WorldWideScience

Sample records for ph-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles

  1. The pH sensitive properties of carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles cross-linked with calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliola, Simo; Repo, Eveliina; Srivastava, Varsha; Heiskanen, Juha P; Sirviö, Juho Antti; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Sillanpää, Mika

    2017-05-01

    In environmental applications the applied materials are required to be non-toxic and biodegradable. Carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles cross-linked with Ca 2+ ions (CMC-Ca) fulfill these requirements, and they are also renewable. These nanoparticles were applied to oil-spill treatment in our previous study and here we focused on enhancing their properties. It was found that while the divalent Ca 2+ ions are crucial for the formation of the CMC-Ca, the attractive interaction between NH 3 + and COO - groups contributed significantly to the formation and stability of the CMC-Ca. The stability decreased as a function of pH due to the deprotonation of the amino groups. Therefore, the nanoparticles were found to be fundamentally pH sensitive in solution, if the pH deviated from the pH (7-9) that was used in the synthesis of the nanoparticles. The pH sensitive CMC-Ca synthesized in pH 7 and 8 were most stable in the studied conditions and could find applications in oil-spill treatment or controlled-release of substances. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sonochemically synthesized biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for pH sensitive drug delivery application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Himani, E-mail: hkalita74@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Prashanth Kumar, B.N., E-mail: prasanthkumar999@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Konar, Suraj, E-mail: suraj.konar@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Tantubay, Sangeeta, E-mail: sang.chem2@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Mahto, Madhusudan Kr., E-mail: mahtomk0@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Mandal, Mahitosh, E-mail: mahitosh@smst.iitkgp.ernet.in [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Pathak, Amita, E-mail: ami@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India)

    2016-03-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of biocompatible zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles as nanocarrier for drug delivery application. The ZP nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple sonochemical method in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and their efficacy for the delivery of drugs has been tested through various in-vitro experiments. The particle size and BET surface area of the nanoparticles were found to be ~ 48 nm and 206.51 m{sup 2}/g respectively. The conventional MTT assay and cellular localization studies of the particles, performed on MDA-MB-231 cell lines, demonstrate their excellent biocompatibility and cellular internalization behavior. The loading of curcumin, an antitumor drug, onto the ZP nanoparticles shows the rapid drug uptake ability of the particles, while the drug release study, performed at two different pH values (at 7.4 and 5) depicts pH sensitive release-profile. The MTT assay and cellular localization studies revealed higher cellular inhibition and better bioavailability of the nanoformulated curcumin compared to free curcumin. - Highlights: • Biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple sonochemical approach. • Curcumin was rapidly loaded onto the particles by the aid by hydrogen bond formation. • The curcumin loaded zirconium phosphate nanoparticles depict pH triggered drug release phenomenon. • The nanoformulated curcumin showed enhanced anti-tumor activity as compared to the native curcumin.

  3. Sonochemically synthesized biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for pH sensitive drug delivery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Himani; Prashanth Kumar, B.N.; Konar, Suraj; Tantubay, Sangeeta; Mahto, Madhusudan Kr.; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of biocompatible zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles as nanocarrier for drug delivery application. The ZP nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple sonochemical method in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and their efficacy for the delivery of drugs has been tested through various in-vitro experiments. The particle size and BET surface area of the nanoparticles were found to be ~ 48 nm and 206.51 m"2/g respectively. The conventional MTT assay and cellular localization studies of the particles, performed on MDA-MB-231 cell lines, demonstrate their excellent biocompatibility and cellular internalization behavior. The loading of curcumin, an antitumor drug, onto the ZP nanoparticles shows the rapid drug uptake ability of the particles, while the drug release study, performed at two different pH values (at 7.4 and 5) depicts pH sensitive release-profile. The MTT assay and cellular localization studies revealed higher cellular inhibition and better bioavailability of the nanoformulated curcumin compared to free curcumin. - Highlights: • Biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple sonochemical approach. • Curcumin was rapidly loaded onto the particles by the aid by hydrogen bond formation. • The curcumin loaded zirconium phosphate nanoparticles depict pH triggered drug release phenomenon. • The nanoformulated curcumin showed enhanced anti-tumor activity as compared to the native curcumin.

  4. Development of pH sensitive polymeric nanoparticles of erythromycin stearate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulekha Bhadra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bioavailability of conventional tablet of erythromycin stearate is low as it is unstable at acidic pH and also shows a low dissolution rate. Objective: It was proposed to protect it from the acidic condition of the stomach along with an increase in dissolution rate by formulating pH sensitive nanoparticles. Materials and Methods: The nanoparticles were prepared by the solvent evaporation technique using different quantities of Eudragit L100-55 and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. Size reduction was achieved by high speed homogenization technique using Digital Ultra Turrax homogenizer. The formulation was optimized using 32 factorial design, keeping drug polymer ratio and surfactant concentration as independent variables. Particle size, entrapment efficiency, and drug-release (DR were studied as dependent variables. Results: Optimized batch containing 1:0.3 erythromycin stearate: Eudragit L100-55 ratio and 1.0% PVA showed 8.24 ± 0.71% DR in pH 1.2 in 1-h and 90.38 ± 5.97% in pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 within 2-h, respectively. Discussion: The optimized batch exhibited lower release in acidic pH and faster release in higher pH compared to the marketed preparation. Conclusion: Thus the present study concludes that pH sensitive nanoparticles of erythromycin stearate increases the dissolution of the drug in intestinal pH and also protect it from acidic pH, which may help in improving the bioavailability of erythromycin.

  5. Sonochemically synthesized biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for pH sensitive drug delivery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Himani; Prashanth Kumar, B N; Konar, Suraj; Tantubay, Sangeeta; Kr Mahto, Madhusudan; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2016-03-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of biocompatible zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles as nanocarrier for drug delivery application. The ZP nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple sonochemical method in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and their efficacy for the delivery of drugs has been tested through various in-vitro experiments. The particle size and BET surface area of the nanoparticles were found to be ~48 nm and 206.51 m(2)/g respectively. The conventional MTT assay and cellular localization studies of the particles, performed on MDA-MB-231 cell lines, demonstrate their excellent biocompatibility and cellular internalization behavior. The loading of curcumin, an antitumor drug, onto the ZP nanoparticles shows the rapid drug uptake ability of the particles, while the drug release study, performed at two different pH values (at 7.4 and 5) depicts pH sensitive release-profile. The MTT assay and cellular localization studies revealed higher cellular inhibition and better bioavailability of the nanoformulated curcumin compared to free curcumin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recovery and redispersion of gold nanoparticles using the self-assembly of a pH sensitive zwitterionic amphiphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita-Imura, Clara; Imura, Yoshiro; Kawai, Takeshi; Shindo, Hitoshi

    2014-11-04

    The pH-responsive self-assembly of zwitterionic amphiphile C16CA was expanded to the recovery of gold (Au) nanoparticles for environmentally friendly chemistry applications. Multilayered lamellae at pH ∼ 4 were successfully incorporated into nanoparticles by dispersion. Redispersion of nanoparticles was achieved under basic conditions by the transition of self-assembly.

  7. Magnetic interactions between nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    We present a short overview of the influence of inter-particle interactions on the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. Strong magnetic dipole interactions between ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic particles, that would be superparamagnetic if isolated, can result in a collective state...... of nanoparticles. This collective state has many similarities to spin-glasses. In samples of aggregated magnetic nanoparticles, exchange interactions are often important and this can also lead to a strong suppression of superparamagnetic relaxation. The temperature dependence of the order parameter in samples...... of strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles or goethite grains is well described by a simple mean field model. Exchange interactions between nanoparticles with different orientations of the easy axes can also result in a rotation of the sub-lattice magnetization directions....

