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Sample records for photosynthetic isotope exchange

  1. Isotopic exchange between CO2 and H2O and labelling kinetics of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard

    1971-01-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide with water has been studied by measuring the rate of oxygen exchange between C 18 O 2 and H 2 16 O. The mathematical treatment of the kinetics allows to determine with accuracy the diffusion flow between the gas and the liquid phase, in the same way as the CO 2 hydration rate. The velocity constant of this last process, whose value gives the in situ enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase, has been established in the case of chloroplast and Euglena suspensions and of aerial leaves. The study of the isotopic exchange between C 18 O 2 and a vegetable submitted to alternations of dark and light has allowed to calculate the isotopic abundance of the metabolized CO 2 whose value has been compared to that of the intracellular water and that of photosynthetic oxygen. In addition, a new method using 13 C 18 O 2 gives the means to measure with accuracy eventual isotopic effects. The labelling kinetics of the oxygen evolved by Euglena suspensions whose water has been enriched with 18 O have been established at different temperatures. (author) [fr

  2. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Uranium isotope separation using styrene cation exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahovec, J.

    1980-01-01

    The separation of 235 U and 238 U isotopes is carried out either by simple isotope exchange in the system uranium-cation exchanger (sulphonated styrene divinylbenzene resin), or by combination of isotope exchange in a uranium-cation exchanger (Dowex 50, Amberlite IR-120) system and a chemical reaction. A review is presented of elution agents used, the degree of cation exchanger cross-linking, columns length, and 235 U enrichment. The results are described of the isotope effect study in a U(IV)-U(VI)-cation exchanger system conducted by Japanese and Romanian authors (isotope exchange kinetics, frontal analysis, reverse (indirect) frontal analysis). (H.S.)

  4. Dual temperature isotope exchange system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Improvements in the method for isotope concentration by dual temperature exchange between feed and auxiliary fluids in a multistage system are described. In a preferred embodiment the first is a vaporizable liquid and the auxiliary fluid a gas, comprising steps for improving the heating and/or cooling and/or humidifying and/or dehumidifying operations

  5. Theory of oxygen isotope exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, M.W.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Transients for oxygen molecular mass numbers 32, 34 and 36 are derived which can be used for the interpretation of oxygen isotope exchange data based on measurement of concentrations of 16O2, 16O18O and 18O2 in the gas phase. Key parameters in the theory are the rate at which oxygen molecules are

  6. Catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    A method is described for enhancing the rate of exchange of hydrogen atoms in organic compounds or moieties with deuterium or tritium atoms. It comprises reacting the organic compound or moiety and a compound which is the source of deuterium or tritium in the presence of a catalyst consisting of a non-metallic, metallic or organometallic halide of Lewis acid character and which is reactive towards water, hydrogen halides or similar protonic acids. The catalyst is a halide or organometallic halide of: (i) zinc or another element of Group IIb; (ii) boron, aluminium or another element of Group III; (iii) tin, lead, antimony or another element of Groups IV to VI; or (iv) a transition metal, lanthanide or stable actinide; or a halohalide. (author)

  7. Isotope exchange reactions in hydrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplinski, W.; Gula, A.; Kravtsov, A.; Mikhailov, A.; Popov, N.

    1990-12-01

    The rates of isotopic exchange for the excited states of muonic hydrogen are calculated as functions of collision energy. Ground state population q 1s for different collision energies, target densities and isotope concentrations is obtained. It is shown that for principal quantum numbers n > 5 the isotopic exchange still considerably influences the value of q 1s . (author)

  8. Separation of uranium isotopes by accelerated isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seko, M.; Miyake, T.; Inada, K.; Ochi, K.; Sakamoto, T.

    1977-01-01

    A novel catalyst for isotope exchange reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) compounds enables acceleration of the reaction rate as much as 3000 times to make industrial separation of uranium isotopes economically possible

  9. Isotope exchange process and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvalle, Pierre.

    1974-01-01

    A process for enriching uranium in one of its isotopes is described. To do so, cascade isotopic exchanges are made by contact between U(III) and U(IV) in conditions avoiding the oxidation of U(III) in U(IV). A liquid phase containing an uranium compound and free of other group III to VIII metals of the periodic classification, in which uranium is present at a first valence is placed in contact with a second valence uranium compound, protected from any contact with a conducting solid and with an agent bringing free or release oxygen. The second phase is organic. The process includes a counter current isotopic exchange between an aqueous phase containing a U +4 salting-out agent and the uranium as U +3 ions and an organic phase containing the uranium at valence IV. This is followed by the extraction of U(IV) from the organic phase into the previously spent aqueous phase and the reduction of uranium from valence IV to valence III; finally by oxidation of U(III) of the aqueous phase into U(IV) and the transfer of U(IV) into the previously exhausted organic phase [fr

  10. Stomatal kinetics and photosynthetic gas exchange along a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric regulation of plant water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Frederick C; Smith, Duncan D; Woodruff, David R; Marias, Danielle E; McCulloh, Katherine A; Howard, Ava R; Magedman, Alicia L

    2017-08-01

    Species' differences in the stringency of stomatal control of plant water potential represent a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviours. However, little is known about how quasi-steady-state stomatal regulation of water potential may relate to dynamic behaviour of stomata and photosynthetic gas exchange in species operating at different positions along this continuum. Here, we evaluated kinetics of light-induced stomatal opening, activation of photosynthesis and features of quasi-steady-state photosynthetic gas exchange in 10 woody species selected to represent different degrees of anisohydry. Based on a previously developed proxy for the degree of anisohydry, species' leaf water potentials at turgor loss, we found consistent trends in photosynthetic gas exchange traits across a spectrum of isohydry to anisohydry. More anisohydric species had faster kinetics of stomatal opening and activation of photosynthesis, and these kinetics were closely coordinated within species. Quasi-steady-state stomatal conductance and measures of photosynthetic capacity and performance were also greater in more anisohydric species. Intrinsic water-use efficiency estimated from leaf gas exchange and stable carbon isotope ratios was lowest in the most anisohydric species. In comparisons between gas exchange traits, species rankings were highly consistent, leading to species-independent scaling relationships over the range of isohydry to anisohydry observed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  12. Isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems, according to the calculations of the equilibrium constants for oxygen isotopic exchange reactions, and the calculations of the oxygen isotope separation factors between two phases. The equilibrium constants (K65, K67, K68 and K69) of 16 O- 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O exchange reactions between diatomic oxides were calculated in a wide temperature range on the basis of quantum statistical mechanics. Many equilibrium constants showed the anomalous mass effects, and then had the crossover temperatures and the mass independent fractionation (MIF) temperatures which held K67 = K65, K67 = K68, or K67 = K69, etc. For example, the equilibrium constants for the reactions between OH and the other diatomic oxides (MO) showed the anomalous mass effects, when M was Li, Na, Mg, K, Fe, Al, Ge, Zr, Pt, etc. The 16 O 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O oxygen isotope separation factors (S65, S67, S68 and S69) between two phases were calculated, when OH and CO were in the first phase, and SiO was in the second phase. Although the oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria in the two phases had no MIF and crossover temperatures, the separation factors showed the anomalous mass effects and had the temperatures. According to what is called the normal mass effects for the equilibrium constant of isotopic exchange reaction, the value of InK68/InK67 is 1.885. Therefore, the value of InS68/InS67 should be 1.885 too. The value calculated, however, widely changed. It can be concluded from the results obtained in the present work that some oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria cause the anomalous mass effects, the anomalous oxygen isotope separation factors, and then isotope anomalies

  13. Isotope exchange reaction on solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, A.; Nishikawa, M.; Eguchi, T.; Kawagoe, T.

    2000-01-01

    Lithium ceramic materials such as Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 SiO 4 are considered to be as candidate for the tritium breeding material in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactor. In the recent blanket designs, helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas to reduce tritium inventory and promote tritium release from the breeding material. In addition, the rate of isotope exchange reaction between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of the breeding material is necessary to analyze the tritium release behavior from the breeding materials. However, the rate of isotope exchange reactions between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of those materials has not been quantified until recently. Recently, the present authors quantified the rate of isotope exchange reaction on Li 2 O and Li 2 ZrO 3 . The overall mass transfer coefficients representing the isotope exchange reaction between H 2 and D 2 O on breeding materials or the same between D 2 and H 2 O are experimentally obtained in this study. Comparison to isotope exchange reaction rates on various breeding materials is also performed in this study. Discussions about the effects of temperature, concentration of hydrogen in the purge gas or flow rate of the purge gas on the conversion of tritiated water to tritium gas are also performed

  14. Isotope Exchange in Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert V.; Miller, Irvin M.; Schryer, David R.; Sidney, Barry D.; Wood, George M., Jr.; Hoyt, Ronald F.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Replacement technique maintains level of CO2/18 in closed-cycle CO2 lasers. High-energy, pulsed CO2 lasers using rare chemical isotopes must be operated in closed cycles to conserve gas. Rare isotopes operated in closed cycles to conserve gas. Rare isotopes as CO2/18 used for improved transmission of laser beam in atmosphere. To maintain laser power, CO2 must be regenerated, and O2 concentration kept below few tenths of percent. Conditions achieved by recombining CO and O2.

  15. Isotope exchange in oxide-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Hoyt, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of exchanging rare-isotope oxygen for common-isotope oxygen in the top several layers of an oxide-containing catalyst is disclosed. A sample of an oxide-containing catalyst is exposed to a flowing stream of reducing gas in an inert carrier gas at a temperature suitable for the removal of the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms from the surface layer or layers of the catalyst without damaging the catalyst structure. The reduction temperature must be higher than any at which the catalyst will subsequently operate. Sufficient reducing gas is used to allow removal of all the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms in the top several layers of the catalyst. The catalyst is then reoxidized with the desired rare-isotope oxygen in sufficient quantity to replace all of the common-isotope oxygen that was removed.

  16. Tritium isotopic exchange in air detritiation dryers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everatt, A.E.; Johnson, R.E.; Senohrabek, J.A.; Shultz, C.M.

    1989-02-01

    Isotopic exchange between tritiated and non-tritiated water species in a molecular sieve bed has been demonstrated. At high humidities (+6 degrees Celsius dew point) the rate of tritium isotopic exchange in a 2.4 L molecular sieve bed has been demonstrated to be at least 50% of published exchange rates. In an industrial-sized air detritiation dryer, utilizing the pretreatment technique of H 2 O steam washing to elute the residual tritium, a DF of 12 600 has been demonstrated when operating at an inlet vapor tritium concentration of 14 Ci/kg and at inlet and outlet dew points of 4.8 and -54 degrees Celsius, respectively. In the NPD dryer bed studied, which was not optimally designed for full benefit from isotopic exchange, at least one order of magnitude in additional detritiation is attributed to isotopic exchange in the unsaturated zone. The technique of eluting the residual tritium from an industrial sized bed by H 2 O washing at high temperature, high humidity and low bed loading has been demonstrated to be a fast and effective way of removing tritium from a molecular sieve bed during regeneration. The isotopic exchange model accurately predicted the exchange between tritiated and non-tritiated water species in a molecular sieve bed where there is no net adsorption or desorption. The model's prediction of the tritium breakthrough trend observed in the NPD tests was poor; however, a forced fit can be achieved if the exchange rates in the MTZ and the unsaturated zone are manipulated. More experiments are needed to determine the relative rates of tritium exchange in the saturated, mass transfer, and unsaturated zones of a dryer bed

  17. Influence of photosynthetic pathway on the hydrogen isotopic profile of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-li Zhang; Billault, I.; Xiaobao Li; Mabon, F.; Remaud, G.; Martin, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The SNIF-NMR method (site-specific natural isotope fractionation studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) was used to examine the isotopic profile of glucoses derived from plants with different photosynthetic pathways. It is shown that the type of photosynthetic metabolism, either C3 (beet-root, orange, grape), C4 (maize, sugar-cane) C5 (pineapple), exerts a strong influence on the deuterium distribution in the sugar molecules. The isotope profile also depends, secondarily, on the physiological status of the precursor plant. Consequently, the isotopic fingerprint of glucose may be a rich source of information in mechanistic comparisons of metabolic pathways. Moreover, from an analytical point of view, it may provide complementary criteria with respect to the ethanol probe for origin interface of sugars. (author)

  18. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by the purple photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small inverse isotope effects of 1-3 per thousand were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur during anaerobic photometabolism by Chromatium vinosum. The inverse fractionation can be accounted for by an equilibrium isotope effect between H 2 S and HS - , and may indicate that C. vinosum (and other photosynthetic bacteria) utilizes H 2 S rather than HS - as the substrate during sulfide oxidation. (Auth.)

  19. Carbon isotopic composition of legumes with photosynthetic stems from Mediterranean and desert habitats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, E.T.; Sharifi, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    The carbon isotopic compositions of leaves and stems of woody legumes growing in coastal mediterranean and inland desert sites in California were compared. The overall goal was to determine what factors were most associated with the carbon isotope composition of photosynthetic stems in these habitats. The carbon isotope signature (delta 13C) of photosynthetic stems was less negative than that of leaves on the same plants by an average of 1.51 +/- 0.42 per thousand. The delta 13C of bark (cortical chlorenchyma and epidermis) was more negative than that of wood (vascular tissue and pith) from the same plant for all species studied on all dates. Desert woody legumes had a higher delta 13C (less negative) and a lower intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) (for both photosynthetic tissues) than that of woody legumes from mediterranean climate sites. Differences in the delta 13C of stems among sites could be entirely accounted for by differences among site air temperatures. Thus, the delta 13C composition of stems did not indicate a difference in whole-plant integrated water use efficiency (WUE) among sites. In contrast, stems on all plants had a lower stem Ci and a higher delta 13C than leaves on the same plant, indicating that photosynthetic stems improve long-term, whole-plant water use efficiency in a diversity of species

  20. Oxygen isotope exchange on palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchuk, L.S.; Beschetvertnaya, T.I.; Novorodskij, V.G.; Novikova, M.G.; Zaretskij, M.V.; Valieva, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Oxygen heteromolecular isotope exchange on unreduced palladium catalysts, distingushing by metal content is studied. Content of 18 O in gaseous phase is eoual to 46%. Calculations of heteroexchange rates are conducted with decrease of the 18 O in the gaseous phase over solid sample. Method of oxygen thermodesorption has been used to establish that palladium, deposited on γ-Al 2 O 3 during exchange process is in oxidized state; in this case strength of Pd-O bond is determined by content dispersity) of the metal. It is shown that significant increase of exchange rate on the samples with Pd >> 0.5 mass.% content can be induced as by side decomposition reaction of its oxide and corresponding dilution of gaseous mixture by ''light'' oxygen so by possibility of exchange with oxygen of PdO phase

  1. Radioiodination via isotope exchange in pivalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichert, J.P.; Van Dort, M.E.; Groziak, M.P.; Counsell, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of benzoic and aryl aliphatic mono and polyiodinated acids and esters (sterol, triglyceride) were radioiodinated in 55-99% radiochemical yield by isotope exchange with Na 125 i in a melt of pivalic acid. In general, the reaction was complete in 1 h at 155 0 C with little or no substrate decomposition. High specific activity studies afforded 125 I-labeled iopanoic acid with a specific activity of over 700 Ci/mmol. (author)

  2. Procedure and apparatus for isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delvalle, Pierre

    1977-09-30

    A process for enriching uranium in one of its isotopes is described. To do so, cascade isotopic exchanges are made by contact between U(III) and U(IV) in conditions avoiding the oxidation of U(III) in U(IV). A liquid phase containing a uranium compound and free of other Group III to VIII metals of the periodic classification, in which uranium is present at a first valence is placed in contact with a second valence uranium compound, protected from any contact with a conducting solid and with an agent bringing free or release oxygen. The second phase is organic. The process includes a counter current isotopic exchange between an aqueous phase containing a U/sup +4/salting-out agent and the uranium as U/sup +3/ ions and an organic phase containing the uranium at Valence IV. This is followed by the extraction of U(IV) from the organic phase into the previously spent aqueous phase and the reduction of uranium from Valence IV to Valence III finally by oxidation of U(III) of the aqueous phase into U(IV) and the transfer of U(IV) into the previously exhausted organic phase.

  3. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1984-01-01

    The objects of this invention are achieved by a dual temperature isotopic exchange process employing hydrogen-water exchange with water passing in a closed recirculation loop between a catalyst-containing cold tower and the upper portion of a catalyst-containing hot tower, with feed water being introduced to the lower portion of the hot tower and being maintained out of contact with the water recirculating in the closed loop. Undue retarding of catalyst activity during deuterium concentration can thus be avoided. The cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower can be operated with relatively expensive catalyst material of higher catalyst activity, while the lower portion of the hot tower can be operated with a relatively less expensive, more rugged catalyst material of lesser catalyst activity. The feed water stream, being restricted solely to the lower portion of the hot tower, requires minimal pretreatment for the removal of potential catalyst contaminants. The catalyst materials are desirably coated with a hydrophobic treating material so as to be substantially inaccessible to liquid water, thereby retarding catalyst fouling while being accessible to the gas for enhancing isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor. A portion of the water of the closed loop can be passed to a humidification zone to heat and humidify the circulating hydrogen gas and then returned to the closed loop

  4. Water-hydrogen isotope exchange process analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.; Alekseev, I.; Uborsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    The use of a numerical method is needed to find a solution to the equation system describing a general case of heterogeneous isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water in a column. A computer model of the column merely outputting the isotope compositions in the flows leaving the column, like the experimental column itself, is a 'black box' to a certain extent: the solution is not transparent and occasionally not fully comprehended. The approximate analytical solution was derived from the ZXY-diagram (McCabe-Thiele diagram), which illustrates the solution of the renewed computer model called 'EVIO-4.2' Several 'unusual' results and dependences have been analyzed and explained. (authors)

  5. Uranium isotopic effect studies on cation and anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpal, S.K.; Gupta, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium isotope effects in exchange reactions involving hexavalent and tetravalent uranium, on ion exchange resins, have been re-examined. The earlier work on uranium isotope effects in electron exchange reactions involving hexavalent and tetravalent uranium, has been critically reviewed. New experimental data on these systems in hydrochloric acid medium, has been obtained, using break-through technique on anion-exchange columns. The isotope effects in these break-through experiments have been reinterpreted in a way which is consistent with the anion exchange behaviour of the various uranium species in these systems. (author)

  6. Study of isotopic exchange reactions of azidothymidine with tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, G.V.; Zverkov, Yu.B.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    2003-01-01

    Different reactions of isotopic exchange of azidothymidine (3 - azido-3 - desoxythymidine) with tritium, such as solid- and liquid-phase catalytic isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium and isotopic exchange in solution with tritium water, are investigated. It is determined that catalytic reactions of azidothymidine with gaseous tritium in solution lead to practically full reduction of azido group up to amino group. In reactions of solid-phase catalytic hydrogenation this process takes place too and 3 - azido-3 - desoxythymidine yield is from 20 to 70 %. Molar radioactivity of labelled with tritium azidothymidine prepared in reactions of solid-phase catalytic isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium and so by isotopic exchange in solution with tritium water does not exceed 0.5 Cu/mmol [ru

  7. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-07-05

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two "sun-leaf-like" surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature.

  8. Fractionation of lithium isotopes in cation-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Takao; Kawada, Kazuhiko; Kakihana, Hidetake; Hosoe, Morikazu

    1991-01-01

    Various methods for lithium isotope separation have been developed, and their applicability to large-scale enriched lithium isotope production has been assessed. Ion-exchange chromatography is one such method. Cation-exchange chromatography of lithium was carried out to investigate the lithium isotope effect in aqueous ion-exchange systems. The heavier isotope. 7 Li, was preferentially fractionated into the resin phase in every experiment conducted, and this result is consistent with the results of previous work. The value of the separation factor was 1.00089-1.00171 at 25C. A comparison of lithium isotope effect with those of potassium and rubidium indicated that the isotope effect originating from hydration is larger than the effect due to phase change for lithium, while the opposite is the case with potassium and rubidium

  9. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1983-01-01

    Deuterium is concentrated in a hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process enhanced by the use of catalyst materials in cold and hot tower contacting zones. Water is employed in a closed liquid recirculation loop that includes the cold tower, in which deuterium is concentrated in the water, and the upper portion of the hot tower in which said deuterium is concentrated in the hydrogen stream. Feed water is fed to the lower portion of said hot tower for contact with the circulating hydrogen stream. The feed water does not contact the water in the closed loop. Catalyst employed in the cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower, preferably higher quality material, is isolated from impurities in the feed water that contacts only the catalyst, preferably of lower quality, in the lower portion of the hot zone. The closed loop water passes from the cold zone to the dehumidification zone, and a portion of said water leaving the upper portion of the hot tower can be passed to the humidification zone and thereafter recycled to said closed loop. Deuterium concentration is enhanced in said catalytic hydrogen-water system while undue retarding of catalyst activity is avoided

  10. Kinetics of isotopic exchanges by using radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.

    1958-12-01

    After having noticed that iodine 131 under the form of sodium iodide has always been used as radioactive indicator in the CEA atomic pile located in Chatillon, this research report recalls the counting technique and some historical aspects of the notion of isotopic exchange and qualitative works, and presents some generalities on isotopic exchanges (reactions and calculation of rate constants of order 1 and 2, calculation of activation energy, spectro-photometric studies, Walden inversion, alkaline hydrolysis, influence of solvent on exchange kinetics, influence of the nature of the mineral halide). The author then addresses exchanges in aliphatic series (exchange with sodium iodide and with molecular iodine), exchanges in olefin series, exchanges in alicyclic series, and exchanges in aromatic series

  11. Rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masanori; Poulson, Simon R

    2012-04-17

    The rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water was investigated at conditions of 10 to 80 °C and pH -0.6 to 4.4. Oxygen isotope exchange proceeds as a first-order reaction, and the exchange rate is strongly affected by reaction temperature and pH, with increased rates of isotope exchange at higher temperature and lower pH. Selenate speciation (HSeO(4)(-) vs SeO(4)(2-)) also has a significant effect on the rate of isotope exchange. The half-life for isotope exchange at example natural conditions (25 °C and pH 7) is estimated to be significantly in excess of 10(6) years. The very slow rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water under most environmental conditions demonstrates that selenate-δ(18)O signatures produced by biogeochemical processes will be preserved and hence that it will be possible to use the value of selenate-δ(18)O to investigate the biogeochemical behavior of selenate, in an analogous fashion to the use of sulfate-δ(18)O to study the biogeochemical behavior of sulfate.

  12. Isotope exchange reaction in uranous-uranyl-sulphuric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Daren; Yue Tingsheng; Mu Dehai; Wang Yani

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of the isotope exchange reaction between U(IV) and U(VI) has been studied in low concentrations of sulphuric acid. A minimum exchange rate appears at 0.25 M H 2 SO 4 . From the rates at different temperatures ranging from 20deg to 35deg C, an apparent activation energy of 86 kcal/mole was calculated. The exchange rate was found to be accelerated by the addition of ferrous ions, and a half-life of less than 1 s, was obtained. Probable mechanisms for the acceleration of the uranium isotope exchange reactions by acidity and ferrous ions are proposed. (orig.)

  13. Separation of boron isotopes using NMG type anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Takaharu; Kosuge, Masao; Fukuda, Junji; Fujii, Yasuhiko.

    1992-01-01

    Ion exchange separation of boron isotopes (B-10 and B-11) has been studied by using a special boron selective ion exchange resin; NMG (n-methyl glucamine)-type anion exchange resin. The resin has shown a large isotope separation coefficient of 1.02 at the experimental conditions of temperature, 80degC, and boric acid concentration, 0.2 M (mole/dm 3 ). Enriched B-10 (92%) was obtained after the migration of 1149 m by a recyclic operation of ion exchange columns in a merry-go-round method. (author)

  14. Novel catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Rolston, J.H.; Stevens, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water offers many inherent potential advantages for the separation of hydrogen isotopes which is of great importance in the Canadian nuclear program. Active catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor have long been available, but these catalysts are essentially inactive in the presence of liquid water. New, water-repellent platinum catalysts have been prepared by: (1) treating supported catalysts with silicone, (2) depositing platinum on inherently hydrophobic polymeric supports, and (3) treating platinized carbon with Teflon and bonding to a carrier. The activity of these catalysts for isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of liquid water and hydrogen saturated with water vapor has been measured in a packed trickle bed integral reactor. The performance of these hydrophobic catalysts is compared with nonwetproofed catalysts. The mechanism of the overall exchange reaction is briefly discussed. 6 figures

  15. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  16. Isotope Exchange: a Potential Mechanism Regulating the Natural and Anthropogenic Pb Isotope Budget in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Boyle, E. A.; Zurbrick, C.; Carrasco, G. G.; Switzer, A.; Zhao, N.

    2016-02-01

    Two independent studies on anthropogenic Pb and Pb isotopes in coastal corals from the northern Arabian Gulf and the Singapore Straits have shown an isotopic excursion where the main Pb sources discharging to the water move to more crustal-like values, indicating that the Pb in coastal waters might exchange isotopically with crustal particulates without propotional change in concentration. To investigate this issue, Pb isotope exchange is assessed through a closed-system exchange experiment using estuarine waters collected at the Johor River mouth (discharging to the Singapore Straits). During the experiment, a known amount of NBS-981 (206Pb/207Pb=1.093) was spiked into the unfiltered Johor water (dissolved 206Pb/207Pb = 1.199) and the changing isotopic composition of the dissolved Pb was monitored. Shortly after the spike addition, dissolved Pb exhibited 206Pb/207Pb=1.178, reflecting the influence of the spike. Within the following few days, the 206Pb/207Pb in the water increased to >1.190 with limited changes of the dissolved Pb concentration. The observations in closed-system experiment agree with the isotope difference between Singapore aerosol and seawater in our 2-year-long field observations. The kinetics of isotope exchange were assessed using a simple model, which reproduced >70% of the observed Pb isotope variance. Both the close-system experiment and field measurements imply that isotope exchange can be an important mechanism for regulating the Pb and Pb isotopes in coastal waters. Investigations on the distribution of Pb and Pb isotope in estuaries and coastal waters should further assess the role of isotope exchange in ocean Pb chemistry.

  17. The isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography. Application to the lithium isotopes separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work is described the used study step to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a lithium isotopes separation process by ion exchange chromatography. After having recalled how is carried out the exchange reaction between the lithium isotopes bound on the cations exchanger resin and those which are in solution and gave the ion exchange chromatography principle, the authors establish a model which takes into account the cascade theory already used for enriched uranium production. The size parameters of this model are: the isotopic separation factor (which depends for lithium of the ligands nature and of the coordination factor), the isotopic exchange kinetics and the mass flow (which depends of the temperature, the lithium concentration, the resins diameter and the front advance). The way they have to be optimized and the implementation of the industrial process are given. (O.M.)

  18. Calcium isotope fractionation in ion-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.A.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Significant fractionation of the isotopes of calcium has been observed during elution through short ion-exchange columns packed with Dowex 50W-X8 resin. A double isotopic tracer was used to provide correction for instrumental fractionation effects. The absolute 40 Ca/ 44 Ca ratio is determined by this method to 0.05% and provides a measure of the fractionation of all Ca isotopes. It is found that the lighter isotopes are preferentially retained by the resin, with variations in 40 Ca/ 44 Ca between the first and last fractions of up to 1.1%. An estimate of the separation factor between batch solute and resin gives epsilon = 2.1 x 10 -4 . Details of the chemical or physical mechanisms causing isotope fractionation of Li, Na, Ca, and other elements during ion-exchange chromatography are not yet clear

  19. Magnesium isotope fractionation in cation-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, T.; Yanase, S.; Kakihana, H.

    1987-01-01

    Band displacement chromatography of magnesium has been carried out successfully for the purpose of magnesium isotope separation by using a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin and the strontium ion as the replacement ion. A small but definite accumulation of the heavier isotopes ( 25 Mg, 26 Mg) has been observed at the front parts of the magnesium chromatograms. The heavier isotopes have been fractionated preferentially into the solution phase. The single-stage separation factors have been calculated for the 25 Mg/ 24 Mg and 26 Mg/ 24 isotopic pairs at 25 0 C. The reduced partition function ratios of magnesium species involved in the present study have been estimated

  20. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.; Stevens, W.H.; Butler, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes can be separated efficiently by a process which combines an electrolysis cell with a trickle bed column packed with a hydrophobic platinum catalyst. The column effects isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of electrolytic hydrogen and liquid water while the electrolysis cell contributes to isotope separation by virtue of the kinetic isotope effect inherent in the hydrogen evolution reaction. The main features of the CECE process for heavy water production are presented as well as a discussion of the inherent positive synergistic effects, and other advantages and disadvantages of the process. Several potential applications of the process in the nuclear power industry are discussed. 3 figures, 2 tables

  1. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    A process is described for exchanging isotopes (particularly tritium) between water and gaseous hydrogen. Isotope depleted gaseous hydrogen and water containing a hydrogen isotope are introduced into the vapour phase in a first reaction area. The steam and gaseous hydrogen are brought into contact with a supported metal catalyst in this area in a parallel flow at a temperature range of around 225 and 300 0 C. An effluent flow comprising a mixture of isotope enriched gaseous hydrogen and depleted steam is evacuated from this area and the steam condensed into liquid water [fr

  2. Photosynthetic solar cell using nanostructured proton exchange membrane for microbial biofilm prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Oh, Hwa Jin; Bai, Seoung Jae; Song, Young Seok

    2014-06-24

    Unwanted biofilm formation has a detrimental effect on bioelectrical energy harvesting in microbial cells. This issue still needs to be solved for higher power and longer durability and could be resolved with the help of nanoengineering in designing and manufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a photosynthetic solar cell (PSC) that contains a nanostructure to prevent the formation of biofilm by micro-organisms. Nanostructures were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, where a film heater array system was introduced to precisely control the local wall temperature. To understand the heat and mass transfer phenomena behind the manufacturing and energy harvesting processes of PSC, we carried out a numerical simulation and experimental measurements. It revealed that the nanostructures developed on the proton exchange membrane enable PSC to produce enhanced output power due to the retarded microbial attachment on the Nafion membrane. We anticipate that this strategy can provide a pathway where PSC can ensure more renewable, sustainable, and efficient energy harvesting performance.

  3. Determination of kinetic parameters of heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Tsai, Fuan-Nan

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed for a heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction which involves film diffusion, surface chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion. The exchange equation to predict the exchange fraction as a function of time for the spherical particles immersed in a solution of finite volume has been derived. The relations between the exchange fraction and dimensionless time are plotted with xi(=ak sub(f)/KD sub(e)), xi 1 (=K 1 a 2 /D sub(e)) and final fractional uptake as parameters. From the values of the kinetic parameters xi and xi 1 , the relative importance of each limiting step is discussed. Experimental results of the isotopic exchange reaction of calcium ion in both system CaCO 3 (s)/Ca 2+ (aq) and system calcium type resin Dowex 50W-X8/Ca 2+ (aq) are coincident with the theoretical equation proposed in this study. (auth.)

  4. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  5. Stomatal kinetics and photosynthetic gas exchange along a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric regulation of plant water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick C. Meinzer; Duncan D. Smith; David R. Woodruff; Danielle E. Marias; Katherine A. McCulloh; Ava R. Howard; Alicia L. Magedman

    2017-01-01

    Species’ differences in the stringency of stomatal control of plant water potential represent a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviours. However, little is known about how quasi-steady-state stomatal regulation of water potential may relate to dynamic behaviour of stomata and photosynthetic gas exchange in species operating at different positions along this...

  6. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange cromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.; Matsui, E.; Salati, E.

    1979-01-01

    The ionic exchange chromatographic method in columns of resin which is employed in the study of isotopic enrichment of 15 N is presented. Determinations are made of the isotopic separation constant for the exchange of isotopes 15 N and 14 N in the equilibrium involving ammonium hidroxide in the solution phase and ions NH 4 + adsorbed in cationic resins: Dowex 50W-X8 and X12, 100-200 mesh. Experiments are also conducted for determination of height of theoretical plates for situations of equilibrium of the NH 4 + band in two systems of resin's columns aimed at estimating the experimental conditions used. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen are carried out by mass spectrometry [pt

  7. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, V.; McAdam, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    Under the influence of tritium β-radiation, 1,4-dioxan undergoes hydrogen exchange with the solvent water. The inhibition of the reaction by known electron scavengers (Ag + , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , H 3 + O) and also by species with high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals but negligible reactivity towards solvated electrons (N 3 - , Br - , SCN - ) has been examined in detail. γ-irradiation similarly induces hydrogen exchange. The action of scavengers is interpreted as requiring the involvement of two separately scavengeable primary radiolysis products in the sequence of reactions leading to exchange. The presence of electron scavengers, even at high concentration, does not totally inhibit the exchange, and a secondary exchange route, involving a low vacancy state of inhibitor cations, is considered responsible for the 'unscavengeable' portion of the reaction, by providing an alternative exchange route. Analogies are drawn between the exchange reaction and other radiation-induced reactions that are thought to involve spur processes. Some implication of radiation-chemical studies in water-alcohol mixtures are indicated. (author)

  8. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A.M. [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Fink, D. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Rose, J. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Waite, T. David [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability — a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases — of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl{sub 2}) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg{sup −1}. Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E = 1.68 × Al{sub KCl}, r{sup 2} = 0.66, n = 25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial ‘organic-rich’ CLASS having E values < 1000 mg·kg{sup −1}. It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here. - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Al was compared to 1 M KCl or 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extractable Al. • 1 M KCl always underestimated isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations. • 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} mobilised non-isotopically exchangeable Al • 1 M KCl values require correction of ~ 1.7 to reflect exchangeable Al concentrations.

  9. Isotopic exchange of nitrogen and ammonia synthesis on uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, G.I.; Boreskov, G.K.; Kharitonov, A.S.; Moroz, Eh.M.; Sobolev, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalytic properties of uranium nitride samples of different chemical composition: α - U 2 N 3 and UNsub(1, 70) are compared. The isotopic exchange at 553-623 K in both cases is realized by reversible dissociative nitrogen adsorption. Despite the proximity of structural and thermodynamic phase characteristics, the nitrogen adsorption heat differs by 120 kJ/mol which leads to strong differences in catalytic sample properties. It is shown that the isotopic exchange serves a reliable characteristic of activation of molecular nitrogen and its ability to react with the ammonia synthesis

  10. Contact isotopic- and contact ion-exchange between two adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunzl, K.; Mohan, R.; Haimerl, M.

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of contact ion exchange processes between an ion exchange membrane and resin ion exchange beads, stirred in pure water, was investigated. A general criterion was derived, which indicates whether diffusion of the ions between the intermingling electric double layers or the collision frequency between the two adsorbents is the rate dermining step. Since the latter process proved to be rate controlling under our experimental conditions, the corresponding rate equations were derived under various initial and boundary conditions. Experimentally, the kinetics of contact isotopic exchange of Cs + - and Na + -ions as well as of the reverse contact ion exchange process of Cs + -versus Na + -ions were investigated by using Na 22 and Cs 137 radioisotopes. The experiments reveal in quantitative accord with the theory that the rate of collision controlled contact ion exchange processes depends mainly on the 'exchange coefficient', the separation factor and the collision frequency. While the latter two quantities were determined independently by separate experiments, the 'exchange coefficient' was evaluated from a contact isotopic exchange experiment. (orig.) [de

  11. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  12. Isotopic exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Alex L.; Sylva, Sean P.; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The increasing popularity of compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses for investigating sedimentary organic matter raises numerous questions about the exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales. Important questions include the rates of isotopic exchange, methods for diagnosing exchange in ancient samples, and the isotopic consequences of that exchange. This article provides a review of relevant literature data along with new data from several pilot studies to investigate such issues. Published experimental estimates of exchange rates between organic hydrogen and water indicate that at warm temperatures (50-100°C) exchange likely occurs on timescales of 104 to 108 yr. Incubation experiments using organic compounds and D-enriched water, combined with compound-specific D/H analyses, provide a new and highly sensitive method for measuring exchange at low temperatures. Comparison of δD values for isoprenoid and n-alkyl carbon skeletons in sedimentary organic matter provides no evidence for exchange in young (exchange in ancient (>350 Ma) rocks. Specific rates of exchange are probably influenced by the nature and abundance of organic matter, pore-water chemistry, the presence of catalytic mineral surfaces, and perhaps even enzymatic activity. Estimates of equilibrium fractionation factors between organic H and water indicate that typical lipids will be depleted in D relative to water by ∼75 to 140‰ at equilibrium (30°C). Thus large differences in δD between organic molecules and water cannot be unambiguously interpreted as evidence against hydrogen exchange. A better approach may be to use changes in stereochemistry as a proxy for hydrogen exchange. For example, estimated rates of H exchange in pristane are similar to predicted rates for stereochemical inversion in steranes and hopanes. The isotopic consequences of this exchange remain in question. Incubations of cholestene with D2O indicate that the number of D atoms incorporated during

  13. Isotopic Exchange in Porous and Dense Magnesium Borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorotynska, Olena; Deledda, Stefano; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Hauback, Bjørn C

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH4)2) is one of the most promising complex hydrides presently studied for energy-related applications. Many of its properties depend on the stability of the BH4(-) anion. The BH4(-) stability was investigated with respect to H→D exchange. In situ Raman measurements on high-surface-area porous Mg(BH4 )2 in 0.3 MPa D2 have shown that the isotopic exchange at appreciable rates occurs already at 373 K. This is the lowest exchange temperature observed in stable borohydrides. Gas-solid isotopic exchange follows the BH4(-) +D˙ →BH3D(-) +H˙ mechanism at least at the initial reaction steps. Ex situ deuteration of porous Mg(BH4)2 and its dense-phase polymorph indicates that the intrinsic porosity of the hydride is the key behind the high isotopic exchange rates. It implies that the solid-state H(D) diffusion is considerably slower than the gas-solid H→D exchange reaction at the surface and it is a rate-limiting steps for hydrogen desorption and absorption in Mg(BH4)2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparative study on bromide and iodide ion-isotopic exchange reactions using strongly basic anion exchange resin Duolite A-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Dole, M.H.; Singare, P.U.

    2006-01-01

    Kinetics of ion-isotopic exchange reaction was studied using industrial grade ion exchange resin Duolite A-113. The radioactive isotopes 131 I and 82 Br were used to trace the ion-isotopic exchange reaction. The experiments were performed in the temperature range of 26.0degC to 43.0degC and the concentration of external ionic solution varying from 0.005 M to 0.100 M. For bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, the calculated values of specific reaction rate, initial rate of bromide ion exchange, and amount of bromide ions exchanged were obtained higher than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction under identical experimental conditions. The observed variation in the results for two ion-isotopic exchange reactions was due to the difference in the ionic size of bromide and iodide ions. (author)

  15. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2016-11-01

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of {sup 14}C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  16. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14 C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO 3 ) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of 14 C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  17. Nitrogen isotope exchange between nitric oxide and nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.; Abrudean, M.; Baldea, A.

    1996-01-01

    The rate of nitrogen isotope exchange between NO and HNO 3 has been measured as a function of nitric acid concentration of 1.5-4M x 1 -1 . The exchange rate law is shown to be R=k[HNO 3 ] 2 [N 2 O 3 ] and the measured activation energy is E=67.78 kJ x M -1 (16.2 kcal x M -1 ). It is concluded that N 2 O 3 participates in 15 N/ 14 N exchange between NO and HNO 3 at nitric acid concentrations higher than 1.5M x 1 -1 . (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Isotopic exchange reactions. Kinetics and efficiency of the reactors using them in isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, Jean

    1979-11-01

    In the first part, some definitions and the thermodynamic and kinetic isotopic effect concepts are recalled. In the second part the kinetic laws are established, in homogeneous and heterogeneous medium (one component being on occasions present in both phases), without and with isotopic effects. Emphasis is put on application to separation of isotopes, the separation factor α being close to 1, one isotope being in large excess with respect to the other one. Isotopic transfer is then given by: J = Ka (x - y/α) where x and y are the (isotopic) mole fractions in both phases, Ka may be either the rate of exchange or a transfer coefficient which can be considered as the 'same in both ways' if α-1 is small compared to the relative error on the measure of Ka. The third part is devoted to isotopic exchange reactors. Relationships between their efficiency and kinetics are established in some simple cases: plug cocurrent flow reactors, perfectly mixed reactors, countercurrent reactors without axial mixing. We treat only cases where α and the up flow to down flow ratio is close to 1 so that Murphee efficiency approximately overall efficiency (discrete stage contactors). HTU (phase 1) approximately HTU (phase 2) approximately HETP (columns). In a fourth part, an expression of the isotopic separative power of reactors is proposed and discussed [fr

  19. Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiswall, R.; Reilly, J.; Bloch, F.; Wirsing, E.

    1977-01-01

    Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70 0 C; zirconium, 500 to 600 0 C; LaNi 5 , -78 to +30 0 C; Mg 2 Ni, 300 to 375 0 C; palladium, 0 to 70 0 C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%

  20. Critical overview on water - hydrogen isotopic exchange; a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Water - hydrogen isotopic exchange process is attractive due to its high separation factor; it is neither corrosive or pollutant and, when used as a technological process of heavy water production, it requires water as raw material. Its efficiency depends strongly on the catalyst performance and geometry of the isotopic water - hydrogen exchange zone in which the isotopic transfer proceeds in two steps: liquid vapor distillation in the presence of an inert gas and a catalytic reaction in vapor - gas gaseous phase. An overview of the water hydrogen isotopic exchange is presented and technological details of the Trail - Canada facility as well as characteristics of the two pilots operated in Romania with Ni, Cr and hydrophobic catalysts are described. The mathematical approach of the successive water-water vapor-hydrogen isotopic exchange process given is based on a mathematical model worked out earlier by Palibroda. Discrepancies between computation and experimental results, lower than 11% for extreme cases and around 6% for the average range are explained as due to the ratio of the exchange potentials. Assumption is made in the theoretical approach that this ratio is positive and constant all long the column while the measurements showed that it varies within 0.7 and 1.1 at the upper end and within - 2.5 and - 4.4 at the lower end, what indicates a strong end effect. In conclusion it is stressed that a competing technological solution is emerging based on a monothermal electrolytic process or a bithermal - bibaric process both for heavy water and tritium separation process

  1. Isotope effects in ion-exchange equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Isotope effects in ion-exchange equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvents are analyzed in terms of the general features of ion-exchange equilibria and of isotope effects in chemical equilibria. The special role of solvent fractionation effects in ion-exchange equilibria in mixed solvents is pointed out. The various situations arising in isotope fractionation in ion exchange in mixed solvents due to solvent fractionation effects are theoretically discussed. The experimental data on lithium isotope effects in ion-exchange equilibria in mixed solvents are shown to conform to the above situations. The limitations of ion-exchange equilibria in mixed solvents for isotope fractionation are pointed out. 3 tables

  2. Mass-independent isotope effects in chemical exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kazushige

    2000-01-01

    Isotope effects of some elements in chemical exchange reaction were investigated by use of liquid-liquid extraction, liquid membrane or chromatographic separation. Cyclic polyether was used for every method. All polyethers used in a series of the studies were made clear that they distinguished the isotopes not only by their nuclear masses but also by their nuclear sizes and shapes. Chromium isotopes, for example, were recognized to have enrichment factors being proportional to δ 2 > which is a parameter to show field shift or the nuclear size and shape of the isotope. It follows that the chromium isotopes are separated not by their masses but by their field shift effects. Nuclear spin also played a great role to separate odd mass number isotopes from even mass number isotopes in even atomic number elements. Contribution of the nuclear spin (I=3/2) of 53 Cr to total enrichment factor, ε 53/52 = -0.00028, for 53 Cr to 52 Cr was observed to be, ε spin = -0.0025. (author)

  3. The effects of lead on the gaseous exchange and photosynthetic carbon metabolism of pea seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy W. Poskuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Roots of whole 3 week-old pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. var. "Bordi" were immersed for 24 h in solutions of lead chloride at Pb copcentrations of 200, 400, 800,12000 mg dm3. Accumulation of lead in roots was independent of the Pb concentration, whereas the accumulation of Pb in shoots was an almost linear function of the concentration of this element in the root medium. This treatment caused Pb concentration-dependent inhibition of apparent photosynthesis (APS, photorespiration (PR, 14CO2 uptake, stomatal opening and transpiration of shoots and also germination of seeds. The most sensitive to Pb contamination was CO2 exchange, then transpiration and to a lesser degree germination of seeds. Lead caused a considerable alteration of photosynthetic and photorespiratory carbon metabolism, restricted the 14C-labeling of: phosphoglycerate, ribose+ribulose, sucrose, glycolate and glycine+serine. Under conditions of C02 uptake limited by lead, an enhancement of the 14C-labeling of malate+citrate, alanine and glucose was observed.

  4. Hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium isotope exchange experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.D.; Andrew, P.; Bracco, G.; Conroy, S.; Corti, S.; Ehrenberg, J.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Jarvis, O.N.; Lomas, P.; Loughlin, M.; Peacock, A.T.; Saibene, G.; Sadler, G.; Sartori, R.; Stamp, M.F.; Thomas, P.R.; Belle, P. van (JET Joint Untertaking, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom))

    1992-12-01

    Isotope exchange experiments have been performed in JET using hydrogen, deuterium, and, in the recent preliminary tritium experiment (PTE), tritium. The rate of change-over from one isotope to another involves two quite different time constants. We have modelled this behaviour using a multireservoir model which splits the accessible hydrogenic particles into two groups, each having a different rate of exchange of particles with the plasma. By applying this model to the sequence of discharges during and after the PTE, we can determine the parameters in the model. The resulting fit also gives a good representation of hydrogen/deuterium change-over experiments, indicating that the tritium behaves in the same manner as other hydrogen isotopes, at least as far as recycling is concerned. Discrepancies between the model and the actual measurements of tritium recovery after the PTE lead us to conclude that isotope exchange processes resulting from collisions of molecules with the vessel walls play a significant role in spreading tritrium around the machine. (orig.).

  5. Sensitivity of Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Growth of Lodgepole Pine to Climate Variability Depends on the Age of Pleistocene Glacial Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, B.; Chapple, W.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between soil conditions and climate variability plays a central role in the ecohydrological functions of montane conifer forests. Although soil moisture availability to trees is largely dependent on climate, the depth and texture of soil exerts a key secondary influence. Multiple Pleistocene glacial events have shaped the landscape of the central Rocky Mountains creating a patchwork of soils differing in age and textural classification. This mosaic of soil conditions impacts hydrological properties, and montane conifer forests potentially respond to climate variability quite differently depending on the age of glacial till and soil development. We hypothesized that the age of glacial till and associated soil textural changes exert strong control on growth and photosynthetic gas exchange of lodgepole pine. We examined physiological and growth responses of lodgepole pine to interannual variation in maximum annual snow water equivalence (SWEmax) of montane snowpack and growing season air temperature (Tair) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) across a chronosequence of Pleistocene glacial tills ranging in age from 700k to 12k years. Soil textural differences across the glacial tills illustrate the varying degrees of weathering with the most well developed soils with highest clay content on the oldest till surfaces. We show that sensitivity of growth and carbon isotope discrimination, an integrated measure of canopy gas exchange properties, to interannual variation SWEmax , Tair and VPD is greatest on young till surfaces, whereas trees on old glacial tills with well-developed soils are mostly insensitive to these interannual climate fluctuations. Tree-ring widths were most sensitive to changes in SWEmax on young glacial tills (p < 0.01), and less sensitive on the oldest till (p < 0.05). Tair correlates strongly with δ13C values on the oldest and youngest tills sites, but shows no significant relationship on the middle aged glacial till. It is clear that

  6. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicka, J.; Stamberg, K.; Cabicar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1986-01-01

    The description of kinetics of ion exchange in ternary system was based upon three Nernst-Planck equations, each of them describing the particle diffusion flux of a given counterion as an independent process. For experimental verification, the strongly acidic cation exchanger OSTION KS 08 the shallow-bed technique, and 0.2 mol x dm -3 aqueous nitrate solutions were chosen. The kinetics of ion exchange in the system of cations Na + - Mg 2+ - UO 2 2+ was studied. The values of diffusion coefficients obtained by evaluating of kinetics of isotope exchange and binary ion exchange were used for calculation. The comparison of calculated exchange rate curves with the experimental ones was made. It was found that the exchanging counterions were affected by each other. (author)

  7. An Excel tool for deriving key photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Combined photosynthetic gas exchange and modulated fluorometres are widely used to evaluate physiological characteristics associated with phenotypic and genotypic variation, whether in response to genetic manipulation or resource limitation in natural vegetation or crops. After describing relatively simple experimental procedures, we present the theoretical background to the derivation of photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel-based fitting tool (EFT) that will be of use to specialists and non-specialists alike. We use data acquired in concurrent variable fluorescence-gas exchange experiments, where A/Ci and light-response curves have been measured under ambient and low oxygen. From these data, the EFT derives light respiration, initial PSII (photosystem II) photochemical yield, initial quantum yield for CO2 fixation, fraction of incident light harvested by PSII, initial quantum yield for electron transport, electron transport rate, rate of photorespiration, stomatal limitation, Rubisco (ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) rate of carboxylation and oxygenation, Rubisco specificity factor, mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion, light and CO2 compensation point, Rubisco apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, and Rubisco CO2 -saturated carboxylation rate. As an example, a complete analysis of gas exchange data on tobacco plants is provided. We also discuss potential measurement problems and pitfalls, and suggest how such empirical data could subsequently be used to parameterize predictive photosynthetic models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Deriving C4 photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence using an Excel tool: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The higher photosynthetic potential of C4 plants has led to extensive research over the past 50 years, including C4 -dominated natural biomes, crops such as maize, or for evaluating the transfer of C4 traits into C3 lineages. Photosynthetic gas exchange can be measured in air or in a 2% Oxygen mixture using readily available commercial gas exchange and modulated PSII fluorescence systems. Interpretation of these data, however, requires an understanding (or the development) of various modelling approaches, which limit the use by non-specialists. In this paper we present an accessible summary of the theory behind the analysis and derivation of C4 photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel Fitting Tool (EFT), making rigorous C4 data analysis accessible to a broader audience. Outputs include those defining C4 photochemical and biochemical efficiency, the rate of photorespiration, bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion and the in vivo biochemical constants for PEP carboxylase. The EFT compares several methodological variants proposed by different investigators, allowing users to choose the level of complexity required to interpret data. We provide a complete analysis of gas exchange data on maize (as a model C4 organism and key global crop) to illustrate the approaches, their analysis and interpretation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Isotope exchange of strontium and molybdate ions in strontium polymolybdates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, G.

    2002-01-01

    The heterogeneous isotopic exchange reactions in strontium polymolybdates of Sr 2+ and MoO 4 2- ions in the strontium nitrate and sodium molybdate solutions have been studied using 90 Sr and 99 Mo as tracers. Electrometric methods have been used to study the compositions of strontium molybdates obtained by adding strontium chloride to a progressively acidified solution of sodium molybdate. It has been found that the exchange fraction increases with increasing chain length of strontium polymolybdate. The exchange equilibrium constant (K ex ) has been calculated between 298 and 348 K as well as ΔG deg, ΔH deg and ΔS deg. The results indicate that Sr 2+ cations have a much higher affinity for exchangers than MoO 4 2- anions. By fitting the data to the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm it has been shown that the exchange capacity (X m ) for both ions is affected by the ion adsorption process at low temperatures and by the ion exchange process at high temperatures. At high concentrations, the recrystallization process contributes to on the cation exchange but is ineffective on the anion exchange mechanism. (author)

  10. Isotopic exchange in mixed valence compounds in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Valverde, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work aims at the determination of isotopic exchange kinetics and mechanism in two mixed valence compounds: Cs 10 (Sbsup(V)Cl 6 ) (Sbsup(III)Cl 6 ) 3 and Tl 3 sup(I)(Tlsup(III)Cl 6 ). The synthesis of the first compound is very difficult because in most of the cases mixtures of chloroantimoniates are obtained. Exchange in Tl 4 Cl 6 labelled on Tlsup(III) is studied in detail by radiochemical analysis and physical techniques: ionic conductivity and positon annihilation. Cation vacancies are easily created in the lattice with formation enthalpy of 0.35 eV and migration enthalpy of 0.52 eV. Isochronic and isothermal exchange curves are described by a kinetic based on species diffusion. Models are given. Exchange is increased by grinding probably because extrinseque defects are introduced [fr

  11. Determination of traces of phosphorus using isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, A.; Kratzer, K.

    1976-01-01

    A simple and selective radioanalytical method for the determination of phosphorus (0.015 - 5 μg in a 5 ml sample), based on the heterogeneous isotope exchange, has been developed. The sample containing phosphorus is shaken in the presence of molybdate with a standard solution of tetraphenylarsonium molybdophosphate labelled with phosphorus-32 in 1-2 dicloroethan. From the distribution of the activity between the aqueous and organic phases the amount of phosphorus in the sample can be determined. (Authors)

  12. Calcium hydroxide isotope effect in calcium isotope enrichment by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.; Shockey, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    The enrichment of calcium isotopes has been observed in ion-exchange chromatography with an aqueous phase of calcium hydroxide and a solid phase of sulfonic acid resin. The band front was exceedingly sharp as a result of the acid-base reaction occuring at the front of the band. Single-stage separation coefficients were found to be epsilon( 44 Ca/ 40 Ca) = 11 x 10 -4 and epsilon( 48 Ca/ 40 Ca) = 18 x 10 -4 . The maximum column separation factors achieved were 1.05 for calcium-44 and 1.09 for calcium-48 with the heavy isotopes enriching in the fluid phase. The calcium isotope effect between fully hydrated aqueous calcium ions and undissociated aqueous calcium hydroxide was estimated. For the calcium-44/40 isotope pair the separation coefficient was 13 x 10 -4 . 20 references, 2 figures

  13. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk

    2005-01-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water

  14. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water.

  15. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, 18 O-β,γ-ATP and 18 O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field 31 P NMR, we were able to differentiate between 18 O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with 18 O-β,γ-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the 18 O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN 1 /sub P/) type of mechanism

  16. Boron isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography using weakly basic anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Yoichi; Aida, Masao; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1980-01-01

    Isotopic plateau displacement chromatography, a useful method for isotope separation is presented. The boric acid band formed in a column of weakly basic anion exchange resin Diaion WA21 can be eluted with pure water. In order to obtain good accumulation of the isotope effect, a series of experiments with different migration length were carried out. The boron-10 enriched part of the boric acid absorbed band was always preceded by the isotopic plateau part, in which the atomic fraction of boron-10 was maintained at its original value. The atomic fraction of boron-10 at the end of the chromatogram increased with migration length, and in the case of 256-m migration, boron-10 was enriched from its original atomic fraction of 19.84 to 91.00%, the separation factor S being constant irrespective of migration length: S = 1.0100 +- 0.0005. (author)

  17. Comparative study on ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by application of tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes 131 I and 82 Br were used to trace the ion-isotopic exchange reactions using industrial grade ion exchange resins Amberlite IRA-400. The experiments were performed to understand the effect of temperature and concentration of ionic solution on kinetics of exchange reactions. Both the exchange reactions were greatly influenced by rise in temperature, which result in higher percentage of ions exchanged. For bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions, the calculated values of specific reaction rate/min -1 , and amount of ions exchanged/mmol were obtained higher than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reactions under identical experimental conditions. The observed variation in the results for two ion-isotopic exchange reactions was due to the difference in the ionic size of bromide and iodide ions. (orig.)

