing HPC Network Technologies in High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088631; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Because of their performance characteristics high-performance fabrics like Infiniband or OmniPath are interesting technologies for many local area network applications, including data acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This paper analyzes existing APIs for high-performance fabrics and evaluates their suitability for data acquisition systems in terms of performance and domain applicability. The study finds that existing software APIs for high-performance interconnects are focused on applications in high-performance computing with specific workloads and are not compatible with the requirements of data acquisition systems. To evaluate the use of high-performance interconnects in data acquisition systems a custom library, NetIO, is presented and compared against existing technologies. NetIO has a message queue-like interface which matches the ATLAS use case better than traditional HPC APIs like MPI. The architecture of NetIO is based on a interchangeable bac...

  10. Physical protection system design and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    The design of an effective physical protection system includes the determination of physical protection system objectives, initial design of a physical protection system, design evaluation, and probably a redesign or refinement. To develop the objectives, the designer must begin by gathering information about facility operation and conditions, such as a comprehensive description of the facility, operating conditions, and the physical protection requirements. The designer then needs to define the threat. This involves considering factors about potential adversaries: class of adversary, adversary's capabilities, and range of adversary's tactics. Next, the designer should identify targets. Determination of whether or not the materials being protected are attractive targets is based mainly on the ease or difficulty of acquisition and desirability of the material. The designer now knows the objectives of the physical protection system, that is, open-quotes what to protect against whom.close quotes The next step is to design the system by determining how best to combine such elements as fences, vaults, sensors and assessment devices, entry control elements, procedures, communication devices, and protective forces personnel to meet the objectives of the system. Once a physical protection system is designed, it must be analyzed and evaluated to ensure it meets the physical protection objectives. Evaluation must allow for features working together to ensure protection rather than regarding each feature separately. Due to the complexity of the protection systems, an evaluation usually requires modeling techniques. If any vulnerabilities are found, the initial system must be redesigned to correct the vulnerabilities and a reevaluation conducted. This paper reviews the physical protection system design and methodology mentioned above. Examples of the steps required and a brief introduction to some of the technologies used in modem physical protections system are given

  11. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Reisman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM, circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  12. Archival of the ZPPR-15B physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.; McKnight, R.

    2012-01-01

    This I-NERI collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) began mid-year (April, 2010). This report summarizes the progress for year two of the proposed three-year collaboration to generate a physics validation database of integral experiments for metallic fueled fast reactor systems. The objective of the proposed project is to archive and evaluate the integral experiment data, analyze the experiments, and prepare detailed computational models to be used for validating the modern suites of fast reactor design analysis tools which are under development at ANL and KAERI. A series of mockup experiments for a 330 MWe Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) at ANL under the ZPPR-15 Program, also known as the IFR Benchmark Physics Test Program will be retrieved and analyzed in this project. The ZPPR-15 program was conducted in four phases. Each phase was marked by a particular composition of the reference assembly. In the first phase (15A), only plutonium, depleted uranium, stainless steel and sodium were included in this very clean physics assembly. This allowed examination of the effect of removing oxygen from the typical oxide-fueled sodium fast reactor. Zirconium was added in the second phase (15B). Additionally, 13 control rods and channels were added after the first phase. In the third phase (15C), roughly half of the core volume was fueled by enriched uranium to simulate a fast reactor transition composition. In the final phase (15D), the enriched uranium component was increased to 90%, simulating a near-beginning-of-life composition. In addition to criticality, control rod worths, reaction rate distribution, reactivity coefficients, gamma heating, neutron spectrum and kinetics, there were a number of measurements aimed at addressing special issues of safety, economics and metal fuel composition. The BFS-73-1 and BFS-75-1 experiments of KAERI carried out as the mockup experiment of KALIMER-150 at the Russian BFS-1

  13. Experience, gender, and performance: Connecting high school physics experience and gender differences to introductory college physics performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Robert H.

    Current science educational practice is coming under heavy criticism based on the dismaying results of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study of 1998, the latest in a series of large scale surveys; and from research showing the appallingly low representation of females in science-related fields. These critical evaluations serve to draw attention to science literacy in general and lack of persistence among females in particular, two issues that relate closely to the "preparation for future study" goal held by many high school science teachers. In other words, these teachers often seek to promote future success and to prevent future failure in their students' academic careers. This thesis studies the connection between the teaching practices recommended by reformers and researchers for high school teachers, and their students' subsequent college physics performance. The teaching practices studied were: laboratory experiences, class discussion experiences, content coverage, and reliance on textbooks. This study analyzed a survey of 1500 students from 16 different lecture-format college physics courses at 14 different universities. Using hierarchical linear modeling, this study accounted for course-level variables (Calculus-based/Non-calculus course type, professor's gender, and university selectivity). This study controlled for the student's parents education, high school science/mathematics achievement, high school calculus background, and racial background. In addition, the interactions between gender and both pedagogical/curricular and course-level variables were analyzed. The results indicated that teaching fewer topics in greater depth in high school physics appeared to be helpful to college physics students. An interaction between college course type and content coverage showed that students in Calculus-based physics reaped even greater benefits from a depth-oriented curriculum. Also students with fewer labs per month in high school physics

  14. New evaluation system for antisabotage physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itakura, Shuichiro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The discussion on an appropriate level of physical protection has not been elaborated so far because of the confidentiality of its nature, thus resulting in a lack of consensus on this issue. In view of this context, a new system for the evaluation of antisabotage physical protection systems is proposed in this paper, in which we introduce openness to a certain extent in the process of the evaluation. The proposed system is composed of the following three elements; (1) establishment of an evaluation basis threat (EBT), which should be less strong but more likely to occur than the design basis threat (DBT); (2) employment of realistic standard scenarios in the process of evaluation; (3) disclosure of results of evaluation implemented based on the above EBT and standard scenarios. It is expected that this considerably open system will foment peace of mind among citizens as well as create a deterrent effect that would minimize the occurrence of sabotage on nuclear facilities. (author)

  15. Physics Experiments with Nintendo Wii Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from…

  16. The development for the particle physics experiments platform in university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Futian; Yao Yuan; Wang Zhaoqi; Liu Yuzhe; Sang Ziru; Chen Lian; Wen Fei; Jin Ge; Liu Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear science and particle physics is an important subject in physics, and it is important to launch particle physics experiments in university to training students. We design an experiments platform based on particle physics experiments in university. By employing digitalization and reconfiguration techniques in our design, we achieve all kinds of device functions with only one device. With the customized software for particular experiments and a website for teaching assistance, the platform is easy to be employed in universities. Students can accomplish a classical particle physics experiment in a modern way with the help of the platform, and they can also try new ideals. The experiments platform is ready to be used, and some of the lab sessions in USTC have already begin to use our experiments platform. (authors)

  17. The Physics of Bird Flight: An Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Michael D.; George, Thomas F.; Feldman, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an experiment that measures the forces acting on a flying bird during takeoff. The experiment uses a minimum of equipment and only an elementary knowledge of kinematics and Newton's second law. The experiment involves first digitally videotaping a bird during takeoff, analyzing the video to determine the bird's position as a…

  18. Physics design requirements for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Goldston, R.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Reiersen, W.T.; Porkolab, M.; Ulrickson, M.

    1993-01-01

    The design of TPX is driven by physics requirements that follow from its mission. The tokamak and heating systems provide the performance and profile controls needed to study advanced steady state tokamak operating modes. The magnetic control systems provide substantial flexibility for the study of regimes with high beta and bootstrap current. The divertor is designed for high steady state power and particle exhaust

  19. Lecture note on circuit technology for high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hirokazu.

    1992-07-01

    This lecture gives basic ideas and practice of the circuit technology for high energy physics experiment. The program of this lecture gives access to the integrated circuit technology to be applied for a high luminosity hadron collider experiment. (author)

  20. Accelerator based atomic physics experiments: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, C.D.

    1976-01-01

    Atomic Physics research with beams from accelerators has continued to expand and the number of papers and articles at meetings and in journals reflects a steadily increasing interest and an increasing support from various funding agencies. An attempt will be made to point out where interdisciplinary benefits have occurred, and where applications of the new results to engineering problems are expected. Drawing from material which will be discussed in the conference, a list of the most active areas of research is presented. Accelerator based atomic physics brings together techniques from many areas, including chemistry, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and engineering. An example is the use of crystal channeling to sort some of the phenomena of ordinary heavy ion stopping powers. This tool has helped us to reach a better understanding of stopping mechanisms with the result that now we have established a better base for predicting energy losses of heavy ions in various materials

  1. Physics experiments with Nintendo Wii controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from a spring undergoing simple harmonic motion, a pair of controllers mounted on colliding gliders on a linear air track, and a person jumping from a balance board.

  2. An Experiment on a Physical Pendulum and Steiner's Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russeva, G. B.; Tsutsumanova, G. G.; Russev, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratory curricula usually include experiments on the moment of inertia, the centre of gravity, the harmonic motion of a physical pendulum, and Steiner's theorem. We present a simple experiment using very low cost equipment for investigating these subjects in the general case of an asymmetrical test body. (Contains 3 figures…

  3. First order error corrections in common introductory physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckey, Jacob; Baker, Andrew; Aravind, Vasudeva; Clarion Team

    As a part of introductory physics courses, students perform different standard lab experiments. Almost all of these experiments are prone to errors owing to factors like friction, misalignment of equipment, air drag, etc. Usually these types of errors are ignored by students and not much thought is paid to the source of these errors. However, paying attention to these factors that give rise to errors help students make better physics models and understand physical phenomena behind experiments in more detail. In this work, we explore common causes of errors in introductory physics experiment and suggest changes that will mitigate the errors, or suggest models that take the sources of these errors into consideration. This work helps students build better and refined physical models and understand physics concepts in greater detail. We thank Clarion University undergraduate student grant for financial support involving this project.

  4. CMS experiment at the LHC Commissioning and early physics

    CERN Document Server

    Safonov, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS collaboration used the past year to greatly improve the level of detector readiness for the first collisions data. The acquired operational experience over this year, large gains in understanding the detector and improved preparedness for early physics will be instrumental in minimizing the time from the first collisions to first LHC physics. The following describes the status of the CMS experiment and outlines early physics plans with the first LHC data.

  5. NTES laser facility for physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, D.J.; Foley, R.J.; Frank, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on the NTES laser facility: Mission Statement and Project Description; Experiment Area; High-Energy, Double-Pass Laser; Facilities; Laser Control and Data Acquisition; and Auxiliary Lasers

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  7. Dod physical security equipment application experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    In the Department of Defense, the subject of physical security is very broad in scope. Its application ranges from countering the shoplifters in the post exchange facilities to the sophisticated terrorist who may attempt to obtain access to one of our nuclear weapons. This paper focuses on the area of specific interest to the members of INMM which is the protection of nuclear devices and the classified information associated with them

  8. Application of radix sorting in high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuan; Gu Minhao; Zhu Kejun

    2012-01-01

    In the high energy physics experiments, there are always requirements to sort the large scale of experiment data. To meet the demand, this paper introduces one radix sorting algorithms, whose sub-sort is counting sorting and time complex is O (n), based on the characteristic of high energy physics experiment data that is marked by time stamp. This paper gives the description, analysis, implementation and experimental result of the sorting algorithms. (authors)

  9. Physical Adsorption: Experiment, Theory and Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Lis; Kjær, Ulla Dorte; Nielsen, Peter A.

    .ADSORPTION/DESORPTION IN BUILDING MATERIALS: Short description of our research project which deals with lab size and full scale experiments, mathematical modelling and development of a standard test method for characterization of the sorption properties of indoor materials.STUDIES OF ADSORPTION/DESORPTION IN DUST...

  10. Solution Calorimetry Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizen, Deborah A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents two experiments: the first one measures the heat of an exothermic reaction by the reduction of permanganate by the ferris ion; the second one measures the heat of an endothermic process, the mixing of ethanol and cyclohexane. Lists tables to aid in the use of the solution calorimeter. (MVL)

  11. Shifting standards experiments in particle physics in the twentieth century

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Allan

    2013-01-01

    In Shifting Standards, Allan Franklin provides an overview of notable experiments in particle physics. Using papers published in Physical Review, the journal of the American Physical Society, as his basis, Franklin details the experiments themselves, their data collection, the events witnessed, and the interpretation of results. From these papers, he distills the dramatic changes to particle physics experimentation from 1894 through 2009.Franklin develops a framework for his analysis, viewing each example according to exclusion and selection of data; possible experimenter bias; details of the experimental apparatus; size of the data set, apparatus, and number of authors; rates of data taking along with analysis and reduction; distinction between ideal and actual experiments; historical accounts of previous experiments; and personal comments and style.From Millikan’s tabletop oil-drop experiment to the Compact Muon Solenoid apparatus measuring approximately 4,000 cubic meters (not including accelerators) and...

  12. Physics with photons at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Réale, V

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector due to start operation next year at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC will collide pairs of protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, with a bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, and luminosities up to L = 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. The identification of photons is crucial for the study of a number of physics channels, including the search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs, and measurements of direct production of single photons and photon pairs. Events containing true high-p_T photons must be selected with high efficiency, while rejecting the bulk of high-p_T jet events produced with enormously larger rate through QCD processes. The photon--photon and photon--jet channels are interesting in their own right, allowing the study of QCD at high energy. It is also essential to understand these proceses as the dominant background in the search for certain new physics processes, notably the production and decay of Higgs bosons to photon pairs. There are large uncertaintin...

  13. Nuclear data and integral experiments in reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinelli, U.

    1980-01-01

    The material given here broadly covers the content of the 10 lectures delivered at the Winter Course on Reactor Theory and Power Reactors, ICTP, Trieste (13 February - 10 March 1978). However, the parts that could easily be found in the current literature have been omitted and replaced with the appropriate references. The needs for reactor physics calculations, particularly as applicable to commercial reactors, are reviewed in the introduction. The relative merits and shortcomings of fundamental and semi-empirical methods are discussed. The relative importance of different nuclear data, the ways in which they can be measured or calculated, and the sources of information on measured and evaluated data are briefly reviewed. The various approaches to the condensation of nuclear data to multigroup cross sections are described. After some consideration to the sensitivity calculations and the evaluation of errors, some of the most important type of integral experiments in reactor physics are introduced, with a view to showing the main difficulties in the interpretation and utilization of their results and the most recent trends in experimentation. The conclusions try to assign some priorities in the implementation of experimental and calculational capabilities, especially for a developing country. (author)

  14. Experiment to evaluate software safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubies, B.; Henry, J.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The process of licensing nuclear power plants for operation consists of mandatory steps featuring detailed examination of the instrumentation and control system by the safety authorities, including softwares. The criticality of these softwares obliges the manufacturer to develop in accordance with the IEC 880 standard 'Computer software in nuclear power plant safety systems' issued by the International Electronic Commission. The evaluation approach, a two-stage assessment is described in detail. In this context, the IPSN (Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety), the technical support body of the safety authority uses the MALPAS tool to analyse the quality of the programs. (R.P.). 4 refs

  15. Smashing physics inside the world's biggest experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working...

  16. Aspects of students' self-evaluation of their physical condition and motivation for physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Avižonienė, Genovaitė; Gylienė, Rasa

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to establish how the students evaluate their physical condition and get involved into physical activity; make a research of physical status and physical capacity of the students; establish how adequate is a subjective self evaluation of physical condition and in what way it influences motivation for physical training and physical activity. The survey has showed that the results of majority of the students' physical condition are low, though 86,2% of the stud...

  17. Review Committee report on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment: Role and mission of TPX; overview of design; physics design assessment; engineering design assessment; evaluation of cost, schedule, and management plans; and, environment safety and health

  18. Physics experiments with the operating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullington, G R; King, D C

    1973-09-27

    Experimental techniques have been developed and used on Dragon to give consistent information on excess reactivity and shut down margin. The reactivity measurements have been correlated with the theoretical calculations and have led to improvements in the calculations. The methods used and the results obtained are accepted by the Safety Committee as sufficient evidence for compliance with the fuel loading safety rules. Although the reactor was not designed as an experimental facility, flux and dose measurements experiments have been successfully carried out. Mass flow and negative reactivity transient measurements have been carried out. These are valuable for demonstration of the flexibility of the reactor system and for giving confidence in theoretical calculations.

  19. Hadron physics at the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krinner Fabian

    2015-01-01

    The Compass experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large data sets, which allow to study light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unprecedented detail. The presented overview of the first results from this data set focuses in particular on the light meson sector and presents a detailed analysis of three-pion final states. A new JPC = 1++ state, the a1(1420, is observed with a mass and width in the ranges m = 1412 − 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 − 150MeV/c2.

  20. Physics Analysis of the FIRE Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Meade, D.; Breslau, J.; Fu, G.; Gorelenkov, N.; Manickam, J.; Park, W.; Strauss, H.

    2002-01-01

    An integrated model of a complete discharge in the FIRE experiment has been developed based on the TSC simulation code. The complete simulation model includes a choice of several models for core transport, combined with an edge pedestal model and the Porcelli sawtooth model. Burn control is provided by feedback on the auxiliary heating power. We find that with the GLF23 and MMM95 transport models, Q >10 operation should be possible for H-mode pedestal temperatures in the range of 4-5 keV

  1. Physics experiment on the Dragon reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, C.

    1974-10-15

    The paper describes a set of DRAGON experiments planned to measure burn-up effects in DRAGON irradiated fuel. Irradiated fuel elements from DRAGON are to be subjected to reactivity measurements in the HECTOR experimental reactor to infer the residual U235 content followed by isotopic analyses at CEA laboratories in 1975. Fast neutron damage to DRAGON graphite is compared to fast neutron dose measurements using Ni58 (n,p) Co58 activation wires in both DRAGON and the DIDO MTR. Gamma scanning of irradiated fuel elements are used to compare axial power profiles to those derived from two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations of the DRAGON reactor.

  2. Evaluation of patient satisfaction with physical therapy following primary THA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Kimona; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Memon, Talha; Dattilo, Jonathan; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is intended to maximize a patient's range of motion and function and improve the quality of life. No universally accepted standard of care exists for physical therapy among physicians or therapists. However, it may be crucial to enhance efforts to more fully elucidate contributing parameters that affect patient experiences. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various factors contributing to patient satisfaction with postoperative physical therapy. One hundred consecutive patients (110 hips) who underwent THA were prospectively surveyed for satisfaction with postoperative physical therapy. All surveys were filled out anonymously by the patients, and investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes and who was surveyed. Seventy-six percent of patients reported being satisfied with their rehabilitation experiences. Factors, including patient age and sex, duration of therapy, number of patients per session, continuity of care with the same therapist, amount of hands-on time spent with the therapist, number of patients per session, and total number of sessions completed, were significantly correlated with patient satisfaction. Co-pay amount did not significantly affect patient satisfaction. These factors may be underappreciated by physicians and physical therapists. To maximize patient satisfaction with physical therapy, physicians should identify institutions whose therapists are willing to spend adequate hands-on time during one-on-one or small-group sessions while maintaining the greatest possible continuity of care with a single provider. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Centralising Space: The Physical Education and Physical Activity Experiences of South Asian, Muslim Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stride, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the physical education (PE) and physical activity experiences of a group of South Asian, Muslim girls, a group typically marginalised in PE and physical activity research. The study responds to ongoing calls for research to explore across different spaces in young people's lives. Specifically, I draw on a…

  4. Divertor design for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.N.; Braams, B.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the present divertor design for the planned TPX tokamak, which will explore the physics and technology of steady-state (1000s pulses) heat and particle removal in high confinement (2--4x L-mode), high beta (β N ≥ 3) divertor plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive. The TPX device will operate in the double-null divertor configuration, with actively cooled graphite targets forming a deep (0.5 m) slot at the outer strike point. The peak heat flux on, the highly tilted (74 degrees from normal) re-entrant (to recycle ions back toward the separatrix) will be in the range of 4--6 MW/m 2 with 18 MW of neutral beams and RF heating power. The combination of active pumping and gas puffing (deuterium plus impurities), along with higher heating power (45 MW maximum) will allow testing of radiative divertor concepts at ITER-like power densities

  5. The PANDA experiment: Antiproton physics at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagna, P.

    2011-01-01

    The new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), under construction at the GSI laboratory at Darmstadt, in a few years will make available, among different types of beams, even antiproton beams with unique features. Through a High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) for antiprotons, an antiproton beam will be available in a momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c, which will interact on a hydrogen target. The products of the interaction, including hadronic systems with strangeness and/or charm, will be detected with the PANDA magnetic spectrometer (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt), and the spectroscopic analysis will allow a detailed investigation on a number of open problems of the hadronic physics, as the quark confinement, the existence of non-conventional meson states (so-called glueballs and hybrids), the structure of hadrons and of the strong interaction, with particular attention to charmonium spectroscopy. An overview of the scientific program of PANDA and the current status of the project will be presented.

  6. Creative Turbulence: Experiments in Art and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Enrico; Dubois, R. Luke; Camnasio, Sara; Porfiri, Maurizio; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Serrano, Daniel; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Effective communication of basic research to non-experts is necessary to inspire the public and to justify support for science by the taxpayers. The creative power of art is particularly important to engage an adult audience, who otherwise might not be receptive to standard didactic material. Interdisciplinarity defines new trends in research, and works at the intersection of art and science are growing in popularity, even though they are often isolated experiments. We present a public-facing collaboration between physicists/engineers performing research in fluid dynamics, and audiovisual artists working in cutting-edge media installation and performance. The result of this collaboration is a curated exhibition, with supporting public programming. We present the artworks, the lesson learned from the interactions between artists and scientists, the potential outreach impact and future developments. This project is supported by the APS Public Outreach Mini Grant.

  7. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, C. M.

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  8. Diamond detectors for high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäni, L.; Alexopoulos, A.; Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Beck, H.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D'Alessandro, R.; Dauvergne, D.; de Boer, W.; Dorfer, C.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Giroletti, C.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gorišek, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grummer, A.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hiti, B.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Hutton, C.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Konovalov, V.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Lukosi, E.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Muškinja, M.; Oh, A.; Oliviero, P.; Passeri, D.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Reichmann, M.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sanz, D.; Scaringella, M.; Schaefer, D.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Smith, S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Tannenwald, B.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2018-01-01

    Beam test results of the radiation tolerance study of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond against different particle species and energies is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition functionality of poly-crystalline CVD diamond 3D devices was demonstrated in beam tests and 3D diamond detectors are shown to be a promising technology for applications in future high luminosity experiments.

  9. The impact of war experiences and physical abuse on formerly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-25

    Apr 25, 2006 ... Many studies have reported that physical, behavioural, cognitive, and emotional sequelae ... 1Department of Psychology, Gulu University, Gulu, Uganda. 2Division of ...... Goldstein RD, Wampler NS, Wise PH. War experiences ...

  10. Simple Experiments on the Physics of Vision: The Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortel, Adolf

    2005-01-01

    Many simple experiments can be performed in the classroom to explore the physics of vision. Students can learn of the two types of receptive cells (rods and cones), their distribution on the retina and the existence of the blind spot.

  11. Laboratory Experiments in Physics for Modern Astronomy With Comprehensive Development of the Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Golden, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This book presents experiments which will teach physics relevant to astronomy. The astronomer, as instructor, frequently faces this need when his college or university has no astronomy department and any astronomy course is taught in the physics department. The physicist, as instructor, will find this intellectually appealing when faced with teaching an introductory astronomy course. From these experiments, the student will acquire important analytical tools, learn physics appropriate to astronomy, and experience instrument calibration and the direct gathering and analysis of data. Experiments that can be performed in one laboratory session as well as semester-long observation projects are included. This textbook is aimed at undergraduate astronomy students.

  12. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1985-01-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  13. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1984-12-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  14. Physical exercise and return to work: cancer survivors' experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we aimed to explore cancer survivors' experiences with (1) return to work (RtW) and work performance, (2) a physical exercise program after treatment, and (3) the perceived link between physical exercise and work. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with ten

  15. Analysis of pre-service physics teacher skills designing simple physics experiments based technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilawati; Huda, C.; Kurniawan, W.; Masturi; Khoiri, N.

    2018-03-01

    Pre-service physics teacher skill in designing simple experiment set is very important in adding understanding of student concept and practicing scientific skill in laboratory. This study describes the skills of physics students in designing simple experiments based technologicall. The experimental design stages include simple tool design and sensor modification. The research method used is descriptive method with the number of research samples 25 students and 5 variations of simple physics experimental design. Based on the results of interviews and observations obtained the results of pre-service physics teacher skill analysis in designing simple experimental physics charged technology is good. Based on observation result, pre-service physics teacher skill in designing simple experiment is good while modification and sensor application are still not good. This suggests that pre-service physics teacher still need a lot of practice and do experiments in designing physics experiments using sensor modifications. Based on the interview result, it is found that students have high enough motivation to perform laboratory activities actively and students have high curiosity to be skilled at making simple practicum tool for physics experiment.

  16. Benefits of reactor physics experiments for the HTGR industrial development - an attempt to a quantitative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuniberti, R; Graziani, G; Massino, L; Rinaldini, C; Zanantoni, C

    1972-10-15

    The available results of reactor physics experiments on HTGRs and their accuracies are briefiy reviewed. The physical quantities of interest are grouped into three categories: basic nuclear data, lattice parameters and integral design data. The last two are considered and their possible improvements in accuracy by means of experimental measurements are assessed. The cost penalty on fuel cycle and capital cost due to each physical quantity is then considered, and consequently the benefits of reactor physics experiments are evaluated for a number of hypotheses concerning the foreseeable HTGR development and the delay in taking practical advantage of experimental results. It is concluded that, at the present state of knowledge of basic nuclear data and with the available calculation methods, the economic incentive to new reactor physics experiments is small, and a previous careful analysis is recommended to those intending to perform such experiments.

  17. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  18. Qualitative and quantitative physical land evaluation : an operational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, van H.A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Physical land evaluation methods are crucial for evaluating potentials and constraints of land for intended land use. Physical resources, such as soil, climate, hydrology, and topography are evaluated. Different technical procedures are used for physical land evaluation ranging from simple

  19. Self-directed learning: A heretical experiment in teaching physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, M. P.

    1995-06-01

    An account is given of the instruction of university-level introductory physics courses according to an educational framework in which (1) curiosity-driven inquiry is recognized as an essential activity of both science and science teaching; (2) the principal role of the instructor is to provide students the incentive to learn science through their pursuit of personally meaningful questions; (3) the commission of errors is regarded as a natural concomitant to learning and is not penalized; (4) emphasis is placed on laboratory investigations that foster minimally restrictive free exploration rather than prescriptive adherence to formal procedure; (5) research skills are developed through out-of-class projects that involve literature search, experiment, and the modeling of real-world physical phenomena: (6) the precise and articulate use of language is regarded as seminal to communication in science (as it is in the humanities) and is promoted through activities that help develop written and oral language skills; (7) the evaluation of student performance is based on a portfolio of accomplished work rather than on the outcome of formal testing.

  20. The impact of sensorimotor experience on affective evaluation of dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eKirsch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Past research demonstrates that we are more likely to positively evaluate a stimulus if we have had previous experience with that stimulus. This has been shown for judgement of faces, architecture, artworks and body movements. In contrast, other evidence suggests that this relationship can also work in the inverse direction, at least in the domain of watching dance. Specifically, it has been shown that in certain contexts, people derive greater pleasure from watching unfamiliar movements they would not be able to physically reproduce compared to simpler, familiar actions they could physically reproduce. It remains unknown, however, how different kinds of experience with complex actions, such as dance, might change observers’ affective judgements of these movements. Our aim was to clarify the relationship between experience and affective evaluation of whole body movements. In a between-subjects design, participants received either physical dance training with a video game system, visual and auditory experience or auditory experience only. Participants’ aesthetic preferences for dance stimuli were measured before and after the training sessions. Results show that participants from the physical training group not only improved their physical performance of the dance sequences, but also reported higher enjoyment and interest in the stimuli after training. This suggests that physically learning particular movements leads to greater enjoyment while observing them. These effects are not simply due to increased familiarity with audio or visual elements of the stimuli, as the other two training groups showed no increase in aesthetic ratings post-training. We suggest these results support an embodied simulation account of aesthetics, and discuss how the present findings contribute to a better understanding of the shaping of preferences by sensorimotor experience.

  1. Physical protection system design and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.D.

    1997-11-01

    The design of an effective physical protection system (PPS) includes the determination of the PPS objectives, the initial design of a PPS, the evaluation of the design, and probably, the redesign or refinement of the system. To develop the objectives, the designer must begin by gathering information about facility operation and conditions, such as a comprehensive description of the facility, operating conditions, and the physical protection requirements. The designer then needs to define the threat. This involves considering factors about potential adversaries: class of adversary, adversary's capabilities, and range of adversary's tactics. Next, the designer should identify targets. Determination of whether or not the materials being protected are attractive targets is based mainly on the ease or difficulty of acquisition and desirability of the material. The designer now knows the objectives of the PPS, that is, ''what to protect against whom.'' The next step is to design the system by determining how best to combine such elements as fences, vaults, sensors and assessment devices, entry control devices, communication devices, procedures, and protective force personnel to meet the objectives of the system. Once a PPS is designed, it must be analyzed and evaluated to ensure it meets the PPS objectives. Evaluation must allow for features working together to ensure protection rather than regarding each feature separately. Due to the complexity of the protection systems, an evaluation usually requires modeling techniques. If any vulnerabilities are found, the initial system must be redesigned to correct the vulnerabilities and a reevaluation conducted. After the system is installed, the threat and system parameters may change with time. If they do, the analysis must be performed periodically to ensure the system objectives are still being met

  2. Nucleation Characteristics in Physical Experiments/explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Fauske, Hans K.

    1976-01-01

    Large-scale vapor explosion experiments have shown that intimate contact between hot and cold liquids, and a temperature upon contact that is greater than the spontaneous nucleation temperature of the system, are two necessary conditions for the onset of large scale vapor explosions. A model, based on spontaneous nucleation of the homogeneous type, has been proposed to describe the relevant processes and the resulting energetics for explosive boiling systems. The model considers that spontaneous nucleation cannot occur either during the relief time for constant volume heating or until the thermal boundary layer is sufficiently thick to support a vapor cavity of the critical size. After nucleation, bubble growth does not occur until an acoustic wave establishes a pressure gradient in the cold liquid. These considerations lead to the prediction that, for a given temperature, drops greater than a critical size will remain in film boiling due to coalescence of vapor nuclei and drops smaller than this value will wet and be captured by the hot liquid surface. These results are compared to small drop data for well-wetted systems and excellent agreement is obtained between the observed behavior and the model predictions. In conclusion: A model, based on spontaneous nucleation, has been proposed to describe vaporization potential and behavior upon contact in a liquid/liquid system. This behavior is determined by the size of the liquid mass, single-phase pressurization and acoustic relief, nucleation frequency due to random density fluctuations, the initiation of unstable growth and acoustic relief, and the development of the thermal boundary layer in the cold liquid. The proposed model predicts that the stability of a given size drop upon intimate contact with another liquid is extremely dependent upon the interface temperature. For low interface temperatures, large masses will be captured by the hot liquid and the resulting vaporization rates will be extremely low because

  3. Data acquisition systems for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Olmos, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Data Acquisition Systems most frequently used in High Energy Physics experiments is described. This report begins with a brief description of the main elements of a typical signal processing chain, following with a detailed exposition of the four most popular instrumentation standards used in this kind of experiments: NIM, CAMAC, and VMI. (author). 20 figs., 9 ref

  4. Perceptions of Overweight Students Concerning Their Experiences in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Josh; Graber, Kim C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine overweight students' perceptions of and experiences in physical education. Specifically, the applicability of learned helplessness as a framework to understand their experiences was explored. Participants were seven female and five male high school students whose body mass index was at or higher…

  5. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  6. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  7. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  8. The engineering design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    A mission and supporting physics objectives have been developed, which establishes an important role for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) in developing the physic basis for a future fusion reactor. The design of TPX include advanced physics features, such as shaping and profile control, along with the capability of operating for very long pulses. The development of the superconducting magnets, actively cooled internal hardware, and remote maintenance will be an important technology contribution to future fusion projects, such as ITER. The Conceptual Design and Management Systems for TPX have been developed and reviewed, and the project is beginning Preliminary Design. If adequately funded the construction project should be completed in the year 2000

  9. Current status and improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Guopu; Guo Lanying

    1999-01-01

    The author reviews the current status of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology in higher education and expresses author's views on the future improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course

  10. Detecting physics beyond the Standard Model with the REDTOP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, D.; León, D.; Fabela, B.; Pedraza, M. I.