  8. Metallic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernando

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm, covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Trohidou, Kalliopi N

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with diameters in the range of a few nanometers are today at the cutting edge of modern technology and innovation because of their use in numerous applications ranging from engineering to biomedicine. A great deal of scientific interest has been focused on the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. The understanding of interparticle interactions is necessary to clarify the physics of these assemblies and their use in the development of high-performance magnetic materials. This book reviews prominent research studies on the static and dynamic magnetic properties of nanoparticle assemblies, gathering together experimental and computational techniques in an effort to reveal their optimized magnetic properties for biomedical use and as ultra-high magnetic recording media.

  10. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Klem, Michael T.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches...

  11. Nanolubricant: magnetic nanoparticle based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Kinjal; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, Ramesh V.

    2017-11-01

    In the present study magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 having average particle diameter, 11.7 nm were synthesized using chemical coprecipitation technique and dispersed in alpha olefin hydrocarbon synthetic lubricating oil. The solid weight fraction of magnetic nanoparticles in the lubricating oil was varied from 0 wt% to 10 wt%. The tribological properties were studied using four-ball tester. The results demonstrate that the coefficient of friction and wear scar diameter reduces by 45% and 30%, respectively at an optimal value, i.e. 4 wt% of magnetic nanoparticles concentration. The surface characterization of worn surface was carried out using a scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. These results implied that rolling mechanism is responsible to reduce coefficient of friction while magnetic nanoparticles act as the spacer between the asperities and reduces the wear scar diameter. The surface roughness of the worn surface studied using an atomic force microscope shows a reduction in surface roughness by a factor of four when magnetic nanoparticles are used as an additive. The positive response of magnetic nanoparticles in a lubricating oil, shows the potential replacement of conventional lubricating oil.

  12. Functional Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, James

    Nanoparticle system research and characterization is the focal point of this research and dissertation. In the research presented here, magnetite, cobalt, and ferrite nanoparticle systems have been explored in regard to their magnetocaloric effect (MCE) properties, as well as for use in polymer composites. Both areas of study have potential applications across a wide variety of interdisciplinary fields. Magnetite nanoparticles have been successfully dispersed in a polymer. The surface chemistry of the magnetic nanoparticle proves critical to obtaining a homogenous and well separated high density dispersion in PMMA. Theoretical studies found in the literature have indicated that surface interface energy is a critical component in dispersion. Oleic acid is used to alter the surface of magnetite nanoparticles and successfully achieve good dispersion in a PMMA thin film. Polypyrrole is then coated onto the PMMA composite layer. The bilayer is characterized using cross-sectional TEM, cross-sectional SEM, magnetic characterization, and low frequency conductivity. The results show that the superparmagnetic properties of the as synthesized particles are maintained in the composite. With further study of the properties of these nanoparticles for real and functional uses, MCE is studied on a variety of magnetic nanoparticle systems. Magnetite, manganese zinc ferrite, and cobalt ferrite systems show significant broadening of the MCE and the ability to tune the peak temperature of MCE by varying the size of the nanoparticles. Four distinct systems are studied including cobalt, cobalt core silver shell nanoparticles, nickel ferrite, and ball milled zinc ferrite. The results demonstrate the importance of surface characteristics on MCE. Surface spin disorder appears to have a large influence on the low temperature magnetic and magnetocalorie characteristics of these nanoparticle systems.

  13. Surface Effects in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorani, Dino

    2005-01-01

    This volume is a collection of articles on different approaches to the investigation of surface effects on nanosized magnetic materials, with special emphasis on magnetic nanoparticles. The book aims to provide an overview of progress in the understanding of surface properties and surface driven effects in magnetic nanoparticles through recent results of different modeling, simulation, and experimental investigations.

  14. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2010-01-01

    We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization...... and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering....

  15. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Mørup

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krustev, P.; Ruskov, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe different biomedical application using magnetic nanoparticles. Over the past decade, a number of biomedical applications have begun to emerge for magnetic nanoparticles of differing sizes, shapes, and compositions. Areas under investigation include targeted drug delivery, ultra-sensitive disease detection, gene therapy, high throughput genetic screening, biochemical sensing, and rapid toxicity cleansing. Magnetic nanoparticles exhibit ferromagnetic or superparamagnetic behavior, magnetizing strongly under an applied field. In the second case (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) there is no permanent magnetism once the field is removed. The superparamagnetic nanoparticles are highly attractive as in vivo probes or in vitro tools to extract information on biochemical systems. The optical properties of magnetic metal nanoparticles are spectacular and, therefore, have promoted a great deal of excitement during the last few decades. Many applications as MRI imaging and hyperthermia rely on the use of iron oxide particles. Moreover magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies are also applied to hyperthermia and have enabled tumor specific contrast enhancement in MRI. Other promising biomedical applications are connected with tumor cells treated with magnetic nanoparticles with X-ray ionizing radiation, which employs magnetic nanoparticles as a complementary radiate source inside the tumor. (authors)

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles for theragnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayev, Veronica I.; Pisanic, Thomas R.; Jin, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a cutting-edge tool in medicine because they can be simultaneously functionalized and guided by a magnetic field. Use of MNPs has advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cell tracking and bioseparation. Integrative therapeutic and diagnostic (i.e., theragnostic) applications have emerged with MNP use, such as MRI-guided cell replacement therapy or MRI-based imaging of cancer-specific gene delivery. However, mounting evidence suggests that certain properties of nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell and tissue barriers, resistance to biodegradation) amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to molecular or bulk counterparts. Oxidative stress, a 3-tier paradigm of nanotoxicity, manifests in activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (tier I), followed by a pro-inflammatory response (tier II) and DNA damage leading to cellular apoptosis and mutagenesis (tier III). In vivo administered MNPs are quickly challenged by macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system (RES), resulting in not only neutralization of potential MNP toxicity but also reduced circulation time necessary for MNP efficacy. We discuss the role of MNP size, composition and surface chemistry in their intracellular uptake, biodistribution, macrophage recognition and cytotoxicity, and review current studies on MNP toxicity, caveats of nanotoxicity assessments and engineering strategies to optimize MNPs for biomedical use. PMID:19389434

  18. Uniform magnetic excitations in nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    2005-01-01

    We have used a spin-wave model to calculate the temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles. The uniform precession mode, corresponding to a spin wave with wave vector q=0, is predominant in nanoparticles and gives rise to an approximately linear temperature...... dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization well below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature for both ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic particles. This is in accordance with the results of a classical model for collective magnetic excitations in nanoparticles. In nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic...... materials, quantum effects give rise to a small deviation from the linear temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization at very low temperatures. The complex nature of the excited precession states of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials, with deviations from antiparallel orientation...

  19. Spin Structures in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Spin structures in nanoparticles of ferrimagnetic materials may deviate locally in a nontrivial way from ideal collinear spin structures. For instance, magnetic frustration due to the reduced numbers of magnetic neighbors at the particle surface or around defects in the interior can lead to spin...... canting and hence a reduced magnetization. Moreover, relaxation between almost degenerate canted spin states can lead to anomalous temperature dependences of the magnetization at low temperatures. In ensembles of nanoparticles, interparticle exchange interactions can also result in spin reorientation....... Here, we give a short review of anomalous spin structures in nanoparticles....