  18. Speciation and isotopic exchangeability of nickel in soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Annette L; Ma, Yibing; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of trace metal speciation in soil pore waters is important in addressing metal bioavailability and risk assessment of contaminated soils. In this study, free Ni(2+) activities were determined in pore waters of long-term Ni-contaminated soils using a Donnan dialysis membrane technique. The pore water free Ni(2+) concentration as a percentage of total soluble Ni ranged from 21 to 80% (average 53%), and the average amount of Ni bound to dissolved organic matter estimated by Windermere Humic Aqueous Model VI was < or = 17%. These data indicate that complexed forms of Ni can constitute a significant fraction of total Ni in solution. Windermere Humic Aqueous Model VI provided reasonable estimates of free Ni(2+) fractions in comparison to the measured fractions (R(2) = 0.83 with a slope of 1.0). Also, the isotopically exchangeable pools (E value) of soil Ni were measured by an isotope dilution technique using water extraction, with and without resin purification, and 0.1 mol L(-1) CaCl(2) extraction, and the isotopic exchangeability of Ni species in soil water extracts was investigated. The concentrations of isotopically non-exchangeable Ni in water extracts were <9% of total water soluble Ni concentrations for all soils. The resin E values expressed as a percentage of the total Ni concentrations in soil showed that the labile Ni pool ranged from 0.9 to 32.4% (average 12.4%) of total soil Ni. Therefore the labile Ni pool in these well-equilibrated contaminated soils appears to be relatively small in relation to total Ni concentrations.

  19. Sulfur Isotope Exchange between S-35 Labeled Inorganic Sulfur-Compounds in Anoxic Marine-Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FOSSING, H.; THODEANDERSEN, S.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    of isotope exchange, specific radioactivities of the reduced sulfur pools were poorly defined and could not be used to calculate their rates of formation. Such isotope exchange reactions between the reduced inorganic sulfur compounds will affect the stable isotope distribution and are expected to decrease...

  20. Electron exchange reaction in anion exchangers as observed in uranium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obanawa, Heiichiro; Takeda, Kunihiko; Seko, Maomi

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of electron exchange in an ion exchanger, as occurring between U 4+ and UO 2 2+ in uranium isotope separation, was investigated. The height of the separation unit (H q ) in the presence of metal ion catalysts, as obtained from the separation experiments, was found to be almost coincident with the theoretical value of H q as calculated on the basis of the intrasolution acceleration mechanism of the metal ion, suggesting that the electron exchange mechanism in the ion-exchanger is essentially the same as that in the solution when metal ion catalysts are present. Separation experiments with no metal ion catalyst, on the other hand, showed the electron exchange reaction in the ion exchanger to be substantially higher than that in the solution, suggesting an acceleration of the electron exchange reaction by the ion-exchanger which is due to the close existence of higher order Cl - complexes of UO 2 2+ and U 4+ in the vicinity of the ion-exchange group. (author)

  1. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on gas exchange and stable isotope ratio of δ13C, δ15N of leymus chinensis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Weiqi; Wang Guoan; Li Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    Leymus chinensis, one of dominant species in Inner Mongolia grassland, was selected to evaluate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on plant gas change parameters and stable isotope ratio in pot culture. The plant was inoculated with two mycorrhizal fungi, Glomus intraradices and Glomus claroidum, and the uninoculated plant was used as the control check. On the 45th , 60th , 75th days after sowing, gas exchange parameters and stable isotope ratio were measured. The results showed that AM infection promoted phosphoms content, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate of Leymus chinensis, reduced host δ 15 N, however, it did not influence host intrinsic water using efficiency and δ 13 C. It was the growth time that significantly affected the gas exchange and stable isotope ratio of δ 13 C and δ 15 N. And the interaction of inoculation and growth time also influenced on the net photosynthetic rate, δ 13 C and δ 15 N of the host. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate were always changed the same direction by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi causing no significant difference between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plant. AMF absorbed nitrogen and accumulated δ 15 N, thus, it transformed less 15 N into the host, and as a result, the mycorrhizal plant had lower δ 15 N. Therefore, the results gave a new way and reference to know of the grass balance of carbon gain and water cost and the nitrogen cycle in grassland. (authors)

  2. Charge exchange effect on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Hideaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Otani, Hiroyasu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1982-01-01

    Uranium isotope separating experiment was performed using the two-step photoionization technique with dye laser and nitrogen laser by heating uranium metal with electron beam and producing atomic beam using generated vapour. The experimental results are described after explaining the two-step photoionization by laser, experimental apparatus, the selection of exciting wavelength and others. Enrichment factor depends largely on the spectrum purity of dye laser which is the exciting source. A large enrichment factor of 48.3 times was obtained for spectrum width 0.03A. To put the uranium isotope separation with laser into practice, the increase of uranium atomic density is considered to be necessary for improving the yield. Experimental investigation was first carried out on the charge exchange effect that seems most likely to affect the decrease of enrichment factor, and the charge exchange cross-section was determined. The charge exchange cross-section depends on the relative kinetic energy between ions and atoms. The experimental result showed that the cross-section was about 5 x 10 -13 cm 2 at 1 eV and 10 -13 cm 2 at 90 eV. These values are roughly ten times as great as those calculated in Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and it is expected that they become the greatest factor for giving the upper limit of uranium atomic density in a process of practical application. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper presents some studies on production of 15 N-enriched ammonium sulphate with 5% atoms by ionic exchange chromatography method. Two systems are described of columns of resin, where experiments were conducted by eluition of NH 4 + bands with sodium hydroxide solution. Analyses were made of the cost of production of 15 N-enriched ammonium sulphate 5% atoms and, based on the experiments developed, a cost was obtained which was compatible with the international price of the product. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen were made by mass spectrometry. (Author) [pt

  4. Thermodynamics of calcium-isotope-exchange reactions. 1. Exchange between isotopic calcium carbonates and aqueous calcium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.S.; Nash, C.P.; Rock, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the authors results for the direct experimental determination of the equilibrium constant for the calcium-isotope-exchange reaction 40 CaCO 3 (s) + 44 CaCl 2 (aq) reversible 44 CaCO 2 (s) + 40 CaCl 2 (aq). The reaction was studied in electrochemical double cells without liquid junction of the type shown in eq 2. The experimental value of the equilibrium constant at 295 +/- 2 K is K = 1.08 +/- 0.02. The experimental value for K is compared with the values of K calculated for various model reactions according to the statistical thermodynamic theory of isotope effects. The isotopic solid carbonates were modeled according to both the Debye and Kieffer theories. No structured models of solvated isotopic aqueous calcium ions yield calculated equilibrium constants in agreement with their experimental results. This conclusion is in agreement with published molecular dynamics calculations which show that the aqueous solvation of Ca 2 =(aq) is essentially unstructured

  5. Chemical exchange equilibria in isotope separation. Part I : Evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of chemical exchange equilibria as applied to the isotope separation processes and the isotope effects on equilibrium constants of different exchange reactions has come a long way since its inception by Urey and Rittenberg. An attempt has been made to bring relevant information together and present a unified approach to isotopic chemical exchange equilibrium constant evaluation and its implications to separation processes. (auth.)

  6. Study on influencing factors for hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Mei; Liu Jun; Luo Yangming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction offers an approach to hydrogen isotope separation, which can be applied in heavy water detritiation. Purpose: To optimize the operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction, we analysed the influence of different factors on the transfer coefficient. Methods: In detail, the isotope exchange experiments of H-D system were carried out in a self-designed catalytic bed loaded with hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing with certain volume ratio. The experiments showed the changes of both the transfer coefficient and the pressure drop of column with the changing of the operational temperatures (29℃, 45℃, 60℃ and 75℃), the ratios of gas to liquid (0.58, 1.17, 2.65, 3.54) and the deuterium concentrations (5.05×10 -3 , 1.0144×10 -2 , 2.01×10 -2 ). Results: Results showed that 45℃ is the optimal temperature for operating. The transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of the ratio of gas to liquid in the ranges of 0.58 to 1.17 and 2.65 to 3.56, while decreases with the deuterium concentration increases from 5.05×10 -3 to 2.01×10 -2 . The pressure drop of column increases with increasing of gas flow rate. Conclusions: The experiment proves that the ratio of gas to liquid, the reaction temperature and the deuterium concentration are all important factors, which influence the transfer coefficient of deuterium obviously. The optimal operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction are as follows: the temperature is 45℃, the ratio of gas to liquid is 3.56, and the deuterium concentration is 2.01×10 -2 . (authors)

  7. The isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography. Application to the lithium isotopes separation; La separation isotopique par chromatographie ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, M G; Barre, Y; Neige, R

    1994-12-31

    In this work is described the used study step to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a lithium isotopes separation process by ion exchange chromatography. After having recalled how is carried out the exchange reaction between the lithium isotopes bound on the cations exchanger resin and those which are in solution and gave the ion exchange chromatography principle, the authors establish a model which takes into account the cascade theory already used for enriched uranium production. The size parameters of this model are: the isotopic separation factor (which depends for lithium of the ligands nature and of the coordination factor), the isotopic exchange kinetics and the mass flow (which depends of the temperature, the lithium concentration, the resins diameter and the front advance). The way they have to be optimized and the implementation of the industrial process are given. (O.M.). 5 refs.

  8. Study of the isotopic exchange associated with ionic exchange for the radiochemical separation of 233-Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda Munita, C.J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The isotopic ion exchange procedure is applied in order to establish an analytical method for the determination of thorium by means of the 233 Th activity, when the presence of interfering elements does not allow a direct non-destructive activation analysis. The separation is based on the retention of 233 Th by a thorium saturated resin, due to the isotopic exchange effect, and subsequent elution of the interfering radioisotopes with a solution of thorium in diluted hydrochloric acid. The interfering elements were those which either present a great affinity for the resin or emit gamma rays with energies close to that of 233 Th (86.6 KeV), when a NaI(Tl) detector is used to obtain the gama-ray spectra of the irradiated samples. The equilibrium time for the thorium isotopic ion exchange and the distribution coefficients for the interfering elements were determined by using Bio-Rad AG 50W resins (100-200 mesh), with 4% to 8% of divinylbenzene. The best separation conditions were established in terms of the thorium and hydrochloric acid concentrations in the solution, the resin cross-linking degree, and the solution flow through the resin. The analytical method was applied to the determination of thorium in samples of ammonium diuranate as well in standard rock samples from the United States Geological Survey. The sensitivity, precision and accuracy of the method are also discussed. (Author) [pt

  9. Application of ion exchange to isotope separation. 2. Isotope separation of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Aida, Masao; Nomura, Masao; Aoyama, Taku

    1985-10-01

    Research work on the uranium isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography done by the ahthors was reviewed and summarized in the present paper. Specifically described are the determination of separation coefficients of uranium isotopes in various chemical systems involving uranium ions and complexes. The chemical systems are classifield into three main categories; (1) uranyl, U (VI), complex formation system, (2) uranous, U (IV), complex formation system and (3) U (IV) - U (VI) redox system. The redox system showed the largest separation coefficient of approx. 7 x 10/sup -4/, while the uranyl and uranous complex systems showed the separation coefficients of -- 2 x 10/sup -4/ and approx. 6 x 10/sup -5/, respectively.

  10. Preparation of inorganic ion exchangers with high selectivity for lithium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    Development of ion exchangers that show large lithium isotope effects is hoped for to establish highly efficient chromatographic processes of lithium isotope separation. In this paper, preparation, characterization, ion exchange properties, and lithium isotope selectivity of inorganic materials that have been and still are being studied by my research group at Sophia University are reviewed. They include manganese oxides-based ion exchangers, antimonic acids and titanium/zirconium phosphates-based ion exchangers. As a result, the lithium isotope separation effects that were one order of magnitude larger than those of organic ion exchangers were obtained. Some inorganic ion exchangers were found to show ion exchange rates more than comparable to those of organic ones. (author)

  11. Method for enriching and separating heavy hydrogen isotopes from substance streams containing such isotopes by means of isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knochel, A.; Eggers, I.; Klatte, B.; Wilken, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    A process for enriching and separating heavy hydrogen isotopes having a heavy hydrogen cation (deuterium and/or tritium) from substance streams containing them, wherein the respectively present hydrogen isotopes are exchanged in chemical equilibria. A protic, acid solution containing deuterium and/or tritium is brought into contact with a value material from the group of open-chained polyethers or aminopolyethers, macro-monocyclic or macro-polycyclic polyethers, macro-monocyclic or macro-polycyclic amino polyethers, and mixtures of these values, in their free or proton salt form to form a reaction product of the heavy hydrogen cation with the value or value salt and bring about enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium in the reaction product. The reaction product containing the value or value salt is separated from the solution. The separated reaction product is treated to release the hydrogen isotope(s) to be enriched in the form of deuterium oxide (HDO) and/or tritium oxide (HTO) by regenerating the value or its salt, respectively. The regenerated value is returned for reuse

  12. Radiation-related retrograde hydrogen isotope and K-Ar exchange in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, C.; Pagel, M.; Sheppard, S.M.F.; Weber, F.; Clauer, N.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies have been widely applied to characterize the origin of fluids during ore-foaming processes. The primary isotope record, however, may be disturbed by retrograde exchange reactions, thus complicating the interpretation of the data. The susceptibility of minerals to retrograde isotope and chemical exchange is variable, reflecting differences in the mechanism and rate of isotope exchange. Results are presented on deuterium depletion, K/Ar ages and H 2 O + content of illites associated with uranium mineralization from the Athabasca basin (Canada). (author)

  13. Isotope separation by chemical exchange process: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, A.

    1987-02-01

    The feasibility of a chemical exchange method for the separation of the isotopes of europium was demonstrated in the system EuCl 2 -EuCl 3 . The single stage separation factor, α, in this system is 1.001 or 1.0005 per mass unit. This value of α is comparable to the separation factors reported for the U 4+ - U 6 and U 3+ - Y 4+ systems. The separation of the ionic species was done by precipitation of the Eu 2+ ions or by extraction of the Eu 3+ ions with HDEHP. Conceptual schemes were developed for a countercurrent reflux cascades consisting of solvent extraction contractors. A regenerative electrocel, combining simultaneous europium reduction, europium oxidation with energy generation, and europium stripping from the organic phase is described. 32 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Thermoneutral isotope exchange reactions of cations in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.; Lias, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Rate constants have been measured for reactions of the type AD 2 + + MH → MD + ADH + , where AD 2 + is CD 3 CND + , CD 3 CDOD + , (CD 3 COCD 3 )D + , or (C 2 D 5 ) 2 OD + and the MH molecules are alcohols, acids, mercaptans, H 2 S, AsH 3 , PH 3 , or aromatic molecules. Rate constants are also presented for the reactions Ar/sub H/D + + D 2 O → Ar/sub d/D + + HDO, where Ar/sub H/D + is a deuteronated aromatic molecule and Ar/sub D/D + is the same species with a D atom incorporated on the ring. In all but two cases, the competing deuteron transfer is sufficiently endothermic that it cannot be observed under the conditions of the ICR experiments at 320 to 420 K. The efficiencies of the isotope exchange reactions are interpreted in terms of estimated potential surface cross sections for the reactions AD 2 + + MH → [AD 2 + MH] → [ADMHD + ] → [ADH + MD] → ADH + + MD. When the formation of the [ADMHD + ] complex is estimated to be thermoneutral or slightly endothermic, the isotope exchange process is inefficient (probability of a reactive collision 2 + MH] → [ADMHD + ] is exothermic. For most of the systems, trends in reaction efficiency appear to be related to factors such as dipole moments of reactant species (or for aromatic compounds, the electron-donating or -withdrawing properties of ring substituents) which influence the relative orientation of the two reactant species in the complex

  15. Separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography: studies with Duolite-162, a type-II resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The selection of resin plays an important role in the process of separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography. The determination of (i) ion exchange capacity of Duolite-162 resin for hydroxyl - chloride exchange, (ii) hydroxyl - borate exchange, (iii) isotopic exchange separation factor by batch method and (iv) effect of concentration of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor to test the suitability of the above resin for this process are discussed in this report. (author)

  16. Enhancement of isotope exchange reactions over ceramic breeder material by deposition of catalyst metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narisato, Y.; Munakata, K.; Koga, A.; Yokoyama, Y.; Takata, T.; Okabe, H.

    2004-01-01

    The deposition of catalyst metals in ceramic breeders could enhance the release rate of tritium due to the promotion of isotope exchange reactions taking place at the interface of the breeder surface and the sweep gas. In this work, the authors examined the effects of catalytic active metal deposited on lithium titanate on the isotope exchange reactions. With respect to the virgin lithium titanate, it was found that the rate of the isotope exchange reactions taking place on the surface is quite low. However, the deposition of palladium greatly increased the exchange reaction rate. The effect of the amounts of deposited palladium on the isotope exchange reaction rate was also investigated. The results indicate that the exchange reactions are still enhanced even if the amounts of deposited palladium are as low as 0.04%

  17. Sulfur isotope separation by anion exchange chromatography: 34 S isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar O.; Carneiro Junior, Francisco

    1995-01-01

    The 34 S isotope separation was carried out by isotopic exchange reactions between sulphurous acid in solution and bisulphite anions adsorbed on an ammonium quaternary (Dowex 1 x 8 and Dowex 2 x 8, 100-200 mesh) anion exchange resin packed in columns. Each resin column had 130 cm length and 2.2 cm diameter. The columns were connected in series during displacement of bisulphite bands. For the experiments, a band of bisulphite was fixed to the anion resin, initially in the hydroxyl ion form, and subsequently eluted with 0.2 0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 mol L -1 HCL solution. The hydrochloric acid solution was kept under a nitrogen atmosphere at 245 KPa of pressure, in order to prevent the evolution of gases and also the oxidation of the bisulphite. The experiments showed that the best results were obtained with the elution of bisulphite with 0.2 mol.L -1 HCL, with the Dowex 1 x 8 resin. Enrichments in 34 S of 17.33 atoms% were obtained using Dowex 1 x 8 resin, 0.2 mol.L -1 HCL solution and band displacement of 50 m. Replacing the depleted portion of the band with natural bisulphite, for each 10 m of band displacement, produced 6.79 mmol of sulphurous acid enriched with approximately 17% of 34 S, after 14 m of band dislocation. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. Oxygen isotope exchange rate between dissolved sulfate and water at hydrothermal temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, H.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen isotope exchange rate between dissolved sulfate and water was experimentally determined at 100, 200 and 300 deg C. The isotope exchange rate is strongly dependent on temperature and pH of the solution. Combining the temperature and pH dependence of the reaction rate, the exchange reaction was estimated to be first-order with respect to sulfate. The logarithm of apparent rate constant of exchange reaction at a given temperature is a function of the pH calculated at the experimental temperatures. From the pH dependence of the apparent rate constant, it was deduced that the isotope exchange reaction between dissolved sulfate and water proceeds through collision between H 2 SO 4 0 and H 2 O at low pH, and between HSO 4 - and H 2 O at intermediate pH. The isotope exchange rate obtained indicates that oxygen isotope geothermometry utilizing the studied isotope exchange is suitable for temperature estimation of geothermal reservoirs. The extrapolated half-life of this reaction to oceanic temperature is about 10 9 years, implying that exchange between oceanic sulfate and water cannot control the oxygen isotope ratio of oceanic sulfates. (author)

  19. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of leaf biomass reveals contrasting photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 near geologic vents in Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Williams

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the use of natural CO2 emissions in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in Wyoming, USA to study responses of natural vegetation to elevated CO2 levels. Radiocarbon (14C analysis of leaf biomass from a conifer (Pinus contortus; lodgepole pine and an invasive, non-native herb (Linaria dalmatica; Dalmation toadflax was used to trace the inputs of vent CO2 and quantify assimilation-weighted CO2 concentrations experienced by individual plants near vents and in comparable locations with no geologic CO2 exposure. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition and nitrogen percent of leaf biomass from the same plants was used to investigate photosynthetic responses of these plants to naturally elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The coupled shifts in carbon and oxygen isotope values suggest that dalmation toadflax responded to elevated CO2 exposure by increasing stomatal conductance with no change in photosynthetic capacity and lodgepole pine apparently responded by decreasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Lodgepole pine saplings exposed to elevated levels of CO2 likewise had reduced leaf nitrogen concentrations compared to plants with no enhanced CO2 exposure, further suggesting widespread and dominant conifer down-regulated photosynthetic capacity under elevated CO2 levels near geologic vents.

  20. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions over illuminated and nonilluminated TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange between H 2 , gaseous H 2 O, and the surface hydroxyls of TiO 2 , and oxygen isotope exchange between O 2 , CO 2 , CO, H 2 O vapor, and the hydroxyls over TiO 3 were studied at room temperature in the dark and under illumination. Hydrogen isotope exchange between H 2 O and the hydroxyls occurred rapidly in the dark, but the exchange involving H 2 did not occur at all even under illumination. Oxygen isotope exchange among H 2 O vapor, CO 2 , and the hydroxyls easily took place in the dark, but the exchange involving O 2 required band-gap illumination. Dioxygen isotope equilibration was much faster than the other photoexchange reactions. Although the oxygen exchange between O 2 and illuminated TiO 2 has been considered to involve lattice-oxygen exchange, the present experiments revealed that the hydroxyls of TiO 2 mainly participate in the exchange reaction. The oxygen exchange between O 2 and H 2 O vapor was strongly inhibited by H 2 O vapor itself probably because oxygen adsorption was retarded by adsorbed water. Oxygen in CO was not exchanged with the other substrates under any conditions tested

  1. Theoretical investigation of isotope exchange reaction in tritium-contaminated mineral oil in vacuum pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Xie, Yun [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Du, Liang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection (SRMP), School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Suzhou 215000 (China); Li, Weiyi [School of Physics and Chemistry, Xihua University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Tan, Zhaoyi, E-mail: zhyitan@126.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • This is the first theoretical investigation about T–H exchange in vacuum oil. • T–H isotope exchange is accomplished through two different change mechanisms. • Isotope exchange is selective, molecules with −OH and −COOH exchange more easily. • The methyl and methylene radicals in waste oil were observed by {sup 1}HNMR. - Abstract: The mechanism of the isotope exchange reaction between molecular tritium and several typical organic molecules in vacuum pump mineral oil has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT), and the reaction rates are determined by conventional transition state theory (TST). The tritium–hydrogen isotope exchange reaction can proceed with two different mechanisms, the direct T–H exchange mechanism and the hyrogenation–dehydrogenation exchange mechanism. In the direct exchange mechanism, the titrated product is obtained through one-step via a four-membered ring hydrogen migration transition state. In the hyrogenation–dehydrogenation exchange mechanism, the T–H exchange could be accomplished by the hydrogenation of the unsaturated bond with tritium followed by the dehydrogenation of HT. Isotope exchange between hydrogen and tritium is selective, and oil containing molecules with −OH and −COOH groups can more easily exchange hydrogen for tritium. For aldehydes and ketones, the ability of T–H isotope exchange can be determined by the hydrogenation of T{sub 2} or the dehydrogenation of HT. The molecules containing one type of hydrogen provide a single product, while the molecules containing different types of hydrogens provide competitive products. The rate constants are presented to quantitatively estimate the selectivity of the products.

  2. Effect of Magnesium on Gas Exchange and Photosynthetic Efficiency of Coffee Plants Grown under Different Light Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaio Gonçalves de Lima Dias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium on the gas exchange and photosynthetic efficiency of Coffee seedlings grown in nutrient solution under different light levels. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions in growth chambers and nutrient solution at the Department of Plant Pathology of the Federal University of Lavras. The treatments consisted of five different Mg concentrations (0, 48, 96, 192 and 384 mg·L−1 and four light levels (80, 160, 240 and 320 µmol photon m−2·s−1. Both the Mg concentration and light levels affected gas exchange in the coffee plants. Photosynthesis increased linearly with the increasing light, indicating that the light levels tested were low for this crop. The highest CO2 assimilation rate, lowest transpiration, and highest water use efficiency were observed with 250 mg·Mg·L−1, indicating that this concentration was the optimal Mg supply for the tested light levels.

  3. Efficiency of Al2O3 supported palladium sorbents in the process of hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, B.M.; Perevezentsev, A.N.; Yasenkov, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    It is found that in the hydrogen-palladium system while applying the metal to aluminium oxide a considerable increase of the heterogeneous hydrogen isotopic exchange rate is observed due to the increase of its specific surface at 167-298 K temperatures and 350-500 Torr hydrogen pressures. It is shown that in the process of thermal treatment of the supported palladium sorbent resulting in reconstruction of the carrier porous structure, as well as in increasing the metal crystal size, the change of the stage, limiting the isotopic exchange process, occurs. The values of the rate and energy of activation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange are presented [ru

  4. Ion-Isotopic Exchange Reaction Kinetics using Anion Exchange Resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. Singare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the characterization of ion exchange resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A based on kinetics of ion-isotopic exchange reactions for which the short lived radioactive isotopes 131I and 82Br were used as a tracers. The study was performed for different concentration of ionic solution varying from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L and temperature in the range of 30.0 °C to 45.0 °C. The results indicate that as compared to bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, iodide exchange reaction take place at the faster rate. For both the ion-isotopic exchange reactions, under identical experimental conditions, the values of specific reaction rate increases with increase in the ionic concentration and decreases with rise in temperature. It was observed that at 35.00C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1, amount of ion exchanged (mmol, initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min and log Kd were 0.270, 0.342, 0.092 and 11.8 respectively for Dowex 550A LC resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.156, 0.241, 0.038 and 7.4 as that obtained for Indion-930A resins. From the results, it appears that Dowex 550A LC resins show superior performance over Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions.

  5. Preparation of [125I]triiodothyronine by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopicka, K.; Kronrad, L.; Hradilek, P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect was studied of various factors on isotopic exchange. The reaction proceeded in an ethanol-water (1:1) medium under the catalytic effect of elemental iodine added in form of an ethanol solution at a temperature of 25 degC. The yield is significantly affected by the sequence of adding components in the reaction mixture. The highest yield of labelled triiodothyronine was obtained using the following procedure: a solution of radioactive sodium iodide and elemental iodine was mixed and after 5 seconds, a triiodothyronine solution was added. The yield also depended on the concentrations of I 2 , of triiodothyronine and of the nonactive carrier in the radioactive sodium iodide solution. The specific activity of 2.6 GBq/mg was achieved for a triiodothyronine concentration in the reaction mixture of 2.4x10 -4 M and an I 2 concentration of 10 -4 N. For analytical chromatographic separation of reaction products, the n-hexane/amyl alcohol/2M ammonia system was used reliably separating triiodothyronine and thyroxine. (Ha)

  6. Bicarbonate adsorption band of the chromatography for carbon isotope separation using anion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kunihiko; Obanawa, Heiichiro; Hata, Masahisa; Sato, Katsuya

    1985-01-01

    The equilibria of bicarbonate ion between two phases were studied for the carbon isotope separation using anion exchangers. The condition of the formation of a bicarbonate adsorption band was quantitatively discussed. The formation of the adsorption band depends on the difference of S-potential which is the sum of the standard redection chemical potentials and L-potential which is the sum of the reduction chemical potential. The isotopic separation factor observed was about 1.012, independent of the concentrations of acid and alkali in the solutions. The isotopic separation factor was considered to be determined by the reaction of bicarbonate ion on anion exchangers and carbon dioxide dissolved in solutions. The enriched carbon isotope whose isotopic abundance ratio ( 13 C/ 12 C) was 1.258 was obtained with the column packed with anion exchangers. (author)

  7. Theoretical investigation of isotope exchange reaction in tritium-contaminated mineral oil in vacuum pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Xie, Yun; Du, Liang; Li, Weiyi; Tan, Zhaoyi

    2015-04-28

    The mechanism of the isotope exchange reaction between molecular tritium and several typical organic molecules in vacuum pump mineral oil has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT), and the reaction rates are determined by conventional transition state theory (TST). The tritium-hydrogen isotope exchange reaction can proceed with two different mechanisms, the direct T-H exchange mechanism and the hyrogenation-dehydrogenation exchange mechanism. In the direct exchange mechanism, the titrated product is obtained through one-step via a four-membered ring hydrogen migration transition state. In the hyrogenation-dehydrogenation exchange mechanism, the T-H exchange could be accomplished by the hydrogenation of the unsaturated bond with tritium followed by the dehydrogenation of HT. Isotope exchange between hydrogen and tritium is selective, and oil containing molecules with OH and COOH groups can more easily exchange hydrogen for tritium. For aldehydes and ketones, the ability of T-H isotope exchange can be determined by the hydrogenation of T2 or the dehydrogenation of HT. The molecules containing one type of hydrogen provide a single product, while the molecules containing different types of hydrogens provide competitive products. The rate constants are presented to quantitatively estimate the selectivity of the products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of reactions of isotopic exchange of trans-zeatin with tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, G.V.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    2006-01-01

    Reactions of isotopic exchange of trans-zeatin with high-radioactive tritium water, with gaseous tritium in solution and solid-phase catalytic hydrogenation are studied to prepare trans-zeatin and dihydrozeatin labelled with tritium. It is shown that reaction of isotopic exchange of trans-zeatin with gaseous tritium both in solutions and without solvents at 160 Deg C and above leads to practically total hydrogenation of initial compound with formation of dihydrozeatin labelled with tritium. Isotopic exchange with tritium water permits to prepare zeatin labelled with tritium with 67 % yield and specific radioactivity 0.68 PBq/mol. It is determined that in the case of solid-phase isotopic exchange within 150-155 Deg C temperature interval both dihydrozeatin and trans-zeatin labelled with tritium are formed [ru

  9. Low-temperature, non-stoichiometric oxygen isotope exchange coupled to Fe(II)-goethite interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frierdich, Andrew J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Beard, Brian L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scherer, Michelle M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Spicuzza, Michael J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Valley, John W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Johnson, Clark M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of natural iron oxide minerals has been widely used as a paleoclimate proxy. Interpretation of their stable isotope compositions, however, requires accurate knowledge of isotopic fractionation factors and an understanding of their isotopic exchange kinetics, the latter of which informs us how diagenetic processes may alter their isotopic compositions. Prior work has demonstrated that crystalline iron oxides do not significantly exchange oxygen isotopes with pure water at low temperature, which has restricted studies of isotopic fractionation factors to precipitation experiments or theoretical calculations. Using a double three-isotope method (¹⁸O-¹⁷O-¹⁶O and ⁵⁷Fe-⁵⁶Fe-⁵⁴Fe) we compare O and Fe isotope exchange kinetics, and demonstrate, for the first time, that O isotope exchange between structural O in crystalline goethite and water occurs in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) at ambient temperature (i.e., 22–50 °C). The three-isotope method was used to extrapolate partial exchange results to infer the equilibrium, mass-dependent isotope fractionations between goethite and water. In addition, this was combined with a reversal approach to equilibrium by reacting goethite in two unique waters that vary in composition by about 16‰ in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Our results show that interactions between Fe(II)aq and goethite catalyzes O isotope exchange between the mineral and bulk fluid; no exchange (within error) is observed when goethite is suspended in ¹⁷O-enriched water in the absence of Fe(II)aq. In contrast, Fe(II)-catalyzed O isotope exchange is accompanied by significant changes in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Despite significant O exchange, however, we observed disproportionate amounts of Fe versus O exchange, where Fe isotope exchange in goethite was roughly three times that of O. This disparity provides novel insight into the reactivity of oxide minerals in aqueous

  10. Photosynthetic pigments and gas exchange in castor bean under conditions of above the optimal temperature and high CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola França Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The castor bean plant, a Euphorbiaceae oil seed C3-metabolism rustic and drought-resistant plant, is cultivated in a wide range of environments due to its good adaptive capacity. However, given the current environmental changes, many biochemical and physiological impacts may affect the productivity of important crops, such as castor bean. This work aimed to evaluate the impacts of the castor bean gas exchange in response to high temperature and increased CO2concentration.Our experiment was conducted in a phytotron located at Embrapa Algodão in 2010. We adopted a completely randomized design, with four treatments in a factorial combination of two temperatures (30/20 and 37/30°C and two CO2 levels (400 and 800 mmol L-1; four replications were performed, obtained in five surveys over the growth cycle, for a total of 80 sample units. An infrared gas analyzer (IRGA - Infra Red Gas Analyzer was used for the quantification of the photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration. An increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature negatively affected the physiology of the castor bean plants, decreasing the net rate of photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance.

  11. BASIN TCP Stable Isotope Composition of CO2 in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports stable isotope ratio data of CO2 (13C/12C and 18O/16O) associated with photosynthetic and respiratory exchanges across the biosphere-atmosphere...

  12. BASIN TCP Stable Isotope Composition of CO2 in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports stable isotope ratio data of CO2 (13C/12C and 18O/16O) associated with photosynthetic and respiratory exchanges across the...

  13. Seasonal photosynthetic gas exchange and water-use efficiency in a constitutive CAM plant, the giant saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Dustin R; English, Nathan B; Dettman, David L; Williams, David G

    2011-11-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and the capacity to store large quantities of water are thought to confer high water use efficiency (WUE) and survival of succulent plants in warm desert environments. Yet the highly variable precipitation, temperature and humidity conditions in these environments likely have unique impacts on underlying processes regulating photosynthetic gas exchange and WUE, limiting our ability to predict growth and survival responses of desert CAM plants to climate change. We monitored net CO(2) assimilation (A(net)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), and transpiration (E) rates periodically over 2 years in a natural population of the giant columnar cactus Carnegiea gigantea (saguaro) near Tucson, Arizona USA to investigate environmental and physiological controls over carbon gain and water loss in this ecologically important plant. We hypothesized that seasonal changes in daily integrated water use efficiency (WUE(day)) in this constitutive CAM species would be driven largely by stomatal regulation of nighttime transpiration and CO(2) uptake responding to shifts in nighttime air temperature and humidity. The lowest WUE(day) occurred during time periods with extreme high and low air vapor pressure deficit (D(a)). The diurnal with the highest D(a) had low WUE(day) due to minimal net carbon gain across the 24 h period. Low WUE(day) was also observed under conditions of low D(a); however, it was due to significant transpiration losses. Gas exchange measurements on potted saguaro plants exposed to experimental changes in D(a) confirmed the relationship between D(a) and g(s). Our results suggest that climatic changes involving shifts in air temperature and humidity will have large impacts on the water and carbon economy of the giant saguaro and potentially other succulent CAM plants of warm desert environments.

  14. Drought tolerance of selected bottle gourd [Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl.] landraces assessed by leaf gas exchange and photosynthetic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashilo, Jacob; Odindo, Alfred O; Shimelis, Hussein A; Musenge, Pearl; Tesfay, Samson Z; Magwaza, Lembe S

    2017-11-01

    Successful cultivation of bottle gourd in arid and semi-arid areas of sub-Saharan Africa and globally requires the identification of drought tolerant parents for developing superior genotypes with increased drought resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the level of drought tolerance among genetically diverse South African bottle gourd landraces based on leaf gas exchange and photosynthetic efficiency and identify promising genotypes for breeding. The responses of 12 bottle gourd landraces grown in glasshouse under non-stressed (NS) and drought-stressed (DS) conditions were studied. A significant genotype x water regime interaction was observed for gs, T, A, A/C i , IWUE, WUE ins , F m ', F v '/F m ', Ф PSII , qP, qN, ETR, ETR/A and AES indicating variability in response among the studied bottle gourd landraces under NS and DS conditions. Principal component analysis identified three principal components (PC's) under drought stress condition contributing to 82.9% of total variation among leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters measured. PC1 explained 36% of total variation contributed by gs, T, F 0 ', F m ', F v '/F m ' and qN, while PC2 explained 28% of the variation and highly correlated with A, A/C i , IWUE, WUE ins ETR/A and AES. PC3 explained 14% of total variation contributed by Ф PSII , qP and ETR. Principal biplot analysis allowed the identification of drought tolerant genotypes such as BG-27, BG-48, BG-58, BG-79, BG-70 and BG-78 which were grouped based on high gs, A, F m 'F v '/F m ', qN, ETR/A and AES under DS condition. The study suggests that the identified physiological traits could be useful indicators in the selection of bottle gourd genotypes for increased drought tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Sodium isotopic exchange rate between crystalline zirconium phosphate and molten NaNO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Y; Yamada, Y [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1975-12-01

    The isotopic exchange rate of sodium ion between crystalline zirconium phosphate and molten NaNO/sub 3/ has been measured at 312/sup 0/C and 362/sup 0/C by batch method. The equilibrium was reached within 20 minutes at either temperature, and the rate was very rapid as compared with that of sodium-potassium ion exchange.

  16. Some considerations on the treatment of the kinetic data of heterogeneous isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernyei, J.; Szirtes, L.; Lakatos, M.

    1985-01-01

    A direct curve simulation treatment was worked out for the evaluation of the kinetic curves of heterogeneous isotope exchange. Based on the data obtained by a personal computer, some considerations were made on the transport processes in the fully and half exchanged sodium forms of crystalline zirconium phosphate. (author)

  17. Early history of chemical exchange isotope enrichment and lessons we learn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu; Ono, Yuriko

    2006-01-01

    The chemical exchange isotope enrichment process has an advantage over other isotope separation methods in that it involves two chemicals rather than one and, consequently, relatively large separation factors can be obtained. However, the chemical exchange method requires a chemical conversion of the substance enriched in the target isotope into the second substance. The idiosyncrasies of the isotope separation process by this method are pointed out using McCabe-Thiele diagram and, from them, the difficulties involved in the chemical exchange methods are itemized. Examples of the points being made are taken from the pioneering works of this field carried out by Harold C. Urey, his contemporaries, the students and the students' students. Lessons we learn from these works are discussed. (author)

  18. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in allende and solar nebula Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto; Ito; Nagasawa

    1998-12-04

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope compositions ( approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  19. Relative mobility of 1-H atoms of carbohydrates in heterogeneous isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskii, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The method of competitive reactions was used to determine the relative mobilities of the 1-H atoms of carbohydrates in reactions of heterogeneous isotope exchange, using various reference standards, catalysts, and buffer systems. On the basis of the results obtained, the investigated carbohydrates are ranged in a series of decreasing mobility of the hydrogen atoms exchanged in heterogeneous isotope exchange reactions. It was demonstrated that the mobility of the 1-H atoms is related to the concentration of the acyclic forms of the carbohydrates

  20. Isotope exchange reaction of tritium on precious metal catalyst based on cation-exchanged mordenite for blanket tritium recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Yoshinori, E-mail: kawamura.yoshinori@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Hayashi, Takumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamanishi, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Precious metal catalyst based on cation-exchanged mordenite was prepared. • Isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and HTO on the catalyst was investigated. • The order of entire reaction is not clear, but it is the first-order reaction as for HTO. • Effect of exchanged cation may appear as the difference of the surface area of catalyst. - Abstract: It is known that the chemical forms of tritium released from a ceramic breeder blanket are hydrogen form and water form. To recover tritiated water vapor, adoption of dryer that is packed column of synthetic zeolite has been proposed. On the other hand, synthetic zeolite is often used as a support of precious metal catalyst. Such catalysts usually have a capability of hydrogen isotope exchange between gas and water vapor. If this catalyst is used to dryer, the dryer may obtain a preferable function for tritium recovery by isotopic exchange reaction. To assess such functions, reaction rate should be estimated. The results of water adsorption experiment on cation-exchanged mordenite-type zeolite suggested the possibility that state of adsorbed water varied by exchanged cation. So, in this work, precious metal catalyst based on cation-exchanged mordenite was prepared, and the reaction rate of chemical exchange between hydrogen and tritiated water was investigated under temperature range between 30 °C and 80 °C by the steady-state approximation. In the case of platinum on Na-mordenite, the reaction between gaseous hydrogen and tritiated water vapor was almost expressed as first-order reaction concerning tritiated water vapor concentration.

  1. Calcium isotope effects in ion exchange electromigration and calcium isotope analysis by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Hoshi, J.; Iwamoto, H.; Okamoto, M.; Kakihana, H.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ions were made to electromigrate along a cation exchange membrane. The abundance ratios of the calcium isotopes (Ca-40, 42, 43, 44, 48) in the migrated bands were measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. The lighter isotopes were enriched in the front part of the migrated band. The increments in the isotope abundance ratios were found to be proportional to the mass difference of the isotopes. The observed epsilon-values per unit mass difference (epsilon/ΔM) were 1.26 x 10 -4 (at 20 0 C), 1.85 x 10 -4 (at 25 0 C) and 2.4 x 10 -4 (at 40 0 C). The mass spectrometry was improved by using a low temperature for the evaporation of CaI 2 . (orig.)

  2. Mechanistic study of the isotopic-exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and palladium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outka, D.A.; Foltz, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the isotopic-exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and solid palladium hydride is developed which extends previous model for this reaction by specifically including surface reactions. The modeling indicates that there are two surface-related processes that contribute to the overall rate of exchange: the desorption of hydrogen from the surface and the exchange between surface hydrogen and bulk hydrogen. This conclusion is based upon measurements examining the effect of small concentrations of carbon monoxide were helpful in elucidating the mechanism. Carbon monoxide reversibly inhibits certain steps in the exchange; this slows the overall rate of exchange and changes the distribution of products from the reactor

  3. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, Gulten; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using 90 Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters ΔH*, ΔS*, and ΔG* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction

  4. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atun, Gulten E-mail: gultena@istanbul.edu.tr; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-06-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using {sup 90}Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters {delta}H*, {delta}S*, and {delta}G* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction.

  5. Isotope exchange kinetic of phosphorus in soils from Pernambuco State -Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, F.J.B. de.

    1989-12-01

    The applicability of isotopic exchange kinetics of 32 p to characterize phosphorus available to plants and to diagnose the reactivity of soil-fertilizer-P in six soils from Pernambuco is described. This methodology was compared with anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange equilibrium methods (E-value and L-value) and P absorption by plants. The first greenhouse experiment had the following treatments: 1) with P and, 2) with addition of 43.7 mg P/Kg of soil, incubated for O, 42 and 84 days before seeding. The kinetic of isotopic exchange (KIE), resin-P and E-value were determined before seeding and after harvesting pearl millet grown for 42 days. Results indicated that the KIE parameters rated the soils more efficiently, in terms of available P and soil-fertilizer-P reactivity, than resin-P, E-value and L-value. (author). 38 refs, 2 figs, 18 tabs

  6. Separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography: studies on regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The optimum conditions for the regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins of type-I and type-II were determined for cost-effective separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography where the hydroxyl form of an anion exchange resin is equilibrated with boric acid solution containing mannitol as a complexing reagent. The possibility of using unspent alkali content of the effluent was also exploited. Removal of carbonate impurity from Rayon grade caustic lye (used as regenerant after dilution) and recycling of Ba(OH) 2 was studied to avoid waste disposal problems. (author)

  7. On-line stable isotope measurements during plant and soil gas exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakir, D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent techniques for on-line stable isotope measurements during plant and soil exchange of CO 2 and/or water vapor are briefly reviewed. For CO 2 , these techniques provide means for on-line measurements of isotopic discrimination during CO 2 exchange by leaves in the laboratory and in the field, of isotopic discrimination during soil respiration and during soil-atmosphere CO 2 exchange, and of isotopic discrimination in O 2 during plant respiration. For water vapor, these techniques provide means to measure oxygen isotopic composition of water vapor during leaf transpiration and for the analysis of sub microliter condensed water vapor samples. Most of these techniques involve on-line sampling of CO 2 and water vapor from a dynamic, intact soil or plant system. In the laboratory, these systems also allow on-line isotopic analysis by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The information obtained with these on-line techniques is becoming increasingly valuable, and often critical, for ecophysiologial research and in the study of biosphere-atmosphere interactions. (author)

  8. Kinetics of isotopic exchange of [1-3H]saccharides with hydrogen using palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Kayumov, V.G.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics was studied of the isotopic exchange of [1- 3 H]saccharides with hydrogen on palladium catalysts. The effect was studied of different factors on the rate of isotopic exchange, e.g., of the composition and structure of saccharides, their concentration in the solution (C), the type of catalyst and of the buffer solution. It was found that by reduced rate of isotopic exchange with hydrogen, all studied saccharides may be arranged into a series independent of the type of catalyst in accordance with the sequence of declining coefficient of relative mobility of l-H atoms during the reaction. Linear dependence was found to exist between the rate constant of the isotopic exchange reaction (r) and the coefficient of relative lability. It was also found that in the range of low concentrations the observed rate constants of isotopic exchange were not dependent on concentration and in the range of higher concentrations, r decreased with increasing C. This character of dependence is justified by the side effect of the processes of sorption on the catalyst. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs

  9. Isotopic exchange reaction between barium ion and tri barium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgin, G.B.; Cetin, I.

    1982-01-01

    Heterogeneous exchange reaction of tri barium phosphate in barium chloride solution has been studied using 133 Ba as a tracer. The results show that the exchange fraction increases as barium chloride concentration increases for different mole ratio of the exchange ion on the solid surface and in the solution. The phenomenon was studied with respect to the previous treatment of the precipitate leading to different crystal sizes and the effect of reaction time. (author)

  10. Isotopic exchange of cyclic ethers with deuterium over metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchet, J.C.; Cornet, D.

    1976-01-01

    The exchange reaction between deuterium and cyclic ethers (oxolane and α-methyl derivatives) has been investigated using rhodium and palladium catalysts. The first hydrogen undergoing exchange has been found to be located on a β-carbon. This fact, and the poisoning of the exchange of cyclopentane in the presence of ether, suggest that the O atom participates in the exchange mechanism of ethers. It appears, however, that the oxygen--metal bonding occurs only during this simple exchange process; simultaneous adsorption of oxygen and a vicinal carbon causes hydrogenolysis of the O--C bond. In each case multiple exchange is important. In the oxolane molecule two sets of exchangeable hydrogens are distinguished according to their reactivities, as could be expected by analogy with cycloalkanes. However, this distinction is not so clear in the exchange patterns of substituted oxolanes, since intermediate maxima are observed in these cases. It is suggested that the conformational properties of the substituted rings cause a constraint in the formation of 3,4-diadsorbed oxolanes. Thus, multiple exchange, based on α,β-process, and epimerization via the ''roll-over'' mechanism occur preferentially in certain parts of the molecules

  11. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between calcium molybdate and molybdate ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atun, G.; Ayar, N.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry, Fac. of Engineering; Bodur, N.; Ayyildiz, H. [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    The heterogeneous isotopic anion exchange kinetics and equilibria between calcium molybdate and sodium molybdate solutions have been studied by using {sup 99}Mo as tracer in batch experiments. The values of exchange ratio lower than unity suggest that rate-limiting step is particle diffusion process and the effect of re-crystallization can be neglected. The self-diffusion coefficients calculated using both Paterson's and Nernst-Plank approximations are increased by the temperature. The observed values for isotope exchange characteristics such as exchange fractions, exchanging amounts and fractional attainment of equilibrium are consistent with those of their calculated values. Activation energy and thermodynamic parameters calculated based on transition state theory indicate the existence of both energy and entropy barrier in the system. (orig.)

  12. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between calcium molybdate and molybdate ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, G.; Ayar, N.; Bilgin, B.

    2007-01-01

    The heterogeneous isotopic anion exchange kinetics and equilibria between calcium molybdate and sodium molybdate solutions have been studied by using 99 Mo as tracer in batch experiments. The values of exchange ratio lower than unity suggest that rate-limiting step is particle diffusion process and the effect of re-crystallization can be neglected. The self-diffusion coefficients calculated using both Paterson's and Nernst-Plank approximations are increased by the temperature. The observed values for isotope exchange characteristics such as exchange fractions, exchanging amounts and fractional attainment of equilibrium are consistent with those of their calculated values. Activation energy and thermodynamic parameters calculated based on transition state theory indicate the existence of both energy and entropy barrier in the system. (orig.)

  13. Chromatographic separation process with pellicular ion exchange resins that can be used for ion or isotope separation and resins used in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, M.; Neige, R.; Niemann, C.; Michel, A.; Bert, M.; Bodrero, S.; Guyot, A.

    1989-01-01

    For separation of uranium, boron or nitrogen isotopes, an isotopic exchange is carried out betwen an isotope fixed on an ion exchange resin and another isotope of the same element in the liquid phase contacting the resin. Pellicular resins are used comprising composite particulates with an inert polymeric core and a surface layer with ion exchange groups [fr

  14. Isotope exchange reaction in Li2ZrO3 packed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Y.; Enoeda, M.; Okuno, K.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the release behavior of bred tritium in a solid breeder blanket, the tritium transfer rate and tritium inventory for various mass transfer processes should be investigated. The contribution of the surface reactions (adsorption, desorption and two kinds of isotope exchange reactions) to the release process cannot be ignored. It is believed that two kinds of isotope exchange reactions (gaseous hydrogen-tritiated water and water vapor-tritiated water) occur on the surface of the solid breeder materials when hydrogen is added to the sweep gas to enhance the tritium release rate. The isotope exchange reaction study in H-D systems was carried out using a Li 2 ZrO 3 packed bed. The exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and water was the rate controlling step among the two kinds of exchange reactions. The reaction rate constants were quantified, and experimental equations were proposed. The equilibrium constant of the isotope exchange reaction in the H-D system was obtained from experimental data and was found to be 1.17. (orig.)

  15. Isotope exchange study of the dissociation of metal-humic substance complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizera, J.; Jansova, A.; Hvozdova, I.; Benes, P.; Novak, F.

    2003-01-01

    Isotope exchange was employed to study dissociation of metal cations from their complexes with humic substances (HS). Dissociation of cation from HS controls the rate of isotope exchange between two identical metal-HS solutions (but for the presence of a radiotracer) divided by a dialysis membrane. The rate of isotope exchange of Eu/ 152 Eu and Co/ 60 Co in the systems with various HS was monitored as a function of pH, ionic strength, and the degree of HS loading with metal. The apparent rate of Eu-HS dissociation was found to be enhanced by decreasing pH, increasing ionic strength, and increasing metal loading. Co-HS dissociation was too fast to be followed by the method. For interpretation of the experimental kinetic data, the multiple first order law has been applied. Based on the results, a concept of HS as a mixture of two types of binding sites is discussed. (author)

  16. Isotope exchange study of nickel xanthate in presence of aniline and isomeric toluidines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, G.R.K.; Naidu, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    Isotopic exchange behaviour of nickel xanthate is studied in the presence of aniline and three isomeric toluidines at 18degC. The effect of base concentration is also studied on the exchange rate. The results show that the complex is labile in the kinetic sense in the presence of aniline meta and para toluidines. The rate of exchange increases with and para toluidines. The rate of exchange increases with increase in concentration of the base. The complex displays inert behaviour in the presence of o-toluidine and it is ascribed to dominant steric effect. (author)

  17. Isotopic exchange rate of sodium ions between hydrous metal oxides and aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Hiromichi

    1991-01-01

    To elucidate the kinetics of ion-exchange reaction on hydrous metal oxide, the isotopic exchange rates of sodium ions between hydrous metal oxides such as hydrous tin (IV), niobium (V), zirconium (IV) and titanium (IV) oxides, and aqueous solutions were measured radiochemically and compared with each other. The rate of reaction cannot be understood by an unified view since the rate controlling step differs with the kind of exchangers. The rate constants relevant to each exchanger such as diffusion constants and their activation energies were also determined. (author)

  18. Hydrogen isotope exchange in a metal hydride tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a model of the displacement of one hydrogen isotope within a metal hydride tube by a different isotope in the gas phase that is blown through the tube. The model incorporates only the most basic parameters to make a clear connection to the theory of open-tube gas chromatography, and to provide a simple description of how the behavior of the system scales with controllable parameters such as gas velocity and tube radius. A single tube can be seen as a building block for more complex architectures that provide higher molar flow rates or other advanced design goals.

  19. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.L.; Drouet, M.; Martinavičius, A.; Somers, M.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390 °C with 14 N and 15 N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms ( 15 N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding ( 14 N) was observed. Denitriding after plasma- and gaseous nitriding resulted in predominant retraction of 14 N, and only a minor amount of 15 N. The nitrogen isotope diffusion behaviour is explained by two different states of nitrogen bonding and short-range ordering between nitrogen and chromium

  20. The outline of the processes for lithium isotope separation by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Saito, Keiichiro; Naruse, Yuji; Shiba, Koreyuki; Kosuge, Masao; Itoi, Toshiaki; Kitsukawa, Tomohiko.

    1981-10-01

    A plant of lithium isotope separation by displacement chromatography is preliminary designed. The construction expenses of a 100 kg 7 Li/year plant and the unit cost of separation are estimated on the basis of the data taken from the literature, and the feasibility is studied. Experimental equipment of continuous displacement chromatography is set up and is tested with the stable automatic operation. These results indicate that the ion exchange method is promising for industrial lithium isotope separation. (author)

  1. Charge exchange of excited mesic atoms of hydrogen isotopes in triple collisions with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men'shikov, L.I.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    At high densities of deuterium-tritium mixture the probability for the occurrence of the isotope-exchange reaction (dμ)/sub n/+t → d+(tμ)/sub n/ from the excited states of n mesic atoms of deuterium is high in the triple collisions of mesic atoms with the molecules of hydrogen isotopes. This reaction should be taken into account in describing the kinetics of muon catalysis

  2. Enrichment of {sup 15}N and {sup 10}B isotopes by chemical exchange process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D` Souza, A B; Sonwalkar, A S; Subrahmanyam, B V; Valladares, B A [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Many processes are available for separation of stable isotopes like distillation, chemical exchange, thermal diffusion, gaseous diffusion, centrifuge etc. Chemical exchange process is eminently suitable for separation of isotopes of light elements. Work done on separation and enrichment of two of the stable isotopes viz. {sup 15}N and {sup 10}B in Chemical Engineering Division is presented. {sup 15}N is widely used as a tracer in agricultural research and {sup 10}B is used in nuclear industry as control rod material, soluble reactor poison, neutron detector etc. The work on {sup 15}N isotope resulted in a pilot plant, which was the only source of this material in the country for many years and later it was translated into a production plant as M/s. RCF Ltd. The work done on the ion-exchange process for enrichment of {sup 10}B isotope which is basically a chemical exchange process, is now being updated into a pilot plant to produce enriched {sup 10}B to be used as soluble reactor poison. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Enrichment of 15N and 10B isotopes by chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, A.B.; Sonwalkar, A.S.; Subrahmanyam, B.V.; Valladares, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    Many processes are available for separation of stable isotopes like distillation, chemical exchange, thermal diffusion, gaseous diffusion, centrifuge etc. Chemical exchange process is eminently suitable for separation of isotopes of light elements. Work done on separation and enrichment of two of the stable isotopes viz. 15 N and 10 B in Chemical Engineering Division is presented. 15 N is widely used as a tracer in agricultural research and 10 B is used in nuclear industry as control rod material, soluble reactor poison, neutron detector etc. The work on 15 N isotope resulted in a pilot plant, which was the only source of this material in the country for many years and later it was translated into a production plant as M/s. RCF Ltd. The work done on the ion-exchange process for enrichment of 10 B isotope which is basically a chemical exchange process, is now being updated into a pilot plant to produce enriched 10 B to be used as soluble reactor poison. (author)

  4. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in tritium, hydrogen and deuterium mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in H 2 +T 2 , D 2 +T 2 and H 2 +D 2 +T 2 mixed gases, as induced by tritium decay and beta radiation, were experimentally measured by laser Raman spectrometry. Initially a glass cell was filled with T 2 gas to a pressure of 30-40 kPa, and an equivalent partial pressure of H 2 and/or D 2 was added. The first-order hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates were 5.54x10 -2 h -1 for H 2 +T 2 mixed gas and 4.76x10 -2 h -1 for D 2 +T 2 . The actual HT producing rate was nearly equivalent to the rate of DT, but the reverse reaction rate of HT was faster than that of DT. The exchange reaction rates between H, D and T showed the isotope effect, HD>HT>DT. The hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates observed were about twenty times larger than ion formation rates by beta radiation. This result suggests that a free radical chain reaction in hydrogen isotopes is occurring. (orig.)