    2017-10-01

    REDTOP is an experiment at its proposal stage. It belongs to the High Intensity class of experiments. REDTOP will use a 1.8 GeV continuous proton beam impinging on a fixed target. It is expected to produce about 1013 η mesons per year. The main goal of REDTOP is to look for physics beyond the Standard Model by detecting rare η decays. The detector is designed with innovative technologies based on the detection of prompt Cherenkov light, such that interesting events can be observed and the background events are efficiently rejected. The experimental design, the physics program and the running plan of the experiment is presented.

  11. The Oil Drop Experiment: An Illustration of Scientific Research Methodology and its Implications for Physics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria A.; Niaz, Mansoor

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) evaluation of the methodology used in recent search for particles with fractional electrical charge (quarks) and its implications for understanding the scientific research methodology of Millikan; (2) evaluation of 43 general physics textbooks and 11 laboratory manuals, with respect to the oil drop experiment,…

  12. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  13. Complex evaluation of student‘s physical activity by physical health, physical fitness and body composition parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Šiupšinskas, Laimonas

    2007-01-01

    Physical activity level of students is decreasing. Students are specific population group with similar patterns of habitual physical activity influenced by study process. That formed requirement to search for a new ways to assess physical activity of the students indirectly. Offered method assesses level of physical health, measures physical fitness and evaluates body composition. The aim of the study is to evaluate indirectly measured health-enhanced physical activity of the students by phys...

  14. Gender, experience, and self-efficacy in introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayson M. Nissen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] There is growing evidence of persistent gender achievement gaps in university physics instruction, not only for learning physics content, but also for developing productive attitudes and beliefs about learning physics. These gaps occur in both traditional and interactive-engagement (IE styles of physics instruction. We investigated one gender gap in the area of attitudes and beliefs. This was men’s and women’s physics self-efficacy, which comprises students’ thoughts and feelings about their capabilities to succeed as learners in physics. According to extant research using pre- and post-course surveys, the self-efficacy of both men and women tends to be reduced after taking traditional and IE physics courses. Moreover, self-efficacy is reduced further for women than for men. However, it remains unclear from these studies whether this gender difference is caused by physics instruction. It may be, for instance, that the greater reduction of women’s self-efficacy in physics merely reflects a broader trend in university education that has little to do with physics per se. We investigated this and other alternative causes, using an in-the-moment measurement technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM. We used ESM to collect multiple samples of university students’ feelings of self-efficacy during four types of activity for two one-week periods: (i an introductory IE physics course, (ii students’ other introductory STEM courses, (iii their non-STEM courses, and (iv their activities outside of school. We found that women experienced the IE physics course with lower self-efficacy than men, but for the other three activity types, women’s self-efficacy was not reliably different from men’s. We therefore concluded that the experience of physics instruction in the IE physics course depressed women’s self-efficacy. Using complementary measures showing the IE

  15. User Experience Evaluation in the Mobile Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Marianna; Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Tscheligi, Manfred

    Multimedia services on mobile devices are becoming increasingly popular. Whereas the mobile phone is the most likely platform for mobile TV, PDAs, portable game consoles, and music players are attractive alternatives. Mobile TV consumption on mobile phones allows new kinds of user experiences, but it also puts designers and researchers in front of new challenges. On the one hand, designers have to take these novel experience potentials into account. On the other hand, the right methods to collect user feedback to further improve services for the mobile context have to be applied. In this chapter the importance of user experience research for mobile TV within the mobile context is highlighted. We present how different experience levels can be evaluated taking different mobile context categories into account. In particular, we discuss the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), which seems to be a fruitful approach for investigating user TV experiences.

  16. CMOS test and evaluation a physical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Manjul

    2015-01-01

    This book extends test structure applications described in Microelectronic Test Struc­tures for CMOS Technology (Springer 2011) to digital CMOS product chips. Intended for engineering students and professionals, this book provides a single comprehensive source for evaluating CMOS technology and product test data from a basic knowledge of the physical behavior of the constituent components. Elementary circuits that exhibit key properties of complex CMOS chips are simulated and analyzed, and an integrated view of design, test and characterization is developed. Appropriately designed circuit monitors embedded in the CMOS chip serve to correlate CMOS technology models and circuit design tools to the hardware and also aid in test debug. Impact of silicon process variability, reliability, and power and performance sensitivities to a range of product application conditions are described. Circuit simulations exemplify the methodologies presented, and problems are included at the end of the chapters.

  17. REPFLO model evaluation, physical and numerical consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.N.; Holland, D.H.

    1978-11-01

    This report contains a description of some suggested changes and an evaluation of the REPFLO computer code, which models ground-water flow and nuclear-waste migration in and about a nuclear-waste repository. The discussion contained in the main body of the report is supplemented by a flow chart, presented in the Appendix of this report. The suggested changes are of four kinds: (1) technical changes to make the code compatible with a wider variety of digital computer systems; (2) changes to fill gaps in the computer code, due to missing proprietary subroutines; (3) changes to (a) correct programming errors, (b) correct logical flaws, and (c) remove unnecessary complexity; and (4) changes in the computer code logical structure to make REPFLO a more viable model from the physical point of view

  18. IRPhE - International Reactor Physics Experiments database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, E.

    2004-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists and has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. It is a significant saving results from disseminating a standard benchmark set to be used worldwide. A framework for professionals that use the standard benchmark set to validate and verify modeling codes and data for radiation transport, criticality safety and reactor physics applications guarantees a comparative set of analyses. It represents also a good basis for pinpointing important gaps and where efforts should be concentrated and ensures knowledge and competence preservation, management and transfer in nuclear science and engineering. A large number of experimentalists, physicists, evaluators, modelers have devoted large amounts of their efforts and competencies to produce the data on which the methods we are using today are based. These data are far from having been exploited fully for the different nuclear and radiation technologies. This wealth of information needs to be preserved in a form more easily exploitable by modern information technology and for use in connection with novel and refined computational models with limitations of the past removed. These data will form the basis for the studies of more advanced nuclear technology, will be instrumental in identifying areas where there is a lack of knowledge and thus provide support to justifying new experiments that would reduce design uncertainties and consequently costs. Improvement of

  19. Becoming physics people: Development of integrated physics identity through the Learning Assistant experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor W.; Conn, Jessica; Close, Hunter G.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] In this study, we analyze the experience of students in the Physics Learning Assistant (LA) program at Texas State University in terms of the existing theoretical frameworks of community of practice and physics identity, and explore the implications suggested by these theories for LA program adoption and adaptation. Regression models from physics identity studies show that the physics identity construct strongly predicts intended choice of a career in physics. The goal of our current project is to understand the details of the impacts of participation in the LA experience on participants' practice and self-concept, in order to identify critical elements of LA program structure that positively influence physics identity and physics career intentions for students. Our analysis suggests that participation in the LA program impacts LAs in ways that support both stronger "physics student" identity and stronger "physics instructor" identity, and that these identities are reconciled into a coherent integrated physics identity. Increased comfort in interactions with peers, near peers, and faculty seems to be an important component of this identity development and reconciliation, suggesting that a focus on supporting community membership is useful for effective program design.

  20. Becoming Physics People: Development of Integrated Physics Identity through the Learning Assistant Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor W.; Conn, Jessica; Close, Hunter G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the experience of students in the Physics Learning Assistant (LA) program at Texas State University in terms of the existing theoretical frameworks of "community of practice" and "physics identity," and explore the implications suggested by these theories for LA program adoption and adaptation.…

  1. The physics of musical scales: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Dallin S.; Colton, John S.

    2015-10-01

    The theory of musical scales involves mathematical ratios, harmonic resonators, beats, and human perception and provides an interesting application of the physics of waves and sound. We first review the history and physics of musical scales, with an emphasis on four historically important scales: twelve-tone equal temperament, Pythagorean, quarter-comma meantone, and Ptolemaic just intonation. We then present an easy way for students and teachers to directly experience the qualities of different scales using MIDI synthesis.

  2. Experience acquired in health physics at Saclay Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitoussi, L.; Joffre, H.

    1963-06-15

    Description is given of the general organization and functions of the Health Physics Department of Saclay Nuclear Research Establishment. The means employed for the various installations covered and the general rules adopted for health physics are presented. From an overall survey of the results obtained in 1962, conclusions were drawn from past experience and to foresee improvements for the future are foreseen. (P.C.H.)

  3. Physics in your pocket: experimenting and learning with your smartphone

    OpenAIRE

    González, Manuel Á.; González Rebollo, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Along the last years the use of mobile devices in education has increased hugely. This increase includes not only the use of ICTs as learning facilitators. Mobile devices have also become useful tools in experimental physics thanks to their rich sets of built-in sensors. The use of smartphones as measurement devices in physics experiments requires careful attention to ensure good learning outcomes. Some aspects that must be considered are the reliability and accuracy of the smartphone sensors...

  4. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Lehar, F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kettle, P.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  5. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  6. Basic experiments of reactor physics using the critical assembly TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Toru; Igashira, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Ken; Suzaki, Takenori.

    1994-02-01

    This report is based on lectures given to graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology. It covers educational experiments conducted with the Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in July, 1993. During this period, the following basic experiments on reactor physics were performed: (1) Critical approach experiment, (2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, (3) Measurement of power distribution, (4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, (5) Measurement of safety sheet worth by the rod drop method. The principle of experiments, experimental procedure, and analysis of results are described in this report. (author)

  7. Advanced detection techniques for educational experiments in cosmic ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiola, Salvatore; La-Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we describe several detection techniques that can be employed to study cosmic ray properties and carry out training activities at high school and undergraduate level. Some of the proposed devices and instrumentation are inherited from professional research experiments, while others were especially developed and marketed for educational cosmic ray experiments. The educational impact of experiments in cosmic ray physics in high-school or undergraduate curricula will be exploited through various examples, going from simple experiments carried out with small Geiger counters or scintillation devices to more advanced detection instrumentation which can offer starting points for not trivial research work. (authors)

  8. Experiences in sport, physical activity, and physical education among Christian, Buddhist, and Hindu Asian adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kaori; Kodani, Iku; Gupta, Nidhi; Gill, Diane L

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural scholarship in sport and exercise psychology should help us understand and apply cultural competencies for all to be physically active. In the present study, two Asian countries, Japan and Singapore, were chosen. The participation rate for physical activities among adolescent girls tends to be lower than that of boys in both countries. Thus, the purpose of the project was to gain knowledge and understanding about sociocultural factors that may explain adolescent girls' perceptions and behaviors toward sport, physical activity, and physical education (PE). A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with focus groups was used to understand meanings of physical activity among Buddhist Japanese, and Hindu Indians and Christian Chinese from Singapore. Each focus group consisted of four or five girls and female researchers. Based on the analysis, we created four themes which were "cultural identities," "Asian girls and sport/physical activities," "PE experiences," "motivation for future involvement." The Buddhist Japanese, Hindu Indian, and Christian Chinese participants each reported unique physical activity experiences, and all the participants were aware of how Asian culture may affect being physically active. Experiences of PE classes were similar but perceptions of their PE attire were different for Christian Chinese and Hindu Indian adolescent girls. Based on the results, the importance of nurturing cultural competencies and ways to encourage girls to be physically active throughout life were discussed.

  9. A Study on school experiences of physics department students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerit, N.

    2005-01-01

    Bringing up the young people who are seen as the guaranty of the future depends on a better education. One of the best ways of forming a high in quality education is connected to developing the quality in teacher training. Most of the developed countries have been carrying on studies in order to develop teacher training. School experience classes are the ones which are planned for the candidate teachers to observe the school in learning and teaching period and to practice in classrooms. Beginning from candidate teachers first years at school, this class should be thought to be beneficial for identifying their future school atmosphere, and it should be run effectively. For this purpose, it has been identified what difficulties the physics undergraduate and physics (with no thesis) master students, who took part in School Experience classes at the practice schools of Konya at which faculty-school cooperation is applied, had during activities, and their success at overcoming these difficulties, and their ideas about the practice school and its teachers. The research was done by making a survey to the physics undergraduate and physics(with no thesis) master students in 2003 Spring semester. The results of the research were analyzed for both girls and boys separately. After analyzed, the results showed that the most striking activity which both the undergraduate physics and physics(with no thesis) master students had difficulty was group activities. Moreover, it showed that 90 percent of the two groups had the idea that school experience activities would be beneficial for being a good physics teacher. It has been also recognized that the physics undergraduate students had a more positive view than physics(with no thesis) master students on the matter of meeting lack of interest from practice teachers, and taking the same course from the same teacher

  10. A programmatic framework for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Goldston, R.J.; Neilson, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the confinement of reactor-grade plasmas, so that the authors are now preparing for experiments at the open-quotes power breakevenclose quotes level in the JET and TFTR experiments. In ITER the authors will extend the performance of tokamaks into the burning plasma regime, develop the technology of fusion reactors, and produce over a gigawatt of fusion power. Besides taking these crucial steps toward the technical feasibility of fusion, the authors must also take steps to ensure its economic acceptability. The broad requirements for economically attractive tokamak reactors based on physics advancements have been set forth in a number of studies. An advanced physics data base is emerging from a physics program of concept improvement using existing tokamaks around the world. This concept improvements program is emerging as the primary focus of the US domestic tokamak program, and a key element of that program is the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). With TPX the authors can develop the scientific data base for compact, continuously-operating fusion reactors, using advanced steady-state control techniques to improve plasma performance. The authors can develop operating techniques needed to ensure the success of ITER and provide first-time experience with several key fusion reactor technologies. This paper explains the relationships of TPX to the current US fusion physics program, to the ITER program, and to the development of an attractive tokamak demonstration plant for this next stage in the fusion program

  11. Lifetime Traumatic Experiences and Leisure Physical Inactivity among Adolescent Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas; Malinauskiene, Vilija; Malinauskas, Mindaugas

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between lifetime traumatic experiences and leisure physical inactivity among adolescent boys and to determine to what extent those associations are mediated by posttraumatic stress symptoms, unhealthy behaviors (smoking, alcohol use), the daily consumption of fresh fruit, and sense of coherence. A self-administered questionnaire combining 3 instruments measured leisure physical activity level (Godin and Shephard), symptoms of posttraumatic stress (IES-revised), lifetime traumatic experiences, sense of coherence (SOC-13, from Antonovsky), and behavioral and dietary patterns in a representative sample of eighth grade boys from a number of Kaunas, Lithuania, secondary schools (N = 885; response rate 88.6%). Fifty-six point eight percent of boys had experienced at least 1 lifetime traumatic event, with a 20.5% prevalence of PTS symptoms, and 5.4% were inactive during leisure time. In the logistic regression models, leisure physical inactivity was associated with lifetime traumatic experiences (adjusted OR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.09-4.98). Sense of coherence and posttraumatic stress symptoms did not mediate those associations. Less-than-daily consumption of fresh fruit showed an independent effect, while smoking and weekly consumption of alcohol did not. Consistent associations between lifetime traumatic experiences and leisure physical inactivity among adolescent boys indicate that the presence of lifetime traumatic events should be taken into account when employing intervention and prevention programs on unhealthy lifestyles (physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol).

  12. Great experiments in physics firsthand accounts from Galileo to Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    1959-01-01

    From Galileo's famous experiments in accelerated motion to Einstein's revolutionary theory of relativity, the experiments recorded here trace the evolution of modern physics from its beginnings to the mid-20th century. Brought together for the first time in one volume are important source readings on 25 epochal discoveries that changed man's understanding of the physical world. The accounts, written by the physicists who made them, include:Issac Newton: The Laws of MotionHenry Cavendish: The Law of GravitationAugustin Fresnel: The Diffraction of LightHans Christian Oersted: ElecromagnetismH

  13. Future high precision experiments and new physics beyond Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Mingxing.

    1993-01-01

    High precision (< 1%) electroweak experiments that have been done or are likely to be done in this decade are examined on the basis of Standard Model (SM) predictions of fourteen weak neutral current observables and fifteen W and Z properties to the one-loop level, the implications of the corresponding experimental measurements to various types of possible new physics that enter at the tree or loop level were investigated. Certain experiments appear to have special promise as probes of the new physics considered here

  14. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976

  15. The physics analysis tools project for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzi, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is expected to start colliding proton beams in 2009. The enormous amount of data produced by the ATLAS experiment (≅1 PB per year) will be used in searches for the Higgs boson and Physics beyond the standard model. In order to meet this challenge, a suite of common Physics Analysis Tools has been developed as part of the Physics Analysis software project. These tools run within the ATLAS software framework, ATHENA, covering a wide range of applications. There are tools responsible for event selection based on analysed data and detector quality information, tools responsible for specific physics analysis operations including data quality monitoring and physics validation, and complete analysis tool-kits (frameworks) with the goal to aid the physicist to perform his analysis hiding the details of the ATHENA framework. (authors)

  16. Use of soft probabilities in evaluating physical-security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.N.

    1982-03-01

    The complexity of evaluating how a physical security system would perform against a broad array of threat situations dictates the use by an inspector of methods which are not completely rigorous. Intuition and judgment based on experience have a large role to play. The use of soft probabilities can give meaningful results when the nature of the situation to which they are applied is sufficiently understood. Although the scoring method proposed is based on complex theory, it is feasible to apply on an intuitive basis. 6 figures

  17. Modular safety interlock system for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, J.; Golceff, B.V.

    1980-10-01

    A frequent problem in electronics systems for high energy physics experiments is to provide protection for personnel and equipment. Interlock systems are typically designed as an afterthought and as a result, the working environment around complex experiments with many independent high voltages or hazardous gas subsystems, and many different kinds of people involved, can be particularly dangerous. A set of modular hardware has been designed which makes possible a standardized, intergrated, hierarchical system's approach and which can be easily tailored to custom requirements

  18. When Physical Activity Participation Promotes Inactivity: Negative Experiences of Spanish Adolescents in Physical Education and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Carrillo, Vicente J.; Devis-Devis, Jose; Peiro-Velert, Carmen; Brown, David H. K.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses negative experiences in physical education and sport reported during qualitative interviews of a group of inactive adolescent Spanish boys and girls. The purpose of this analysis is twofold. First and most important, it seeks to give voice to these young people reporting negative experiences and connect them to contexts of…

  19. Impact of detector simulation in particle physics collider experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Elvira, V.

    2017-06-01

    Through the last three decades, accurate simulation of the interactions of particles with matter and modeling of detector geometries has proven to be of critical importance to the success of the international high-energy physics (HEP) experimental programs. For example, the detailed detector modeling and accurate physics of the Geant4-based simulation software of the CMS and ATLAS particle physics experiments at the European Center of Nuclear Research (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was a determinant factor for these collaborations to deliver physics results of outstanding quality faster than any hadron collider experiment ever before. This review article highlights the impact of detector simulation on particle physics collider experiments. It presents numerous examples of the use of simulation, from detector design and optimization, through software and computing development and testing, to cases where the use of simulation samples made a difference in the precision of the physics results and publication turnaround, from data-taking to submission. It also presents estimates of the cost and economic impact of simulation in the CMS experiment. Future experiments will collect orders of magnitude more data with increasingly complex detectors, taxing heavily the performance of simulation and reconstruction software. Consequently, exploring solutions to speed up simulation and reconstruction software to satisfy the growing demand of computing resources in a time of flat budgets is a matter that deserves immediate attention. The article ends with a short discussion on the potential solutions that are being considered, based on leveraging core count growth in multicore machines, using new generation coprocessors, and re-engineering HEP code for concurrency and parallel computing.

  20. Implementation of the GFS physical package in the GRAPES regional model: single column experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baode; Huang, Wei; Bao, Jian-wen

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing concern about coupling among physical components in NWP models. The Physics package of the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) has been considerably turned and connection among various components is well considered. Thus, the full GFS physical package was implemented into the GRAPES-MESO and its single column version as well. Using the data collected at ARM Southern Great Plain site during the summer 1997 Intensive Observing Period, several experiments of single-column model (SCM) were conducted to test performance of a set of original physical processes of GRAPES(CTL experiment) and the GFS physics package implemented(GFS experiment). Temperature, moisture, radiation, surface heat flux, surface air temperature and precipitation are evaluated. It is found that potential temperature and vapor mixing ratio simulated by GFS experiment is more accurate than that of CTL experiment. Errors of surface downward solar and long-wave radiation simulated by GFS experiment are less than that of CTL experiment and upward latent and sensible heat flux are also better agreeing with observation. The maximum and minimum 2-m air temperatures of the GFS experiment are close to observation compared with that of CTL experiment. Analysis of precipitation simulated shows that both sets of physical processes well reproduce heavy rainfall events. Failure and delay of moderate rainfall events and over predictions of drizzle events are commonly found for two sets of experiments. For the case of three rainfall events, the errors of potential temperature and vapor mixing ratio simulated by GFS experiment were smaller than that of CTL experiment. It is shown that the late occurrences of rainfall are resulted from a more stable temperature profile and lower moisture simulated in boundary layer than those from the observation prior to rainfall. When the simulated rainfall occurs, the simulated temperature and moisture become more favorable to the precipitation than observation.

  1. Techniques for nuclear and particle physics experiments. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leo, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of an advanced laboratory course in experimental nuclear and particle physics the author gave to physics majors at the University of Geneva during the years 1978- 1983. The course was offered to third and fourth year students, the latter of which had, at this point in their studies, chosen to specialize in experimental nuclear or particle physics. This implied that they would go on to do a 'diplome' thesis with one of the high- or intermediate-energy research groups in the physics department. The format of the course was such that the students were required to concentrate on only one experiment during the trimester, rather than perform a series of experiments as is more typical of a traditional course of this type. Their tasks thus included planning the experiment, learning the relevant techniques, setting up and troubleshooting the measuring apparatus, calibration, data-taking and analysis, as well as responsibility for maintaining their equipment, i.e., tasks resembling those in a real experiment. This more intensive involvement provided the students with a better understanding of the experimental problems encountered in a professional experiment and helped instill a certain independence and confidence which would prepare them for entry into a research group in the department. Teaching assistants were presented to help the students during the trimester and a series of weekly lectures was also given on various topics in experimental nuclear and particle physics. This included general information on detectors, nuclear electronics, statistics, the interaction of radiation in matter, etc., and a good deal of practical information for actually doing experiments. (orig.) With 254 figs

  2. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  3. ASIC design used in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongyu; Lin Tao; Wu Ling; Zhao jingwei; Gu Shudi

    1997-01-01

    The author introduces an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) design environment based on PC. Some design tools used in such environment are also introduced. A kind of ASIC chip used in high energy physics experiment, weighting mean timer, is being developed now

  4. Chladni Patterns on Drumheads: A "Physics of Music" Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worland, Randy

    2011-01-01

    In our "Physics of Music" class for non-science majors, we have developed a laboratory exercise in which students experiment with Chladni sand patterns on drumheads. Chladni patterns provide a kinesthetic, visual, and entertaining way to illustrate standing waves on flat surfaces and are very helpful when making the transition from one-dimensional…

  5. Lessons from feedback of safety operating experience for reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, J.; Rapavy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of events in WWER operations as a part of safety experience feedback provide a valuable source of lessons for reactor physics. Examples of events from Bohunice operation will be shown such as events with inadequate approach to criticality, positive reactivity insertions, expulsion of a control rod from shut-down reactor, problems with reactor protection system and control rods. (Authors)

  6. The physical imitation experiments of nuclear belt weight scaler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Qicun; Wang Mingqian; Sun Jinhua; Li Zhonghao

    1993-01-01

    The physical imitation experiments of the nuclear belt weight scaler (NBWS) were performed with a coal-loaded belt. The linearity, repetition and long-time stability; of the NBWS were measured. And the influence of pile shape, load bias and the composition of coal on weight calculation were studied

  7. The physics analysis environment of the ZEUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Derugin, O.; Gilkinson, D.; Kasemann, M.; Manczak, O.

    1995-12-01

    The ZEUS Experiment has over the last three years developed its own model of the central computing environment for physics analysis. This model has been designed to provide ZEUS physicists with powerful and user friendly tools for data analysis as well as to be truly scalable and open. (orig.)

  8. Enthalpy of Vaporization by Gas Chromatography: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to measure the enthalpy of vaporization of volatile compounds like methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and others by using gas chromatography. This physical property was measured using a very tiny quantity of sample revealing that it is possible to measure the enthalpies of two or more compounds at the same time.

  9. Data acquisition systems for high energy Physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Olmos, P.

    1986-01-01

    We describe here the Data Acquisition Systems most frequently used in High Energy Physics experiments. This report begins with a brief description of the main elements of a typical signal processing chain, following with a detailed exposition of the four most popular instrumentation standards used in this kind of experimental: NIM, CAMAC, FASTBUS and VME. (Author) 9 refs

  10. Statistical physics of human beings in games: Controlled experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yuan; Huang Ji-Ping

    2014-01-01

    It is important to know whether the laws or phenomena in statistical physics for natural systems with non-adaptive agents still hold for social human systems with adaptive agents, because this implies whether it is possible to study or understand social human systems by using statistical physics originating from natural systems. For this purpose, we review the role of human adaptability in four kinds of specific human behaviors, namely, normal behavior, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, and hedge behavior. The approach is based on controlled experiments in the framework of market-directed resource-allocation games. The role of the controlled experiments could be at least two-fold: adopting the real human decision-making process so that the system under consideration could reflect the performance of genuine human beings; making it possible to obtain macroscopic physical properties of a human system by tuning a particular factor of the system, thus directly revealing cause and effect. As a result, both computer simulations and theoretical analyses help to show a few counterparts of some laws or phenomena in statistical physics for social human systems: two-phase phenomena or phase transitions, entropy-related phenomena, and a non-equilibrium steady state. This review highlights the role of human adaptability in these counterparts, and makes it possible to study or understand some particular social human systems by means of statistical physics coming from natural systems. (topical review - statistical physics and complex systems)

  11. The AMS experiment: first results and physics prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialle, J.P.

    2000-04-01

    The main physics goal of the AMS experiment is the search for primordial antimatter, non-baryonic dark matter, and the measurement with high statistics and high accuracy of the electrically charged cosmic ray particles and light nuclei in the extraterrestrial space beyond the atmosphere. AMS is the first magnetic spectrometer which will be flown in space. It will be installed for 3 years on the international space station (ISS) in 2003. A precursor flight with the space shuttle DISCOVERY took place in June 1998. 100 millions particles were recorded during the test flight and unexpected physics results were observed on fluxes of protons, electrons, positrons, and helium nuclei. These results are described below, and the physics prospects for the second phase of the experiment on the space station as well. (author)

  12. B-physics prospects with the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnew, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the B-physics prospects of the LHCb experiment. Firstly, a brief introduction to the CKM matrix and the mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model is given. The advantages of the LHCb experiment for B-physics exploitation will then be described, together with a short description of the detector components. Finally, the LHCb physics aims and prospects will be summarized, focusing on the measurements of sin(2β) in tree and gluonic penguin diagrams, sin(2α) in B d 0 → π + π - and π + π - π 0 , neutral B-meson oscillations and the B s 0 mixing phase, and the measurement of γ using a variety of complementary methods

  13. Focal plane array based infrared thermography in fine physical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainer, Boris G

    2008-01-01

    By two examples of dissimilar physical phenomena causing thermophysical effects, the unique capabilities of one of the up-to-date methods of experimental physics-focal plane array (FPA) based infrared (IR) thermography (IRT), are demonstrated distinctly. Experimenters inexperienced in IRT can grasp how this method provides a means for combining real-time visualization with quantitative analysis. A narrow-band short-wavelength IR camera was used in the experiments. It is discussed and stated that IRT is best matched and suited to the next two test conditions-when a heated specimen is thin and when heat is generated in the immediate region of a surface of a solid. The first prerequisite is realized in the search for directional patterns of combined low-power radiation sources with the use of the IRT-aided method. The second one is realized in studies of water vapour adsorption on uneven (irregular) surfaces of solid materials. With multiple swatches taken from a set of different fabrics and used as experimental samples, a sharp distinction between adsorptivities of their surfaces is strikingly illustrated by IRT time-domain measurements exhibiting the associated thermal effect ranging within an order of magnitude. It is justified that the described IRT-aided test can find practical implementation at least in the light industry. Emissivities of different fabrics are evaluated experimentally with the described reflection method based on the narrow spectral range of IRT. On the basis of direct IR observations, attention is paid to the need for close control over the surface temperature increase while the adsorption isotherms are being measured. Sensitivity of the FPA-based IRT method, as applied to examine the kinetics of initial stages of adsorption of gaseous molecules on the solid surface, is evaluated analytically and quantitatively. The relationship between the amount of adsorbate and the measurable excess of adsorbent temperature is found. It is discovered that

  14. Becoming physics people: Development of physics identity in self-concept and practice through the Learning Assistant experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor

    2016-03-01

    The physics department at Texas State University has implemented a Learning Assistant (LA) program with reform-based instructional changes in our introductory course sequences. We are interested in how participation in the LA program influences LAs' identity both as physics students and as physics teachers; in particular, how being part of the LA community changes participants' self-concepts and their day-to-day practice. We analyze video of weekly LA preparation sessions and interviews with LAs as well as written artifacts from program applications, pedagogy course reflections, and evaluations. Our analysis of self-concepts is informed by the identity framework developed by Hazari et al., and our analysis of practice is informed by Lave and Wenger's theory of Communities of Practice. Regression models from quantitative studies show that the physics identity construct strongly predicts intended choice of a career in physics; the goal of our current project is to understand the details of the impacts of participation in the LA experience on participants' practice and self-concept, in order to identify critical elements of LA program structure that positively influence physics identity and physics career intentions for students. Our analysis suggests that participation in the LA program impacts LAs in ways that support both stronger ``physics student'' identity and stronger ``physics instructor'' identity, and that these identities are reconciled into a coherent integrated physics identity. In addition to becoming more confident and competent in physics, LAs perceive themselves to have increased competence in communication and a stronger sense of belonging to a supportive and collaborative community; participation in the LA program also changes their ways of learning and of being students, both within and beyond physics. This research and the TXST LA program are supported by NSF DUE-1240036, NSF DUE-1431578, and the Halliburton Foundation.