  20. Magnetic properties of iron nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvell, J.; Ayieta, E.; Gavrin, A.; Cheng, Ruihua; Shah, V. R.; Sokol, P.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic properties of Fe nanoparticles with different sizes synthesized by a physical deposition technique have been investigated experimentally. We have used a high pressure sputtering technique to deposit iron nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. The nanoparticles are then analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device techniques. TEM and AFM data show that the particle size could be tuned by adjusting the deposition conditions. The magnetic properties have been investigated from temperature dependent magnetization M(T) and field dependent magnetization M(H) measurements. The results show that two phases including both ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic particles are present in our system. From these data we extracted the superparamagnetic critical size to be 9 nm for our samples. Ferromagnetic particles are single magnetic domain particles and the magnetic properties can be explained by the Stoner and Wohlfarth model. For the superparamagnetic phase, the effective anisotropy constant, K eff , decreases as the particle size increases.

  1. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, Iryna S.; Lemishko, Serhii V.; Morozovska, Anna N.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO3) and potassium niobate (KNbO3) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  2. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, Iryna S; Lemishko, Serhii V; Morozovska, Anna N

    2017-12-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO 3 ) and potassium niobate (KNbO 3 ) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe 3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles in medical nanorobotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.martel@polymtl.ca [Polytechnique Montréal, NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Medical nanorobotics is a field of robotics that exploits the physics at the nanoscale to implement new functionalities in untethered robotic agents aimed for ultimate operations in constrained physiological environments of the human body. The implementation of such new functionalities is achieved by embedding specific nano-components in such robotic agents. Because magnetism has been and still widely used in medical nanorobotics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in particular have shown to be well suited for this purpose. To date, although such magnetic nanoparticles play a critical role in medical nanorobotics, no literature has addressed specifically the use of MNP in medical nanorobotic agents. As such, this paper presents a short introductory tutorial and review of the use of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of medical nanorobotics with some of the related main functionalities that can be embedded in nanorobotic agents.

  4. Magnetic hyperthermia with hard-magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashevsky, Bronislav E., E-mail: bekas@itmo.by [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashevsky, Sergey B.; Korenkov, Victor S. [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Istomin, Yuri P. [N. N. Alexandrov National Cancer Center of Belarus, Lesnoy-2, Minsk 223040 (Belarus); Terpinskaya, Tatyana I.; Ulashchik, Vladimir S. [Institute of Physiology, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskaya str. 28, Minsk 220072 (Belarus)

    2015-04-15

    Recent clinical trials of magnetic hyperthermia have proved, and even hardened, the Ankinson-Brezovich restriction as upon magnetic field conditions applicable to any site of human body. Subject to this restriction, which is harshly violated in numerous laboratory and small animal studies, magnetic hyperthermia can relay on rather moderate heat source, so that optimization of the whole hyperthermia system remains, after all, the basic problem predetermining its clinical perspectives. We present short account of our complex (theoretical, laboratory and small animal) studies to demonstrate that such perspectives should be related with the hyperthermia system based on hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlfarth type) nanoparticles and strong low-frequency fields rather than with superparamagnetic (Brownian or Neél) nanoparticles and weak high-frequency fields. This conclusion is backed by an analytical evaluation of the maximum absorption rates possible under the field restriction in the ideal hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlarth) and the ideal superparamagnetic (single relaxation time) systems, by theoretical and experimental studies of the dynamic magnetic hysteresis in suspensions of movable hard-magnetic particles, by producing nanoparticles with adjusted coercivity and suspensions of such particles capable of effective energy absorption and intratumoral penetration, and finally, by successful treatment of a mice model tumor under field conditions acceptable for whole human body. - Highlights: • Hard-magnetic nanoparticles are shown superior for hyperthetmia to superparamagnetic. • Optimal system parameters are found from magnetic reversal model in movable particle. • Penetrating suspension of HM particles with aggregation-independent SAR is developed. • For the first time, mice with tumors are healed in AC field acceptable for human body.

  5. Classification of Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogren, Sara; Fornara, Andrea; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-01-01

    and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from...... the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles.......This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry...

  6. Magnetic moment measurement of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J-W; Lee, E-C; Ju, H; Yoo, I S; Chang, W-S; Chung, B H; Kim, B S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic moment per unit mass of magnetic nanoparticles was found by using the atomic force microscope (AFM). The mass of the nanoparticles was acquired from the resonance frequency shift of the particle-attached AFM probe and magnetic force measurement was also carried out with the AFM. Combining with magnetic field strength, the magnetic moment per unit mass of the nanoparticles was determined as a function of magnetic field strength. (technical design note)

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakuzis, Andris F.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in several biomedical applications, spanning from cell separation, early diagnosis of metastasis to even the treatment of cancer via magnetic hyperthermia (MH). This last technique consists in the increase of temperature of nanoparticles when their magnetic moments interact with a magnetic alternating field. This effect has been suggested as an innovative therapy to cancer treatment, due to the delivery of heat or therapeutic agents, such as drugs, genes, and others. In addition, several clinical studies has demonstrated synergetic effects between hyperthermia and radiotherapy [1]. This indicates a great therapeutic potential for this noninvasive and targeted technique. In this talk we will discuss results from the literature and from our own group in the treatment of cancer via magnetic hyperthermia. Several types of magnetic nanoparticles suggested for this application will be discussed, as well as the historical evolution of this procedure, which although suggested in the late 50' only recently was approved in Europe for treatment of humans with brain tumors. (author) [pt

  8. Magnetic properties of hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic properties of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) particles with sizes of about 16 nm have been studied by use of Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, and neutron diffraction. The nanoparticles are weakly ferromagnetic at temperatures at least down to 5 K with a spontaneous...... magnetization that is only slightly higher than that of weakly ferromagnetic bulk hematite. At T greater than or similar to 100 K the Mossbauer spectra contain a doublet, which is asymmetric due to magnetic relaxation in the presence of an electric field gradient in accordance with the Blume-Tjon model......, Simultaneous fitting of series of Mossbauer spectra obtained at temperatures from 5 K to well above the superparamagnetic blocking temperature allowed the estimation of the pre-exponential factor in Neel's expression for the superparamagnetic relaxation time, tau(0) = (6 +/- 4) X 10(-11) s and the magnetic...

  9. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles with magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Wenyan [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Xu, Guizhi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, 300130 (China); Sclabassi, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zhu Jiangang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Melon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bagic, Anto [Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Sun Mingui [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)], E-mail: mrsun@neuronet.pitt.edu

    2008-04-15

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been widely utilized in biomedical applications due to their extremely high sensitivity to magnetic signals. The present study explores the feasibility of a new type of nanotechnology-based imaging method using standard clinical magnetoencephalographic (MEG) systems equipped with SQUID sensors. Previous studies have shown that biological targets labeled with non-toxic, magnetized nanoparticles can be imaged by measuring the magnetic field generated by these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that (1) the magnetic signals from certain nanoparticles can be detected without magnetization using standard clinical MEG, (2) for some types of nanoparticles, only bound particles produce detectable signals, and (3) the magnetic field of particles several hours after magnetization is significantly stronger than that of un-magnetized particles. These findings hold promise in facilitating the potential application of magnetic nanoparticles to in vivo tumor imaging. The minimum amount of nanoparticles that produce detectable signals is predicted by theoretical modeling and computer simulation.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, ordering and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.; Luna, C.; Morales, M.P.; Sanz, R.; Serna, C.J.; Mijangos, C.