  5. Experimental studies of the transfer phenomena of tritium in an isotope exchange column for tritium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion; Zamfirache, Marius; Varlam, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    To extract the tritium generated in the heavy water moderated power reactor, we have chosen the catalytic isotope exchange process in liquid phase combined with cryogenic distillation LPCE-CD. This paper presents the experimental studies of the catalytic isotope transfer of tritium. The catalytic isotope exchange process is performed in a column filled with successive layers of catalyst PT/C/PTFE and B7 type ordered package of phosphorous bronze. The catalyst and the package are manufactured in our institute and corresponding patents were issues. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% PTFE, 4.1 wt. % carbon and 0.40 wt. % platinum and was made with 10'10'2 mm Raschig rings. The ordered package was consists of wire mesh phosphor bronze of 4'1 wire with a mesh size of 0.18 x 0.48 mm. The paper also presents the mathematical model which is used to evaluate the performance of the process. The mathematical model and the experimental data allowed determining two speed constants for isotope exchange process and for distillation process, respectively. By considering the values of these speed constants it is possible to improve the hydrophobic Pt catalyst and to design the H 2 /H 2 O isotopic exchange column package with this catalyst. (authors)

  6. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Drouet, M.; Martinavičius, A.

    2013-01-01

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390°C with 14N and 15N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms (15N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding (14N) was observed. Denitriding after...

  7. New method for the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction in a hydrophobic catalyst bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Y.; Kikuchi, M.; Yusa, H.

    1982-01-01

    To improve the isotope exchange reaction efficiency between water and hydrogen, a new reactor in which water mists and hydrogen gas react cocurrently was studied. To apply this to the enrichment of tritium in heavy water, a dual temperature isotope exchange reactor which is composed of cocurrent low temperature reactors and the usual countercurrent high temperature reactor was proposed and analyzed using a McCabe-Thiele diagram. By utilizing cocurrent reactors, in combination, the necessary catalyst volume can be reduced to one-tenth as compared with the usual countercurrent low temperature reactor. 17 refs

  8. A new type separation column for the water-hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic water/hydrogen isotope exchange process is by right considered the most attractive for the solution a number of urgent problems of hydrogen isotope separation. A new type exchange reaction column is described and studied in details by computer simulation and with the help of McCabe-Thiele diagrams. It is shown that the new column in comparison with a traditional one needs less catalyst quantity and a smaller diameter for the solving of the same separation tasks. Generalized calculation data are presented in graphical form

  9. Performance characterization of hydrogen isotope exchange and recombination catalysts for tritium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppiah, S.; Ryland, D.; Marcinkowska, K.; Boniface, H.; Everatt, A.

    2010-01-01

    AECL's hydrogen isotope exchange catalyst and recombination catalysts have been successfully applied to a wide range of industrial tritium-removal applications. The catalysts are used for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) and for gas-phase and trickle-bed recombination of hydrogen isotopes and have led to process simplification, improved safety and operational advantages. Catalyst performance design equations derived from laboratory testing of these catalysts have been validated against performance under industrial conditions. In a Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) demonstration plant analyses of LPCE and recombiner efficiency were carried out as a function of catalyst activity over a wide range of operation. A steady-state process simulation used to model and design the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange processes, such as the CECE detritiation plant, was validated using the results of this demonstration. Catalyst development for isotope-exchange and recombination applications has continued over the last decade. As a result, significant improvements in catalyst performance have been achieved for these applications. This paper outlines the uniqueness of AECL's specialized catalysts and process designs for these applications with examples from laboratory and industrial case studies.

  10. Application of personal computers to study the kinetics of heterogeneous isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernyei, Jozsef; Lakatos, Mihaly

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of some heterogeneous isotopic exchange reactions of alkaline metal ions between solid (crystalline zirconium phosphate) and liquid phases were investigated. Ion diffusion in solid phase was considered as rate controlling step. The Laplace transformation solution of Fick's II law was used with a Sinclair ZX Spectrum personal computer. In some cases the exchange reaction should be regarded as a superposition of diffusion and a first order process. (author)

  11. Increased recovery in dual temperature isotope exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, D.F.; Neill, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement comprises increasing the flow ratio of liquid with respect to gas within the upper portion of the first tower, wherein the liquid is enriched in the isotope, and within the lower portion of the second tower, wherein the liquid is depleted in the isotope each to a value of at least 5% above the corresponding flow ratio within the remaining lower portion of the first tower and the remaining upper portion of the second tower respectively. The increased flow ratios are provided by increasing the rate of liquid substance being fed to the first tower and withdrawing up to about 50% of the increased liquid substance flow from a location within the upper one-half of the first tower and reintroducing the withdrawn liquid at a location within the lower one-half portion of the second tower. (author)

  12. Separation of hydrogen isotope by hydrogen-water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomura, Shohei; Kaetsu, Hayato; Nakane, Ryohei

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water is studied by use of three kinds of trickle bed exchange columns packed with hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. All columns have the effective lengths of 30 cm. They are 17 mm, 30 mm, and 95 mm in diameters, respectively. The separation experiments are carried out by the once-through methods. The separation efficiencies of the columns are evaluated by the parameters such as the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (H. E. T. P.) and the mass transfer co-efficient. It is found that the operating condition of the exchange column is optimum when the superficial hydrogen flow velocity is 0.3 m/sec. (author)

  13. Oxygen isotope exchange with quartz during pyrolysis of silver sulfate and silver nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Andrew J; Kunasek, Shelley A; Sofen, Eric D; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Ben W; Amos, Helen M; Shaheen, Robina; Abaunza, Mariana; Jackson, Terri L; Thiemens, Mark H; Alexander, Becky

    2012-09-30

    Triple oxygen isotopes of sulfate and nitrate are useful metrics for the chemistry of their formation. Existing measurement methods, however, do not account for oxygen atom exchange with quartz during the thermal decomposition of sulfate. We present evidence for oxygen atom exchange, a simple modification to prevent exchange, and a correction for previous measurements. Silver sulfates and silver nitrates with excess (17)O were thermally decomposed in quartz and gold (for sulfate) and quartz and silver (for nitrate) sample containers to O(2) and byproducts in a modified Temperature Conversion/Elemental Analyzer (TC/EA). Helium carries O(2) through purification for isotope-ratio analysis of the three isotopes of oxygen in a Finnigan MAT253 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The Δ(17)O results show clear oxygen atom exchange from non-zero (17)O-excess reference materials to zero (17)O-excess quartz cup sample containers. Quartz sample containers lower the Δ(17)O values of designer sulfate reference materials and USGS35 nitrate by 15% relative to gold or silver sample containers for quantities of 2-10 µmol O(2). Previous Δ(17)O measurements of sulfate that rely on pyrolysis in a quartz cup have been affected by oxygen exchange. These previous results can be corrected using a simple linear equation (Δ(17)O(gold) = Δ(17)O(quartz) * 1.14 + 0.06). Future pyrolysis of silver sulfate should be conducted in gold capsules or corrected to data obtained from gold capsules to avoid obtaining oxygen isotope exchange-affected data. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Kinetics of isotope exchange reactions involving intra- and intermolecular reactions: 1. Rate law for a system with two chemical compounds and three exchangeable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuelei Chu; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    For an isotopic exchange reaction between two compounds (X and AB) in a homogeneous system, such as a gaseous or aqueous system, where one (AB) of them possesses two exchangeable atoms in non-equivalent positions and where one intramolecular isotope exchange (A ↔ B) and two intermolecular isotope exchange reactions (X ↔ A and X ↔ B) may occur, its rate law no longer obeys a pseudo-first order rate equation described for simple two-component systems by many previous investigators. The change with time of the δ value of each of the three components (X, A, and B) in a closed and homogeneous system is a complicated function of the initial δ values of the three components, the chemical concentrations of the two compounds, and the overall rate constants of the forward and reverse reactions involving the two intermolecular and one intramolecular reactions of isotope exchanges. Also, for some one of the three components, the change of its δ value with time may not be monotonic, and the relationship of 1n (1 - F) with time may be non-linear in a plot of 1n (1 - F) vs. t. In addition, the rate law of the isotope exchange reaction in this system also provides a quantitative method to estimate the overall rate constants for the one-intra-and two intermolecular isotope exchanges and the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors among the three components

  15. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have measured the 13 C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D 2 O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D 2 O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13 C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13 C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  16. Assessing the identifiability in isotope exchange depth profiling measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciucci, Francesco; Panagakos, Grigorios; Chen, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Accurate identification of the physical parameters describing the surface exchange kinetic coefficient k and oxygen diffusion coefficient D is key in solid state ionics, because the performance of many ionic devices is connected to such quantities. In this work we extend and generalize the concept...

  17. Tritium enrichment in aqueous phase by catalytic isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindewolf, U.

    1983-01-01

    At normal pressure, the most promising enrichment method appears to be an inverse current exchanger system using electrolysis at the bottom of the inverse current column apparatus and recombination in an oxyhydrogen gas flame at the top of the column apparatus. A hydrophobic catalyst is used which is made of a pulverized mix of platinized activated carbon and PTFE. (DG) [de

  18. Preparation of radioactive labelled compounds. Pt. 2. 82Br labelled organic bromine compounds by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, R.

    1988-05-01

    Studies on isotopic exchange between organic bromine compounds and 82 Br labelled dioxane dibromide in the presence of AlCl 3 are described. The results obtained enable to develop a simple and quick preparation method for the labelling with 82 Br [fr

  19. Isotope exchange study of the dissociation of metal - humic substance complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, J.; Jansová, A.; Hvoždová, I.; Beneš, P.; Novák, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, A (2003), s. A97-A101 ISSN 0011-4626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911; CEZ:MSM 210000019 Keywords : isotope exchange * dissociation of metal * humic substance complexes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  20. Process for the production of heavy water by H2-methylamine isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briec, M.; Ravoire, J.; Rostaing, M.

    1977-01-01

    An isotopic exchange process for separating D 2 from H 2 is presented. The H 2 -monomethylamine system is studied on the laboratory scale (kinetics, H 2 solubility, thermal stability and solubility of the catalyst) and on the pilot plant scale (operating conditions and economics) [fr

  1. The introduction of tritium in lactose and saccharose by isotope exchange with gaseous tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.; Kudelin, B.K.; Efimova, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for conducting reactions of catalytic protium-tritium isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium were developed in order to synthesize tritium labelled lactose and saccharose. These methods enabled to prepare these labelled disaccharides with high molar activity. The yield was equal to 50-60%, radiochemical purity ∼ 95%

  2. A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaoning; Luo Wenzong

    1987-01-01

    A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change is developed and described. This method is simple to use and consumes less extractant as compared with the commonly used Woodward method. It is also convenient for unstable systems

  3. Determination of the energetics of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase reaction by positional isotope exchange inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, L.S.; Raushel, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for obtaining qualitative information about enzyme-catalyzed reactions by measuring the inhibitory effects of added substrates on positional isotope exchange rates. It has been demonstrated for ordered kinetic mechanisms that an increase in the concentration of the second substrate to add to the enzyme will result in a linear increase in the ratio of the chemical and positional isotope exchange rates. The slopes and intercepts from these plots can be used to determine the partitioning ratios of binary and ternary enzyme complexes. The method has been applied to the reaction catalyzed by UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. A positional isotope exchange reaction was measured within oxygen-18-labeled UTP as a function of variable glucose 1-phosphate concentration in the forward reaction. In the reverse reaction, a positional isotope exchange reaction was measured within oxygen-18-labeled UDP-glucose as a function of increasing pyrophosphate concentration. The results have been interpreted to indicate that the interconversion of the ternary central complexes is fast relative to product dissociation in either direction. In the forward direction, the release of UDP-glucose is slower than the release of pyrophosphate. The release of glucose 1-phosphate is slower than the release of UTP in the reverse reaction

  4. Surface area of antimony oxide by isotope exchange and other methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Y.K.; Acharya, B.V.; Rangamannar, B.

    1985-06-17

    Specific surface areas of antimony oxide samples, one commercial, the other prepared from antimony trichloride were measured by heterogeneous isotope exchange, gas adsorption, air permeability and microscopic methods. Specific surface areas obtained by these four methods for the two samples were compared and the observed differences are explained.

  5. Speciative determination of phosphorus in environmental water by the isotope exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, N.; Yoshikawa, M.; Murakami, S.; Kunika, J.

    1988-01-01

    An isotope exchage method for the speciative determination of phosphorus (PO 4 3- ,PO 3 3- and total P) in natural water samples is proposed by using the exchange system of molybdophosphate in the aqueous phase and tetraphenylarsonium molybdophosphate in the organic phase. In this exchange system, only PO 4 3- exchanges and is determined. When the sample water is treated with Br 2 water in advance, the amount of PO 4 3- +PO 3 3- can be obtained. When the sample is treated with H 2 SO 4 and HNO 3 , the amount of total P can be determined. (author) 4 refs.; 5 tabs

  6. Kinetics of tritium isotope exchange between liquid pyrrole and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarz, A.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of tritium isotope exchange between liquid pyrrole and gaseous hydrogen has been studied over the temperature range of 290-303 K. The reaction was carried out in the presence of platinum black but in spite of that, it appeared to be relatively slow. The kinetics of the exchange reaction studied could be described by the simple McKay equation. The results obtained suggest that diffusion is the rate-determining step. A mechanism of exchange is proposed. (author) 10 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by anion exchange in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, L.

    2016-01-01

    Method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The major advantages of the method are the low cost of the analysis, high radiochemical yields and good decontamination factors from the matrix elements, natural and man-made radionuclides. The separation and purification of uranium is attained by adsorption with strong base anion exchange resin in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media. Uranium is electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been applied for the determination of concentrations of uranium isotopes in mineral, spring and tap waters from Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials. - Highlights: • The method allows cost-effective determination of U isotopes. • High amounts of environmental samples can be analyzed. • High chemical yields, energy resolution and decontamination factors were achieved. • Uranium isotope concentrations in mineral waters from Bulgaria are presented.

  8. Lithium isotope separation on an ion exchange resin having azacrown ether as an anchor group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.W.; Jeong, Y.K.; Lee, J.K.; Hong, Ch.P.; Kim, Ch.S.; Jeon, Y.Sh.

    1997-01-01

    As study on the separation of lithium isotopes was carried out with an ion exchange resin having 1,7,13-trioxa-4,10,16-triazacyclooctadecane (N 3 O 3 ) as an anchor group. The lighter isotope, 6 Li concentrated in the resin phase, while the heavier isotope, 7 Li is enriched in the fluid phase. Upon column chromatography [0.6 cm (I. D.) x 20 cm (height) using 1.0M ammonium chloride solution as an eluent, single separation factor, α, 1.068 ( 6 Li/ 7 Li) r esin/( 6 Li/ 7 Li) s olution was obtained by the GLUECKAUF method from the elution curve and isotope ratios. (author)

  9. Anomalous isotope effects in the U(IV)-U(VI) exchange system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Masao; Okamoto, Makoto; Onitsuka, Hatsuki; Nakanishi, Takashi.

    1992-01-01

    In previous papers, the enrichment of 236 U in the U(IV) - U(VI) chemical exchange system was found to be significantly smaller than the value estimated by the normal mass dependence enrichment of 235 U. Further experiments have been carried out in the present work to confirm the strange phenomenon of the isotopic anomaly in uranium enrichment. The results have indicated that the separation coefficient of 236 U is the same value as one previously reported. To confirm the anomaly of uranium isotope separation, α-ray spectrometry was implemented to check the enrichment behavior of 234 U. Although no theoretical explanation is given for the isotopic anomaly, this is favorable phenomenon for the re-enrichment of recycled uranium which contains isotopes 232 U and 236 U. (author)

  10. Multiphysics Model of Palladium Hydride Isotope Exchange Accounting for Higher Dimensionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Eliassi, Mehdi; Bon, Bradley Luis

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes computational model developm ent and simulations results for a series of isotope exchange dynamics experiments i ncluding long and thin isothermal beds similar to the Foltz and Melius beds and a lar ger non-isothermal experiment on the NENG7 test bed. The multiphysics 2D axi-symmetr ic model simulates the temperature and pressure dependent exchange reactio n kinetics, pressure and isotope dependent stoichiometry, heat generation from the r eaction, reacting gas flow through porous media, and non-uniformities in the bed perme ability. The new model is now able to replicate the curved reaction front and asy mmetry of the exit gas mass fractions over time. The improved understanding of the exchange process and its dependence on the non-uniform bed properties and te mperatures in these larger systems is critical to the future design of such sy stems.

  11. Oxygen isotope exchange in La2NiO(4±δ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, M V; Tropin, E S; Eremin, V A; Farlenkov, A S; Smirnov, A S; Kolchugin, A A; Porotnikova, N M; Khodimchuk, A V; Berenov, A V; Kurumchin, E Kh

    2016-04-07

    Oxygen surface exchange kinetics and diffusion have been studied by the isotope exchange method with gas phase equilibration using a static circulation experimental rig in the temperature range of 600-800 °C and oxygen pressure range of 0.13-2.5 kPa. A novel model which takes into account distributions of the dissociative adsorption and incorporation rates has been developed. The rates of the elementary stages have been calculated. The rate-determining stages for a La2NiO(4±δ) polycrystalline specimen have been discussed. The diffusion activation energies calculated using the gas phase equilibration method (1.4 eV) differ significantly from those calculated using isotope exchange depth profiling (0.5-0.8 eV), which was attributed to the influence of different oxygen diffusion pathways.

  12. Separation of lithium isotopes on ion exchangers; Separation des isotopes du lithium sur echangeurs d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menes, F; Saito, E; Roth, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    A survey of the literature shows that little information has been published on the separation of lithium isotopes with ion exchange resins. We have undertaken a series of elutions using the ion-exchange resins 'Dowex 50 x 12' and IRC 50, and various eluting solutions. Formulae derived from the treatment of Mayer and Tompkins permit the calculation of the separation factor per theoretical plate. For the solutions tried out in our experiments the separation factors lie in the interval 1.001 to 1.002. These values are quite low in comparison to the factor 1.022 found by Taylor and Urey for ion exchange with zeolites. (author) [French] Nous avons trouve relativement peu de donnees dans la litterature scientifique sur la separation des isotopes de lithium par les resines echangeuses d'ions. Nous avons effectue un certain nombre d'essais sur Dowex 50 X 12 et IRC 50 utilisant divers eluants. Des formules derivees de celles de Mayer et Tompkins permettent le calcul du coefficient de separation par plateau theorique. Pour les eluants etudies, ces facteurs de separation se trouvent entre 1,001 et 1,002. Ces valeurs sont faibles en comparaison du facteur 1,022 trouve par Taylor et Urey pour les zeolithes. (auteur)

  13. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamberg, K.; Plicka, J.; Calibar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of ion exchange in the Nasup(+)-Mgsup(2+)-strongly acidic cation exchanger system in a batch stirred reactor was studied. The samples of exchangers OSTION KS (containing DVB in the range of 1.5 - 12%) and AMBERLITE IR 120 for experimental work were used; the concentration of the aqueous nitrate solution was always 0.2M. The Nernst-Planck equation for description of diffusion of ions in a particle was used. The values of diffusion coefficients of magnesium ions in the exchangers and their dependence on the content of DVB were obtained by evaluating the experimental data and using the self-diffusion coefficients of sodium. (author)

  14. Exchange of hydrogen isotopes in oxide ceramics at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Morita, K.; Soda, K.

    2001-01-01

    The decay curves of D and up-take curves of H on the exchange of D implanted into Li 2 TiO 3 for H in H 2 O vapor caused by exposure to normal-air at room temperature have been measured as a function of exposure time at different implantation concentrations by means of the elastic recoil detection technique. The re-emission curves of D retained and H up-taken in a specimen by isochronal annealing for 10 min have been also measured. It is found that the thermal re-emission of D and H takes place uniformly over the whole specimen due to local molecular recombination in the bulk and that the re-emission rates of H and D in the near-surface layers are slower than those in the deeper layers. It is also found that the decay of D caused by the D-H exchange takes place rapidly in the beginning and the retained amount of D attains at a constant level and the retained fraction of D are higher as the initial implantation concentrations of D are lower. The decay curves of D and the up-take curves of H have been analysed using the mass balance equations, in which the elementary processes are taken into account according to the exchange model of one way diffusion from the surface into the bulk. It is shown that the solution of the mass balance equations reproduces well the experimental data. The rate constants of the elementary processes determined are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, T.; Isomura, S.; Izawa, H.; Nakane, R.

    1980-01-01

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  16. Isotopic exchange rate of cobalt ions between hydrous tin(IV) oxide and aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Itami, Akira

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic exchange rate of cobalt ions between hydrous tin(IV) oxide ion exchanger and aqueous solutions was radiochemically measured to obtain fundamental data which are useful for elucidating the ion-exchange kinetics of the material for the transition metal elements. The rate can be understood by considering that the cobalt ions were present in the exchanger as three kinds of species: (A 1 ) Free ions which can diffuse in the exchanger particles, (A 2 ) Weakly bound ions to the exchange sites which exchange rapidly with A 1 , and (B) Covalently fixed ions to the exchange sites which exchange very slowly with A 1 . At low fraction of B, the rate is controlled by the diffusion of A 1 with the effective diffusion coefficient, D eff , the values of which depend on the concentration ratios of A 2 to A 1 . When B predominates over the A species, the concentration ratios of B to A 1 affect greatly D eff . The values of D eff and their activation energy(20 kJ/mol) were also estimated

  17. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M; Baba, A [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y; Nishi, M

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  18. Minutes of the 28th annual plutonium sample exchange meeting. Part I: isotopic sample exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Contents of this publication include the following: list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 24 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: interlaboratory comparisons of plutonium isotope ratios. The plutonium ratios considered are 240/239, 241/239, 242/239, 238/239, 239/240, 241/240, 242/240, and 238/240; carbon, uranium, iron, and nickel data; mass spectroscopy data; determination of plutonium 241 half-life; review of plutonium overplating sample loading technique; on-line measurement evaluation system for isotopic analysis; and description of a new thermal ionization mass spectrometer

  19. Determination of phosphorus in urban sewage sludge using the isotopic exchange kinetics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas de Tramontini, Susana; Barbaro, Nestor O.; Lopez, Silvia C.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the differences among soil available P, the use by the plants of sludge P, and of a water soluble fertilizer (Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 ) P, using isotopic exchange kinetics methods. The sludge was provided by the Sewage Sludge Treatment Plant of Tucuman City, Argentina. The isotopic exchange kinetics experiment, in which the fate of carrier free 32 PO 4 added to the soil solution at a steady state was studied, gives information on soil P exchangeability. The experiment was carried out in the laboratory, where sewage sludge and water soluble fertilizer were added to soil samples taken at a depth of 0-25 and 25-40 cm. Changes in the soil P isotopically exchangeable within 1 minute measurements in the soil with sludge and in the soil with water soluble fertilizer showed that the 0-25 cm deep soil samples had a low P sorption capacity (r1 /R values were low). The sludge had high total and organic P, but the P in the soil solution was lower than the P provided by the water soluble fertilizer. Therefore, despite its higher total P content, this sludge contained slow available forms of P

  20. Non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model for the design of boron isotopes chemical exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Peng; Fan, Kaigong; Guo, Xianghai; Zhang, Haocui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model instead of a distillation equilibrium model to calculate boron isotopes separation. • We apply the model to calculate the needed column height to meet prescribed separation requirements. - Abstract: To interpret the phenomenon of chemical exchange in boron isotopes separation accurately, the process is specified as an absorption–reaction–desorption hybrid process instead of a distillation equilibrium model, the non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model is put forward and a mass transfer enhancement factor E is introduced to find the packing height needed to meet the specified separation requirements with MATLAB.

  1. Hydrogen isotope exchange of organic compounds in dilute acid at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werstiuk, N.H.

    1987-01-01

    Introduction of one or more deuterium (or tritium) atoms into organic molecules can be accomplished in many ways depending on the nature of the substrate and the extent and sterochemistry of deuteriation or tritiation required. Some of the common methods include acid- and base-catalyzed exchange of carbonyl compounds, metal hydride reductions, dissolving metal reductions, catalytic reduction of double bonds, chromatographic exchange, homogeneous and heterogeneous metal-catalyzed exchange, base-catalyzed exchange of carbon acids other than carbonyl compounds and acid-catalyzed exchange via electrophilic substitution. Only the latter three methods have been used for perdeuteriation of organic compounds. A very useful compendium of labeling methods with examples has been available to chemists for some time. Although metal-catalyzed exchange has been used extensively, the method suffers from some deficiencies: irreproducibility of catalyst surfaces, catalyst poisoning, side reactions such as coupling and hydrogenolysis of labile groups and low deuterium incorporation. Usually a number of cycles are required with fresh catalyst and fresh deuterium source to achieve substantial isotope incorporation. Acid-catalyzed exchange of aromatics and alkenes, strongly acidic media such as liquid DBr, concentrated DBr, acetic acid/stannic chloride, concentrated D 3 PO 4 , concentrated DC1, D 3 PO 4 /BF 3 SO 2 , 50-80% D 2 SO 4 and DFSO 4 /SbF 5 at moderate temperatures (<100 degrees) have been used to effect exchange. The methods are not particularly suitable for large scale deuteriations because of the cost and the fact that the recovery and upgrading of the diluted deuterium pool is difficult. This paper describes the hydrogen isotope exchange of a variety of organic compounds in dilute aqueous acid (0.1-0.5 M) at elevated temperatures (150-300 degrees)

  2. [Solid state isotope hydrogen exchange for deuterium and tritium in human gene-engineered insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotarev, Yu A; Dadayan, A K; Kozik, V S; Gasanov, E V; Nazimov, I V; Ziganshin, R Kh; Vaskovsky, B V; Murashov, A N; Ksenofontov, A L; Haribin, O N; Nikolaev, E N; Myasoedov, N F

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of high temperature solid state catalytic isotope exchange in peptides and proteins under the action of catalyst-activated spillover hydrogen was studied. The reaction of human gene-engineered insulin with deuterium and tritium was conducted at 120-140° C to produce insulin samples containing 2-6 hydrogen isotope atoms. To determine the distribution of the isotope label over tritium-labeled insulin's amino acid residues, oxidation of the S-S bonds of insulin by performic acid was performed and polypeptide chains isolated; then their acid hydrolysis, amino acid analysis and liquid scintillation counts of tritium in the amino acids were conducted. The isotope label was shown to be incorporated in all amino acids of the protein, with the peptide fragment FVNQHLCGSHLVE of the insulin β-chain showing the largest incorporation. About 45% of the total protein isotope label was incorporated in His5 and His10 of this fragment. For the analysis of isotope label distribution in labeled insulin's peptide fragments, the recovery of the S-S bonds by mercaptoethanol, the enzymatic hydrolysis by glutamyl endopeptidase from Bacillus intermedius and HPLC division of the resulting peptides were carried out. Attribution of the peptide fragments formed due to hydrolysis at the Glu-X bond in the β-chain was accomplished by mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry analysis data of the deuterium-labeled insulin samples' isotopomeric composition showed that the studied solid state isotope exchange reaction equally involved all the protein molecules. Biological studying of tritium-labeled insulin showed its physiological activity to be completely retained.

  3. The role of soil biogeochemistry in wine taste: Soil factors influencing grape elemental composition, photosynthetic biomarkers and Cu/Zn isotopic signature of Vitis vinifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Simon; Oliva, Priscia; Darrozes, José; Viers, Jérôme; Audry, Stéphane; Courjault-Radé, Pierre; Orgogozo, Laurent; Le Guedard, Marina; Schreck, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the influence of soil composition in wine taste is of great economic and environmental interest in France and around the world. Nevertheless the impact of soil composition on wine taste is still controversially discussed. Since inorganic soil components do not have a proper taste and do not enter the plant anyway, their influence needs to be induced by nutrient absorption and its impact on plant functioning and grape composition. Indeed recent development of geological tracers of origin proof the existence of soil chemical and isotopic signatures in wine. However, type and scale of the impact of soil composition on wine taste are not well understood yet, and little experimental evidence exists due to the complexity of mechanisms involved. Thus, to provide evidence for the impact of soil composition on grape composition and potentially wine taste, we studied soil and plant material from two relevant vineyards (Soave, Italia). On those two directly adjacent vineyards, two different wines are produced with the same plant material and cultivation techniques. The vineyards only differ by their underlying bedrock - limestone versus basaltic rock - and thus present suitable conditions for investigating the impact of soil composition on grapes and wine. Pedological and mineralogical parameters were analyzed for the two vineyards whereas chemical extractions (citrate, CaCl2) were performed to determine nutrient bioavailability in both soils. Elemental compositions were determined by ICP-MS analyses in different compartments (soils, vine leaves and grapes). Isotopic fractionation of Cu and Zn was investigated in various samples as source tracers and in order to better understand fractionation mechanisms involved. Finally, plant health was studied using the Omega-3 biomarker which determines the fatty acid composition in vine leaves, directly involved in photosynthetic processes. Results show that the vineyards are characterized by two different soil types due

  4. Lead isotope exchange between dissolved and fluvial particulate matter: a laboratory study from the Johor River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengli; Boyle, Edward A.; Lee, Jong-Mi; Nurhati, Intan; Zurbrick, Cheryl; Switzer, Adam D.; Carrasco, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the dominant source of Pb to the modern marine environment, and as a result, in most regions of the ocean the Pb isotopic composition of dissolved Pb in the surface ocean (and in corals) matches that of the regional aerosols. In the Singapore Strait, however, there is a large offset between seawater dissolved and coral Pb isotopes and that of the regional aerosols. We propose that this difference results from isotope exchange between dissolved Pb supplied by anthropogenic aerosol deposition and adsorbed natural crustal Pb on weathered particles delivered to the ocean by coastal rivers. To investigate this issue, Pb isotope exchange was assessed through a closed-system exchange experiment using estuarine waters collected at the Johor River mouth (which discharges to the Singapore Strait). During the experiment, a known amount of dissolved Pb with the isotopic composition of NBS-981 (206Pb/207Pb = 1.093) was spiked into the unfiltered Johor water (dissolved and particulate 206Pb/207Pb = 1.199) and the changing isotopic composition of the dissolved Pb was monitored. The mixing ratio of the estuarine and spike Pb should have produced a dissolved 206Pb/207Pb isotopic composition of 1.161, but within a week, the 206Pb/207Pb in the water increased to 1.190 and continued to increase to 1.197 during the next two months without significant changes of the dissolved Pb concentration. The kinetics of isotope exchange was assessed using a simple Kd model, which assumes multiple sub-reservoirs within the particulate matter with different exchange rate constants. The Kd model reproduced 56% of the observed Pb isotope variance. Both the closed-system experiment and field measurements imply that isotope exchange can be an important mechanism for controlling Pb and Pb isotopes in coastal waters. A similar process may occur for other trace elements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  5. Measurements of tritium recycling and isotope exchange in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Kamperschroer, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Stotler, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    Tritium Balmer-alpha (T α ) emission, along with H α and D α is observed in the current D-T experimental campaign in TFTR. The data are a measure of the fueling of the plasma by tritium accumulated in the TFTR limiter and the spectral profile maps neutral hydrogenic velocities. T α is relatively slow to appear in tritium neutral beam heated discharges, (T α /(H α + D α + T α ) = 11% after 8 tritium-only neutral beam discharges). In contrast, the T α fraction in a sequence of six discharges fueled with tritium puff,s increased to 44%. Larger transient increases (up to 75% T α ) were observed during subsequent tritium gas puffs. Analysis of the Doppler broadened spectral profiles revealed overall agreement with the dissociation, charge exchange, sputtering and reflection velocities predicted by the neutral Monte-Carlo code DEGAS with some deficiency in the treatment of dissociation products in the 10--100 eV range

  6. Lithium isotope effects in chemical exchange with (2,2,1) cryptand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.; Cairns, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Equilibrium single-stage separation factors were determined for three lithium - (2,2,1) cryptand two-phase chemical exchange systems. The equilibrated phases consisted of an aqueous solution of a lithium salt and a chloroform solution of lithium cryptate salt complex. Lithium-6 concentrated in the organic phase in all cases, and the lithium isotope exchange rate with (2,2,1) cryptand was rapid. The separation factors were α = 1.026 +- 0.006 (LiBr exchange), α = 1.035 +- 0.003 (LiTFA), and α = 1.041 +- 0.006 (LiTFA + HTFA), where TFA represents trifluoroacetate. These values were compared with separation factors of other lithium chemical exchange systems. This work has shown that separation factors are influenced by the choice of chemical species and parameters. It has also demonstrated that significant lithium isotope effects can be obtained without a valence change of the metal exchanging between the aquo and cryptate complexes

  7. Comparison of calculated and experimental isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for purple bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers with different quinones incorporated into the QA binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eZhao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that ONIOM type (QM/MM calculations can be used to simulate isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for neutral ubiquinone in the QA binding site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we considerably extend upon this previous work by calculating isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for reaction centers with a variety of unlabeled and 18O labeled foreign quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. Isotope edited spectra were calculated for reaction centers with 2,3-dimethoxy-5,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MQ0, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (duroquinone, DQ, and 2,3-dimethyl-l,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ incorporated, and compared to corresponding experimental spectra. The calculated and experimental spectra agree well, further demonstrating the utility and applicability of our ONIOM approach for calculating the vibrational properties of pigments in protein binding sites.The normal modes that contribute to the bands in the calculated spectra, their composition, frequency and intensity, and how these quantities are modified upon 18O labeling, are presented. This computed information leads to a new and more detailed understanding/interpretation of the experimental FTIR difference spectra. Hydrogen bonding to the carbonyl groups of the incorporated quinones is shown to be relatively weak. It is also shown that there is some asymmetry in hydrogen bonding, accounting for 10-13 cm-1 separation in the frequencies of the carbonyl vibrational modes of the incorporated quinones. The extent of asymmetry H-bonding could only be established by considering the spectra for various types of quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. The quinones listed above are tail-less. Spectra were also calculated for reaction centers with corresponding tail containing quinones incorporated, and it is found that replacement of the quinone methyl group by a phytyl or prenyl chain does not alter ONIOM calculated s

  8. Mixed filling for the successive isotopic exchange in the phase sequence water - water vapors - hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, D.; Peculea, M.; Hirean, I.; Croitoru, C.

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of the isotopic exchange implied in heavy water production. Details concerning the structural arrangement of the process contact elements inside the exchange columns are presented. A hydrophilic filling, based on phosphorous bronze, and the platinum catalyst structure , resulted from this work, are to be implemented in the column equipment of the heavy water distillation pilot operating in connection with the CANDU type reactors. The performances of the mixed catalyst components were derived from experimental data by means of the three fluids model equations

  9. Preparation of Pt-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen-water isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junhua; Kang Yi; Han Yande; Ruan Hao; Dou Qincheng; Hu Shilin

    2001-01-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst used in the hydrogen-water isotope exchange is prepared with Pt as the active metal, PTFE as the hydrophobic material, active carbon or silicon dioxide as the support. The isotope catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water is carried out in the trickle bed and the effects of different carriers, mass fraction of Pt and PTFE on the catalytic activity are discussed. The experimental results show that the activity of Pt-C-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst with the ratio between PTFE and Pt-C from 1 to 2 is higher than other kinds of catalysts and the overall volume transfer coefficient is increased with the increasing of the hydrogen flow rate and reaction temperature

  10. Separation of rate processes for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hartog, J. den; Goodale, J.W.; Rolston, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Wetproofed platinum catalysts in packed columns promote isotopic exchange between counter-current streams of hydrogen saturated with water vapour and liquid water. The net rate of deuterium transfer from isotopically enriched hydrogen has been measured and separated into two rate processes involving the transfer of deuterium from hydrogen to water vapour and from water vapour to liquid. These are compared with independent measurements of the two rate processes to test the two-step successive exchange model for trickle bed reactors. The separated transfer rates are independent of bed height and characterize the deuterium concentrations of each stream along the length of the bed. The dependences of the transfer rates upon hydrogen and liquid flow, hydrogen pressure, platinum loading and the effect of dilution of the hydrophobic catalyst with inert hydrophilic packing are reported. The results indicate a third process may be important in the transfer of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water. (author)

  11. Determination of phosphorus traces in platinum alloys by two-phase isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlacil, F.

    1980-01-01

    The method of ZEMAN and KRATZER for the determination of phosphorus traces by means of two-phase isotope exchange was modified for the determination of phosphorus in pure platinum or pure platinum alloys. It was found that Pt, Rh, Ag and As do not interfere with the determination. Among the elements usually present in platinum metal or platinum alloys, only gold interferes. It was removed by extraction from 7M HCl by MIBK and AmOAc. Hydrochloric acid also interferes but it can be removed by evaporation. The analytical procedure is given for the solution obtained by pressure decomposition of the sample (0.5 g) in a steel bomb with PTFE inlay. It is possible to determine > 2 ppm P (approximate error -10%). If using calibration dependence instead of the well known equation for isotope exchange it is not necessary to know the content of P in the standard solution labelled with 32 P. (author)

  12. Assessment of phosphorus fertility by means of isotopically exchangeable phosphorus and the fixing capacity of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gachon, L.

    1979-01-01

    Using over 400 soils representative of French pedological types, the absorption kinetics of phosphorus were studied on Italian rye-grass grown in pots until assimilable reserves had been exhausted. At the same time, Russell's E value (isotopically exchangeable P in vitro), Larsen's L value (isotopically exchangeable P in vivo) and the fixing capacity of the soils were measured. The study shows a very close correlation between the phosphorus removed by the first four cuttings and fertility indices combining E or L with the fixing capacity. The agricultural value of the two indices proposed, Isub(E) and Isub(L), is confirmed by the results of about forty one-year and multi-year field experiments. Norms for the interpretation of these indices are deduced; these are independent of the pedological type but need to be modified as a function of the type of crop and the cultural practice. (author)

  13. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes using a catalyst packed bed assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; den Hartog, J.; Molson, F.W.R.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of gaseous hydrogen and liquid water is described, wherein the streams of liquid water and gaseous hydrogen are simultaneously brought into contact with one another and a catalyst packed bed assembly while at a temperature in the range 273 0 to 573 0 K. The catalyst packed bed assembly may be composed of discrete carrier bodies of e.g. ceramics, metals, fibrous materials or synthetic plastics with catalytically active metal crystallites selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table, partially enclosed in and bonded to the carrier bodies by a water repellent, water vapor and hydrogen gas permeable, porous, polymeric material, and discrete packing bodies having an exterior surface which is substantially hydrophilic and relatively noncatalytically active with regard to hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor to that of the catalyst bodies

  14. Ligand isotopic exchange of tris(acetylacetonato)germanium(IV) perchlorate in organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Akira; Saito, Kazuo

    1978-01-01

    The ligand isotopic exchange between tris(acetylacetonato)germanium(IV) perchlorate and acetylacetone[ 14 C] has been studied in 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE), nitromethane (NM), and acetonitrile (AN), at 100 - 120 0 C. In these solvents, the rate formula was R = k[H 2 O][complex]; the concentrations of the complex, free ligand, and water in solution were in the ranges from 0.01 to 0.1 mol dm -3 . The activation enthalpies and entropies for the k's are 105, 98, and 90 kJ mol -1 ; and -25, -53, and -69 JK -1 mol -1 , in TCE, NM, and AN, respectively. Influence of acid and base concentrations, and deuterium isotope effect on the rate in AN suggest that the rate controlling step of the exchange is governed by the ease of the proton transfer between the leaving and the incoming acac - in an intermediate. (auth.)

  15. Calculation of isotopic profile during band displacement on ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonwalkar, A.S.; Puranik, V.D.; D'Souza, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the isotopic profile during band displacement on ion exchange resins using computer simulation. Persoz had utilized this technique earlier for calculating the isotopic profile during band displacement as well as frontal analysis. The present report deals with a simplification of the method used by Persoz by reducing the number of variables and making certain approximations where the separation factor is not far from unity. Calculations were made for the typical case of boron isotope separation. The results obtained by the modified method were found to be in very good agreement with those obtained by using an exact equation, at the same time requiring conside--rably less computer time. (author)

  16. Separation of 15N by isotopic exchange in NO, NO2-HNO3 system under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.; Baldea, A.; Teaca, C.; Horga, R.; Abrudean, M.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most used method for production of 15 N with 99% at. concentration is the isotopic exchange between gaseous nitrogen oxides and HNO 3 solution 10M: ( 15 NO, 15 NO 2 ) g + H 14 NO 3,l = ( 14 NO, 14 NO 2 ) g + H 15 NO 3,l . The isotopic exchange is characterized by an elemental separation factor α=1.055 at 25 deg. C and atmospheric pressure. Recently, kinetics data pointed to the linear dependence of the exchange rate 15 N/ 14 N(R) on the nitrogen oxide pressure with a rate law R = k[HNO 3 ] 2 · [N 2 O 3 ]. In this work, the influence of the nitrogen oxide pressure on the 15 N separation efficiency was determined by the use of a laboratory equipment with a separation column pack of Helipack type, with dimensions 1.8 mm x 1.8 mm x 0.2 mm. The increase of nitrogen oxide pressure led to a better isotopic transfer between the two counter-flow phases in the column pack. The HETP (Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate) determined for a 3.14 ml ·cm -2 · min -1 load is equal to that obtained at atmospheric pressure for a two times lower load. The operation of the equipment for isotopic separation of 15 N at 1.8 atm instead of atmospheric pressure allows doubling the HNO 3 10 M load of the column and consequently, doubling the production rate. A better performance of the separation process at higher pressure is essential for the industrial production of 15 N isotope which is used for the production of uranium nitride in FBR type reactors. (authors)

  17. Studies of the hydrous titanium oxide ion exchanger. 4. Rate of the isotopic exchange of sodium ions between the exchanger in the Na+ form and aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Kasuga, Fuminori

    1995-01-01

    The isotopic exchange rate of Na + between hydrous titanium(IV) oxides, precipitated at pH 6 and 13, in the Na + form and aqueous solution of sodium salt was determined radiochemically. The rate in the exchanger precipitated at pH 6 is controlled by the diffusion of Na + in the exchanger particles (particle diffusion). The diffusion coefficient and its activation energy are 1.9 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 (pH 12, 5.0degC) and 29 kJ mol -1 (pH 12), respectively. The rate in the exchanger precipitated at pH 13 is also controlled by the particle diffusion. The rate is much slower than that in the other; this can be explained by assuming the existence of two kinds of independently diffusing ions (fast and slow species) in the exchanger. The diffusion coefficients are of the order of 10 -12 and 10 -13 m 2 s -1 for the fast and the slow species, respectively. Their activation energies are 48-60 kJ mol -1 at pH 12. The marked difference in kinetics between two exchanges was interpreted in terms of the difference in the acid-base property and in the microstructure of the matrix. (author)

  18. Factors affecting the determination of the isotopically exchangeable phosphorus in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, L.E.M.

    1981-06-01

    In order to evaluate the factors that affect the determination of the isotopically exchangeable phosphorus in soils (L value), various greenhouse experiments were carried out. The following factors were considered: carrier level; plant species; harvest time; nitrogen doses; nitrogen sources; culture conditions and soil type. A radioactive solution with an activity level of approximately 10 μCi 32 p/3 kg soil with different carrier levels was located in layers or mixed completely with the soil depending upon the experiment. (author)

  19. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities.

  20. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H.

    2005-01-01

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities

  1. Use of water as displacing agent in ion exchange chromatographic separation of isotope of boron using weak base ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Mohanakrishnan, G.; Anand Babu, C.; Krishna Prabhu, R.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to study the feasibility of using weakly basic anion exchange resin for enrichment of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography and water as eluent. The results of experiments carried out to determine total chloride capacity (TCC), strong base capacity (SBC) of the resin at different concentrations of boric acid and enrichment profiles are reported in this paper. (author)

  2. Isotope exchange study of the dissociation of metal-humic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizera, J.; Jansova, A.; Hvozdova, I.; Benes, P.

    2002-01-01

    Prediction of the migration of toxic metals and radionuclides in the environment requires knowledge of equilibrium and kinetic parameters characterising their interaction with humic substance (HS). In this work, isotope exchange of Eu and Co in the systems containing HS has been used to study dissociation of the cations from their complexes with HS under quasi-stationary conditions. In the experimental arrangement of the so-called diaphragm method, a dialysis membrane divides two compartments containing solutions of metal and HS, identical in both half-cells but for radiolabeling ( 152 Eu and 60 Co) applied only in one cell. The membrane is permeable for free metal cation but not for the metal-HS complex. The slow dissociation of metal cation from HS is reflected by retardation (compared to a reference system in the absence of HS) of the rate of the isotope exchange between the two compartments. However, only an apparent dissociation rate can be observed, as detection of fast dissociation is limited by the rate of diffusion of dissociated cations through membrane and by their recombination with available binding sites of HS. The rate of isotope exchange of Eu and Co in the systems with HS (Aldrich sodium humate, soil humic and fulvic acid) was monitored as function of pH (4 and 6), ionic strength (0.01 and 0.1 M), and the degree of HS loading with metal ([M] 0 = 10 -7 - 2x10 -5 M at 10 mg/L HS). For Co, the rate of 60 Co 2+ diffusion through the membrane showed up to control the rate of the isotope exchange indicating that the Co-HS dissociation is too fast to be followed by the diaphragm method, and that the abundance of non-complexed Co is not negligible. The apparent rate of Eu-HS dissociation was found to be enhanced by decreasing pH value, increasing ionic strength, and increasing metal loading (i.e., metal/HS ratio). For interpretation of the experimental kinetic data, a discrete 2-component model (bi-exponential decay function) was applied. Based on

  3. Progress in 15N and 13C separation by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of 15 N separation by isotopic exchange in NO, NO 2 - HNO 3 system under pressure is presented. The pressure increase in 15 N separation plant improved the isotopic transport between the two phases circulated in counter-current in the packed column according to a better kinetics of isotopic exchange at higher pressures. The operation of 15 N separation plant at a pressure of 1.8 atm (absolute) will permit doubling of 10 M nitric acid flow rate and of 15 N production of a given column. The improved performance at a higher pressure is significant for large scale 15 N production, which would be utilized for uranium nitride fuels for FBRs. Enrichment of 13 C by chemical exchange between CO 2 and amine carbamate in nonaqueous solvent has been modelled. For process optimization the steady state separation and the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) have been determined for different experimental conditions and simulated for higher pressures than atmospheric one. At lower temperature (5 deg C) as the pressure increases the quantity of CO 2 dissolved in amine solution increases. For process analysis at higher pressures and lower temperatures, the two steps model has been considered. At 0.9 MPa pressure and 5 deg C the reaction rate is higher than at 25 deg C and atmospheric pressure, the value of HETP being lower with more than 100% than at 25 deg C. (author)

  4. Asymmetrical effects of mesophyll conductance on fundamental photosynthetic parameters and their relationships estimated from leaf gas exchange measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E; Pallardy, Stephen G; Baker, John; Cao, Yonghui; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Dong, Xuejun; Ellsworth, David; Van Goethem, Davina; Jensen, Anna M; Law, Beverly E; Loos, Rodolfo; Martins, Samuel C Vitor; Norby, Richard J; Warren, Jeffrey; Weston, David; Winter, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    Worldwide measurements of nearly 130 C3 species covering all major plant functional types are analysed in conjunction with model simulations to determine the effects of mesophyll conductance (g(m)) on photosynthetic parameters and their relationships estimated from A/Ci curves. We find that an assumption of infinite g(m) results in up to 75% underestimation for maximum carboxylation rate V(cmax), 60% for maximum electron transport rate J(max), and 40% for triose phosphate utilization rate T(u) . V(cmax) is most sensitive, J(max) is less sensitive, and T(u) has the least sensitivity to the variation of g(m). Because of this asymmetrical effect of g(m), the ratios of J(max) to V(cmax), T(u) to V(cmax) and T(u) to J(max) are all overestimated. An infinite g(m) assumption also limits the freedom of variation of estimated parameters and artificially constrains parameter relationships to stronger shapes. These findings suggest the importance of quantifying g(m) for understanding in situ photosynthetic machinery functioning. We show that a nonzero resistance to CO2 movement in chloroplasts has small effects on estimated parameters. A non-linear function with gm as input is developed to convert the parameters estimated under an assumption of infinite gm to proper values. This function will facilitate gm representation in global carbon cycle models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Investigation into reaction of heterogenous isotopic exchange with gaseoUs tritium in solution for preparation labelled lipid compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, V.P.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of the method of heterogeneous catalytic isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium in the solution for the production of labelled lipide preparations is studied. Labelled saturated and unsaturated aliphatic acids, prostaglandins, phospholipides and sphingolipides are prepared

  6. High porewater exchange in a mangrove-dominated estuary revealed from short-lived radium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Santos, Isaac R.; Tait, Douglas R.; Reading, Michael J.; Sanders, Christian J.

    2017-10-01

    We hypothesise that mangroves play an important role in groundwater exchange processes in sub-tropical and tropical estuarine waters. To investigate this, multiple high resolution time series measurements of radium across a tidal estuary (Coffs Creek, NSW, Australia) were performed as well as a spatial survey in both bottom and surface layers. Results from the spatial survey revealed increasing radium concentrations in parts of the estuary surrounded by mangroves. The average radium concentration in estuary areas lined with mangroves was 2.5 times higher than the average concentration at the mouth of the estuary and 6.5-fold higher than upstream freshwater areas. Additionally, the area enriched in radium coincided with low dissolved oxygen concentrations, implying that porewater exchange may drive anoxia. A radium mass balance model based on 223Ra and 224Ra isotopes at different sections of the estuary confirmed higher porewater exchange rates from areas fringed with mangrove vegetation. Estimated porewater exchange rates were 27.8 ± 5.3 and 13.6 ± 2.1 cm d-1 (0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.4 ± 0.1 m3 s-1) based on 223Ra and 224Ra isotopes, respectively. The average saline porewater exchange was ∼ 10-fold larger than the upstream surface freshwater inputs to the estuary. We suggest that mangrove environments within subtropical estuaries are hotspots for porewater exchange due to the complex belowground structure of crab burrows and the effect of tidal pumping. Because porewater exchange releases carbon and nitrogen from coastal sediments, development and modification of mangrove areas in subtropical estuaries have a significant effect on coastal biogeochemical cycles.

  7. OXYGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF THE ALLENDE TYPE C CAIs: EVIDENCE FOR ISOTOPIC EXCHANGE DURING NEBULAR MELTING AND ASTEROIDAL THERMAL METAMORPHISM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, A N; Chaussidon, M; Yurimoto, H; Sakamoto, N; Nagashima, K; Hutcheon, I D; MacPherson, G J

    2008-02-21

    that CAIs 100, 160 and CG5 experienced melting in an {sup 16}O-rich ({Delta}{sup 17}O < -20{per_thousand}) nebular gas in the CAI-forming region. The Type C and Type-B-like portions of CAI 6-1-72 experienced melting in an {sup 16}O-depleted ({Delta}{sup 17}O {ge} -13{per_thousand}) nebular gas. CAIs ABC, TS26 and 93 experienced isotopic exchange during re-melting in the presence of an {sup 16}O-poor ({Delta}{sup 17}O {ge} -10{per_thousand}) nebular gas in the chondrule-forming region(s). Subsequently, Allende Type C CAIs experienced post-crystallization isotopic exchange with an {sup 16}O-poor reservoir that affected largely melilite and anorthite. Because pseudomorphic replacement of lacy melilite by grossular, monticellite and forsterite occurred during thermal metamorphism, some oxygen isotopic exchange of melilite and anorthite must have continued after formation of these secondary minerals. We suggest that some or all oxygen isotopic exchange in melilite and anorthite occurred during fluid-assisted thermal metamorphism on the CV parent asteroid. Similar processes may have also affected melilite and anorthite of CAIs in metamorphosed CO chondrites.

  8. Effect of complexing reagents on the ionization constant of boric acid and its relation to isotopic exchange separation factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of change in concentration of complexing reagents having two or more hydroxyl groups, viz., ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dextrose and mannitol on the ionization constant of boric acid has been studied by pH-metric titration method. The effect of increase in ionization constant of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor for the separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography has been studied by the batch method. (author). 9 refs

  9. Kinetics of liquid-phase catalytic heterogeneous protium-tritium isotope exchange with participation of gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of catalytic (PdO/BaSO 4 (Al 2 O 3 ) catalyst) heterogeneous protium - tritium isotopic exchange D - [1- 3 H] of carbohydrates and gaseous oxygen have been measured. It is ascertained that the rate of isotopic exchange depends on the nature of carbohydrate, catalyst, buffer and medium acidity. The value of concentration of carbohydrate acyclic forms plays the determining role in the process

  10. Isotopic study of water exchange between atmosphere and biosphere at Changa Manga site in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazil, M.; Ali, M.; Latif, Z.; Butt, S.

    2012-01-01

    Study of water exchange between atmosphere and biosphere was initiated to understand the ties between these two spheres. Samples of leaves and stems of 23 woody plants along with soil from the surface and from the depth of 7 cm were collected from Changa Manga forest. Moisture content from these samples was extracted using the vacuum distillation method and analyzed for stable isotopes (/sup 18/O and /sup 2/H). Air moisture was also collected in the field. Isotopic data plotted long with the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL) indicates that /sup 18/O and /sup 2/H contents of moisture in the leaves of woody plants are higher than their respective stems. This behavior is due to the evaporative enrichment trend originating from the soil moisture in active root zone and also from the leaf surface. The stem samples did not show any significant variation in gamma /sup 18/O suggesting no significant evaporation from stems of big trees. Degree of enrichment of leave samples of woody plants indicated the species-specific effects in isotopes during transpiration. Pine and Eucalyptus leaves showed more variation in the isotopic contents as compared to other species. Temporal variations of /sup 18/O and /sup 2/H in the leaves indicated enriched isotopic values during hot and dry periods as compared to those during wet period (monsoon and winter rains) mainly due to higher transpiration rates at high temperature and low humidity. (orig./A.B.)