  15. Observation, experiment and hypothesis in modern physical science

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaway, Owen

    1985-01-01

    These original contributions by philosophers and historians of science discuss a range of issues pertaining to the testing of hypotheses in modern physics by observation and experiment. Chapters by Lawrence Sklar, Dudley Shapere, Richard Boyd, R. C. Jeffrey, Peter Achinstein, and Ronald Laymon explore general philosophical themes with applications to modern physics and astrophysics. The themes include the nature of the hypothetico-deductive method, the concept of observation and the validity of the theoretical-observation distinction, the probabilistic basis of confirmation, and the testing of idealizations and approximations.The remaining four chapters focus on the history of particular twentieth-century experiments, the instruments and techniques utilized, and the hypotheses they were designed to test. Peter Galison reviews the development of the bubble chamber; Roger Stuewer recounts a sharp dispute between physicists in Cambridge and Vienna over the interpretation of artificial disintegration experiments;...

  16. Industrial metrology as applied to large physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veal, D.

    1993-05-01

    A physics experiment is a large complex 3-D object (typ. 1200 m 3 , 35000 tonnes), with sub-millimetric alignment requirements. Two generic survey alignment tasks can be identified; first, an iterative positioning of the apparatus subsystems in space and, second, a quantification of as-built parameters. The most convenient measurement technique is industrial triangulation but the complexity of the measured object and measurement environment constraints frequently requires a more sophisticated approach. To enlarge the ''survey alignment toolbox'' measurement techniques commonly associated with other disciplines such as geodesy, applied geodesy for accelerator alignment, and mechanical engineering are also used. Disparate observables require a heavy reliance on least squares programs for campaign pre-analysis and calculation. This paper will offer an introduction to the alignment of physics experiments and will identify trends for the next generation of SSC experiments

  17. Geneva University: Experiments in Physics: Hands-on Creative Processes

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 3 octobre 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg «Experiments in Physics : Hands-on Creative Processes» Prof. Manfred Euler Leibniz-Institute for Mathematics and Science Education (IPN) University of Kiel, Deutschland Experiments play a variety of different roles in knowledge generation. The lecture will focus on the function of experiments as engines of intuition that foster insights into complex processes. The experimental presentations consider self-organization phenomena in various domains that range from the nanomechanics of biomolecules to perception and cognition. The inherent universality contributes to elucidating the enigmatic phenomenon of creativity. Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.       &...

  18. Industrial metrology as applied to large physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veal, D.

    1993-05-01

    A physics experiment is a large complex 3-D object (typ. 1200 m{sup 3}, 35000 tonnes), with sub-millimetric alignment requirements. Two generic survey alignment tasks can be identified; first, an iterative positioning of the apparatus subsystems in space and, second, a quantification of as-built parameters. The most convenient measurement technique is industrial triangulation but the complexity of the measured object and measurement environment constraints frequently requires a more sophisticated approach. To enlarge the ``survey alignment toolbox`` measurement techniques commonly associated with other disciplines such as geodesy, applied geodesy for accelerator alignment, and mechanical engineering are also used. Disparate observables require a heavy reliance on least squares programs for campaign pre-analysis and calculation. This paper will offer an introduction to the alignment of physics experiments and will identify trends for the next generation of SSC experiments.

  19. Statistical physics of human beings in games: Controlled experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuan; Huang, Ji-Ping

    2014-07-01

    It is important to know whether the laws or phenomena in statistical physics for natural systems with non-adaptive agents still hold for social human systems with adaptive agents, because this implies whether it is possible to study or understand social human systems by using statistical physics originating from natural systems. For this purpose, we review the role of human adaptability in four kinds of specific human behaviors, namely, normal behavior, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, and hedge behavior. The approach is based on controlled experiments in the framework of market-directed resource-allocation games. The role of the controlled experiments could be at least two-fold: adopting the real human decision-making process so that the system under consideration could reflect the performance of genuine human beings; making it possible to obtain macroscopic physical properties of a human system by tuning a particular factor of the system, thus directly revealing cause and effect. As a result, both computer simulations and theoretical analyses help to show a few counterparts of some laws or phenomena in statistical physics for social human systems: two-phase phenomena or phase transitions, entropy-related phenomena, and a non-equilibrium steady state. This review highlights the role of human adaptability in these counterparts, and makes it possible to study or understand some particular social human systems by means of statistical physics coming from natural systems.

  20. Interactive Lecture Experiments in Large Introductory Physics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina M.; Kotlicki, A.; Rieger, G.; Bates, F.; Moll, R.; McPhee, K.; Nashon, S.

    2006-12-01

    We describe Interactive Lecture Experiments (ILE), which build on Interactive Lecture Demonstrations proposed by Sokoloff and Thornton (2004) and extends it by providing students with the opportunity to analyze experiments demonstrated in the lecture outside of the classroom. Real time experimental data is collected, using Logger Pro combined with the digital video technology. This data is uploaded to the Internet and made available to the students for further analysis. Student learning is assessed in the following lecture using conceptual questions (clickers). The goal of this project is to use ILE to make large lectures more interactive and promote student interest in science, critical thinking and data analysis skills. We report on the systematic study conducted using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey, Force Concept Inventory, open-ended physics problems and focus group interviews to determine the impact of ILE on student academic achievement, motivation and attitudes towards physics. Three sections of students (750 students) experienced four ILE experiments. The surveys were administered twice and academic results for students who experienced the ILE for a particular topic were compared to the students, from a different section, who did not complete the ILE for that topic. Additional qualitative data on students’ attitudes was collected using open ended survey questions and interviews. We will present preliminary conclusions about the role of ILEs as an effective pedagogy in large introductory physics courses. Sokoloff, D.R. and R.K. Thornton (2004). Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Introductory Physics, J.Wiley & Sons, INC. Interactive Lecture Experiments: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/ year1lab/p100/LectureLabs/lectureLabs.html

  1. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan, E-mail: lidan@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xiao, B.J., E-mail: bjxiao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xia, J.Y., E-mail: jyxia@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Yang, Fei, E-mail: fyang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Department of Computer Science, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  2. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Xiao, B.J.; Xia, J.Y.; Yang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  3. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boca Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1–2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region; secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons; a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  4. Elementary Particle Physics Experiment at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, Benjamin; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Willocq, Stephane

    2013-07-30

    In this progress report we summarize the activities of the University of Massachusetts- Amherst group for the three years of this research project. We are fully engaged in research at the energy frontier with the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We have made leading contributions in software development and performance studies for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, as well as on physics analysis with an emphasis on Standard Model measurements and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In addition, we have increased our contributions to the Muon Spectrometer New Small Wheel upgrade project.

  5. LHCf experiment: forward physics at LHC for cosmic rays study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Prete M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment, optimized for the study of forward physics at LHC, completes its main physics program in this year 2015, with the proton-proton collisions at the energy of 13 TeV. LHCf gives important results on the study of neutral particles at extreme pseudo-rapidity, both for proton-proton and for proton-ion interactions. These results are an important reference for tuning the models of the hadronic interaction currently used for the simulation of the atmospheric showers induced by very high energy cosmic rays. The results of this analysis and the future perspective are presented in this paper.

  6. A system for designing and simulating particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, R.; Strzalkowski, P.

    1987-01-01

    In view of the rapid development of experimental facilities and their costs, the systematic design and preparation of particle physics experiments have become crucial. A software system is proposed as an aid for the experimental designer, mainly for experimental geometry analysis and experimental simulation. The following model is adopted: the description of an experiment is formulated in a language (here called XL) and put by its processor in a data base. The language is based on the entity-relationship-attribute approach. The information contained in the data base can be reported and analysed by an analyser (called XA) and modifications can be made at any time. In particular, the Monte Carlo methods can be used in experiment simulation for both physical phenomena in experimental set-up and detection analysis. The general idea of the system is based on the design concept of ISDOS project information systems. The characteristics of the simulation module are similar to those of the CERN Geant system, but some extensions are proposed. The system could be treated as a component of greater, integrated software environment for the design of particle physics experiments, their monitoring and data processing. (orig.)

  7. Engineering Physics Division integral experiments and their analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Integral experiments are performed as part of the Engineering Physics Division's on-going research in the development and application of radiation shielding methods. Integral experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) under the Division's Magnetic Fusion program are designed to provide data against which ORNL and all other organizations involved in shielding calculations for fusion devices can test their calculational methods and interaction data. The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) continues to be the primary source of integral data for fission reactor shielding design. The experiments performed at the TSF during the last few years have been sponsored by the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) program. During this report period final documentation was also prepared for the remaining LMFBR shielding experiments, including an examination of streaming through annular slits and measurement of secondary gamma-ray production in reinforced concrete

  8. MESA. An ERL project for particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, Florian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Mainz Energy-recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) will be constructed at the Institut fuer Kernphysik of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz. The accelerator is a low energy continuous wave (CW) recirculating electron linac for particle physics experiments. MESA will be operated in two different modes serving mainly two experiments: the first is the external beam (EB) mode, where the beam is dumped after being used with the external fixed target experiment P2, whose goal is the measurement of the weak mixing angle with highest accuracy. The required beam current for P2 is 150 μA with polarized electrons at 155 MeV. In the second operation mode MESA will be run as an energy recovery linac (ERL). In an ERL the energy of the electrons is recovered after their experimental use by decelerating them in the superconducting acceleration cavities. The experiment served in this mode is a (pseudo) internal fixed target experiment named MAGIX. It demands an unpolarized beam of 1 mA at 105 MeV. In a later construction stage of MESA the achievable beam current in ERL-mode shall be upgraded to 10 mA. Within this talk an overview of the MESA project will be given highlighting the challenges of operation with high density internal gas targets and the (*new*) physics applications.

  9. Review of recent experiments in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P D [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA)

    1978-01-01

    The data generated at intermediate-energy accelerator facilities has expanded rapidly over the past few years. A number of recent experiments chosen for their impact on nuclear structure questions are reviewed. Proton scattering together with pionic and muonic atom X-ray measurements are shown to be giving very precise determinations of gross nuclear properties. Pion scattering and reaction data although less precise, are starting to generate a new understanding of wave functions of specific nuclear states. Specific examples where new unpublished data are now available are emphasized. In addition, other medium-energy experiments that are starting to contribute to nuclear structure physics are summarized.

  10. SNEAK-4, a series of physics experiments for KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, P.

    1969-10-01

    At the end of 1968 a three months program of neutron physics experiments was performed at SNEAK for the investigation of some nuclear properties of the KNK II reactor. The experiments were conducted by the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in close cooperation with INTERATOM. The results of the measurements on SNEAK assemblies 4A and 4B are reported and compared with calculations. The experimental results of critical mass and reactivities, control rod worths, Doppler coefficient and power distribution were used to draw conclusions for the KNK II design

  11. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments - Sept. 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addis, L.; Odian, A.; Row, G. M.; Ward, C. E. W.; Wanderer, P.; Armenteros, R.; Joos, P.; Groves, T. H.; Oyanagi, Y.; Arnison, G. T. J.; Antipov, Yu; Barinov, N.

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche. (RWR)

  12. B Physics at the D0 experiment A Mexican review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Cruz-Burelo, E.

    2010-01-01

    On April of 1992 a Mexican group from Cinvestav officially joined the D0 experiment, one of the two experiments in the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The seed for this experimental group on high energy physics from Cinvestav was planted in Mexico in some measure by Augusto Garcia, to whom this workshop is in memorial. Augusto's efforts and support to groups dedicated to this area was clear and important. Some of these seeds have given origin to today's established Mexican groups on experimental high energy physics, one example of this is the Mexican group at D0. I present here a short review of some of the D0 results on which the Mexican group has contributed, emphasizing the last decade, which I have witnessed.

  13. Physics Regimes in the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. Meade; S.C.Jardin; C.E. Kessel; M.A. Ulrickson; J.H. Schultz; P.H. Rutherford; J.A. Schmidt; J.C. Wesley; K.M. Young; N.A.Uckan; R.J. Thome; P. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; and C.C.Baker

    2001-01-01

    Burning plasma science is recognized widely as the next frontier in fusion research. The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is a design study of a next-step burning plasma experiment with the goal of developing a concept for an experimental facility to explore and understand the strong nonlinear coupling among confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) self-heating, stability, edge physics, and wave-particle interactions that is fundamental to fusion plasma behavior. This will require plasmas dominated by alpha heating (Q greater than or equal to 5) that are sustained for a duration comparable to characteristic plasma timescales (greater than or equal to 10) tau(subscript ''E''), approximately 4 tau(subscript ''He''), approximately 2 tau(subscript ''skin''). The work reported here has been undertaken with the objective of finding the minimum size (cost) device to achieve these physics goals

  14. Health physics practices and experience at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.

    1986-01-01

    The history and development of the health physics and as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) program at Duke Power Company's Oconee Nuclear Station is described as are the fundamental elements of the program and how the program works. The benefits of this health physics/ALARA program have been determined to be (a) improved quality of manpower planning and scheduling, (b) increased efficiency of shutdown activities, (c) reduced cost of shutdown, (d) immediate awareness of adverse job exposure trends, (e) better management information on exposure-related problems, (f) improved accuracy of personnel and job dose records, and (g) in general, improved outage performance and subsequent plant operation. Experience with the health physics/ALARA program is discussed in terms of (a) savings of critical path time, (b) maintaining ALARA personnel doses, and (c) record capacity factors

  15. Physics prospects of the KTeV experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, J.

    1996-10-01

    KTeV is a new Fermilab fixed target experiment which will search for direct CP violation in the neutral kaon system. In addition, we will make precision measurements of other CP and CPT violating parameters and make high sensitivity studies of rare kaon decays. The detector has been commissioned and is currently taking data. The physics goals and detector performance are presented. 12 refs., 1 fig

  16. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, G.; Ingebretsen, F.; Holt, K.; Skaali, B.

    1983-04-01

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configuration of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  17. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, G.; Holt, K.; Ingebretsen, F.; Skaali, B.

    1983-01-01

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configurations of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  18. Evaluating self and partner physical attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Georgiades, Chrissa; Pang, Lily

    2007-03-01

    This study used a novel questionnaire to examine ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. Seventy-two men and 83 women estimated their own and their opposite-sex partner's overall physical attractiveness and the attractiveness of various body parts and measures. They also answered six simple questions concerning physical attractiveness. Results showed significant gender differences in self-estimates of overall facial attractiveness and upper body features. In general, and regardless of gender, participants rated their opposite-sex partners as being significantly more attractive than themselves. In addition, the results showed that body weight and facial attractiveness were the best predictors of overall physical attractiveness. Implications of these results in terms of social biases are considered.

  19. Trends in integrated circuit design for particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkin, E V

    2017-01-01

    Integrated circuits are one of the key complex units available to designers of multichannel detector setups. A whole number of factors makes Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) valuable for Particle Physics and Astrophysics experiments. Among them the most important ones are: integration scale, low power dissipation, radiation tolerance. In order to make possible future experiments in the intensity, cosmic, and energy frontiers today ASICs should provide new level of functionality at a new set of constraints and trade-offs, like low-noise high-dynamic range amplification and pulse shaping, high-speed waveform sampling, low power digitization, fast digital data processing, serialization and data transmission. All integrated circuits, necessary for physical instrumentation, should be radiation tolerant at an earlier not reached level (hundreds of Mrad) of total ionizing dose and allow minute almost 3D assemblies. The paper is based on literary source analysis and presents an overview of the state of the art and trends in nowadays chip design, using partially own ASIC lab experience. That shows a next stage of ising micro- and nanoelectronics in physical instrumentation. (paper)

  20. A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design and optimization in laser driven inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haiyan [Mechatronics Engineering School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Huang, Yunbao, E-mail: Huangyblhy@gmail.com [Mechatronics Engineering School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: Jiangshn@vip.sina.com [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jing, Longfei, E-mail: scmyking_2008@163.com [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tianxuan, Huang; Ding, Yongkun [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design is presented. • Any laser facility can be flexibly defined and included with two scripts. • Complex targets and laser beams can be parametrically modeled for optimization. • Automatically mapping of laser beam energy facilitates targets shape optimization. - Abstract: Physical experiment design and optimization is very essential for laser driven inertial confinement fusion due to the high cost of each shot. However, only limited experiments with simple structure or shape on several laser facilities can be designed and evaluated in available codes, and targets are usually defined by programming, which may lead to it difficult for complex shape target design and optimization on arbitrary laser facilities. A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design and optimization on any laser facilities is presented in this paper. Its core idea includes: (1) any laser facility can be flexibly defined and included with two scripts, (2) complex shape targets and laser beams can be parametrically modeled based on features, (3) an automatically mapping scheme of laser beam energy onto discrete mesh elements of targets enable targets or laser beams be optimized without any additional interactive modeling or programming, and (4) significant computation algorithms are additionally presented to efficiently evaluate radiation symmetry on the target. Finally, examples are demonstrated to validate the significance of such unified modeling approach for physical experiments design and optimization in laser driven inertial confinement fusion.

  1. Embodiment: A New Perspective for Evaluating Physicality in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Insook

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a new perspective for evaluating physicality in learning with a preliminary experimental study based on embodied cognition. While there are studies showing no superiority of physical manipulation over virtual manipulation, there are also studies that seem to advocate adding more physicality in simulations…

  2. [Physical therapy in pediatric primary care: a review of experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Miriam Ribeiro Calheiros; Thomazinho, Paula de Almeida; Santos, Fabiano Luiz; Cavalcanti, Nicolette Celani; Ribeiro, Carla Trevisan Martins; Negreiros, Maria Fernanda Vieira; Vinhaes, Marcia Regina

    2014-11-01

    To review pediatric physical therapy experiences described in the literature and to analyze the production of knowledge on physical therapy in the context of pediatric primary health care (PPHC). A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA criteria. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane; Brazilian Ministry of Health's CAPES doctoral dissertations database; and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (SIGLE). The following search terms were used: ["primary health care" and ("physical therapy" or "physiotherapy") and ("child" or "infant")] and equivalent terms in Portuguese and Spanish, with no restriction on publication year. Thirteen articles from six countries were analyzed and grouped into three main themes: professional dilemmas (three articles), specific competencies and skills required in a PPHC setting (seven articles), and practice reports (four articles). Professional dilemmas involved expanding the role of physical therapists to encompass community environments and sharing the decision-making process with the family, as well as collaborative work with other health services to identify the needs of children. The competencies and skills mentioned in the literature related to the identification of clinical and sociocultural symptoms that go beyond musculoskeletal conditions, the establishment of early physical therapy diagnoses, prevention of overmedication, and the ability to work as team players. Practice reports addressed stimulation in children with neurological diseases, respiratory treatment, and establishing groups with mothers of children with these conditions. The small number of studies identified in this review suggests that there is little knowledge regarding the roles of physical therapists in PPHC and possibly regarding the professional abilities required in this setting. Therefore, further studies are required to provide data on the field, along with a continuing

  3. Physical basis of coastal productivity: The SEEP and MASAR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanady, G. T.

    Two major cooperative experiments, code-named Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) I and II, were carried out on the northeast U.S. continental shelf and slope by an interdisciplinary group of scientists in the past decade. The work, supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research, had the broad aim of determining whether or to what extent energy-related human activities interfere with the high biological productivity of coastal waters. Much of SEEP I work was reported in a dedicated issue of Continental Shelf Research, including a summary article on the experiment as a whole [Walsh et al., 1988[. A parallel experiment, supported by the Minerals Management Service and code-named Mid Atlantic Slope and Rise (MASAR), had the objective of exploring physical processes over the continental slope and rise, including especially currents in the upper part of the water column. A good deal of MASAR work was also reported in the SEEP issue just mentioned, mainly in an article by Csanady and Hamilton (1988). There have been other papers and publications on these experiments, and more are forthcoming. While many questions remain, our horizons have broadened considerably after a decade of work on this problem, as if our aeroplane had just emerged from clouds to expose an interesting landscape. In this article I shall try to describe the physical (-oceanographic) features of that landscape, not in the chronological order in which we have espied them, but as the logic of the subject dictates.

  4. Autonomy and the Student Experience in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nicholas Ron

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a Self-Determination Theory perspective with two studies. Study I, a correlational study, investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (vs. controlling) students perceived their instructors to be. An autonomy supportive instructor acknowledges students' perspectives, feelings, and perceptions and provides students with information and opportunities for choice, while minimizing external pressures. It was found that the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was positively correlated with student interest and enjoyment in learning physics (beta=0.31***) and negatively correlated with student anxiety about taking physics (beta=-0.23**). It was also positively correlated with how autonomous (vs. controlled) students' reasons for studying physics became over the duration of the course (i.e., studying physics more because they wanted to vs. had to; beta=0.24***). This change in autonomous reasons for studying physics was in turn positively correlated with student performance in the course (beta=0.17*). Additionally, the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was directly correlated with performance for those students entering the course with relatively autonomous reasons for studying physics (beta=0.25**). In summary, students who perceived their instructors as more autonomy supportive tended to have a more favorable experience in the course. If greater autonomy support was in fact the cause of a more favorable student experience, as suggested by Self-determination Theory and experimental studies in other contexts, these results would have implications for instruction and instructor professional development in similar contexts. I discuss these implications. Study II, an experimental study, investigated the effect

  5. Educational reactor-physics experiments with the critical assemble TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Okubo, Masaaki; Igashira, Masayuki [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Horiki, Oichiro; Suzaki, Takenori

    1997-10-01

    The Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is research equipment for light water reactor physics. In the present report, the lectures given to the graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology who participated in the educational experiment course held on 26-30 August at TCA are rearranged to provide useful information for those who will implement educational basic experiments with TCA in the future. This report describes the principles, procedures, and data analyses for (1) Critical approach and Exponential experiment, (2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, (3) Measurement of power distribution, (4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, and (5) Measurement of safety plate worth by the rod drop method. (author)

  6. Introductory Physics Experiments Using the Wii Balance Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Julian; Sobczak, Robert; Iqbal, Zohaib; Ochoa, Romulo

    2010-02-01

    The Wii, a video game console by Nintendo, utilizes several different controllers, such as the Wii remote (Wiimote) and the balance board, for game-playing. The balance board was introduced in early 2008. It contains four strain gauges and has Bluetooth connectivity at a relatively low price. Thanks to available open source code, such as GlovePie, any PC with Bluetooth capability can detect the information sent out by the balance board. Based on the ease with which the forces measured by each strain gauge can be obtained, we have designed several experiments for introductory physics courses that make use of this device. We present experiments to measure the forces generated when students lift their arms with and without added weights, distribution of forces on an extended object when weights are repositioned, and other normal forces cases. The results of our experiments are compared with those predicted by Newtonian mechanics. )

  7. Software for physics of tau lepton decay in LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Przedzinski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Software development in high energy physics experiments offers unique experience with rapidly changing environment and variety of different standards and frameworks that software must be adapted to. As such, regular methods of software development are hard to use as they do not take into account how greatly some of these changes influence the whole structure. The following thesis summarizes development of TAUOLA C++ Interface introducing tau decays to new event record standard. Documentation of the program is already published. That is why it is not recalled here again. We focus on the development cycle and methodology used in the project, starting from the definition of the expectations through planning and designing the abstract model and concluding with the implementation. In the last part of the paper we present installation of the software within different experiments surrounding Large Hadron Collider and the problems that emerged during this process.

  8. Educational reactor-physics experiments with the critical assembly TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Okubo, Masaaki; Igashira, Masayuki; Horiki, Oichiro; Suzaki, Takenori.

    1997-10-01

    The Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is research equipment for light water reactor physics. In the present report, the lectures given to the graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology who participated in the educational experiment course held on 26-30 August at TCA are rearranged to provide useful information for those who will implement educational basic experiments with TCA in the future. This report describes the principles, procedures, and data analyses for 1) Critical approach and Exponential experiment, 2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, 3) Measurement of power distribution, 4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, and 5) Measurement of safety plate worth by the rod drop method. (author)

  9. Size variation and flow experience of physical game support objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijs, L.M.G.; Peters, P.J.F.; Eggen, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about designing and evaluating an innovative type of computer game. Game support objects are used to enrich the gaming experience [7]. The added objects are active but are simpler than real robots. In the study reported here they are four helper ghosts connected to a traditional Pacman

  10. Compendium of quantum physics. Concepts, experiments, history and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberger, Daniel; Hentschel, Klaus; Weinert, Friedel

    2009-01-01

    With contributions by many of today's leading quantum physicists, philosophers and historians, including three Nobel laureates, this comprehensive A to Z of quantum physics provides a lucid understanding of the key concepts of quantum theory and experiment. It covers technical and interpretational aspects alike, and includes both traditional topics and newer areas such as quantum information and its relatives. The central concepts that have shaped contemporary understanding of the quantum world are clearly defined, with illustrations where helpful, and discussed at a level suitable for undergraduate and graduate students of physics, history of science, and philosophy of physics. All articles share three main aims: (1) to provide a clear definition and understanding of the term concerned; (2) where possible, to trace the historical origins of the concept; and (3) to provide a small but optimal selection of references to the most relevant literature, including pertinent historical studies. Also discussed are the often contentious philosophical implications derived from quantum theory and its associated experimental findings. This compendium will be an indispensable resource for all those seeking concise up-to-date information about the many facets of quantum physics. (orig.)

  11. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes

  12. Unpacking Gender Differences in Students' Perceived Experiences in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-11-01

    Prior research has shown, at our institution: 1) males outperform females on conceptual assessments (a gender gap), 2) the gender gap persists despite the use of research-based reforms, and 3) the gender gap is correlated with students' physics and mathematics background and prior attitudes and beliefs [Kost, et al. PRST-PER, 5, 010101]. Our follow-up work begins to explore how males and females experience the introductory course differently and how these differences relate to the gender gap. We gave a survey to students in the introductory course in which we investigated students' physics identity and self-efficacy. We find there are significant gender differences in each of these three areas, and further find that these measures are weakly correlated with student conceptual performance, and moderately correlated with course grade.

  13. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  14. Negative Experiences in Physical Education and Sport: How Much Do They Affect Physical Activity Participation Later in Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yan, Zi; Cardinal, Marita K.

    2013-01-01

    People's feelings toward physical activity are often influenced by memories of their childhood experiences in physical education and sport. Unfortunately, many adults remember negative experiences, which may affect their desire to maintain a physically active lifestyle. A survey that asked 293 students about recollections from their childhood…

  15. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  16. Moderate energy ions for high energy density physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives the results of a preliminary exploration of whether moderate energy ions (≅0.3-3 MeV/amu) could be useful as modest-cost drivers for high energy density physics experiments. It is found that if the target thickness is chosen so that the ion beam enters and then leaves the target in the vicinity of the peak of the dE/dX (stopping power) curve, high uniformity of energy deposition may be achievable while also maximizing the amount of energy per beam particle deposited within the target

  17. USING INTERNET-RESOURCES FOR SCHOOL PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Using virtual computer simulation of physics processes and phenomena is becoming increasingly popular among teachers of science around the world. Such simulation for school experiment has several advantages, but teaching needs improvement of methodology for using in modern school. In order to computer simulations were successful in education it requires compliance with a number of conditions. Educators around the world collaborate on the web site Phet (http://phet.colorado.edu/, which provides science-based and effective computer simulations for studying the natural sciences in different languages, as well as the methodology for use in secondary school.

  18. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, C.G.; Bonney, R.F.; Levine, J.D.; Masson, L.S.; Commander, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), includes an indication of the magnitude of facility hazards, complexity of facility operations, and the stage of the facility life-cycle. It presents the results of safety analyses, safety assurance programs, identified vulnerabilities, compensatory measures, and, in general, the rationale describing why the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) can be safely operated. It discusses application of the graded approach to the TPX safety analysis, including the basis for using Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 in the development of the PSAR

  19. The lived experiences of being physically active when morbidly obese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Bente Skovsby; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to identify facilitators and barriers for physical activity (PA) experienced by morbidly obese adults in the Western world. Inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle have become a major challenge for health and well-being, particularly among persons with morbid obesity. Lifestyle changes may...... lead to long-term changes in activity level, if facilitators and barriers are approached in a holistic way by professionals. To develop lifestyle interventions, the perspective and experiences of this group of patients are essential for success. The methodology of the systematic review followed...... active....

  20. A Summer Research Experience in Particle Physics Using Skype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Curran; Alexander, Steven; Mahmood, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    This last summer I did research in particle physics as part of a ``remote REU.'' This poster will describe that experience and the results of my project which was to experimentally verify the mass ranges of the Z' boson. Data from the LHC's Atlas detector was filtered by computers to select for likely Z boson decays; my work was in noting all instances of Z or Z' boson decays in one thousand events and their masses, separating the Z from Z' bosons, and generating histograms of the masses.

  1. Alpha particle physics experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.

    2000-01-01

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on TFTR during its DT run from 1993 to 1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single particle confinement model in MHD quiescent discharges. The alpha loss due to toroidal field ripple was identified in some cases, and the low radial diffusivity inferred for high energy alphas was consistent with orbit averaging over small scale turbulence. Finally, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and ICRF waves were approximately consistent with theoretical modelling. What was learned is reviewed and what remains to be understood is identified. (author)

  2. An unfolding method for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    2002-06-01

    Finite detector resolution and limited acceptance require one to apply unfolding methods in high energy physics experiments. Information on the detector resolution is usually given by a set of Monte Carlo events. Based on the experience with a widely used unfolding program (RUN) a modified method has been developed. The first step of the method is a maximum likelihood fit of the Monte Carlo distributions to the measured distribution in one, two or three dimensions; the finite statistics of the Monte Carlo events is taken into account by the use of Barlow's method with a new method of solution. A clustering method is used before combining bins in sparsely populated areas. In the second step a regularization is applied to the solution, which introduces only a small bias. The regularization parameter is determined from the data after a diagonalization and rotation procedure. (orig.)

  3. Controlled damping of a physical pendulum: experiments near critical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Manuel I; Bol, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental device for the study of damped oscillatory motion along with three associated experiments. Special emphasis is given on both didactic aspects and the interactivity of the experimental set-up, in order to assist students in understanding fundamental aspects of damped oscillatory motion and allow them to directly compare their experimental results with the well-known theory they can find in textbooks. With this in mind, a physical pendulum was selected with an eddy-current damping system that allows the damping conditions to be controlled with great precision. The three experiments examine accurate control of damping, frequency shift near critical damping and the transition from underdamped to overdamped conditions

  4. Experiences and unmet needs of women with physical disabilities for pain relief during labor and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-Bellil, Linda; Mitra, Monika; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Smith, Lauren D

    2017-07-01

    Childbirth is widely acknowledged as one of the most painful experiences most women will undergo in their lifetimes. Alleviating labor and delivery pain for women with physical disabilities can involve an additional level of complexity beyond that experienced by most women, but little research has explored their experiences. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of women with physical disabilities with respect to pain relief during labor and delivery with the goal of informing their care. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with twenty-five women with physical disabilities from across the United States. Women expressed specific preferences for the method of pain relief. Some confronted systemic barriers in exploring their options for pain relief, while others were given a choice. At times, anesthesiologists lacked knowledge and experience in caring for women with disabilities. Conversely, some women described how the administration of anesthesia was meticulously planned and attributed their positive labor and delivery experiences to this careful planning. Advanced, individualized planning and evaluation of their options for pain relief was most satisfying to women and enabled them to make an informed choice. This approach is consistent with the recommendations of clinicians who have successfully provided pain relief during labor to women with complex physical disabilities. Clinicians who have successfully delivered babies of women with these and similar disabilities emphasize the importance of a team approach where the anesthesiologist and other specialists are involved early on in a woman's care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health physics measurements of laser radiation: Experience and competence wanted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the parameters required for an analysis of hazards involved is a complex task in terms of measuring techniques and calibration, and a costly procedure at that. Although part of the evaluation work can be done with the support of computers, evaluation and interpretation of measured information requires the experience and competence of the human expert. It is to be hoped that the computer industry will soon have developed turn-key solutions of universal applicability for analytical tasks of this kind, so that in the near future determination of the source terms, especially for LED or IRED radiation, will be an easy task. (orig./CB) [de

  6. Neutron- and muon-induced background in underground physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Tomasello, V.; Pandola, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background induced by neutrons in deep underground laboratories is a critical issue for all experiments looking for rare events, such as dark matter interactions or neutrinoless ββ decay. Neutrons can be produced either by natural radioactivity, via spontaneous fission or (α, n) reactions, or by interactions initiated by high-energy cosmic rays. In all underground experiments, Monte Carlo simulations of neutron background play a crucial role for the evaluation of the total background rate and for the optimization of rejection strategies. The Monte Carlo methods that are commonly employed to evaluate neutron-induced background and to optimize the experimental setup, are reviewed and discussed. Focus is given to the issue of reliability of Monte Carlo background estimates. (orig.)