    2004-01-01

    Polyol methods to synthesize nanoparticles and their arrays are firstly described. Magnetic nanoparticles self-assemble under particular conditions into spherical superstructures, like CoNi nanoparticles, or planar structures with hexagonal ordering, like FePt nanoparticles. Particles and their arrays are structurally analysed by techniques like TEM, X-ray, etc. Magnetic characterization is firstly performed by VSM magnetomer as a function of the nanoparticles size paying particular attention to the transition from multidomain to single-domain structures. Later on, magnetic exchange coupling effects are discussed including the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters as coercive and exchange bias fields, as well as the influence of field or zero-field cooling processes. Finally, magnetic polymers consisting of magnetic nanoparticles embedded into PVC polymeric matrix are prepared and magnetically analysed

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles. Metrological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, V N; Nikiforov, A V; Oxengendler, B L; Turaeva, N N; Sredin, V G

    2011-01-01

    The experiments on influence of the iron oxide cluster size on the specific magnetic moment are performed. Both free and covered clusters are investigated. The experiments are interpreted on the base of core-shell model by analogy to Weizsaecker formula in the nuclear physics. Metrological parameters for the cluster size investigation are obtained.

  12. Non-rare earth magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Everett E.; Huba, Zachary J.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Farghaly, Ahmed; Khanna, Shiv N.; Qian, Meichun; Bertino, Massimo

    2017-09-26

    Continuous flow synthetic methods are used to make single phase magnetic metal alloy nanoparticles that do not contain rare earth metals. Soft and hard magnets made from the magnetic nanoparticles are used for a variety of purposes, e.g. in electric motors, communication devices, etc.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles From Fabrication to Clinical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thanh, Nguyen TK

    2012-01-01

    Offering the latest information in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) research, Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Fabrication to Clinical Applications provides a comprehensive review, from synthesis, characterization, and biofunctionalization to clinical applications of MNPs, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. This book, written by some of the most qualified experts in the field, not only fills a hole in the literature, but also bridges the gaps between all the different areas in this field. Translational research on tailored magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications spans a variet

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles for tunable microwave metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Noginova, Natalia; Williams, Quincy Leon; Dallas, Panagiotis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Commonly, metamaterials are electrically engineered systems with optimized spatial arrangement of subwavelength sized metal and dielectric components. We explore alternative methods based on use of magnetic inclusions, such as magnetic nanoparticles, which can allow permeability of a composite to be tuned from negative to positive at the range of magnetic resonance. To better understand effects of particle size and magnetization dynamics, we performed electron magnetic resonance study on several varieties of magnetic nanoparticles and determined potential of nanoparticle use as building blocks for tunable microwave metamaterials. © (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles for tunable microwave metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Noginova, Natalia

    2012-09-24

    Commonly, metamaterials are electrically engineered systems with optimized spatial arrangement of subwavelength sized metal and dielectric components. We explore alternative methods based on use of magnetic inclusions, such as magnetic nanoparticles, which can allow permeability of a composite to be tuned from negative to positive at the range of magnetic resonance. To better understand effects of particle size and magnetization dynamics, we performed electron magnetic resonance study on several varieties of magnetic nanoparticles and determined potential of nanoparticle use as building blocks for tunable microwave metamaterials. © (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  16. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V.; Novoselova, Iu.P.; Schupletsova, V.V.; Andrade, R.; Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S.; Safronov, A.P.; Yurova, K.A.; Kulesh, N.A.; Dzyuman, A.N.; Khlusov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  17. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina@we.lc.ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco BCMaterials UPV-EHU, Leioa, 48940 Spain (Spain); Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Novoselova, Iu.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Schupletsova, V.V. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Andrade, R. [SGIker, ServiciosGenerales de Investigación, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, 48080 Spain (Spain); Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Division, RAS, Ekaterinburg, 620016 (Russian Federation); Yurova, K.A. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Kulesh, N.A. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A.N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Khlusov, I.A. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles and their application in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felinto, M.C.F.C.; Camilo, R.L.; Diegues, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic nanoparticles offer some attractive possibilities in biomedicine for the following reasons: First, they have controllable sizes ranging from a few nanometers up to tens of nanometers, which places them at dimensions that are smaller than or comparable to those of a cell (10-100μm) a virus (20-450 nm) or a protein (5-50 nm). Second, the nanoparticles are magnetic, which means that they obey Coulomb's law, and can be manipulated by an external magnetic field gradient. This possibility, combined with the intrinsic penetrability of magnetic fields into human tissue, opens up many applications involving the transport and/or immobilization of magnetic nanoparticles, or of magnetically tagged biological entities. Third, the magnetic nanoparticles can be made to resonantly respond to a time-varying magnetic field, with advantageous results related to the transfer of energy from the exciting field to the nanoparticle. In this paper, we will address the underlying chemical and physics of the biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles including radioisotope delivery and a magnetic radiolabeled fluid. We will consider four particular applications: magnetic separation for radio labeled proteins, drug radiolabeled delivery, hyperthermia treatments, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement. There will be included some results obtained in our laboratory in the obtention of these magnetic (author)

  19. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Anand [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite

  20. Using magnetic nanoparticles to manipulate biological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yi; Gao Yu; Xu Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for the manipulation of biological objects, including proteins, genes, cellular organelles, bacteria, cells, and organs, are reviewed. MNPs are popular candidates for controlling and probing biological objects with a magnetic force. In the past decade, progress in the synthesis and surface engineering of MNPs has further enhanced this popularity. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  1. Magnetic irone oxide nanoparticles in photosynthetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalilov, R.I.; Nasibova, A.N.; Khomutov, G.B.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : It was found and studied the effect of biogenic formation of magnetic inclusions in photosynthetic systems - in various higher plants under the influence of some external stress factors (radiation impact, moisture deficit) and in a model system - a suspension of chloroplasts. For registration and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles in the samples used EPR spectrometer because superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic nanoparticles have a chcracteristic signals of electron magnetic resonance. For direct visualization of magnetic nanoparticles it was used the method of transmission electron microscopy

  2. Magnetic behaviour of interacting antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovich, V; Jung, G; Gorodetsky, G; Puzniak, R; Wisniewski, A; Skourski, Y; Mogilyanski, D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic properties of interacting La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 nanoparticles have been investigated. The field-induced transition from antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) state in the La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 bulk has been observed at exceptionally high magnetic fields. For large particles, the field-induced transition widens while magnetization progressively decreases. In small particles the transition is almost fully suppressed. The thermoremanence and isothermoremanence curves constitute fingerprints of irreversible magnetization originating from nanoparticle shells. We have ascribed the magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles to a core-shell scenario with two main magnetic contributions; one attributed to the formation of a collective state formed by FM clusters in frustrated coordination at the surfaces of interacting AFM nanoparticles and the other associated with inner core behaviour as a two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnet. (paper)

  3. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  4. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  5. Drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgons, R; Seliger, C; Hilpert, A; Trahms, L; Odenbach, S; Alexiou, C

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. In medicine they are used for several approaches such as magnetic cell separation or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is the focus of medical research, especially for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the vascular system. In an experimental cancer model, we performed targeted drug delivery and used magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, bound to a chemotherapeutic agent, which were attracted to an experimental tumour in rabbits by an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting). Complete tumour remission could be achieved. An important advantage of these carriers is the possibility for detecting these nanoparticles after treatment with common imaging techniques (i.e. x-ray-tomography, magnetorelaxometry, magnetic resonance imaging), which can be correlated to histology

  6. Parylene nanocomposites using modified magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ignacio; Luzuriaga, A. Ruiz de; Grande, H.; Jeandupeux, L.; Charmet, J.; Laux, E.; Keppner, H.; Mecerreyes, D.; Cabanero, German

    2010-01-01

    Parylene/Fe 3 O 4 nanocomposites were synthesized and characterized. The nanocomposites were obtained by chemical vapour deposition polymerization of Parylene onto functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. For this purpose, allyltrichlorosilane was used to modify the surface of 7 nm size Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles obtained by the coprecipitation method. The magnetic nanoparticles and obtained nanocomposite were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and magnetic measurements (SQUID). The successful incorporation of different amounts of nanoparticles into Parylene was confirmed by FTIR and TGA. Interestingly, increments in saturation magnetization of the nanocomposites were observed ranging from 0 emu/g of neat Parylene to 16.94 emu/g in the case of nanocomposite films that contained 27.5 wt% of nanoparticles.