  11. Study of iodine-iodate isotopic exchange reaction in neutral aqueous solutions by radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, R.; Ram, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The isotopic exchange of iodine atoms in neutral aqueous solutions of iodate ions and iodine (in KI) is found to obey the rate law R = k [IO 3 - ] 0.4 [I 2 ] 1.2 at 175 o C. The addition of neutral ionic salts, e.g. KCl and KNO 3 , in the reaction mixture showed a slight catalytic effect on the exchange rate. Further, the kinetic salt effect indicated the involvement of at least one neutral species on the rate-determining step. The activation energy in neutral aqueous solutions of iodate ions and iodine is found to be 86 ± 3 kJ mol -1 , which decreases in the presence of KCl (79 ± 3 kJ mol -1 and KNO 3 (82 + 3 kJ mol -1 ). The activation parameters, viz. free energy of activation, enthalpy of activation and entropy of activation, were also calculated. Based on these results, an association-dissociation type of reaction mechanism is proposed for this exchange reaction in neutral aqueous medium, similar to that proposed earlier for iodide-iodate isotopic exchange reaction in neutral aqueous solutions, nitrate eutectic melts and iodide-iodate melts. (author)

  12. Rate of Isotope Exchange Reaction Between Tritiated Water in a Gas Phase and Water on the Surface of Piping Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashio, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Junya; Kobayashi, Ryusuke; Nishikawa, Masabumi

    2001-01-01

    The system effect of tritium arises from the interaction of tritium in the gas phase with water on the surface of piping materials. It has been reported that the system effect can be quantified by applying the serial reactor model to the piping system and that adsorption and isotope exchange reactions play the main roles in the trapping of tritium. The isotope exchange reaction that occurs when the chemical form of tritium in the gas phase is in the molecular form, i.e., HT or T 2 , has been named isotope exchange reaction 1, and that which occurs when tritium in the gas phase is in water form, i.e., HTO or T 2 O, has been named isotope exchange reaction 2.The rate of isotope exchange reaction 2 is experimentally quantified, and the rate is observed to be about one-third of the rate of adsorption. The trapping and release behavior of tritium from the piping surface due to isotope exchange reaction 2 is also discussed. It is certified that swamping of water vapor to process gas is effective to release tritium from the surface contaminated with tritium

  13. Isotopic shifts in chemical exchange systems. 1. Large isotope effects in the complexation of Na+ isotopes by macrocyclic polyethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoechel, A.; Wilken, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The complexation of 24 Na + and 22 Na + by 18 of the most widely used macrocyclic polyethers (crown ethers and monocyclic and bicyclic aminopolyethers) has been investigated in view of possible equilibrium isotope shifts. Solvated salts and polyether complexes were distributed differently into two phases and isotope ratios determined in both phases. Chloroform/water systems were shown to be particularly suitable to the investigations allowing favorable distribution for Na + and 13 of the 18 polyethers employed. With crown ethers 24 Na + enrichment varied from nonsignficant values (for large crown ethers) up to 3.1 +- 0.4% (18-crown-6). In the case of bicyclic aminopolyethers, ligands with cages of optimum size to accommodate Na + showed 24 Na + enrichment between O (nonsignificant) (2.2/sub B/2./sub B/) and 5.2 +- 1.8% (2.2.1). In contrast, for 2.2.2. and its derivatives, being too large for Na + , 22 Na + enrichment varying from O (nonsignificant) (2.2.2.p) up to 5.4 +- 0.5% (2.2.2.) has been observed. These values are remarkably high. They are explained by different bonding in solvate structure and polyether complex by using the theoretical approach of Bigeleisen

  14. Isotopic exchange between deuterium and neohexane on supported platinum and palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskinazi, V.

    1979-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction between neohexane and deuterium on supported Pt/SiO 2 and Pd/SiO 2 catalysts has been investigated in the temperature range 86.5 to 110 0 C. Rates of exchange were studied as functions of percentage of metal atoms exposed, the conditions of catalyst pretreatment, and the reaction temperature. The rates of exchange were not strongly dependent upon percentage exposed; however, the relative yields of d 1 through d 5 in the ethyl moiety or neohexane were dependent on the percentage metal atoms exposed. The Pt/SiO 2 catalysts were found to be more active for exchange than the Pd/SiO 2 catalysts by an order of magnitude. Both the turnover frequencies and the exchange pattern were observed to be influenced by the pretreatment of the catalyst. Maxima in the exchange pattern occurred at d 3 and d 5 in the case of Pt/SiO 2 and at d 5 only in the case of the Pd/SiO 2 catalysts. In order to account for the d 3 maximum observed for Pt catalysts, some extension of the Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism is required. Mechanisms by which the d 3 species might be formed are proposed and discussed. On Pd/SiO 2 catalysts exchange occurs preferentially in the ethyl substituent of the quaternary carbon atom rather than on the three methyl substituents of the quaternary carbon atom. Such preference is not observed on Pt/SiO 2 catalysts; in fact, in some cases, this preference is reversed. Whenever exchange occurs in the three methyl substituents, mostly the d 1 product is obtained. For Pt/SiO 2 catalysts, the exchange pattern appears to be influenced by steric effects, but the data suggest that factors other than steric effects are important on Pd

  15. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  16. Process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas and catalyst assembly therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bithermal, catalytic, hydrogen isotope exchange process between liquid water and hydrogen gas to effect concentration of the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is described. Liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted with one another and with at least one catalytically active metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table; the catalyst body has a water repellent, gas and water vapor permeable, organic polymer or resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone resin coating, so that the isotope exchange takes place by two simultaneously occurring, and closely coupled in space, steps and concentration is effected by operating two interconnected sections containing catalyst at different temperatures. (U.S.)

  17. Characterization of xanthophyll pigments, photosynthetic performance, photon energy dissipation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination during artemisinin-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Iftikhar Hussain

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0 seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40-160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis.

  18. Process and device for step by step enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium by isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniotakis, N.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1984-01-01

    Deuterium and/or tritium are bound to steam by isotope exchange after permeation through an exchange wall. Primary and secondary flows are guided by the counterflow principle. The secondary side has a metal oxide as oxidation catalyst. The plant can consist of several enrichment stages. The various flows and parts of the plant are described. (PW) [de

  19. Isotopic exchange kinetics of zinc ions in Zn-A zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radak, V M; Gal, I J; Salai, J J [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia)

    1976-01-01

    The isotopic exchange kinetics of Zn/sup 2 +/ ions in hydrated Zn-A zeolite of composition (Znsub(5.55)Nasub(0.90)(A10/sub 2/)/sub 12/(Si0/sub 2/)/sub 12/.aq) have been investigated by measuring the fractional attainment of isotopic equilibrium between a ZnCl/sub 2/ solution and a /sup 65/Zn-labelled Zn-A zeolite (30 and 45 ..mu..m particle radii) as a function of time, in the temperature range 25 to 60/sup 0/C. The exchange mechanism is a two-step process which has been resolved, using the Brown-Sherry-Krambeck model (J.Phys.Chem.;75:3846(1971)) into diffusion in the solid particles, with Zn/sup 2 +/ diffusivity of D = 10sup(-3.97 + -0.03) exp(-Esub(D)/RT)m/sup 2/ s/sup -1/, Esub(D) = 67.1 +- 0.5 kJ molee/sup -1/, and an intracrystalline first-order exchange between bound and mobile Zn/sup 2 +/ ions in the network, with a rate constant of k/sub 2/ = 10sup(3.05 +- 0.25) exp(-Esub(k)/RT)s/sup -1/, Esub(k) = 56.5 +- 1.5 kJ mol/sup -1/.

  20. Positional isotope exchange analysis of the uridine-diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, L.; Hilscher, L.; Raushel, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme uridine-diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the reversible formation of pyrophosphate and UDP-glucose from UTP and glc-1P. The positional isotope exchange reaction was measured using oxygen-18 labelled UTP. The synthesis of [β- 18 O 2 , βγ- 18 O, γ- 18 O 3 ]UTP was accomplished by the coupled activities of carbamate kinase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase, and nucleoside monophosphate kinase. The exchange of an oxygen-18 from a β-nonbridge position of the labelled UTP to the αβ-bridge position was measured with 31 P NMR. The ratio of the rate of net substrate turnover and the positional isotope exchange rate was measured as a function of the initial glc-1P concentration. This ratio was found to increase with an increasing concentration of glc-1P. The intercept at low glc-1P was found to be 1.2 and the slope was 4.5 mM -1 . These results have been interpreted to mean that this enzyme has an ordered addition of substrates. The lower limit for the release of pyrophosphate from E-UDPG-PP/sub i/ relative to V 2 is 1.2. The rate constant for the release of UTP from E-UTP relative to V 1 is 9

  1. Stochastic Simulation of Isotopic Exchange Mechanisms for Fe(II)-Catalyzed Recrystallization of Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarzycki, Piotr [Energy; Institute; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest

    2017-06-15

    Understanding Fe(II)-catalyzed transformations of Fe(III)- (oxyhydr)oxides is critical for correctly interpreting stable isotopic distributions and for predicting the fate of metal ions in the environment. Recent Fe isotopic tracer experiments have shown that goethite undergoes rapid recrystallization without phase change when exposed to aqueous Fe(II). The proposed explanation is oxidation of sorbed Fe(II) and reductive Fe(II) release coupled 1:1 by electron conduction through crystallites. Given the availability of two tracer exchange data sets that explore pH and particle size effects (e.g., Handler et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, 48, 11302-11311; Joshi and Gorski Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50, 7315-7324), we developed a stochastic simulation that exactly mimics these experiments, while imposing the 1:1 constraint. We find that all data can be represented by this model, and unifying mechanistic information emerges. At pH 7.5 a rapid initial exchange is followed by slower exchange, consistent with mixed surface- and diffusion-limited kinetics arising from prominent particle aggregation. At pH 5.0 where aggregation and net Fe(II) sorption are minimal, that exchange is quantitatively proportional to available particle surface area and the density of sorbed Fe(II) is more readily evident. Our analysis reveals a fundamental atom exchange rate of ~10-5 Fe nm-2 s-1, commensurate with some of the reported reductive dissolution rates of goethite, suggesting Fe(II) release is the rate-limiting step in the conduction mechanism during recrystallization.

  2. Canopy uptake of atmospheric N deposition at a conifer forest: part I -canopy N budget, photosynthetic efficiency and net ecosystem exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievering, H.; Tomaszewski, T.; Torizzo, J.

    2007-01-01

    Global carbon cycle assessments of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition influences on carbon sequestration often assume enhanced sequestration results. This assumption was evaluated at a Rocky Mountains spruce-fir forest. Forest canopy N uptake (CNU) of atmospheric N deposition was estimated by combining event wet and throughfall N fluxes with gradient measured HNO 3 and NH 3 as well as inferred (NO x and particulate N) dry fluxes. Approximately 80% of the growing-season 3 kg N/ha total deposition is retained in canopy foliage and branches. This CNU constitutes ∼1/3 of canopy growing season new N supply at this conifer forest site. Daytime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) significantly (P = 0.006) and negatively (CO 2 uptake) correlated with CNU. Multiple regression indicates ∼20% of daytime NEE may be attributed to CNU (P < 0.02); more than soil water content. A wet deposition N-amendment study (Tomaszewski and Sievering), at canopy spruce branches, increased their growing-season CNU by 40-50% above ambient. Fluorometry and gas exchange results show N-amended spruce branches had greater photosynthetic efficiency and higher carboxylation rates than control and untreated branches. N-amended branches had 25% less photoinhibition, with a 5-9% greater proportion of foliar-N-in-Rubisco. The combined results provide, partly, a mechanistic explanation for the NEE dependence on CNU

  3. Boron isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography using weakly basic anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.; Aida, M.; Okamoto, M.; Nomura, M.; Fujii, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Influences of operating temperatures and concentrations of feed boric acid solutions were examined on the above titled process over the ranges of 25 - 70 0 C and 0.1 - 1.6 mol/dm 3 (M), respectively. The ideal displacement chromatography with a very sharp-cut boundary of the boric acid adsorption band was realized at higher temperatures and lower boric acid concentrations within the experimental conditions. The isotope separation coefficient epsilon was found to decrease with increases in either temperature or the boric acid concentration. The observed values of epsilon at 25 0 C were 0.013, 0.012 and 0.011 corresponding to feed boric acid concentrations of 0.1 M, 0.4 M and 0.8 M, respectively. The epsilon's at 70 0 C were 0.0097 (0.1 M), 0.0086 (0.4 M), 0.0083 (0.8 M) and 0.0073 (1.6 M). A temperature of 40 0 C and 0.4 M of boric acid concentration was considered the optimum operating condition for the production of enriched 10 B. (author)

  4. Improvements on heavy water separation technology by isotopic water-hydrogen sulfide exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.

    1987-01-01

    A series of possible variance is presented for the heavy water separation technology by isotopic H 2 O-H 2 S exchange at dual temperatures. The critical study of these variants, which are considered as characteristic quantities for the isotopes transport (production) and the extraction level is related to a dual temperature plant fed by liquid and cold column, which is the up-to-date technology employed in all heavy water production plants as variants of following plants are studied: dual temperature plant with double feeding; dual-temperature plant with equilibrium column (booster); dual-temperature-dual-pressure plant. Attention is paid to the variant with equilibration column (booster), executed and tested at the State Committee for Nuclear Energy and to the dual-temperature-dual pressure plant which presents the highest efficiency. (author)

  5. Analysis of positional isotope exchange in ATP by cleavage of the βP-OγP bond. Demonstration of negligible positional isotope exchange by myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, M.P.; Hackney, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    A method for analysis of positional isotope exchange (PIX) during ATP ↔ HOH oxygen exchange is presented that uses a two-step degradation of ATP resulting in cleavage of the βP-OγP bond. This cleavage yields P/sub i/ derived from the γ-phosphoryl of ATP that contains all four of the γ oxygens. Both PIX between the β, γ-bridge and β-nonbridge positions and washout of the γ-nonbridge oxygens can be simultaneously followed by using ATP labeled with 17 O at the β-nonbridge positions and 18 O at the β,γ-bridge and γ-nonbridge positions. Application of this method to ATP ↔ HOH exchange during single turnovers of myosin indicates that the bulk of the ATP undergoes rapid washout of γ-nonbridge oxygens in the virtual absence of PIX. At 25 0 C with subfragment 1 the scrambling rate is at the limit of detectability of approximately 0.001 s -1 , which is 50-fold slower than the steady-state rate. This corresponds to a probability of scrambling for the β-oxygens of bound ADP of 1 in 10,000 for each cycle of reversible hydrolysis of bound ATP. A fraction of the ATP, however, does not undergo rapid washout. With myosin and stoichiometric ATP at 0 0 C, this fraction correspond to 10% of the ATP remaining at 36 s, or 2% of the initial ATP, and an equivalent level of ATP is found that does not bind irreversibly to myosin in a cold chase experiment. A significant level of apparent PIX is observed with subfragment 1 in the fraction that resists washout, and this apparent PIX is shown to be due to contaminant adenylate kinase activity. This apparent PIX due to adenylate kinase provides a possible explanation for the PIX observed by Geeves et al. with subfragment 1

  6. Isotopically decoupled vibrational spectra and proton exchange rates for crystalline NH3 and ammonia hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Cynthia; Khatkale, M. S.; Devlin, J. Paul

    1981-12-01

    Codeposits of NH3 with ND3 or D2O have been prepared at liquid nitrogen temperatures in the absence of proton exchange. Vibrational data for the anhydrous cubic crystalline ammonia, containing isolated NH3 or ND3, confirm that, relative to water ice, intermolecular coupling in ammonia ice exerts a relatively minor influence on the infrared and Raman spectra. Nevertheless, sizeable decoupling shifts, particularly for ν1, have been observed and attributed to a combination of factors including correlation field and Fermi resonance effects. The Raman polarization data has also affirmed long standing assignments of ν1 and ν3 for ammonia ice. Warming of the ammonia thin films resulted in limited isotopic scrambling at 130 K, apparently possible only through the agency of trace concentrations of water. The vibrational coupling pattern for the resultant NHD2 and NH2D molecules suggest that proton (deuteron) migration away from the exchange centers is impossible at temperatures up to 150 K. By contrast, isotopic scrambling was rapid and complete at 140 K for amorphous ammonia hydrate films (˜35% NH3, ˜65% D2O) which were also prepared without exchange at ˜90 K. The proton (deuteron) exchange rate is much greater for the amorphous ammonia hydrate at 140 K than for pure water ice. Such exchange requires both ion-pair defect formation and proton mobility. Since the NH3 suppresses the H3O+ concentration via formation of NH+4, a suppression the likes of which has been shown to stop proton exchange in water ice, the evidence strongly suggests that NH4+ in ammonia, like H3O+ in water, is an effective proton transfer agent, probably acting through a tunneling mechanism (i.e., H3N+-HṡṡṡNH3→H3NṡṡṡH-N+H3 etc.) to render the proton mobile in the ammonia hydrate. This mobility combined with the greater NH4+ concentration, relative to the H3O+ concentration in H2O ice Ic, results in isotopic scrambling at the reduced temperature.

  7. Asymmetrical effects of mesophyll conductance on fundamental photosynthetic parameters and their relationships estimated from leaf gas exchange measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most previous analyses of leaf gas exchange measurements assumed an infinite value of mesophyll conductance (gm) and thus equaled CO2 partial pressures in the substomatal cavity and chloroplast. Yet an increasing number of studies have recognized that gm is finite and there is a drawdown of CO2 part...

  8. Gamma irradiation effects of 51Cr(III) isotope exchange in doped magnesium chromate - zinc chromate mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahfouz, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Gamma irradiation effects of 51 Cr(III) isotope exchange in magnesium chromate - zinc chromate mixtures doped with 51 Cr(III) were investigated. It was found that γ irradiation has an oxidation effect and the percentage of exchanged 51 Cr(VI) increases with the increasing γ-ray dose. The data are explained in terms of mechanistic model involving metal and ligand vacancies exchange and substitution reactions. (author)

  9. Predicting the bioavailability of phosphorus in soil amended with phosphate rocks using isotopic exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Edwin Syah Lubis; Zaharah Abd Rahman; Sharifuddin Abd Hamid

    1997-01-01

    Investigations on plant responses to applications of various forms and rates of P fertilizers usually involve glasshouse and/or field experiments. This traditional procedure assumes that whatever the soil-fertilizer-plant system, increase in total P uptake by plant between no P treatment (control) and fertilizer treatment equals the plant P uptake from fertilizer. This study uses the isotopic exchange techniques in the laboratory to predict bioavailability of P fertilizers without the need to conduct glasshouse or field experiments. Serdang series soil (Typic Paleudult) was incubated with 7 sources of P fertilizers comprising of triple superhosphate (TSP) and phosphate rocks from North Carolina (NCPR), Algeria (APR), Tunisia (TPR), Jordan (JPR), Christmas Island (CIPR) and China (CPR) at the rates of 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8g Kg-' soil with 20% moisture content at room temperature in three replications. The soils were sampled at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months after incubation and isotopically exchangeable p determined by the method of Fardeau and Jappe (1976). Intensity, quantity and capacity factors of soil P were calculated and the residual availability of these fertilizers were predicted. Phosphorus in solution was highest in TSP treated soil for all treatments. Among the phosphate rocks, NCPR at rate 8g kg-' soil gave the highest value while, CPR at rate 2 gave the lowest value. Thus showing that these PRs have different reactivities in this soil, where NCPR, APR, TPR and JPR were the reactive PR, while CIPR and CPR were the unreactive ones. The isotopically exchangeable P at one minute (1) in the soil sampled 9 months after incubation was found to correlate very well with plant P uptake by oil palm seedlings grown under the same conditions. Calculations made on the percentage of P derived from these fertilizers up to a period of more than one year after application showed that the reactive PRs to have more residual P made available to plants than the unreactive PR

  10. The study of stability of Pt-SDB in isotopic exchange between tritium oxide and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan Guiping

    2008-06-01

    The stability of Pt-SDB on its catalytic activity and the Pt contained in Pt-SDB have been studied during three years in isotopic exchange between tritium oxide and hydrogen. The convert efficiency of the catalyst declined 10% in first two years and then it is 2% after another two years, when it is used interruptedly. The losing of Pt on Pt-SDB is separately 9.09% and 2.31% after it is washed 2000 hours by water and immersed in water 525 days. (authors)

  11. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH 3 -H 2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  12. Isotope exchange behaviour of nickel xanthate in presence of substituted anilines and isomeric picolines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, G.R.K.; Naidu, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The isotope exchange behaviour of nickel xanthate was investigated in the presence of aniline, N-methylaniline, N,N-dimethylaniline and three picoline isomers at 25 deg C. The results showed that the labelled free nickel(II) replaces inactive nickel(II) in the complex. Hence the complex is labile in the presence of all bases except β- and γ-picolines. The observed lability has been attributed to an adduct formation between the complex and the bases. The inert behaviour observed in the presence of β- and ν-picolines has been ascribed to the steric effect of the methyl groups on the adduct formation. (author)

  13. A trap activation model for hydrogen retention and isotope exchange in some refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.; Doyle, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Our recently-developed Local Mixing Model (LMM) has been successful in describing and predicting the properties of hydrogen retention and isotope exchange for a variety of refractory materials. For some materials, however, the detailed predictions of the LMM are not observed. A Trap Activation Model (TAM) is proposed here to account for the observed departures from the LMM. Comparison of experimental room temperature saturation depth profiles for H + →Si with the predictions of TAM suggests that the hydrogen traps are multiple-vacancy complexes in this system. The observed profiles result from a beam-induced competition between trap creation/annihilation and H-trapping/detrapping. (orig.)

  14. Separation of iodine-131 from water using isotopic exchange with iodine-starch compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, V.P.; Kolomejtseva, I.V.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions of iodine isotopic exchange with iodine-starch compound (ISC) were studied with the aim of compound utilizatoin for radioactive iodine separation from solution. It is shown that in pH range from 2 to 7 the degree of iodine extraction and coefficient of its distribution practically do not depend on pH, at pH>7 ISC destruction (decolorizing) starts and iodine extraction decreases. Rapid method of iodine separation from solution is suggested. The method can be used in radiochemical techniques. The degree of extraction equals 80 %, a higher degree of extraction can not be achieved owing to ISC formation peculiarities

  15. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  16. Isotopic study of water exchange between atmosphere and biosphere at different sites in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazil, M.; Ali, M.; Ahmad, M.; Latif, Z.; Butt, S.; Choudhry, M.A.; Qureshiu, R.M.

    2009-11-01

    Study of Isotopic behavior of water exchange between atmosphere and biosphere was initiated to understand the ties between these two spheres. This report presents the isotopic data of delta/sup 18/O and delta /sup 2/H in the water contents of leaves and stems in different plant species along with soil moisture. Non woody plants of wheat and grass along with soil from the surface and from the depth of 7 cm were collected during January 2005 to April 2005. Woody plants of many species were sampled from two sites near Islamabad and Lahore. Air moisture was also collected in the field. Moisture contents from these samples were extracted using the vacuum distillation method and analyzed for /sup 18/O and /sup 2/H Data depicts that the /sup 18/O and /sup 2/H of moisture in the leaves of non- woody and woody plants are much more enriched than their respective stems. This behavior is due to the evaporative enrichment trend originating from the soil moisture in the active root zone and also from the surface of the leaf. Degree of enrichment depends on the size of leaves, temperature, wind speed, stomatal resistance, soil chemistry and humidity. Significant evaporation effects in the moisture of grass stems are due to photosynthesis. Reflection of typical isotopic values of individual rain events is also observed in soil, plant water and atmospheric moisture, which can be used for studying water-use efficiency. Leaves of woody plants have relatively depleted/sup 18/O values during wet (monsoon) period mainly due to retardation of fractionation resulting from higher humidity. The stem samples do not show any significant variation in delta/sup 18/O indicating no evaporation from stems of big trees. Degree of enrichment of leave samples of woody plants also indicates the species- specific effects in oxygen and hydrogen isotopes during transpiration. Pine and Eucalyptus leaves show more variation in the isotopic contents as compared to other species. (author)

  17. Electrical, electrochemical and isotopic exchange measurements on lanthanum gallate based ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronin, D.I.; Gorelov, V.P. [RAS, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Kuzin, B.L.; Kurumchin, E.Kh.; Vdovin, G.K.; Sokolova, Ju.V.; Beresnev, S.M. [RAS, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry; Keppeler, M.; Naefe, H.; Aldinger, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The solubility limits of Sr and Mg in La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Ga{sub 1-y}Mg{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSGM) and the electrical conductivity of LSGM and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Ga{sub 1-y-z}Mg{sub y}Co{sub z}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSGMC) were studied. By electrochemical and isotopic exchange measurements on both LSGM material and on an LSGM pellet whose surface was modified by Co-doping, it was shown that the oxygen exchange rate between the solids and the surrounding gas phase is much higher in the case of the modified electrolyte material. A single fuel cell with an LSGM electrolyte was constructed and tested. (orig.)

  18. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals

  19. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, E

    2009-05-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

  20. Cooperation between bound waters and hydroxyls in controlling isotope-exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasci, Adele F.; McAlpin, J. Gregory; Ohlin, C. André; Christensen, Shauna; Fettinger, James C.; Britt, R. David; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2012-02-01

    Mineral oxides differ from aqueous ions in that the bound water molecules are usually attached to different metal centers, or vicinal, and thus separated from one another. In contrast, for most monomeric ions used to establish kinetic reactivity trends, such as octahedral aquo ions (e.g., Al(H 2O) 63+), the bound waters are closely packed, or geminal. Because of this structural difference, the existing literature about ligand substitution in monomer ions may be a poor guide to the reactions of geochemical interest. To understand how coordination of the reactive functional groups might affect the rates of simple water-exchange reactions, we synthesized two structurally similar Rh(III) complexes, [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O) 2] 3+ [ 1] and [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O)Cl] 2+ [ 2] where (phen) = 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex [ 1] has two adjacent, geminal, bound waters in the inner-coordination sphere and [ 2] has a single bound water adjacent to a bound chloride ion. We employed Rh(III) as a trivalent metal rather than a more geochemically relevant metal like Fe(III) or Al(III) to slow the rate of reaction, which makes possible measurement of the rates of isotopic substitution by simple mass spectrometry. We prepared isotopically pure versions of the molecules, dissolved them into isotopically dissimilar water, and measured the rates of exchange from the extents of 18O and 16O exchange at the bound waters. The pH dependency of rates differ enormously between the two complexes. Pseudo-first-order rate coefficients at 298 K for water exchanges from the fully protonated molecules are close: k0298 = 5 × 10 -8(±0.5 × 10 -8) s -1 for [ 1] and k0298 = 2.5 × 10 -9(±1 × 10 -9) for [ 2]. Enthalpy and entropy activation parameters (Δ H‡ and Δ S‡) were measured to be 119(±3) kJ mol -1, and 14(±1) J mol -1 K -1, respectively for [ 1]. The corresponding parameters for the mono-aquo complex, [ 2], are 132(±3) kJ mol -1 and 41.5(±2) J mol -1 K -1. Rates increase by many orders of magnitude

  1. Isotopic exchangeability as a measure of the available fraction of the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in river sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mike, E-mail: mike.williams@csiro.au [CSIRO Land and Water, PMB No 2, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064 (Australia); Kookana, Rai [CSIRO Land and Water, PMB No 2, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064 (Australia)

    2010-08-01

    Cabamazepine (CBZ), an antiepileptic pharmaceutical compound, is a pollutant of aquatic ecosystems entering via wastewater treatment plants that is considered to be persistent to degradation. An isotope exchange technique was employed using radiolabelled CBZ as a model compound, to determine the amount of isotopic exchangeability of CBZ in river sediment. The amount of isotopically exchangeable CBZ was used as an estimate of the extent of desorption hysteresis in solution from river sediment, including a treatment where the sediment was amended with black carbon. The isotopically exchangeable CBZ was measured by equilibrating {sup 12}C-CBZ with sediment for 0 to 28 days followed by a 24 hour equilibration with {sup 14}C-CBZ at the end of the incubation period. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of CBZ decreased over time in the sediment, particularly following amendment with black carbon. This has important implications for the fate of CBZ, which, apart from being resistant to degradation, is constantly released into aquatic ecosystems from wastewater treatment plants. This study demonstrates the availability of a relatively quick and simple alternative to batch desorption techniques for the assessment of the available fraction of organic compounds in sediments following their release into aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Absorption of carbon dioxide and isotope exchange rate of carbon in a reaction system between carbon dioxide and carbamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Kenji; Kitamoto, Asashi

    1985-01-01

    The performance of isotope separation of carbon-13 by chemical exchange between carbon dioxide and carbamic acid was studied. The working fluid used in the study was a solution of DNBA, (C 4 H 9 ) 2 NH and n-octane mixture. Factors related to the isotope exchange rate were measured, such as the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into the solution of DNBA and n-octane, the isotope exchange rate and the separation factor in the reaction between CO 2 and carbamic acid. The absorption of CO 2 into the working fluid was the sum of chemical absorption by DNBA and physical absorption by n-octane. The absorption of carbon dioxide into the working fluid was negligible at temperatures over 90 0 C, but increased gradually at lower temperatures. Carbon dioxide was absorbed into DNBA by chemical absorption, and DNBA was converted to carbamic acid by the reaction. The reaction for synthesis and decomposition of carbamic acid was reversible. The separation factor in equilibrium reached a large value at lower temperatures. The isotope exchange rate between gas and liquid was proportional to the product of the concentration of carbamic acid and the concentration of CO 2 by physical absorption. The isotope separation of carbon by chemical exchange reaction is better operated under the conditions of lower temperature and higher pressure. (author)

  3. Isotopic exchangeability as a measure of the available fraction of the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in river sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Mike; Kookana, Rai

    2010-01-01

    Cabamazepine (CBZ), an antiepileptic pharmaceutical compound, is a pollutant of aquatic ecosystems entering via wastewater treatment plants that is considered to be persistent to degradation. An isotope exchange technique was employed using radiolabelled CBZ as a model compound, to determine the amount of isotopic exchangeability of CBZ in river sediment. The amount of isotopically exchangeable CBZ was used as an estimate of the extent of desorption hysteresis in solution from river sediment, including a treatment where the sediment was amended with black carbon. The isotopically exchangeable CBZ was measured by equilibrating 12 C-CBZ with sediment for 0 to 28 days followed by a 24 hour equilibration with 14 C-CBZ at the end of the incubation period. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of CBZ decreased over time in the sediment, particularly following amendment with black carbon. This has important implications for the fate of CBZ, which, apart from being resistant to degradation, is constantly released into aquatic ecosystems from wastewater treatment plants. This study demonstrates the availability of a relatively quick and simple alternative to batch desorption techniques for the assessment of the available fraction of organic compounds in sediments following their release into aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Catalytic isotope exchange reaction between deuterium gas and water pre-adsorbed on platinum/alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Itsuo; Kato, Junko; Tamaru, Kenzi.

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic isotope exchange reaction between deuterium gas and the water pre-adsorbed on Pt/Al 2 O 3 was studied. At reaction temperatures above 273 K, the exchange rate was proportional to the deuterium pressure and independent of the amount of adsorbed water, which suggests that the rate determining step is the supply of deuterium from the gas phase. Its apparent activation energy was 38 kJ mol -1 . Below freezing point of water, the kinetic behaviour was different from that above freezing point. At higher deuterium pressures the rate dropped abruptly at 273 K. Below the temperature the apparent activation energy was 54 kJ mol -1 and the exchange rate depended not on the deuterium pressure but on the amount of the pre-adsorbed water. At lower pressures, however, the kinetic behaviour was the same as the above 273 K, till the rate of the supply of deuterium from the gas phase exceeded the supply of hydrogen from adsorbed water to platinum surface. These results suggest that below 273 K the supply of hydrogen is markedly retarded, the state of the adsorbed water differing from that above 273 K. It was also demonstrated that when the adsorbed water is in the state of capillary condensation, the exchange rate becomes very small. (auth.)

  5. Isotope exchange between alkaline earth metal hydroxide and HTO water in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Gounome, J.; Kano, N.

    1997-01-01

    In order reveal to what extent tritium ( 3 H or T) can be incorporated into hydroxides, the isotope exchange reaction (OT-for-OH exchange reaction) between each alkaline earth metal hydroxide (M(OH) 2 ), where M means alkaline earth metal (M=Ca, Sr or Ba) and HTO water was observed homogeneously at 30 deg C under equilibrium after mixing. Consequently, the followings were obtained: a quantitative relation between the electronegativity of each M ion and the ability (of the M ion) incorporating OT - into the M hydroxide can be found and the ability is small when the temperature is high, the exchange rate for the OT-for-OH exchange reaction is small when the electronegativity of the M ion in the M hydroxide is great, as for the dissociation of HTO water, it seems that formula (HTO ↔ T + + OH - ) is more predominant than the formula (HTO ↔H + + OT - ) when the temperature is high and the method used in this work is useful to estimate the reactivity of a certain alkaline material. (author)

  6. Internal conductance does not scale with photosynthetic capacity: implications for carbon isotope discrimination and the economics of water and nitrogen use in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Charles R; Adams, Mark A

    2006-02-01

    Central paradigms of ecophysiology are that there are recognizable and even explicit and predictable patterns among species, genera, and life forms in the economics of water and nitrogen use in photosynthesis and in carbon isotope discrimination (delta). However most previous examinations have implicitly assumed an infinite internal conductance (gi) and/or that internal conductance scales with the biochemical capacity for photosynthesis. Examination of published data for 54 species and a detailed examination for three well-characterized species--Eucalyptus globulus, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Phaseolus vulgaris--show these assumptions to be incorrect. The reduction in concentration of CO2 between the substomatal cavity (Ci) and the site of carbon fixation (Cc) varies greatly among species. Photosynthesis does not scale perfectly with gi and there is a general trend for plants with low gi to have a larger draw-down from Ci to Cc, further confounding efforts to scale photosynthesis and other attributes with gi. Variation in the gi-photosynthesis relationship contributes to variation in photosynthetic 'use' efficiency of N (PNUE) and water (WUE). Delta is an information-rich signal, but for many species only about two-thirds of this information relates to A/gs with the remaining one-third related to A/gi. Using data for three well-studied species we demonstrate that at common WUE, delta may vary by up to 3 per thousand. This is as large or larger than is commonly reported in many interspecific comparisons of delta, and adds to previous warnings about simplistic interpretations of WUE based on delta. A priority for future research should be elucidation of relationships between gi and gs and how these vary in response to environmental conditions (e.g. soil water, leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit, temperature) and among species.

  7. Sulfur Isotope Exchange between S-35 Labeled Inorganic Sulfur-Compounds in Anoxic Marine-Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FOSSING, H.; THODEANDERSEN, S.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    Isotope exchange reactions between S-35-labeled sulfur compounds were studied in anoxic estuarine sediment slurries at 21-degrees-C and pH 7.4-7.7. Two experiments labeled with radioactive elemental sulfur (S-35-degrees) and one labeled with radioactive sulfate ((SO42-)-S-35) were performed as time......% of the total S-35 was recovered in the SIGMA-HS- pool in less than 1.5 h. With no detectable SIGMA-HS- (less than 1-mu-M) in the slurry, 58% of the total S-35 was observed in the pyrite pool within 1.5 h. The FeS pool received up to 31% of all S-35 added. The rapid S-35 incorporation from S-35-degrees...... into SIGMA-HS- and FeS pools was explained by isotope exchange reactions. In contrast, there was evidence that the radioactivity observed in the 'pyrite pool' was caused by adhesion of the added S-35-degrees to the FeS2 grains. In all S-35-degrees-labeled experiments we also observed oxidation...

  8. Regeneration of the iodine isotope-exchange efficiency for nuclear-grade activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    The removal of radioactive iodine from air flows passing through impregnated activated carbons depends on a minimum of three distinguishable reactions: (1) adsorption on the carbon networks of the activated carbons, (2) iodine isotope exchange with impregnated iodine-127, and (3) chemical combination with impregnated tertiary amines when present. When a carbon is new, all three mechanisms are at peak performance and it is not possible to distinguish among the three reactions by a single measurement; the retention of methyl iodide-127 is usually equal to the retention of methyl iodide-131. After the carbon is placed in service, the three mechanisms of iodine removal are degraded by the contaminants of the air at different rates; the adsorption process degrades faster than the other two. This behavior will be shown by comparisons of methyl iodide-127 and methyl iodide-131 penetration tests. It was found possible to regenerate the iodine isotope-exchange efficiency by reaction with airborne chemical reducing agents with little or no improvement in methyl iodine-127 retention. Examples will be given of the chemical regeneration of carbons after exhaustion with known contaminants as well as for many carbons removed from nuclear power operations. The depth profile of methyl iodide-131 penetration was determined in 2-inch deep layers before and after chemical treatments

  9. Isothermal and non-isothermal conditions of isotope separation by chemical exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshilov, A.V.; Andreev, B.M.; Katalnikov, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The published data about the effect of temperature on thermodynamic and mass transfer parameters of isotope separation by the chemical exchange method were used to examine the influence of iso- and non-isothermal conditions on the effectiveness of the separation process. It has been shown that simultaneous fulfillment of several optimization criteria is impossible in optimization of the isothermal process. If the limitation that temperature must be constant in the whole range of concentrational changes for an isolated isotope is removed, then it is possible to solve the problem of optimization with simultaneous fulfillment of several optimization criteria. When the separation process is carried out with non-isothermal conditions, that is, in temperature cascade, then the maximum concentration change takes place at every theoretical separation plate, and whole cascade is characterised by maximum throughput, minimum height and volume, and minimum cost for the stream reflux. From the results of our study, it was concluded that in the optimum temperature cascade, the cost of production of unity quantity of isotope can be decreased at least by a factor of two as compared with the optimal isothermal version of the separation process. (author)

  10. The exchange of acetaldehyde between plants and the atmosphere: Stable carbon isotope and flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Kolby Jeremiah

    The exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere may significantly influence regional atmospheric chemistry and plant metabolism. While plants are known to both produce and consume acetaldehyde, the exchange of this compound with forested ecosystems is complicated by physical, biological, and chemical processes that range from being poorly understood to completely unknown. This precludes a quantitative understanding of acetaldehyde exchange rates between the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this study, the processes controlling the exchange of acetaldehyde with plant canopies was investigated using concentration, flux, and natural abundance 13C measurements of gas phase acetaldehyde from individual plants, soils, and entire ecosystems. Although previously only considered important in anoxic tissues, it was discovered that acetaldehyde is produced and consumed in leaves through ethanolic fermentation coupled to the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass system under normal aerobic conditions. These coupled pathways determine the acetaldehyde compensation point, a major factor controlling its exchange with the atmosphere. Carbon isotope analysis suggests a new pathway for acetaldehyde production from plants under stress involving the peroxidation of membrane fatty acids. This pathway may be a major source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere from plants under biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant stomata were found to be the dominant pathway for the exchange of acetaldehyde with the atmosphere with stomatal conductance influencing both emission and uptake fluxes. In addition, increasing temperature and solar radiation was found to increase the compensation point by increasing the rates of acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. Under ambient conditions, bare soil was neutral to the exchange of acetaldehyde while senescing and decaying leaves were found to be strong source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere due to increased decomposition processes and

  11. Measurement of liquid mixing characteristics in large-sized ion exchange column for isotope separation by stepwise response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Saito, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Itoi, Toshiaki.

    1981-07-01

    Liquid mixing in a large-sized ion exchange column for isotope separation was measured by the step-wise response method, using NaCl solution as tracer. A 50 cm diameter column was packed with an ion exchange resin of 200 μm in mean diameter. Experiments were carried out for several types of distributor and collector, which were attached to each end of the column. The smallest mixing was observed for the perforated plate type of the collector, coupled with a minimum stagnant volume above the ion exchange resin bed. The 50 cm diameter column exhibited the better characteristics of liquid mixing than the 2 cm diameter column for which the good performance of lithium isotope separation had already been confirmed. These results indicate that a large increment of throughput is attainable by the scale-up of column diameter with the same performance of isotope separation as for the 2 cm diameter column. (author)

  12. Foliar antitranspirant and soil superabsorbent hydrogel affects photosynthetic gas exchange and water use efficiency of maize grown under low rainfall conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Guo, Shi-Wen; Li, Pin-Fang; Song, Ri-Quan; Yu, Jian

    2018-06-08

    Two lysimeter experiments with maize plants were conducted to inquiry the effect of combined superabsorbent polymer (SAP) and fulvic acid (FA) application on photosynthetic gas exchange and water use efficiency (WUE) under deficit irrigation conditions. Soil SAP (45 kg ha -1 ) was applied while sowing, and FA solution (2 g L -1 ) was sprayed onto crop canopy three times at later plant growth periods. Combining SAP and FA application significantly improved plant photosynthesis, chlorophyll contents, and instantaneous WUE, while maintaining the optimal leaf stomatal transpiration. The effect of combined two chemicals use on photosynthesis and leaf instantaneous WUE was superior compared with the effects of their individual applications. As compared with plots not treated with chemicals, soil SAP significantly improved the yield by 12% and grain WUE by 10% when averaged across the two experiments, whereas foliar FA application did not affect yield and grain WUE. In contrast, the combined use of two chemicals significantly increased the yield by 20% and grain WUE by 26%, largely attributed to the increase in grain number. Soil SAP and foliar FA use, under low rainfall conditions, had little influence on crop water consumption but improved plant WUE by enhancing photosynthesis and increasing kernel number. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Nucleophilic radioiodination of 6-bromocholesterol via non-isotopic exchange reaction in molten state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shaboury, G.; Farah, K.; El-Tawoosy, M.

    2001-01-01

    A synthetic method for preparing radioiodinated 6-[ 125 I]iodocholesterol [CL-6- 125 I] for adrenal evaluation is described. The radioiodine atom was incorporated onto the cholesterol molecule via non-isotopic exchange between 6-bromocholesterol [CL-6-Br] and radioiodine as iodide ion [ 125 I - ] in a molten state. The different parameters affecting the yield of exchange were investigated using 125 I (T 1/2 ≅ 60 d) to centralize the different physical and chemical reaction conditions and purification of the final product as pure as 6-[ 125 I]iodocholesterol. The method was suitable to either 131 I (T 1/2 ≅ 8 d) nucleophilic radioiodination which facilitates the scanning of the adrenal for a few days after administration or the use of 124 I (T 1/2 ≅ 4.16 d) nucleophilic radioiodination for PET evaluation of the adrenal. TLC as well as HPLC chromatographic analysis is used to determine the efficiency of the exchange reactions under different chemical reaction conditions and to monitor the stability of the final product as pure as CL-6- 125 I with radiochemical purity of ≅99%. This no-carrier-added method improved the speed of the reaction and affords high radiochemical yield of 90% and suitable specific activity due to the use of CL-6-Br rather than CL-6-I as substrate. Kinetic studies revealed second order iodine-bromine exchange reaction. The activation energy for the exchange reaction in ammonium acetate (m.p. 114 deg C) was calculated to be 4.576 kcal/mole. (author)

  14. Application of tracer isotope in kinetic study of first order ion exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of first order ion exchange reaction rates at different temperatures (27 deg- 48 degC) and particularly at low concentration of potassium iodide solution (electrolyte) ranging from 0.005 M to 0.040 M is carried out by application of radioactive tracer isotope 131 I. With increase in concentration of electrolyte, amount of iodide ion exchanged in millimoles increases. Specific reaction rates of ion exchange reaction are calculated for different temperatures and for different amount of ion exchange resins. It is observed that with increase in temperature, reaction rate increases but the increase is more pronounced for increase in amount of ion exchange resins. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte, the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 at 27 degC to 0.178 min -1 at 48 degC. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 at 27 degC to 0.178 min 1 at 48 degC. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte at 27 degC the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 for 1.0 g of resin to 0.368 min -1 for 5.0 g of resin. From the reaction rates calculated at different temperatures, energy of activation in kJ/mole is calculated. It is observed that for 0.005 M solution of electrolyte, energy of activation is 4.62 kJ/mole which decreases to 2.87 kJ/mole for increase in concentration of electrolyte to 0.100 M. (author)

  15. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbon and an apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, E.A.; Rolston, J.H.; Clermont, M.J.; Paterson, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbons comprising: (a) bringing into contact a water stream, a halohydrocarbon stream, and a catalytic porous anion exchange resin so that the isotope-deficient halohydrocarbon stream is enriched; (b) decomposing the halohydrocarbon stream photolytically into two gaseous streams, one enriched and the other deficient; (c) removing as a product the first, enriched stream; and (d) recycling the second stream for enrichment. An apparatus is also provided

  16. Uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF6 and solid UF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yato, Yumio; Kishimoto, Yoichiro; Sasao, Nobuyuki; Suto, Osamu; Funasaka, Hideyuki

    1996-01-01

    Based on a collision model, a new rate equation is derived for uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF 6 and solid UF 5 by considering the number of UF 5 molecules on the solid surface to be dependent on time. The reaction parameters included in the equation are determined from the experimental data and compared with the previous ones. A remarkable agreement is found between the particle sizes of UF 5 estimated from the reaction parameter and from the direct observation with an electron microscope. The rate equation given in this work fully satisfies the related mass conservation and furthermore includes explicitly the terms related to the UF 6 density and the mean size of UF 5 particles, both of which are considered to cause an important effect on the reaction. This remarkable feature facilitates the simulation studies on this reaction under various conditions. The long term behavior of a simulated exchange reaction is studied under the condition considered to be close to that in a recovery zone of the MLIS process. The result indicates that the reaction is virtually limited to the solid surface under this conditions and thus the depletion of 235 UF 5 concentration averaged over the whole UF 5 particles is not significant even after 200 h of the exchange reaction

  17. Application of expert systems to heat exchanger control at the 100-megawatt high-flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, N.E. Jr.; Clark, F.H.; Mullens, J.A.; Otaduy, P.J.; Wehe, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a 100-MW pressurized water reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is used to produce isotopes and as a source of high neutron flux for research. Three heat exchangers are used to remove heat from the reactor to the cooling towers. A fourth heat exchanger is available as a spare in case one of the operating heat exchangers malfunctions. It is desirable to maintain the reactor at full power while replacing the failed heat exchanger with the spare. The existing procedures used by the operators form the initial knowledge base for design of an expert system to perform the switchover. To verify performance of the expert system, a dynamic simulation of the system was developed in the MACLISP programming language. 2 refs., 3 figs

  18. Impacts of leaf age and heat stress duration on photosynthetic gas exchange and foliar nonstructural carbohydrates in Coffea arabica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marias, Danielle E; Meinzer, Frederick C; Still, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Given future climate predictions of increased temperature, and frequency and intensity of heat waves in the tropics, suitable habitat to grow ecologically, economically, and socially valuable Coffea arabica is severely threatened. We investigated how leaf age and heat stress duration impact recovery from heat stress in C. arabica . Treated plants were heated in a growth chamber at 49°C for 45 or 90 min. Physiological recovery was monitored in situ using gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence (the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence, F V / F M ), and leaf nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) on mature and expanding leaves before and 2, 15, 25, and 50 days after treatment. Regardless of leaf age, the 90-min treatment resulted in greater F V / F M reduction 2 days after treatment and slower recovery than the 45-min treatment. In both treatments, photosynthesis of expanding leaves recovered more slowly than in mature leaves. Stomatal conductance ( g s ) decreased in expanding leaves but did not change in mature leaves. These responses led to reduced intrinsic water-use efficiency with increasing heat stress duration in both age classes. Based on a leaf energy balance model, aftereffects of heat stress would be exacerbated by increases in leaf temperature at low g s under full sunlight where C. arabica is often grown, but also under partial sunlight. Starch and total NSC content of the 45-min group significantly decreased 2 days after treatment and then accumulated 15 and 25 days after treatment coinciding with recovery of photosynthesis and F V / F M . In contrast, sucrose of the 90-min group accumulated at day 2 suggesting that phloem transport was inhibited. Both treatment group responses contrasted with control plant total NSC and starch, which declined with time associated with subsequent flower and fruit production. No treated plants produced flowers or fruits, suggesting that short duration heat stress can lead to crop failure.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of photoaccelerated isotope exchange between U(VI) and U(IV) in oxalate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaban, I.S.; Owreit, M.F.; Nikitenko, S.I.

    1992-01-01

    A kinetic study of thermal and photoaccelerated U(IV)-U(VI) isotope exchange has been carried out in oxalate solutions at 11-40 deg C. The rate and quantum yield were determined as a function of U(IV), U(VI) and oxalate concentration, wavelength of incident light, temperature and absorbed dose of γ-radiation. The kinetic equations for thermal and photoaccelerated exchange have been obtained. It was assumed that the mechanism of exchange involves formation of U(V) as an intermediate, followed by slow exchange between U(V) and U(IV). The isokinetic dependence confirms the identity of limiting stages for thermal and photostimulated exchange. The upper component of photoexcited T 1 level of uranyl is supposed to be the most reactive in the process of U(V) generation. It was observed that the small doses of γ-radiation evoke the acceleration of isotope exchange, however, at D>100 krad the rate of exchange is reduced to the level of thermal exchange. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Isotopic exchange between 232Th and 234Th using ion exchange resins and its application for the radiochemical separation of thorium and europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda Munita, C.J.A.; Atalla, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of thorium via the measurement of 233 Th activity (obtained by irradiating natural thorium with neutrons) may suffer the interference of various radioisotopes which may be also formed during irradiation, if their parent isotopes are present in the sample. Taking into account this possibility, another technique was chosen for the determination of thorium, based on isotopic exchange associated with ionic exchange. Conditions for the isotopic exchange between 234 Th in solution and 232 Th in the resin were optimized. It was verified that the behaviour of 233 Th and 234 Th is the same regarding isotopic exchange with 232 Th. 234 Th was chosen for the experiments since it has a longer half-life (24.1 days) than 233 Th (22.3 min), thus facilitating the performance of the work. As the major objective of this work is to separate thorium and europium isotopes, the behaviour of 152-154 Eu was studied in the same system used for thorium, envisaging a minimum retention of these radioisotopes in the resin. In order to establish the best conditions for separating 234-Th and 152/154-Eu, the following parameters were considered: the thorium concentration in the solution; the hydrochloric acid concentration in solution; the concentration of other elements in solution; the degree of cross-linking of the resin; the flow rate of the solution through the column. The other elements added to the elutant solution were: uranium, molybdenum, lanthanum, europium, ytterbium, bromine, cobalt, barium, manganese, indium, cesium and selenium. Europium was added so to dilute the 152/154-Eu tracer and avoid the retention of the latter in the resin. The other elements were added because they give rise to radioisotopes which interfere in the activation analysis of thorium when 233-Th activity is used and, the separation of these elements from thorium will also be subsequently studied by the method used in the present work. (C.L.B.) [pt

  1. Experimental evaluation of improved dual temperature hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Yamato; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1984-01-01

    A proposed dual temperature hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction system between water and hydrogen gas is evaluated experimentally. The proposed system is composed of low temperature co-current reactors for reaction between water mists and hydrogen gas and high temperature co-current reactors for reaction between water vapor and hydrogen gas. Thus, operation is possible under atmospheric pressure with high reaction efficiency. Using the pilot test system which is composed of ten low temperature (30 0 C) reaction units and ten high temperature (200 0 C) reaction units, an experimental separation of deuterium from light water is carried out. The enrichment factor under steady state conditions, its dependency on operating time, and the reaction period necessary to obtain the steady state enrichment factor are determined experimentally and compared with calculations. It is shown that separation ability in a multistage reaction system can be estimated by numerical calculation using actual reaction efficiency in a unit reactor. (author)

  2. Theoretical study on platinum-catalyzed isotope exchange reaction mechanism of hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Wang Heyi; Luo Shunzhong

    2009-04-01

    Based on electron and vibration approximate means and the density function theory B3LYP, the ΔG degree and equilibrium pressures of adsorption and dissociation reactions of H 2 and water vapor on Pt surface have been calculated. The adsorption, dissociation and coadsorption actions of H 2 and water were analyzed. According to the ΔG degree, hydrogen molecule combines with metal atoms in single atom, and water vapor molecule has no tendency to dissociate on Pt surface. The dissociation of hydrogen molecule would hold back the direct adsorption of water vapor molecules on Pt surface. The structures of Pt-H (OH 2 ) n + (n=1, 2, 3) hydroniums were optimized. According to the mulliken overlap populations, Pt-H (OH 2 ) + is not stable or produced. Hydrogen isotope exchange occurs between hydration layer and D atoms which adsorb on Pt surface via intermediates (H 2 O) n D + (ads) (n≥2). (authors)

  3. Experimental studies on hydrogen isotopic deuterium from gas to liquid phase by catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yangming; Wang Heyi; Liu Jun; Fu Zhonghua; Wang Changbin; Han Jun; Xia Xiulong; Tang Lei

    2005-01-01

    The experimental studies on hydrogen isotopic deuterium from gas to liquid phase were completed by mixed ratio 1:4 of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing. The influencing factors on number of transfer units (NTU) and transformation efficiencies of deuterium were researched. The results show that preferable NTU can be obtained by choosing suitable operational temperature and flux of exchange gas. The transformation rate increases with increasing liquid flux, but it cannot obviously be improved when liquid flux attains some level. The length of catalytic column has an obvious influence on transformation rate and 90% of transformation rate is obtained by 4 m column length at gas flux with 2 m 3 /h, liquid flux with 1-2 kg/h and 45 degree C. (author)

  4. Origin of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard; Dupuy, Jacques; Guerin de Montgareuil, Pierre

    From the comparison of isotopic exchange kinetics between C 18 O 2 and the water of algae suspensions or aerial leaves subjected to alternating darkness and light, it becomes possible to calculate the isotopic abundance of the CO 2 involved in the photochemical process; this value has been compared to those of the intracellular water and of the evolved O 2 . Kinetics of the appearance of 18 O in the oxygen produced by algae suspended in enriched water are also presented [fr

  5. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  6. Enrichment of lithium isotope .sup.6./sup.Li by ion exchange resin with specific particle size

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikeš, J.; Ďurišová, Jana; Jelínek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 312, č. 1 (2017), s. 13-18 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : lithium * isotope separation * elution chromatography * ion exchange chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  7. Modelling non-steady-state isotope enrichment of leaf water in a gas-exchange cuvette environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Simonin, Kevin A; Loucos, Karen E; Barbour, Margaret M

    2015-12-01

    The combined use of a gas-exchange system and laser-based isotope measurement is a tool of growing interest in plant ecophysiological studies, owing to its relevance for assessing isotopic variability in leaf water and/or transpiration under non-steady-state (NSS) conditions. However, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model, originally developed for open-field scenarios, is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment where isotope composition of water vapour (δv ) is intrinsically linked to that of transpiration (δE ). Here, we modified the F&C model to make it directly compatible with the δv -δE dynamic characteristic of a typical cuvette setting. The resultant new model suggests a role of 'net-flux' (rather than 'gross-flux' as suggested by the original F&C model)-based leaf water turnover rate in controlling the time constant (τ) for the approach to steady sate. The validity of the new model was subsequently confirmed in a cuvette experiment involving cotton leaves, for which we demonstrated close agreement between τ values predicted from the model and those measured from NSS variations in isotope enrichment of transpiration. Hence, we recommend that our new model be incorporated into future isotope studies involving a cuvette condition where the transpiration flux directly influences δv . There is an increasing popularity among plant ecophysiologists to use a gas-exchange system coupled to laser-based isotope measurement for investigating non-steady state (NSS) isotopic variability in leaf water (and/or transpiration); however, the current Farquhar & Cernusak (F&C) NSS leaf water model is unsuited for use in a gas-exchange cuvette environment due to its implicit assumption of isotope composition of water vapor (δv ) being constant and independent of that of transpiration (δE ). In the present study, we modified the F&C model to make it compatible with the dynamic relationship between δv and δE as is typically associated

  8. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  9. Study of stratosphere-troposphere exchange via 10Be/7Be isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priller, A.; Berger, M.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Steier, P.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wild, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The present study is part of the European project STACCATO (influence of stratosphere-troposphere exchange in a changing climate on atmospheric transport and oxidation capacity). Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) is one of the key factors controlling the budgets of ozone, water vapor and other substances in both the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. However, its contribution to their ozone budget relative to photo-chemical ozone formation from natural and anthropogenic precursor emissions is still uncertain. An international effort is made to estimate the strength of STE and its impact on tropospheric chemistry. The two cosmogenic radioisotopes of beryllium, 10 Be and 7 Be have very different half-lives of 1.51 Ma and 53.4 d, respectively. The combination of production rates, half-lives and different residence times in the stratosphere and troposphere, respectively, results in 10 Be/ 7 Be isotope ratios which can be used as fingerprints for STE. This ratio helps to give a much improved estimate of STE. However, only few 10 Be measurements exist, because its detection requires the rather elaborate method of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). At the AMS facility VERA we are now measuring the 10 Be content of air filters from the high-alpine stations 'Hoher Sonnblick', Austria, and 'Zugspitze', Germany. The TBe content is measured separately by decay counting. In this presentation, we want to describe the method of measuring 10 Be with AMS, and to discuss the results of first 10 Be/ 7 Be ratios. (author)

  10. Isotope exchange between natural and anthropogenic Pb in the coastal waters of Singapore: exchange experiment, Kd model, and implications for the interpretation of coastal 210Pb data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, E. A.; Chen, M.; Zurbrick, C.; Carrasco, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from annually-banded corals and seawater samples show that marine lead (Pb) in the coastal waters of Singapore has an isotopic composition that does not match that of the anthropogenic aerosols in this region, unlike what is seen in most parts of the open ocean. The 206Pb/207Pb composition of Singaporean marine Pb is 1.18-1.20 whereas the local aerosols are 1.14-1.16. In order to explore this discrepancy further, we collected a large volume water from the Johor River estuary (flowing from Malaysia to the northern border of Singapore), added a distinct isotope spike (NBS981, 206Pb/207Pb =1.093) to an unfiltered sample, and followed the dissolved isotope composition of the mixture during the following two months. The initial dissolved Pb concentration was 18.3 pmol/kg with 206Pb/207Pb of 1.200. "Total dissolvable" Pb released after acidification of the in the unfiltered sample was 373 pmol/kg with 206Pb/207Pb of 1.199, indicating that there is a large particulate Pb reservoir with an isotopic composition comparable to regional crustal natural Pb. The isotope spike should have brought the dissolved 206Pb/207Pb to 1.162, but less than a day after isotope spiking, the dissolved Pb had risen to 1.181 and continued a slow increase to 1.197 over the next two months. This experiment demonstrates that Johor estuary particulate matter contains a large reservoir of exchangeable Pb that will modify the isotopic composition of deposited aeolian aerosol anthropogenic Pb. We have modeled the evolution of Pb and Pb isotopes in this experiment with a single Kd -type model that assumes that there are two or three different Pb reservoirs with different exchange time constants. This observation has implications for isotope equilibrium between high Pb/210Pb continental particles and low Pb/210Pb ocean waters - what is merely isotope equilibration may appear to be 210Pb scavenging.