  7. Neutron- and muon-induced background in underground physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Tomasello, V. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Pandola, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Background induced by neutrons in deep underground laboratories is a critical issue for all experiments looking for rare events, such as dark matter interactions or neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay. Neutrons can be produced either by natural radioactivity, via spontaneous fission or ({alpha}, n) reactions, or by interactions initiated by high-energy cosmic rays. In all underground experiments, Monte Carlo simulations of neutron background play a crucial role for the evaluation of the total background rate and for the optimization of rejection strategies. The Monte Carlo methods that are commonly employed to evaluate neutron-induced background and to optimize the experimental setup, are reviewed and discussed. Focus is given to the issue of reliability of Monte Carlo background estimates. (orig.)

  8. Data assimilation and model evaluation experiment datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Cheng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMEE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets. The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: (1) collection of observational data; (2) analysis and interpretation; (3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; (4) quality control and re-analysis; and (5) data archiving and software documentation. The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement. Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include (1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, (2) diagnosis and theoretical studies, and (3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  9. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  10. The Parkinson's experience of group physical activity: Understanding social support, social comparison, physical self-perceptions, and posttraumatic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehy, Tammy L

    2014-01-01

    Group physical activity programs for clinical populations can provide opportunities for adaptive social interactions, improving perceptions of competence, and may facilitate posttraumatic growth (positive psychological changes resulting from traumatic life experiences). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how people with Parkinson's experience social interactions and physical challenges in a group physical activity program, and to investigate what role they think those experie...

  11. Evaluation of German and international operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueck, Reinhard; Verstegen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The systematic analysis of safety-relevant events in nuclear power plants and their causes is a key driver for the further development of nuclear safety. The findings obtained from the evaluation of operating experience in this respect form the basis for both technical and organisational improvements in the plants as well as for adaptations of technical rules and standards. In its role as Technical Safety Organisation advising the German federal government, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) has been concerned with the detection and analysis of failure mechanisms that underlie events in nuclear power plants at home and abroad since its foundation in 1977. This article provides an overview of the different objectives which are pursued in this context by order of or funded by the Federal Environment Ministry. Here, the focus is on the evaluation of reportable events for the preparation of so-called Information Notices and generic reports as well as for the acquisition of data that can be used for in-depth probabilistic analyses.

  12. Assessing Student Achievement in Physical Education for Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    While many teachers continue to ignore the practice of assessing student achievement in physical education, recent federal pressures to include student assessment data in teacher evaluation systems has shown that assessment of student outcomes is here to stay. Though there is a strong tradition of assessing teacher practice in physical education,…

  13. Effects of Physical Attractiveness on Evaluation of Vocal Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapnick, Joel; Darrow, Alice Ann; Kovacs, Jolan; Dalrymple, Lucinda

    1997-01-01

    Studies whether physical attractiveness of singers affects judges' ratings of their vocal performances. Reveals that physical attractiveness does impact evaluation, that male raters were more severe than female raters, and that the rating of undergraduate majors versus graduate students and professors combined were not differently affected by…

  14. Evaluation of anatomical and physical properties of Khaya nthotheca

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anatomical and physical properties of Khaya anthotheca (Welw.) C. DC wood from the transition forest of middle altitude (zone 1) and the humid dense forest of low altitude (zone 2) in the East of the Democratic Republic of Congo were evaluated to ascertain the effect of growth area on the anatomical and physical ...

  15. Evaluation of physical facilities and processing operations of major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of these abattoirs were evaluated based on their presence and functional status. ... of safe and wholesome meat and meat products for human consumption. Keywords: Abattoir, Butcher, Meat, Physical facilities, Public health, Standard ...

  16. Assistive Technology for Persons with Physical Disabilities: Evaluation and Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigby, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a compilation of published studies that evaluated assistive technology interventions for children and adults with physical disabilities. The first chapter introduces the need for and the challenges involved in studying the outcomes of assistive technology interventions. The

  17. EBR-II Reactor Physics Benchmark Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Chad L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Lum, Edward S [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Stewart, Ryan [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Byambadorj, Bilguun [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Beaulieu, Quinton [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2017-12-28

    This report provides a reactor physics benchmark evaluation with associated uncertainty quantification for the critical configuration of the April 1986 Experimental Breeder Reactor II Run 138B core configuration.

  18. Process evaluation of a worksite social and physical environmental intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffeng, J.K.; Hendriksen, I.J.M.; Mechelen, W. van; Boot, C.R.L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To evaluate the process of implementation of a social and physical environmental intervention and to explore differences regarding this process between both interventions. METHODS:: Context, recruitment, dose delivered, fidelity, reach, dose received, satisfaction, and implementation

  19. Physics results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.; Bell, M.

    2000-01-01

    The mission of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to extend the understanding of toroidal physics to low aspect ratio (R/a ∼ 1.25) in low collisionality regimes. NSTX is designed to operate with up to 6 MW of High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating and current drive, 5 MW of Neutral Beam Injection (NBI), and Co-Axial Helicity Injection (CHI) for non-inductive startup. Initial experiments focused on establishing conditions that will allow NSTX to achieve its aims of simultaneous high-β t and high-bootstrap current fraction, and to develop methods for non-inductive operation, which will be necessary for Spherical Torus power plants. Ohmic discharges with plasma currents up to 1 MA, stored energies up to 55 kJ, β t ∼ 10%, and a range of shapes and configurations were produced. Density limits in deuterium and helium reached 80% and 120% of the Greenwald limit respectively. Significant electron heating was observed with up to 2.3 MW of HHFW. Up to 270 kA of toroidal current for up to 200 msec was produced noninductively using CHI. Initial NBI experiments were carried out with up to two beam sources (3.2 MW). Plasmas with stored energies of up to 140 kJ and β t =21% were produced

  20. The smartphone as a barometer in Physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Salilnas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two experiments that take advantage of smartphones pressure sensor, using it to determine the value of the pressure within in equilibrium water in a test tube. In a first experiment, aimed at students of secondary and higher levels, the data collected with the pressure sensor of a smartphone at different depths allow a linear fit, thus checking the validity of Stevin's Law. In addition, based on this law and the parameters of the adjustment it has been possible to determine the density of the water. The density values obtained indirectly by this procedure differ between 2% and 4% of the result of dividing the mass and volume of a sample. In a second experiment, more focused on students of the first university courses of Physics subjects, the submerged smartphone oscillates suspended from a spring. The measurements of the pressure sensor allow, through Stevin's Law, to obtain the time series of the pressure in the corresponding damped oscillation, whose parameters are determined by a non-linear adjustment. The comparison of the free pulsation obtained from these values differs by 1.5% from that obtained from the direct measurement of the period outside the water. In both cases, the results obtained indicate the suitability of the current methodology in teaching contexts.

  1. Smashing physics. Inside the world's biggest experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working knowledge of the new physics and what the discovery of the Higgs particle means for how we define the laws of nature. It will take you to the cutting edge of modern scientific thinking.

  2. Reflections on Empowerment Evaluation: Learning from Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Reflects on empowerment evaluation, the use of evaluation to foster improvement and self-determination. Empowerment evaluation uses quantitative and qualitative methods, and usually focuses on program evaluation. Discusses the growth in empowerment evaluation as a result of interest in participatory evaluation. (SLD)

  3. Physics experiments in graphite lattices (1962); Experiences sur les reseaux a graphite (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A review is made of the various experimental methods used to determine the physics of graphite, natural uranium lattices: integral lattice experiments; both absolute and differential, effective cross section measurements, both by activation methods and by analysis of irradiated fuels, fine structure measurements. A number of experimental results are also given. (authors) [French] On decrit les differentes methodes experimentales utilisees pour determiner les parametres physiques de reseaux a uranium-graphite. Il s'agit d'experiences globales: mesures absolues et relatives de laplaciens, mesures de sections efficaces effectives par activation et par analyses de combustibles irradies, mesures de structures fines. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux sont communiques. (auteurs)

  4. Task A, High energy physics program experiment and theory: Task B, High energy physics program numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses progress in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Fixed target experiments, collider experiments, computing, networking, VAX upgrade, SSC preparation, detector development, and particle theory are some of the areas covered

  5. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G. [Sao Paulo State U.; Apostolakis, J. [CERN; Bandieramonte, M. [Catania Astrophys. Observ.; Bianchini, C. [Mackenzie Presbiteriana U.; Bitzes, G. [CERN; Brun, R. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab; Carminati, F. [CERN; Licht, J.de Fine [U. Copenhagen (main); Duhem, L. [Intel, Santa Clara; Elvira, D. [Fermilab; Gheata, A. [CERN; Jun, S. Y. [Fermilab; Lima, G. [Fermilab; Novak, M. [CERN; Presbyterian, M. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Shadura, O. [CERN; Seghal, R. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Wenzel, S. [CERN

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  6. Electron-cyclotron current drive in the tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.; Kritz, A.H.; Radin, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-tracking calculations provide estimates of the electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) power required to suppress tearing modes near the q=2 surface in the Tokamak Physics Experiment. Effects of finite beam width and divergence are included, as are the effects of scattering of the ECH power by drift-wave turbulence. A frequency of about 120 GHz allows current drive on the small-R (high-B) portion of q=2, while 80 GHz drives current on the large-R (low-B) portion. The higher frequency has the advantages of less sensitivity to wave and plasma parameters and of no trapped-electron degradation of current-drive efficiency. Less than 1 MW suffices to suppress tearing modes even with high turbulence levels

  7. Long pulse neutral beam system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Bowen, O.N.; Dahlgren, F.; Edwards, J.W.; Kamperschroer, J.; Newman, R.; O'Connor, T.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; Halle, A. von; Wright, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is planned as a long-pulse or steady-state machine to serve as a successor to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The neutral beam component of the heating and current drive systems will be provided by a TFTR beamline modified to allow operation for pulse lengths of 1000s. This paper presents a brief overview of the conceptual design which has been carried out to determine the changes to the beamline and power supply components that will be required to extend the pulse length from its present limitation of 1s at full power. The modified system, like the present one, will be capable of injecting about 8MW of power as neutral deuterium. The initial operation will be with a single beamline oriented co-directional to the plasma current, but the TPX system design is capable of accommodating an additional co-directional beamline and a counter-directional beamline. ((orig.))

  8. Some possible atomic physics experiments with 15 UD pelletron machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, A.

    1995-01-01

    Some possible experiments in atomic physics using medium energy heavy ion beam from the Pelletron are discussed. Main discussions is on x-ray spectroscopy using heavy ion beam. Different excitation mechanisms of inner atomic shells, experimental results and comparison with different theoretical models are presented. Effects of multiple vacancies in outer shells on K-shell ionisation, projectile charge state and target thickness effects are discussed. High resolution x-ray spectroscopy using curved crystal spectrometer is useful for studying these effects. Special emphasis is given to the study of quasi-molecular orbit (MO) formation during adiabatic collision of heavy ion with atom. Different aspects of MO x-ray study are presented. Other continuum x-rays e.g. radiative electron capture (REC), secondary electron Bremsstrahlung (SEB) nucleus-nucleus Bremsstrahlung (NNB) etc are also discussed. (author). 16 refs., 5 figs

  9. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadio, G; Bianchini, C; Apostolakis, J; Bitzes, G; Brun, R; Carminati, F; Gheata, A; Novak, M; Shadura, O; Wenzel, S; Bandieramonte, M; Canal, P; Elvira, D; Jun, S Y; Lima, G; Licht, J de Fine; Duhem, L; Presbyterian, M; Seghal, R

    2015-01-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project. (paper)

  10. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; de Fine Licht, J.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  11. Multimicroprocessor system for high-energy physics experiment applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piska, K.; Falkenberg, W.; Glasneck, C.P.; Pflugbeil, W.

    1982-01-01

    An autonomous modular multicomputer system based on the INTEL 8080 for program development and for application to the high-energy physics experiment 'RISK' is presented. The associated microcomputers (a three-processor configuration is realized) with uniform software systems can perform, in parallel, the interactively-controlled processing and monitoring of data accessible in the common memory block coupled to the processors via the direct shared bus. Data are acquired into the common memory buffer by the main processor, which is linked by the CAMAC interface with the experimental apparatus and optionally with a large-size computer. One microcomputer can be connected with the magnetic tape unit used for data recording. (orig.)

  12. Magnetospheric and solar physics observations with the PAMELA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casolino, M.; Adriani, O.; Ambriola, M.; Barbarino, G.C.; Basili, A.; Bazilevskaja, G.A.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.A.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Castellini, G.

    2008-01-01

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment designed to make long duration measurements of the cosmic radiation in Low Earth Orbit. It is devoted to the detection of the cosmic-ray spectra in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range with primary scientific goal the measurement of antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved. Other tasks include the search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity and the measurement of the light nuclear component of cosmic rays. In addition, PAMELA can investigate phenomena connected with solar and Earth physics. The apparatus consists of: a Time of Flight system, a magnetic spectrometer, an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, a shower tail catcher scintillator, a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system. In this work we present some measurements of galactic, secondary and trapped particles performed in the first months of operation

  13. Magnetospheric and solar physics observations with the PAMELA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, M. [INFN, Structure of Rome ' Tor Vergata' and Physics Department of University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: Marco.Casolino@roma2.infn.it; Adriani, O. [INFN, Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Ambriola, M. [INFN, Structure of Bari and Physics Department of University of Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Barbarino, G.C. [INFN, Structure of Naples and Physics Department of University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Basili, A. [INFN, Structure of Rome ' Tor Vergata' and Physics Department of University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Bazilevskaja, G.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky Prospekt 53, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Boezio, M. [INFN, Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, Via A. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E.A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M. [INFN, Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, Via A. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F. [INFN, Structure of Bari and Physics Department of University of Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Structure of Naples and Physics Department of University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, Albanova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Castellini, G. [IFAC, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)] (and others)

    2008-04-01

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment designed to make long duration measurements of the cosmic radiation in Low Earth Orbit. It is devoted to the detection of the cosmic-ray spectra in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range with primary scientific goal the measurement of antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved. Other tasks include the search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity and the measurement of the light nuclear component of cosmic rays. In addition, PAMELA can investigate phenomena connected with solar and Earth physics. The apparatus consists of: a Time of Flight system, a magnetic spectrometer, an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, a shower tail catcher scintillator, a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system. In this work we present some measurements of galactic, secondary and trapped particles performed in the first months of operation.

  14. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  15. The Entangled Cosmos: an experiment in physical theopoetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    As an experiment in constructive transdisciplinary relationality, a theology of nonseparable difference here engages a physics of quantum entanglement. The metaphoric potential of "spooky action at a distance" to intensify a cosmology resistant to the dominant individualism and conducive to ethical ecologies of interdependence has only begun to develop across multiple discourses. This essay contemplates the specific unfolding of a theory of nonlocal superpositions by physicists such as Stapp, Bohm and Barad. It does not literalize any God-trope, but rather entangles theology in the mysterious uncertainty of our widest interdependencies. This essay, first presented as a lecture at the American Academy of Religion "Science, Technology and Religion" Group, San Francisco, November 2011, forms the core of a chapter in a book I am currently completing, The Cloud of the Impossible: Theological Entanglements.

  16. A multi-chip module for physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Benso, A; Giovannetti, S; Mariani, R; Motto, S; Prinetto, P

    1999-01-01

    MCMs are widely adopted as assembly solutions for multi-die based systems, where area, performance, and costs are critical constraints. This paper describes both the project strategies and production flow that are to be adopted to realize an MCM-D for data acquisition in high-energy physics experiments. The activity starts from the results of RD/16 CERN project, and is part of the LAP Esprit project. The paper details the most critical issues faced in the production phase, and analyzes how they influenced system partitioning and component design. Moreover, it presents the design-for-testability methodologies adopted at both chip and MCM levels to achieve low defect levels and high production yields, minimizing the overhead in terms of system performance and area occupation. This work should demonstrate the feasibility of the MCM technology in such high speed data processing systems, where both size and cost constraints are important. (10 refs).

  17. Physics of charged cosmic rays with the AMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialle, J.P

    2000-04-01

    The AMS experiment aims at searching for primordial antimatter, non-baryonic dark matter, and measuring with high statistics and high accuracy the electrically charged cosmic ray particles and light nuclei in the extraterrestrial space beyond the atmosphere. AMS is the first magnetic spectrometer which will be flown in space. It will be installed for 3 years on the international space station (ISS) in 2003. A test flight with the space shuttle DISCOVERY took place in June 1998 with a first detector and gave many results: best limit on the existence of antinuclei, fluxes of protons, leptons, and helium nuclei above the geomagnetic threshold, existence of a secondary flux below the geomagnetic threshold. These results are described below. The physics goal and perspectives for AMS on the space station with an improved detector are described as well. (author)

  18. Quantitative evaluation of physical protection system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yahua; Li Bin; Li Shiju

    2009-01-01

    Based on the prompt detection analysis, this paper introduced one analysis model of intrusion path in nuclear power plant by means of morphology analysis and developed the evaluation software for path model analysis of physical protection system. Quantitative analysis on three elements (detection, delay, and response) of physical protection system was presented with an imaginary intrusion event example in Mac Arthur nuclear center. The results indicated that the path prompt detection analysis worked effectively to find the weak point of the physical protection system in NPP, and meantime we can also get the high cost-effectiveness improved measures. It is an effective approach to evaluate the overall performance of the system. (authors)

  19. Physics with the KLOE2 experiment at the φ factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloise, C.; Gauzzi, P.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the most debated issues which experimentation at the φ factory can really shed light on with a short-term program of measurements. Recent, very promising improvements in the lattice-QCD calculations call for new precision measurements in the Kaon sector to obtain more stringent results on CKM Unitarity and Lepton Flavour Universality. Neutral Kaon Interferometry can probe Discrete Symmetries, but also Quantum Mechanics at the Planck scale. Current limits obtained by KLOE can be overcome by both, the increase in statistics, and the upgrade of the tracking system with an inner GEM chamber for improving vertex resolution near the beam interaction region. One possible solution to the Dark Mass problem, allowing also to interpret the positron excess measured by the satellite Payload experiment PAMELA, suggests a '' dark '' sector that can really be constrained by the experiments at the Kaon and B-Factories. Low energy QCD phenomenology can receive an important contribution from the new measurements of radiative and non-leptonic decays of K, eta and eta' mesons. Finally, important results on the physics in the continuum can be achieved by new measurements of the hadronic cross section and the study of gamma-gamma processes. Improvements on hadronic cross section at low energy are needed to understand the 3-sigma effect on (g-2) μ and for precision determination of alpha em at the TeV scale while the analysis of the gamma-gamma sample impacts scalar spectroscopy and the underlying physics but also the light-by-light hadronic contribution to (g-2) μ . (authors)

  20. Hands-On Experiments in the Interactive Physics Laboratory: Students' Intrinsic Motivation and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snetinová, Marie; Kácovský, Petr; Machalická, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Experiments in different forms can certainly be suitable tools for increasing student interest in physics. However, educators continuously discuss which forms of experimenting (if any) are the most beneficial for these purposes. At the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague, two different forms of physics experiments are…

  1. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Gail G.

    2013-01-01

    The highlight of our last budget period, June 1, 2010, to May 31, 2013, was the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), announced on July 4, 2012, and for which Francois Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 8, 2013. The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964 to explain how elementary particles obtain mass and was the missing piece of the Standard Model. However, the Standard Model does not describe everything that we know. There are many unanswered questions, such as how can the Higgs boson have the mass that we have observed, are there more Higgs bosons, why is there more matter than antimatter, and what is the invisible dark matter, which constitutes about 85% of the matter in the universe. Our group played a significant role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and in subsequent analyses. We also carried out searches for new physics, in ways that could help elucidate some of the remaining questions. Our role in the CMS detector focused on the Tracker, a silicon strip outer tracker and pixel inner tracker.

  2. Effect of Physical Therapy Students' Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivko, Susan E; Abbruzzese, Laurel D; Duttaroy, Pragati; Hansen, Ruth L; Ryans, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Physical therapy clinical education experiences (CEEs) are difficult to secure, particularly first-level CEEs. Our purpose was to determine 1) what impact student full-time CEEs have on PT clinician productivity and 2) whether there is a productivity difference between first vs final CEEs. Productivity logs, including possible factors impacting productivity, were distributed to clinician-student pairings on first and final CEEs. Two-week baseline data (without a student) were compared to weeks 1 and 6 (with a student) for 31 logs using a 2x4 repeated-measures ANOVA. In a subset of 17 logs for CEEs 8 weeks or longer, a 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. There was a significant increase in the number of patients seen and CPT units billed by both levels of CEEs comparing weeks 1 and 6. In the subset of CEEs, 8 weeks or longer, there was a significant increase in the number of patients treated per hour at week 6 and a trend toward a change at week 8 when compared to baseline week A. The factors selected as impacting productivity were census (59%) and staffing (32%). Physical therapy clinician-student pairings showed an overall increase in productivity during both full-time first and final level CEEs.

  3. Methodology For Evaluation Of Regulatory Effectiveness In Physical Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmaylov, Alexander; Valente, John; Griggs, James R.; Rexroth, Paul; Piskarev, Alexander; Babkin, Vladimir; Sokolov, Egor; Melton, Ronald B.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Baker, Kathryn A.; Brothers, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    Material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) regulatory documents play an important role in securing and protecting nuclear material by regulating a variety of activities at different hierarchical levels. The development, implementation, and practical application of these regulatory documents requires a significant investment of financial and material resources. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of the regulatory development process and the extent to which regulations improve the effectiveness of MPC and A at nuclear sites. The joint Russian and U.S. Regulatory Development Project has a goal of evaluating the effectiveness of regulatory documents developed for MPC and A. As part of this joint Project, a methodology for evaluating effectiveness has been developed. This methodology was developed around physical protection objectives. The developed methodology specifies physical protection objectives to be accomplished through the implementation of a regulatory system based on the physical protection goals at the nuclear sites. It includes approaches to assessing regulatory effectiveness, the hierarchical structure of physical protection objectives to be accomplished through implementing regulations, a 'mapping' of the physical protection objectives to the regulatory framework, a list of criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection regulations and effectiveness indicators, as well as means and methods for gathering information and implementation of this evaluation.

  4. Studies on implementation of pellet tracking in hadron physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyszniak A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A system for optical tracking of frozen hydrogen microsphere targets (pellets has been designed. It is intended for the upcoming hadron physics experiment PANDA at FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. With such a tracking system one can reconstruct the positions of the individual pellets at the time of a hadronic interaction in the offline event analysis. This gives information on the position of the primary interaction vertex with an accuracy of a few 100 µm, which is very useful e.g. for reconstruction of charged particle tracks and secondary vertices and for background suppression. A study has been done at the WASA detector setup (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany to check the possibility of classification of hadronic events as originating in pellets or in background. The study has been done based on the instantaneous rate a Long Range TDC which was used to determine if a pellet was present in the accelerator beam region. It was clearly shown that it is possible to distinguish the two event classes. Also, an experience was gained with operation of two synchronized systems operating in different time scales, as it will also be the case with the optical pellet tracking.

  5. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  6. Physical trauma experience among school children in periurban Blantyre, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muula Adamson S

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical trauma is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. There are however, few community-based reports on the subject on the continent. The present study was conducted to explore school children's experience of physical trauma in a disadvantaged periurban area of Blantyre, in Malawi. Methods A cross sectional questionnaire study was carried out among school children in Ndirande-Blantyre, Malawi in 2004. Data were obtained to describe the following aspects of trauma experience: being a victim or observer of motor vehicular accidents involving pedestrians; history of falls from heights; and knowledge about road safety. Sex differences were determined for some of the variables in order to gain insights as to whether there is a difference in trauma experience between boys and girls. Results A total of 217 school children, 99 (45.6% boys and 118 (54.4% girls participated in the study. Eight of them reported to have ever been hit by a motor vehicle, 87 (40.1% had witnessed a road accident where a pedestrian had been hit and 83 (38.2% had witnessed a pedestrian they knew having been hit by a motor vehicle. Of those that reported to have ever been hit by motor vehicle, 2 (25% reported that they had been hospitalized as a result of injury. With regard to falling from heights, 86 reported to have ever fallen from tree, 44 of these (51.2% were injured from the fall and 14 (16.3% were hospitalized as a result of injury sustained from the fall. Girls were more likely to fall from trees and getting injured as compared to males (p = 0.04 for both situations. Just under half (41.9% of the study participants were able to report the correct procedure of crossing the road despite the fact that the majority (80% reported having been taught road safety at home or school. Conclusion Many school children in Blantyre, Malawi have been exposed to trauma either involving themselves or someone they observed. Prevention

  7. Not strange but bizarre physics from the sample experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinweber, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Since the report of the SAMPLE Collaboration suggesting the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon, G M s (0), may be greater than zero, numerous models have appeared supporting positive values for G M s (0) In this paper the bizarre physics associated with G M s (0) > 0 is illustrated. Two equations are presented describing the strange quark contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment in terms of the ratio of strange to light sea-quark-loop contributions and valence-quark ratios, probing the subtle effects of environment sensitivity. The evaluations involve no approximations outside of the usual assumption of equal current quark masses. Using the new lattice QCD results, our best estimate for G M s (0) shifts slightly from G M s (0) =-0.75 ± 0.30 μ N , to G M s (0) = -0.62 ± 0.26 μ N . Copyright (1999) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd

  8. Physical modeling of the boiling crisis: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Beysens, Daniel; Chatain, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In this presentation we describe a physical approach to the boiling crisis called also the critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the boiling crisis is triggered by spreading of individual vapor bubbles over the heater or equivalently by the growth of individual dry spots under the bubbles. The role of bubble coalescence is assumed to be secondary. The spreading is due to forces acting at the microscopic scale, in the neighborhood of the line of triple contact of liquid, vapor and heater where the local heat fluxes are the strongest. This picture is supposed to be independent on boiling conditions. It is confirmed by the pool boiling experiments carried out at extremely high pressures close to the gas-liquid critical point. Such unusual conditions are chosen to slow down the bubble growth sufficiently to be able to observe the dryout dynamics. In the above experiments it lasted during about a minute. To keep the usual bubble geometry, it is necessary to perform such experiments under reduced gravity. The numerical simulations are carried out for high pressures. They show two regimes of bubble growth. When the heat flux is smaller than a threshold value associated with the CHF, a vapor bubble grows and then leaves the heater by buoyancy. When the heat flux is larger than the CHF, the bubble spreads over the heater without leaving it in agreement with the experimental data. This occurs because the vapor recoil force causes both bubble spreading and strong adhesion to the heater. The CHF variation with system parameters predicted by simulations is briefly discussed. (authors) [fr

  9. The necessity of environmental capability evaluation in physical planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakol, M.

    1997-01-01

    For the physical planning of V az research Forest, the necessity of site selection in the context of land evaluation, has been discussed. the project has studied the evaluation of ecological capability of Land in the following stages: 1- Studying of physical and Biological resources in the context of GIS system. 2- Analysis and integration of data. Evaluation of ecological capability of the land by employing the suitable ecological model. 4- Site selection by comparison and coordination of the principles used in the model with the results of ecological capability of the land in GIS system. 5- Site and environmental design based on ecological principles

  10. Gender, Experience, and Self-Efficacy in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jayson M.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence of persistent gender achievement gaps in university physics instruction, not only for learning physics content, but also for developing productive attitudes and beliefs about learning physics. These gaps occur in both traditional and interactive-engagement (IE) styles of physics instruction. We investigated one gender gap…

  11. A New Physical Protection System Design and Evaluation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Heoksoon; Kim, Myungsu; Bae, Yeongkyoung; Na, Janghwan [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) had established security-related department and has been strengthening security measures against possible sabotage. IAEA enforces the recommendations for the physical protection of NPPs in the INFCIRC/ 225/Rev.5 to the member states and U.S. NRC also enforces the similar requirements in 10 CFR 73.55. Thus, in order to let Korean NPPs meet the new requirements in INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 or U.S. NRC requirements, Korea nuclear licensee should develop or establish appropriate physical protection system (PPS) design methods for the physical protection of the operating NPPs and new NPPs. KHNP is doing the project of 'Development of APR1400 Physical Protection System Design (2012- 2015, KHNP/KAERI /KEPCO E-C)'. This paper describes overview of a physical protection system (PPS) design and evaluation for an advanced nuclear power plant. It found that a new physical protection system (PPS)design and evaluation. KHNP is doing the project of Physical Protection System design according to U.S. NRC requirements and IAEA requirements in INFCIRC /225 /Rev.5 and will complete by 7.31, 2015 for development of APR1400 Physical Protection System. After completing this project, the results of project are expected to apply new NPPs.

  12. Physical protection evaluation methodology program development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is essential to develop a reliable physical protection evaluation methodology for applying physical protection concept to the design stage. The methodology can be used to assess weak points and improve performance not only for the design stage but also for nuclear facilities in operation. Analyzing physical protection property of nuclear facilities is not a trivial work since there are many interconnected factors affecting overall performance. Therefore several international projects have been organized to develop a systematic physical protection evaluation methodology. INPRO (The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles) and GIF PRPP (Generation IV International Forum Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection) methodology are among the most well-known evaluation methodologies. INPRO adopts a checklist type of questionnaire and has a strong point in analyzing overall characteristic of facilities in a qualitative way. COMPRE program has been developed to help general users apply COMPRE methodology to nuclear facilities. In this work, COMPRE program development and a case study of the hypothetical nuclear facility are presented. The development of COMPRE program and a case study for hypothetic facility is presented in this work. The case study shows that COMPRE PP methodology can be a useful tool to assess the overall physical protection performance of nuclear facilities. To obtain meaningful results from COMPRE PP methodology, detailed information and comprehensive analysis are required. Especially, it is not trivial to calculate reliable values for PPSE (Physical Protection System Effectiveness) and C (Consequence), while it is relatively straightforward to evaluate LI (Legislative and Institutional framework), MC (Material Control) and HR (Human Resources). To obtain a reliable PPSE value, comprehensive information about physical protection system, vital area analysis and realistic threat scenario assessment are required. Like

  13. Physical protection evaluation methodology program development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to develop a reliable physical protection evaluation methodology for applying physical protection concept to the design stage. The methodology can be used to assess weak points and improve performance not only for the design stage but also for nuclear facilities in operation. Analyzing physical protection property of nuclear facilities is not a trivial work since there are many interconnected factors affecting overall performance. Therefore several international projects have been organized to develop a systematic physical protection evaluation methodology. INPRO (The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles) and GIF PRPP (Generation IV International Forum Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection) methodology are among the most well-known evaluation methodologies. INPRO adopts a checklist type of questionnaire and has a strong point in analyzing overall characteristic of facilities in a qualitative way. COMPRE program has been developed to help general users apply COMPRE methodology to nuclear facilities. In this work, COMPRE program development and a case study of the hypothetical nuclear facility are presented. The development of COMPRE program and a case study for hypothetic facility is presented in this work. The case study shows that COMPRE PP methodology can be a useful tool to assess the overall physical protection performance of nuclear facilities. To obtain meaningful results from COMPRE PP methodology, detailed information and comprehensive analysis are required. Especially, it is not trivial to calculate reliable values for PPSE (Physical Protection System Effectiveness) and C (Consequence), while it is relatively straightforward to evaluate LI (Legislative and Institutional framework), MC (Material Control) and HR (Human Resources). To obtain a reliable PPSE value, comprehensive information about physical protection system, vital area analysis and realistic threat scenario assessment are required. Like

  14. We experience more than we comprehend. Quantum physics and quaesions of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, H.P.; Oesterreicher, M.