  7. Biodegradation of magnetic nanoparticles evaluated from Moessbauer and magnetization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mischenko, I., E-mail: IlyaMischenko@rambler.ru; Chuev, M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Cherepanov, V.; Polikarpov, M.; Panchenko, V. [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    In order to extract a quantitative information about characteristics of the magnetic nanoparticles injected into a living organism it is necessary to define a model of the magnetic dynamics for fitting self-consistently the whole set of the experimental data, specifically, the evolution of Moessbauer spectral shape with temperature and external magnetic field as well as the magnetization curves. We have developed such a model and performed such an analysis of the temperature- and magnetic field-dependent spectra and magnetization curves of nanoparticles injected into mice. This allowed us to reliably evaluate changes in the characteristics of the residual particles and their chemical transformation to paramagnetic ferritin-like forms in different mouse organs as a function of time. Actually, the approach makes it possible to quantitatively characterize biodegradation and biotransformation of magnetic nanoparticles delivered in a body.

  8. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, B.-R.; Chen, P.-Y.; Huang, C.-Y.; Jung, S.-M.; Ma, Y.-H.; Wu, Tony; Chen, J.-P.; Wei, K.-C.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  9. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.-R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, P.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang-Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jung, S.-M. [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Y.-H. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tony [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-P. [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Wei, K.-C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuochenwei@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  10. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brown, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Coopersmith, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fulmer, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Sessions, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Ali, M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  11. Measuring magnetic correlations in nanoparticle assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate how to extract correlations between magnetic moments in assemblies of nanoparticles from, e.g., electron holography data providing the combined knowledge of particle size distribution, inter-particle distances, and magnitude and orientation of each magnetic moment within...... a nanoparticle superstructure, We show, based on simulated data, how to build a radial/angular pair distribution function f(r,θ) encoding the spatial and angular difference between every pair of magnetic moments. A scatter-plot of f(r,θ) reveals the degree of structural and magnetic order present, and hence...

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticle design for medical application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mornet, S.; Vasseur, S.; Grasset, F.; Veverka, Pavel; Goglio, G.; Demourgues, A.; Portier, J.; Pollert, Emil; Duguet, E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 34, - (2006), s. 237-247 ISSN 0079-6786 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS100100553; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * medical applications * magnetic resonance imaging * magnetic hyperthermia Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.500, year: 2006

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles for local drug delivery using magnetic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Marquina, Clara; Gabriel Valdivia, J.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates used for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor agents. They can be concentrated on a desired region, reducing collateral effects and improving the efficiency of the chemotherapy. We propose a method in which permanent magnets are implanted by laparoscopic technique directly in the affected organ. This method proposes the use of FeC nanoparticles, which are loaded with doxorubicin and injected intravenously. The particles, once attracted to the magnet, release the drug at the tumor region. This method seems to be more promising and effective than that based on the application of external magnetic fields

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles for local drug delivery using magnetic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo [Instituto Universitario de Investigacion en Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Edif. Inter. II, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, Clara [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Ciencias, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gabriel Valdivia, J. [Instituto Universitario de Investigacion en Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Edif. Inter. II, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Hospital Clinico Universitario ' Lozano Blesa' , Avda Gomez Laguna, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)] (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates used for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor agents. They can be concentrated on a desired region, reducing collateral effects and improving the efficiency of the chemotherapy. We propose a method in which permanent magnets are implanted by laparoscopic technique directly in the affected organ. This method proposes the use of FeC nanoparticles, which are loaded with doxorubicin and injected intravenously. The particles, once attracted to the magnet, release the drug at the tumor region. This method seems to be more promising and effective than that based on the application of external magnetic fields.

  16. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase....

  17. Tailoring magnetic nanoparticle for transformers application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, P C; Silva, A S; Leite, E S; Garg, V K; Oliveira, A C; Viali, W R; Sartoratto, P P C

    2010-02-01

    In this study photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of dilution of an oil-based magnetic fluid sample on the magnetic nanoparticle surface-coating. Changes of the photoacoustic signal intensity on the band-L region (640 to 830 nm) upon dilution of the stock magnetic fluid sample were discussed in terms of molecular surface desorption. The model proposed here assumes that the driving force taking the molecules out from the nanoparticle surface into the bulk solvent is the gradient of osmotic pressure. This gradient of osmotic pressure is established between the nanoparticle surface and the bulk suspension. It is further assumed that the photoacoustic signal intensity (area under the photoacoustic spectra) scales linearly with the number of coating molecules (surface grafting) at the nanoparticle surface. This model picture provides a non-linear analytical description for the reduction of the surface grafting coefficient upon dilution, which was successfully-used to curve-fit the photoacoustic experimental data.

  18. Magnetic Thermometer: Thermal effect on the Agglomeration of Magnetic Nanoparticles by Magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Daeseong; Kim, Hackjin

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the agglomeration of magnetite nanoparticles in the aqueous solution under magnetic field by measuring temporal change of magnetic weight. The magnetic weight corresponds to the force due to the magnetization of magnetic materials. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized and used in this work. When the aqueous solution of magnetite nanoparticle is placed under magnetic field, the magnetic weight of the sample jumps instantaneously by Neel and Brown mechanisms and thereafter increases steadily following a stretched exponential function as the nanoparticles agglomerate, which results from the distribution of energy barriers involved in the dynamics. Thermal motions of nanoparticles in the agglomerate perturb the ordered structure of the agglomerate to reduce the magnetic weight. Fluctuation of the structural order of the agglomerate by temperature change is much faster than the formation of agglomerate and explained well with the Boltzmann distribution, which suggests that the magnetic weight of the agglomerate works as a magnetic thermometer.

  19. Structural characterization of copolymer embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedelcu, G.G., E-mail: ggnedelcu@yahoo.com [Faculty of Physics, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza”, Carol I Bulevard, Nr.11, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Nastro, A.; Filippelli, L. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Cazacu, M.; Iacob, M. [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry “Petru Poni”, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, nr. 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Rossi, C. Oliviero [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Popa, A.; Toloman, D. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca 5 (Romania); Dobromir, M.; Iacomi, F. [Faculty of Physics, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza”, Carol I Bulevard, Nr.11, 700506 Iasi (Romania)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The emulsion polymerization method was used to synthesize three samples of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) coated magnetite obtained before through co-precipitation technique. • Poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) coated magnetite nanoparticles were prepared having spherical shape and dimensions between 13 and 16 nm without agglomerations. • Fourier transform infrared spectra have found that the magnetite was pure and spectral characteristics of PMMA-co-AAc were present. • The electron spin resonance spectra revealed that interactions between nanoparticles are very weak due to the fact that the nanoparticles have been individually embedded in polymer. • The resonance field values as function of temperature demonstrate that the presence of polymer has not modified essentially its magnetic properties, except that at temperatures below 140 K there was a change due to decreasing of the magnetic anisotropy. - Abstract: Small magnetic nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were synthesized by co-precipitation and coated by emulsion polymerization with poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) (PMMA-co-AAc) to create surface functional groups that can attach drug molecules and other biomolecules. The coated and uncoated magnetite nanoparticles were stored for two years in normal closed ships and than characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solid phase transformation of magnetite to maghemite, as well as an increase in particle size were evidenced for the uncoated nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles preserved their magnetite structure and magnetic properties. The influences of monomers and surfactant layers on interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles evidenced that the thickness of the polymer has a significant effect on magnetic properties.