  11. Study of isotopic exchange of radioactive calcium and cerium cations with y zeolites in aqueous and alcoholic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilloux, M

    1974-12-31

    Thesis. The isotopic exchange of y zeolite cations with calcium and cerium was studied. The experimental work was carried out utilizing the heterogeneous isotopic exchange between aqueous and alcoholic solutions of the cation considered and a zeolite powder containing a corresponding radioisotope. Aqueous phase exchanges demonstrate that a complex diffusion phenomenon is taking place which is capable of being decomposed into at least two distinct phases: a very slowly occurring phase representing 25 to 30% of the total exchange at ordinary temperatures and a very rapidly occurring phase. In alcoholic solutions, a rapid phase is always observed together with a slow diffusion phase although the exchange rates and diffusion coefficients may vary considerably with the nature and composition of the solvent. The results enable a hypothesis to be advanced on the ion exchange mechanism. The migration of the ions requires the crossing of two types of barrier: the large windows of the supercages (8A); the windows of the sodalite cages (2A). The two stages of the exchange kinetics can be related to these two types of barrier. (FR)

  12. Catalytic activity in reactions of isotopic exchange of carbon monoxide and adsorption properties of catalysts on zinc oxide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheeva, T.M.; Kasatkina, L.A.; Volynkina, A.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    Activity of different zinc oxide samples in reaction of CO homomolecular isotopic exchnge (HMIE) ( 13 C 18 O+ 12 C 16 O= 13 C 16 O+ 12 C 18 O), CO adsorption on ZnO and isotopic exchange between adsorbed and gaseous CO are investigated. The most active is ZnO sample prepared from ZnCO 3 . Quantitative ratio between different with respect to surface strength molecules of adsorbed CO are experimentally determined. It is shown that by increase of ZnO time contact with CO the quantity of adsorbed CO(N σ/0 ), capable of fast exchange with a gaseous phase, is reduced and the quantity of slowly exchanged adsorbed CO is increased. Correlation between decrease of N σ/0 and decrease of CO HMIE with the catalyst holding time in CO medium is stated

  13. Deuterium in astrophysical ice analogues: Isotope exchange and IR detection sensitivity for HDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, R. M.; Galvez, O.; Mate, B.; Herrero, V. J.

    2011-12-01

    Among D-bearing molecules, water is especially interesting from an astrophysical point of view. Although the deuterium content of water in astronomical environments is relatively small as compared with other molecules, it holds most valuable information, still largely undeciphered, on the dynamics of formation and evaporation of ice grain mantels in protostellar regions [1], and is crucial for the understanding of the formation of the Solar System and the Earth [2]. In this work, we have used the OD stretching bands of HDO and D2O molecules in various ice mixtures formed by vapor deposition on a cold substrate (see ref [3] for a description of the experimental set-up) to study the sensitivity of the IR technique for the detection of HDO in ice samples, and to monitor processes of H/D isotope exchange in these solids. It is found that the detection sensitivity is strongly dependent on the ice structure. The OD band is extremely broad and tends to disappear into the absorption continuum of H2O for low temperature amorphous samples. Detectable HDO/H2O ratios with this technique may range from a few per cent for amorphous samples to a few per thousand in crystalline ice. These relatively high upper limits and the appreciable dependence of the band shape on temperature, complicating the interpretation of data from many lines of sight, may question the usefulness of this technique. Isotopic H/D exchange in mixed ices of H2O/D2O is found to start at ~ 120 K and is greatly accelerated at 150 K, as crystallization proceeds in the ice. The process is mainly driven by proton transfer assisted by orientational defect mobility. Annealed amorphous samples are more favourable for isotope exchange than samples directly formed in the crystalline phase. The annealing process seems to lead to polycrystalline ice morphology with a higher defect activity. The present data emphasize the relevance of a depletion mechanism for D atoms in hydroxylic bonds in the solid state, recently

  14. Inversion of the calcium isotope separation at an ion exchanger resin by variation of the LiCl electrolyte concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heumann, K.G.; Kloeppel, H.; Sigl, G.

    1982-01-01

    The calcium isotope separation at a strongly acidic exchanger resin as a function of the concentration of a LiCl solution is investigated in column experiments. Whereas an enrichment of the heavier calcium isotopes in the solution phase is found with a 3 M LiCl solution, an inverse effect is obtained with 8 M and 12 M LiCl solutions. The separation effect epsilon for the 12 M solution is found to be the highest calcium enrichment in a system without a complexing agent. The results are compared with those for other electrolyte solutions and can be explained by the anion/cation interactions. (orig.)

  15. No oxygen isotope exchange between water and APS-sulfate at surface temperature: Evidence from quantum chemical modeling and triple-oxygen isotope experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Issaku E.; Asatryan, Rubik; Bao, Huiming

    2012-10-01

    In both laboratory experiments and natural environments where microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction (MDSR) occurs in a closed system, the δ34S ((34S/32S)sample/(34S/32S)standard - 1) for dissolved SO42- has been found to follow a typical Rayleigh-Distillation path. In contrast, the corresponding δ18O ((18O/16O)sample/(18O/16O)standard) - 1) is seen to plateau with an apparent enrichment of between 23‰ and 29‰ relative to that of ambient water under surface conditions. This apparent steady-state in the observed difference between δ18O and δ18OO can be attributed to any of these three steps: (1) the formation of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) from ATP and SO42-, (2) oxygen exchange between sulfite (or other downstream sulfoxy-anions) and water later in the MDSR reaction chain and its back reaction to APS and sulfate, and (3) the re-oxidation of produced H2S or precursor sulfoxy-anions to sulfate in environments containing Fe(III) or O2. This study examines the first step as a potential pathway for water oxygen incorporation into sulfate. We examined the structures and process of APS formation using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) hybrid density functional theory, implemented in the Gaussian-03 program suite, to predict the potential for oxygen exchange. We conducted a set of in vitro, enzyme-catalyzed, APS formation experiments (with no further reduction to sulfite) to determine the degree of oxygen isotope exchange between the APS-sulfate and water. Triple-oxygen-isotope labeled water was used in the reactor solutions to monitor oxygen isotope exchange between water and APS sulfate. The formation and hydrolysis of APS were identified as potential steps for oxygen exchange with water to occur. Quantum chemical modeling indicates that the combination of sulfate with ATP has effects on bond strength and symmetry of the sulfate. However, these small effects impart little influence on the integrity of the SO42- tetrahedron due to the high activation energy required for

  16. Isotopic exchange processes in cold plasmas of H2/D2 mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Carrasco, Esther; Herrero, Víctor J; Tanarro, Isabel

    2011-05-28

    Isotope exchange in low pressure cold plasmas of H(2)/D(2) mixtures has been investigated by means of mass spectrometric measurements of neutrals and ions, and kinetic model calculations. The measurements, which include also electron temperatures and densities, were performed in a stainless steel hollow cathode reactor for three discharge pressures: 1, 2 and 8 Pa, and for mixture compositions ranging from 100% H(2) to 100% D(2). The data are analyzed in the light of the model calculations, which are in good global agreement with the experiments. Isotope selective effects are found both in the surface recombination and in the gas-phase ionic chemistry. The dissociation of the fuel gas molecules is followed by wall recycling, which regenerates H(2) and D(2) and produces HD. Atomic recombination at the wall is found to proceed through an Eley-Rideal mechanism, with a preference for reaction of the adsorbed atoms with gas phase D atoms. The best fit probabilities for Eley-Rideal abstraction with H and D are: γ(ER H) = 1.5 × 10(-3), γ(ER D) = 2.0 × 10(-3). Concerning ions, at 1 Pa the diatomic species H(2)(+), D(2)(+) and HD(+), formed directly by electron impact, prevail in the distributions, and at 8 Pa, the triatomic ions H(3)(+), H(2)D(+), HD(2)(+) and D(3)(+), produced primarily in reactions of diatomic ions with molecules, dominate the plasma composition. In this higher pressure regime, the formation of the mixed ions H(2)D(+) and HD(2)(+) is favoured in comparison with that of H(3)(+) and D(3)(+), as expected on statistical grounds. The model results predict a very small preference, undetectable within the precision of the measurements, for the generation of triatomic ions with a higher degree of deuteration, which is probably a residual influence at room temperature of the marked zero point energy effects (ZPE), relevant for deuterium fractionation in interstellar space. In contrast, ZPE effects are found to be decisive for the observed distribution of

  17. A PC-based system for simulation of processes in the isotopic exchange column of a cryogenic pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retevoi, Carmen Maria; Stefan, Liviu; Baltateanu, Ovidiu; Stefan, Iuliana

    2001-01-01

    The technology developed at the Institute of Cryogenics and Isotope Separations is based on catalytic isotope exchange between water and hydrogen gas both carrying various isotopes of hydrogen: normal hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium. This isotope exchange is followed by cryogenic distillation to separate the various isotopes of hydrogen gas. The detritiation process was simulated using water as working fluid, with a small content of deuterium and a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and deuterium. Isotopic separation of hydrogen is very important for nuclear plants utilizing the CANDU reactor concept. Tritiated water is extracted from the moderator of the reactor and the tritium is removed in order to reduce the radiation levels from the reactor. One of the most important steps in this process is the catalytic isotope exchange between tritiated water and hydrogen gas. In the 'Catalytic isotope exchange' system, tritium transfer occurs from the liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) into the gaseous phase (hydrogen) in an isotope exchange column. The column is packed with alternating layers of two types of catalysts: an ordered B7 type of phosphorous bronze to catalyze the equilibration between liquid and gaseous water and a PT/C/PTFE catalyst to catalyze the reaction between water vapor and hydrogen gas. The corresponding reactions are (DTO) L + (D 2 O) V ↔ (D 2 O) L + (DTO) V and (DTO) V + (D 2 ) G ↔ (D 2 O) V + (DT)G. The design of the process requires a constant catalytic exchange temperature that must be maintained at a value of 90 deg.C. To achieve this, the plant is equipped with electrical heat exchangers for heating the gas (hydrogen) and the heavy water. The control is achieved using an array of sensors and controllers. The sensors used for monitoring the process are type J thermocouples. The temperature control is achieved by controlling the electrical power fed to the heaters. Besides sensing the fluid temperatures at various points, we also monitor the

  18. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-01-01

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40 0 C for a tightly bound 15 N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads

  19. Kinetic study of the isotopic exchange of Na+ and Zn2+ ions on iron and chromium titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, E.S.; Ali, I.M.; Aly, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    Iron(III) (FeTi) and chromium (III) titanates (CrTi) were prepared as cation exchange materials in a granular form. The rate of the isotopic exchange of Na + /*Na + and Zn 2+ /*Zn 2+ between aqueous solution and iron(III) and chromium(III) titanates in Na + or Zn 2+ form has been carried out radiometrically in the 25-60 deg C temperature range. The exchange rate is controlled by a particle diffusion mechanism and experimental and theoretical approaches have been used to obtain the rate of diffusion through the spherical particles of the exchangers. The values of self diffusion (D-bar) of Na + and Zn 2+ ions were measured at different operation conditions, particle size, reaction temperatures and drying temperatures of the matrix. The values of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated and their significance discussed. (author)

  20. Some results on the isotope studies of water exchange in boreal raised bogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirin, A.A.; Vlasova, L.S.; Polyakov, V.A.; Trofimova, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    Raised bogs are rather common and one of the most exciting mire types of the boreal zone. They receive water and nutrients from precipitation and pore water stored in their domes (up to 10 m in height) is spaced above levels of regional ground water or streams draining them. Peatland hydrologists have long assumed that fluid flow occurs mainly in a peat layer near to the surface and water transport is negligible in deeper layers. The 'acrotelm/catotelm' paradigm on active and inert horizons for the peat above and below the lowest water level is still widely spread in peatland hydrology. However, recent studies have shown that deep water movement is much more dynamic in raised bogs than was previously thought. Based on geochemical studies and numerical simulations even temporal reverse of the vertical direction of water fluid flow through the peat as connected to climate fluctuations was assumed. Relying on isotope studies we consider only the mounded strata of the raised bogs to have relatively active water exchange. The study included two raised bogs, representing different local hydrological conditions (underlain by outwash sands and moraine clay) at the Zapadnaya Dvina Peatland Field Station of the Forest Research Institute located 400 km west of Moscow. Peatlands, among which raised bogs dominate, constitute >30% of the area, and maximum peat thickness exceeds 7 m

  1. Oxygen isotopic exchange occurring during dry thermal oxidation of 6H SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I.C. E-mail: vickridge@gps.jussieu.fr; Tromson, D.; Trimaille, I.; Ganem, J.-J.; Szilagyi, E.; Battistig, G

    2002-05-01

    SiC is a large band gap semiconductor, promising for high power and high frequency devices. The thermal oxide is SiO{sub 2} however the growth rates of thermal oxide on SiC are substantially slower than on Si, and different along the polar directions (<0 0 0 1-bar> and <0 0 0 1> in the hexagonal polytypes). Thorough understanding of the oxide growth mechanisms may give us new insights into the nature of the SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface, crucial for device applications. We have determined growth kinetics for ultra-dry thermal oxidation of 6H SiC at 1100 deg. C for pressures from 3 to 200 mbar. At 3 mbar, the lowest pressure studied, the oxide growth rates along the two polar directions are virtually the same. At higher pressures growth is faster on the carbon-terminated (0 0 0 1-bar) face. After consecutive oxidations at 1100 deg. C and 100 mbar in {sup 18}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O{sub 2} gases, {sup 18}O depth profiles show significant isotopic exchange and oxygen movement within the oxide during oxidation.

  2. Predicting trace metal solubility and fractionation in Urban soils from isotopic exchangeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, L.C.; Young, S.D.; Tye, A.M.; Bailey, E.H.

    2017-01-01

    Metal-salt amended soils (MA, n = 23), and historically-contaminated urban soils from two English cities (Urban, n = 50), were investigated to assess the effects of soil properties and contaminant source on metal lability and solubility. A stable isotope dilution method, with and without a resin purification step, was used to measure the lability of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. For all five metals in MA soils, lability (%E-values) could be reasonably well predicted from soil pH value with a simple logistic equation. However, there was evidence of continuing time-dependent fixation of Cd and Zn in the MA soils, following more than a decade of storage under air-dried conditions, mainly in high pH soils. All five metals in MA soils remained much more labile than in Urban soils, strongly indicating an effect of contaminant source on metal lability in the latter. Metal solubility was predicted for both sets of soil by the geochemical speciation model WHAM-VII, using E-value as an input variable. For soils with low metal solution concentrations, over-estimation of Cd, Ni and Zn solubility was associated with binding to the Fe oxide fraction while accurate prediction of Cu solubility was dependent on humic acid content. Lead solubility was most poorly described, especially in the Urban soils. Generally, slightly poorer estimation of metal solubility was observed in Urban soils, possibly due to a greater incidence of high pH values. The use of isotopically exchangeable metal to predict solubility is appropriate both for historically contaminated soils and where amendment with soluble forms of metal is used, as in toxicological trials. However, the major limitation to predicting solubility may lie with the accuracy of model input variables such as humic acid and Fe oxide contents where there is often a reliance on relatively crude analytical estimations of these variables. Trace metal reactivity in urban soils depends on both soil properties and the original source material

  3. Deactivation of hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange: Application of the time-on-stream theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui-Joo; Lee, Han Soo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Kim, Jeong-Guk; Kim, Wi-soo; Sohn, SoonHwan

    2005-01-01

    A recycle reactor was built for the purpose of characterizing newly developed hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange. The catalytic rate constants of two types of hydrophobic catalysts were measured at a 100% relative humidity. The catalytic rate constants were measured at 60 deg C for 28 days and both the catalysts showed very high initial catalytic rate constants. The measured deactivation profile showed that the catalytic rate constants of both the catalysts were almost identical for 28 days. The deactivation of the catalysts was modelled based upon the time-on-stream theory. The deactivation profiles of the catalysts were estimated by using the model for a period of three years. The results showed that both the catalysts had a good exchange capacity for hydrogen isotopes and they could be applicable to a tritium removal facility that will be built at the Wolsong nuclear power plants in the near future

  4. Dependence of chlorine isotope separation in ion exchange chromatography on the nature and concentration of the eluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heumann, K.G.; Baier, K.

    1980-01-01

    In a heterogeneous electrolyte system of a strongly basic anion exchanger and solutions of NaBF 4 or NaClO 4 we established the influence of the nature and concentration of the eluent in chromatographic experiments on chlorine isotope separation. Results show that when the elctrolyte concentration is increased the degree of isotope separation decreases. With NaBF 4 the separation factor is greater than with NaClO 4 under conditions which are otherwise the same. For electrolyte solutions containing ClO 4 -, NO 3 - and BF 4 - there is a linear relation between the separation factor of the chlorine isotopes and the logarithm of the heat of anion hydration of the elution electrolyte. (orig.)

  5. Homogeneous activation of molecular hydrogen: on the development of effective catalysts for isotopic exchange in protolytic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharovskij, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of different catalytic systems for hydrogen isotopic exchange with protolytic solvent based on activation enthalpy and entropy values is carried out. Particular attention is paid to the effect of ligand environment of complex forming metallic central ion and solvent composition on free activation energy and stability of catalytic system. A conclusion is drawn on impossibility of absolutely stable and high-temperature catalyst in an isolated system

  6. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Steven L.; Brooks, J. Renée; Meinzer, Frederick C.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; Bader, Martin K.-F.; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Becklin, Katie M.; Beerling, David; Bert, Didier; Betancourt, Julio L.; Dawson, Todd E.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Guyette, Richard P.; Körner, Christian; Leavitt, Steven W.; Linder, Sune; Marshall, John D.; Mildner, Manuel; Ogée, Jérôme; Panyushkina, Irina P.; Plumpton, Heather J.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Saurer, Matthias; Smith, Andrew R.; Siegwolf, Rolf T.W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Talhelm, Alan F.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Van De Water, Peter K.; Ward, Joy K.; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water, and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have proposed various strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange that include maintaining a constant leaf internal [CO2], ci, a constant drawdown in CO2(ca − ci), and a constant ci/ca. These strategies can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange. The accuracy of Earth systems models depends in part on assumptions about generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to varying ca. The concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these strategies, provides a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca. To assess leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies, we analyzed patterns in ci inferred from studies reporting C stable isotope ratios (δ13C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆) in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms that grew across a range of ca spanning at least 100 ppm. Our results suggest that much of the ca-induced changes in ci/ca occurred across ca spanning 200 to 400 ppm. These patterns imply that ca − ci will eventually approach a constant level at high ca because assimilation rates will reach a maximum and stomatal conductance of each species should be constrained to some minimum level. These analyses are not consistent with canalization toward any single strategy, particularly maintaining a constant ci. Rather, the results are consistent with the existence of a broadly conserved pattern of stomatal optimization in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms. This results in trees being profligate water users at low ca, when additional water loss is small for each unit of C gain, and increasingly water-conservative at high ca, when photosystems are saturated and water loss is large for each unit C gain.

  7. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H2 and D2) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency

  8. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency.

  9. Biological Apatite Formed from Polyphosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase May Exchange Oxygen Isotopes from Water through Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelon, S. J.; Stanley, S. Y.; Gorelikov, I.; Matsuura, N.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition in bone mineral phosphate is known to reflect the local water composition, environmental humidity, and diet1. Once ingested, biochemical processes presumably equilibrate PO43- with "body water" by the many biochemical reactions involving PO43- 2. Blake et al. demonstrated that enzymatic release of PO43- from organophosphorus compounds, and microbial metabolism of dissolved orthophosphate, significantly exchange the oxygen in precipitated apatite within environmental water3,4, which otherwise does not exchange with water at low temperatures. One of the enzymes that can cleave phosphates from organic substrates is alkaline phosphastase5, the enzyme also associated with bone mineralization. The literature often states that the mineral in bone in hydroxylapatite, however the mineral in bone is carbonated apatite that also contains some fluoride6. Deprotonation of HPO32- occurs at pH 12, which is impossibly high for biological system, and the predominate carbonate species in solution at neutral pH is HCO3-. To produce an apatite mineral without a significant hydroxyl content, it is possible that apatite biomineralization occurs through a polyphosphate pathway, where the oxygen atom required to transform polyphosphate into individual phosphate ions is from carbonate: [PO3-]n + CO32- -> [PO3-]n-1 + PO43- + CO2. Alkaline phosphatase can depolymerise polyphosphate into orthophosphate5. If alkaline phosphatase cleaves an oxygen atom from a calcium-carbonate complex, then there is no requirement for removing a hydrogen atom from the HCO3- or HPO43- ions of body water to form bioapatite. A mix of 1 mL of 1 M calcium polyphosphate hydogel, or nano-particles of calcium polyphosphate, and amorphous calcium carbonate were reacted with alkaline phosphatase, and maintained at neutral to basic pH. After two weeks, carbonated apatite and other calcium phosphate minerals were identified by powder x-ray diffraction. Orthophosphate and unreacted

  10. pH-Dependent isotope exchange and hydrogenation catalysed by water-soluble NiRu complexes as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Bunsho; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Koji; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Ogo, Seiji

    2008-09-21

    The pH-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes and hydrogenation of the carbonyl compounds have been investigated with water-soluble bis(mu-thiolate)(mu-hydride)NiRu complexes, Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) {(mu-SR)(2) = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine}, as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases. In acidic media (at pH 4-6), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes has H(+) properties, and the complexes catalyse the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes. A mechanism of the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes through a low-valent Ni(I)(mu-SR)(2)Ru(I) complex is proposed. In contrast, in neutral-basic media (at pH 7-10), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes acts as H(-), and the complexes catalyse the hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds.

  11. Evaluation of the isotope separation rate of deuterium exchange reaction between H2 and H2O with platinum catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, Asashi; Takashima, Yoichi; Shimizu, Masami.

    1983-01-01

    The high performance catalysts of hydrophobic carrier with fully dispersed platinum were used to measure the isotope separation performance of hydrogen by the chemical exchange method. The continuous injection of oxygen on the order of 10 3 ppm was effective in regenerating catalyst activity and in maintaining high performance for a long time. The separation performance in a trickle bed column should be evaluated by using two parameters, ksub(g) and ksub(l). These two parameters were unified to the overall transfer coefficient ksub(fg), which may be sufficient in the estimation of overall performance or the design of a separation plant by the chemical exchange method. When one wants to increase the transfer rate in a chemical exchange column, the improvement of ksub(l) rather than ksub(g) may be more effective in increasing the overall transfer rate (its coefficient is expressed by ksub(fg) in this paper). (author)

  12. Physico-Chemical Study of the Separation of Calcium Isotopes by Chemical Exchange Between Amalgam and Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duie, P.; Dirian, G.

    1962-01-01

    In a preliminary study of the isotopic exchange between Ca amalgam and aqueous or organic solutions of Ca salts, the main parameters governing the feasibility of a separation process based on these systems such as separation factor, exchange kinetics, rate of decomposition of the amalgam were investigated. The separation factor between 40 Ca and 46 Ca was found to be of the order of 1.02. The rate of the exchange reaction is rather low for aqueous solutions, extremely low for organic solutions. The amalgam seems not to be attacked by dimethyl-formamide solutions; but it is rapidly decomposed by aqueous solutions of Ca halides. This decomposition is slow in the case of aqueous solutions of calcium formate and still slower for Ca(OH) 2 ; however, except in particular conditions, the observed rate is often much higher, owing to interfering reactions between amalgam and water vapor contained in H 2 bubbles. (authors) [fr

  13. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  14. Study of isotopic exchange reactors (1961); Etude des reacteurs d'echange isotopique (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandcollot, P; Dirian, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A study is made of the general case of the theory of first-order isotopic chemical exchange between a gaseous and a liquid phase in a reactor, starting from fundamental reaction kinetics data, and without making any limiting hypothesis concerning the value of the separation factor. The cases of counter-current reactors and of co-current reactors are considered successively. The general deuterium conservation equation requires the definition of the quotient of the reactor; the performances of this reactor are characterised by its overall efficiency. The idea of the ratio is introduced because it represents a convenient intermediary in the calculations. The search for an additive value for reactors in series leads logically to the defining of an exchange capacity, and a total efficiency, or number of theoretical reactors. This method of expressing the performances of a reactor is more general than the efficiency due to Murphee which only has a physical significance in the particular case of homogeneous liquid reactors. The relationships between these various quantities are established, and the representation due to Mc Cabe and Thiele is generalized. The reactor performances are linked to the first - order reaction kinetics by the transfer number. The relationships are given for a certain number of concrete cases. Finally the application of these calculations is given, together with the approximations necessary in the case where, because of the presence of several components in each phase, the exchange reaction no longer obeys a single kinetic law. (authors) [French] On examine dans le cas general la theorie d'un reacteur quelconque pour l'echange chimique isotopique du premier ordre entre une phase gazeuse et une phase liquide, a partir des donnees fondamentales sur la cinetique de la reaction, sans faire aucune hypothese limitative sur le cas des reacteurs a contre ourant, puis celui des reacteurs a co-courant. L'equation generale de conservation du deuterium

  15. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbon and an apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, E. A.; Clermont, M. J.; Paterson, L. M.; Rolston, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope (e.g. deuterium) exchange from liquid water to a gaseous halohydrocarbon (e.g. fluoroform, CF 3 H-CF 3 D) is obtained at an operating temperature in the range 0 0 to 100 0 C. using a catalytically active mass comprising a porous anion exchange resin in the hydroxide ion form and enriched gaseous halohydrocarbon stream is decomposed by isotope selective photo-decomposition into a first, gaseous stream enriched in the hydrogen isotope, which is removed as a product, and a depleted gaseous halohydrocarbon stream, which is recirculated for enrichment again. The catalytically active mass may, for example, be in the form of resin particles suspended in a fluidized bed or packed as resin particles between sheets wound into a roll. One of the sheets may be corrugated and have open interstices to form a packing in a column which permits countercurrent gas and liquid flow past the resin. Preferably the wound sheets are hydrophilic to retard flooding by the liquid water. The liquid water stream may contain dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) added as co-solvent

  16. Transpiration efficiency over an annual cycle, leaf gas exchange and wood carbon isotope ratio of three tropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Aranda, Jorge; Virgo, Aurelio; Garcia, Milton

    2009-09-01

    Variation in transpiration efficiency (TE) and its relationship with the stable carbon isotope ratio of wood was investigated in the saplings of three tropical tree species. Five individuals each of Platymiscium pinnatum (Jacq.) Dugand, Swietenia macrophylla King and Tectona grandis Linn. f. were grown individually in large (760 l) pots over 16 months in the Republic of Panama. Cumulative transpiration was determined by repeatedly weighing the pots with a pallet truck scale. Dry matter production was determined by destructive harvest. The TE, expressed as experiment-long dry matter production divided by cumulative water use, averaged 4.1, 4.3 and 2.9 g dry matter kg(-1) water for P. pinnatum, S. macrophylla and T. grandis, respectively. The TE of T. grandis was significantly lower than that of the other two species. Instantaneous measurements of the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO(2) partial pressures (c(i)/c(a)), taken near the end of the experiment, explained 66% of variation in TE. Stomatal conductance was lower in S. macrophylla than in T. grandis, whereas P. pinnatum had similar stomatal conductance to T. grandis, but with a higher photosynthetic rate. Thus, c(i)/c(a) and TE appeared to vary in response to both stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Stem-wood delta(13)C varied over a relatively narrow range of just 2.2 per thousand, but still explained 28% of variation in TE. The results suggest that leaf-level processes largely determined variation among the three tropical tree species in whole-plant water-use efficiency integrated over a full annual cycle.

  17. A determination of elementary separation factors of isotopes 235U and 238U in the ionic exchange process and of eluents in the water-glycerine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murgulescu, S.E.

    1977-01-01

    In the experiments focused on uranium isotope separation by ion and chemical exchange, the water-glycerine system was employed. The principle of the method consists in shifting a uranium band along an ion-exchange resin column by means of an eluent. The isotope effect of reactions determining the band heading into the column where complex bands between the metal ion and the ligand form and break up under the resin influence, is determined by the difference in affinity between the two isotopes as against the eluent. The isotope effect in question determines a unit deviation of the equilibrium constant for the classical isotope exchange reaction. Starting from the experimental results obtained, it was concluded that the ion and chemical exchange between the IV and VI valence forms of uranium can be applied to isotope separation in terms of the separation unit. As against the methods that have been applied at present (gaseous scattering, hydro-extracting and the nozzle method), for which every new stage corresponds to a separation elementary factor, several separation elementary factors can be cumulated into a single stage in a chemical and ion exchange unit, by the optimization of the shifting band and length. (author)

  18. [Photosynthetic gas exchange and water utilization of flag leaf of spring wheat with bunch sowing and field plastic mulching below soil on semi-arid rain-fed area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen Xiong; Liu, Na; Liu, Xiao Hua; Zhang, Xue Ting; Wang, Shi Hong; Yuan, Jun Xiu; Zhang, Xu Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Based on the field experiment which was conducted in Dingxi County of Gansu Province, and involved in the three treatments: (1) plastic mulching on entire land with soil coverage and bunching (PMS), (2) plastic mulching on entire land and bunching (PM), and (3) direct bunching without mulching (CK). The parameters of SPAD values, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic gas exchange parameters, as well as leaf area index (LAI), yield, evapotranspiration, and water use efficiency in flag leaves of spring wheat were recorded and analyzed from 2012 to 2013 continuously. The results showed that SPAD values of wheat flag leaves increased in PMS by 10.0%-21.5% and 3.2%-21.6% compared to PM and CK in post-flowering stage, respectively. The maximum photochemical efficiency (F v /F m ) , actual photochemical efficiency (Φ PS 2 ) of photosystem 2 (PS2), and photochemical quenching coefficient (q P ) of PMS were higher than those of PM and CK, the maximum increment values were 6.1%, 9.6% and 30.9% as compared with PM, and significant differences were observed in filling stage (P<0.05). The values of q N in PMS were lowest among the three treatments, and it decreased significantly by 23.8% and 15.4% in heading stage in 2012 and 2013 respectively, as compared with PM. The stoma conductance (g s ) of wheat flag leaves in PMS was higher than that of PM and CK, with significant difference being observed in filling stage, and it increased by 17.1% and 21.1% in 2012 and 2013 respectively, as compared with PM. The transpiration rate (T r ), net photosynthetic rate (P n ), and leaf instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE i ) except heading stage in 2013 of PMS increased by 5.4%-16.7%, 11.2%-23.7%, and 5.6%-7.2%, respectively, as compared with PM, and significant difference of WUE i was observed in flowering stage in 2012. The leaf area index (LAI) of PMS was higher than that of PM and CK, especially, it differed significantly in seasonal drought of 2013. Consequently

  19. Separation and sampling technique of light element isotopes by chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shunsaku; Oi, Kenta; Takagi, Norio; Hirotsu, Takafumi; Kano, Hirofumi; Sonoda, Akinari; Makita, Yoji

    2000-01-01

    Lithium and boron isotope separation technique were studied. Granulation of lithium isotope separation agent was carried out by cure covering in solution. Separation of lithium isotope was stepped up by ammonium carbonate used as elusion agent. Styrene and ester resin derived three kinds of agents such as 2-amino-1, 3-propanediol (1, 3-PD), 2-amino-2-methyl-1, 3-propanediol (Me-1,3-PD) and tris(2-hydroxyethyl)amine (Tris) were used as absorbent.The ester resin with Tris showed larger amount of adsorption (1.4 mmol/g) than other resins. However, all resins with agent indicated more large adsorption volume of boron than the objective value (0.5 mmol/g). Large isotope shift was shown by the unsymmetrical vibration mode of lithium ion on the basis of quantum chemical calculation of isotope effect on dehydration of hydrated lithium ion. (S.Y.)

  20. Mechanistic investigations of the hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters via kinetic isotope effects and positional isotope exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lori I; Fogle, Emily J; Marlier, John F

    2015-11-01

    The hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters is an important reaction in both organic chemistry and biochemistry. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are one of the most important physical organic methods for determining the most likely transition state structure and rate-determining step of these reaction mechanisms. This method induces a very small change in reaction rates, which, in turn, results in a minimum disturbance of the natural mechanism. KIE studies were carried out on both the non-enzymatic and the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in an effort to compare both types of mechanisms. In these studies the amides and esters of formic acid were chosen because this molecular structure allowed development of methodology to determine heavy-atom solvent (nucleophile) KIEs. This type of isotope effect is difficult to measure, but is rich in mechanistic information. Results of these investigations point to transition states with varying degrees of tetrahedral character that fit a classical stepwise mechanism. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Soil solution phosphorus turnover: derivation, interpretation, and insights from a global compilation of isotope exchange kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Julian; Jegminat, Jannes; McLaren, Timothy I.; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The exchange rate of inorganic phosphorus (P) between the soil solution and solid phase, also known as soil solution P turnover, is essential for describing the kinetics of bioavailable P. While soil solution P turnover (Km) can be determined by tracing radioisotopes in a soil-solution system, few studies have done so. We believe that this is due to a lack of understanding on how to derive Km from isotopic exchange kinetic (IEK) experiments, a common form of radioisotope dilution study. Here, we provide a derivation of calculating Km using parameters obtained from IEK experiments. We then calculated Km for 217 soils from published IEK experiments in terrestrial ecosystems, and also that of 18 long-term P fertilizer field experiments. Analysis of the global compilation data set revealed a negative relationship between concentrations of soil solution P and Km. Furthermore, Km buffered isotopically exchangeable P in soils with low concentrations of soil solution P. This finding was supported by an analysis of long-term P fertilizer field experiments, which revealed a negative relationship between Km and phosphate-buffering capacity. Our study highlights the importance of calculating Km for understanding the kinetics of P between the soil solid and solution phases where it is bioavailable. We argue that our derivation can also be used to calculate soil solution turnover of other environmentally relevant and strongly sorbing elements that can be traced with radioisotopes, such as zinc, cadmium, nickel, arsenic, and uranium.

  2. First-Principles Computed Rate Constant for the O + O2 Isotopic Exchange Reaction Now Matches Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Grégoire; Honvault, Pascal; Kochanov, Roman; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2018-04-19

    We show, by performing exact time-independent quantum molecular scattering calculations, that the quality of the ground electronic state global potential energy surface appears to be of utmost importance in accurately obtaining even as strongly averaged quantities as kinetic rate constants. The oxygen isotope exchange reaction, 18 O + 32 O 2 , motivated by the understanding of a complex long-standing problem of isotopic ozone anomalies in the stratosphere and laboratory experiments, is explored in this context. The thermal rate constant for this key reaction is now in quantitative agreement with all experimental data available to date. A significant recent progress at the frontier of three research domains, advanced electronic structure calculations, ultrasensitive spectroscopy, and quantum scattering calculations, has therefore permitted a breakthrough in the theoretical modeling of this crucial collision process from first principles.

  3. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S. [ITER Organization, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  4. Isotope exchange kinetic of phosphorus in soils from Pernambuco State -Brazil; Cinetica de diluicao isotopica de fosforo em solos de Pernambuco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, F J.B. de

    1989-12-01

    The applicability of isotopic exchange kinetics of {sup 32} p to characterize phosphorus available to plants and to diagnose the reactivity of soil-fertilizer-P in six soils from Pernambuco is described. This methodology was compared with anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange equilibrium methods (E-value and L-value) and P absorption by plants. The first greenhouse experiment had the following treatments: (1) with P and, (2) with addition of 43.7 mg P/Kg of soil, incubated for O, 42 and 84 days before seeding. The kinetic of isotopic exchange (KIE), resin-P and E-value were determined before seeding and after harvesting pearl millet grown for 42 days. Results indicated that the KIE parameters rated the soils more efficiently, in terms of available P and soil-fertilizer-P reactivity, than resin-P, E-value and L-value. (author). 38 refs, 2 figs, 18 tabs.

  5. A study on the deactivation and stability of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2006-02-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst has been prepared by deposition of platinum on porous styrene divinylbenzene copolymers(Pt/SDBC) and at the same time a separated type catalytic reactor has been developed for the Wolsong tritium removal facility(WTRF). Several tests carried out to obtain the experimental performance data of the Pt/SDBC with a recycle reactor system. The long-term stability was also measured with the Pt/SDBC catalyst immersed in water for a long time. The long-term deactivations of the Pt/SDBC catalyst were evaluated quantitatively by mathematical models. The simple mathematical models were presented to evaluate the uniform poisoning and shell progressive poisoning to be occurred simultaneously during the hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and liquid water in the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange(LPCE) column. The uniform poisoning was well characterized by a time on stream theory and then the deactivation parameters were determined from the experimental performance data. The impurity poisoning was derived by a shell progressive model with two-layer mass transfer. The water vapor condensation was a main cause of the reversible uniform poisoning for the Pt/SDBC catalyst. The values of the decay rate constant (K d ) and order of the decay reaction(m) were of 2 and 4, respectively, based on the experimental data. It indicated that the decay might be attributable to pore mouth poisoning. From the long-term stability of the catalyst immersed in water, there was no intrinsic decay of catalyst activity due to water logging to the catalyst. The activity decreased by only 7% over 18 months, which was equivalent to a catalyst half-life longer than 15 years. On the basis of the above deactivation parameters, the values for k c /k co with Thiele modulus=20 after 3 years and 10 years of operation were expected about 19% and 15% of the initial activity, respectively, while the values for k c /k co with Thiele modulus=100 were of about 22% and 18%, respectively

  6. Stability of Zircon and Its Isotopic Ratios in High-Temperature Fluids: Long-Term (4 months Isotope Exchange Experiment at 850°C and 50 MPa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya N. Bindeman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Stability of zircon in hydrothermal fluids and vanishingly slow rates of diffusion identify zircon as a reliable recorder of its formation conditions in recent and ancient rocks. Debate, however, persists on how rapidly oxygen and key trace elements (e.g., Li, B, Pb diffuse when zircon is exposed to silicate melt or hot aqueous fluids. Here, we report results of a nano- to micrometer-scale investigation of isotopic exchange using natural zircon from Mesa Falls Tuff (Yellowstone treated with quartz-saturated, isotopically (18O, D, 7Li, and 11B labeled water with a nominal δ18O value of +450%0 over 4 months at 850°C and 50 MPa. Frontside (crystal rim inwards δ18O depth profiling of zircon by magnetic sector SIMS shows initially high but decreasing 18O/16O over a ~130 nm non-Fickian profile, with a decay length comparable to the signal from surficial Au coating deposited onto zircon. In contrast, backside (crystal interior outwards depth profiling on a 2-3 μm thick wafer cut and thinned from treated zircon by focused ion beam (FIB milling lacks any significant increase in 18O/16O during penetration of the original surface layer. Near-surface time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS frontside profiles of uncoated zircon from 4-month and 1-day-long experiments as well as untreated zircons display similar enrichments of 18O over a distance of ~20 nm. All frontside 18O profiles are here interpreted as transient surface signals from nm-thick surface enrichment or contamination unrelated to diffusion. Likewise, frontside depth profiling of H, Li, and B isotopes are similar for long- and short-duration experiments. Additionally, surface U-Pb dating of zircon from the 4-month experiment returned U-Pb ages by depth profiling with ~1 μm penetration that were identical to untreated samples. Frontside and backside depth-profiling thus demonstrate that diffusive 18O enrichment in the presence of H2O is much slower than predicted from experiments in Watson and Cherniak

  7. Data acquisition and quantitative analysis of stable hydrogen isotope in liquid and gas in the liquid phase catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Cheong, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot plant for the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange process was built and has been operating to test the hydrophobic catalyst developed to remove the tritium generated at the CANDU nuclear power plants. The methods of quantitative analysis of hydrogen stable isotope were compared. Infrared spectroscopy was used for the liquid samples, and gas chromatography with hydrogen carrier gas showed the best result for gas samples. Also, a data acquisition system was developed to record the operation parameters. This record was very useful to investigate the causes of the system trip

  8. Isotopic exchange in a neutron-irradiated mixed-valence compound: Tl3(I) Tl(III)Cl6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Valverde, S.; Duplatre, G.

    1977-01-01

    The initial distribution of Tl(I) and Tl(III) species, and its change on heating, have been investigated in solid thermal neutron-irradiated Th 4 Cl 6 . An initial ratio of 5/1 for 204 Tl(I)/ 204 Tl(III) is found and this remains constant for integral gamma-doses of 3 to 12 MRad. The variation of the 204 Tl(III) fraction with temperature is found identical to that observed in labelled Tl 4 Cl 6 for which a genuine isotopic exchange has previously been described. It is concluded that the recoil species are rapidly converted, after the recoil processes, into stable ions

  9. Preparation of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst used in H2-H2O isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junhua; Kang Yi; Ruan Hao; Dou Qincheng; Han Yande; Hu Shilin

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst is studied, in which platinum as active metal and polystyrene divinylbenzene (SDB) as the carrier. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction is carried out with Pt-SDB catalyst in counter-current in the trickle bed. The effect of preparing condition on the activity of catalyst is discussed. The results show that the excellent catalyst is obtained by reduced at the temperature of 200 degree C over 8 hours. Hydrophobic catalyst is high activity and stability as the amount of platinum content is 3%, the platinum can reach the economic use with the content of (1-2)%

  10. New NMR method for measuring the difference between corresponding proton and deuterium chemical shifts: isotope effects on exchange equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, M.; Saunders, S.; Johnson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    A convenient and accurate method is described for measuring the difference between a proton frequency and the corresponding deuterium frequency in its deuterated analogue relative to a reference system by using the deuterium lock in a Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer. This measurement is a sensitive way of measuring equilibrium isotope effects for hydrogen-deuterium exchange. A value of 1.60 per H-D pair is obtained for the equilibrium 2H 3 O + + 3D 2 O in equilibrium 2D 3 O + + 3H 2 O at 30 0 C in aqueous perchloric acid (HClO 4 ). 7 references, 2 tables

  11. Dynamics of metal-humate complexation equilibria as revealed by isotope exchange studies - a matter of concentration and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Holger; Eidner, Sascha; Kumke, Michael U.; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Complexation with dissolved humic matter can be crucial in controlling the mobility of toxic or radioactive contaminant metals. For speciation and transport modelling, a dynamic equilibrium process is commonly assumed, where association and dissociation run permanently. This is, however, questionable in view of reported observations of a growing resistance to dissociation over time. In this study, the isotope exchange principle was employed to gain direct insight into the dynamics of the complexation equilibrium, including kinetic inertisation phenomena. Terbium(III), an analogue of trivalent actinides, was used as a representative of higher-valent metals. Isotherms of binding to (flocculated) humic acid, determined by means of 160Tb as a radiotracer, were found to be identical regardless of whether the radioisotope was introduced together with the bulk of stable 159Tb or subsequently after pre-equilibration for up to 3 months. Consequently, there is a permanent exchange of free and humic-bound Tb since all available binding sites are occupied in the plateau region of the isotherm. The existence of a dynamic equilibrium was thus evidenced. There was no indication of an inertisation under these experimental conditions. If the small amount of 160Tb was introduced prior to saturation with 159Tb, the expected partial desorption of 160Tb occurred at much lower rates than observed for the equilibration process in the reverse procedure. In addition, the rates decreased with time of pre-equilibration. Inertisation phenomena are thus confined to the stronger sites of humic molecules (occupied at low metal concentrations). Analysing the time-dependent course of isotope exchange according to first-order kinetics indicated that up to 3 years are needed to attain equilibrium. Since, however, metal-humic interaction remains reversible, exchange of metals between humic carriers and mineral surfaces cannot be neglected on the long time scale to be considered in predictive

  12. Genotypic variation in carbon isotope discrimination and transpiration efficiency in wheat. Leaf gas exchange and whole plant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condon, A.G.; Farquhar, G.D.; Richards, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between carbon isotope discrimination, Δ, measured in plant dry matter and the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric partial pressures of CO 2 ,p i /p a , in leaves was examined in two glasshouse experiments using 14 wheat genotypes selected on the basis of variation in Δ of dry matter. Genotypic variation in Δ was similar in both experiments, with an average range of 1.8 x 10 -3 . Δ measured in dry matter and p i /p a measured in flag leaves were positively correlated. Variation among genotypes in p i /p a was attributed, approximately equally, to variation in leaf conductance and in photosynthetic capacity. The relationship between plant transpiration efficiency, W * (the amount of above-ground dry matter produced per unit water transpired) and Δ was was also examined. The results indicate that genotypic variation in Δ, measured in dry matter, should provide a reasonable measure of genotypic variation in long-term mean leaf p i /p a in wheat. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  13. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30 0 . Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp ↔ C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P ↔ Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp ↔ C-Asp, but not C-P ↔ Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher [PALA] completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme

  14. On the photosynthetic and devlopmental responses of leaves to the spectral composition of light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: action spectrum, artificial solar spectrum, blue light, Cucumis sativus, gas-exchange, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), light interception, light quality, non-photosynthetic pigments, photo-synthetic capacity, photomorphogenesis, photosystem excitation balance, quantum yield, red light.

  15. Analysis of ping-pong reaction mechanisms by positional isotope exchange. Application to galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, L.S.; Raushel, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    A new positional isotope exchange method has been developed that can be used for the analysis of enzyme-catalyzed reactions which have ping-pong kinetic mechanisms. The technique can be used to measure the relative rates of ligand dissociation from enzyme-product complexes. Enzyme is incubated with the labeled substrate and an excess of the corresponding unlabeled product. The partitioning of the enzyme-product complex back toward free enzyme is determined from the rate of positional isotope exchange within the original labeled substrate. The partitioning of the enzyme-product complex forward toward free enzyme is determined from the rate of formation of totally unlabeled substrate. It has been shown that the ratio of the two rates provides a lower limit for the release of product from the enzyme-product complex. The technique has been applied to the reaction catalyzed by galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. The lower limit for the release of glucose 1-phosphate from the uridyl-enzyme relative to the maximal velocity of the reverse reaction was determined to be 3.4 +/- 0.5

  16. Ab initio R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange reaction on a defect TiO{sub 2} surface: The case of terminal oxygen atom exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevorkyants, Ruslan, E-mail: ruslan.kevorkyants@gmail.com; Sboev, Mikhail N.; Chizhov, Yuri V.

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • DFT R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange between {sup 16}O{sup 18}O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect surface of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} is proposed. • The mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. • Activation energy of the reaction is 0.24 eV. • G-tensors of O{sub 3}{sup −} intermediates match EPR data on O{sub 2} adsorbed on UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} surface. - Abstract: Based on density functional theory we propose R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange (POIEx) reaction between {sup 16}O{sup 18}O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect TiO{sub 2} surface, which is modeled by amorphous Ti{sub 8}O{sub 16} nanocluster in excited S{sup 1} electronic state. The proposed mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. The computed activation energy of the POIEx equals 0.24 eV. The computed g-tensors of the predicted ozonide O{sub 3}{sup −} chemisorption species match well EPR data on O{sub 2} adsorption on UV-irradiated nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}. This match serves a mean of justification of the proposed R1 mechanism of the POIEx reaction. In addition, it is found that the proposed R1 POIEx reaction’s mechanism differs from R1 mechanism of thermo-assisted OIEx reaction on a surface of supported vanadium oxide catalyst VO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} reported earlier.

  17. An isotopic method to distinguish between ion exchange and adsorption of diazonium cations of zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohl, M.; Fejes, P.; Horvath, G.

    1984-01-01

    The ion exchange isotherms of two different diazonium cations have been determined on synthetic mordenite and faujasite using 22 Na as radiotracer. Under similar conditions (but with no radiotracer) the isotherms were followed spectrophotometrically so that a comparison between the amounts of ion exchanged and adsorbed cations can be made. (author)

  18. Lithium isotope effects in cation exchange chromatography of lithium lactate in water-dimethyl sulfoxide and water-acetone mixed solvent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Takao; Kondoh, Akiko; Ohno, Etsuko; Hosoe, Morikazu

    1993-01-01

    Lithium isotope separation by ion exchange displacement chromatography of lithium lactate in water-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water-acetone mixed solvent media at 25 C was explored. In both the water-DMSO and water-acetone system, the single stage isotope separation factor (S) was a convex function of the mixing ratio of the solvents in the external solution phase; S had its maximum value of 1.00254 at water: DMSO=25:75 v/v and 1.00182 at water: acetone=75:25 v/v. Strong correlations of S with solvent partitions between the solution and the exchanger phases were found in both systems, which was qualitatively explainable by considering the lithium isotope distributions between the two phases based on the fundamental lithium isotope effects and the relative affinities of water, DMSO and acetone towards the lithium ion. (orig.)

  19. Parameterization of Leaf-Level Gas Exchange for Plant Functional Groups From Amazonian Seasonal Tropical Rain Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, T. F.; Berry, J. A.; Ometto, J. P.; Martinelli, L. A.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Plant communities exert strong influence over the magnitude of carbon and water cycling through ecosystems by controlling photosynthetic gas exchange and respiratory processes. Leaf-level gas exchange fluxes result from a combination of physiological properties, such as carboxylation capacity, respiration rates and hydraulic conductivity, interacting with environmental drivers such as water and light availability, leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit, and temperature. Carbon balance models concerned with ecosystem-scale responses have as a common feature the description of eco-physiological properties of vegetation. Here we focus on the parameterization of ecophysiological gas-exchange properties of plant functional groups from a pristine Amazonian seasonally dry tropical rain forest ecosystem (FLONA-Tapajós, Santarém, PA, Brazil). The parameters were specific leaf weight, leaf nitrogen content, leaf carbon isotope ratio, maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate, photosynthetic carboxylation capacity, dark respiration rates, and stomatal conductance to water vapor. Our plant functional groupings were lianas at the top of the canopy, trees at the top of the canopy, mid-canopy trees and undestory trees. Within the functional groups, we found no evidence that leaves acclimated to seasonal changes in precipitation. However, there were life-form dependent distinctions when a combination of parameters was included. Top-canopy lianas were statistically different from top-canopy trees for leaf carbon isotope ratio, maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate, and stomatal conductance to water vapor, suggesting that lianas are more conservative in the use of water, causing a stomatal limitation on photosynthetic assimilation. Top-canopy, mid canopy and understory groupings were distinct for specific leaf weight, leaf nitrogen content, leaf carbon isotope ratio, maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate, and photosynthetic carboxylation capacity. The recognition that plant

  20. Predicting the solubility and lability of Zn, Cd, and Pb in soils from a minespoil-contaminated catchment by stable isotopic exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, E. R.; Chenery, S. R.; Young, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Rookhope catchment of Weardale, England, has a diverse legacy of contaminated soils due to extensive lead mining activity over four centuries. We measured the isotopically exchangeable content of Pb, Cd and Zn (E-values) in a large representative subset of the catchment soils (n = 246) using stable isotope dilution. All three metals displayed a wide range of %E-values (c. 1-100%) but relative lability followed the sequence Cd > Pb > Zn. A refinement of the stable isotope dilution approach also enabled detection of non-reactive metal contained within suspended sub-micron (dilution, in a diverse range of soil ecosystems within the catchment of an old Pb/Zn mining area. Assess the controlling influences of soil properties on metal lability and develop predictive algorithms for metal lability in the contaminated catchment based on simple soil properties (such as pH, organic matter (LOI), and total metal content). Examine the incidence of non-isotopically-exchangeable metal held within suspended colloidal particles (SCP-metal) in filtered soil solutions (<0.22 μm) by comparing E-values from isotopic abundance in solutions equilibrated with soil and in a resin phase equilibrated with the separated solution. Assess the ability of a geochemical speciation model, WHAM(VII), to predict metal solubility using isotopically exchangeable metal as an input variable.

  1. pH-Dependent isotope exchange and hydrogenation catalysed by water-soluble NiRu complexes as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases

    OpenAIRE

    Kure, Bunsho; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Koji; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Ogo, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    The pH-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes and hydrogenation of the carbonyl compounds have been investigated with water-soluble bis(mu-thiolate)(mu-hydride)NiRu complexes, Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) {(mu-SR)(2) = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine}, as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases. In acidic media (at pH 4-6), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes has H(+) properties, and the c...