    2007-01-01

    The quantum physics has been arrived by thinking and experimenting to revolutioning knowledges, which determine our world, also if only few have understood these theories in their real sense. The present book follows the question, whether and how far a consciousness trained by quantum physics can reach more directly to the understanding of questions of life and religious questions than a thinking, which is obliged to classical physics. It deals especially with fundamental existential questions: The theme of personal responsibility, the value of the indivdual existence, the evaluation of the personal I-you relation. Hans Peter Duerr, a personality with guiding qualities, as they are necessary in the new milennium, is the ideal speech partner for the deimension of this theme. The connections of natural sciences and religion, ecology, and sociological change have always driven the Heisenberg successo. How can we speech about that, which science cannot comprehend?. What means self, identity, responsibilit for the quantum physicist? An exciting meeting

  15. We experience more than we comprehend. Quantum physics and questions of life. rev. new ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, Hans-Peter; Oesterreicher-Mollwo, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The quantum physics has been arrived by thinking and experimenting to revolutioning knowledges, which determine our world, also if only few have understood these theories in their real sense. The present book follows the question, whether and how far a consciousness trained by quantum physics can reach more directly to the understanding of questions of life and religious questions than a thinking, which is obliged to classical physics. It deals especially with fundamental existential questions: The theme of personal responsibility, the value of the individual existence, the evaluation of the personal I-you relation. Hans Peter Duerr, a personality with guiding qualities, as they are necessary in the new millennium, is the ideal speech partner for the dimension of this theme. The connections of natural sciences and religion, ecology, and sociological change have always driven the Heisenberg successor. How can we speech about that, which science cannot comprehend?. What means self, identity, responsibility for the quantum physicist? An exciting meeting.

  16. Design and evaluation of physical protection systems of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jin Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Kwack, Eun Ho; Choi, Yung Myung

    2001-06-01

    Nuclear material and safety equipment of nuclear facilities are required to be protected against any kind of theft or sabotage. Physical protection is one of the measures to prevent such illegally potential threats for public security. It should cover all the cases of use, storage, and transportation of nuclear material. A physical protection system of a facility consists of exterior intrusion sensors, interior intrusion sensors, an alarm assessment and communication system, entry control systems, access delay equipment, etc. The design of an effective physical protection system requires a comprehensive approach in which the designers define the objective of the system, establish an initial design, and evaluate the proposed design. The evaluation results are used to determine whether or not the initial design should be modified and improved. Some modelling techniques are commonly used to analyse and evaluate the performance of a physical protection system. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) has developed a prototype of software as a part of a full computer model for effectiveness evaluation for physical protection systems. The input data elements for the prototype, contain the type of adversary, tactics, protection equipment, and the attributes of each protection component. This report contains the functional and structural requirements defined in the development of the evaluation computer model.

  17. Physical protection concepts of nuclear materials. The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, G.; Artaud, R.

    1995-01-01

    As the nuclear energy was being developed, it appeared necessary to set up protections against its potential hazards, that should be more complete and elaborate than those implemented on the other industrial installations. This had to be done both in the safety field to prevent the environment and the populations from the consequences of severe casualties, and in the security field to avoid the risk of proliferation and limit to an acceptable level the results of voluntarily provoked accidents and sabotages. Taking advantage of the gathered experience, this document gives consideration to the concepts used in France in order to ensure the physical protection of the nuclear materials. The following topics are tackled: context inside which are envisaged the specific measures, coherence with the general dispositions taken to protect industrial installations, importance and limitations of the part played by the regulations, respective responsibilities of the plant operators and the public authorities, compromise between objectives in view and means to implement, adjustment between the physical protection system and the operating requirements. In addition, the ways in which these systems should be implemented are discussed, underlining the necessity to make progressive steps under a permanent will, in order, first, to update and bring under conformity the old installations, and second, to ensure the maintenance of the systems, taking account of the evolutions of needs and techniques. Those points are commented on examples taken among the different types of installations to be found in France, showing the differences in approach coming from the type and the age of the facilities, and giving the present trends for the new plants. (authors). 1 annexe

  18. Evaluating XML-Extended OLAP Queries Based on a Physical Algebra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Xuepeng; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2006-01-01

    . In this paper, we extend previous work on the logical federation of OLAP and XML data sources by presenting a simplified query semantics, a physical query algebra and a robust OLAP-XML query engine as well as the query evaluation techniques. Performance experiments with a prototypical implementation suggest...

  19. Increasing Physical Activity in Preschool: A Pilot Study to Evaluate Animal Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L.; Carter, Betty Jean; Kibbe, Debra L.; Dennison, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This report describes a pilot study to evaluate Animal Trackers (AT), a preschool program designed to (1) increase structured physical activity (PA) during the preschool day; (2) increase practice of gross motor skills; (3) provide teachers with an easy-to-use PA program regardless of teacher experience; and (4) implement a teacher…

  20. Student evaluations of physics teachers: On the stability and persistence of gender bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Potvin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] There is a long history of research which confounds the simple interpretation that evaluations in an educational context are purely measures of competency. One such issue is that of gender bias in student evaluations of their teachers. In our prior work, we found that male students underrated female high school teachers in biology and chemistry while all students underrated female high school teachers in physics. In the current work, we independently checked and extended this earlier work to examine the effect of physics identity on student evaluations and gender bias. Employing multiple regression on survey data from a representative sample of 6772 college students across the U.S., attending both 2-year and 4-year post-secondary institutions (including STEM and non-STEM majors, we find the core physics effect is unchanged despite a gap between studies of nearly 10 years. Namely, both male and female students underrate their female high school physics teachers, even after controlling for physics grades and classroom experiences. Our new focus on physics identity reveals that students with a strong physics identity show a larger gender bias in favor of male teachers than those with less of a physics identity. These results may help to explain how structures that privilege certain groups and marginalize others are prevalent amongst the youngest members of a defined physics community and may serve to uphold the status quo as these young members traverse to higher levels of physics community membership. Furthermore, biased evaluative feedback structures may be one of the propagators of women’s lower competency beliefs in physics, a result that has been found by many prior studies.

  1. Student evaluations of physics teachers: On the stability and persistence of gender bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Geoff; Hazari, Zahra

    2016-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] There is a long history of research which confounds the simple interpretation that evaluations in an educational context are purely measures of competency. One such issue is that of gender bias in student evaluations of their teachers. In our prior work, we found that male students underrated female high school teachers in biology and chemistry while all students underrated female high school teachers in physics. In the current work, we independently checked and extended this earlier work to examine the effect of physics identity on student evaluations and gender bias. Employing multiple regression on survey data from a representative sample of 6772 college students across the U.S., attending both 2-year and 4-year post-secondary institutions (including STEM and non-STEM majors), we find the core physics effect is unchanged despite a gap between studies of nearly 10 years. Namely, both male and female students underrate their female high school physics teachers, even after controlling for physics grades and classroom experiences. Our new focus on physics identity reveals that students with a strong physics identity show a larger gender bias in favor of male teachers than those with less of a physics identity. These results may help to explain how structures that privilege certain groups and marginalize others are prevalent amongst the youngest members of a defined physics community and may serve to uphold the status quo as these young members traverse to higher levels of physics community membership. Furthermore, biased evaluative feedback structures may be one of the propagators of women's lower competency beliefs in physics, a result that has been found by many prior studies.

  2. Beam-plasma coupling physics in support of active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Delzanno, G. L.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2017-12-01

    The recent development of compact relativistic accelerators might open up a new era of active experiments in space, driven by important scientific and national security applications. Examples include using electron beams to trace magnetic field lines and establish causality between physical processes occurring in the magnetosphere and those in the ionosphere. Another example is the use of electron beams to trigger waves in the near-Earth environment. Waves could induce pitch-angle scattering and precipitation of energetic electrons, acting as an effective radiation belt remediation scheme. In this work, we revisit the coupling between an electron beam and a magnetized plasma in the framework of linear cold-plasma theory. We show that coupling can occur through two different regimes. In the first, a non-relativistic beam radiates through whistler waves. This is well known, and was in fact the focus of many rockets and space-shuttle campaigns aimed at demonstrating whistler emissions in the eighties. In the second regime, the beam radiates through extraordinary (R-X) modes. Nonlinear simulations with a highly-accurate Vlasov code support the theoretical results qualitatively and demonstrate that the radiated power through R-X modes can be much larger than in the whistler regime. Test-particle simulations in the wave electromagnetic field will also be presented to assess the efficiency of these waves in inducing pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions. Finally, the implications of these results for a rocket active experiment in the ionosphere and for a radiation belt remediation scheme will be discussed.

  3. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  4. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  5. Electronics, trigger, data acquisition, and computing working group on future B physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1993-01-01

    Electronics, trigger, data acquisition, and computing: this is a very broad list of topics. Nevertheless in a modern particle physics experiment one thinks in terms of a data pipeline in which the front end electronics, the trigger and data acquisition, and the offline reconstruction are linked together. In designing any piece of this pipeline it is necessary to understand the bigger picture of the data flow, data rates and volume, and the input rate, output rate, and latencies for each part of the pipeline. All of this needs to be developed with a clear understanding of the requirements imposed by the physics goals of the experiment; the signal efficiencies, background rates, and the amount of recorded information that needs to be propagated through the pipeline to select and analyse the events of interest. The technology needed to meet the demanding high data volume needs of the next round of B physics experiments appears to be available, now or within a couple of years. This seems to be the case for both fixed target and collider B physics experiments. Although there are many differences between the various data pipelines that are being proposed, there are also striking similarities. All experiments have a multi-level trigger scheme (most have levels 1, 2, and 3) where the final level consists of a computing farm that can run offline-type code and reduce the data volume by a factor of a few. Finally, the ability to reconstruct large data volumes offline in a reasonably short time, and making large data volumes available to many physicists for analysis, imposes severe constraints on the foreseen data pipelines, and a significant uncertainty in evaluating the various approaches proposed

  6. RP-10: commissioning. Reproduction by physical experiences calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, Manabu; Madariaga, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents the neutronic calculation results, most of which were carried out after such experiences, to verify the calculation methodology developed at the Analysis and Calculation Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The results obtained were satisfactory, proving that the calculation methodology used is adequate for the design of this type of reactors. The only important disagreement is to evaluate the reactivity excess and cut reactivity, but this responds to a criterion difference and/or that of definition for these parameters. The positions of criticality with errors lower than 100 pcm were predicted. The differential and integral reactivities for the calibration of bars, as well as the flux distribution, are reproduced in a reasonable degree in relation to differences inferior to 10%. (Author) [es

  7. Quench Detection and Instrumentation for the Tokamak Physics Experiment magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, M.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schultz, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The design of the Local Instrumentation ampersand Control (I ampersand C) System for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) superconducting PF ampersand TF magnets is presented. The local I ampersand C system monitors the status of the magnet systems and initiates the proper control sequences to protect the magnets from any foreseeable fault. Local I ampersand C also stores magnet-system data for analysis and archiving. Quench Detection for the TPX magnets must use a minimum of two independent sensing methods and is allowed a detection time of one second. Proposed detection methods include the measurement of; (1) normal-zone resistive voltage, (2) cooling-path helium flow, (3) local temperature in the winding pack, (4) local pressure in the winding pack. Fiber-optic based isolation systems are used to remove high common-mode magnet voltages and eliminate ground loops. The data acquisition and fault-detection systems are computer based. The design of the local I ampersand C system incorporates redundant, fault-tolerant, and/or fail-safe features at all component levels. As part of a quench detection R ampersand D plan, a Quench Detection Model Coil has been proposed to test all detection methods. Initial cost estimates and schedule for the local I ampersand C system are presented

  8. Testing bell inequality at experiments of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiqing; Li Xueqian; Ke Hongwei; Ding Yibing; Shen Pengnian

    2010-01-01

    Besides using the laser beam, it is very tempting to directly testify the Bell inequality at high energy experiments where the spin correlation is exactly what the original Bell inequality investigations. In this work, we follow the proposal raised in literature and use the successive decays J/ψ →γηc →Λ(Λ-bar)→pπ - (p-bar)π + to testify the Bell inequality. Our goal is twofold, namely, we first make a Monte-Carlo simulation of the processes based on the quantum field theory (QFT). Since the underlying theory is QFT, it implies that we pre-admit the validity of quantum picture. Even though the QFT is true, we need to find how big the database should be, so that we can clearly show deviations of the correlation from the Bell inequality determined by the local hidden variable theory. There have been some critiques on the proposed method, so in the second part, we suggest some improvements which may help to remedy the ambiguities indicated by the critiques. It may be realized at an updated facility of high energy physics, such as BES III. (authors)

  9. Physics Design of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Lyon, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    Compact quasi-axisymmetric stellarators offer the possibility of combining the steady-state low-recirculating power, external control, and disruption resilience of previous stellarators with the low-aspect ratio, high beta-limit, and good confinement of advanced tokamaks. Quasi-axisymmetric equilibria have been developed for the proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) with average aspect ratio approximately 4.4 and average elongation approximately 1.8. Even with bootstrap-current consistent profiles, they are passively stable to the ballooning, kink, vertical, Mercier, and neoclassical-tearing modes for b > 4%, without the need for external feedback or conducting walls. The bootstrap current generates only 1/4 of the magnetic rotational transform at b = 4% (the rest is from the coils). Transport simulations show adequate fast-ion confinement and thermal neoclassical transport similar to equivalent tokamaks. Modular coils have been designed which reproduce the physics properties, provide good flux surfaces, and allow flexible variation of the plasma shape to control the predicted MHD stability and transport properties

  10. Experiences developing ALEGRA: A C++ coupled physics framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budge, K.G.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    ALEGRA is a coupled physics framework originally written to simulate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments being conducted at the PBFA-II facility at Sandia National Laboratories. It has since grown into a large software development project supporting a number of computational programs at Sandia. As the project has grown, so has the development team, from the original two authors to a group of over fifteen programmers crossing several departments. In addition, ALEGRA now runs on a wide variety of platforms, from large PCs to the ASCI Teraflops massively parallel supercomputer. The authors discuss the reasons for ALEGRA`s success, which include the intelligent use of object-oriented techniques and the choice of C++ as the programming language. They argue that the intelligent use of development tools, such as build tools (e.g. make), compiler, debugging environment (e.g. dbx), version control system (e.g. cvs), and bug management software (e.g. ClearDDTS), is nearly as important as the choice of language and paradigm.

  11. Experiences developing ALEGRA: A C++ coupled physics framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budge, K.G.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    ALEGRA is a coupled physics framework originally written to simulate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments being conducted at the PBFA-II facility at Sandia National Laboratories. It has since grown into a large software development project supporting a number of computational programs at Sandia. As the project has grown, so has the development team, from the original two authors to a group of over fifteen programmers crossing several departments. In addition, ALEGRA now runs on a wide variety of platforms, from large PCs to the ASCI Teraflops massively parallel supercomputer. The authors discuss the reasons for ALEGRA's success, which include the intelligent use of object-oriented techniques and the choice of C++ as the programming language. They argue that the intelligent use of development tools, such as build tools (e.g. make), compiler, debugging environment (e.g. dbx), version control system (e.g. cvs), and bug management software (e.g. ClearDDTS), is nearly as important as the choice of language and paradigm

  12. The cryogenic helium cooling system for the Tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Slack, D.S.; Wendland, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will use supercritical helium to cool all the magnets and supply helium to the Vacuum cryopumping subsystem. The heat loads will come from the standard steady state conduction and thermal radiation sources and from the pulsed loads of the nuclear and eddy currents caused by the Central Solenoid Coils and the plasma positioning coils. The operations of the TPX will begin with pulses of up to 1000 seconds in duration every 75 minutes. The helium system utilizes a pulse load leveling scheme to buffer out the effects of the pulse load and maintain a constant cryogenic plant operation. The pulse load leveling scheme utilizes the thermal mass of liquid and gaseous helium stored in a remote dewar to absorb the pulses of the tokamak loads. The mass of the stored helium will buffer out the temperature pulses allowing 5 K helium to be delivered to the magnets throughout the length of the pulse. The temperature of the dewar will remain below 5 K with all the energy of the pulse absorbed. This paper will present the details of the heat load sources, of the pulse load leveling scheme operations, a partial helium schematic, dewar temperature as a function of time, the heat load sources as a function of time and the helium temperature as a function of length along the various components that will be cooled

  13. Physics of charged cosmic rays with the AMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialle, J.P

    2001-01-01

    The electrically charged cosmic rays contain very important information about the mechanisms of stars and galaxies and about primordial universe which cannot be found elsewhere. The AMS experiment aims at searching for primordial antimatter, non-baryonic dark matter, and at measuring with high statistics and high accuracy the electrically charged cosmic ray particles and light nuclei in the extraterrestrial space beyond the atmosphere. AMS is the first magnetic spectrometer which will be flown in space. It will be installed for 3 years on the international space station (ISS) in 2003. A test flight with the space shuttle DISCOVERY took place in June 1998 with a first detector and gave many results: best limit on the existence of antinuclei, fluxes of protons, leptons, and helium nuclei above the geomagnetic threshold, existence of a secondary flux below the geomagnetic threshold. These results are described below. The physics goal and perspectives for AMS on the space station with an improved detector are described as well. (author)

  14. An evaluation of teaching methods in the introductory physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Lauren Michelle Williams

    The introductory physics mechanics course at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte has a history of relatively high DFW rates. In 2011, the course was redesigned from the traditional lecture format to the inverted classroom format (flipped). This format inverts the classroom by introducing material in a video assigned as homework while the instructor conducts problem solving activities and guides discussions during the regular meetings. This format focuses on student-centered learning and is more interactive and engaging. To evaluate the effectiveness of the new method, final exam data over the past 10 years was mined and the pass rates examined. A normalization condition was developed to evaluate semesters equally. The two teaching methods were compared using a grade distribution across multiple semesters. Students in the inverted class outperformed those in the traditional class: "A"s increased by 22% and "B"s increased by 38%. The final exam pass rate increased by 12% under the inverted classroom approach. The same analysis was used to compare the written and online final exam formats. Surprisingly, no students scored "A"s on the online final. However, the percent of "B"s increased by 136%. Combining documented best practices from a literature review with personal observations of student performance and attitudes from first hand classroom experience as a teaching assistant in both teaching methods, reasons are given to support the continued use of the inverted classroom approach as well as the online final. Finally, specific recommendations are given to improve the course structure where weaknesses have been identified.

  15. International handbook of evaluated criticality safety benchmark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) in 1995. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculational techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirement and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross section data. The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span over 55,000 pages and contain 516 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4,405 critical, near critical, or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 200 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. Experiments that are found unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments are discussed in these evaluations; however, benchmark specifications are not derived for such experiments (in some cases models are provided in an appendix). Approximately 770 experimental configurations are categorized as unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments. Additional evaluations are in progress and will be

  16. Space, body, time and relationship experiences of recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing recess physical activity has been the aim of several interventions, as this setting can provide numerous physical activity opportunities. However, it is unclear if these interventions are equally effective for all children, or if they only appeal to children who are already...... the classroom as a space for physical activity, designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces and varied facilities, improving children's self-esteem and body image, e.g., during physical education, and creating teacher organised play activities during recess....

  17. Concepts in Physical Education with Laboratories and Experiments. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Charles B.; And Others

    This text is designed for student use in introductory course of physical education at the college level and deals with the specific areas of physical activity, exercise, health, physical fitness, skill learning, and body mechanics. Twenty concepts and thirty accompanying laboratory exercises suitable for both men and women are presented. Two…

  18. Evaluating Experiences in Different Virtual Reality Setups

    OpenAIRE

    Settgast , Volker; Pirker , Johanna; Lontschar , Stefan; Maggale , Stefan; Gütl , Christian

    2016-01-01

    Part 2: Use and Evaluation of Digital Entertainment; International audience; This paper describes the evaluation of three different scenarios in the fully immersive room-based virtual environment DAVE (Definitely Affordable Virtual Environment) and a head-mounted display, the Oculus Rift. The evaluation focuses on comparing the two immersive environments and three different scenarios (observation, emotion in a roller coaster, and interaction) in regards to typical virtual-reality characterist...

  19. Crystal assisted experiments for multi-disciplinary physics with heavy ion beams at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauvergne, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We present a review of the channeling and blocking experiments that have been performed at GANIL during the 30 years of stable beam operation, with the strong support of the multi-disciplinary CIRIL-CIMAP laboratory. These experiments combine atomic physics, solid state physics and nuclear physics. (paper)

  20. A method for the efficient and effective evaluation of contract health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkdoll, S.C.; Conley, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Wolf Creek has developed a method for efficiently training contract health physics technicians. The time allotted for training contractors prior to a refueling and maintenance outage is normally limited to a few days. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a systematic method to evaluate prior experience as well as practical skills and knowledge. In addition, instruction in the particular methodologies used at Wolf Creek hadto be included with methods for evaluating technician comprehension

  1. Users guide for evaluating alternative fixed-site physical protection systems using ''FESEM''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.D.; Kinemond, G.A.; Sasser, D.W.

    1977-11-01

    The objective of this manual is to provide a guide for evaluating physical protection systems using the Forcible Entry Safeguards Effectiveness Model (FESEM). It is intended for use by personnel involved in evaluating fixed-site security systems, or managers involved in making decisions related to the modification of existing protection systems or the implementation of new systems. This users' guide has been written for an audience which has some previous computer experience

  2. Evaluating the travel, physical activity and carbon impacts of a ?natural experiment? in the provision of new walking and cycling infrastructure: methods for the core module of the iConnect study

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, David; Bull, Fiona; Cooper, Ashley; Rutter, Harry; Adams, Emma; Brand, Christian; Ghali, Karen; Jones, Tim; Mutrie, Nanette; Powell, Jane; Preston, John; Sahlqvist, Shannon; Song, Yena

    2012-01-01

    Article summary Article focus Walking and cycling offer an ideal opportunity for people to incorporate more moderate-intensity physical activity into their daily lives, thereby reducing their risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. Improving infrastructure to support walking and cycling is often regarded as fundamental to encouraging their widespread uptake, but there is little robust evidence to support the effectiveness of this type of intervention. Connect2 is...

  3. Forward physics with the LHCf experiment: a LHC contribution to cosmic-ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonechi L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available LHCf is a small detector installed at LHC accelerator to measure neutral particle flow in the forward direction of proton -proton (p - p and proton -nucleus (p - A interactions. Thanks to the optimal performance that has characterized the last years’ running of the LHC collider, several measurements have been taken since 2009 in different running conditions. After data taking for p - p interactions at √s = 900 GeV, 2.76 TeV and 7 TeV and proton - Lead nucleus (p -Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV (energy of a couple of projectile and target nucleons in their center of mass reference frame, LHCf is now going to complete its physics program with the 13 TeV p - p run foreseen in 2015. The complete set of results will become a reference data set of forward physics for the calibration and tuning of the hadronic interaction models currently used for the simulation of the atmospheric showers induced by very high energy cosmic rays. For this reason we think that LHCf is giving an important contribution for the study of cosmic rays at the highest energies. In this paper the experiment, the published results and the current status are reviewed.

  4. Can Building Design Impact Physical Activity? A Natural Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Amy A; Hipp, Aaron; Valko, Cheryl Ann; Ramadas, Ramya; Zwald, Marissa

    2018-05-01

    Workplace design can impact workday physical activity (PA) and sedentary time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PA behavior among university employees before and after moving into a new building. A pre-post, experimental versus control group study design was used. PA data were collected using surveys and accelerometers from university faculty and staff. Accelerometry was used to compare those moving into the new building (MOVERS) and those remaining in existing buildings (NONMOVERS) and from a control group (CONTROLS). Survey results showed increased self-reported PA for MOVERS and NONMOVERS. All 3 groups significantly increased in objectively collected daily energy expenditure and steps per day. The greatest steps per day increase was in CONTROLS (29.8%) compared with MOVERS (27.5%) and NONMOVERS (15.9%), but there were no significant differences between groups at pretest or posttest. Self-reported and objectively measured PA increased from pretest to posttest in all groups; thus, the increase cannot be attributed to the new building. Confounding factors may include contamination bias due to proximity of control site to experimental site and introduction of a university PA tracking contest during postdata collection. Methodology and results can inform future studies on best design practices for increasing PA.

  5. Evaluation of physical conditional capabilities in athletes with physical motors limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira de las Mercedes Saínz-Reyes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in the province of Holguin with the disabled athletes competing in T53 mode event 100 m levels. It was determined as a scientific problem: How to evaluate the conditional physical capabilities in athletes with physical motor limitations in athletics? and as objective: To adapt functional tests to evaluate the conditional physical capabilities in athletes with physical motor limitations in athletics. A selection of functional test was carried out applying then some methodological modifications in order to make them easier for disabled athletes in wheelchairs. Theoretical and empirical levels methods as well as consensus techniques were used. The research has an adequate scientific rigor since a methodologies theoretical foundation on conditional physical capabilities and their evaluation by functional testing. Through the nominal group it could be determined the feasibility of the proposal, since the consulted experts came to the consensus that the chosen and modified functional tests can be applied to disabled athletes in wheelchairs, and recognized that through them it can be checked the training level of these athletes and the influence of the physical exercise in their organism.

  6. Experiences that influence a student's choice on majoring in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Donya Rae

    Currently the production of college graduates with science and engineering degrees is insufficient to fill the increasing number of jobs requiring these skills. This study focuses on physics majors with an in-depth examination of student transitions from high school to college. Many different areas of influence could affect a student's decision to major in physics. The first phase of this study addresses all of the potential areas of influence identified from the literature. The goal was to identify common influences that might be used to increase students' interest in majoring in physics. Subjects (N=35) from the first phase were recruited from physics majors at diverse Michigan colleges and universities. The second phase of this study explored, in more depth, important areas of influence identified in the first phase of the study. Subjects (N=94) from the second phase were recruited from diverse colleges and universities in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. The interviews were also conducted via email. Approximately half of the students in the study decided to major in physics while still in high school. Their reasons relate to many of the areas of influence. For example, high school physics teachers were cited as a strong influence in many students' decisions to major in physics. Influential physics teachers were described as being helpful, encouraging and interesting. The teachers also need to be their students' number one cheerleader and not their number one critic. Some areas of influence were found to be different for males vs. females. A high percentage of all physics majors had influential adults with careers in physical or biological science fields. This percentage was even larger for female physics majors. Female students also showed a greater initial interest in astronomy than the male students. Thus, high school and college physics teachers should seek to expose students to science-related careers and adults with these careers. Astronomy is also an

  7. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH: ONE PEDAGOGIC EXPERIENCE THAT FOLLOWED THE HISTORICAL CRITIC PEDAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Docena Pina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This text presents an experience in physical education classes with students enrolled in an education program for youth and adults. This experience is based on dialectical method of construction of school knowledge. The experience presents the theme 'physical activity and health' as a cultural tool to understand social problems generated or exacerbated by capitalism.

  8. The Use of Cylindrical Lenses in Easy Experiments for Physics Education and the Magic Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Stanislaw; Krysiak, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the properties of cylindrical lenses and provide some examples of their use in easy school physics experiments. Such experiments could be successfully conducted in the context of science education, in fun experiments that teach physics and in science fair projects, or used to entertain an audience by…

  9. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  10. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritort, F

    2006-01-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives. (topical review)

  11. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.; O'Connor, T.G.; Slack, D.S.; Wong, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three pairs of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (Nb 3 Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper. The majority of the design and all fabrication of the superconducting magnet system will be ,accomplished by industry, which will shortly be taking over the preliminary design. The magnet system is expected to be completed in early 2000

  12. Physical threat and self-evaluative emotions in smoking cessation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A; Den Dijker, L

    Negative self-evaluative emotions (e.g., feeling dissatisfied with oneself, feeling stupid) are considered to indicate a threat to the self that can be caused by an external physical threat (e.g., smoking). A sample of 363 smokers was tested twice, with an interval of 8 months. Prospective analyses

  13. Evaluation of an Internet, Stage-Based Physical Activity Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Ronald L.; Hardy, Aaron; Aldana, Steven G.; George, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of online, stage-based materials on exercise behavior and stage of readiness to change. College faculty participated in stage-based, action-message, or control groups. Occupational and leisure activity, 7-day physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, and stage of readiness to change were assessed at baseline and 6 weeks.…

  14. Administrators' Perceptions of Physical Education Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jason M.; van der Mars, Hans; Kulinna, Pamela; Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Using a mixed methods approach, this study aimed to develop a better understanding of school administrators' perceptions of teacher evaluation systems, specific to physical education (PE). Method: This study used two sources of data collection: (a) a survey sent to administrators (n = 19) in one urban school district and (b) a formal…

  15. Evaluation of the mechanical and physical properties of a posterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate the mechanical and physical properties of a micro-hybrid resin composite used in adult posterior restorations A micro-hybrid, light curing resin composite Unolux BCS Composite Restorative, (UnoDent, England) was used to restore 74 carious classes I and II cavities on posterior teeth of 62 adult patients.

  16. Evaluation of the HTR-10 Reactor as a Benchmark for Physics Code QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William K. Terry; Soon Sam Kim; Leland M. Montierth; Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-01-01

    The HTR-10 is a small (10 MWt) pebble-bed research reactor intended to develop pebble-bed reactor (PBR) technology in China. It will be used to test and develop fuel, verify PBR safety features, demonstrate combined electricity production and co-generation of heat, and provide experience in PBR design, operation, and construction. As the only currently operating PBR in the world, the HTR-10 can provide data of great interest to everyone involved in PBR technology. In particular, if it yields data of sufficient quality, it can be used as a benchmark for assessing the accuracy of computer codes proposed for use in PBR analysis. This paper summarizes the evaluation for the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) of data obtained in measurements of the HTR-10's initial criticality experiment for use as benchmarks for reactor physics codes

  17. Evaluating Psychology Students' Library Skills and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steve; Allen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Extensive engagement with current academic sources is expected of all psychology undergraduates. Thirty-eight undergraduate psychology students took part in a series of focus group discussions of their information-searching experiences and skills. The majority of students had not been required to engage with any form of information searching while…

  18. Comments on the interaction between theory and experiment in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses work being conducted in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics where theory and experiment go hand in hand. Pion capture, proton-antiproton interactions, kaon-pion interactions and hypernuclei decay are discussed as examples

  19. Space, body, time and relationship experiences of recess physical activity: a qualitative case study among the least physical active schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Troelsen, Jens; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2016-01-06

    Increasing recess physical activity has been the aim of several interventions, as this setting can provide numerous physical activity opportunities. However, it is unclear if these interventions are equally effective for all children, or if they only appeal to children who are already physically active. This study was conducted to explore the least physically active children's "lived experiences" within four existential lifeworlds linked to physical activity during recess: space, body, time, and relations. The study builds on ethnographic fieldwork in a public school in Denmark using a combination of participatory photo interviews and participant observation. Thirty-seven grade five children (11-12 years old) were grouped in quartiles based on their objectively measured daily physical activity levels. Eight children in the lowest activity quartile (six girls) were selected to participate in the study. To avoid stigmatising and to make generalisations more reliable we further recruited eight children from the two highest activity quartiles (four girls) to participate. An analysis of the least physically active children's "lived experiences" of space, body, time and relations revealed several key factors influencing their recess physical activity: perceived classroom safety, indoor cosiness, lack of attractive outdoor facilities, bodily dissatisfaction, bodily complaints, tiredness, feeling bored, and peer influence. We found that the four existential lifeworlds provided an in-depth understanding of the least physically active children's "lived experiences" of recess physical activity. Our findings imply that specific intervention strategies might be needed to increase the least physically active children's physical activity level. For example, rethinking the classroom as a space for physical activity, designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces and varied facilities, improving children's self-esteem and body image, e.g., during physical education, and

  20. Spanish nuclear industry experience in the evaluation of suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Pellejero, J. L.; Martinez, J. A.; Gomez, R.; Pablos, C. de; Herrero, J.