  20. The spin structure of magnetic nanoparticles and in magnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disch, Sabrina

    2011-09-26

    The present thesis provides an extensive and original contribution to the investigation of magnetic nanoparticles regarding synthesis and structural characterization using advanced scattering methods in all length scales between the atomic and mesoscopic size range. Particular emphasis is on determination of the magnetic structure of single nanoparticles as well as preparation and characterization of higher dimensional assemblies thereof. The unique physical properties arising from the finite size of magnetic nanoparticles are pronounced for very small particle sizes. With the aim of preparing magnetic nanoparticles suitable for investigation of such properties, a micellar synthesis route for very small cobalt nanoparticles is explored. Cobalt nanoparticles with diameters of less than 3 nm are prepared and characterized, and routes for variation of the particle size are developed. The needs and limitations of primary characterization and handling of such small and oxidation-sensitive nanoparticles are highlighted and discussed in detail. Comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization is performed on iron oxide nanoparticles of {proportional_to} 10 nm in diameter. Particle size and narrow size distribution are determined with high precision. Investigation of the long range and local atomic structure reveals a particle size dependent magnetite - maghemite structure type with lattice distortions induced at the particle surface. The spatial magnetization distribution within these nanoparticles is determined to be constant in the particle core with a decrease towards the particle surface, thus indicating a magnetic dead layer or spin canting close to the surface. Magnetically induced arrangements of such nanoparticles into higher dimensional assemblies are investigated in solution and by deposition of long range ordered mesocrystals. Both cases reveal a strong dependence of the found structures on the nanoparticle shape (spheres, cubes, and heavily truncated

  1. Interaction effects in magnetic oxide nanoparticle systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction effects in magnetic nanoparticle system were studied through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results of simulations were compared with two different magnetic systems, namely, iron oxide polymer nanocomposites prepared by polymerization over core and nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite thin films prepared by ...

  2. Structure and dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, K.N.; Bødker, F.; Hansen, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present X-ray and neutron diffraction data illustrating aspects of crystal and magnetic structures of ferromagnetic alpha-Fe and antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles, as well as inelastic neutron scattering studies of the magnetic fluctuations in NiO and in canted antiferromagnetic...

  3. Heating efficiency in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deatsch, Alison E.; Evans, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermic treatment of cancers have gained significant attention in recent years. In magnetic hyperthermia, three independent mechanisms result in thermal energy upon stimulation: Néel relaxation, Brownian relaxation, and hysteresis loss. The relative contribution of each is strongly dependent on size, shape, crystalline anisotropy, and degree of aggregation or agglomeration of the nanoparticles. We review the effects of each of these physical mechanisms in light of recent experimental studies and suggest routes for progress in the field. Particular attention is given to the influence of the collective behaviors of nanoparticles in suspension. A number of recent studies have probed the effect of nanoparticle concentration on heating efficiency and have reported superficially contradictory results. We contextualize these studies and show that they consistently indicate a decrease in magnetic relaxation time with increasing nanoparticle concentration, in both Brownian- and Néel-dominated regimes. This leads to a predictable effect on heating efficiency and alleviates a significant source of confusion within the field. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. • Heating depends on individual properties and collective properties. • We review recent studies with respect to loss mechanisms. • Collective behavior is a key source of confusion in the field. • We contextualize recent studies to elucidate consistencies and alleviate confusion

  4. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase.......Strong magnets with a high energy product are vital when optimizing the efficiency in the electric industry. But since the rare earth metals, normally used for making strong permanent magnets, are both expensive and difficult to mine, a great demand has come to cheaper types of magnets...

  5. Synthesis and characterization of ultrafine well-dispersed magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.L.; Wang, H.B.; Lu, Q.H.; Du, G.H.; Peng, L.; Du, Y.Q.; Zhang, S.M.; Yao, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrafine well-dispersed magnetic nanoparticles were directly prepared in aqueous solution using controlled coprecipitation method. The structure, size, size distributions and magnetic properties of the magnetic nanoparticles, characterized by TEM, XRD and VSM, indicated the formation of single domain nanoparticles with average size smaller than 5 nm. The magnetic nanoparticles show superparamagnetism and a lower saturation magnetization is found as a consequence of smaller particle size. The relevant conditions for obtaining these magnetic colloids are discussed and the so-prepared magnetic nanoparticles are stable in a wide pH range

  6. Standardisation of magnetic nanoparticles in liquid suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, James; Kazakova, Olga; Posth, Oliver; Steinhoff, Uwe; Petronis, Sarunas; Bogart, Lara K.; Southern, Paul; Pankhurst, Quentin; Johansson, Christer

    2017-09-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles offer diverse opportunities for technology innovation, spanning a large number of industry sectors from imaging and actuation based applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, through large-scale environmental remediation uses such as water purification, to engineering-based applications such as position-controlled lubricants and soaps. Continuous advances in their manufacture have produced an ever-growing range of products, each with their own unique properties. At the same time, the characterisation of magnetic nanoparticles is often complex, and expert knowledge is needed to correctly interpret the measurement data. In many cases, the stringent requirements of the end-user technologies dictate that magnetic nanoparticle products should be clearly defined, well characterised, consistent and safe; or to put it another way—standardised. The aims of this document are to outline the concepts and terminology necessary for discussion of magnetic nanoparticles, to examine the current state-of-the-art in characterisation methods necessary for the most prominent applications of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, to suggest a possible structure for the future development of standardisation within the field, and to identify areas and topics which deserve to be the focus of future work items. We discuss potential roadmaps for the future standardisation of this developing industry, and the likely challenges to be encountered along the way.

  7. Standardisation of magnetic nanoparticles in liquid suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, James; Kazakova, Olga; Posth, Oliver; Steinhoff, Uwe; Petronis, Sarunas; Bogart, Lara K; Southern, Paul; Pankhurst, Quentin; Johansson, Christer

    2017-01-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles offer diverse opportunities for technology innovation, spanning a large number of industry sectors from imaging and actuation based applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, through large-scale environmental remediation uses such as water purification, to engineering-based applications such as position-controlled lubricants and soaps. Continuous advances in their manufacture have produced an ever-growing range of products, each with their own unique properties. At the same time, the characterisation of magnetic nanoparticles is often complex, and expert knowledge is needed to correctly interpret the measurement data. In many cases, the stringent requirements of the end-user technologies dictate that magnetic nanoparticle products should be clearly defined, well characterised, consistent and safe; or to put it another way—standardised. The aims of this document are to outline the concepts and terminology necessary for discussion of magnetic nanoparticles, to examine the current state-of-the-art in characterisation methods necessary for the most prominent applications of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, to suggest a possible structure for the future development of standardisation within the field, and to identify areas and topics which deserve to be the focus of future work items. We discuss potential roadmaps for the future standardisation of this developing industry, and the likely challenges to be encountered along the way. (topical review)

  8. Applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankhurst, Q A; Connolly, J; Jones, S K; Dobson, J

    2003-01-01

    The physical principles underlying some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles are reviewed. Starting from well-known basic concepts, and drawing on examples from biology and biomedicine, the relevant physics of magnetic materials and their responses to applied magnetic fields are surveyed. The way these properties are controlled and used is illustrated with reference to (i) magnetic separation of labelled cells and other biological entities; (ii) therapeutic drug, gene and radionuclide delivery; (iii) radio frequency methods for the catabolism of tumours via hyperthermia; and (iv) contrast enhancement agents for magnetic resonance imaging applications. Future prospects are also discussed. (topical review)

  9. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viñas, S. Liébana [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Simeonidis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Angelakeris, M., E-mail: agelaker@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Farle, M., E-mail: michael.farle@uni-due.de [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core–shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) or magnetically harder (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) core and a magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects. - Highlights: • Magnetic hyperthermia is studied for 10 nm single and core/shell ferrite nanoparticles. • Maximum heating rate is observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • The increase is attributed to the interaction of phases with different anisotropy. • The presence of biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} shell potentially minimizes toxic side-effects.