  2. Labelling of long chain fatty acids by non isotopic nucleophilic halogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaba, E.; Al-Suhybani, A.A.; Zaki, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    The parameters of two exchange methods for preparing pure 97% labelled 17-Br-HDA in acetone and in benzene with dry NaI in a closed system are described. In aprotic solvents the need for a phase transfer catalyst up to 50 μg is necessary to dissolve the dry NaI. The use of aqueous medium in the exchange is totally prohibited. Energies of activation are calculated for both reactions. (author)

  3. Effects of elevated root zone CO2 and air temperature on photosynthetic gas exchange, nitrate uptake, and total reduced nitrogen content in aeroponically grown lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Austin, Paul T; Lee, Sing Kong

    2010-09-01

    Effects of elevated root zone (RZ) CO(2) and air temperature on photosynthesis, productivity, nitrate (NO(3)(-)), and total reduced nitrogen (N) content in aeroponically grown lettuce plants were studied. Three weeks after transplanting, four different RZ [CO(2)] concentrations [ambient (360 ppm) and elevated concentrations of 2000, 10,000, and 50,000 ppm] were imposed on plants grown at two air temperature regimes of 28 degrees C/22 degrees C (day/night) and 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. Photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) increased with increasing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). When grown at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C, all plants accumulated more biomass than at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. When measured under a PAR >or=600 micromol m(-2) s(-1), elevated RZ [CO(2)] resulted in significantly higher A, lower g(s), and higher midday leaf relative water content in all plants. Under elevated RZ [CO(2)], the increase of biomass was greater in roots than in shoots, causing a lower shoot/root ratio. The percentage increase in growth under elevated RZ [CO(2)] was greater at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C although the total biomass was higher at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C. NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentrations of shoot and root were significantly higher in all plants under elevated RZ [CO(2)] than under ambient RZ [CO(2)] of 360 ppm at both temperature regimes. At each RZ [CO(2)], NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentration of shoots were greater at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C than at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. At all RZ [CO(2)], roots of plants at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C had significantly higher NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentrations than at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C. Since increased RZ [CO(2)] caused partial stomatal closure, maximal A and maximal g(s) were negatively correlated, with a unique relationship for each air temperature. However, across all RZ [CO(2)] and temperature treatments, there was a close correlation between

  4. Role of the PufX protein in photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. 2. PufX is required for efficient ubiquinone/ubiquinol exchange between the reaction center QB site and the cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Verméglio, A; Francia, F; Venturoli, G; Melandri, B A; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-11-21

    The PufX membrane protein is essential for photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides because it is required for multiple-turnover electron transfer under anaerobic conditions [see accompanying article; Barz, W. P., Francia, F., Venturoli, G., Melandri, B. A., Verméglio, A., & Oesterhelt, D. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 15235-15247]. In order to understand the molecular role of PufX, light-induced absorption spectroscopy was performed using a pufX- mutant, a pufX+ strain, and two suppressor mutants. We show that the reaction center (RC) requires PufX for its functionality under different redox conditions than the cytochrome bc1 complex: When the kinetics of flash-induced reduction of cytochrome b561 were monitored in chromatophores, we observed a requirement of PufX for turnover of the cytochrome bc1 complex only at high redox potential (Eh > 140 mV), suggesting a function of PufX in lateral ubiquinol transfer from the RC. In contrast, PufX is required for multiple turnover of the RC only under reducing conditions: When the Q pool was partially oxidized in vivo using oxygen or electron acceptors like dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide, the deletion of PufX had no effect on light-driven electron flow through the RC. Flash train experiments under anaerobic in vivo conditions revealed that RC photochemistry does not depend on PufX for the first two flash excitations. Following the third and subsequent flashes, however, efficient charge separation requires PufX, indicating an important role of PufX for fast Q/QH2 exchange at the QB site of the RC. We show that the Q/QH2 exchange rate is reduced approximately 500-fold by the deletion of PufX when the Q pool is nearly completely reduced, demonstrating an essential role of PufX for the access of ubiquinone to the QB site. The fast ubiquinone/ubiquinol exchange is partially restored by suppressor mutations altering the macromolecular antenna structure. These results suggest an indirect role of PufX in

  5. Leaf-level gas-exchange uniformity and photosynthetic capacity among loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genotypes of contrasting inherent genetic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Aspinwall; John S. King; Steven E. McKeand; Jean-Christophe Domec

    2011-01-01

    Variation in leaf-level gas exchange among widely planted genetically improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genotypes could impact stand-level water use, carbon assimilation, biomass production, C allocation, ecosystem sustainability and biogeochemical cycling under changing environmental conditions. We examined uniformity in leaf-level light-saturated photosynthesis...

  6. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H2S, H2Se and H2Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, D.

    1959-11-01

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH 2 + OHD ↔ SHD + OH 2 ; SeH 2 + OHD ↔ SeHD + OH 2 ; TeH 2 + OHD ↔ TeHD + OH 2 . In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z OHD x Z RH 2 )/(Z OH 2 x Z RHD ) x e W/T (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [fr

  7. Improved adiabatic calculation of muonic-hydrogen-atom cross sections. I. Isotopic exchange and elastic scattering in asymmetric collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.; Struensee, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The improved adiabatic representation is used in calculations of elastic and isotopic-exchange cross sections for asymmetric collisions of pμ, dμ, and tμ with bare p, d, and t nuclei and with H, D, and T atoms. This formulation dissociates properly, correcting a well-known deficiency of the standard adiabatic method for muonic-atom collisions, and includes some effects at zeroth order that are normally considered nonadiabatic. The electronic screening is calculated directly and precisely within the improved adiabatic description; it is found to be about 30% smaller in magnitude than the previously used value at large internuclear distances and to deviate considerably from the asymptotic form at small distances. The reactance matrices, needed for calculations of molecular-target effects, are given in tables

  8. Isotope exchange experiments on TEXTOR and TORE SUPRA using Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning and Glow Discharge Conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Lyssoivan, A.; Philipps, V.; Bremond, S.; Freisinger, M.; Kreter, A.; Lombard, G.; Marchuk, O.; Mollard, P.; Paul, M.K.; Pegourie, B.; Reimer, H.; Sergienko, G.; Tsitrone, E.; Vervier, M.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Wuenderlich, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Van Oost, G.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reports on isotope exchange studies with both Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) and Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) in TEXTOR and TORE SUPRA. The discharges have been carried out in H 2 , D 2 (ICWC and GDC) and He/H 2 mixtures (ICWC). The higher reionization probability in ICWC compared to GDC, following from the 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher electron density, leads to a lower pumping efficiency of wall desorbed species. GDC has in this analysis (5-10) times higher removal rates of wall desorbed species than ICWC, although the wall release rate is 10 times higher in ICWC. Also the measured high retention during ICWC can be understood as an effect of the high reionization probability. The use of short RF pulses (∼1 s) followed by a larger pumping time significantly improves the ratio of implanted over recovered particles, without severely lowering the total amount of removed particles.

  9. Uranium sorption to natural substrates-insights provided by isotope exchange, selective extraction and surface complexation modelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne T.E.; Davis, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive experimental program has been conducted over the last three years into the interaction of U(VI) with both single oxides and clays and complex natural substrates from the weathered zone in the vicinity of a uranium ore body in northern Australia. While iron oxides have frequently been considered to account for much of the uptake on such natural substrates, the results of laboratory open-quotes pH edgeclose quotes studies and of isotope exchange and selective extraction studies suggest that other phases must also play a significant role in controlling the partitioning of U(VI) between solid and solution phases. Supporting studies on kaolinite, the dominant clay in this system, provide insight into the most appropriate method of modelling the interaction of U(VI) with these natural substrates. The problems still remaining in adequately describing sorption of radionuclides and trace elements to complex natural substrates are discussed

  10. Phylogeny and photosynthetic pathway distribution in Anticharis Endl. (Scrophulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshravesh, Roxana; Hossein, Akhani; Sage, Tammy L; Nordenstam, Bertil; Sage, Rowan F

    2012-09-01

    C(4) photosynthesis independently evolved >62 times, with the majority of origins within 16 dicot families. One origin occurs in the poorly studied genus Anticharis Endl. (Scrophulariaceae), which consists of ~10 species from arid regions of Africa and southwest Asia. Here, the photosynthetic pathway of 10 Anticharis species and one species from each of the sister genera Aptosimum and Peliostomum was identified using carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C). The photosynthetic pathway was then mapped onto an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) phylogeny of Anticharis and its sister genera. Leaf anatomy was examined for nine Anticharis species and plants from Aptosimum and Peliostomum. Leaf ultrastructure, gas exchange, and enzyme distributions were assessed in Anticharis glandulosa collected in SE Iran. The results demonstrate that C(3) photosynthesis is the ancestral condition, with C(4) photosynthesis occurring in one clade containing four species. C(4) Anticharis species exhibit the atriplicoid type of C(4) leaf anatomy and the NAD-malic enzyme biochemical subtype. Six Anticharis species had C(3) or C(3)-C(4) δ(13)C values and branched at phylogenetic nodes that were sister to the C(4) clade. The rest of Anticharis species had enlarged bundle sheath cells, close vein spacing, and clusters of chloroplasts along the centripetal (inner) bundle sheath walls. These traits indicate that basal-branching Anticharis species are evolutionary intermediates between the C(3) and C(4) conditions. Anticharis appears to be an important new group in which to study the dynamics of C(4) evolution.

  11. Critical exponents of a fluid mixture in the presence of isotope exchange: Isobutyric acid/D2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulari, E.; Chu, B.; Woermann, D.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments on phase diagrams and critical opalescence of a fluid mixture, isobutyric acid in D 2 O, indicate that the presence of isotope exchange reactions can change the critical behavior of such a system from that of a simple binary fluid mixture. Appreciable amounts of additional species due to isotope exchange distort the coexistence curve, shift the critical solution concentration y/sub c/ away from the concentration (y/sub I/*) where the maximal phase separation temperature T/sub p/,max occurs, and make the critical exponents γ and ν in the one-phase region (T>T/sub c/) different from those of the coexisting two-phase region (T 0 C differing from y/sub I/*=0.310 at T/sub p/,max=45.11 0 C. In the one-phase region, γ=1.25, ν=0.633, and xi 0 =3.13 A, in excellent agreement with γ=1.24 and ν=0.633 of simple fluid systems. However, in the coexisting two-phase region, the critical exponents appear to be renormalized with γ/sub x/ =1.39, ν/sub x/approx. =0.76, and xi 0 approx. =0.6 A. These results are in agreement with the renormalized critical exponents γ/sub x/=1.40 +- 0.02 and ν/sub x/ =0.73 +- 0.04 near the plait point of a ternary liquid mixture: ethanol--water--chloroform

  12. High Precision Stable Isotope Measurements of Caribic Aircraft CO{sub 2} Samples: Global Distribution and Exchange with the Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assonov, S. S. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (JRC-IRMM), European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Brenninkmeijer, C. A.M.; Schuck, T. J. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Taylor, P. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (JRC-IRMM), European Commission, Geel (Belgium)

    2013-07-15

    In 2007-2009 JRC-IRMM, in collaboration with the project CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribicatmospheric. com), conducted systematic measurements aimed to study the global distribution of CO{sub 2} isotopic composition. A large data set for the upper troposphere-lowermost stratosphere and free troposphere was obtained. For the first time it is demonstrated how CO{sub 2} isotope signals reflect global scale variability in air mass origin. Tight correlations observed arise either from stratosphere/troposphere mixing or from mixing of background air and air masses affected by CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, over long distances and throughout the seasons. The high quality {delta}{sup 18}O(CO{sub 2}) data prove to be a useful tracer reflecting long range CO{sub 2} transport and also CO{sub 2} exchange with land biosphere and soils. The data provide a benchmark for future comparisons and are available for modelling studies. (author)

  13. Contribution to the study of proteins and peptides structure by hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabedryk-Viala, Eliane.

    1978-01-01

    Development of hydrogen exchange measurement methods to study the structure and the molecular interaction of globular protein molecules in aqueous solution (ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, coupling factors of chloroplasts), in peptide hormones in trifluoroethanol solution (angiotensin II, corticotropin) and in proteins of membranes (rhodopsin) [fr

  14. Quantification of tritium ''heels'' and isotope exchange mechanisms in La-Ni-Al tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wermer, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Formation of tritium heels in LANA (LaNi 5-x Al x ) 0.30 (x=0.30) and 0.75 tritides was quantified; size of the heel is dependent on storage and processing conditions. Absorption-desorption cycling of the tritide beds mitigates formation of the tritium heel and can reduce its size. The higher pressure material LANA 0.30 showed slower heel formation than LANA 0.75; this allows more tritium to be removed at the maximum processing temperature. In plant application, LANA 0.30 beds are used as compressors; except during compressor operation, their aging will be very slow. Tritium heel removal by D exchange was demonstrated. Absorption-desorption cycling during an exchange cycle does not improve the exchange efficiency. Residual tritium can be removed to very low levels. For a tritide bed scheduled for removal from the process, a final tritium level can be estimated based on the number of D exchange cycles. 13 refs, 8 figs, 6 tabs

  15. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics between coexistent minerals and water in the Ertaibei granite pluton, northern Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 李志安; 赵志忠

    1996-01-01

    Coexistent minerals quartz, feldspar and biotite vary widely in δ18O value and display remarkable 18O/16O disequilibrium relations in the Ertaibei granite pluton, northern Xinjiang. The 18O/16O exchange reaction definitely occurred between granite and water. Initial δ18O values of the granite and exotic water are evaluated by the mass balance consideration. The results show that the 18O/16O exchange reaction is not necessarily accompanied by what geologists describe as petrological and mineralogiesl alteration effects, indicating that the exchange reaction occurs at a comparatively high temperature during subsolidus cooling of magmas. Exchange mechanism is mainly controlled by diffusion. It is demonstrated through quantitative modelling that the hydrothermal system associated with the Ertaibei pluton lived for 0.8-3 Ma, with a fluid flow rate of 3 × 10-14 mol · s-1 and water/rock (W/R) ratio of 0.79 - 3.08. Flow path and initial heterogeneity of the exotic metamorphic fluid are modelled with the δ1

  16. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  17. Determination of enzyme-substrate dissociation rates by dynamic isotope exchange enhancement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.C.; Raushel, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for the determination of dissociation rates of enzyme-substrate complexes has been developed. The rate of exchange of a labeled product back into the substrate is measured during catalysis of the forward reaction when the forward reaction is kept far from equilibrium by the enzymatic removal of the nonexchanging product. The ratio of the exchange rate and the net rate for product formation is then determined at various concentrations of the exchanging product. A plot of this ratio is a diagnostic indication of the kinetic mechanism and the relative rates of product dissociation from the binary and ternary enzyme complexes. This technique has been applied to the reaction catalyzed by bovine liver argininosuccinate lyase. The ratio for the rate of exchange of fumarate into argininosuccinate and the net rate for product formation was found to increase with the concentration of fumarate but to reach a limit of 3.3. The ratio of rates was half-maximal at 36 mM fumarate. The data have been interpreted to indicate the argininosuccinate lyase has a random kinetic mechanism. The calculated lower limit for the rate of release of arginine from the enzyme-fumarate-arginine complex is 0.35 times as fast as the Vmax in the reverse direction. The rate of release of arginine from the enzyme-arginine binary complex is 210 times faster than Vmax in the reverse direction

  18. Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through Carbon-13 stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thesis ‘Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through

    carbon-13 stable isotopes’

    Ivar van der Velde

    Making predictions of future climate is difficult, mainly due to large uncertainties in the carbon cycle. The rate at which carbon is stored in the oceans and

  19. Preparation of H3-labelled methyl ethers of saturated fatty acids by heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange in solution with gaseous tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, V.P.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    A simple method of preparing 3 H-labelled methyl ethers of saturated fatty acids in the dioxane solution using the method of isotopic heterogenous catalytic exchange with gaseous tritium, is suggested. 3 H-labelled natural fatty acids (C 12 -C 18 ) are prepared by alkaline hydrolysis [ru

  20. Strobilurin fungicides induce changes in photosynthetic gas exchange that do not improve water use efficiency of plants grown under conditions of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Mark A; Farrar, John; Bartlett, David

    2007-12-01

    The effects of five strobilurin (beta-methoxyacrylate) fungicides and one triazole fungicide on the physiological parameters of well-watered or water-stressed wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and soya (Glycine max Merr.) plants were compared. Water use efficiency (WUE) (the ratio of rate of transpiration, E, to net rate of photosynthesis, A(n)) of well-watered wheat plants was improved slightly by strobilurin fungicides, but was reduced in water-stressed plants, so there is limited scope for using strobilurins to improve the water status of crops grown under conditions of drought. The different strobilurin fungicides had similar effects on plant physiology but differed in persistence and potency. When applied to whole plants using a spray gun, they reduced the conductance of water through the epidermis (stomatal and cuticular transpiration), g(sw), of leaves. Concomitantly, leaves of treated plants had a lower rate of transpiration, E, a lower intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, c(i), and a lower net rate of photosynthesis, A(n), compared with leaves of control plants or plants treated with the triazole. The mechanism for the photosynthetic effects is not known, but it is hypothesised that they are caused either by strobilurin fungicides acting directly on ATP production in guard cell mitochondria or by stomata responding to strobilurin-induced changes in mesophyll photosynthesis. The latter may be important since, for leaves of soya plants, the chlorophyll fluorescence parameter F(v)/F(m) (an indication of the potential quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry) was reduced by strobilurin fungicides. It is likely that the response of stomata to strobilurin fungicides is complex, and further research is required to elucidate the different biochemical pathways involved. Copyright (c) 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Deuterium/hydrogen isotope exchange on beryllium and beryllium nitride; Deuterium/Wasserstoff-Isotopenaustausch an Beryllium und Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollase, Petra; Eichler, Michael; Koeppen, Martin; Dittmar, Timo; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the fusion experiments JET and ITER, the first wall is made up of beryllium. The use of nitrogen is discussed for radiative cooling in the divertor. This can react with the surface of the first wall to form beryllium nitride (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}). The hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, which react in the fusion reaction to helium and a neutron, are used as fuel. Since the magnetic confinement of the plasma is not perfect, deuterium and tritium ions are also found on the beryllium wall and can accumulate there. This should be avoided due to the radioactivity of tritium. Therefore the isotope exchange with deuterium is investigated to regenerate the first wall. We investigate the isotopic exchange of deuterium and protium in order to have not to work with radioactive tritium. The ion bombardment is simulated with an ion source. With voltages up to a maximum of 5 kV, deuterium and protic hydrogen ions are implanted in polycrystalline Be and Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}. The samples are then analyzed in situ using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Subsequently, samples prepared under the same conditions are characterized ex-situ by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). [German] In den Fusionsexperimenten JET und ITER besteht die erste Wand im Hauptraum aus Beryllium (Be). Zur Strahlungskuehlung im Divertor wird der Einsatz von Stickstoff diskutiert. Dieser kann mit der Oberflaeche der ersten Wand zu Berylliumnitrid (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}) reagieren. Als Brennstoff werden die Wasserstoffisotope Deuterium und Tritium eingesetzt, die in der Fusionsreaktion zu Helium und einem Neutron reagieren. Da der magnetische Einschluss des Plasmas nicht perfekt ist, treffen auch Deuterium- und Tritiumionen auf die Berylliumwand auf und koennen sich dort anreichern. Das soll aufgrund der Radioaktivitaet von Tritium unbedingt vermieden werden. Daher wird zur Regenerierung der ersten Wand der Isotopenaustausch mit Deuterium untersucht. Wir

  2. Photosynthetic responses of pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Little ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... (O3) have fundamental effects on CO2 exchange by plants. ... produce responses such as reduced photosynthetic rates and earlier senescence .... quality localities treatments and two soil regimes in Riyadh city, KSA. Pn rates.

  3. Development of styrene divinyl benzene catalyst in isotopic exchange reaction of water and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Teizo; Noda, Shigeyuki; Tan, Tsutomu; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Styrene divinyl benzene copolymer (SDBC) is hydrophobic, and porous with large specific surface area. Utilizing these properties, the SDBC was used for the carrier of catalyst in water-hydrogen exchange reaction process, and the hydrophobic platinum catalyst with very high performance was able to be developed. However, the SDBC is usually fine particles smaller than 1 mm, and is not suitable as the filling catalyst for exchange reaction towers. Therefore, in this study, using only platinum as a catalyst metal, the improvement of the property of carriers was emphatically examined, and platinum bearing was proved with an optical or electron microscope. As the result, it was found that the SDBC catalyst showed high activity practically usable as the hydrophobic catalyst for heavy water or tritium exchange reaction. The characteristics of SDBC are explained. The manufacturing processes of the catalyst by making SDBC carriers with fine particles and letting them bear platinum are described. The results of the trial manufacture of spherical, extrusion-formed and honeycomb carrier catalysts are reported. Platinum must be dispersed over the large specific surface area of SDBC carriers. (Kako, I.)

  4. New insights into proton surface mobility processes in PEMFC catalysts using isotopic exchange methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, Paloma

    2009-09-01

    The surface chemistry and the adsorption/desorption/exchange behavior of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst are analyzed as a case study for the development of tailor-made support materials of enhanced performance and stability. By using H2, D2, and CO as probe molecules, the relevance of some surface functional groups of the catalyst support on several diffusion processes taking place during the adsorption is shown. Sulfonic groups associated with the vulcanized carbon black surface have been detected by means of spectroscopic techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and by analysis of the desorbed products during temperature-programmed desorption tests by mass spectrometry. Such hydrophilic species have been observed to favor proton surface mobility and exchange with Pt-adsorbed deuterium even in the presence of adsorbed CO. This behavior is relevant both for the proper characterization of these kinds of catalysts using adsorption probes and for the design of new surface-modified carbon supports, enabling alternative proton-transfer pathways throughout the catalytic layers toward the membrane.

  5. Photosynthesis in Flaveria brownii, a C(4)-Like Species: Leaf Anatomy, Characteristics of CO(2) Exchange, Compartmentation of Photosynthetic Enzymes, and Metabolism of CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S H; Moore, B D; Edwards, G E; Ku, M S

    1988-08-01

    Light microscopic examination of leaf cross-sections showed that Flaveria brownii A. M. Powell exhibits Kranz anatomy, in which distinct, chloroplast-containing bundle sheath cells are surrounded by two types of mesophyll cells. Smaller mesophyll cells containing many chloroplasts are arranged around the bundle sheath cells. Larger, spongy mesophyll cells, having fewer chloroplasts, are located between the smaller mesophyll cells and the epidermis. F. brownii has very low CO(2) compensation points at different O(2) levels, which is typical of C(4) plants, yet it does show about 4% inhibition of net photosynthesis by 21% O(2) at 30 degrees C. Protoplasts of the three photosynthetic leaf cell types were isolated according to relative differences in their buoyant densities. On a chlorophyll basis, the activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate, Pi dikinase (carboxylation phase of C(4) pathway) were highest in the larger mesophyll protoplasts, intermediate in the smaller mesophyll protoplasts, and lowest, but still present, in the bundle sheath protoplasts. In contrast, activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, other C(3) cycle enzymes, and NADP-malic enzyme showed a reverse gradation, although there were significant activities of these enzymes in mesophyll cells. As indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the banding pattern of certain polypeptides of the total soluble proteins from the three cell types also supported the distribution pattern obtained by activity assays of these enzymes. Analysis of initial (14)C products in whole leaves and extrapolation of pulse-labeling curves to zero time indicated that about 80% of the CO(2) is fixed into C(4) acids (malate and aspartate), whereas about 20% of the CO(2) directly enters the C(3) cycle. This is consistent with the high activity of enzymes for CO(2) fixation by the C(4) pathway and the substantial activity of enzymes of the C(3) cycle in the mesophyll cells

  6. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation during cellulose metabolism in Lemna gibba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakir, D.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Lemna gibba L. B3 was grown under heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic, and autotrophic conditions in water having a variety of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions. The slopes of the linear regression lines between the isotopic composition of water and leaf cellulose indicated that under the three growth conditions about 40, 70, and 100% of oxygens and carbon-bound hydrogens of cellulose exchanged with those of water prior to cellulose formation. Using the equations of the linear relationships, we estimated the overall fractionation factors between water and the exchanged oxygen and carbon bound-hydrogen of cellulose. At least two very different isotope effects must determine the hydrogen isotopic composition of Lemna cellulose. One reflects the photosynthetic reduction of NADP, while the second reflects exchange reactions that occur subsequent to NADP reduction. Oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose apparently is determined by a single type of exchange reaction with water. Under different growth conditions, variations in metabolic fluxes affect the hydrogen isotopic composition of cellulose by influencing the extent to which the two isotope effects mentioned above are recorded. The oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose is not affected by such changes in growth conditions

  7. Isotope exchange of molecular oxygen with oxygen of La0,7Sr0,3CoO3-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, G.K.; Kuzin, B.L.; Kurumchin, Eh.Kh.

    1991-01-01

    The exchange rate of the oxygen in La 0,7 Sr 0,3 CoO 3-δ has been measured by an isotopic exchange method at temperatures 620-1250 K and pressures 1.6-10 torr. The activation energy and the dependence of the exchange rate on pressures in gas have been defined. It is suggested that the knees on the temperature dependences of the exchange rate are attributed to the appearance of Co 2+ ions on the surface of the sample at elevated temperature as new centres of the exchange reaction. The activation energies of the adsorption and desorption processes on the La 0,7 Sr 0,3 CoO 3-δ surface have been estimated

  8. Determination of Equine Cytochrome c Backbone Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Rates by Mass Spectrometry Using a Wider Time Window and Isotope Envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-03-01

    A new strategy to analyze amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data is proposed, utilizing a wider time window and isotope envelope analysis of each peptide. While most current scientific reports present HDX-MS data as a set of time-dependent deuteration levels of peptides, the ideal HDX-MS data presentation is a complete set of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The ideal data set can provide single amide resolution, coverage of all exchange events, and the open/close ratio of each amide hydrogen in EX2 mechanism. Toward this goal, a typical HDX-MS protocol was modified in two aspects: measurement of a wider time window in HDX-MS experiments and deconvolution of isotope envelope of each peptide. Measurement of a wider time window enabled the observation of deuterium incorporation of most backbone amide hydrogens. Analysis of the isotope envelope instead of centroid value provides the deuterium distribution instead of the sum of deuteration levels in each peptide. A one-step, global-fitting algorithm optimized exchange rate and deuterium retention during the analysis of each amide hydrogen by fitting the deuterated isotope envelopes at all time points of all peptides in a region. Application of this strategy to cytochrome c yielded 97 out of 100 amide hydrogen exchange rates. A set of exchange rates determined by this approach is more appropriate for a patent or regulatory filing of a biopharmaceutical than a set of peptide deuteration levels obtained by a typical protocol. A wider time window of this method also eliminates false negatives in protein-ligand binding site identification. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Photosynthetic water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  10. A new route of oxygen isotope exchange in the solid phase: demonstration in CuSO4.5H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danon, Albert; Saig, Avraham; Finkelstein, Yacov; Koresh, Jacob E

    2005-11-10

    Temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD-MS) measurements on [(18)O]water-enriched copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO(4).5H(2)(18)O) reveal an unambiguous occurrence of efficient oxygen isotope exchange between the water of crystallization and the sulfate in its CuSO(4) solid phase. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of such an exchange was never observed in a solid phase. The exchange process was observed during the stepwise dehydration (50-300 degrees C) of the compound. Specifically, the exchange promptly occurs somewhere between 160 and 250 degrees C; however, the exact temperature could not be resolved conclusively. It is shown that only the fifth, sulfate-associated, anionic H(2)O molecule participates in the exchange process and that the exchange seems to occur in a preferable fashion with, at the most, one oxygen atom in SO(4). Such an exchange, occurring below 250 degrees C, questions the common conviction of unfeasible oxygen exchange under geothermic conditions. This new oxygen exchange phenomenon is not exclusive to copper sulfate but is unambiguously observed also in other sulfate- and nitrate-containing minerals.

  11. Metal and hydrogen catalysis in isotopic hydrogen exchange in some biologically important heterocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Joly, H.A.; Jones, J.R.; Onyido, I.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the catalytic roles of metal and hydrogen ions in tritium exchange in some heterocyclic substrates which occur as residues in many biologically important molecules. We have found that detritiation of 1-methyl[2- 3 H]imidazole is inhibited by a number of metal ions. As well, inhibition of exchange rates was noted with Ag(I) and Cu(II) for [2- 3 H]thiazole and 1-methyl[8- 3 H]inosine, with Ag(I) for [2- 3 H]benzothiazole, and with Cu(II) for 1-methyl[8- 3 H]guanosine. A complete mechanistic description, which includes the various metal ion-coordinated species generated under the experimental conditions, is presented. The results demonstrate the reactivity order: protonated >> metal-coordinated >> neutral substrates. The differential catalytic effects of metal and hydrogen ions in these processes are discussed in terms of the extent of charge developed on the ligating heteroatom in the reaction intermediate. (author). 13 refs.; 1 fig

  12. Natural Ni speciation in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rocks: implications for potential 63Ni isotopic exchange and retention mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeon, S.; Tournassat, C.; Schaefer, T.; Lerouge, C.; Wille, G.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the perspective of deep underground long-term nuclear waste storage, 63 Ni is considered as a priority radio-element to be studied. 63 Ni behaviour prediction is made difficult mainly because its geochemical behaviour is still subject to debate. For instance, the solubility of Ni simple compounds at high pH is ill-defined, and the knowledge on solubility control phases is still pending. Clay rocks such as Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) contain non negligible amounts of natural and stable isotopes of Ni. As a consequence, a good understanding of the natural speciation of Ni in the formation could help to understand 63 Ni controls in this environment, including long term isotopic exchange with naturally present Ni. We focused our study on the COx formation, where the Bure (France) ANDRA underground research laboratory is located. Speciation of naturally occurring Ni was studied by combining chemical, microscopic and spectrometric methods. Chemical methods consisted of total rock analyses and sequential extractions on various COx samples representative of the variability of the formation (from carbonate rich samples to clay rich samples). This method enabled quantifying the main Ni reservoirs. Physical methods were used to get a closer look at the Ni-bearing phases. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to identify and isolate minerals from thin rock sections, originating from different geological horizons. Chemical results indicate that the mean Ni concentration in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock is of ∼30 ppm (10 -6 g/g). Identified Ni-bearing minerals were mainly primary minerals (biotite, chlorite, muscovite), calcite and pyrite; organic matter being also observed. Electron microprobe and X-ray fluorescence analyses were performed in order to quantify the amounts and variability of Ni contents in these different Callovo-Oxfordian components. Ni is occasionally present in primary minerals with

  13. A counter-intuitive approach to calculating non-exchangeable 2H isotopic composition of hair: treating the molar exchange fraction fE as a process-related rather than compound-specific variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landwehr, J.M.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H.F.

    2011-01-01

    Hair is a keratinous tissue that incorporates hydrogen from material that an animal consumes but it is metabolically inert following synthesis. The stable hydrogen isotope composition of hair has been used in ecological studies to track migrations of mammals as well as for forensic and archaeological purposes to determine the provenance of human remains or the recent geographic life trajectory of living people. Measurement of the total hydrogen isotopic composition of a hair sample yields a composite value comprised of both metabolically informative, non-exchangeable hydrogen and exchangeable hydrogen, with the latter reflecting ambient or sample preparation conditions. Neither of these attributes is directly measurable, and the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition is obtained by estimation using a commonly applied mathematical expression incorporating sample measurements obtained from two distinct equilibration procedures. This commonly used approach treats the fraction of exchangeable hydrogen as a mixing ratio, with a minimal procedural fractionation factor assumed to be close or equal to 1. Instead, we propose to use full molar ratios to derive an expression for the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition explicitly as a function of both the procedural fractionation factor α and the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE. We apply these derivations in a longitudinal study of a hair sample and demonstrate that the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE should, like the procedural fractionation factor α, be treated as a process-dependent parameter, i.e. a reaction-specific constant. This is a counter-intuitive notion given that maximum theoretical values for the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE can be calculated that are arguably protein-type specific and, as such, fE could be regarded as a compound-specific constant. We also make some additional suggestions for future approaches to determine the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition of hair and the use of

  14. Optimization of the operational parameters in isotopic exchange installations. ROMAG PROD plant production of heavy water for the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, A.

    2002-01-01

    The ROMAG PROD heavy water plant at Drobeta Turnu Severin together with SN Nuclearelectrica Company and Nuclear Fuel Plant at Pitesti are the most important pillars the National Nuclear Program is based on. The plant became operational on 17th July 1988, was later modernized and now reached in the field a leading position known world wide. There are described the modifications adopted to the two stages of the isotopic exchange installation besides some refurbishment measures of general character. The increase of discharge flow rate in cool columns vs hot columns resulted in a rise of technological regime stability and the feeding rate. Also in the first stage the stripping vapor injection in the hot columns was modified to avoid vacuum excursion in the columns. In the second stage two isotopic exchange trays were replaced with dry trays to obtain drop separation at the cool column top. All the trays from the isotopic exchange section of the cool column were replaced by trays from the hot column. The thermal exchange zone in the cool column was modified by introducing trays with number of holes. The gas flow rate of the stage two compressor was adapted to the design requirements. By these changes of the parameters in the original design were substantially improved, the operation became easier, more secure and safer for the environment while the production of the heavy water doubled between 1995 and 2001 reaching a value of 163 t/y in 2001

  15. Solvent effects on the kinetics of the chlorine isotopic exchange reaction between chloride ion and O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridate or O,O-diphenyl phosphorchloridothioate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczyk, M.; Slebocka-Tilk, H.; Reimschussel, W.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of solvent on the kinetics of the chlorine isotopic exchange reaction between 36 Cl- ions and O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridate or O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridothioate has been investigated in nitromethane, acetonitrile, propylene carbonate, benzonitrile, nitrobenzene, and hexamethyl-phosphoric triamide. The rate constants decrease with increasing electrophilicity of the solvent. A good correlation between the logarithm of the rate constants and acceptor number (AN) of the solvent was obtained with identical slopes for reactions with phosphoryl and thiophosporyl compounds. The slopes for the dependence of ΔH or TΔS vs. AN for chlorine isotopic exchange in (PHO) 2 pace are opposite those for the exchange reaction in (PHO) 2 PSCl, so a constant ratio of k/sub p=O//k/sub p=s/ is observed, resulting from compensation of ΔH by ΔS. The effect of solvent on the initial state (from solubility measurements) and the transition state of the reaction between (PhO) 2 PSCl and the Cl- ion was evaluated. Changes of solvation of (PHO) 2 PSCE have practically no effect on the kinetics of the reactions. Changes of solvation of the chloride ion and of the transition state primarily influence the rate constants and activation parameters of the investigated isotopic-exchange reaction

  16. Carbon isotope exchange between gaseous CO2 and thin solution films: Artificial cave experiments and a complete diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maximilian; Scholz, Denis; Froeschmann, Marie-Louise; Schöne, Bernd R.; Spötl, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Speleothem stable carbon isotope (δ13C) records provide important paleoclimate and paleo-environmental information. However, the interpretation of these records in terms of past climate or environmental change remains challenging because of various processes affecting the δ13C signals. A process that has only been sparsely discussed so far is carbon isotope exchange between the gaseous CO2 of the cave atmosphere and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contained in the thin solution film on the speleothem, which may be particularly important for strongly ventilated caves. Here we present a novel, complete reaction diffusion model describing carbon isotope exchange between gaseous CO2 and the DIC in thin solution films. The model considers all parameters affecting carbon isotope exchange, such as diffusion into, out of and within the film, the chemical reactions occurring within the film as well as the dependence of diffusion and the reaction rates on isotopic mass and temperature. To verify the model, we conducted laboratory experiments under completely controlled, cave-analogue conditions at three different temperatures (10, 20, 30 °C). We exposed thin (≈0.1 mm) films of a NaHCO3 solution with four different concentrations (1, 2, 5 and 10 mmol/l, respectively) to a nitrogen atmosphere containing a specific amount of CO2 (1000 and 3000 ppmV). The experimentally observed temporal evolution of the pH and δ13C values of the DIC is in good agreement with the model predictions. The carbon isotope exchange times in our experiments range from ca. 200 to ca. 16,000 s and strongly depend on temperature, film thickness, atmospheric pCO2 and the concentration of DIC. For low pCO2 (between 500 and 1000 ppmV, as for strongly ventilated caves), our time constants are substantially lower than those derived in a previous study, suggesting a potentially stronger influence of carbon isotope exchange on speleothem δ13C values. However, this process should only have an

  17. Factors determining the activity of catalysts of various chemical types in the oxidation of hydrogen. I. Oxidation and isotope exchange of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgikh, L.Y.; Golodets, G.I.; Il'chenko, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of data on the kinetics of the reaction 2H 2 + O 2 = 2H 2 O isotope exchange H 2 + D 2 = 2HD under the conditions of oxidative catalysis, and the kinetic isotope effect, a mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide. At low temperatures the reaction proceeds according to a mechanism of alternating reduction-reoxidation of the surface with the participation of hydrogen adsorbed in molecular form; at increased temperature and low P 02 /P /SUB H2/ ratios, a significant contribution to the observed rate is made by a mechanism including dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen

  18. Isotopic modeling of water and sodium distribution and exchange kinetics in 7 stable hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoiseau, S.; Bertrou, L.; Pujo, J.M.; Massol, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sequential serum sampling over 24 h. has been performed in 7 hemodialysis patients after simultaneous intra-venous injection of tritiated water and 24 Na. Each time-activity curve fits a biexponential pattern. A compartment analysis leads to describe either a simple but incomplete single compartment model or a much more satisfactory open two-compartment mamillary model featuring 2 intercompartment transfer rate constants k 21 and k 12 , and a loss out of the system, k 01 . These constants can be related to intrabody resistances to sodium and water transfers. Compartment analysis allows a comprehensive quantitated description of the exchange and transfer kinetics of sodium and water throughout the system. Evidence for a sodium reservoir, probably located in bone, can be drawn from the results and leads to propose a strategy for a targetted bone sodium removal [fr

  19. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-11-02

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  20. Sm isotope composition and Sm/Eu ratio determination in an irradiated 153Eu sample by ion exchange chromatography-quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry combined with double spike isotope dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, M.; Isnard, H.; Gourgiotis, A.; Stadelmann, G.; Gautier, C.; Mialle, S.; Nonell, A.; Chartier, F.

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the research undertaken by the French Atomic Energy Commission on transmutation of long-lived radionuclides, targets of highly enriched actinides and fission products were irradiated in the fast neutron reactor Phenix. Precise and accurate measurements of the isotopic and elemental composition of the enriched elements are therefore required. In order to obtain the uncertainties of several per mil and to reduce handling time and exposure to analyst on radioactive material, the on-line coupling of ion exchange chromatography with quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been associated with the technique of the double spike isotope dilution. We present in this paper the results obtained on an irradiated sample of Europium oxide powder (enriched at 99.13% in 153 Eu). After irradiation of around 5 mg of Eu 2 O 3 powder the theoretical calculations predict the formation of several micrograms of gadolinium and samarium isotopes. In relation to the very high activity of the sample after irradiation and the very low quantity of Sm formed, the on-line ion exchange chromatography separation of Gd, Sm and Eu before Sm isotope ratio measurements has been developed for the quantification of the 152 Sm/ 153 Eu ratio. These on-line measurements were associated with the double spike isotope dilution technique after calibration of a 147 Sm/ 151 Eu spike solution. The external reproducibility of Sm isotopic ratios was determined to be around 0.5% (2 σ) resulting in a final uncertainty on the 152 Sm/ 153 Eu ratio of around 1% (2 σ). These on-line measurements present therefore a robust and high-throughput alternative to the thermal-ionisation mass spectrometry technique used so far in combination with off-line chromatographic separation, particularly in nuclear applications where characterisation of high activity sample solutions is required. (authors)

  1. Isotopic Exchange HPLC-HRMS/MS Applied to Cyclic Proanthocyanidins in Wine and Cranberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Edoardo; Rossetti, Fabrizio; Scampicchio, Matteo; Boselli, Emanuele

    2018-01-01

    Cyclic B-type proanthocyanidins in red wines and grapes have been discovered recently. However, proanthocyanidins of a different chemical structure (non-cyclic A-type proanthocyanidins) already known to be present in cranberries and wine possess an identical theoretical mass. As a matter of fact, the retention times and the MS/MS fragmentations found for the proposed novel cyclic B-type tetrameric proanthocyanidin in red wine and the known tetrameric proanthocyanidin in a cranberry extract are herein shown to be identical. Thus, hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange was applied to HPLC-HRMS/MS to confirm the actual chemical structure of the new oligomeric proanthocyanidins. The comparison of the results in water and deuterium oxide and between wine and cranberry extract indicates that the cyclic B-type tetrameric proanthocyanidin is the actual constituent of the recently proposed novel tetrameric species ([C60H49O24]+, m/z 1153.2608). Surprisingly, the same compound was also identified as the main tetrameric proanthocyanidin in cranberries. Finally, a totally new cyclic B-type hexameric proanthocyanidin ([C90H73O36]+, m/z 1729.3876) belonging to this novel class was identified for the first time in red wine. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Multiple photosynthetic transitions, polyploidy, and lateral gene transfer in the grass subtribe Neurachninae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Wallace, Mark J; Clayton, Harmony; Edwards, Erika J; Furbank, Robert T; Hattersley, Paul W; Sage, Rowan F; Macfarlane, Terry D; Ludwig, Martha

    2012-10-01

    The Neurachninae is the only grass lineage known to contain C(3), C(4), and C(3)-C(4) intermediate species, and as such has been suggested as a model system for studies of photosynthetic pathway evolution in the Poaceae; however, a lack of a robust phylogenetic framework has hindered this possibility. In this study, plastid and nuclear markers were used to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Neurachninae species. In addition, photosynthetic types were determined with carbon isotope ratios, and genome sizes with flow cytometry. A high frequency of autopolyploidy was found in the Neurachninae, including in Neurachne munroi F.Muell. and Paraneurachne muelleri S.T.Blake, which independently evolved C(4) photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that following their separate C(4) origins, these two taxa exchanged a gene encoding the C(4) form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The C(3)-C(4) intermediate Neurachne minor S.T.Blake is phylogenetically distinct from the two C(4) lineages, indicating that intermediacy in this species evolved separately from transitional stages preceding C(4) origins. The Neurachninae shows a substantial capacity to evolve new photosynthetic pathways repeatedly. Enablers of these transitions might include anatomical pre-conditions in the C(3) ancestor, and frequent autopolyploidization. Transfer of key C(4) genetic elements between independently evolved C(4) taxa may have also facilitated a rapid adaptation of photosynthesis in these grasses that had to survive in the harsh climate appearing during the late Pliocene in Australia.

  3. Theoretical study of the Cs isotope exchange reaction of CsI + Cs' → Cs + ICs' (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Hashimoto, Masashi; Yokoyama, Keiichi

    2015-12-01

    To discuss the exchange reaction of Cs isotope by CsI + Cs' → Cs + ICs', the structure and chemical properties of Cs 2 I intermediate and potential energy surface of the entrance reaction are calculated using M06/def2-TZVPPD density functional calculation. The calculation shows that the reaction to the intermediate has no barrier and the two Cs-I bonds of Cs 2 I are chemically equivalent. These results suggest that the rate of the Cs exchange reaction of CsI + Cs' → Cs + ICs' is as high as the collision rate. (author)

  4. Process and device for stage by stage enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium in a material suitable for isotope exchange of deuterium and tritium with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniotakis, N.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1983-01-01

    Water containing deuterium and/or tritium is first introduced into a carrier gas flow and reduced for the stage by stage enrichment of deuterium and/or tritium. A hydrogen partial pressure of a maximum of 100 millibar is set in the carrier gas flow. The carrier gas flow is taken along the primary side of an exchange wall suitable for the permeation of hydrogen, and a further carrier gas flow flows on its secondary side, which contains water or hydrogen. Reaction products formed after isotope exchange of deuterium and/or tritium with hydrogen are removed by the secondary carrier gas flow. (orig./HP) [de

  5. On the basic substances used in the separation process by isotope exchange H2S - H2O, at two temperatures, in view of producing heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, V.

    1977-01-01

    In view of producing heavy water, the influence of the deuterium proportion in the basic substances, on the efficiency of the isotope exchange process H 2 S - H 2 O for two temperatures was studied. Heavy water is extracted from ordinary water and concentrated from 0.014 per cent to 5-15 per cent D 2 O by isotope bithermal exchange with the hydrogen sulphite. Theoretical and experimental research was carried out in laboratories and then applied on a pilot plant by designing and testing a drying equipment for hydrogen sulphite. The maximum H 2 S concentration rose to 99.84 per cent. The purity of the hydrogen sulphite resulting from the pilot plant, as well as the optimization of the installation for producing H 2 S depending on the deuterium distribution, make sure that the two methods for the preparation of sodium sulphite and hydrogen sulphite can be applied in industry. (author)

  6. Study of oxalic acid effect on equilibrium and kinetics of isotopic exchange between penta- and hexavalent neptunium in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Ionnikova, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry at 25 deg C and ionic force μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 +HNO 3 ) was used to show that at HNO 3 concentration 0.1-1.0 mol/l H 2 C 2 O 4 introduction to nitric acid solutions of Np 5+ in the presence of nitrite-ion resulted in the shift of equilibrium between Np 5+ and Np 6+ to the side of Np 6+ accumulation. The presence of H 2 C 2 O 4 at HNO 3 concentration > 1.0 mol/l doesn't affect the equilibrium position. The values of nominal equilibrium constant at different HNO 3 and H 2 C 2 O 4 concentrations were calculated. It was found that isotope exchange ( 239 Np/ 237 Np) between Np 5+ and Np 6+ in oxalate solutions proceeded more slowly than in oxalate absence. Rate constants of isotope exchange calculated at 9 deg C, μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 ), H 2 C 2 O 4 concentration 0.01 mol/l and pH=2.2 and 3.5 are equal to 0.49x10 3 and 0.67x10 2 l/mol·min respectively. Mechanism of isotope exchange including electron transport between Np 5+ and Np 6+ oxalate complexes is suggested

  7. Morning reduction of photosynthetic capacity before midday depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kohei; Takemoto, Shuhei

    2014-03-17

    Midday depression of photosynthesis has important consequences for ecosystem carbon exchange. Recent studies of forest trees have demonstrated that latent reduction of photosynthetic capacity can begin in the early morning, preceding the midday depression. We investigated whether such early morning reduction also occurs in an herbaceous species, Oenothera biennis. Diurnal changes of the photosynthetic light response curve (measured using a light-emitting diode) and incident sunlight intensity were measured under field conditions. The following results were obtained: (1) the light-saturated photosynthetic rate decreased beginning at sunrise; (2) the incident sunlight intensity on the leaves increased from sunrise; and (3) combining (1) and (2), the net photosynthetic rate under natural sunlight intensity increased from sunrise, reached a maximum at mid-morning, and then showed midday depression. Our results demonstrate that the latent morning reduction of photosynthetic capacity begins at sunrise, preceding the apparent midday depression, in agreement with previous studies of forest trees.

  8. Phosphorus Use Efficiency for Symbiotic Fixation Nitrogen in Voandzou (Vigna Subterranea) Using Isotopic Exchange Method in Rhizotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamananjara, A.; Rabeharisoa, L. [Laboratoire des Radio-isotopes, Universite d' Antananarivo, Antananarivo (Madagascar); Masse, D. [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, UMR Eco and Sols, Montpellier, (France); Amenc, L.; Pernot, C.; Drevon, J. J. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, UMR Eco and Sols, Montpellier, (France); Morel, C. [INRA-ENITA, Villenave d' Ornon (France)

    2013-11-15

    Low bioavailability of nitrogen and phosphorus is one of the main constraints in the acid soils with high P-fixing capacity. Plants adapt to low nutrient availability through various biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. Since genetic variation of N{sub 2} fixation exists in numerous legume species, optimization of symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) under P deficiency could be a way to the replenishment of soil fertility in tropical soils. As the genetic potential of crops like Vigna subterranea (Bambara groundnut or voandzou) is little studied, although its agronomic potential is interesting for the farmers of Africa, a physiological study through legume screening for N{sub 2} fixation was performed with 54 cultivars from Madagascar, Niger and Mali, inoculated with the reference strain of Bradyrhizobium sp. Vigna CB756 in hydroponic culture under P deficiency and sufficiency (30 and 75 {mu}mol KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} plant{sup -1} week {sup -1}, respectively), corresponding respectively to 28 and 70 mg P kg{sup -1} of soil. Large variability of nodulation and plant biomass was found among cultivars. These two parameters were generally correlated and the slope of the plant biomass regression as a function of nodulation was considered as an indicator of the efficiency in use of the rhizobial symbiosis. For the two cultivars most tolerant to P deficiency, V1 and V4 from Madagascar, the increase in use efficiency of the rhizobial symbiosis under P deficiency was linked with an increase in nodulated root O{sub 2} consumption linked to N{sub 2} fixation, and in phytase gene expression observed on the nodule sections by in situ RT- PCR. As the complexity of P compartments makes it difficult to assess the P bioavailability in the plant rhizosphere, an isotopic {sup 32}P exchange method was carried out in a rhizotron in order to assess the direct effect of the roots on P mobilization in rhizosphere soil, comparing V1 and V4 with 28 or 70 mg P kg{sup -1} of soil. Throughout

  9. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The systematics of stable-isotope exchange between minerals and fluids are examined in the context of modal mineralogical variations and mass-balance considerations, both in closed and in open systems. On mineral-pair ??18O plots, samples from terranes that have exchanged with large amounts of fluid typically map out steep positively-sloped non-equilibrium arrays. Analytical models are derived to explain these effects; these models allow for different exchange rates between the various minerals and the external fluids, as well as different fluid fluxes. The steep arrays are adequately modelled by calculated isochron lines that involve the whole family of possible exchange trajectories. These isochrons have initially-steep near-vertical positive slopes that rotate toward a 45?? equilibrium slope as the exchange process proceeds to completion. The actual data-point array is thus analogous to the hand of an "isotopic clock" that measures the duration of the hydrothermal episode. The dimensionless ratio of the volumetric fluid flux to the kinetic rate parameter ( u k) determines the shape of each individual exchange trajectory. In a fluid-buffered system ( u k ??? 1), the solutions to the equations: (1) are independent of the mole fractions of the solid phases; (2) correspond to Taylor's open-system water/rock equation; and (3) yield straight-line isochrons that have slopes that approach 1 f, where f is the fraction reacted of the more sluggishly exchanging mineral. The isochrons for this simple exchange model are closely congruent with the isochrons calculated for all of the more complex models, thereby simplifying the application of theory to actual hydrothermal systems in nature. In all of the models an order of magnitude of time (in units of kt) separates steep non-equilibrium arrays (e.g., slope ??? 10) from arrays approaching an equilibrium slope of unity on a ??-?? diagram. Because we know the approximate lifetimes of many hydrothermal systems from geologic and

  10. Net Community and Gross Photosynthetic Production Rates in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific, as Determined from O2/AR Ratios and Triple Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Dissolved O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopenko, M. G.; Yeung, L. Y.; Berelson, W.; Fleming, J.; Rollins, N.; Young, E. D.; Haskell, W. Z.; Hammond, D. E.; Capone, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    This study assesses the rates of ocean carbon production and its fate with respect to recycling or export in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP). ETSP has been previously identified as a region where N2 fixation and denitrification may be spatially coupled; this is also a region of localized CO2 outgassing. Using an Equilibrated Inlet Mass Spectrometer (EIMS) system, we obtained continuous measurements of the biological O2 supersaturation in the mixed layer along the ship track encompassing a region bounded by 10-20° S and 80-100° W in January - March, 2010. Vertical profiles were also taken at selected stations and analyzed for dissolved O2/Ar ratios on EIMS and triple oxygen isotope composition (17O excess) on a multi-collector IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer) at UCLA. Gas exchange rates were estimated using two approaches: the Rn-222 deficit method and the wind parameterization method, which utilized wind speeds extracted from ASCAT satellite database. Oxygen Net Community Production (O-NCP) rates calculated based on biological O2 supersaturation ranged from slightly negative to ~ 0.3 - 15 mmol/m2d, with higher rates along the northern part of the transect. Oxygen Gross Community Production (O-GPP) rates calculated from 17O excess were between 50 ± 20 and 200 ± 40 mmol/m2d, with higher rates observed along the northern cruise transect as well. Notably, the NCP/GPP ratios along the northern transect were higher by the factor of 2 to 3 than their southern counterparts. The O2/Ar-based NCP rates were comparable to POC flux measured with floating traps deployed at the southern stations, but exceeded by a factor of 5-10 the trap POC fluxes obtained at the northern stations. A one-dimensional box model has been constructed to quantify the magnitude of oxygen primary production below the mixed layer. The results of this work will be integrated with measurements of 15-N2 uptake that are in progress, to constrain the potential contribution of N2 fixation

  11. Photosynthetic and nitrogen fixation capability in several soybean mutant lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandanegara, S.; Hendratno, K.

    1987-01-01

    Photosynthetic and nitrogen fixation capability in several soybean mutant lines. A greenhouse experiment has been carried out to study photosynthetic and nitrogen fixation capability of five mutant lines and two soybean varieties. An amount of 330 uCi of 14 CO 2 was fed to the plants including of the non-fixing reference crop (Chippewa non-nodulating isoline). Nitrogen fixation measurements was carried out using 15 N isotope dilution technique according to A-value concept. Results showed that beside variety/mutant lines, plant growth also has important role in photosynthetic and N fixing capability. Better growth and a higher photosynthetic capability in Orba, mutant lines nos. 63 and 65 resulted in a greater amount of N 2 fixed (mg N/plant) than other mutant lines. (author). 12 refs.; 5 figs

  12. Simultaneous determination of platinum group elements and rhenium in rock samples using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after cation exchange separation followed by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotsuka, Kazunori; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A simple and precise determination method for platinum group elements (PGEs) and Re in rock samples was developed using isotope dilution coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). Cation exchange separation was employed for simplicity, because it is applicable to group separation and simultaneous isotopic measurement in contrast with the widely used anion exchange separation which entails separate elution. However, its application to ID-ICP-MS has been limited due to spectral interferences from impurities retained in the PGE fraction even after ion chromatography. To overcome this limitation, solvent extraction using N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) in chloroform was successfully applied for further purification. After the examination of optimum experimental parameters in cation exchange separation and solvent extraction using synthetic PGE solution, the established procedure was applied to the determination of PGEs and Re in some geochemical reference materials. The obtained results agreed well with the literature data determined using the different digestion methods (NiS fire assay and the use of a high-pressure asher) within the analytical uncertainties of each other. Significant difference in reproducibility between Ru, Ir, Pt and Os group, and Pd and Re group was observed in the results for BHVO-2 and JA-2. By considering the error factors affecting analytical reproducibility, we concluded that the difference is ascribed to the sample heterogeneity of minor minerals enriched in Ru, Ir, Pt and Os

  13. Photosynthetic incorporation of 14C by Stevia rebaudiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraresi, M. de L.; Ferraresi Filho, O.; Bracht, A.