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to present the experiences identified by the Evaluation Panel Suppliers in fulfilling its role of supplier evaluation of goods and services s afety related . It belongs to UNESA and its main objective the evaluation of the quality system of the supplier against the basic rules applicable. With it you get two main benefits: - standardize evaluation criteria share experiences between suppliers and better management of own resources. - market access to all Spanish nuclear fleet by a single evaluation. From the experience gained, it can be concluded that there is a population of highly technically qualified suppliers to meet equipment requirements.

  1. Health physics experience with nondestructive X-radiation facilities in the US Air Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.; Piltingsrud, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation safety experience in the construction and use of enclosed nondestructive inspection (NDI) facilities in the US Air Force, has reaffirmed the constant need for the health physicist to continually monitor and assit in upgrading these facilities. Health physics contributions include evaluation of initial shielding requirements, proper selection of construction material, insuring that adequate safety devices are installed and adequate personnel dosimetry devices are available, surveying the facility, and assisting in the safety education program. There is a need to better define NDI warning/safety devices, using the National Bureau of Standards, (NBS) Handbook 107 as the most applicable guide

  2. Evaluating Musical Foreshadowing of Videogame Narrative Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Nelson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    undergraduate and graduate students participated in the study. Statistical analyses suggest that the use of musical cues for narrative foreshadowing induces a better perceived consistency between music and game narrative. Surprisingly, false foreshadowing was found to enhance the player's enjoyment.......We experiment with mood-expressing, procedurally generated music for narrative foreshadowing in videogames, investigating the relationship between music and the player's experience of narrative events in a game. We designed and conducted a user study in which the game's music expresses true...... foreshadowing in some trials (e.g. foreboding music before a negative event) and false foreshadowing in others (e.g. happy music that does not lead to a positive event). We observed players playing the game, recorded analytics data, and had them complete a survey upon completion of the gameplay. Thirty...

  3. Computer Simulations for Lab Experiences in Secondary Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Physical science instruction often involves modeling natural systems, such as electricity that possess particles which are invisible to the unaided eye. The effect of these particles' motion is observable, but the particles are not directly observable to humans. Simulations have been developed in physics, chemistry and biology that, under certain…

  4. Physics of Lightning under Control of Big Scale Experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2007), s. 173-186 ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : gas discharges * physics of lightning * long air gaps Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  5. 'Exhibitions and experiments', in celebration of nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Nakanishi, Akira; Nakano, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2008 was awarded to Professors Yoichiro Nambu, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa. At this opportunity, we held an exhibition to introduce the achievements of the laureates for 10 days at the Omiya campus in May 2009. With the explanations of elementary particle physics, we prepared several experimental instruments with which visitors could play and learn the spontaneous symmetry breaking, cosmic rays, a circle path of an electron in a magnetic field and so on. Our main purpose of the exhibition was, however, not just to explain the contents of the Nobel Prize in Physics, but also to attract students' interests to physics. More than 800 individual students attended during the period, and the survey of questionnaires shows positive contributions to raise the students' awareness of the excitement of physics. (author)

  6. Accelerator Preparations for Muon Physics Experiments at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments - the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment - is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. Operating scenarios being investigated and anticipated accelerator improvements or reconfigurations will be presented.

  7. Expected performance of the ATLAS experiment detector, trigger and physics

    CERN Document Server

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Stevenson, K.S.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T.D.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Strong, J.A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S.I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Sviridov, Yu.M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szczygiel, R.R.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taffard, A.T.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Tali, B.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G.P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.T.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Tevlin, C.M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, J.P.; Thomas, T.L.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Tovey, S.N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D.G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; VanBerg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J.J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, D.; Ventura, S.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A.P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.C.; Wang, S.M.W.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.W.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Wheeler-Ellis, S.J.; Whitaker, S.P.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, H.H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.W.; Winton, L.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P.F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A.V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinna, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V.V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector. The reconstruction of tracks, leptons, photons, missing energy and jets is investigated, together with the performance of b-tagging and the trigger. The physics potential for a variety of interesting physics processes, within the Standard Model and beyond, is examined. The study comprises a series of notes based on simulations of the detector and physics processes, with particular emphasis given to the data expected from the first years of operation of the LHC at CERN.

  8. Physics of Laser Materials Processing Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gladush, Gennady G

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the basic mechanisms, theory, simulations and technological aspects of Laser processing techniques. It covers the principles of laser quenching, welding, cutting, alloying, selective sintering, ablation, etc. The main attention is paid to the quantitative description. The diversity and complexity of technological and physical processes is discussed using a unitary approach. The book aims on understanding the cause-and-effect relations in physical processes in Laser technologies. It will help researchers and engineers to improve the existing and develop new Laser machining techniques. The book addresses readers with a certain background in general physics and mathematical analysis: graduate students, researchers and engineers practicing laser applications.

  9. HL-1 tokamak data acquisition system and its initial application in the physical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Huichen; Fu Bo; Dong Jiafu

    1989-11-01

    A HL-1 tokamak data acquisition system has been developed and has been used in the physical experiment. The hardware and software configuration of the system, as well as the typical acquired data in the HL-1 experiment are introduced

  10. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Direct examination of atomic interactions is difficult. One powerful approach to visualizing atomic interactions is to study near-index-matched colloidal dispersions of microscopic plastic spheres, which can be probed by visible light. Such spheres interact through hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, but they feel no direct force before an infinite repulsion at contact. Through the microgravity flight of the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), researchers have sought a more complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard-sphere colloidal dispersions. The experiment was conceived by Professors Paul M. Chaikin and William B. Russel of Princeton University. Microgravity was required because, on Earth, index-matched colloidal dispersions often cannot be density matched, resulting in significant settling over the crystallization period. This settling makes them a poor model of the equilibrium atomic system, where the effect of gravity is truly negligible. For this purpose, a customized light-scattering instrument was designed, built, and flown by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field on the space shuttle (shuttle missions STS 83 and STS 94). This instrument performed both static and dynamic light scattering, with sample oscillation for determining rheological properties. Scattered light from a 532- nm laser was recorded either by a 10-bit charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera from a concentric screen covering angles of 0 to 60 or by sensitive avalanche photodiode detectors, which convert the photons into binary data from which two correlators compute autocorrelation functions. The sample cell was driven by a direct-current servomotor to allow sinusoidal oscillation for the measurement of rheological properties. Significant microgravity research findings include the observation of beautiful dendritic crystals, the crystallization of a "glassy phase" sample in microgravity that did not crystallize for over 1 year in 1g

  11. The impact of aesthetic evaluation and physical ability on dance perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Emily S; Kirsch, Louise; Ticini, Luca F; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attracts attention from neuroscientists and artists interested in the neural underpinnings of esthetic experience. Though less studied than the neuroaesthetics of visual art, dance neuroaesthetics is a particularly rich subfield to explore, as it is informed not only by research on the neurobiology of aesthetics, but also by an extensive literature on how action experience shapes perception. Moreover, it is ideally suited to explore the embodied simulation account of esthetic experience, which posits that activation within sensorimotor areas of the brain, known as the action observation network (AON), is a critical element of the esthetic response. In the present study, we address how observers' esthetic evaluation of dance is related to their perceived physical ability to reproduce the movements they watch. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while evaluating how much they liked and how well they thought they could physically replicate a range of dance movements performed by professional ballet dancers. We used parametric analyses to evaluate brain regions that tracked with degree of liking and perceived physical ability. The findings reveal strongest activation of occipitotemporal and parietal portions of the AON when participants view movements they rate as both esthetically pleasing and difficult to reproduce. As such, these findings begin to illuminate how the embodied simulation account of esthetic experience might apply to watching dance, and provide preliminary evidence as to why some people find enjoyment in an evening at the ballet.

  12. Experiences in automatic keywording of particle physics literature

    CERN Document Server

    Montejo Ráez, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Attributing keywords can assist in the classification and retrieval of documents in the particle physics literature. As information services face a future with less available manpower and more and more documents being written, the possibility of keyword attribution being assisted by automatic classification software is explored. A project being carried out at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics) for the development and integration of automatic keywording is described.

  13. Evaluation of physical and chemical characteristics of xanthan gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Tondo Vendruscolo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at evaluating the physical and chemical characteristics of the xanthan produced by Xanthomonas arboricola pv pruni strain 115, and at comparing it with two xanthans obtained from commercial sources – Kelzan e Roeper. The analyzed xanthans showed specified patterns mentioned in the literature, except for low pyruvic acid content in the xanthan produced by strain 115, low monovalent salt content in the Roeper sample and high divalent salt content in both commercial samples. The low pyruvic acid content in the xanthan produced by X. arboricola pv pruni 115 did not affect the aqueous solution viscosity. Thus, the xanthan produced by strain 115 show physical and chemical characteristics that allow its use by the petroleum industry, as well as, in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics products. Xanthomonas arboricola pv pruni. Xanthan. Physical and chemical characteristics.

  14. Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Argumentation in a Model Rocketry Physics Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Cem; Süzük, Erol

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of argumentation developed by a group of pre-service physics teachers' (PSPT) as an indicator of subject matter knowledge on model rocketry physics. The structure of arguments and scientific credibility model was used as a design framework in the study. The inquiry of model rocketry physics was employed in…

  15. The impact and applicability of critical experiment evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    This paper very briefly describes a project to evaluate previously performed critical experiments. The evaluation is intended for use by criticality safety engineers to verify calculations, and may also be used to identify data which need further investigation. The evaluation process is briefly outlined; the accepted benchmark critical experiments will be used as a standard for verification and validation. The end result of the project will be a comprehensive reference document.

  16. Inequality in Experiences of Physics Education: Secondary School Girls' and Boys' Perceptions of their Physics Education and Intentions to Continue with Physics After the Age of 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Tamjid; Reiss, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper explores the factors that are associated in England with 15-year-old students' intentions to study physics after the age of 16, when it is no longer compulsory. Survey responses were collated from 5,034 year 10 students as learners of physics during the academic year 2008-2009 from 137 England secondary schools. Our analysis uses individual items from the survey rather than constructs (aggregates of items) to explore what it is about physics teachers, physics lessons and physics itself that is most correlated with intended participation in physics after the age of 16. Our findings indicate that extrinsic material gain motivation in physics was the most important factor associated with intended participation. In addition, an item-level analysis helped to uncover issues around gender inequality in physics educational experiences which were masked by the use of construct-based analyses. Girls' perceptions of their physics teachers were similar to those of boys on many fronts. However, despite the encouragement individual students receive from their teachers being a key factor associated with aspirations to continue with physics, girls were statistically significantly less likely to receive such encouragement. We also found that girls had less positive experiences of their physics lessons and physics education than did boys.

  17. Physical and mechanical restraint in psychiatric units: Perceptions and experiences of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; da Silva, Danielle Maria; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Giacon, Bianca Cristina Ciccone; Zanetti, Ana Carolina Guidorizzi; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Borges, Tatiana Longo

    2018-06-01

    Physical restraint in psychiatric units is a common practice but extremely controversial and poorly evaluated by methodologically appropriate investigations. The cultural issues and professionals' perceptions and attitudes are substantial contributors to the frequency of restraint that tend to be elevated. Aim In this qualitative study, we aimed to understand the experiences and perceptions of nursing staff regarding physical restraint in psychiatric units. Through theoretical sampling, 29 nurses from two Brazilian psychiatric units participated in the study. Data were collected from 2014 to 2016 from individual interviews and analyzed through thematic analysis, employing theoretical presuppositions of symbolic interactionism. Physical restraint was considered unpleasant, challenging, risky, and associated with dilemmas and conflicts. The nursing staff was often exposed to the risks and injuries related to restraint. Professionals sought strategies to reduce restraint-related damages, but still considered it necessary due to the lack of effective options to control aggressive behavior. This study provides additional perspectives about physical restraint and reveals the need for safer, humanized and appropriate methods for the care of aggressive patients that consider the real needs and rights of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Debra K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI. It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control. Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control, which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity.

  19. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  20. Physical security system effectiveness evaluation, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, J.L. Jr.; Nickell, W.C.

    1975-07-01

    A method to permit objective comparisons of physical security is under development and is expected to be useful in the optimization of system design and in cost benefit analysis. The procedure involves identifying the possible or potential characteristics of a postulated adversary, the countermeasures to deny or diminish adversary success, and the response capabilities of the defender. These, in conjunction with system definition information, are evaluated by the use of analytical models which provide a means of ranking systems against threats. This paper describes the status of this effort and includes an overview of the methodology with a brief description of various models being considered for use in effectiveness evaluation. (U.S.)

  1. Tabletop exercise as a tool of evaluating physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Reina

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of designed and implemented physical protection system (PPS) is essential for ensuring the effectiveness of PPS. In Japan, nuclear facility operators, which are required to assess performance of PPS, have conducted performance test of PPS element and periodical trainings as well as annual PPS exercise with relevant agencies. In addition to these practical or field efforts, non-field tool for evaluating PPS effectiveness such as tabletop exercise (TTX) can be utilized as it is applied in the USA and other countries. This paper discusses the potential advantage of TTX as an evaluation tool of PPS effectiveness, looking at the characterizations of TTX in comparison to field evaluations, and potential cases where operator would get benefit from TTX especially. (author)

  2. United States Army physical readiness training: rationale and evaluation of the physical training doctrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Rieger, William; Palkoska, Frank; Van Camp, Steven; Darakjy, Salima

    2009-07-01

    This paper reviews the rationale and evaluations of Physical Readiness Training (PRT), the new U.S. Army physical training doctrine designed to improve soldiers' physical capability for military operations. The purposes of PRT are to improve physical fitness, prevent injuries, progressively train soldiers, and develop soldiers' self-confidence and discipline. The PRT follows the principles of progressive overload, regularity, specificity, precision, variety, and balance. Specificity was achieved by examining the standard list of military (warrior) tasks and determining 1) the physical requirements, 2) the fitness components involved, and 3) the training activities that most likely could improve the military tasks. Injury-prevention features include reduced running mileage, exercise variety (cross-training), and gradual, progressive training. In 3 military field studies, the overall adjusted risk of injury was 1.5-1.8 times higher in groups of soldiers performing traditional military physical training programs when compared with groups using a PRT program. Scores on the Army Physical Fitness Test were similar or higher in groups using PRT programs. In an 8-week laboratory study comparing PRT with a weightlifting/running program, both programs resulted in major improvements in militarily relevant tasks (e.g., 3.2-km walk/run with 32-kg load, 400-m run with 18-kg load, 5- to 30-second rushes to and from prone position, 80-kg casualty drag, obstacle course). When compared with traditional military physical training programs, PRT consistently resulted in fewer injuries and in equal or greater improvements in fitness and military task performance.

  3. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Evaluate Current Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marszalek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of ecological momentary assessment in evaluating physical activity among children, adolescents, and adults. It also determines whether ecological momentary assessment fulfills the criteria of validity, reliability, objectivity, norms, and standardization applied to the tools used for the evaluation of physical activity. Methods. The EBSCO-CINHAL, Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, and SPORTDiscuss databases were reviewed in December 2012 for articles associated with EMA. Results. Of the 20 articles examined, half (10 used electronic methods for data collection, although various methods were used, ranging from pen and paper to smartphone applications. Ten studies used objective monitoring equipment. Nineteen studies were performed over 4 days. While the validity of the EMA method was discussed in 18 studies, only four found it to be objective. In all cases, the EMA procedures were precisely documented and confirmed to be feasible. Conclusions. Ecological momentary assessment is a valid, reliable, and feasible approach to evaluate activity and sedentary behavior. Researchers should be aware that while ecological momentary assessment offers many benefits, it simultaneously imposes many limitations which should be considered when studying physical activity.

  4. Computations, Complexity, Experiments, and the World Outside Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadanoff, L.P

    2009-01-01

    Computer Models in the Sciences and Social Sciences. 1. Simulation and Prediction in Complex Systems: the Good the Bad and the Awful. This lecture deals with the history of large-scale computer modeling mostly in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's sponsorship of modeling for weapons development and innovation in energy sources. 2. Complexity: Making a Splash-Breaking a Neck - The Making of Complexity in Physical System. For ages thinkers have been asking how complexity arise. The laws of physics are very simple. How come we are so complex? This lecture tries to approach this question by asking how complexity arises in physical fluids. 3. Forrester, et. al. Social and Biological Model-Making The partial collapse of the world's economy has raised the question of whether we could improve the performance of economic and social systems by a major effort on creating understanding via large-scale computer models. (author)

  5. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  6. Meaningful Experiences in Physical Education and Youth Sport: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beni, Stephanie; Fletcher, Tim; Ní Chróinín, Déirdre

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to review the literature about young people's meaningful experiences in physical education and youth sport. We reviewed 50 empirical peer-reviewed articles published in English since 1987. Five themes were identified as central influences to young people's meaningful experiences in physical education and sport:…

  7. Guided-Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry: The POGIL-PCL Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Sally S.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of process-oriented, guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. The inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments being developed emphasize modeling of chemical phenomena. In each experiment, students work through at least…

  8. Fostering Inclusion and Positive Physical Education Experiences for Overweight and Obese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Paul B.; Doolittle, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obese students are often socially and instructionally excluded from physical education and school physical activity opportunities. This article describes teaching strategies from a study of middle school physical education teachers who are committed to providing effective teaching and positive experiences for overweight and obese…

  9. Should I Take Further Mathematics? Physics Undergraduates' Experiences of Post-Compulsory Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Jessica; Darlington, Ellie

    2017-01-01

    It is essential that physics undergraduates are appropriately prepared for the mathematical demands of their course. This study investigated physics students' perceptions of post-compulsory mathematics as preparation for their degree course. 494 physics undergraduates responded to an online questionnaire about their experiences of A-level…

  10. Physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences in patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, Lene; Moeller, Marianne K; Vestergaard, Claus H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low physical activity is strongly correlated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and poor physical health. Although the prevalence of MetS is high in patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES), little is still known about the level of and possible barriers for physical activity in FES....... AIM: The purpose of the study was to compare physical activity in patients with FES with healthy controls; to investigate changes in physical activity over 1 year of follow-up; and to explore the correlations of physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences reported by patients with FES. METHODS......: Both physical activity and aerobic fitness were measured. Anomalous bodily experiences were measured by selected items from the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience and The Body Awareness Scale. Psychopathological data comprising negative and positive symptoms and data on psychotropic medication...

  11. Comparing Physics Textbooks in Terms of Assessment and Evaluation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Başkan Takaoğlu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessment and evaluation instruments provide teachers the opportunity of shaping education in the beginning, contributing to education during the process and evaluating education at the end of the process. Textbooks, on the other hand, are resources that present the aforementioned contributions to teachers at first hand. Thus, the study aims to compare the distribution of assessment and evaluation instruments in the physics textbooks being used in the academic year of 2011- 2012 and 2016-2017 according to units, settlement within units and types of assessment instruments that are used. For that purpose, 9, 10, 11 and 12th grade textbooks being used in physics lessons in the academic year of 2011-2012 and 2016-2017 were examined via document analysis method. As a result of the study, it was determined that the highest number of assessment instruments in physics textbooks from two different years was encountered in the unit of force and motion. The reason for this unit having higher number of questions could be associated with higher number of mathematical operations in the unit intended for allowing students to overcome their mathematical deficiencies by practicing such questions. It was observed that the number of questions was increased especially in the books being used in the academic year of 2016-2017 and alternative assessment instruments were fewer than traditional assessment instruments. Traditional assessment instruments are still used very frequently in the textbooks, which proves the effect of traditional approaches in assessment and evaluation. Another reason for this condition is that a result-oriented evaluation is used in the university entrance exam. In the light of these results, it is suggested to make the university exam student-centered rather than making an arrangement in textbooks.

  12. Fit for purpose? Evaluation of an MSc. in Medical Physics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    van der Putten, W J

    2014-05-01

    The National University of Ireland in Galway established a Master in Science (MSc.) program in medical physics in 2002. The course was designed to be 90 ECTS(1) credits and of one calendar year duration. From the outset the MSc. was designed to be part of an overall medical physics training program. MSc. programs are now widely used as part of the training and education of medical physicists. There is however paucity of data on the effectiveness of such courses and the purpose of the study reported here is to provide information on one particular MSc. course in medical physics. This is relevant to medical physicists who are involved in the development and running of medical physics training programs. The study used as methodology the Kirkpatrick levels of professional training. It was conducted through an online survey, both from students who graduated from the course and from students who were in the process of completing the course. The survey proved to be an effective way to determine attributes of modules such as learning outcomes, knowledge imparted, quality of teaching materials and others. The survey proved to be remarkably able to demonstrate interventions in the individual course modules. Although the course was shown to be effective in the imparting of the knowledge required to become a qualified medical physicist several areas for improvement were identified. These are mainly in the areas of increased practical experience and in course delivery.

  13. The CMS experiment puts physics onto the menu

    CERN Document Server

    Leonidopoulos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    CMS has addressed the challenge of identifying in real time different kinds of 
physics at the LHC – from the "bread and butter" of Standard Model processes to 
signals of new particles – with triggers served up according to a carefully designed menu.

  14. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  15. The physics of magnetic confinement configurations : Tokamak theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Several aspects, both theoretical and experimental, in plasma physics are discussed. The problem of magnetic confinement in Tokamak devices is treated. A discussion on the history of the development and on the future problems to be solved in Tokamaks is made. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Can there be Physics without Experiments? Challenges and Pittfalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    2001-01-01

    Physicists investigating space, time and matter at the Planck scale will probably have to work with much less guidance from experimental input than has ever happened before in the history of Physics. This may imply that we should insist on much higher demands of logical and mathematical rigour

  17. Elementary Physical Education Teachers' Experiences in Teaching English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe and explain the views on teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) held by six elementary physical education (PE) teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. Situated in positioning theory, the research approach was descriptive-qualitative. The primary sources of data were face-to-face…

  18. Strange hadronic physics in electroproduction experiments at the Mainz Microtron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Achenbach, P.; Esser, A.; Gayoso, C. A.; Böhm, R.; Borodina, O.; Bosnar, D.; Bozkurt, V.; Bydžovský, Petr; Debenjak, L.; Distler, M. O.; Friscic, I.; Fujii, Y.; Gogami, T.; Gomez, M.R.; Hashimoto, O.; Hirose, S.; Kim, E.; Margaryan, A.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rappold, C.; Reinhold, J.; Saito, T.; Lorente, A.S.; Majos, S. S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Sirca, S.; Tang, L.; Thiel, M.; Tsukada, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 881, 5/6 (2012), s. 187-198 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG11005 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : strangeness reactions * Kaon electroproduction * missing mass spectroscopy * hypernuclei * decay-pion spectroscopy Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.525, year: 2012

  19. Stern-Gerlach Experiments and Complex Numbers in Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    It is often stated that complex numbers are essential in quantum theory. In this article, the need for complex numbers in quantum theory is motivated using the results of tandem Stern-Gerlach experiments

  20. Interpretation of laboratory experiments of interest to space physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, L.P.

    1976-06-01

    The merits and limitations of experiments designed for studies of: 1) solar wind interaction with magnetospheres (terrella experiments) and non-magnetized bodies, 2) neutral lines and sheets, 3) wave-particle interactions, 4) anomalous resistivity, 5) double layers, 6) magnetically field-aligned electric fields in strong magnetic mirrors, and 7) the critical ionization velocity of a plasma moving through natural gas, are discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Physics Accomplishments and Future Prospects of the BES Experiments at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Roy A.; Harris, Frederick A.; Mitchell, Ryan E.

    2016-10-01

    The cornerstone of the Chinese experimental particle physics program is a series of experiments performed in the τ-charm energy region. China began building e+e- colliders at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Beijing more than three decades ago. Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BES) is the common root name for the particle physics detectors operated at these machines. We summarize the development of the BES program and highlight the physics results across several topical areas.

  2. Simple material physics experiment for studying phase diagrams and solid state transformations in alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, S; Kamal, R [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-09-01

    Study of phase diagram and accompanying solid state transformations is essential to determine the best possible composition, manufacturing techniques and physical properties of an alloy. A simple technique having wide applications in metallurgical industry is to study the temperature--time curve of the alloy undergoing cooling with an uniform rate. An experiment which uses this technique is described. It is widely applicable in the fields of materials science, applied solid state physics, physical metallurgy and physical chemistry.

  3. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Gail G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland, is now the highest energy accelerator in the world, colliding protons with protons. On July 4, 2012, the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, announced the observation of a particle consistent with the world’s most sought-after particle, the Higgs boson, at a mass of about 125 GeV (approximately 125 times the mass of the proton). The Higgs boson is the final missing ingredient of the standard model, in which it is needed to allow most other particles to acquire mass through the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. We are members of the team in the CMS experiment that found evidence for the Higgs boson through its decay to two photons, the most sensitive channel at the LHC. We are proposing to carry out studies to determine whether the new particle has the properties expected for the standard model Higgs boson or whether it is something else. The new particle can still carry out its role in electroweak symmetry breaking but have other properties as well. Most theorists think that a single standard model Higgs boson cannot be the complete solution – there are other particles needed to answer some of the remaining questions, such as the hierarchy problem. The particle that has been observed could be one of several Higgs bosons, for example, or it could be composite. One model of physics beyond the standard model is supersymmetry, in which every ordinary particle has a superpartner with opposite spin properties. In supersymmetric models, there must be at least five Higgs bosons. In the most popular versions of supersymmetry, the lightest supersymmetric particle does not decay and is a candidate for dark matter. This proposal covers the period from June 1, 2013, to March 31, 2016. During this period the LHC will finally reach its design energy, almost twice the energy at which it now runs. We will

  4. Evaluation of physical-protection elements for interior applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Considerable emphasis has been given in recent years to the threat of sabotage by an insider at nuclear facilities. This threat is inherently different from the outsider threat of theft or sabotage because of the insiders' unique knowledge and access to vital material and equipment. Thus, special safeguards elements are needed in order to counter the insider threat. In addition, insider physical protection system elements must be compatible with the operations, safety, and maintenance programs at the facility. To help identify elements which meet these needs, field evaluations were performed on an interior access control system, piping sensors, interior video motion detectors, and valve monitoring devices. These elements were tested in a realistic operating environment and both technical and operational evaluation data were obtained. Safeguards element descriptions and the results of the operational tests and evaluations are outlined

  5. Evaluation methodology for fixed-site physical protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, H.A.; Olascoaga, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    A system performance evaluation methodology has been developed to aid the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the implementation of new regulations designed to upgrade the physical protection of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The evaluation methodology, called Safeguards Upgrade Rule Evaluation (SURE), provides a means of explicitly incorporating measures for highly important and often difficult to quantify performance factors, e.g., installation, maintenance, training and proficiency levels, compatibility of components in subsystems, etc. This is achieved by aggregating responses to component and system questionaires through successive levels of a functional hierarchy developed for each primary performance capability specified in the regulations, 10 CFR 73.45. An overall measure of performance for each capability is the result of this aggregation process. This paper provides a descripton of SURE

  6. Atomic cluster physics: new challenges for theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, Frankfurt am Main 60438 (Germany); Solov' yov, Andrey [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, Frankfurt am Main 60438 (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    A brief introduction to atomic cluster physics, the inter-disciplinary field, which developed fairly successfully during last years, is presented. A review of recent achievements in the detailed ab initio description of structure and properties of atomic clusters and complex molecules is given. The main trends of development in the field are discussed and some of its new focuses are outlined. Particular attention is devoted to the role of quantum and many-body phenomena in the formation of complex multi-atomic systems and the methods of theoretical investigation of their specific properties. The role of the simplified model approaches accurately developed from the fundamental physical principles is stressed. Various illustrations are made for sodium, magnesium clusters, fullerenes and clusters of noble gas atoms.

  7. Experience and use of ultrasound scan for fetal evaluation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experience and use of ultrasound scan for fetal evaluation among obstetricians in an African population. ... Annals of Biomedical Sciences ... scan held in May 2014 at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital were recruited for the study.

  8. The construction and experience of ability in physical education

    OpenAIRE

    Croston, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. This thesis explores how notions of ability are socially constructed, defined and experienced within physical education (PE). Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts are used to examine the processes through an acknowledgement and consideration of the culture where pupils’ and teachers’ notions of ability are configured, reconfigured, and experienced. The study covered one academic school year in a North ...

  9. Top quark physics at the D0 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinson, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper I present the latest results on top quark physics from the D0 collaboration since the discovery of the top quark in March 1995. I summarize the discovery results, discuss progress since the discovery, and show how we can measure the top quark mass using three separate techniques. The measurements were made at the Fermilab Tevatron, a p bar p collider with √s = TeV, using ∼50 pb -1 data collected from 1992 to early 1995

  10. A data base for reactor physics experiments at KUCA, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Chihiro; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Fujine, Shigenori; Wakamatsu, Susumu.