  10. Dynamics of magnetic nano-particle assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyev, V N

    2010-01-01

    Ferromagnetically coupled nano-particle assembly is analyzed accounting for inter- and intra- particle electronic structures within the randomly jumping interacting moments model including quantum fluctuations due to the discrete levels and disorder. At the magnetic jump anomalies caused by quantization the magnetic state equation and phase diagram are found to indicate an existence of spinodal regions and critical points. Arrays of magnetized nano-particles with multiple magnetic response anomalies are predicted to display some specific features. In a case of weak coupling such arrays exhibit the well-separated instability regions surrounding the anomaly positions. With increasing coupling we observe further structure modification, plausibly, of bifurcation type. At strong coupling the dynamical instability region become wide while the stable regime arises as a narrow islands at small disorders. It is shown that exploring correlations of magnetic noise amplitudes represents convenient analytical tool for quantitative definition, description and study of supermagnetism, as well as self-organized criticality.

  11. Iron nanoparticle assemblies: structures and magnetic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, D; Cheng, Y; Kan, S; Sachan, M; Ding, Y; Majetich, S A; Yang, L

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembly of spherical, surfactant-coated nanoparticles is discussed, an examples are presented to demonstrate the variety of structures that can be formed, and the conditions that lead to them. The effect of the concentration on the magnetic properties is then examined for 8.5 nm Fe nanoparticles. Dilute dispersions, arrays formed by evaporation of the dispersions, and nanoparticle crystals grown by slow diffusion of a poorly coordinating solvent were characterized by zero field-cooled magnetization, remanent hysteresis loop, and magnetic relaxation measurements. The average spacing between the particles was determined from a combination of transmission electron microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. In the arrays the spacing was 2.5 nm between the edges of the particle cores, while in the nanoparticle crystals the particles were more tightly packed, with a separation of 1.1 nm. The reduced separation increased the magnetostatic interaction strength in the nanoparticle crystals, which showed distinctly different behavior in the rate of approach to saturation in the remanent hysteresis loops, and in the faster rate of time-dependent magnetic relaxation

  12. Microheater based on magnetic nanoparticle embedded PDMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Tai Hyun; Park, Hongsuk; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2010-01-01

    A microheater was established by embedding magnetic nanoparticles into PDMS (MNP-PDMS). MNP-PDMS generated heat under an AC magnetic field and the temperature was controlled by varying the magnetic particle content and the magnetic field intensity. In this study, the MNP-PDMS chip was demonstrated to amplify the target DNA (732 bp) with > 90% efficiency compared to the conventional PCR thermocycler, and exhibited good performance in regards to temperature control. This system holds great promise for reliably controlling the temperature of thermal processes on an integrated microchip platform for biochemical applications.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for application in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Banobre-Lopez, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pineiro-Redondo, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Rivas, B., E-mail: jose.rivas@usc.es [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lopez-Quintela, M.A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Magnetic particles play nowadays an important role in different technological areas with potential applications in fields such as electronics, energy and biomedicine. In this report we will focus on the hyperthermia properties of magnetite nanoparticles and the effect of several chemical/physical parameters on their heating properties. We will discuss about the need of searching new smaller magnetic systems in order to fulfill the required physical properties which allow treating tumoral tissues more efficiently by means of magnetically induced heat. Preliminary results will be shown about the effect of a biocompatible shell of core-shell magnetite NPs on the heating properties by application of a RF magnetic field.

  14. Microheater based on magnetic nanoparticle embedded PDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Tai Hyun [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hongsuk [Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo, E-mail: thpark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-23

    A microheater was established by embedding magnetic nanoparticles into PDMS (MNP-PDMS). MNP-PDMS generated heat under an AC magnetic field and the temperature was controlled by varying the magnetic particle content and the magnetic field intensity. In this study, the MNP-PDMS chip was demonstrated to amplify the target DNA (732 bp) with > 90% efficiency compared to the conventional PCR thermocycler, and exhibited good performance in regards to temperature control. This system holds great promise for reliably controlling the temperature of thermal processes on an integrated microchip platform for biochemical applications.

  15. Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab M. Obaidat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized magnetic hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs under the application of small magnetic fields is a promising tool for treating small or deep-seated tumors. For this method to be applicable, the amount of MNPs used should be minimized. Hence, it is essential to enhance the power dissipation or heating efficiency of MNPs. Several factors influence the heating efficiency of MNPs, such as the amplitude and frequency of the applied magnetic field and the structural and magnetic properties of MNPs. We discuss some of the physics principles for effective heating of MNPs focusing on the role of surface anisotropy, interface exchange anisotropy and dipolar interactions. Basic magnetic properties of MNPs such as their superparamagnetic behavior, are briefly reviewed. The influence of temperature on anisotropy and magnetization of MNPs is discussed. Recent development in self-regulated hyperthermia is briefly discussed. Some physical and practical limitations of using MNPs in magnetic hyperthermia are also briefly discussed.

  16. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  17. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin; Kokkinis, Georgios; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen; Cardoso, Susana; Cardoso, Filipe; Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  18. Purification of rhamnolipid using colloidal magnetic nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phospholipid-coated colloidal magnetic nanoparticles with mean magnetite core size of 9 nm are shown to be effective ion exchange media for the recovery and purification of Rhaminolipid from culture mixtures. These particles have high adsorption capacity for purification (an order of magnitude larger than the best ...

  19. Thermoinduced magnetization in nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2004-01-01

    We show that there is a thermoinduced contribution to the magnetic moment of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials. It arises from thermal excitations of the uniform spin-precession mode, and it has the unusual property that its magnitude increases with increasing temperature. This has...

  20. [Blood detoxification using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (magnetic hemodialysis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciochină, Al D; Untu, Alina; Iacob, Gh

    2010-01-01

    The authors present an experimental study realized in order to simulate blood detoxification with the help of supermagnetic nanoparticles. The particles used are red oxide nanoparticles which are considered to be equivalent from a magnetic susceptibility and dynamic diameter point of view to the complex structures of magnetite nanoparticles. Two types of custom HGMS matrices have been used--a threaded one and a micro-spheres one. For testing red oxide particles have been purposefully created to have a lower magnetic susceptibility than magnetite or iron-carbon particles used in other experimental studies. Different concentrations of iron oxide, glycerine and water have been prepared, creating a 3.5 cP viscosity (equivalent to the one of the blood); the concentrations of the prepared solutions varied between 0.16 mg/mL and 2 mg/mL, with the background magnetic field value ranging from 0.25 T to 0.9 T, in order to observer the effectiveness of filtering at different intensities. The efficiency of HGMS filtering in experimental conditions was almost completely successful (99.99%) in all experimental conditions, both with the threaded and micro-spheres matrices. The high gradient magnetic separation system of nanoparticles has maximum efficiency and has the potential of being implemented in a medical blood detoxification device.