    1985-01-01

    The photosynthetic incorporation of 14 by Stevia rebaudiana specimens was investigated. The 14 C incorporation, when the isotope was furnished to the plant in form of 14 CO 2 , was rapid. After 24 hours, the radioactivity has been incorporated into a great number of compounds including pigments, terpenes, glucose, cellulose and also stevioside and its derivatives. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. A simple and reliable anion-exchange resin method for sulfate extraction and purification suitable for multiple O- and S-isotope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gendre, Erwann; Martin, Erwan; Villemant, Benoit; Cartigny, Pierre; Assayag, Nelly

    2017-01-15

    The O- and S-isotope compositions of sulfates can be used as key tracers of the fate and sink of sulfate in both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial environments. However, their application remains limited in those geological systems where sulfate occurs in low concentrations. Here we present a simple and reliable method to extract, purify and concentrate sulfate from natural samples. The method allows us to take into account the separation of nitrate, which is known to be an issue in O-isotope analysis. The separation and concentration of sulfate from other anions in any aqueous solution are performed within a few hours via anion-exchange resin. The possible O- (δ 18 O and Δ 17 O) and S- (δ 34 S, Δ 33 S and Δ 36 S) isotope exchanges, fractionations and/or contaminations are for the first time monitored during the whole procedure using initial O- and S-mass-dependent and mass-independent sulfate solutions. After elution in HCl, pure sulfate is fully retrieved and precipitated into BaSO 4 , which is suitable for O- and S-isotopic measurements using established techniques. The analysis of retrieved barite presents no variation within 2σ uncertainties: ±0.5‰ and ±0.1‰ in O- (δ 18 O, Δ 17 O) and ±0.2‰, ±0.02‰ and ±0.09‰ in S- (δ 34 S, Δ 33 S and Δ 36 S) isotope ratios, respectively. This study shows that the resin method for sulfate extraction and purification, in addition to being cheap, simple and quick, is applicable for the measurements of all O- and S-isotopic ratios in sulfates (including the Δ 17 O, Δ 33 S and Δ 36 S values). Therefore, this method can be easily used for a high range of natural samples in which sulfate occurs in low concentration including aerosols, ice cores, sediments, volcanic deposits, (paleo)soils and rainwater, and thus it can be a key to our understanding of the sulfur cycle on Earth. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Radiosynthesis of [18F]fluorophenyl-L-amino acids by isotopic exchange on carbonyl-activated precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo Melean, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic [ 18 F]fluoroamino acids have earlier been developed as promising probes for diagnostics using PET. However, a wider use of these radiofluorinated compounds has been limited due to radiosynthetic constraints. The work here presents an amenable three-step radiosynthesis pathway for the preparation of 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine (2-[ 18 F]Fphe), 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-tyrosine (2-[ 18 F]Ftyr), 6-[ 18 F]fuoro-L-m-tyrosine (6-[ 18 F]Fmtyr) and 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA (6-[ 18 F]FDOPA). For this, corresponding precursors were 18 F-fluorinated by nucleophilic isotopic exchange, followed by either removal of an activating formyl group with Rh(PPh 3 ) 3 Cl or its conversion by Baeyer-Villiger oxidation, respectively, and subsequent hydrolysis of protecting groups in acidic medium. Two efficient synthetic approaches were developed for the preparation of highly functionalized fluoro-benzaldehydes and -ketones which were used as labeling precursors. The compounds (2S,5S)-tert-butyl 2-tert-butyl-5-(2-fluoro-5-formylbenzyl)-3-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidine-1 -carboxylate (1a), (2S,5S)-tert-butyl 5-(5-acetyl-2-fluorobenzyl)-2-tert-butyl-3-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidine-1 -carboxylate (1c), (2S,5S)-benzyl 2-tert-butyl-5-(2-fluoro-5-formylbenzyl)-3-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidine-1 -carbo-xylate (1d), 4-fluoro-3-(((2S,5R)-5-isopropyl-3,6-dimethoxy-2,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl) me-thyl)b enzal-dehyde (1e) and 1-(4-fluoro-3-(((2S,5R)-5-isopropyl-3,6-dimethoxy-2,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl) me-thy l)phenyl)ethanone (1f), could be prepared in six steps and overall yields of 41%, 48%, 37%, 27%, and 32%, respectively. (2S,5S)-tert-Butyl 5-(4-(benzyloxy)-2-fluoro-5-formylbenzyl)-2-tert-butyl-3-methyl-4 -oxoimidazolidi ne-1-carboxylate (1b) was prepared in ten steps with an overall yield of 19% while compounds (2S,5S)-tert-butyl 5-(5-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)-benzoyl)-2-fluorobenzyl)-2-tert-butyl-3 -methyl-4-oxoimidazolidine-1-carboxylate (1g) and (2S,5S)-tert-butyl 2-tert-butyl-5-(2-fluoro-5

  16. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  17. Oxygen and U-Th isotopes and the timescales of hydrothermal exchange and melting in granitoid wall rocks at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Valley, John W.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2017-01-01

    We report new whole rock U-Th and in-situ oxygen isotope compositions for partially melted (0–50 vol% melt), low-δ18O Pleistocene granitoid blocks ejected during the ∼7.7 ka caldera-forming eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake, Oregon). The blocks are interpreted to represent wall rocks of the climactic magma chamber that, prior to eruption, experienced variable amounts of exchange with meteoric hydrothermal fluids and subsequent partial melting. U-Th and oxygen isotope results allow us to examine the timescales of hydrothermal circulation and partial melting, and provide an “outside in” perspective on the buildup to the climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama. Oxygen isotope compositions measured in the cores and rims of individual quartz (n = 126) and plagioclase (n = 91) crystals, and for transects across ten quartz crystals, document zonation in quartz (Δ18OCore-Rim ≤ 0.1–5.5‰), but show homogeneity in plagioclase (Δ18OCore-Rim ≤ ±0.8‰). We propose that oxygen isotope zonation in quartz records hydrothermal exchange followed by high-temperature exchange in response to partial melting caused by injection of basaltic to andesitic recharge magma into the deeper portions of the chamber. Results of modeling of oxygen diffusion in quartz indicates that hydrothermal exchange in quartz occurred over a period of ∼1000–63,000 years. Models also suggest that the onset of melting of the granitoids occurred a minimum of ∼10–200 years prior to the Mazama climactic eruption, an inference which is broadly consistent with results for magnetite homogenization and for Zr diffusion in melt previously reported by others.Uranium-thorium isotope compositions of most granitoid blocks are in 238U excess, and are in agreement with a 238U enriched array previously measured for volcanic rocks at Mt. Mazama. Uranium excess in the granitoids is likely due to enrichment via hydrothermal circulation, given their low δ18O values. The sample with the

  18. Ageing and structural effects on the sorption characteristics of Cd2+ by clinoptilolite and Y-type zeolite studied using isotope exchange technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.A.M.; Young, S.D.; Crout, N.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates the long-term kinetics of Cd 2+ sorption and desorption by calcium-exchanged clinoptilolite (CaCpt) and Y-type (CaY) zeolite using isotopic exchange with 109 Cd while maintaining pH at circumneutral values. The effects of Si/Al ratio and crystal structure of these zeolitic materials on intracrystalline transport of Cd are discussed. A first-order kinetic model was developed to describe the progressive transfer of Cd 2+ to a less reactive form within the zeolite structure, following initial sorption and subsequent desorption of Cd subject to different initial contact times. The kinetic model differentiates between two forms of sorbed Cd 2+ designated 'labile' and 'non-labile' in which the labile form is in immediate equilibrium with the free Cd 2+ ion activity in solution. A model combining diffusion and first-order kinetics for cation exchange was also employed to determine Cd 2+ diffusivity and intracrystalline exchange rates in CaY and CaCpt. The efficiency of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) containing zeolitic materials in protecting water systems against lateral flow of metal-contaminated leachate was simulated for three contrasting zeolites. The slow transfer of Cd between labile and non-labile forms was particularly important in moderating high concentration pulses of Cd traversing the PRB. In addition, the reversibility of Cd fixation effectively restored the sorption capability of the zeolite through slow leakage to drainage water.

  19. Gas phase 1H NMR studies and kinetic modeling of dihydrogen isotope equilibration catalyzed by Ru-nanoparticles under normal conditions: dissociative vs. associative exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Pery, Tal; Rothermel, Niels; Chaudret, Bruno; Gutmann, Torsten; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2018-04-25

    The equilibration of H2, HD and D2 between the gas phase and surface hydrides of solid organic-ligand-stabilized Ru metal nanoparticles has been studied by gas phase 1H NMR spectroscopy using closed NMR tubes as batch reactors at room temperature and 800 mbar. When two different nanoparticle systems, Ru/PVP (PVP ≡ polyvinylpyrrolidone) and Ru/HDA (HDA ≡ hexadecylamine) were exposed to D2 gas, only the release of HD from the hydride containing surface could be detected in the initial stages of the reaction, but no H2. In the case of Ru/HDA also the reverse experiment was performed where surface deuterated nanoparticles were exposed to H2. In that case, the conversion of H2 into gaseous HD was detected. In order to analyze the experimental kinetic and spectroscopic data, we explored two different mechanisms taking into account potential kinetic and equilibrium H/D isotope effects. Firstly, we explored the dissociative exchange mechanism consisting of dissociative adsorption of dihydrogen, fast hydride surface diffusion and associative desorption of dihydrogen. It is shown that if D2 is the reaction partner, only H2 will be released in the beginning of the reaction, and HD only in later reaction stages. The second mechanism, dubbed here associative exchange consists of the binding of dihydrogen to Ru surface atoms, followed by a H-transfer to or by H-exchange with an adjacent hydride site, and finally of the associative desorption of dihydrogen. In that case, in the exchange with D2, only HD will be released in the beginning of the reaction. Our experimental results are not compatible with the dissociative exchange but can be explained in terms of the associative exchange. Whereas the former will dominate at low temperatures and pressures, the latter will prevail around room temperature and normal pressures where transition metal nanoparticles are generally used as reaction catalysts.

  20. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvestin...

  1. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  2. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  3. Assessment of surface reactivity of thorium oxide in conditions close to chemical equilibrium by isotope exchange {sup 229}Th/{sup 232}Th method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo; Perrigaud, Katy; Vandenborre, Johan; Ribet, Solange; Grambow, Bernd [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Takamasa, Inai [TOKAI Univ., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to assess the solubility and the surface reactivity of crystallized thorium at pH 3.0 in presence of three types of solids: synthesized powder at 1300 C, crushed kernel, and intact kernel. In this study, the kernel is composed by the core solid from high temperature reactors (HTR) sphere particles. The originality of this work consisted in following in a sequential order the kinetic of dissolution, the surface reactivity in presence of isotope tracer {sup 229}Th, and its desorption process. Long time experiments (634 days) allowed to get deeper understanding on the behavior of the surface reactivity in contact with the solution. Solubility values are ranging from 0.3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} to 3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} with a dissolution rate of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} g.m{sup -2} day{sup -1}. PHREEQC modeling showed that crystallized ThO{sub 2}(cr, 20 nm) phase controls the equilibrium in solution. Isotope exchange between {sup 229}Th and {sup 232}Th indicated that well-crystallized phase exist as an inert surface regarding to the absence of exchange between surface solid and solution.

  4. Direct lead isotope analysis in Hg-rich sulfides by LA-MC-ICP-MS with a gas exchange device and matrix-matched calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Hu, Zhaochu, E-mail: zchu@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Günther, Detlef, E-mail: guenther@inorg.chem.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Inorganic Chemistry, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Liu, Yongsheng; Ling, Wenli; Zong, Keqing; Chen, Haihong; Gao, Shan [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2016-12-15

    In situ Pb isotope data of sulfide samples measured by LA-MC-ICP-MS provide valuable geochemical information for studies of the origin and evolution of ore deposits. However, the severe isobaric interference of {sup 204}Hg on {sup 204}Pb and the lack of matrix-matched sulfide reference materials limit the precision of Pb isotopic analyses for Hg-rich sulfides. In this study, we observe that Hg forms vapor and can be completely removed from sample aerosol particles produced by laser ablation using a gas exchange device. Additionally, this device does not influence the signal intensities of Pb isotopes. The within-run precision, the external reproducibility and the analytical accuracy are significantly improved for the Hg-rich sulfide samples using this mercury-vapor-removing device. Matrix effects are observed when using silicate glass reference materials as the external standards to assess the relationship of mass fractionation factors between Tl and Pb in sulfide samples, resulting in a maximum deviation of ∼0.20% for {sup 20x}Pb/{sup 204}Pb. Matrix-matched reference materials are therefore required for the highly precise and accurate Pb isotope analyses of sulfide samples. We investigated two sulfide samples, MASS-1 (the Unites States Geological Survey reference materials) and Sph-HYLM (a natural sphalerite), as potential candidates. Repeated analyses of the two proposed sulfide reference materials by LA-MC-ICP-MS yield good external reproducibility of <0.04% (RSD, k = 2) for {sup 20x}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and <0.06% (RSD, k = 2) for {sup 20x}Pb/{sup 204}Pb with the exception of {sup 20x}Pb/{sup 204}Pb in MASS-1, which provided an external reproducibility of 0.24% (RSD, k = 2). Because the concentration of Pb in MASS-1 (76 μg g{sup −1}) is ∼5.2 times lower than that in Sph-HYLM (394 ± 264 μg g{sup −1}). The in situ analytical results of MASS-1 and Sph-HYLM are consistent with the values obtained by solution MC-ICP-MS, demonstrating the reliability

  5. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmittner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air–sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air–sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air–sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air–sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface

  6. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase from methanogenic archaea: isotope effects on label exchange and ethane formation with the homologous substrate ethyl-coenzyme M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2013-10-09

    Ethyl-coenzyme M (CH3CH2-S-CH2CH2-SO3(-), Et-S-CoM) serves as a homologous substrate for the enzyme methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) resulting in the product ethane instead of methane. The catalytic reaction proceeds via an intermediate that already contains all six C-H bonds of the product. Because product release occurs after a second, rate-limiting step, many cycles of intermediate formation and reconversion to substrate occur before a substantial amount of ethane is released. In deuterated buffer, the intermediate becomes labeled, and C-H activation in the back reaction rapidly leads to labeled Et-S-CoM, which enables intermediate formation to be detected. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of this pre-equilibrium. (2)H- and (13)C-labeled isotopologues of Et-S-CoM were used as the substrates, and the time course of each isotopologue was followed by NMR spectroscopy. A kinetic simulation including kinetic isotope effects allowed determination of the primary and α- and β-secondary isotope effects for intermediate formation and for the C-H/C-D bond activation in the ethane-containing intermediate. The values obtained are in accordance with those found for the native substrate Me-S-CoM (see preceding publication, Scheller, S.; Goenrich, M.; Thauer, R. K.; Jaun, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, DOI: 10.1021/ja406485z) and thus imply the same catalytic mechanism for both substrates. The experiment by Floss and co-workers, demonstrating a net inversion of configuration to chiral ethane with CH3CDT-S-CoM as the substrate, is compatible with the observed rapid isotope exchange if the isotope effects measured here are taken into account.

  7. Isotope exchange reactions of the hydrogen H-5 of selected pyrimidine derivatives and the preparation of tritium-labeled pyrimidines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Jansa, Petr; Elbert, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 12 (2011), s. 1567-1577 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400550903; GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : isotopic labeling * NMR spectroscopy * nucleobases * pyrimidines Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  8. Iron(II)-Catalyzed Iron Atom Exchange and Mineralogical Changes in Iron-rich Organic Freshwater Flocs: An Iron Isotope Tracer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThomasArrigo, Laurel K; Mikutta, Christian; Byrne, James; Kappler, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2017-06-20

    In freshwater wetlands, organic flocs are often found enriched in trace metal(loid)s associated with poorly crystalline Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. Under reducing conditions, flocs may become exposed to aqueous Fe(II), triggering Fe(II)-catalyzed mineral transformations and trace metal(loid) release. In this study, pure ferrihydrite, a synthetic ferrihydrite-polygalacturonic acid coprecipitate (16.7 wt % C), and As- (1280 and 1230 mg/kg) and organic matter (OM)-rich (18.1 and 21.8 wt % C) freshwater flocs dominated by ferrihydrite and nanocrystalline lepidocrocite were reacted with an isotopically enriched 57 Fe(II) solution (0.1 or 1.0 mM Fe(II)) at pH 5.5 and 7. Using a combination of wet chemistry, Fe isotope analysis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we followed the Fe atom exchange kinetics and secondary mineral formation over 1 week. When reacted with Fe(II) at pH 7, pure ferrihydrite exhibited rapid Fe atom exchange at both Fe(II) concentrations, reaching 76 and 89% atom exchange in experiments with 0.1 and 1 mM Fe(II), respectively. XAS data revealed that it transformed into goethite (21%) at the lower Fe(II) concentration and into lepidocrocite (73%) and goethite (27%) at the higher Fe(II) concentration. Despite smaller Fe mineral particles in the coprecipitate and flocs as compared to pure ferrihydrite (inferred from Mössbauer-derived blocking temperatures), these samples showed reduced Fe atom exchange (9-30% at pH 7) and inhibited secondary mineral formation. No release of As was recorded for Fe(II)-reacted flocs. Our findings indicate that carbohydrate-rich OM in flocs stabilizes poorly crystalline Fe minerals against Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation by surface-site blockage and/or organic Fe(II) complexation. This hinders the extent of Fe atom exchange at mineral surfaces and secondary mineral formation, which may consequently impair Fe(II)-activated trace metal(loid) release. Thus, under short

  9. Isotopic Discrimination During Leaf Litter Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngao, J.; Rubino, M.

    2006-12-01

    Methods involving stable isotopes have been successfully applied since decades in various research fields. Tracing 13C natural abundance in ecosystem compartments greatly enhanced the understanding of the C fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere C exchanges when compartments present different C isotopic signatures (i.e. atmospheric CO2 vs photosynthetic leaves, C3 vs C4; etc.). However, the assumption that no isotopic discrimination occurs during respiration is commonly made in numbers of C isotope-based ecological studies. Furthermore, verifications of such assumption are sparse and not enough reliable. The aim of our study is to assess the potential isotopic discrimination that may occur during litter decomposition. Leaf litter from an Arbutus unedo (L.) stand (Tolfa, Italy) was incubated in 1L jars, under constant laboratory conditions (i.e. 25 ° C and 135% WC). During the entire incubation period, gravimetric mass loss, litter respiration rates and the isotopic composition of respired CO2 are monitored at regular intervals. Data from 7 months of incubation will be presented and discussed. After two months, the litter mass loss averaged 16% of initial dry mass. During the same time-period, the respiration rate decreased significantly by 58% of the initial respiration rate. Isotopic compositions of respired CO2 ranged between -27.95‰ and - 25.69‰. Mean values did not differ significantly among the sampling days, in spite of an apparent enrichment in 13C of respired CO2 with time. The significance of these isotopic enrichment will be determined at a longer time scale. They may reveal both/either a direct microbial discrimination during respiration processes and/or a use of different litter compounds as C source along time. Further chemical and compound-specific isotopic analysis of dry matter will be performed in order to clarify these hypotheses. This work is part of the "ALICE" project, funded by the European Union's Marie Curie Fellowship Actions that aims to

  10. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: measurement of individual amide hydrogen-exchange rates in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein using 13C NMR hydrogen/deuterium isotope shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, G.D.; Weiner, J.H.; Sykes, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen-exchange rates have been measured for individual assigned amide protons in M13 coat protein, a 50-residue integral membrane protein, using a 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) equilibrium isotope shift technique. The locations of the more rapidly exchanging amides have been determined. In D 2 O solutions, a peptide carbonyl resonance undergoes a small upfield isotope shift (0.08-0.09 ppm) from its position in H 2 O solutions; in 1:1 H 2 O/D 2 O mixtures, the carbonyl line shape is determined by the exchange rate at the adjacent nitrogen atom. M13 coat protein was labeled biosynthetically with 13 C at the peptide carbonyls of alanine, glycine, phenylalanine, proline, and lysine, and the exchange rates of 12 assigned amide protons in the hydrophilic regions were measured as a function of pH by using the isotope shift method. This equilibrium technique is sensitive to the more rapidly exchanging protons which are difficult to measure by classical exchange-out experiments. In proteins, structural factors, notably H bonding, can decrease the exchange rate of an amide proton by many orders of magnitude from that observed in the freely exposed amides of model peptides such as poly(DL-alanine). With corrections for sequence-related inductive effects, the retardation of amide exchange in sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized coat protein has been calculated with respect to poly(DL-alanine). The most rapidly exchanging protons, which are retarded very little or not at all, are shown to occur at the N- and C-termini of the molecule. A model of the detergent-solubilized coat protein is constructed from these H-exchange data which is consistent with circular dichroism and other NMR results

  11. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  12. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kuczynska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  13. Classical and quasi-classical trajectory calculations of isotope exchange and ozone formation proceeding through O+O2 collision complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas A.; Gellene, Gregory I.

    2002-10-01

    The isotope exchange reaction, and the three-body ozone formation rate proceeding through an ozone complex, have been studied by classical and quasi-classical trajectory techniques. The exchange rate studies indicate that the rate of this reaction is dominantly sensitive to the O+O2 entrance channel characteristics of the potential energy surface. A detailed consideration of the dynamics of the intermediate ozone complex reveals three important classes. In one class, the complex adopts an ozonelike geometry, largely undergoing asymmetric stretchinglike motion until it dissociates. In a second class, the oxygen atom and molecule never visit the ozonelike geometry but rather remain separated by relatively large distances trapped near the angular momentum barrier in the entrance channel of a pseudo-effective potential. These complexes, which cannot undergo exchange, are, nevertheless, found to contribute significantly to ozone formation at high density of the third body suggesting that the association of the high-density effective formation rate constant with twice the exchange rate may not be valid. The third class can be considered a hybrid of the first two, spending some time as an ozonelike complex and some time as a large atom-diatomic complex. This third class provides a mechanism for rearranging atom locations in the complex (e.g., end and middle position swapping) and, consequently, would not be well accounted for by statistical treatments of the ozone complex based on a single ozonelike reference geometry. In general, the survival time distributions of the complexes are found to be nonexponential. However, when the detailed survival time distributions are coupled with a Lennard-Jones collision model for the stabilization step, the experimental ozone formation rate can be adequately modeled over a broad range of temperature and density.

  14. Studies on Some Physical, Chemical and Sorption Properties of Some Inorganic ion Exchangers and Their Application to Radioactive Isotopes Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sweify, F.H.; Shehata, M.K.K.; El-Shazly, E.A.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the present work, amorphous zirconium phosphate, zirconium titanium phosphate and ceric tungstate have been synthesised. Solubility of the prepared ion exchangers in different media has been examined. These media were mineral acids, aqueous solutions of organic acids: oxalic, citric and tartaric as well as ammonium and potassium carbonate solutions of different molarities. I.R. analysis is applied on some samples of the prepared ion exchangers. Sorption behaviour of different metal ion species, of elements of nuclear significance on the prepared ion exchangers has been studied from aqueous media of different compositions and concentration under different experimental conditions. The studied metal ions are, Ce(III) and Eu(III), as representative for the trivalent lanthanides, Co(II), Zr(IV), Nb(V), Hf(IV), Te(IV), Ce(IV), Th(IV) and U(V I). Optimization of the conditions for the isolation and separation of the desired element species highlighted

  15. Isotopic Exchange Reaction Assisted with Cu (I) generated ''in situ'' For Synthesis of Ready-to-Use for on-the-spot Formulation of [131 I] Iodobenzyl Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaia, J.A.; Suliman, M.O.

    2007-01-01

    It has been examined that meta-Iodobenzylguanidine (m-IBG), para-Iodoamphetamine (p-IPA) and orth-Iodohippuric acid (o-IHA) are three commonly used Iodobenzyl derivative compounds, and can be formulated as Ready-to-Use Kits for on-the-spot labeling catalyzed with copper ion Cu+ (I) generated ''In Situ''. The labeling procedure efficiently has been established within 30 min of heating using an autoclave, 20 min. and 90 min. using dry heating block respectively. Isotopic exchange reaction with Iodine-131 radioactive of those three Ready-to-Use Kits has led to Radiochemical Purity ''RCP'' equals to 98%, > 98%, and almost 99%, and Radiochemical Yield ''RCY'' > 97%, >93% and > 98% respectively. Attention was paid to the Radiochemical Stability of those three Iodobenzyl derivatives for a period time of preservation at low temperature. As a result, this gave evidence that such Radiopharmaceuticals could be used as Ready-to-Use products at different times of preservations.

  16. Effect of isotopic hydrogen exchange on thermochemistry of solution of ammonium halides and deuteroammonium in water, heavy water and their mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    Standard dissolution enthalpies of ammonium and deuteroammonium bromides and iodides in water, heavy water and their mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at 298.15 K and compositions up to X=0.4 (X-mole part of DMSO) are presented. The influence of isotopic hydrogen exchange on the values of the standard dissolution enthalpies of NH 4 Cl, ND 4 Cl, NH 4 Br, ND 4 BR and NH 4 I in H 2 O, D 2 O and H 2 O (D 2 O)-DMSO mixture at 298.15 K, as well as of NH 4 Cl and ND 4 Cl in the same solvents at 323.15 K has been discussed. The values of NH 4 Cl and ND 4 Cl crystal lattice enthalpies have been compared. 15 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Comparison of the reactivity of the materials having two different kinds of functional groups by applying hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Yumoto, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between m- (or p-) aminobenzoic acid and HTO vapor has been observed in order to estimate the scale of the reactivity of the material. Each rate constant has been obtained by the A''-McKay plot method. Comparing the rate constants, the following three items have been confirmed: (1) the reactivity of both COOH and NH 2 groups increases with temperature; (2) the degree of the effect of the COOH (or NH 2 ) group on the reactivity in m-aminobenzoic acid is larger than that in p-aminobenzoic acid; (3) the A''-McKay plot method is useful in studying the reactivity of the materials not only with one (or the same kinds of) functional group(s), but also with two different kinds of functional groups. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions between HTO vapor and the sodium salts of o-, m-, and p-aminobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoko

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between HTO vapor and one of the sodium salts of o-, m-, and p-aminobenzoic acid (solid) was observed at 50 ∼ 80 degC. The acidity (acidity based on kinetic logic) for the materials at each temperature has been obtained with the A''-McKay plots based on the respective data obtained. The followings have been clarified by comparing these acidities (and the acidities obtained previously). 1) The acidity of aromatic amines can be expressed in terms of the acidity based on kinetic logic. 2) The reactivity of aromatic amine is strongly affected by both I-effect and R-effect. 3) It can be deduced that aromatic amines are more reactive than aliphatic amines. (author)

  19. Primary photosynthetic processes: from supercomplex to leaf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on photosynthetic complexes that cover the primary photosynthetic processes, from the absorption of light by photosynthetic pigments to a charge separation (CS) in the reaction center (RC). Fluorescence spectroscopy is a useful tool in

  20. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) and Carbon Dioxide Isotopes to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, B.; Still, C. J.; Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Whelan, M.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J. B.; Huang, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf- level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from four heights as well as the soil to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere for the growing season. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings also seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  1. Comparison of leaf gas exchange and stable isotope signature of water-soluble compounds along canopy gradients of co-occurring Douglas-fir and European beech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögelein, Rebekka; Hassdenteufel, Martin; Thomas, Frank M; Werner, Willy

    2012-07-01

    Combined δ(13) C and δ(18) O analyses of water-soluble leaf and twig phloem material were used to determine intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) and variability of stomatal conductance at different crown positions in adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees. Simultaneous gas exchange measurements allowed evaluation of the differences in calculating iWUE from leaf or phloem water-soluble compounds, and comparison with a semi-quantitative dual isotope model to infer variability of net photosynthesis (A(n) ) between the investigated crown positions. Estimates of iWUE from δ(13) C of leaf water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) outperformed the estimates from phloem compounds. In the beech crown, δ(13) C of leaf WSOM coincided clearly with gas exchange measurements. The relationship was not as reliable in the Douglas-fir. The differences in δ(18) O between leaf and phloem material were found to correlate with stomatal conductance. The semi-quantitative model approach was applicable for comparisons of daily average A(n) between different crown positions and trees. Intracanopy gradients were more pronounced in the beech than in the Douglas-fir, which reached higher values of iWUE at the respective positions, particularly under dry air conditions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Acquisition system of analysis and control data for the catalytic isotopic exchange module of the cryogenic pilot plant with mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retevoi, Carmen Maria; Cristescu, Ioana; Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion

    2000-01-01

    The main problem of the isotope exchange is the catalytic action of the reaction. In order to increase the economic efficiency it is suggested using the hydrophobic catalysts. The 'virtual instrument' which we design is made for monitoring the constant temperature of column, analysis and power supply commands for electrical heat exchangers. With the most popular signal conditioning product line, SCXI 1100 and DAQ hardware AT-MIO-16-XE-10 from National Instruments, we perform the multi-channel acquisition at DAQ boards rates. We chose signal conditioning owing to the following advantages: electrically isolation, transducer interfacing, signal amplification, filtering and high-speed channel multiplexing. The mathematical modeling allows us the equilibrium graphical representation of operating curve for system with equation H 2 O+HD -> HDO+H 2 . With Mc. Cobe-Thicle diagram there are determined the numbers of theoretical taller for different configurations of hydrophilic package / catalyst bed. Also, it is easy to monitor the operating parameter variation (L/G-liquid/gas, temperature, etc.) and feeding concentration on gaseous and liquid phase for separation performances. (authors)

  3. Using lead isotopes and trace element records from two contrasting Lake Tanganyika sediment cores to assess watershed – Lake exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odigie, Kingsley; Cohen, A.D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Flegal, R

    2014-01-01

    Lead isotopic and trace element records of two contrasting sediment cores were examined to reconstruct historic, industrial contaminant inputs to Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Observed fluxes of Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in age-dated sediments collected from the lake varied both spatially and temporally over the past two to four centuries. The fluxes of trace elements were lower (up to 10-fold) at a mid-lake site (MC1) than at a nearshore site (LT-98-58), which is directly downstream from the Kahama and Nyasanga River watersheds and adjacent to the relatively pristine Gombe Stream National Park. Trace element fluxes at that nearshore site did not measurably change over the last two centuries (1815–1998), while the distal, mid-lake site exhibited substantial changes in the fluxes of trace elements – likely caused by changes in land use – over that period. For example, the flux of Pb increased by ∼300% from 1871 to 1991. That apparent accelerated weathering and detrital mobilization of lithogenic trace elements was further evidenced by (i) positive correlations (r = 0.77–0.99, p factors (EF operations within the lake’s watershed over the past century. The data also indicate that the mid-lake site is a much more sensitive and useful recorder of environmental changes than the nearshore site. Furthermore, the lead isotopic compositions of sediment at the sites differed spatially, indicating that the Pb (and other trace elements by association) originated from different natural sources at the two locations.

  4. Historical review of short-lived isotope applications in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Production of short-lived isotopes, nitrogen 13, fluorine 18 and carbon 11 with a small Van de Graaff accelerator. Applications of these isotopes in uptake and photosynthetic translocation studies in plants, and fluorine tracing in dental studies

  5. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  6. Modeling of the Process of Three-Isotope (H, D, T) Exchange Between Hydrogen Gas and Water Vapour on Pt-SDBC Catalyst over a Wide Range of Deuterium Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Tchijov, A.S.; Uborsky, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The large scale studies of Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process in Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute showed a complicated influence of various factors on the process caused by the presence of two simultaneous isotope exchange sub processes: counter-current phase exchange (between liquid water and water vapour) and co-current catalytic exchange (between hydrogen gas and water vapour). A laboratory scale set-up of glass made apparatuses was established in such a way that it allows us to study phase and catalytic exchange apart. A computer model of the set-up has been developed.The catalytic isotope exchange model formulation is presented. A collection of reversible chemical reactions is accompanied by diffusion of the gaseous reactants and reaction products in the pores of catalyst carrier. This has some interesting features that are demonstrated. Thus it was noted that the flow rates ratio (gas to vapour - λ = G/V) as well as the concentrations of reactants exert influence on the process efficiency

  7. Controls of Net Ecosystem Exchange at an Old Field, a Pine Plantation, and a Hardwood Forest under Identical Climatic and Edaphic Conditions-Isotopic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanton, J. P.; Mortazavi, B.

    2004-11-04

    During the past year we have submitted two manuscripts. 1. Mortazavi, B., J. Chanton, J.L. Prater, A.C. Oishi, R. Oren and G. Katul. Temporal variability in 13C of respired CO2 in a pine and a hardwood forest subject to similar climatic conditions (in Press). Oecologia 2. Mortazavi, B. and J. P. Chanton. Use of Keeling plots for determining sources of dissolved organic carbon in nearshore and open ocean systems (Published in Limnology and Oceanography (2004) Vol 49 pages 102-108). 3. Mortazavi, B., J. L. Prater, and J. P. Chanton (2004). A field-based method for simultaneous measurements of the 18O and 13C of soil CO2 efflux. Biogeosciences Vol 1:1-16 Most recent products delivered: Mortazavi, B. and J. P. Chanton. Abiotic and biotic controls on the 13C of respired CO2 in the southeastern US forest mosaics and a new technique for measuring the of soil CO2 efflux. Joint Biosphere Stable Isotope Network (US) and Stable Isotopes in Biosphere Atmosphere Exchange (EU) 2004 Meeting, Interlaken, Switzerland, March 31-April 4, 2004. Mortazavi, B., J. Chanton, J.L. Prater, A.C. Oishi, R. Oren and G. Katul. Temporal variability in 13C of respired CO2 in a pine and a hardwood forest subject to similar climatic conditions. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA, December 8-12, 2003. Prater, J., Mortazavi, B. and J. P. Chanton. Measurement of discrimination against 13C during photosynthesis and quantification of the short-term variability of 13C over a diurnal cycle. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA, December 8-12, 2003.

  8. Drought Sensitivity of the Carbon Isotope Composition of Leaf Dark-Respired CO2 in C3 (Leymus chinensis) and C4 (Chloris virgata and Hemarthria altissima) Grasses in Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Shangzhi; Chai, Hua; Xu, Yueqiao; Li, Yan; Ma, Jian-Ying; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Whether photosynthetic pathway differences exist in the amplitude of nighttime variations in the carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 (δ13Cl) and respiratory apparent isotope fractionation relative to biomass (ΔR,biomass) in response to drought stress is unclear. These differences, if present, would be important for the partitioning of C3-C4 mixed ecosystem C fluxes. We measured δ13Cl, the δ13C of biomass and of potential respiratory substrates and leaf gas exchange in one C3 ...

  9. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of annual rings of pinus radiata provide an integrative record of canopy gas exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbour, M.M.; Farquhar, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Seasonal variation in δ 13 C and δ 18 O of cellulose from annual rings of Pinus radiata growing at each of three sites in New Zealand was measured. The three sites differed in annual water balance, temperature, and vapour pressure deficit, and these differences were reflected in cellulose δ 13 C and δ 18 O. Specific events such as drought or heavy rain were recorded as peaks and troughs in enrichment. A canopy-level combined photosynthesis and conductance model was linked to a model of soil water content and δ 18 O of xylem water to allow daily prediction of δ 13 C and δ 18 O of cellulose. A photosynthesis-weighted average of δ 13 C and δ 18 O was calculated for each sampling period. Each sample represented between 3 and 30 days, depending on stem growth rate. The timing and amplitude of changes in δ 13 C were predicted accurately by the model, while general seasonal patterns and event related peaks in δ 18 O enrichment were well predicted. These results suggest that stable isotope ratios of cellulose from annual rings reflect the canopy response to interactions between site-specific and seasonal variation in climatic conditions and soil water availability

  10. Information system for characterising emergency situations in H2O-H2S dual temperature isotopic exchange plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Anghel, Mihai; Pop, Floarea; Stefanescu, Ioan; Titescu, Gheorghe; Patrascu, Mihai; Watzlawek, Ervin; Cheresdi, Dorin

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In the frame of MENER project 'Information system for response in emergency situation', the National R and D Institute For Cryogenics And Isotopic Technologies - ICIT Rm. Valcea developed calculation programmes to characterise fourteen emergency situations. Emergency situations are presented when process fluids are discharged directly or not to environment. Release of hydrogen sulphide gas or water saturated with hydrogen sulphide into the water feed pipe, steam feed pipe, condense pipe, water distillation plant or waste treating plant represent emergency situations. The information system includes calculation programmes for process fluids break in automatic isolated enclosures, liquid, gas or liquefied gas discharge and atmospheric dispersion. The calculation programs allow including the human or not human intervention in starting the security systems (emergency stack, water inundation, liquid drainage). When the process fluids discharge directly to environment one presents on diagrams the discharge flow rates (local and/or stack), enclosure pressure and/or temperature and the atmospheric dispersion. When the process fluids discharge not directly to environment one presents on diagrams just the variation in time of local discharge flow. (authors)

  11. Production, purification and detergent exchange of isotopically labeled Bacillussubtilis cytochrome b₅₅₈ (SdhC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome b₅₅₈ of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillussubtilis is the membrane anchor subunit of the succinate:quinone oxidoreductase of the citric acid cycle. The cytochrome consists of the SdhC polypeptide (202 residues) and two protoheme IX groups that function in transmembrane electron transfer to menaquinone. The general structure of the cytochrome is known from extensive experimental studies and by comparison to Wolinellasuccinogenes fumarate reductase for which the X-ray crystal structure has been determined. Solution state NMR can potentially be used to identify the quinone binding site(s) and study, e.g. redox-linked, dynamics of cytochrome b₅₅₈. In this work we present an efficient procedure for the isolation of preparative amounts of isotopically labeled B. subtilis cytochrome b₅₅₈ produced in Escherichia coli. We have also evaluated several detergents suitable for NMR for their effectiveness in maintaining the cytochrome solubilized and intact for days at room temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physico-Chemical Study of the Separation of Calcium Isotopes by Chemical Exchange Between Amalgam and Salt Solutions; Etude physico-chimique de la separation des isotopes du calcium par echange chimique entre amalgame et solution saline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duie, P; Dirian, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique. Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    In a preliminary study of the isotopic exchange between Ca amalgam and aqueous or organic solutions of Ca salts, the main parameters governing the feasibility of a separation process based on these systems such as separation factor, exchange kinetics, rate of decomposition of the amalgam were investigated. The separation factor between {sup 40}Ca and {sup 46}Ca was found to be of the order of 1.02. The rate of the exchange reaction is rather low for aqueous solutions, extremely low for organic solutions. The amalgam seems not to be attacked by dimethyl-formamide solutions; but it is rapidly decomposed by aqueous solutions of Ca halides. This decomposition is slow in the case of aqueous solutions of calcium formate and still slower for Ca(OH){sub 2}; however, except in particular conditions, the observed rate is often much higher, owing to interfering reactions between amalgam and water vapor contained in H{sub 2} bubbles. (authors) [French] On a fait une etude preliminaire, pour des systemes amalgame de calcium - solution aqueuse ou organique de sels de calcium, des principaux parametres pouvant intervenir dans l'application d'un procede d'echange a l'enrichissement isotopique du calcium: facteur de separation, cinetique de l'echange, cinetique de la decomposition de l'amalgame. Les facteurs de separation {sup 40}Ca-{sup 46}Ca sont de l'ordre de 1,02. L'echange est assez lent pour les solutions aqueuses, extremement lent pour les solutions organiques. La decomposition de l'amalgame est pratiquement inexistante avec les solutions dans le dimethyl- formamide, appreciable pour les solutions alcooliques, rapide pour les solutions aqueuses d'halogenures; elle est normalement lente pour les solutions aqueuses de formiate et surtout de chaux, mais la decomposition est en general acceleree par une reaction parasite entre l'amalgame et l'eau a l'etat vapeur, reaction que l'on n'evite dans des conditions tres particulieres. (auteurs)

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  14. On the synthesis of radiofluorinated amino acids by isotope exchange based on the example of 6-[18F]Fluor-L-DOPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, F.M.

    2008-06-01

    In nuclear medical diagnosis, 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (6-[ 18 F]fluoro-LDOPA), an analogue of L-DOPA, is one of the few established radiopharmaceuticals used for the in vivo investigation of the presynaptic dopaminergic metabolism and of some kind of tumours via Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The presently used method of preparation of the radiotracer by electrophilic labelling is limited to low amounts of activity at high costs. Known nucleophilic syntheses, however, result either in insufficient enantiomeric purity or the known multi-step syntheses are hard to automate, due to their complexity. During this work a novel, easy to automate alternative for the preparation of 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA, was developed and evaluated, using a direct nucleophilic 18 F-fluorination of a protected amino acid derivative. The resulting product has a very high enantiomeric purity. At first, the general suitability of the (S)-BOC-BMI-derivatives for the synthesis of 18 F-labelled amino acids, used in this work, was investigated using a less complex precursor, which resulted in the amino acid 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosin via acidic hydrolysis. The preparation of a useful precursor for the nucleophilic 18 F-isotope substitution, namely the (2S,5S)-tert.-butyl- 5-(2-fluoro-5-formylbenzyl)-2-tert. -butyl-3-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidine-1-carbox= yl ate, was investigated in three general different ways. At first it was tried to obtain this product via formylation after coupling with the BOC-BMI, secondly via α,β-dehydro amino acid derivatives and finally via a systematic multi-step synthesis. Only the last mentioned way resulted in a precursor with sufficient purity that could be labelled. The radiochemical yield of the isotopic exchange was about 60 %. In the next step, the presented concept was modified to synthesize a precursor for the preparation of 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA. Only a combination of the protecting groups benzyl and THP resulted in the useful

  15. Use of the isotope flux ratio approach to investigate the C18O16O and 13CO2 exchange near the floor of a temperate deciduous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bartlett

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotopologues of CO2, such as 13CO2 and C18OO, have been used to study the CO2 exchange between land and atmosphere. The advent of new measuring techniques has allowed near-continuous measurements of stable isotopes in the air. These measurements can be used with micrometeorological techniques, providing new tools to investigate the isotope exchange in ecosystems. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of the isotope flux ratio method (IFR near the forest floor of a temperate deciduous forest and to study the temporal dynamics of δ18O of CO2 flux near the forest floor by comparing IFR estimates with estimates of δ18O of net soil CO2 flux provided by an analytical model. Mixing ratios of 12C16O2, 13CO2 and C16O18O were measured within and above a temperate deciduous forest, using the tunable diode laser spectroscopy technique. The half-hourly compositions of the CO2 flux near the forest floor (δ13CF and δ18OF were calculated by IFR and compared with estimates provided by a modified Keeling plot technique (mKP and by a Lagrangian dispersion analysis (WT analysis. The mKP and IFR δ18OF estimates showed good agreement (slope = 1.03 and correlation, R2 = 0.80. The δ13CF estimates from the two methods varied in a narrow range of −32.7 and −23‰; the mean (± SE mKP and IFR δ13CF values were −27.5‰ (±0.2 and −27.3‰ (±0.1, respectively, and were statistically identical (p>0.05. WT analysis and IFR δ18OF estimates showed better correlation (R2 = 0.37 when only turbulent periods (u*>0.6 m s−1 were included in the analysis. The large amount of data captured (~95 % of half-hour periods evaluated for the IFR in comparison with mKP (27 % shows that the former provides new opportunities for studying δ18OF dynamics within forest canopies. Values of δ18OF showed large temporal variation, with values ranging from −31.4‰ (DOY 208 to −11.2‰ (DOY 221. Precipitation events caused substantial variation (~8

  16. What Drives Carbon Isotope Fractionation by the Terrestrial Biosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Christopher; Rastogi, Bharat

    2017-11-01

    During photosynthesis, terrestrial plants preferentially assimilate the lighter and much more abundant form of carbon, 12C, which accounts for roughly 99% of naturally occurring forms of this element. This photosynthetic preference for lighter carbon is driven principally by differences in molecular diffusion of carbon dioxide with differing 13C/12C across stomatal pores on leaves, followed by differences in carboxylation rates by the Rubisco enzyme that is central to the process of photosynthesis. As a result of these slight preferences, which work out to about a 2% difference in the fixation rates of 12CO2 versus 13CO2 by C3 vegetation, plant tissues are depleted in the heavier form of carbon (13C) relative to atmospheric CO2. This difference has been exploited in a wide range of scientific applications, as the photosynthetic isotope signature is passed to ecosystem carbon pools and through ecological food webs. What is less appreciated is the signature that terrestrial carbon exchanges leave on atmospheric CO2, as the net uptake of carbon by land plants during their growing season not only draws down the local CO2 concentration, it also leaves behind relatively more CO2 molecules containing 13C. The converse happens outside the growing season, when autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration predominate. During these periods, atmospheric CO2 concentration increases and its corresponding carbon isotope composition becomes relatively depleted in 13C as the products of photosynthesis are respired, along with some small isotope fractionation that happen downstream of the initial photosynthetic assimilation. Similar phenomena were first observed at shorter time scales by the eminent carbon cycle scientist, Charles (Dave) Keeling. Keeling collected samples of air in glass flasks from sites along the Big Sur coast that he later measured for CO2 concentration and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in his lab (Keeling, 1998). From these samples, Keeling observed increasing

  17. Stable-isotope geochemistry of the Pierina high-sulfidation Au-Ag deposit, Peru: Influence of hydrodynamics on SO42--H2S sulfur isotopic exchange in magmatic-steam and steam-heated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifarek, R.H.; Rye, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    environment was unusually slow, which provided sufficient time for the uptake of groundwater and partial to complete SO42--H2S isotopic exchange. The slow steam velocities were likely related to the dispersal of the steam column as it entered the tuffs and possibly to intermediate exsolution rates from magmatic brine. The low ??D values may also partly reflect continuous degassing of the mineralizing magma. Similarly, data for steam-heated alunite (??34S=12.3??? to 27.2???; ??18OSO4=11.7??? to 13.0???; ??18OOH=6.6??? to 9.4???; ??D=-59??? to -42???) are unusual and indicate a strong magmatic influence, relatively high temperatures (140 to 180 ??C, based on ??18 OSO4-OH fractionations), and partial to complete sulfur isotopic exchange between steam-heated sulfate and H2S. Restricted lithologically controlled fluid flow in the host tuffs allowed magmatic condensate to supplant meteoric groundwater at the water table and create the high-temperature low-pH conditions that permitted unusually rapid SO42--H2S isotopic equilibration (50-300 days) and (or) long sulfate residence times for this environment. Late void-filling barite (??34S=7.4??? to 29.7???; ??18OSO4=-0.4??? to 15.1???) and later void-filling goethite (??18O=-11.8??? to 0.2???) document a transition from magmatic condensate to dominantly meteoric water in steam-heated fluids during cooling and collapse of the hydrothermal system. These steam-heated fluids oxidized the top ???300 m of the deposit by leaching sulfides, redistributing metals, and precipitating barite??acanthite??gold and goethite-hematite ??gold. Steam-heated oxidation, rather than weathering, was critical to forming the orebody in that it not only released encapsulated gold but likely enriched the deposit to ore-grade Au concentrations. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Isotope dilution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fudge, A.

    1978-12-15

    The following aspects of isotope dilution analysis are covered in this report: fundamental aspects of the technique; elements of interest in the nuclear field, choice and standardization of spike nuclide; pre-treatment to achieve isotopic exchange and chemical separation; sensitivity; selectivity; and accuracy.

  19. On the photosynthetic and devlopmental responses of leaves to the spectral composition of light

    OpenAIRE

    Hogewoning, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: action spectrum, artificial solar spectrum, blue light, Cucumis sativus, gas-exchange, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), light interception, light quality, non-photosynthetic pigments, photo-synthetic capacity, photomorphogenesis, photosystem excitation balance, quantum yield, red light. A wide range of plant properties respond to the spectral composition of irradiance, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, phototropism and photonastic movements. These responses affect plant pr...

  20. Development of a Method to Isolate Glutamic Acid from Foodstuffs for a Precise Determination of Their Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Masaharu; Yatsukawa, Yoichi; Tanabe, Soichi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2018-01-01

    Recent growing health awareness is leading to increasingly conscious decisions by consumers regarding the production and traceability of food. Stable isotopic compositions provide useful information for tracing the origin of foodstuffs and processes of food production. Plants exhibit different ratios of stable carbon isotopes (δ 13 C) because they utilized different photosynthetic (carbon fixation) pathways and grow in various environments. The origins of glutamic acid in foodstuffs can be differentiated on the basis of these photosynthetic characteristics. Here, we have developed a method to isolate glutamic acid in foodstuffs for determining the δ 13 C value by elemental analyzer-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) without unintended isotopic fractionation. Briefly, following acid-hydrolysis, samples were defatted and passed through activated carbon and a cation-exchange column. Then, glutamic acid was isolated using preparative HPLC. This method is applicable to measuring, with a low standard deviation, the δ 13 C values of glutamic acid from foodstuffs derived from C3 and C4 plants and marine algae.

  1. Isotopic separation by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction and the isotopic separation factor are first recalled; the principles of ion chromatography applied to lithium isotope separation are then reviewed (displacement chromatography) and the process is modelled in the view of dimensioning and optimizing the industrial process; the various dimensioning parameters are the isotopic separation factor, the isotopic exchange kinetics and the material flow rate. Effects of the resin type and structure are presented. Dimensioning is also affected by physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters. Industrial implementation features are also discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  2. [Effects of low-light stress on photosynthetic characteristics of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis in artificial domestication cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shun-lin; Tian, Meng-liang; Liu, Jin-liang; Zhao, Ting-ting; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-09-01

    To decide on the optimum artificial domestication cultivation light environment for Paris polyphylla var. chinensis through investigating the effect of light intensity on leaf's gas exchange parameters, photosynthetic parameters, light saturation point and compensation point of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. Different low-light stress gradients' effect on the growth of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis was compared with no low-light stress treatment through calculating leaf's gas exchange parameters, photosynthetic parameters, light saturation point and compensation point, and then all these parameters were statistically analyzed. Light intensity had significant influence on the photosynthetic characteristics of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. With the strengthening of the low-light stress, chlorophyll content, gas exchange parameters, photosynthetic parameters P., AQY and light saturation point all gradually increased at first, and then decreased. However, both photosynthetic parameters Rd and light compensation point firstly decreased and then rose again. These results showed that too strong or too weak light intensity affected the optimization of photosynthetic parameters of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. The optimal illuminance for each parameter was not completely same, but they could all reach a relative ideal state when the shading ranges between 40% and 60%. However, photosynthetic parameters deteriorated rapidly when the shading surpass 80%. For artificially cultivating Paris polyphylla var. chinensis in Baoxing,Sichuan or the similar ecological region, shading 40%-60% is the optimal light environment, which can enhance the photosynthesis of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis and promote the accumulation of photosynthetic products.

  3. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren eDubbert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated.The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43% and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to

  4. Phosphorus fertility recapitalization of nutrient-depleted tropical acid soils with reactive phosphate rock: An assessment using the isotopic exchange technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardeau, J.-C.; Zapata, F.

    2002-01-01

    A 'soil P fertility recapitalization' initiative utilizing large rates of phosphate rocks (PRs) was proposed to improve the soil P status and increase the sustainable food production in acid and P-deficient tropical soils. Two series of experiments were carried out using five tropical acid soils treated with heavy applications of Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR). In the first series, the soils were mixed with GPR at the following application rates: 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg P·kg -1 , and incubated for one month in moist conditions. In another series, 1000 mg P kg -1 applied as GPR was added to three soils and incubated for 1.5 month; thereafter 50 mg P kg -1 as triple superphosphate (TSP) were added. The 32 P isotopic exchange method was utilized to assess the contribution of GPR to the available soil P. Changes in amounts, E, of P transferred with time as phosphate ions from the soil particles to the soil solution as well as changes in pH, calcium and phosphate concentrations in soil suspensions were determined. It was found that: (i) the contribution of P from GPR to recapitalization of soil P fertility was mainly assessed by E pool size, pH, calcium and phosphate concentrations; other variables were not significant at the 0.1 level; (ii) heavy applications of GPR did not saturate all the P sorption sites, P freshly applied as water-soluble P was still sorbed; (iii) recapitalization of soil P fertility using GPR was partly obtained in some acid tropical soils; (iv) Upon dissolution, GPR provided calcium ions to crops and to soils, thus reducing Al toxicity, but its liming effect was limited. To explain these effects with heavy application rates of GPR, it was postulated that a coating of Al and Fe compounds is formed around PR particles with time, thus reducing further dissolution. (author)

  5. Special issue of photosynthetic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okamura, M.; Wraight, C.A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue of Photosynthesis Research honors Louis M. N. Duysens, Roderick K. Clayton, and George Feher, three pioneering researchers whose work on bacterial photosynthesis laid much of the groundwork for our understanding of the role of the reaction center in photosynthetic light energy

  6. Pion double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1978-01-01

    The pion double charge exchange data on the oxygen isotopes is reviewed and new data on 9 Be, 12 C, 24 Mg, and 28 Si are presented. Where theoretical calculations exist, they are compared to the data. 9 references

  7. Photosynthetic characteristics of Lycoris aurea and monthly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaf photosynthetic characteristics of Lycoris aurea, the monthly dynamics in lycorine and galantamine contents in its bulb and the correlation among the photosynthetic characteristics and the lycorine and galantamine during the annual growth period were studied by using LI-6400 portable photosynthetic measurement ...

  8. Seasonal photosynthetic activity in evergreen conifer leaves monitored with spectral reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. Y.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal evergreen conifers must maintain photosynthetic systems in environments where temperatures vary greatly across seasons from high temperatures in the summer to freezing levels in the winter. This involves seasonal downregulation and photoprotection during periods of extreme temperatures. To better understand this downregulation, seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis of lodgepole (Pinus contorta D.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa D.) were monitored in Edmonton, Canada over two years. Spectral reflectance at the leaf and stand scales was measured weekly and the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), often used as a proxy for chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment levels and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), was used to track the seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity. Additional physiological measurements included leaf pigment content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and gas exchange. All the metrics indicate large seasonal changes in photosynthetic activity, with a sharp transition from winter downregulation to active photosynthesis in the spring and a more gradual fall transition into winter. The PRI was a good indicator of several other variables including seasonally changing photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic LUE, and pigment pool sizes. Over the two-year cycle, PRI was primarily driven by changes in constitutive (chlorophyll:carotenoid) pigment levels correlated with seasonal photosynthetic activity, with a much smaller variation caused by diurnal changes in xanthophyll cycle activity (conversion between violaxanthin & zeaxanthin). Leaf and canopy scale PRI measurements exhibited parallel responses during the winter-spring transition. Together, our findings indicate that evergreen conifers photosynthetic system possesses a remarkable degree of resilience in response to large temperature changes across seasons, and that optical remote sensing can be used to observe the seasonal effects on photosynthesis and

  9. To problem of experimental determination of parameters of μ-atom charge-exchange process of hydrogen isotopes on He nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Stolupin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of μ-atomic and μ-molecular processes occuring in hydrogen isotopes-helium mixture is observed. The expressions are obtained to determine the parameters of a process of the muon transition from hydrogen isotope μ atoms to helium nuclei with the use of different experimental methods. 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  11. Detecting in-field variation in photosynthetic capacity of trangenically modifed plants with hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, K.; Montes, C.; Pederson, T.; Wu, J.; Guan, K.; Bernacchi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Improved photosynthetic rates have been shown to increase crop biomass, making improved photosynthesis a focus for driving future grain yield increases. Improving the photosynthetic pathway offers opportunity to meet food demand, but requires high throughput measurement techniques to detect photosynthetic variation in natural accessions and transgenically modified plants. Gas exchange measurements are the most widely used method of measuring photosynthesis in field trials but this process is laborious and slow, and requires further modeling to estimate meaningful parameters and to upscale to the plot or canopy level. In field trials of tobacco with modifications made to the photosynthetic pathway, we infer the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco (Vcmax) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) and detect photosynthetic variation from hyperspectral imaging with a partial least squares regression technique. Ground-truth measurements from photosynthetic gas exchange, a full-range (400-2500nm) handheld spectroadiometer with leaf clip, hyperspectral indices, and extractions of leaf pigments support the model. The results from a range of wild-type cultivars and from genetically modified germplasm suggest that the opportunity for rapid selection of top performing genotypes from among thousands of plots. This research creates the opportunity to extend agroecosystem models from simplified "one-cultivar" generic parameterization to better represent a full suite of current and future crop cultivars for a wider range of environmental conditions.

  12. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  13. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF/sub 3/ gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF/sub 3/. Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF/sub 3/ solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references.