    1986-01-01

    A data base of the experiment done at the Critical Assembly of Kyoto University(KUCA) was constructed both on personal computers and a main frame. A retrieval data base based on each experiment serve as the key data base. The critical experiment data, geometries of the core configuration or fuel elements, and the various numeric data are referred after the results of the retrieval. The personal computer program for this data base is made using BASIC language and the whole system consist of the retrieval data base and the graphic data. The construction of the critical experiment data is now in progress. The data base system can be supplied to the KUCA users with floppy disks. A universal information retrieval system, FAIRS is prepared at the Data Processing Center Kyoto University. By using this system, the retrieval data base of the experiment was constructed. The image information such as core configuration and fuel elements are stored by using ELF system which can be linked to the FAIRS. The data base on FAIRS can be referred from each university through an online network. However, ELF is a closed service within Kyoto University at present. (author)

  11. Thermal-hydraulic Experiments for Advanced Physical Model Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chulhwa

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of prediction models is needed to enhance the safety analysis capability through experimental database of local phenomena. To improve the two-phase interfacial area transport model, the various experiments were carried out with local two-phase interfacial structure test facilities. 2 Χ 2 and 6 Χ 6 rod bundle test facilities were used for the experiment on the droplet behavior. The experiments on the droplet behavior inside a heated rod bundle geometry. The experiments used GIRLS and JICO and CFD analysis were carried out to comprehend the local condensation of steam jet, turbulent jet induced by condensation and the thermal mixing in a pool. In order to develop a model for key phenomena of newly adapted safety system, experiments for boiling inside a pool and condensation in horizontal channel have been performed. An experimental database of the CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and PDO (Post-dryout) was constructed. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement by surface modifications in nano-fluid was investigated in boiling mode and rapid quenching mode. The special measurement techniques were developed. They are Double-sensor optical void probe, Optic Rod, PIV technique and UBIM system

  12. Evaluating the SAMT English Textbook for BSc Students of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Sajjadi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available English for Academic Purposes (EAP and English for Specific Purposes (ESP are developing branches of English as a Foreign Language (EFL instruction in Iran. These branches have a marginal status in the tertiary education, and the Ministry of Science, Research, and Technology’s high commission offers no clear guidance for selecting and developing basic academic instructional materials related to the linguistic or communicative standards expected by teachers (Mazdayasna & Tahririan, 2008. This paper tries to evaluate an ESP textbook written for BSc students of physics entitled, ‘English for the students of physics’, which is prepared by the Center for Studying and Compiling University Books in Humanities (SAMT. The present research was based on qualitative and quantitative research techniques and included two steps. First, internal, external and overall evaluation of the book was carried out based on McDonough & Shaw (1993 model. While conducting the external evaluation of the book, the intended audience, the proficiency level, the context of use, the language, the author's views on language and methodology, the inclusion of a vocabulary list/index, visual features, and the cultural aspects were examined. The internal evaluation included the presentation of the skills, grading and sequencing, discourse skills, listening section, the representation of different learning styles. And in overall evaluation, general suitability of the textbook was assessed. In the second step, six teachers each responded to a 22-item textbook evaluation questionnaire to express their perceptions concerning various aspects of the textbooks. The results revealed the extent of appropriateness of the textbook used by BSc students of physics. Suggestions are offered for the future revision and/or designing the textbooks.

  13. Applications of closed cycle refrigerator for some physical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simkin, V.G.; Pokotilovski, Yu.N.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: It is known that CCRs give a good possibility to conduct various experiments in a wide range of temperatures from 2.5 K up to 500 deg. C. These do not need nor liquid helium, nor liquid nitrogen and create a quick, precise and stable conditions for researchers. Some applications of such CCRs from Lake Shore corporation will be consider ed in this communication. The first one is a measurement of temperature dependence of the viscosity by drop-falling method of some special liquids which can be used in ultra cold neutron investigations. The second one is an experiment for receiving the perfect solid crystals of methane which are need in producing ultra cold neutrons in medium power reactors. For these experiments some special arrangements were installed on the cold head of refrigerator with long vertical or small round windows on the screens through which the processes studied were visually observed and measured. (authors)

  14. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  15. Recent top physics results from the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Oleg [Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.

    2012-09-01

    We review recent measurements of the properties of the top quark by the D0 experiment: the decay width of the top quark, the CKM matrix element $V_{tb}$, the helicity of the $W$ boson, anomalous couplings at the $Wtb$ vertex, violation of invariance under Lorentz transformations, and the asymmetry of $\\ttbar$ production due to the strong colour charge. The measurements are performed using data samples of up to 5.4 \\fb\\ acquired by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt s=1.96 \\TeV$.

  16. Open-source sensors system for doing simple physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Llamas Bello

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An open-source platform to be used in high school or university laboratories has been developed. The platform permits the performance of dynamics experiments in a simple and affordable way, combining measurements of different sensors in the platform. The sensors are controlled by an Arduino microcontroller, which can be wirelessly accessed with smartphones or tablets. The platform constitutes an economical sensing alternative to commercial configurations and can easily be extended by including new sensors that broaden the range of covered experiments.

  17. The physical activity scale for individuals with physical disabilities: development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Richard A; Zhu, Weimo; McAuley, Edward; Frogley, Michael; Figoni, Stephen F

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate the construct validity of a new 13-item physical activity survey designed to assess physical activity in individuals with physical disabilities. Mail survey requesting information on physical activity, basic demographic characteristics, self-rated health, and self-rated physical activity. In February 2000, surveys were sent to 1176 individuals who had used rehabilitative services at a major midwestern university between 1950 and 1999. Two hundred twenty-seven men and 145 women with disabilities responded to the mail survey (80%, spinal cord or other locomotor injuries; 13%, visual and auditory injuries; 7%, other; 92%, white; mean age +/- standard deviation, 49.8 +/- 12.9y; mean length of disability, 36.9 +/- 14.9y). Not applicable. Physical activity was assessed with the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD). The PASIPD requests the number of days a week and hours daily (categories) of participation in recreational, household, and occupational activities over the past 7 days. Total scores were calculated as the average hours daily times a metabolic equivalent value and summed over items. Pearson correlations between each survey item and the total PASIPD score were all statistically significant (P or= .20 (range, .20- .67). Factor analysis with principal component extraction and varimax orthogonal rotations revealed 5 latent factors (eigenvalues >or= 1, factor loadings >or= .40): home repair and lawn and garden, housework, vigorous sport and recreation, light sport and recreation, and occupation and transportation. These 5 factors accounted for 63% of the total variance. Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from.37 to.65, indicating low-to-moderate internal consistency within factors. Those who reported being "active/highly active" had higher total and subcategory scores compared with those "not active at all." Those in "excellent" health had higher total, vigorous sport and recreation, and occupation and

  18. Ultrasonic evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of granites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, G; Lourenço, P B; Alves, C A S; Pamplona, J

    2008-09-01

    Masonry is the oldest building material that survived until today, being used all over the world and being present in the most impressive historical structures as an evidence of spirit of enterprise of ancient cultures. Conservation, rehabilitation and strengthening of the built heritage and protection of human lives are clear demands of modern societies. In this process, the use of nondestructive methods has become much common in the diagnosis of structural integrity of masonry elements. With respect to the evaluation of the stone condition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity is a simple and economical tool. Thus, the central issue of the present paper concerns the evaluation of the suitability of the ultrasonic pulse velocity method for describing the mechanical and physical properties of granites (range size between 0.1-4.0 mm and 0.3-16.5 mm) and for the assessment of its weathering state. The mechanical properties encompass the compressive and tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, and the physical properties include the density and porosity. For this purpose, measurements of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulse velocity with distinct natural frequency of the transducers were carried out on specimens with different size and shape. A discussion of the factors that induce variations on the ultrasonic velocity is also provided. Additionally, statistical correlations between ultrasonic pulse velocity and mechanical and physical properties of granites are presented and discussed. The major output of the work is the confirmation that ultrasonic pulse velocity can be effectively used as a simple and economical nondestructive method for a preliminary prediction of mechanical and physical properties, as well as a tool for the assessment of the weathering changes of granites that occur during the serviceable life. This is of much interest due to the usual difficulties in removing specimens for mechanical characterization.

  19. Development of Thermal Radiation Experiments Kit Based on Data Logger for Physics Learning Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, H.; Iswanto, B. H.

    2018-04-01

    Thermal Radiation Experiments Kit (TREK) based on data logger for physics learning media was developed. TREK will be used as a learning medium on the subject of Temperature and Heat to explain the concept of emissivity of a material in grade XI so that it can add variations of experiments which are commonly done such as thermal expansion, transfer of thermal energy (conduction, convection, and radiation), and specific heat capacity. DHT11 sensor is used to measure temperature and microcontroller Arduino-uno used as data logger. The object tested are in the form of coated glass thin films and aluminum with different colors. TREK comes with a user manual and student worksheet (LKS) to make it easier for teachers and students to use. TREK was developed using the ADDIE Development Model (Analyze, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation). And validated by experts, physics teachers, and students. Validation instrument is a questionnaire with a five-item Likert response scale with reviewed aspect coverage: appropriate content and concepts, design, and user friendly. The results showed that TREK was excellent (experts 88.13%, science teachers 95.68%, and students 85.77%).

  20. Recent heavy flavor physics results from fixed target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, L.

    1991-11-01

    Recent results from fixed target experiments in the field of heavy quark flavors, as published or otherwise disseminated in the last year, are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on distilling the main conclusions from these results. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Recent heavy flavor physics results from fixed target experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, L.

    1991-11-01

    Recent results from fixed target experiments in the field of heavy quark flavors, as published or otherwise disseminated in the last year, are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on distilling the main conclusions from these results. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Complementarity of integral and differential experiments for reactor physics purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Henry.

    1981-04-01

    In this paper, the following topics are studied: uranium 238 effective integral; thermal range uranium 238 capture cross section; Americium 242 m capture cross section. The mentioned examples show that differential and integral experiments are both useful to the reactor physicists

  3. Thermal-hydraulic Experiments for Advanced Physical Model Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Baek, W. P.; Yoon, B. J.

    2010-04-01

    The improvement of prediction models is needed to enhance the safety analysis capability through the fine measurements of local phenomena. To improve the two-phase interfacial area transport model, the various experiments were carried out used SUBO and DOBO. 2x2 and 6x6 rod bundle test facilities were used for the experiment on the droplet behavior. The experiments on the droplet behavior inside a heated rod bundle were focused on the break-up of droplets induced by a spacer grid in a rod bundle geometry. The experiments used GIRLS and JICO and CFD analysis were carried out to comprehend the local condensation of steam jet, turbulent jet induced by condensation and the thermal mixing in a pool. An experimental database of the CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and PDO (Post-dryout) had been constructed. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement by surface modifications in nano-fluid was investigated in boiling mode and rapid quenching mode. The special measurement techniques were developed. They are Double -sensor optical void probe, Optic Rod, PIV technique and UBIM system

  4. Physics perspectives of the ALICE experiment at the large hadron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    masera masera

    ature reached in the collision should well exceed the critical value for the .... nonstatistical fluctuations which are expected to occur at the phase transition. ... the L3 experiment: it generates a weak solenoidal field (B < 0.5 T) over the whole region ... The TOF is made with multi-gap resistive plate chambers with an intrinsic ...

  5. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  6. Accelerator-based atomic physics experiments with photon and ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerator-based atomic physics experiments at Brookhaven presently use heavy-ion beams from the Dual MP Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator Facility for atomic physics experiments of several types. Work is presently in progress to develop experiments which will use the intense photon beams which will be available in the near future from the ultraviolet (uv) and x-ray rings of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Plans are described for experiments at the NSLS and an exciting development in instrumentation for heavy-ion experiments is summarized

  7. Phase Equilibrium, Chemical Equilibrium, and a Test of the Third Law: Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, Walter

    1980-01-01

    Described is an experiment designed to provide an experimental basis for a unifying point of view (utilizing theoretical framework and chemistry laboratory experiments) for physical chemistry students. Three experiments are described: phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and a test of the third law of thermodynamics. (Author/DS)

  8. Experiences in Sport, Physical Activity, and Physical Education Among Christian, Buddhist, and Hindu Asian Adolescent Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, Kaori; Kodani, Iku; Gupta, Nidhi; Gill, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural scholarship in sport and exercise psychology should help us understand and apply cultural competencies for all to be physically active. In the present study, two Asian countries, Japan and Singapore, were chosen. The participation rate for physical activities among adolescent girls tends to be lower than that of boys in both countries. Thus, the purpose of the project was to gain knowledge and understanding about sociocultural factors that may explain adolescent girls' perceptio...

  9. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model

  10. Experimenting with the virtual environment Moodle in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Ines; Dickman, Adriana

    2008-03-01

    The master's program in Physics Education of the Catholic University in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, includes the discipline ``Digital technologies in Physics education.'' The main goal of this discipline is to discuss the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the process of learning-teaching science. We introduce our students to several virtual platforms, both free and commercial, discussing their functionality and features. We encourage our students to get in touch with computer tools and resources by planning their own computer based course using the Moodle platform. We discuss different patterns of virtual environment courses, whose proposals are centered mainly in the students, or teacher-centered or even system-centered. The student is free to choose between only one topic and a year course to work with, since their interests vary from learning something more about a specific subject to a complete e-learning course covering the entire school year. (The courses are available online in the address sitesinf01.pucmg.br/moodle. Participation only requires filling out an application form.) After three editions of this discipline, we have several courses available. We realize that students tend to focus on traditional methods, always preserving their role as knowledge-givers. In conclusion, we can say that, in spite of exhaustive discussion about autonomy involved with ICTs abilities, most of the students used the new virtual medium to organize traditional teacher-centered courses.

  11. The Design and Evaluation of Teaching Experiments in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcheri, Paola; Molfino, Maria Teresa

    1992-01-01

    Describes a relational model that was developed to provide a framework for the design and evaluation of teaching experiments for the introduction of computer science in secondary schools in Italy. Teacher training is discussed, instructional materials are considered, and use of the model for the evaluation process is described. (eight references)…

  12. An evaluation of the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale: A preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene van Wyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The positive organisational behaviour movement emphasises the advantages of psychological strengths in business. The psychological virtues of positive emotional experiences can potentially promote human strengths to the advantages of business functioning and the management of work conditions. This is supported by Fredrickson’s broaden-and-build theory that emphasises the broadening of reactive thought patterns through experiences of positive emotions. Research purpose: A preliminary psychometric evaluation of a positive measurement of dimensions of emotional experiences in the workplace, by rephrasing the Kiefer and Barclay Toxic Emotional Experiences Scale. Motivation for the study: This quantitative Exploratory Factor Analysis investigates the factorial structure and reliability of the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale, a positive rephrased version of the Toxic Emotional Experiences Scale. Research approach, design and method: This Exploratory Factor Analysis indicates an acceptable three-factor model for the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale. These three factors are: (1 psychological recurrent positive state, (2 social connectedness and (3 physical refreshed energy, with strong Cronbach’s alphas of 0.91, 0.91 and 0.94, respectively. Main findings: The three-factor model of the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale provides a valid measure in support of Fredrickson’s theory of social, physical and psychological endured personal resources that build positive emotions. Practical/Managerial implications: Knowledge gained on positive versus negative emotional experiences could be applied by management to promote endured personal resources that strengthen positive emotional experiences. Contribution/value-add: The contribution of this rephrased Positive Emotional Experiences Scale provides a reliable measure of assessment of the social, physical and endured psychological and personal resources identified in Fredrickson

  13. Interfacing detectors and collecting data for large-scale experiments in high energy physics using COTS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, Joern

    2017-01-01

    Data-acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at the European particle-physics research institute CERN are used to record experimental physics data and are essential for the effective operation of an experiment. Located in underground facilities with limited space, power, cooling, and exposed to ionizing radiation and strong magnetic fields, data-acquisition systems have unique requirements and are challenging to design and build. Traditionally, these systems have been composed of custom-designed electronic components to be able to cope with the large data volumes that high-energy physics experiments generate and at the same time meet technological and environmental requirements. Custom-designed electronics is costly to develop,effortful to maintain and typically not very flexible. This thesis explores an alternative architecture for data-acquisition systems based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A COTS-based data distribution device called FELIX that will be integrated in ATLAS is presented. The hardware and software implementation of this device is discussed, with a specific focus on performance, heterogenity of systems and traffic patterns. The COTS-based readout approach is evaluated in the context of the future requirements of the ATLAS experiment. The main contributions of the thesis are an analysis of the ATLAS data-acquisition system with a focus on the readout system, a software architecture for the main application on FELIX hosts, a performance analysis and tuning based on computer science methods for central FELIX software components with respect to the requirements of the ATLAS experiment, a network communication library with a high-level software interface to utilize high-performance computing network technology for the purpose of data-acquisition systems, and an evaluation and discussion of ATLAS data-acquisition using FELIX systems as a case study for COTS-based data-acquisition in high

  14. Interfacing detectors and collecting data for large-scale experiments in high energy physics using COTS technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Joern

    2017-07-01

    Data-acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at the European particle-physics research institute CERN are used to record experimental physics data and are essential for the effective operation of an experiment. Located in underground facilities with limited space, power, cooling, and exposed to ionizing radiation and strong magnetic fields, data-acquisition systems have unique requirements and are challenging to design and build. Traditionally, these systems have been composed of custom-designed electronic components to be able to cope with the large data volumes that high-energy physics experiments generate and at the same time meet technological and environmental requirements. Custom-designed electronics is costly to develop,effortful to maintain and typically not very flexible. This thesis explores an alternative architecture for data-acquisition systems based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A COTS-based data distribution device called FELIX that will be integrated in ATLAS is presented. The hardware and software implementation of this device is discussed, with a specific focus on performance, heterogenity of systems and traffic patterns. The COTS-based readout approach is evaluated in the context of the future requirements of the ATLAS experiment. The main contributions of the thesis are an analysis of the ATLAS data-acquisition system with a focus on the readout system, a software architecture for the main application on FELIX hosts, a performance analysis and tuning based on computer science methods for central FELIX software components with respect to the requirements of the ATLAS experiment, a network communication library with a high-level software interface to utilize high-performance computing network technology for the purpose of data-acquisition systems, and an evaluation and discussion of ATLAS data-acquisition using FELIX systems as a case study for COTS-based data-acquisition in high

  15. Metrics for Performance Evaluation of Patient Exercises during Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, Aleksandar; Ferguson, Jake M; Lee, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The article proposes a set of metrics for evaluation of patient performance in physical therapy exercises. Taxonomy is employed that classifies the metrics into quantitative and qualitative categories, based on the level of abstraction of the captured motion sequences. Further, the quantitative metrics are classified into model-less and model-based metrics, in reference to whether the evaluation employs the raw measurements of patient performed motions, or whether the evaluation is based on a mathematical model of the motions. The reviewed metrics include root-mean square distance, Kullback Leibler divergence, log-likelihood, heuristic consistency, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and similar. The metrics are evaluated for a set of five human motions captured with a Kinect sensor. The metrics can potentially be integrated into a system that employs machine learning for modelling and assessment of the consistency of patient performance in home-based therapy setting. Automated performance evaluation can overcome the inherent subjectivity in human performed therapy assessment, and it can increase the adherence to prescribed therapy plans, and reduce healthcare costs.

  16. Ensembles and Experiments in Classical and Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Arnold

    A philosophically consistent axiomatic approach to classical and quantum mechanics is given. The approach realizes a strong formal implementation of Bohr's correspondence principle. In all instances, classical and quantum concepts are fully parallel: the same general theory has a classical realization and a quantum realization. Extending the ''probability via expectation'' approach of Whittle to noncommuting quantities, this paper defines quantities, ensembles, and experiments as mathematical concepts and shows how to model complementarity, uncertainty, probability, nonlocality and dynamics in these terms. The approach carries no connotation of unlimited repeatability; hence it can be applied to unique systems such as the universe. Consistent experiments provide an elegant solution to the reality problem, confirming the insistence of the orthodox Copenhagen interpretation on that there is nothing but ensembles, while avoiding its elusive reality picture. The weak law of large numbers explains the emergence of classical properties for macroscopic systems.

  17. Simple smoothing technique to reduce data scattering in physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, L

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment involving motorized motion and a method to reduce data scattering from data acquisition. Jitter or minute instrumental vibrations add noise to a detected signal, which often renders small modulations of a graph very difficult to interpret. Here we describe a method to reduce scattering amongst data points from the signal measured by a photodetector that is motorized and scanned in a direction parallel to the plane of a rectangular slit during a computer-controlled diffraction experiment. The smoothing technique is investigated using subsets of many data points from the data acquisition. A limit for the number of data points in a subset is determined from the results based on the trend of the small measured signal to avoid severe changes in the shape of the signal from the averaging procedure. This simple smoothing method can be achieved using any type of spreadsheet software

  18. Main real time software for high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The general problems of organization of software complexes, as well as development of typical algorithms and packages of applied programs for real time systems used in experiments with charged particle accelerators are discussed. It is noted that numerous qualitatively different real time tasks are solved by parallel programming of the processes of data acquisition, equipment control, data exchange with remote terminals, data express processing and accumulation, operator's instruction interpretation, generation and buffering of resulting files for data output and information processing which is realized on the basis of multicomputer system utilization. Further development of software for experiments is associated with improving the algorithms for automatic recognition and analysis of events with complex topology and standardization of applied program packages

  19. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K + beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  20. New results on Higgs boson physics from the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently released several results that shed more light on the nature of the Higgs boson particle and the BEH mechanism. A selection of these Higgs boson results, including some results based on up to 80 fb-1of integrated luminosity collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, will be presented.

  1. Alkali Rydberg states in electromagnetic fields: computational physics meets experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, A.

    2001-11-01

    We study highly excited hydrogen and alkali atoms ('Rydberg states') under the influence of a strong microwave field. As the external frequency is comparable to the highly excited electron's classical Kepler frequency, the external field induces a strong coupling of many different quantum mechanical energy levels and finally leads to the ionization of the outer electron. While periodically driven atomic hydrogen can be seen as a paradigm of quantum chaotic motion in an open (decaying) quantum system, the presence of the non-hydrogenic atomic core - which unavoidably has to be treated quantum mechanically - entails some complications. Indeed, laboratory experiments show clear differences in the ionization dynamics of microwave driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg states. In the first part of this thesis, a machinery is developed that allows for numerical experiments on alkali and hydrogen atoms under precisely identical laboratory conditions. Due to the high density of states in the parameter regime typically explored in laboratory experiments, such simulations are only possible with the most advanced parallel computing facilities, in combination with an efficient parallel implementation of the numerical approach. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the results of the numerical experiment. We identify and describe significant differences and surprising similarities in the ionization dynamics of atomic hydrogen as compared to alkali atoms, and give account of the relevant frequency scales that distinguish hydrogenic from non-hydrogenic ionization behavior. Our results necessitate a reinterpretation of the experimental results so far available, and solve the puzzle of a distinct ionization behavior of periodically driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg atoms - an unresolved question for about one decade. Finally, microwave-driven Rydberg states will be considered as prototypes of open, complex quantum systems that exhibit a complicated temporal decay

  2. Evaluation of a Theory of Instructional Sequences for Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Rainer; Trendel, Georg; Fischer, Hans E.

    2010-05-01

    The background of the study is the theory of basis models of teaching and learning, a comprehensive set of models of learning processes which includes, for example, learning through experience and problem-solving. The combined use of different models of learning processes has not been fully investigated and it is frequently not clear under what circumstances a particular model should be used by teachers. In contrast, the theory under investigation here gives guidelines for choosing a particular model and provides instructional sequences for each model. The aim is to investigate the implementation of the theory applied to physics instruction and to show if possible effects for the students may be attributed to the use of the theory. Therefore, a theory-oriented education programme for 18 physics teachers was developed and implemented in the 2005/06 school year. The main features of the intervention consisted of coaching physics lessons and video analysis according to the theory. The study follows a pre-treatment-post design with non-equivalent control group. Findings of repeated-measures ANOVAs show large effects for teachers' subjective beliefs, large effects for classroom actions, and small to medium effects for student outcomes such as perceived instructional quality and student emotions. The teachers/classes that applied the theory especially well according to video analysis showed the larger effects. The results showed that differentiating between different models of learning processes improves physics instruction. Effects can be followed through to student outcomes. The education programme effect was clearer for classroom actions and students' outcomes than for teachers' beliefs.

  3. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig

  4. Developments in remote participation in plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, B.

    1999-01-01

    Recent growth in the size of plasma experiments and developments in network based software have contributed to a high level of interest in remote participation. Highlights of the recent conferences on this subject, and the ensuing 'white paper' are presented, with demonstrations of various Data Server/Web/Java based remote access techniques. These not only allow AINSE/AFRG users convenient access to H-1NF data from their home laboratory, but are (or soon will be) available to and from many overseas laboratories with similar systems. Many large plasma laboratories predict a large increase in remote access in the next two years. Several demonstrations of remote experiment control have been performed over medium speed networks, and several new experiments are planning on remote access from the beginning. In this paper we consider data access rights and security, access to common documents, and access to processed and raw data. The full version of this document can be viewed on the ANU's H-1NF web page at: http://rsphysse.anu.edu.au/

  5. Physical security system effectiveness evaluation: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, J.L.; Nickell, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    A method to permit objective comparisons of physical security systems is under development and is expected to be useful in the optimization of system design and in cost benefit analysis. The procedure involves identifying the possible or potential characteristics of a postulated adversary, the counter-measures to deny or diminish adversary success and the response capabilities of the defender. These, in conjunction with system definition information, are evaluated by the use of analytical models which provide a menas of ranking systems against threats. The status of this effort and an overview of the methodology with a brief description of various models being considered for use in effective evaluation are discussed. (U.S.)

  6. Waiting for physics? An inquiry into first year physics students’ experience of a traditionel science curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Bjørn Friis; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    Studies of attrition in science education show that students who leave are often extrinsically motivated, whereas students who stay are often intrinsically motivated. Furthermore, students (in Scandinavia) tend to use an introvert discourse when explaining their motives for leaving. A longitudinal...... study of 26 first year students of physics, who were interviewed on two to seven occasions over a year, show that even the intrinsically motivated students struggle with their studies. They experience a pressure for using a surface approach to studying, which they find inappropriate. Although students...... use an introspective discourse, analysis of interviews show that they experience a conflict between their intrinsic interest in physics and the curriculum. This can be interpreted as a problem with the didactical transposition; the ‘physics taught’ is too distant from ‘research physics’....

  7. Tensor polarized deuteron targets for intermediate energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Schilling, E.

    1985-03-01

    At intermediate energies measurements from a tensor polarized deuteron target are being prepared for the following reactions: the photodisintegration of the deuteron, the elastic pion-deuteron scattering and the elastic electron-deuteron scattering. The experimental situation of the polarization experiments for these reactions is briefly discussed in section 2. In section 3 the definitions of the deuteron polarization and the possibilities to determine the vector and tensor polarization are given. Present tensor polarization values and further improvements in this field are reported in section 4. (orig.)

  8. A multiprocessor system for experiments in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudold, M.

    1986-12-01

    In the first part of this report, a provisional version of the data acquisition system for the magnetic spectrometer LITTLE JOHN at the Karlsruhe isochronous cyclotron is described. The conceptual ideas of this first version and the problems appearing during the test of its hardware and software components are discussed. Basing on the experience with this system possible extensions and new busstructures are suggested. In the second part, some prototype programs are described, which have been developed in order to test the ADC-systems and the dataways. (orig.) [de

  9. Hypernuclear physics studies of the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Lorente, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Hypernuclear research will be one of the main topics addressed by the PANDA experiment at the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR at Darmstadt (Germany). http://www. gsi.de, http://www.gsi.de/fair/. Thanks to the use of stored overline {p} beams, copious production of double Λ hypernuclei is expected at the PANDA experiment, which will enable high precision γ spectroscopy of such nuclei for the first time, and consequently a unique chance to explore the hyperon-hyperon interaction. In particular, ambiguities of past experiments in determining the strength of the ΛΛ interaction will be avoided thanks to the excellent energy precision of a few keV (FWHM) achieved by germanium detectors. Such a resolution capability is particularly needed to resolve the small energy spacing of the order of (10-100) keV, which is characteristic from the spin doublet in hypernuclei the so -called "hypernuclear fine structure". In comparison to previous experiments, PANDA will benefit from a novel technique to assign the various observable γ-transitions in a unique way to specific double hypernuclei by exploring various light targets. Nevertheless, the ability to carry out unique assignments requires a devoted hypernuclear detector setup. This consists of a primary nuclear target for the production of {Ξ }-+overline {Ξ } pairs, a secondary active target for the hypernuclei formation and the identification of associated decay products and a germanium array detector to perform γ spectroscopy. Moreover, one of the most challenging issues of this project is the fact that all detector systems need to operate in the presence of a high magnetic field and a large hadronic background. Accordingly, the need of an innovative detector concept will require dramatic improvements to fulfil these conditions and that will likely lead to a new generation of detectors. In the present talk details concerning the current status of the activities related to the detector developments

  10. Unraveling Gender Bias from Student Evaluations of their High School Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Tai, Robert; Sadler, Philip

    2009-05-01

    In this talk, the evaluation of high school physics, chemistry, and biology teachers by their students is examined according to the gender of the student and the gender of the teacher. Female teachers are rated significantly lower than male teachers by male students in all three disciplines, while female students under-rate female teachers only in physics. Interestingly, physics is also the field that suffers the greatest lack of females and has been criticized most for its androcentric culture. The gender bias in teacher ratings persists even after accounting for academic performance, classroom experiences, and family support. Further, male and female teachers in each discipline appear equally effective at preparing their students for future science study in college, suggesting that students have a discipline-specific gender bias. Such a bias may negatively impact female students and contribute to the loss of females in STEM fields.

  11. Neutrino physics with the SHiP experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)759942

    2015-01-01

    Despite the Standard Model (SM) has been strongly confirmed by the Higgs discovery, several experimental facts are still not explained. The SHiP experiment (Search for Hidden Particles), a beam dump experiment at CERN, aims at the observation of long lived particles very weakly coupled with ordinary matter. These particles of the GeV mass scale, foreseen in many extensions of the SM, might come from the decay of charmed hadrons produced in the collision of a 400 GeV proton beam on a target. High rates of all the three active neutrinos are also expected. For the first time the properties and the cross section of the ντ will be studied thanks to a detector based on nuclear emulsions, with the micrometric resolution needed to identify the tau lepton produced in neutrino interactions. Measuring the charge of the tau daughters, will enable the first observation of the ν ̄τ and the study of its cross section.

  12. Physics operating experience and fuel management of RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakra, A.N.; Purandare, H.D.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 achieved criticality on August 11, 1972. Thereafter the reactor was brought to power, in November, 1972. Due to non-availability of the depleted fuel, the loading of which was necessary to obtain full power to begin with, the core was loaded with all natural uranium fuel and only 70% of the full power could be achieved. During the reactor operation for the last three years, the reactor has seen more than one effective full power year and about 1400 fresh fuel bundles have been loaded in the core. The reactor was subjected to about 150 power cycles resulting in more than 30% variation in operating power level and about 10 fuel bundles have failed. For satisfactory fuel management and refuelling decisions, a three dimensional simulator TRIVENI was developed. This was extensively tested during the start-up experiments and was found to be a satisfactory tool for day to day operation of the plant. In this paper, a brief account of analysis of the start-up experiments, approach to full power, power distortions and flux peaking, fuel management service and analysis of the failed fuel data has been given. (author)

  13. Use of NMAC for the Evaluation of Physical Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Ho Sik; Koh, Moon Sung; Seo, Hyoung Min; Kim, Jae San [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    At the facility level, an NMAC system can help to deter and detect the unauthorized removal of nuclear material by maintaining an accurate inventory, including information related to its location. An effective NMAC system can detect insider activities and assess any irregularity involving nuclear material. Therefore, an NMAC can be a useful tool for evaluating a physical protection system at nuclear facility. In this study, elements of an NMAC system at the facility level were identified based on a draft document prepared by the IAEA. An evaluation sheet on the NMAC system was also developed by analyzing these elements. The NMAC system has been used as an important measure in safeguards. The system is useful in detecting and preventing insiders from acquiring nuclear material. Many countries are considering adopting the NMAC system for their own nuclear security. The IAEA has also recognized the importance of the NMAC system for strengthening the nuclear security regime. The Agency is preparing to publish a document on the use of the NMAC for nuclear security as implementation guide. The NMAC system consists of several elements such as management, nuclear material control, nuclear material movement and PIT. Those elements can be used as attributes for evaluating the NMAC system at a nuclear facility. In this study, all the elements comprising the NMAC system were extracted and major elements that were seen as significant for evaluating the system were selected. In addition, questionnaires on each selected element were developed. These questionnaires reflected the underlying purpose of the NMAC system for nuclear security.

  14. Experiences of postdocs and principal investigators in physics education research postdoc hiring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis V. Knaub

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Postdoc positions, intended to be advanced or continued research training in a field, are a part of the physics education research (PER enterprise yet little is known about them. PER postdocs differ from their traditional physics counterparts in that they may have different education and research experiences. This study examined the types of postdoc positions available as well as what hiring is like. To determine the types of postdoc positions available, we used the advertisements posted in PERJobs blog. To learn more about hiring practices, interviews were conducted with both principal investigators (PIs and current and former postdocs. Results show that many PER postdoc positions have been available since 2008, with many of these advertisements indicating that the PI will consider hiring someone with a physics or a PER or science, technology, engineering, or mathematics education background. The interviews indicate that there is no typical way for hiring PER postdocs. Some aspects that PIs consider include the background of the candidates and how well the candidates fit in with the group. Postdocs likewise consider whether they like the research group when accepting offers. For both, having ties to the PER community is important for hiring. Overall, PIs and postdocs have been satisfied. Postdocs who were originally in traditional physics have felt that being a PER postdoc has allowed them to transition to PER. In giving advice, both PIs and postdocs reiterate the importance of connecting to the community, evaluating the postdoc position as a stepping stone in the career trajectory, and holistically considering candidates.

  15. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kingston

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD, and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS and geographical information systems (GIS. The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students. A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular. Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  16. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular). Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  17. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual fieldtrips in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field trip for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field trip over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field trip in particular). We believe our experiences are directly relevant to the implementation of such novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  18. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH: ONE PEDAGOGIC EXPERIENCE THAT FOLLOWED THE HISTORICAL CRITIC PEDAGOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Docena Pina

    2009-01-01

    This text presents an experience in physical education classes with students enrolled in an education program for youth and adults. This experience is based on dialectical method of construction of school knowledge. The experience presents the theme 'physical activity and health' as a cultural tool to understand social problems generated or exacerbated by capitalism. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8042.2008n30p158Este texto apresenta uma experiência desenvolvida nas aulas de educação físic...

  19. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  20. Gender Differences in the High School and Affective Experiences of Introductory College Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2008-10-01

    The disparity in persistence between males and females studying physics has been a topic of concern to physics educators for decades. Overall, while female students perform as well as or better than male students, they continue to lag considerably in terms of persistence. The most significant drop in females studying physics occurs between high school and college.2 Since most female physicists report that they became attracted to physics and decided to study it further while in high school, according to the International Study of Women in Physics,3 it is problematic that high school is also the stage at which females begin to opt out at much higher rates than males. Although half of the students taking one year of physics in high school are female, females are less likely than males to take a second or Advanced Placement (AP) physics course.4 In addition, the percentage of females taking the first physics course in college usually falls between 30% and 40%. In other words, although you may see gender parity in a first high school physics course, this parity does not usually persist to the next level of physics course. In addition, even if there is parity in a high school physics course, it does not mean that males and females experience the course in the same way. It is this difference in experience that may help to explain the drop in persistence of females.

  1. Test on the reactor with the portable digital reactivity meter for physical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Liyuan

    2010-01-01

    Test must be performed on the zero power reactor During the development of portable digital reactivity meter for physical experiment, in order to check its measurement function and accuracy. It describes the test facility, test core, test methods, test items and test results. The test results show that the instrument satisfy the requirements of technical specification, and satisfy the reactivity measurement in the physical experiments on reactors. (authors)

  2. INSPIRE: Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, K. A.; Garcia, L. N.; Webb, P. A.; Green, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The INSPIRE Project is a non-profit scientific and educational corporation whose objective is to bring the excitement of observing very low frequency (VLF) natural radio waves to high school students. Underlying this objective is the conviction that science and technology are the underpinnings of our modern society, and that only with an understanding of these disciplines can people make correct decisions in their lives. Since 1989, the INSPIRE Project has provided specially designed radio receiver kits to over 2,500 students and other groups to make observations of signals in the VLF frequency range. These kits provide an innovative and unique opportunity for students to actively gather data that can be used in a basic research project. Natural VLF emissions that can be studied with the INSPIRE receiver kits include sferics, tweeks, whistlers, and chorus, which originate from phenomena such as lightning. These emissions can either come from the local atmospheric environment within a few tens of kilometers of the receiver or from outer space thousands of kilometers from the Earth. VLF emissions are at such low frequencies that they can be received, amplified and turned into sound that we can hear, with each emission producing in a distinctive sound. In 2006 INSPIRE was re-branded and its mission has expanded to developing new partnerships with multiple science projects. Links to magnetospheric physics, astronomy, and meteorology are being identified. This presentation will introduce the INSPIRE project, display the INSPIRE receiver kits, show examples of the types of VLF emissions that can be collected and provide information on scholarship programs being offered.

  3. Physical modeling of glacier contact with bedrock (experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Epifanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the adhesive strength of glacial ice connection with bedrock has been studied using the analysis of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of acoustic emission (AE in the frequency range from 15 Hz to 20,000 Hz. Identification of signal source on bed is based on physical modeling of adhesive ice fracture at the complex shear and patterns of elastic waves propagation in the ice using data on ice thickness of the ice and its acoustic properties. The experimental dependence of the ice and serpentinite substrate adhesive strength with temperature (from 0 °C to −30 °C has been obtained at constraint axial shear. It is shown that the destruction of adhesive ice contact with substrate begins long before the maximum shear stress achieved, and AE signals in the coordinates amplitude-frequency-time have been obtained for the for static friction and sliding parts of deformation curves. Influence of shear to normal stresses ratio on the adhesive ice/substrate strength has been shown. Influence of the ratio of longitudinal and transverse shear stresses on the adhesive bond strength of ice to the substrate has been shown. The natural glacier spectra revealed periodic reduction of AE signals frequency in the middle range of frequencies. The similar effect of AE signals shifting along the frequency axis to the low frequency domain was obtained by testing of freshwater ice samples and related with expansion of the destruction scale. Practical application of the strain AE results for remote determination of the local glacial stability and for studies of glacier ice mechanics is discussed.

  4. Physical Unclonable Function with Multiplexing Units and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masaya; Asai, Toshiya; Shiozaki, Mitsuru; Fujino, Takeshi

    Recently, semiconductor counterfeiting has become an increasingly serious problem. Therefore, techniques to prevent the counterfeit by using random characteristic patterns that are difficult to control artificially have attracted attention. The physical unclonable function (PUF) is one of the techniques. It is a method to derive ID information peculiar to a device by detecting random physical features that cannot be controlled during the device's manufacture. Because information such as the ID information is difficult to replicate, PUF is used as a technique to prevent counterfeiting. Several studies have been reported on PUF. Arbiter PUF, which utilizes the difference in signal propagation delay between selectors, is the typical method of composing PUF using delay characteristics. This paper proposed a new PUF which is based on the arbiter PUF. The proposed PUF introduces new multiplexing selector units. It attempts to generate an effective response using the orders of three signal arrivals. Experiments using FPGAs verify the validity of the proposed PUF. Although Uniqueness is deteriorated, Correctness, Steadiness, Randomness and Resistance against the machine learning attacks are improved in comparison with conventional one.

  5. Mental Health Consumer Experiences and Strategies When Seeking Physical Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie B. Ewart; Julia Bocking; Brenda Happell; Chris Platania-Phung; Robert Stanton

    2016-01-01

    People with mental illness have higher rates of physical health problems and consequently live significantly shorter lives. This issue is not yet viewed as a national health priority and research about mental health consumer views on accessing physical health care is lacking. The aim of this study is to explore the experience of mental health consumers in utilizing health services for physical health needs. Qualitative exploratory design was utilized. Semistructured focus groups were held wit...

  6. Development and evaluation of clicker methodology for introductory physics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert H.

    Many educators understand that lectures are cost effective but not learning efficient, so continue to search for ways to increase active student participation in this traditionally passive learning environment. In-class polling systems, or "clickers", are inexpensive and reliable tools allowing students to actively participate in lectures by answering multiple-choice questions. Students assess their learning in real time by observing instant polling summaries displayed in front of them. This in turn motivates additional discussions which increase the opportunity for active learning. We wanted to develop a comprehensive clicker methodology that creates an active lecture environment for a broad spectrum of students taking introductory physics courses. We wanted our methodology to incorporate many findings of contemporary learning science. It is recognized that learning requires active construction; students need to be actively involved in their own learning process. Learning also depends on preexisting knowledge; students construct new knowledge and understandings based on what they already know and believe. Learning is context dependent; students who have learned to apply a concept in one context may not be able to recognize and apply the same concept in a different context, even when both contexts are considered to be isomorphic by experts. On this basis, we developed question sequences, each involving the same concept but having different contexts. Answer choices are designed to address students preexisting knowledge. These sequences are used with the clickers to promote active discussions and multiple assessments. We have created, validated, and evaluated sequences sufficient in number to populate all of introductory physics courses. Our research has found that using clickers with our question sequences significantly improved student conceptual understanding. Our research has also found how to best measure student conceptual gain using research-based instruments

  7. Pre-evaluation of fusion shielding benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Handa, H.; Konno, C.

    1994-01-01

    Shielding benchmark experiment is very useful to test the design code and nuclear data for fusion devices. There are many types of benchmark experiments that should be done in fusion shielding problems, but time and budget are limited. Therefore it will be important to select and determine the effective experimental configurations by precalculation before the experiment. The authors did three types of pre-evaluation to determine the experimental assembly configurations of shielding benchmark experiments planned in FNS, JAERI. (1) Void Effect Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure the local increase of dose and nuclear heating behind small void(s) in shield material. Dimension of the voids and its arrangements were decided as follows. Dose and nuclear heating were calculated both for with and without void(s). Minimum size of the void was determined so that the ratio of these two results may be larger than error of the measurement system. (2) Auxiliary Shield Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure shielding properties of B 4 C, Pb, W, and dose around superconducting magnet (SCM). Thickness of B 4 C, Pb, W and their arrangement including multilayer configuration were determined. (3) SCM Nuclear Heating Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure nuclear heating and dose distribution in SCM material. Because it is difficult to use liquid helium as a part of SCM mock up material, material composition of SCM mock up are surveyed to have similar nuclear heating property of real SCM composition

  8. Including Visually Impaired Students in Physical Education Lessons: A Case Study of Teacher and Pupil Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Dandolo, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Following recent education policy and curriculum changes in England, the notion of inclusion of children with special educational needs in physical education has increasingly become a topic of research interest and concern. It was the aim of this study to explore personal experiences and perspectives of inclusion in physical education. To this end…

  9. The Acculturation Experiences of Foreign-Born Students of Color in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries-Britt, Sharon; George Mwangi, Chrystal A.; Peralta, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on 15 foreign-born students majoring in physics who are also racial/ethnic minorities. We address the research question: What are the acculturation experiences of foreign-born Students of Color majoring in physics? Berry's (2003) theory of acculturation and Bandura's (1994) theory of self-efficacy were substantive…

  10. Physicists purchase materials testing machine in support of pioneering particle physics experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Sharpe, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    "The particle physics group at Liverpool University has purchased an LRXPlus singlecolumn materials testing machine from Lloyd Instruments, which will be used to help characterise the carbon-fibre support frames for detectors used for state-of-the-art particle physics experiments." (1 page)

  11. The Experiences of Students without Disabilities in Inclusive Physical Education Classrooms: A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitti, Robert Joseph; Thomas, Scott Gordon; Bentley, Danielle Christine

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to analyse studies of the experiences of students without disabilities (SWOD) in inclusive physical education (PE) classes. The literature published from 1975 to 2015 was compiled from three online databases (PsycInfo, Physical Education Index and ERIC). Included literature met inclusion criteria focussed…

  12. Investigation of the Perceived Causes of Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Problems Encountered in School Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Didis, M. Gözde

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates a group of pre-service physics teachers' perceptions about the causes of problems in school experience through the attribution theory. The participants were thirteen pre-service physics teachers from a public university in Turkey. Data were collected through the interviews by requesting the participants to reflect their own…

  13. Experiences and Outcomes of Preschool Physical Education: An Analysis of Developmental Discourses in Scottish Curricular Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvilly, Nollaig

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of developmental discourses underpinning preschool physical education in Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence. Implementing a post-structural perspective, the article examines the preschool experiences and outcomes related to physical education as presented in the Curriculum for Excellence "health and…

  14. Computing for ongoing experiments on high energy physics in LPP, JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belosludtsev, D.A.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.; Zinchenko, A.I.; Kekelidze, V.D.; Madigozhin, D.T.; Potrebenikov, Yu.K.; Khabarov, S.V.; Shkarovskij, S.N.; Shchinov, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    The computer infrastructure made at the Laboratory of Particle Physics, JINR, purposed for active participation of JINR experts in ongoing experiments on particle and nuclear physics is presented. The principles of design and construction of the personal computer farm have been given and the used computer and informational services for effective application of distributed computer resources have been described

  15. Physical Activity Experiences and Beliefs among Single Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugonski, Deirdre; Motl, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Single motherhood has been associated with negative health consequences such as depression and cardiovascular disease. Physical activity might reduce these consequences, but little is known about physical activity experiences and beliefs that might inform interventions and programs for single mothers. The present study used…

  16. Coherent investigation of nuclear data at CEA DAM: Theoretical models, experiments and evaluated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Cartier, J.; Chatillon, A.; Daugas, J.M.; Delaroche, J.P.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.; Duarte, H.; Dubray, N.; Ducauze-Philippe, M.; Gaudefroy, L.; Gosselin, G.; Granier, T.; Hilaire, S.; Chau, Huu-Tai P.; Laborie, J.M.; Laurent, B.; Ledoux, X.; Le Luel, C.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Morillon, B.; Roig, O.; Romain, P.; Taieb, J.; Varignon, C.; Authier, N.; Casoli, P.; Richard, B.

    2012-01-01

    The domain of evaluated nuclear data involves at the same time, a close interaction between the field of nuclear applications and that of nuclear physics, and a close interaction between experiments and theory. The final product, the evaluated data file, synthesises vast amounts of information stemming from all of the above fields. In CEA DAM, all these aspects of nuclear data are investigated in a consistent way, making full use of experimental facilities and high-performance computing as well as numerous national and international collaborations, for the measurement, calculation, evaluation, and validation of nuclear data. (orig.)

  17. Coherent investigation of nuclear data at CEA DAM: Theoretical models, experiments and evaluated data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Cartier, J.; Chatillon, A.; Daugas, J.M.; Delaroche, J.P.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.; Duarte, H.; Dubray, N.; Ducauze-Philippe, M.; Gaudefroy, L.; Gosselin, G.; Granier, T.; Hilaire, S.; Chau, Huu-Tai P.; Laborie, J.M.; Laurent, B.; Ledoux, X.; Le Luel, C.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Morillon, B.; Roig, O.; Romain, P.; Taieb, J.; Varignon, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Authier, N.; Casoli, P.; Richard, B. [CEA Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2012-08-15

    The domain of evaluated nuclear data involves at the same time, a close interaction between the field of nuclear applications and that of nuclear physics, and a close interaction between experiments and theory. The final product, the evaluated data file, synthesises vast amounts of information stemming from all of the above fields. In CEA DAM, all these aspects of nuclear data are investigated in a consistent way, making full use of experimental facilities and high-performance computing as well as numerous national and international collaborations, for the measurement, calculation, evaluation, and validation of nuclear data. (orig.)

  18. Use of experience data for DOE seismic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, M.W.; Budnitz, R.; Eder, S.J.; Eli, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    As dictated by DOE Order 5480.28, seismic evaluations of essential systems and components at DOE facilities will be conducted over the next several years. For many of these systems and components, few, if any, seismic requirements applied to the original design, procurement, installation, and maintenance process. Thus the verification of the seismic adequacy of existing systems and components presents a difficult challenge. DOE has undertaken development of the criteria and procedures for these seismic evaluations that will maximize safety benefits in a timely and cost effective manner. As demonstrated in previous applications at DOE facilities and by the experience from the commercial nuclear power industry, use of experience data for these evaluations is the only viable option for most existing systems and components. This paper describes seismic experience data, the needs at DOE facilities, the precedent of application at nuclear power plants and DOE facilities, and the program being put in place for the seismic verification task ahead for DOE

  19. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone

    2015-07-01

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described.

  20. Versatile single-chip event sequencer for atomic physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Edward

    2010-03-01

    A very inexpensive dsPIC microcontroller with internal 32-bit counters is used to produce a flexible timing signal generator with up to 16 TTL-compatible digital outputs, with a time resolution and accuracy of 50 ns. This time resolution is easily sufficient for event sequencing in typical experiments involving cold atoms or laser spectroscopy. This single-chip device is capable of triggered operation and can also function as a sweeping delay generator. With one additional chip it can also concurrently produce accurately timed analog ramps, and another one-chip addition allows real-time control from an external computer. Compared to an FPGA-based digital pattern generator, this design is slower but simpler and more flexible, and it can be reprogrammed using ordinary `C' code without special knowledge. I will also describe the use of the same microcontroller with additional hardware to implement a digital lock-in amplifier and PID controller for laser locking, including a simple graphics-based control unit. This work is supported in part by the NSF.

  1. Results on axion physics from the CAST Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Eleftheriadis, Christos A; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Beltran, B; Bräuninger, H; Carmona, J; Cebrián, S; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Di Lella, L; Englhauser, J; Fanourakis, G K; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Geralis, T; Giomataris, Ioanis; Gninenko, S; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Heinsius, F H; Hoffmann, D H H; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakovcic, K; Kang, D; Königsmann, K C; Kotthaus, R; Krcmar, M; Kousouris, K; Kuster, M; Laki, B; Lasseur, C; Liolios, A; Ljubicic, cA; Lutz, G; Luzón, G; Miller, D; Morales, A; Morales, J; Nordt, A; Ortiz, A; Papaevangelou, T; Placci, A; Raffelt, G; Riege1, H; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Semertzidis, Y K; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Stewart, L; Villar, J; Vogel, J; Walckiers, L; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    Axions are expected to be produced in the sun via the Primakoff process. They may be detected through the inverse process in the laboratory, under the influence of a strong magnetic field, giving rise to X-rays of energies in the range of a few keV. Such an Axion detector is the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), collecting data since 2003. Results have been published, pushing the axion-photon coupling g$_{a\\gamma}$ below the 10$^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ limit at 95% CL, for axion masses less than 0.02 eV. This limit is nearly an order of magnitude lower than previous experimental limits and surpassed for the first time limits set from astrophysical arguments based on the energy-loss concept. The experiment is currently exploring axion masses in the range of 0.02 eV $< m_a <$ 1.1 eV. In the next run, currently under preparation, the axion mass explored will be extended up to the limit of 1.1 eV, testing for the first time the region of theoretical axion models with the axion helioscope method.

  2. User Experience Evaluation Methods in Product Development (UXEM'09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roto, Virpi; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa; Law, Effie; Vermeeren, Arnold

    High quality user experience (UX) has become a central competitive factor of product development in mature consumer markets [1]. Although the term UX originated from industry and is a widely used term also in academia, the tools for managing UX in product development are still inadequate. A prerequisite for designing delightful UX in an industrial setting is to understand both the requirements tied to the pragmatic level of functionality and interaction and the requirements pertaining to the hedonic level of personal human needs, which motivate product use [2]. Understanding these requirements helps managers set UX targets for product development. The next phase in a good user-centered design process is to iteratively design and evaluate prototypes [3]. Evaluation is critical for systematically improving UX. In many approaches to UX, evaluation basically needs to be postponed until the product is fully or at least almost fully functional. However, in an industrial setting, it is very expensive to find the UX failures only at this phase of product development. Thus, product development managers and developers have a strong need to conduct UX evaluation as early as possible, well before all the parts affecting the holistic experience are available. Different types of products require evaluation on different granularity and maturity levels of a prototype. For example, due to its multi-user characteristic, a community service or an enterprise resource planning system requires a broader scope of UX evaluation than a microwave oven or a word processor that is meant for a single user at a time. Before systematic UX evaluation can be taken into practice, practical, lightweight UX evaluation methods suitable for different types of products and different phases of product readiness are needed. A considerable amount of UX research is still about the conceptual frameworks and models for user experience [4]. Besides, applying existing usability evaluation methods (UEMs) without

  3. Examining the effects of testwiseness in conceptual physics evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay

    2016-12-01

    Testwiseness is defined as the set of cognitive strategies used by a student that is intended to improve his or her score on a test regardless of the test's subject matter. Questions with elements that may be affected by testwiseness are common in physics assessments, even in those which have been extensively validated and widely used as evaluation tools in physics education research. The potential effect of several elements of testwiseness were analyzed for questions in the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and Conceptual Survey on Electricity and Magnetism that contain distractors that are predicted to be influenced by testwiseness. This analysis was performed using data sets collected between fall 2001 and spring 2014 at one midwestern U.S. university (including over 9500 students) and between Spring 2011 and Spring 2015 at a second eastern U.S. university (including over 2500 students). Student avoidance of "none of the above" or "zero" distractors was statistically significant. The effect of the position of a distractor on its likelihood to be selected was also significant. The effects of several potential positive and negative testwiseness effects on student scores were also examined by developing two modified versions of the FCI designed to include additional elements related to testwiseness; testwiseness produced little effect post-instruction in student performance on the modified instruments.

  4. The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1108, evaluating the environmental effects of the proposed construction and operation of the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) within the existing C-Stellarator (CS) Building at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. The purpose of the NSTX is to investigate the physics of spherically shaped plasmas as an alternative path to conventional tokamaks for development of fusion energy. Fusion energy has the potential to help compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Construction of the NSTX in the CS Building would require the dismantling and removal of the existing unused Princeton Large Torus (PLT) device, part of which would be reused to construct the NSTX. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4,321 et seq. The preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. Thus, the DOE is issuing a FONSI pursuant to the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508) and the DOE NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021)

  5. Experiment on Physical Desalinisation of Uranium-contaminated Gravel Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jai-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    As a result, the method to wash uranium-contaminated gravels could not get satisfactory desalinization rate. During the long oxidization process it was judged that uranium penetrated inside the gravels, so we tried to increase the desalinization rate by fragmentizing them into pieces and then washing them. The desalinization rate after fragmentizing the gravels into pieces and washing them brought a satisfactory result.. However, we could obtain desired concentration for gravels with high uranium concentration by fragmentizing them and breaking them further into even smaller pieces. Likewise, desalinization using soil washing process is complicated and has to go through multiple washing steps, resulting in too much of waste fluid generated accordingly. The increase of waste fluid generated leads to the increase in by-products of the final disposal process later on, bringing a not good economic result. Furthermore, taking into account that the desalinization rate is 65% during soil washing process, it is expected that gravel washing will show a similar desalinization result; it is considered uneasy to have a perfect desalinization only by soil washing. The grinding method is actually used in the primary desalinization process in order to desalinize radioactivity-contaminated concrete. This method does desalinization by grinding the radioactivity-contaminated area of the concrete surface with desalinization equipment, which enables a near-to-perfect desalinization for relatively thinly contaminated surface. Likewise, this research verified the degree of desalinization by applying the grinding method and comparing it to the fragmentizing-washing method, and attempted to find a method to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively. In order to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively and compare to the existing washing-desalinization method, we conducted a desalinization experiment with grinding method that grinds gravel surface. As a

  6. THERMAL EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE SHIPPING CASK FOR GTRI EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-06-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has many experiments yet to be irradiated in support of the High Performance Research Reactor fuels development program. Most of the experiments will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), then later shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex for post irradiation examination. To date, the General Electric (GE)-2000 cask has been used to transport GTRI experiments between these facilities. However, the availability of the GE-2000 cask to support future GTRI experiments is at risk. In addition, the internal cavity of the GE-2000 cask is too short to accommodate shipping the larger GTRI experiments. Therefore, an alternate shipping capability is being pursued. The Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Research Reactor (BRR) cask has been determined to be the best alternative to the GE-2000 cask. An evaluation of the thermal performance of the BRR cask is necessary before proceeding with fabrication of the newly designed cask hardware and the development of handling, shipping, and transport procedures. This paper presents the results of the thermal evaluation of the BRR cask loaded with a representative set of fueled and non-fueled experiments. When analyzed with identical payloads, experiment temperatures were found to be lower with the BRR cask than with the GE-2000 cask. From a thermal standpoint, the BRR cask was found to be a suitable alternate to the GE-2000 cask.

  7. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based landslide susceptibility models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capparelli, Giovanna; Formetta, Giuseppe; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause significant damages involving loss of life and properties. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. This paper presents a package of GIS based models for landslide susceptibility analysis. It was integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model using the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices (GOF) by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system offers the possibility to investigate and fairly compare the quality and the robustness of models and models parameters, according a procedure that includes: i) model parameters estimation by optimizing each of the GOF index separately, ii) models evaluation in the ROC plane by using each of the optimal parameter set, and iii) GOF robustness evaluation by assessing their sensitivity to the input parameter variation. This procedure was repeated for all three models. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, Average Index (AI) optimization coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case. This research was funded by PON Project No. 01_01503 "Integrated Systems for Hydrogeological Risk

  8. Evaluation of cross-section uncertainties using physical constraints for 238U, 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Privas, Edwin; Archier, Pascal; Noguere, Gilles; Litaize, Olivier; Leconte, Pierre; Bernard, David

    2014-01-01

    Neutron-induced reactions between 0 eV and 20 MeV are based on various physical properties such as nuclear reaction models, microscopic and integral measurements. Most of the time, the evaluation work is done independently between the resolved resonance range and the continuum, giving rise to mismatches for the cross-sections, larger uncertainties on boundary and no cross-correlation between high-energy domain and resonance range. In addition the use of integral experiment is sometimes only related to central values (evaluation is 'working fine' on a dedicated set of benchmarks) and reductions of uncertainties are not straightforward on cross-sections themselves: working fine could be mathematically reflected by a reduced uncertainty. As the CIELO initiative is to bring experts in each field to propose/discuss these matters, after having presented the status of 238 U and 239 Pu cross-sections covariances evaluation (for JEFF-3.2 as well as the WPEC SG34 subgroup), this paper will present several methodologies that may be used to avoid such effects on covariances. A first idea based on the use of experiments overlapping two energy domains appeared in the near past. It was reviewed and extended to the use of systematic uncertainties (normalisation for example) and for integral experiments as well. In addition, we propose a methodology taking into account physical constraints on an overlapping energy domain where both nuclear reaction models are used (continuity of both cross-sections and derivatives for example). The use of Lagrange multiplier (related to these constraints) in a classical generalised least square procedure will be exposed. Some academic examples will then be presented for both point-wise and multi-group cross-sections to present the methodologies. In addition, new results for 239 Pu will be presented on resonance range and higher energies to reduce capture and fission cross-section uncertainties by using integral experiments (JEZEBEL experiment as

  9. Practical Ways Psychotherapy Can Support Physical Healthcare Experiences for Male Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Angela; Stalker, Carol A.; Schachter, Candice L.; Teram, Eli; Lasiuk, Gerri

    2011-01-01

    Many survivors of child sexual abuse who engage in psychotherapy also experience physical health problems. This article summarizes the findings of a multiphased qualitative study about survivors' experiences in healthcare settings. The study informed the development of the "Handbook on Sensitive Practice for Health Care Practitioners: Lessons…

  10. Grounded Learning Experience: Helping Students Learn Physics through Visuo-Haptic Priming and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Chieh Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate the effects of a grounded learning experience on college students' mental models of physics systems. The grounded learning experience consisted of a priming stage and an instruction stage, and within each stage, one of two different types of visuo-haptic representation was applied: visuo-gestural simulation…

  11. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs

  12. Teaching with Socio-Scientific Issues in Physical Science: Teacher and Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talens, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Socio-scientific issues (SSI) are recommended by many science educators worldwide for learners to acquire first hand experience to apply what they learned in class. This investigated experiences of teacher-researcher and students in using SSI in Physical Science, Second Semester, School Year 2012-2013. Latest and controversial news articles on…

  13. Studying Gender Bias in Physics Grading: The Role of Teaching Experience and Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Sarah I.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gender-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) stereotypes has been repeatedly documented. This article examines physics teachers' gender bias in grading and the influence of teaching experience in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. In a 2?×?2 between-subjects design, with years of teaching experience included as…

  14. Model-independent search for new physics at D0 experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-11

    Nov 11, 2012 ... at D0 experiment. MD NAIMUDDIN. Department of Physics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. E-mail: nayeem@fnal.gov. Abstract. Finding the .... a similar analysis performed at the CMS experiment. The preliminary results of the CMS analysis was also shown at the Lepton–Photon 2011. Conference.

  15. Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

  16. Navigating Theory and Practice through Evaluation Fieldwork: Experiences of Novice Evaluation Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Jill Anne; Boyce, Ayesha S.; Hicks, Juanita; Jones, Jennie; Long, Justin; Pitts, Robyn; Stockdale, Myrah

    2017-01-01

    To explore the relationship between theory and practice in evaluation, we focus on the perspectives and experiences of student evaluators, as they move from the classroom to an engagement with the social, political, and cultural dynamics of evaluation in the field. Through reflective journals, postcourse interviews, and facilitated group…

  17. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  18. VIRTUAL MODELING OF PHYSICAL EXPERIMENT FOR DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEMS IN THE SECONDARY AND HIGHER PEDAGOGICAL SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V. Holovko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the state of the educational computer simulation and its modern features. It deals with psychological and didactic approaches to modeling in physics education and school physical experiment. It was considered the possible classification of computer models for distance learning system, as well as proposed the ways of implementing virtual experiment in distance education in physics. The main types of virtual modeling, the most widely used computer systems support in teaching physics, their possible application in teaching secondary school students were characterized. The peculiarities of distance education of future physics teachers by means of electronic teaching methods as a combination of integrated electronic educational resources and services were highlighted.

  19. Sandia's experience in designing and implementing integrated high security physical protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    As DOE's lead laboratory for physical security, Sandia National Laboratories has had a major physical security program for over ten years. Activities have ranged from component development and evaluation, to full scale system design and implementation. This paper presents some of the lessons learned in designing and implementing state-of-the-art high security physical protection systems for a number of government facilities. A generic system design is discussed for illustration purposes. Sandia efforts to transfer technology to industry are described

  20. Relationship between sports experience and executive function in 6-12-year-old children: independence from physical fitness and moderation by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Toru; Sugasawa, Shigemi; Matsuda, Yusuke; Mizuno, Masao

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sports experience (i.e., tennis experience) and executive function in children while controlling for physical activity and physical fitness. Sixty-eight participants (6-12 years old, 34 males and 34 females) were enrolled in regular tennis lessons (mean = 2.4 years, range = 0.1-7.3 years) prior to the study. Executive functions, including inhibitory control (the Stroop Color-Word Test), working memory (the 2-back Task), and cognitive flexibility (the Local-global Task) were evaluated. Participants' levels of daily physical activity, ranging from moderate to vigorous, were evaluated using triaxial accelerometers. The total score for physical fitness was assessed using the Tennis Field Test. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed interaction effects between gender and tennis experience on participants' reaction time (RT) on the switch cost of the Local-global Task after controlling for age, BMI, gender, physical activity, physical fitness, and tennis experience. Longer tennis experience was associated with shorter switch cost in males but not in females. Higher scores on physical fitness were positively associated with lower interference scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test, RT on the 2-back Task, and RT in the switching condition of the Local-global Task, after controlling for age, BMI, gender, and physical activity. In conclusion, all three foundational components of executive function (i.e., inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) were more strongly related to physical fitness than to physical activity in males and females, whereas greater cognitive flexibility was related to tennis experience only in the males. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.