  14. Melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of isotope exchange between melatonin and deuterium (D 2 O) or tritium (HTO) oxide under different conditions. The ease of isotope exchange for the indole ring hydrogens of melatonin in an acidic medium decreases over the series H 4 > H 2 H 6 >> H 7 , enabling the authors to process a route for production of melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at positions 4,6, and 2 of the indole ring. A method has been suggested for producing melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at position 2 by desulfurization of 2-(2,4-dinitro-phenylsulfenyl)melatonin at Ni(Re) (D)

  15. Melatonin labelled by hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope exchange of melatonin with deuterium (D 2 O) and tritium (HTO) oxides under different conditions is studied. Simplicity of isotope exchange of hydrogens of the indole ring of melatonin in the acidic medium decreases in series H 4 >H 2 >H 6 >>H 7 , that permits to suggest the way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in positions 4,6 and 2 of the indole ring. The way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in position 2 according to the reaction of desulfation 2-(2,4-dinitrophenylsulphenyl) melatonin at catalyst Ni(Re)(D) is suggested

  16. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF 3 gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF 3 . Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF 3 solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references

  17. Isotope effect and isotope separation. A chemist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    What causes the isotope effects (IE)? This presentation will be centered around the equilibrium isotope effects due to the differences in the nuclear masses. The occurrence of the equilibrium constant, K, of isotope exchange reactions which differ from the values predicted by the classical theory of statistical mechanics, K cl , is explored. The non-classical K corresponds to the unit-stage separation factor, α, that is different from unity and forms a basis of an isotope separation process involving the chemical exchange reaction. Here, the word 'chemical exchange' includes not only the isotope exchange chemical reactions between two or more chemical species but also the isotope exchanges involving the equilibria between liquid and vapor phases and liquid-gas, liquid solution-gas, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid phases. In Section I, origins of the isotope effect phenomena will be explored and, in the process, various quantities used in discussions of isotope effect that have often caused confusions will be unambiguously defined. This Section will also correlate equilibrium constant with separation factor. In Section II, various forms of temperature-dependence of IE and separation factor will be discussed. (author)

  18. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D 2 O, EtOD, or ND 3 as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND 3 , D 2 O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables

  19. The effect of leaf age on the photosynthetic rate of Themeda triandra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The apparent photosynthesis of progressively older leaves of Themeda triandra was recorded in a controlled environment by means of gas exchange measurements. Photosynthetic rate increased with increasing leaf age and was maximal in the third fully expanded leaf. Thereafter, photosynthesis dropped sharply, but the ...

  20. Rhodium trichloride as a homogeneous catalyst for isotopic hydrogen exchange. Comparison with heterogeneous rhodium in the deuteriation of aromatic compounds and alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, M R; Garnett, J L; Gregor, I K; Hannan, W; Hoa, K; Long, M A [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia)

    1975-12-03

    The use of rhodium trichloride as a homogeneous catalyst for the exchange of aromatic compounds and alkanes is described; comparison of the results with corresponding data from heterogeneous rhodium metal and other homogeneous systems, e.g., platinum and iridium, supports the proposal that specific type of ..pi..-complex mechanisms are common to all such exchange systems.

  1. Enhanced photosynthetic efficiency in trees world-wide by rising atmospheric CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Ina; Wieloch, Thomas; Groenendijk, Peter; Vlam, Mart; van der Sleen, Peter; Zuidema, Pieter A.; Robertson, Iain; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration is increasing rapidly due to anthropogenic emissions but the effect on the Earth's biosphere is poorly understood. The ability of the biosphere to fix CO2 through photosynthesis will determine future atmospheric CO2 concentrations as well as future productivity of crops and forests. Manipulative CO2 enrichment experiments (e.g. FACE) are limited to (i) short time spans, (ii) few locations and (iii) large step increases in [CO2]. Here, we apply new stable isotope methodology to tree-ring archives, to study the effect of increasing CO2 concentrations retrospectively during the past centuries. We cover the whole [CO2] increase since industrialization, and sample trees with global distribution. Instead of isotope ratios of whole molecules, we use intramolecular isotope distributions, a new tool for tree-ring analysis with decisive advantages. In experiments on annual plants, we have found that the intramolecular distribution of deuterium (equivalent to ratios of isotopomer abundances) in photosynthetic glucose depends on growth [CO2] and reflects the metabolic flux ratio of photosynthesis to photorespiration. By applying this isotopomer methodology to trees from Oak Ridge FACE experiment, we show that this CO2 response is present in trees on the leaf level. This CO2 dependence constitutes a physiological signal, which is transferred to the wood of the tree rings. In trees from 13 locations on all continents the isotopomer ratio of tree-ring cellulose is correlated to atmospheric [CO2] during the past 200 years. The shift of the isotopomer ratio is universal for all 12 species analyzed, including both broad-leafed trees and conifers. Because the trees originate from sites with widely differing D/H ratios of precipitation, the generality of the response demonstrates that the signal is independent of the source isotope ratio, because it is encoded in an isotopomer abundance ratio. This decoupling of climate signals and physiological

  2. The genesis and isotopic composition of carbonates associated with some Permian Australian coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, K.W.; Smith, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Siderite and calcite are the two forms of carbonate commonly associated with Permian Australian coals. The former occurs as disseminated spherulites and is a product of the early post-depositional environment. Isotopic measurements show that the CO 2 fixed as siderite did not result from the direct oxidation of photosynthetically derived materials, but rather from the anaerobic fermentation of these. The higher concentrations of calcite are generally found towards the roofs of coal seams and are characterized by isotopic enrichments to delta 13 C values of +25% PDB. Isotopic exchange between CO 2 and CH 4 within the coal seam is postulated as the mechanism which leads to the formation of isotopically heavy CO 2 . At sites along the seam margins where the CO 2 escapes, interaction with circulating metal ions or preexisting calcite results in the deposition of ''heavy'' calcite. With increasing alteration of coal by thermal metamorphism, the 13 C content of calcites and finally siderites decreases so that it more nearly approaches that of the associated coal. (Auth.)

  3. Photosynthetic light reactions at the gold interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In the project described in this thesis we studied a simple bio-electronic device for solar energy conversion by surface-assembly of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes on a bare gold-electrode. Optical excitation of the photosynthetic pigments gives rise to charge separation in the so-called

  4. Continuous-flow IRMS technique for determining the 17O excess of CO2 using complete oxygen isotope exchange with cerium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrozek, D. J.; Van Der Veen, C.; Kliphuis, M.; Kaiser, J.; Wiegel, A. A.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical system for analysis of all single substituted isotopologues (12C16O17O, 12C16O18O, 13C16O16O) in nanomolar quantities of CO2 extracted from atmospheric air samples. CO2 is separated from bulk air by gas chromatography and CO2 isotope ratio measurements (ion masses

  5. Application of the isotopic index in isotope geochemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, H.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described which allows to calculate approximately isotope exchange equilibria between different crystalline silicates. The algorithm uses a newly introduced isotopic index. It is defined using isotopic increments of the variant types of silicatic bonds. This isotopic index gives a quantitative measure of the ability to enrich 18 O or 30 Si, respectively. The dependence of isotopic fractionations on temperature can be calculated approximately by means of the isotopic index, too. On this theoretical base some problems of magmatism and two varieties of an isotope geochemical model of the evolution of the Earth's crust are treated. Finally, the possibility is demonstrated to give prognostic statements about the likelihood of ore bearing of different granites. (author)

  6. Electrolyte control of photosynthetic electron transport in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Ion-permeable cells (permeaplasts) of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans were prepared enzymatically and were characterized with respect to several structural and functional indices. The permeaplasts contain intact, ion-impermeable thylakoids and are photosynthetically active. The authors discuss how, employing these cells, they investigated the effects of cations, acting either on the outer, or on the inner thylakoid membrane surface, on photoinduced electron exchanges with anionic donors (Cyt c-550, plastocyanin, innersurface), or anionic acceptors (FeCN 3- ; outer surface). Cations accelerate such exchanges by accumulating near the solution-membrane interfaces and screening the negative surface charge of membranes. Electrostatic screening, however, is not the only contributing factor, and other electrolyte-linked influences must be invoked in order to interpret the experimental observations

  7. Investigation on the structure of thiocyanatoruthenate (3) complex by isotopic exchange method in the system [Ru(SCN)6]-3-S14CN-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajda, S.; Rachlewicz, K.

    1973-01-01

    Because of the discrepancy in the literature data and the difficulties in the synthesis of Ru(3) thiocyanate complexes, an attempt was made to obtain them under different conditions than usual. Our attempts turned out to be successful. This allowed to examine the radioisotopic exchange in the system [Ru(SCN) 6 ] -3 -S 14 CN - . The experimental data indicated that the thiocyanate groups in the complex are nonequivalent and exchange with various rate. The two groups in the axial plane exchange with a rate by two orders higher than the remaining four groups in the equatorial plane. On this ground the electronic structure of the examined complex was discussed and its symmetry was determined. (author)

  8. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in water medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 2. Radiocyanide ligand exchange study between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in water solutions of mineral acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiocyanide ligand exchange between potassium octacyanotungstate(4) and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid and between octacyanotungstic(4) acid and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions have been investigated experimentally. The observed enhancement of the rate of ligand exchange in acidic medium has been rationalized in terms of the proposed new general reaction scheme taking into account the reversible decomposition of complex cyanide at low pH, and irreversible one at high pH. The discussion on the results obtained has been carried out within the framework of derived formal kinetic equations. (author)

  9. Multilayer models of photosynthetic membranes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocklehurst, J R; Flanagan, M T

    1982-01-01

    The primary aim of this project has been to build an artificial membrane in which is incorporated, in a functional state, the protein bacteriorhodopsin responsible for generating an electrical potential difference across the membrane of the photosynthetic bacterium, halobacterium halobium, and to investigate the use of this artificial system as the basis of a solar cell. the bacteriorhodopsin has been incorporated into Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers. If ths supporting filter is then illuminated, a potential difference is generated between the two compartments. The lipid in the filter appears to act as a charge carrier for protons, the charge species that forms the electrochemical gradient generated by the bacteriorhodopsin when this molecule absorbs light. The internal resistances of such solar cells were determined and found to be so high that the cells could not be seriously considered as competitors with classical semiconductor cells. Multilayerswere deposited onto filters in which ion carriers that make the filters permeable to sodium ions had been dissolved in the paraffin. The photovoltage obtained indicated that protons transferred from one side of the filter to the other by the action of the bacteriorhodopsin were bing exchanged for sodium ions. A secondary aim of the project has been to examine the possibility of depositing mixed multilayers of a dye and a long chain quinone onto a semiconductor surface. A sensitizing multilayer has been prepared and the mobility of long chain quinones within the layers is high enough to warrant further research. However, it was found that, with the dyes and quinones used, quenched complexes were formed which would not act as sensitizers.

  10. Photosynthetic pathway types of evergreen rosette plants (Liliaceae) of the Chihuahuan desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Paul R; Gardetto, Pietra E

    1982-11-01

    Diurnal patterns of CO 2 exchange and titratable acidity were monitored in six species of evergreen rosette plants growing in controlled environment chambers and under outdoor environmental conditions. These patterns indicated that two of the species, Yucca baccata and Y. torreyi, were constituitive CAM plants while the other species, Y. elata, Y. campestris, Nolina microcarpa and Dasylirion wheeleri, were C 3 plants. The C 3 species did not exhibit CAM when grown in any of several different temperature, photoperiod, and moisture regimes. Both photosynthetic pathway types appear adapted to desert environments and all species show environmentally induced changes in their photosynthetic responses consistent with desert adaptation. The results of this study do not indicate that changes in the photosynthetic pathway type are an adaptation in any of these species.

  11. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction under fluctuating light in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Isik; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    for photosynthetic induction. Gas exchange measurements were used to investigate the rate of induction and the opening of stomata. It was determined that induction equilibrium for C. morifolium at varying temperatures under dynamic light conditions was reached within 15 to 45 minutes except at saturating light...... intensity. For the same photon irradiance, the momentary state of induction equilibrated was higher approximately at 30° C and it decreased as temperature increased. The interaction effect of irradiance and temperature on induction equilibrium was not significant. The rate of photosynthetic induction...... and the time that it reached its 90% value (t90) was influenced by irradiance significantly. The light history of a leaf had a significant effect on t90, which indicated that an equilibrium state of induction will not always be reached within the same time. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction...

  12. Preparation of deuterated heterocyclic five-membered ring compounds (furan, thiophene, pyrrole, and derivatives) by base-catalyzed hydrogen isotope exchange with deuterium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, K.H.; Herrmann, M.; Moebius, G.; Sprinz, H.

    1984-01-01

    Several deuterated heterocyclic compounds of the type of furan,thiophene and pyrrole were prepared by base-catalyzed proton exchange with deuterium oxide at temperatures above 423 K in a closed system. The determination of deuterium and its distribution within the molecules was carried out by mass spectrometry and 1 H nmr spectrometry. (author)

  13. Hydrogen exchange rate of tyrosine hydroxyl groups in proteins as studied by the deuterium isotope effect on C(zeta) chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, Jungoo; Ono, Akira Mei; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2009-12-30

    We describe a new NMR method for monitoring the individual hydrogen exchange rates of the hydroxyl groups of tyrosine (Tyr) residues in proteins. The method utilizes (2S,3R)-[beta(2),epsilon(1,2)-(2)H(3);0,alpha,beta,zeta-(13)C(4);(15)N]-Tyr, zeta-SAIL Tyr, to detect and assign the (13)C(zeta) signals of Tyr rings efficiently, either by indirect (1)H-detection through 7-8 Hz (1)H(delta)-(13)C(zeta) spin couplings or by direct (13)C(zeta) observation. A comparison of the (13)C(zeta) chemical shifts of three Tyr residues of an 18.2 kDa protein, EPPIb, dissolved in H(2)O and D(2)O, revealed that all three (13)C(zeta) signals in D(2)O appeared at approximately 0.13 ppm ( approximately 20 Hz at 150.9 MHz) higher than those in H(2)O. In a H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) mixture, however, one of the three signals for (13)C(zeta) appeared as a single peak at the averaged chemical shifts, and the other two appeared as double peaks at exactly the same chemical shifts in H(2)O and D(2)O, in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.6) at 40 degrees C. These three peaks were assigned to Tyr-36, Tyr-120, and Tyr-30, from the lower to higher chemical shifts, respectively. The results indicate that the hydroxyl proton of Tyr-120 exchanges faster than a few milliseconds, whereas those of Tyr-30 and Tyr-36 exchange more slowly. The exchange rate of the Tyr-30 hydroxyl proton, k(ex), under these conditions was determined by (13)C NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) to be 9.2 +/- 1.1 s(-1). The Tyr-36 hydroxyl proton, however, exchanges too slowly to be determined by EXSY. These profound differences among the hydroxyl proton exchange rates are closely related to their relative solvent accessibility and the hydrogen bonds associated with the Tyr hydroxyl groups in proteins.

  14. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabicar, J.; Stamberg, K.; Katzer, J.

    1983-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by the method of controlled distribution is claimed. A first phase is either a solution of isotopic components and a ligand (from 10 - 6 M to a saturated solution), or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components, or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components and an inert gas. The isotopes are in the starting mixture in molar ratio from 1:10 5 to 1:10 - 5 . The second phase is a solid sorbent such as styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchangers, or bio-sorbents on the basis of mycelium of lower fungi and sorbents on the basis of cellulose, or an extraction agent such as tributyl phosphate and trioctyl amine, if need be, kept by a carrier such as teflon, silica gel and cellulose. The two-phase system exhibits non-linear equilibrium isotherm for sorption and/or desorption or for extraction and/or re-extraction. After bringing both phases into contact the rate of transport of isotopic components from one phase into another is not equal. Retardation of isotopic exchange takes place by complexation of isotopes with ligands such as cabonate, sulphate, citrate, chloride and ethylenediamine tetraacetate ions, or by using sorbents and extraction agents with chelating functional groups such as carboxyl and hyroxyl groups, groups on the basis of phosphorus, nitrogen and sulphur and/or by operating in darkness, or in the light having wave length between 2.5x10 2 and 10 9 nm. The contact time is between 10 - 2 and 10 6 s, temperature between 10 2 and 10 3 K, the number of stirrer revolutions between 10 - 2 and 10 4 revolutions per s, flow rate at column arrangement between 10 - 6 and 10 - 1 m/s and the size of particles of sorbent between 10 - 6 and 10 - 2 m

  15. Stable isotopes, δ18O and δ2H, in the study of water balance of Lake Massoko, Tanzania: Investigation of the exchange between lake and underground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergonzini, L.; Gibert, E.; Winckel, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The stable oxygen and deuterium isotope compositions of a lake depend upon its water balance. Therefore the balance equations of stable isotopes, which imply calculation of the composition of evaporating moisture α E , provide information for assessing the water balance. In most cases, this approach is used to investigate the relationships between lakes and groundwater. Lake Massoko (8 deg. 20'S, 33 deg. 45'E, 870 m.a.s.l.) is a freshwater maar-lake without surface outlet. The lake surface and its runoff area cover 0.38 and 0.55 km 2 respectively. In contrast with the mean annual rainfall in the other parts of south Tanzania (1000-1200 mm y -1 ), the presence of Lake Malawi to the South, and the high ranges to the North (Mounts Poroto, Rungwe and Livingstone) imply local climatic features. Air masses overloaded with humidity bypassing Lake Malawi are submitted, especially in April, to ascending currents, producing rainfalls up to 2450 mm y -1 over Massoko area. Because of the evaporation rate from the lake's surface (around 2100 mm y -1 ) and without taking into account the runoff from the drainage basin, hydrological balance is positive and imply underground lost. One of most difficult points in the establishment of the isotope balances is the calculation of the composition of the evaporated water (δ E ), which requires an estimation of the isotopic composition of the water vapour in the atmosphere over the lake (δ Atm ). Without direct measurements, two ways can be used for the determination of the vapour composition (i) equilibrium with precipitation and reconstitution from them, or (ii) calculation from the balances of a terminal lake of the region. Both approaches are presented and compared, but only the second one allows physical solutions. δ Atm determined from Lake Rukwa hydrological and isotope balances has been used to calculate values for δ E over Lake Massoko. The estimation of δ Atm obtained from Lake Rukwa budgets presents a deuterium

  16. Growth of the C4 dicot Flaveria bidentis: photosynthetic acclimation to low light through shifts in leaf anatomy and biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengelly, Jasper J L; Sirault, Xavier R R; Tazoe, Youshi; Evans, John R; Furbank, Robert T; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2010-09-01

    In C(4) plants, acclimation to growth at low irradiance by means of anatomical and biochemical changes to leaf tissue is considered to be limited by the need for a close interaction and coordination between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Here differences in relative growth rate (RGR), gas exchange, carbon isotope discrimination, photosynthetic enzyme activity, and leaf anatomy in the C(4) dicot Flaveria bidentis grown at a low (LI; 150 micromol quanta m(2) s(-1)) and medium (MI; 500 micromol quanta m(2) s(-1)) irradiance and with a 12 h photoperiod over 36 d were examined. RGRs measured using a 3D non-destructive imaging technique were consistently higher in MI plants. Rates of CO(2) assimilation per leaf area measured at 1500 micromol quanta m(2) s(-1) were higher for MI than LI plants but did not differ on a mass basis. LI plants had lower Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities and chlorophyll content on a leaf area basis. Bundle sheath leakiness of CO(2) (phi) calculated from real-time carbon isotope discrimination was similar for MI and LI plants at high irradiance. phi increased at lower irradiances, but more so in MI plants, reflecting acclimation to low growth irradiance. Leaf thickness and vein density were greater in MI plants, and mesophyll surface area exposed to intercellular airspace (S(m)) and bundle sheath surface area per unit leaf area (S(b)) measured from leaf cross-sections were also both significantly greater in MI compared with LI leaves. Both mesophyll and bundle sheath conductance to CO(2) diffusion were greater in MI compared with LI plants. Despite being a C(4) species, F. bidentis is very plastic with respect to growth irradiance.

  17. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices. (topical reviews)

  18. Separation, identification and quantification of photosynthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty one photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls, carotenoids and degradation products) from the seaweeds, Codium dwarkense, (Chlorophyta), , Laurencia obtusa , (Rhodophyta) and , Lobophora variegata, (Phaeophyta), were separated in a single-step procedure by reversed phase high-performance liquid ...

  19. Photosynthetic recovery and acclimation to excess light intensity in the rehydrated lichen soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    Full Text Available As an important successional stage and main type of biological soil crusts (BSCs in Shapotou region of China (southeastern edge of Tengger Desert, lichen soil crusts (LSCs often suffer from many stresses, such as desiccation and excess light intensity. In this study, the chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 exchange in the rehydrated LSCs were detected under a series of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR gradients to study the photosynthetic acclimation of LSCs. The results showed that although desiccation leaded to the loss of photosynthetic activity in LSCs, the fluorescence parameters including Fo, Fv and Fv/Fm of LSCs could be well recovered after rehydration. After the recovery of photosynthetic activity, the effective photosynthetic efficiency ΦPSII detected by Imaging PAM had declined to nearly 0 within both the lichen thallus upper and lower layers when the PAR increased to 200 μE m-2 s-1, however the net photosynthesis detected by the CO2 gas analyzer in the LSCs still appeared when the PAR increased to 1000 μE m-2 s-1. Our results indicate that LSCs acclimating to high PAR, on the one hand is ascribed to the special structure in crust lichens, making the incident light into the lichen thallus be weakened; on the other hand the massive accumulation of photosynthetic pigments in LSCs also provides a protective barrier for the photosynthetic organisms against radiation damage. Furthermore, the excessive light energy absorbed by crust lichens is also possibly dissipated by the increasing non-photochemical quenching, therefore to some extent providing some protection for LSCs.

  20. Oxygen Concentration Inside a Functioning Photosynthetic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A.; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic...

  1. Stable Isotope Signatures of Carbon and Nitrogen to Characterize Exchange Processes and Their Use for Restoration Projects along the Austrian Danube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, T. [Wasser Cluster Lunz, Lunz-See and Institute of Hydrobiology and Aquatic Ecosystem Management, University for Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, (Austria); Bondar-Kunze, E. [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Welti, N. [Institute of Hydrobiology and Aquatic Ecosystem Management, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    The size and composition of an organic matter pool and its sources is a fundamental ecosystem property of river networks. River ecosystems are known to receive large amounts of terrestrial organic matter from catchments, still the question is to what extent aquatic sources influence riverine food webs or at least some components of these food webs. To identify different sources and their potential biological availability at the ecosystem level, we propose using stable isotope signatures of carbon and nitrogen and their respective elemental ratios. In this study, we used these parameters to evaluate river restoration measures. The target of the restoration was to improve surface connectivity between the main channel of the Danube downstream from Vienna and a side arm system within a floodplain. Analyses of the natural abundance of stable isotopes revealed that the restored side arm system showed distinct differences in the particulate organic matter pool in relation to hydrological connectivity. At low water levels, aquatic sources dominate in the side arm system, while at high water levels riverine organic matter is the dominating source. At medium connectivity levels aquatic sources also prevail in the side arm, thus an export of bio-available organic matter into the main channel can be expected. Based on these measurements, the increased - but hydrologically controlled - phytoplankton production was assessed and through this information, changes in ecosystem function were evaluated. (author)

  2. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Blankenship, Robert E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Frank, Harry A. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  3. Determination of wine authenticity and geographical origin by measuring non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in wine ethanol with EIM-IRMS® methodology in combination with δ18O values obtained from wine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajlovic, Ivan; Glavanovic, Mirko; Sparks, Kimberlee L.; Sparks, Jed P.; Jovic, Slobodan

    2014-05-01

    Wine consumption has grown significantly in the last two decades, with the United States being the leading consumer of wine in the world. It is also the second largest wine producer and importer after the European Union, which consists of 27 European countries. The world has seen a significant increase in production from new world countries, especially the United States, Australia and Chile, and wine imports have grown significantly with this globalization. The quality and authenticity of products have become critical concerns. With the amount of wine being imported the need for verifying wine authenticity and understanding procedures used in wine making has become more important than ever. Understanding the origin of consumed wine in rapidly expanding global economy has become fundamental in order to control quality and protect consumers. In our previous scientific work we have shown that EIM-IRMS®, Ethanol Isotope Measurement - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (EIM-IRMS®), is capable of providing unique molecular fingerprint that cannot be reproduced or counterfeited. Today we know that δ18O value from the wine water is one of the most important parameters which can give information about wine geographical origin. Earlier we have suggested that grape juice or grape pulp is a closed biochemical system in which all chemical compounds stand in dynamic equilibrium and are in direct connection with each other. Taking that into consideration we have concluded that if system is genuine and if no water, or no sugar has been added to the grape must or grape juice prior to alcoholic fermentation, then ethanol which is made in process of alcoholic fermentation will have specific δD value of non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes which will be in range from -205 to -215 ‰ vs. V-SMOW. In this work we will show that this value, which we named δDn (non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in ethanol), is very important because it can support or refute conclusions

  4. Comparison of 18O Isotopic Exchange After and During the Interaction of N2O, NO and NO2 with Fe Ions in Ferrierites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 89, 3/4 (2003), s. 243-247 ISSN 1011-372X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4040016; GA MŠk OC D15.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Fe-ferrierite * N oxides * 18O2 exchange Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.581, year: 2003

  5. Carbon isotope discrimination of arctic and boreal biomes inferred from remote atmospheric measurements and a biosphere-atmosphere model - art. no. 1028

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randerson, J.T.; Still, C.J.; Balle, J.J.; Fung, I.Y.; Doney, S.C.; Tans, P.P.; Conway, T.J.; White, J.W.C.; Vaughn, B.; Suits, N.; Denning, A.S. [CALTECH, Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geology & Planetary Science

    2002-07-01

    Estimating discrimination against C-13 during photosynthesis at landscape, regional, and biome scales is difficult because of large-scale variability in plant stress, vegetation composition, and photosynthetic pathway. The authors present estimates of C-13 discrimination for northern biomes based on a biosphere-atmosphere model and on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory and Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research remote flask measurements. With the inversion approach, solutions were found for three ecophysiological parameters of the northern biosphere {delta}{sup 13}C discrimination, a net primary production light use efficiency, and a temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration (a Q10 factor) that provided a best fit between modeled and observed {delta}{sup 13}C and CO{sub 2}. The analysis attempted to explicitly correct for fossil fuel emissions, remote C4 ecosystem fluxes, ocean exchange, and isotopic disequilibria of terrestrial heterotrophic respiration caused by the Suess effect. A photosynthetic discrimination was obtained for arctic and boreal biomes between 19.0 and 19.6%. The inversion analysis suggests that Q10 and light use efficiency values that minimize the cost function covary. The optimal light use efficiency was 0.47 gC MJ{sup -1} photosynthetically active radiation, and the optimal Q10 value was 1.52. Fossil fuel and ocean exchange contributed proportionally more to month-to-month changes in the atmospheric growth rate of {delta}{sup 13}C and CO{sub 2} during winter months, suggesting that remote atmospheric observations during the summer may yield more precise estimates of the isotopic composition of the biosphere.

  6. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  7. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in aqueous medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 1. Rate law and temperature dependence study of the radiocyanide exchange between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in aque us medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1978-01-01

    Dark radiocyanide ligand exchange in the closed system consisting of K 4 W(CN) 8 , hydrogen cyanide and water have been investigated. It has been found that the reaction is first order in respect to the complex cyanide and zero order in respect to the free hydrogen cyanide. Arrhenius activation energy within the temperature interval of 20-100 0 C equals to 32.373 kcal/mole. Enthalpy and entropy of activation are correspondingly ΔH not equal to Λ31.716kcal/mole and ΔS not equal to =5.45 e.u. A preliminary discussion of the above findings is presented. (author)

  8. On-line interconversion of [15O]O2 and [15O]CO2 via metal oxide by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Ren; Ido, Tatsuo; Fujisawa, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shigeki

    1988-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for the on-line production of 15 O-labelled gases. The 15 O exchange reactions between O 2 and CO 2 assisted by a metal oxide catalyst were successfully applied to on-line interconversion of [ 15 O]O 2 and [ 15 O]CO 2 with Hopcalite II(CuO 40% and MnO 2 60%). The conversion reactions were optimized as to the reaction temperature, the amount of the catalyst, and the flow rate of a gas added for oxygen exchange. [ 15 O]O 2 was converted to [ 15 O]CO 2 in a 80% yield with 0.7 g of Hopcalite II and 100 mL/min of CO 2 at 500 0 C, and [ 15 O]CO 2 to [ 15 O]O 2 in 70% with 100 mL/min of O 2 at 650 0 C. The radiochemical purities of the 15 O-labelled gases converted under the optimal conditions were high enough for clinical studies using the standard dilution and inhalation procedures. (author)

  9. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-06

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Refurbishing the seals of the H2S compressors in the isotopic exchange installations at the Heavy Water Reprocessing Plant. Technical solutions for replacing liquid seals by dry seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait; Adrian; Serban, Viorel; Androne, Marian; Florea, Ioana; Ciocan, George; State, Elena

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of the present sealing system in the H 2 S compressors showed that the risk of accidental hydrogen sulfide escape into the atmosphere is high in case of a seal oil pressure loss. At the same time there exist drawbacks occurring even in normal regime of functioning among which one can mention: - relatively high losses of oil occur, part of the oil being carried away by the compressors and released into the isotopic exchange columns where the water counter current flow produces a foaming that reduces the column processing capacity; - part of the sealing oil leaks reaches the final product, the heavy water, where from it must be removed by chemical procedures; - the installations adjacent to the sealing system are relatively sophisticated and require relatively high expenses for exploitation and maintenance. The classical sealing systems using sealing rings, sleeves, labyrinths, etc, cannot be used since their safe working range is exceeded due to either driving shaft rotational speed, or to the increase of its diameter, or else to an increase of the speed of motion of moving parts relative to the fix parts. The sealing systems with magnetic liquids are rather sophisticated and expensive while in case of electric supply loss they are completely unsafe, because their sealing capacity vanishes. The materials used for sealing gaskets limit their application only to the cases when the relative motion of the moving pieces is low or vanishing what happens only at shut down or failure situations. To prevent these drawbacks of the present seal system in the H 2 S compressors of the isotopic exchange columns and having in view the limitations of the currently used sealing systems a new system of sealing was conceived and designed on the basis of the patent titled 'Sealing Installation and Procedure' recorded by OSIM under No. A/0315/10.04.2003. The new system can be built as a single or double stage each of them having in turn a dynamic and a static sub-stage. The

  11. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  12. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  13. Chemical kinetics: on the heterogeneous catalysis processes leading to an exchange between two phases. Example: isotopic exchange reactions; Cinetique chimique: sur les processus de catalyse 'heterogene' conduisant a un echange entre deux phases. Exemple: reactions d'echange isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirian, G; Grandcollot, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    For an exchange reaction between a gaseous and a liquid phase proceeding by 'heterogeneous' catalysis in the liquid phase, diffusion in the liquid and the chemical reaction are two simultaneous and indivisible processes. We have nevertheless been able to establish criteria making it possible to distinguish between a really homogeneous kinetic process and a pseudo-homogeneous one. (author) [French] Pour une reaction d'echange entre une phase gazeuse et une phase liquide procedant par catalyse 'heterogene' en phase liquide, la diffusion dans le liquide et la reaction chimique sont deux etapes simultanees et indissociables. Nous avons pu neanmoins etablir des criteres permettant de distinguer entre une cinetique homogene vraie et une cinetique pseudo-homogene. (auteur)

  14. The competition of charge remote and charge directed fragmentation mechanisms in quaternary ammonium salt derivatized peptides--an isotopic exchange study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydzik, Marzena; Rudowska, Magdalena; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2011-12-01

    Derivatization of peptides as quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) is a promising method for sensitive detection by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (Cydzik et al. J. Pept. Sci. 2011, 17, 445-453). The peptides derivatized by QAS at their N-termini undergo fragmentation according to the two competing mechanisms - charge remote (ChR) and charge directed (ChD). The absence of mobile proton in the quaternary salt ion results in ChR dissociation of a peptide bond. However, Hofmann elimination of quaternary salt creates an ion with one mobile proton leading to the ChD fragmentation. The experiments on the quaternary ammonium salts with deuterated N-alkyl groups or amide NH bonds revealed that QAS derivatized peptides dissociate according to the mixed ChR-ChD mechanism. The isotopic labeling allows differentiation of fragments formed according to ChR and ChD mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com

  15. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  16. Electron spray ionization mass spectrometry and 2D 31P NMR for monitoring 18O/16O isotope exchange and turnover rates of metabolic oligophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Juranic, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Zhang, Song; Terzic, Andre; Dzeja, Petras P.; Ward, Lawrence E.; Dutta, Tumpa; Nair, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    A new method was here developed for the determination of 18 O-labeling ratios in metabolic oligophosphates, such as ATP, at different phosphoryl moieties (α-, β-, and γ-ATP) using sensitive and rapid electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The ESI-MS-based method for monitoring of 18 O/ 16 O exchange was validated with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 2D 31 P NMR correlation spectroscopy, the current standard methods in labeling studies. Significant correlation was found between isotopomer selective 2D 31 P NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer less selective ESI-MS method. Results demonstrate that ESI-MS provides a robust analytical platform for simultaneous determination of levels, 18 O-labeling kinetics and turnover rates of α-, β-, and γ-phosphoryls in ATP molecule. Such method is advantageous for large scale dynamic phosphometabolomic profiling of metabolic networks and acquiring information on the status of probed cellular energetic system. (orig.)

  17. Effect of the number of phenyl groups per molecule on the reactivity of hydroxyl or carboxyl group in hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Oguma, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen-exchange reactions in solid alcohols (or solid carboxylic acids) which contain phenyl group(s) in each molecule have been observed in a gas-solid system or liquid-solid system at 40 ≅ 80deg C. The data thus obtained have been analyzed by using the A''-McKay plot method, and 'the acidities based on kinetic logic' have been obtained for those compounds. From the acidities the following four characteristics have been determined. (1) The acidity increases with increases of temperature. (2) The reactivities of carboxylic acids are larger than those of alcohols at any temperature. (3) The effect of the number of phenyl groups on the reactivity of the functional group in the molecule in question is fairly large. (4) Acidity based on kinetic logic can be applied not only to gas-solid reactions, but also to liquid-solid reactions. (orig.)

  18. Leaf gas exchange, carbon isotope discrimination, and grain yield in contrasting rice genotypes subjected to water deficits during the reproductive stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centritto, Mauro; Lauteri, Marco; Monteverdi, Maria Cristina; Serraj, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    Genotypic variations in leaf gas exchange and yield were analysed in five upland-adapted and three lowland rice cultivars subjected to a differential soil moisture gradient, varying from well-watered to severely water-stressed conditions. A reduction in the amount of water applied resulted in a significant decrease in leaf gas exchange and, subsequently, in above-ground dry mass and grain yield, that varied among genotypes and distance from the line source. The comparison between the variable J and the Delta values in recently synthesized sugars methods, yielded congruent estimations of mesophyll conductance (g(m)), confirming the reliability of these two techniques. Our data demonstrate that g(m) is a major determinant of photosynthesis (A), because rice genotypes with inherently higher g(m) were capable of keeping higher A in stressed conditions. Furthermore, A, g(s), and g(m) of water-stressed genotypes rapidly recovered to the well-watered values upon the relief of water stress, indicating that drought did not cause any lasting metabolic limitation to photosynthesis. The comparisons between the A/C(i) and corresponding A/C(c) curves, measured in the genotypes that showed intrinsically higher and lower instantaneous A, confirmed this finding. Moreover, the effect of drought stress on grain yield was correlated with the effects on both A and total diffusional limitations to photosynthesis. Overall, these data indicate that genotypes which showed higher photosynthesis and conductances were also generally more productive across the entire soil moisture gradient. The analysis of Delta revealed a substantial variation of water use efficiency among the genotypes, both on the long-term (leaf pellet analysis) and short-term scale (leaf soluble sugars analysis).

  19. Leaf Characteristics and Photosynthetic Performance of Floating, Emergent and Terrestrial Leaves of Marsilea quadrifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hong Lin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals of Marsilea quadrifolia, an amphibious fern, experiencing extreme variation in environment develop heterophyll. In this study, we compared stomatal and trichome density on upper and lower surfaces, leaf and petiole area mass ratio, spectral properties and photosynthetic performance of floating, emergent and terrestrial leaves of M. quadrifolia, to explore the ecological advantages of producing different leaf types. Morphological measurement reveals that these three types of leaf display highly differences in stomatal density on lower epidermis, trichome density on both surfaces and petiole dry mass per length, and reflectance coefficient between 500 and 650 nm. In contrast, no significant difference was found in the PSII electron transport rate of the three types of leaves. The analysis of stable carbon isotope ratio of the three types of leaves indicates that they all use C3 photosynthetic pathway.

  20. Iodine isotopes and radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styro, B.; Nedvekajte, T.; Filistovich, V.

    1992-01-01

    Methods of concentration determination of stable and radioactive iodine isotopes in the Earth's different geospheres are described. Iodine isotopes concentration data, chemical forms and transformations as well as their exchange among separate geospheres of their global biochemical circulation (ocean, atmosphere, lithosphere and biosphere) are presented. Information on iodine isotopes as after-effects of nuclear installations accident (in particular, the Chernobyl accident) is generalized. The book is intended for scientists and practical workers in ecology and radioactivity protection and for a students of physics. 442 refs.; 82 figs.; 36 tabs

  1. Fast analysis of quaternary ammonium pesticides in food and beverages using cation-exchange chromatography coupled with isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardin, Tiziana; Barnaba, Chiara; Abballe, Franco; Trenti, Gianmaria; Malacarne, Mario; Larcher, Roberto

    2017-10-01

    A fast separation based on cation-exchange liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry is proposed for simultaneous determination of chlormequat, difenzoquat, diquat, mepiquat and paraquat in several food and beverage commodities. Solid samples were extracted using a mixture of water/methanol/formic acid (69.6:30:0.4, v/v/v), while liquid samples were ten times diluted with the same solution. Separation was carried out on an experimental length-modified IonPac CS17 column (2 × 15 mm 2 ) that allowed the use of formic acid and acetonitrile as mobile phase. Detection limits for food and beverage matrices were established at 1.5 μg/L for chlormequat, difenzoquat and mepiquat, and 3 μg/L for diquat and paraquat, while for drinking water a pre-analytical sample concentration allowed detection limits of 9 and 20 ng/L, respectively. Precision, as repeatability (RSD%), ranged from 0.2 to 24%, with a median value of 6%, and trueness, as recovery, ranged from 64 to 118%, with a median value of 96%. The method developed was successfully applied to investigate the presence of herbicide residues in commercial commodities (mineral water, orange juice, beer, tea, green coffee bean, toasted coffee powder, cocoa bean, white corn flour, rice and sugar samples). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Zinc oxide and chromia as catalysts for the isomerization of butene, the hydrogenation of ethylene, and the isotopic exchange and allotropic conversion of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.C. Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogenation of olefins has been studied over metals and metal oxides. Over metals the following observations generalize the characteristics of hydrogenation and isomerization. Metal hydrogenation catalysts are effective for H 2 -D 2 exchange (and para hydrogen conversion) under the same conditions as they effect olefin hydrogenation. This suggests that hydrogen ''activation'' involves formation of hydrogen atoms as a surface intermediate. Addition of deuterium to light ethylene leads to ethane products of the form C 2 H/sub 6-x/D/sub x/ (where 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 6). This is a result of the reversal of the alkyl (C 2 H 5 *) formation on the surface. Moreover, efficient isomerization of olefins require hydrogen as a co-catalyst. Both these observations suggest that alkyl formation and its reversal play a major role in hydrogenation and related reactions over metals. In this work it is found that zinc oxide catalyzes the deuteration of ethylene to dideuterioethane selectivity. Furthermore, the hydrogenation of ethylene using mixtures of hydrogen and deuterium indicate that hydrogenation occurs in such a manner as to reflect the molecular identity of the gas phase in the product ethane

  3. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these

  4. The effect of carbonic anhydrase on the kinetics and equilibrium of the oxygen isotope exchange in the CO2-H2O system: Implications for δ18O vital effects in biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Interpretations of the primary paleoceanographic information recorded in stable oxygen isotope values (δ18O) of biogenic CaCO3 can be obscured by disequilibrium effects. CaCO3 is often depleted in 18O relative to the δ18O values expected for precipitation in thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater as a result of vital effects. Vital effects in δ18O have been explained in terms of the influence of fluid pH on the overall δ18O of the sum of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species (often referred to as "pH model") and in terms of 18O depletion as a result of the kinetic effects associated with CO2 hydration (CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3- + H+) and CO2 hydroxylation (CO2 + OH- ↔ HCO3-) in the calcification sites (so-called "kinetic model"). This study addresses the potential role of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), that catalyzes inter-conversion of CO2 and HCO3- in relation to the underlying mechanism of vital effects. We performed quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments in order to examine the changes in 18O equilibration rate as a function of CA concentration. Experiments were performed at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are comparable to the average surface ocean pH and elevated pH levels observed in the calcification sites of some coral and foraminiferal species, respectively. The rate of uncatalyzed 18O exchange in the CO2-H2O system is governed by the pH-dependent DIC speciation and the kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydration and hydroxylation, which can be summarized by a simple mathematical expression. The results from control experiments (no CA addition) are in agreement with this expression. The results from control experiments also suggest that the most recently published kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydroxylation has been overestimated. When CA is present, the 18O equilibration process is greatly enhanced at both pH levels due to the catalysis of CO2 hydration by the enzyme. For example, the time required for 18O

  5. Height-related changes in leaf photosynthetic traits in diverse Bornean tropical rain forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzo, Tanaka; Inoue, Yuta; Yoshimura, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Megumi; Tanaka-Oda, Ayumi; Ichie, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of variations in morphophysiological leaf traits with forest height is essential for quantifying carbon and water fluxes from forest ecosystems. Here, we examined changes in leaf traits with forest height in diverse tree species and their role in environmental acclimation in a tropical rain forest in Borneo that does not experience dry spells. Height-related changes in leaf physiological and morphological traits [e.g., maximum photosynthetic rate (Amax), stomatal conductance (gs), dark respiration rate (Rd), carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C), nitrogen (N) content, and leaf mass per area (LMA)] from understory to emergent trees were investigated in 104 species in 29 families. We found that many leaf area-based physiological traits (e.g., A(max-area), Rd, gs), N, δ(13)C, and LMA increased linearly with tree height, while leaf mass-based physiological traits (e.g., A(max-mass)) only increased slightly. These patterns differed from other biomes such as temperate and tropical dry forests, where trees usually show decreased photosynthetic capacity (e.g., A(max-area), A(max-mass)) with height. Increases in photosynthetic capacity, LMA, and δ(13)C are favored under bright and dry upper canopy conditions with higher photosynthetic productivity and drought tolerance, whereas lower R d and LMA may improve shade tolerance in lower canopy trees. Rapid recovery of leaf midday water potential to theoretical gravity potential during the night supports the idea that the majority of trees do not suffer from strong drought stress. Overall, leaf area-based photosynthetic traits were associated with tree height and the degree of leaf drought stress, even in diverse tropical rain forest trees.

  6. Difference in photosynthetic performance among three peach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) on greenhouse grown peach trees ('Qingfeng': Prunus persica L. Batsch, 'NJN76': Prunus persica L. Batsch and 'Maixiang': P. persica var. nectarine) were investigated. Difference in photosynthesis rate (Pn) and stoma morphology among cultivars were studied.

  7. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in freshwater phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeger, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism of natural assemblages of freshwater phytoplankton was measured by following the flow of inorganic 14 C into the photosynthetic end products polysaccharide protein, lipid, and soluble metabolites. Data were collected from a wide range of physical, chemical, and trophic conditions in six southern United States reservoirs, with the primary environmental variables of interest being light intensity and nutrient supply. Polysaccharide and protein were consistently the primary products of photosynthetic carbon metabolism, comprising an average of 70% of the total carbon fixation over a wide range of light intensities. Polysaccharide was quantitatively more important at higher light intensities, and protein at lower light intensities, as light intensity varied both with depth within the water column and over diurnal cycles. Polysaccharide synthesis was more variable over the diurnal period than was protein synthesis. Phytoplankton in the downlake epilimnion of Normandy Lake, a central Tennessee reservoir, responded to summer nitrogen (N) deficiency by increasing relative rates of lipid synthesis from 10-15% to 20-25% of the total photosynthetic carbon fixation. Phytoplankton in more nitrogen-sufficient areas of the reservoir maintained lower rates of lipid synthesis throughout the summer. These results document the occurrence in nature of a relationship between N-deficiency and increased lipid synthesis previously observed only in laboratory algal culture studies

  8. Natural strategies for photosynthetic light harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croce, R.; van Amerongen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are crucial for life on Earth as they provide food and oxygen and are at the basis of most energy resources. They have a large variety of light-harvesting strategies that allow them to live nearly everywhere where sunlight can penetrate. They have adapted their pigmentation

  9. Excitons in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Arvi; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Rätsep, Margus

    2013-09-26

    Live cells and regular crystals seem fundamentally incompatible. Still, effects characteristic to ideal crystals, such as coherent sharing of excitation, have been recently used in many studies to explain the behavior of several photosynthetic complexes, especially the inner workings of the light-harvesting apparatus of the oldest known photosynthetic organisms, the purple bacteria. To this date, there has been no concrete evidence that the same effects are instrumental in real living cells, leaving a possibility that this is an artifact of unnatural study conditions, not a real effect relevant to the biological operation of bacteria. Hereby, we demonstrate survival of collective coherent excitations (excitons) in intact cells of photosynthetic purple bacteria. This is done by using excitation anisotropy spectroscopy for tracking the temperature-dependent evolution of exciton bands in light-harvesting systems of increasing structural complexity. The temperature was gradually raised from 4.5 K to ambient temperature, and the complexity of the systems ranged from detergent-isolated complexes to complete bacterial cells. The results provide conclusive evidence that excitons are indeed one of the key elements contributing to the energetic and dynamic properties of photosynthetic organisms.

  10. Isotopic exchange on solid-phase micro extraction fiber in sediment under stagnant conditions: Implications for field application of performance reference compound calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lian-Jun; Wu, Xiaoqin; Jia, Fang; Zeng, Eddy Y; Gan, Jay

    2016-08-01

    An overlooked issue for field application of in situ performance reference compound (PRC) calibration methods is the validity of the assumption that both the sorption of a target compound and desorption of its corresponding PRC follow the first-order kinetics with the same rate constants under stagnant conditions. In the present study, disposable polydimethylsiloxane fibers of 2 sizes (7 and 35 µm) impregnated with 8 (13) C-labeled or deuterated PRCs were statically deployed into different marine sediments, from which the kinetics for sorption of the target compounds and desorption of the PRCs were characterized. Nonsymmetrical profiles were observed for exchange of the target analytes and their corresponding PRCs in sediment under stagnant conditions. The hysteretic desorption of PRCs in the kinetic regime may be ascribed to the low chemical potential between the fiber and sediment porewater, which reflects the inability of water molecules to rapidly diffuse through sediment to solvate the PRCs in the aqueous layer around the fiber surface. A moderate correlation (r = 0.77 and r = 0.57, p < 0.05 for both regressions) between the PRC-calibrated equilibrium concentrations of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p'-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-153 and the lipid normalized levels in worms (Neanthes arenaceodentata) was obtained in co-exposure tests under simulating field conditions, probably resulting from slightly overestimated bioavailability because of the hysteretic desorption of PRCs and toxic effects. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1978-1985. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Long-term effects of ozone on CO2 exchange in peatland microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haapala, JK; Mörsky, SK; Rinnan, Riikka

    2011-01-01

    Effects of elevated tropospheric ozone concentration on the CO2 exchange of peatland microcosms and the photosynthetic capacity of the dominating sedge, Eriophorum vaginatum, were studied in a four-year open-field experiment. The net ecosystem CO2 exchange and the dark respiration rate of the mic......Effects of elevated tropospheric ozone concentration on the CO2 exchange of peatland microcosms and the photosynthetic capacity of the dominating sedge, Eriophorum vaginatum, were studied in a four-year open-field experiment. The net ecosystem CO2 exchange and the dark respiration rate...... exchange of the peatland microcosms....

  12. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method for deriving, from a starting material including an element having a plurality of isotopes, derived material enriched in one isotope of the element. The starting material is deposited on a substrate at less than a critical submonatomic surface density, typically less than 10 16 atoms per square centimeter. The deposit is then selectively irradiated by a laser (maser or electronic oscillator) beam with monochromatic coherent radiation resonant with the one isotope causing the material including the one istope to escape from the substrate. The escaping enriched material is then collected. Where the element has two isotopes, one of which is to be collected, the deposit may be irradiated with radiation resonant with the other isotope and the residual material enriched in the one isotope may be evaporated from the substrate and collected

  13. Rapid deuterium exchange-in time for probing conformational change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmasiri, K.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Isotopic exchange of protein backbone amide hydrogens has been used extensively as a sensitive probe of protein structure. One of the salient features of hydrogen exchange is the vast range of exchange rates in one protein. Isotopic exchange methods have been used to study the structural features including protein folding and unfolding (1), functionally different forms of proteins (2), protein-protein complexation (3), and protein stability parameter. Many backbone amide protons that are surface accessible and are not involved in hydrogen bonding undergo rapid deuterium exchange. In order to study, fast exchanging amide protons, fast exchange-in times are necessary

  14. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  15. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  16. The photochemical reflectance index provides an optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation in evergreen conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Y S; Gamon, John A

    2015-04-01

    In evergreens, the seasonal down-regulation and reactivation of photosynthesis is largely invisible and difficult to assess with remote sensing. This invisible phenology may be changing as a result of climate change. To better understand the mechanism and timing of these hidden physiological transitions, we explored several assays and optical indicators of spring photosynthetic activation in conifers exposed to a boreal climate. The photochemical reflectance index (PRI), chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf pigments for evergreen conifer seedlings were monitored over 1 yr of a boreal climate with the addition of gas exchange during the spring. PRI, electron transport rate, pigment levels, light-use efficiency and photosynthesis all exhibited striking seasonal changes, with varying kinetics and strengths of correlation, which were used to evaluate the mechanisms and timing of spring activation. PRI and pigment pools were closely timed with photosynthetic reactivation measured by gas exchange. The PRI provided a clear optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation that was detectable at leaf and stand scales in conifers. We propose that PRI might provide a useful metric of effective growing season length amenable to remote sensing and could improve remote-sensing-driven models of carbon uptake in evergreen ecosystems. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Oxygen isotope fractionations across individual leaf carbohydrates in grass and tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marco M; Gamarra, Bruno; Kahmen, Ansgar; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Saurer, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Almost no δ 18 O data are available for leaf carbohydrates, leaving a gap in the understanding of the δ 18 O relationship between leaf water and cellulose. We measured δ 18 O values of bulk leaf water (δ 18 O LW ) and individual leaf carbohydrates (e.g. fructose, glucose and sucrose) in grass and tree species and δ 18 O of leaf cellulose in grasses. The grasses were grown under two relative humidity (rH) conditions. Sucrose was generally 18 O-enriched compared with hexoses across all species with an apparent biosynthetic fractionation factor (ε bio ) of more than 27‰ relative to δ 18 O LW , which might be explained by isotopic leaf water and sucrose synthesis gradients. δ 18 O LW and δ 18 O values of carbohydrates and cellulose in grasses were strongly related, indicating that the leaf water signal in carbohydrates was transferred to cellulose (ε bio  = 25.1‰). Interestingly, damping factor p ex p x , which reflects oxygen isotope exchange with less enriched water during cellulose synthesis, responded to rH conditions if modelled from δ 18 O LW but not if modelled directly from δ 18 O of individual carbohydrates. We conclude that δ 18 O LW is not always a good substitute for δ 18 O of synthesis water due to isotopic leaf water gradients. Thus, compound-specific δ 18 O analyses of individual carbohydrates are helpful to better constrain (post-)photosynthetic isotope fractionation processes in plants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Isotopic exchange between molecular hydrogen and liquid ammonia catalysed by alkali amides; Echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene moleculaire et l'ammoniac liquide catalyse par les amidures alcalins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmas, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-15

    The catalytic action of alkali amides on the isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid ammonia has been reinvestigated. It was clear before this work that the reaction is homogeneous and first order with respect to the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, but the nature of the catalytic species was still subject to discussion. On one hand new precise kinetic measurements have been made with sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium amide. On the other hand, the dissociation of these salts has been calculated with the help of the FUOSS-ONSAGER equation. If the rate of exchange is plotted as a function of the concentration of the free amide ion, a linear relationship is obtained. In our experimental conditions, primary salt effects are negligible and the concentration has to be used in the rate equations. This shows that only the free amide ion is acting as a catalytic species. Experiments on common ion effects and secondary salt effects support this conclusion. The results are in agreement with an associative mechanism. (author) [French] Une nouvelle etude de l'echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene et l'ammoniac liquide catalyse par les amidures alcalins a ete effectuee. II etait bien etabli avant le present travail que la reaction etait homogene et que sa vitesse etait du premier ordre par rapport a la concentration d'hydrogene dissous, mais la nature de l'espece catalytique etait encore controversee. De nouvelles mesures cinetiques precises ont ete faites avec les amidures de sodium, de potassium, de rubidium et de cesium. D'autre part, la dissociation de ces sels a ete calculee a l'aide de l'equation de FUOSS-ONSAGER. On constate que la vitesse d'echange est proportionnelle a la concentration de l'ion amidure libre. Dans nos conditions experimentales, les effets de sel primaires sont negligeables, l'equation de vitesse doit s'exprimer simplement en fonction des concentrations. Ceci indique que l'ion amidure libre est la seule espece catalytique. Des experiences d

  19. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Rizal

    Full Text Available Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33 with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT. The back-cross (BC1F1 progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used

  20. Photosynthetic capacity of 'Niagara Rosada' grapes grown under transparent plastic covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Corrêa da Silva de Deus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: New techniques in tropical regions such as use of transparent plastic covering (TPC, have been employed in grapes to avoid the wetting leaves and fruits, which can reduce the occurrence of fungal diseases, reduce the use of sprays, and reduce damage caused by hail and high winds. TPC may significantly affect the photosynthetic rates of grapevines cultivated in tropical regions, and thus have strong effects on plant productivity and improve fruit quality. However, in the North of Rio de Janeiro region there are lacks of studies related to TPC effects on photosynthetic capacity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the photosynthetic capacity in 'Niagara Rosada' vines grown under TPC and without transparent plastic covering (WTPC. The experiment was conducted between April and June 2013, on Tabuinha farm, located in the 3rd district of São Fidélis, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. A completely randomized block design was used with two treatments (TPC and WTPC and twelve replications. Evaluations consisted of climatological variables, gas exchange and maximum quantum efficiency of open photosystem II centers-quantum yield (Fv/Fm It was possible to observe that under TPC maximum temperature increase of 2.3°C, relative humidity reduced 1.5%, vapor pressure deficit increase 0.4kPa, and light intensity reduced 47.7%. These changes did not cause photochemical damage to the leaves. The TPC promoted higher net photosynthetic rate at 800h, which was associated with higher stomatal conductance. Thus, the TPC used in the northern region of Rio de Janeiro State did not impair the photosynthetic capacity of 'Niagara Rosada' vines.