  1. Chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assa, Farnaz; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Ajamein, Hossein; Vaghari, Hamideh; Anarjan, Navideh; Ahmadi, Omid; Berenjian, Aydin

    2017-06-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in drug delivery systems (DDSs) is mainly related to its magnetic core and surface coating. These coatings can eliminate or minimize their aggregation under physiological conditions. Also, they can provide functional groups for bioconjugation to anticancer drugs and/or targeted ligands. Chitosan, as a derivative of chitin, is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs), due to their huge surface to volume ratio as compared to the chitosan in its bulk form, have outstanding physico-chemical, antimicrobial and biological properties. These unique properties make chitosan NPs a promising biopolymer for the application of DDSs. In this review, the current state and challenges for the application magnetic chitosan NPs in drug delivery systems were investigated. The present review also revisits the limitations and commercial impediments to provide insight for future works.

  2. Composite magnetic nanoparticles: Synthesis and cancer-related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Ping; Chen Hong-Min; Xie Jin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the preparation and applications of composite magnetic nanoparticles are reviewed and summarized, with a focus on cancer-related applications. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  3. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiyanagi, Yuko [Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Physics, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: yuko@ynu.ac.jp; Moritake, Shinji [Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Physics, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Taira, Shu [Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Molecular Gerontology Research Group, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan); Setou, Mitsutoshi [Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Molecular Gerontology Research Group, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    We prepared an amino-substituted nanoparticle by means of the amino-silane coupling procedure. The original magnetic particles were {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which ranged in size from 1.3 to 34 nm, surrounded by amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The modification of the magnetic particle by the addition of an amino group was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a spinel structure both before and after modification of the amino group. The magnetization curve indicated paramagnetic behavior for the 3 nm particles, superparamagnetic behavior for the 7 nm particles, and ferromagnetic behavior for 9 nm particles at room temperature. A fluorescent reagent was applied to the particle, and the particle was introduced into a cell. The magnetic particles in the cell were localized using an external magnetic field.

  4. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiyanagi, Yuko; Moritake, Shinji; Taira, Shu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2007-01-01

    We prepared an amino-substituted nanoparticle by means of the amino-silane coupling procedure. The original magnetic particles were γ-Fe 2 O 3 , which ranged in size from 1.3 to 34 nm, surrounded by amorphous SiO 2 . The modification of the magnetic particle by the addition of an amino group was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a spinel structure both before and after modification of the amino group. The magnetization curve indicated paramagnetic behavior for the 3 nm particles, superparamagnetic behavior for the 7 nm particles, and ferromagnetic behavior for 9 nm particles at room temperature. A fluorescent reagent was applied to the particle, and the particle was introduced into a cell. The magnetic particles in the cell were localized using an external magnetic field

  5. ph Sensitive hydrogel as colon specific drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarifi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    γ-radiation induced graft copolymerization and crosslinking was for the synthesis of ph-sensitive hydrogels composed of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) acrylic acid. The prepared hydrogels were subjected to swelling test to evaluate the effects of ph and ionic strength of the surrounding solution. Drastic changes in the swelling parameters where observed by changing the surrounding solution ph values. The release of ibuprofen from hydrogels was monitored as a function of time at ph 1 and ph 7 in order to evaluate the prepared copolymer ability for colon- specific drug carrier uses.

  6. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  7. Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haracz, S. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Hilgendorff, M. [Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Rybka, J.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Giersig, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. • Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. • Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties. - Abstract: For different medical applications nanoparticles (NPs) with well-defined magnetic properties have to be used. Coating ligand can change the magnetic moment on the surface of nanostructures and therefore the magnetic behavior of the system. Here we investigated magnetic NPs in a size of 13 nm conjugated with four different kinds of surfactants. The surface anisotropy and the magnetic moment of the system were changed due to the presence of the surfactant on the surface of iron oxide NPs.

  8. Magnetic behavior of iron oxide nanoparticle-biomolecule assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyun; Reis, Lynn; Rajan, Krishna; Shima, Mutsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of 8-20 nm in size were investigated as an assembly with biomolecules synthesized in an aqueous solution. The magnetic behavior of the biomolecule-nanoparticles assembly depends sensitively on the morphology and hence the distribution of the nanoparticles, where the dipole coupling between the nanoparticles governs the overall magnetic behavior. In assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles with trypsin, we observe a formation of unusual self-alignment of nanoparticles within trypsin molecules. In such an assembly structure, the magnetic particles tend to exhibit a lower spin-glass transition temperature than as-synthesized bare iron oxide nanoparticles probably due to reduced interparticle couplings within the molecular matrix. The observed self-alignment of nanoparticles in biomolecules may be a useful approach for directed nanoparticles assembly

  9. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetically-Guided and Magnetically-Responsive Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Estelrich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss the recent advances in and problems with the use of magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive nanoparticles in drug delivery and magnetofection. In magnetically-guided nanoparticles, a constant external magnetic field is used to transport magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drugs to a specific site within the body or to increase the transfection capacity. Magnetofection is the delivery of nucleic acids under the influence of a magnetic field acting on nucleic acid vectors that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. In magnetically-responsive nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated or embedded in a larger colloidal structure that carries a drug. In this last case, an alternating magnetic field can modify the structure of the colloid, thereby providing spatial and temporal control over drug release.

  10. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelrich, Joan; Escribano, Elvira; Queralt, Josep; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-04-10

    In this review, we discuss the recent advances in and problems with the use of magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive nanoparticles in drug delivery and magnetofection. In magnetically-guided nanoparticles, a constant external magnetic field is used to transport magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drugs to a specific site within the body or to increase the transfection capacity. Magnetofection is the delivery of nucleic acids under the influence of a magnetic field acting on nucleic acid vectors that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. In magnetically-responsive nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated or embedded in a larger colloidal structure that carries a drug. In this last case, an alternating magnetic field can modify the structure of the colloid, thereby providing spatial and temporal control over drug release.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of novel polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles for controlled delivery of doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarzadeh A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abolfazl Akbarzadeh1, Nosratollah Zarghami2, Haleh Mikaeili3, Davoud Asgari4, Amir Mohammad Goganian5, Hanie Khaksar Khiabani5, Mohammad Samiei6, Soodabeh Davaran31Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 3Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 4Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 5Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 6Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranAbstract: Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-methyl methacrylic acid, PNIPAAm-MAA-grafted magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using silane-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a template for radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and methacrylic acid. Properties of these nanoparticles, such as size, drug-loading efficiency, and drug release kinetics, were evaluated in vitro for targeted and controlled drug delivery. The resulting nanoparticles had a diameter of 100 nm and a doxorubicin-loading efficiency of 75%, significantly higher doxorubicin release at 40°C compared with 37°C, and pH 5.8 compared with pH 7.4, demonstrating their temperature and pH sensitivity, respectively. In addition, the particles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. In vitro cytotoxicity testing showed that the PNIPAAm-MAA-coated magnetic nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity and were biocompatible, indicating their potential for biomedical application.Keywords: magnetic nanoparticles, drug loading, doxorubicin release, biocompatibility

  12. The internal structure of magnetic nanoparticles determines the magnetic response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Kubíčková, Simona; Salas, G.; Mantlíková, Alice; Marciello, M.; Morales, M.P.; Nižňanský, D.; Vejpravová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 16 (2017), s. 5129-5140 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanoparticles * single-domain * internal structure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  13. Recent analytical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analytical chemistry has experienced, as well as other areas of science, a big change due to the needs and opportunities provided by analytical nanoscience and nanotechnology. Now, nanotechnology is increasingly proving to be a powerful ally of analytical chemistry to achieve its objectives, and to simplify analytical processes. Moreover, the information needs arising from the growing nanotechnological activity are opening an exciting new field of action for analytical chemists. Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in various fields owing to their unique properties including large specific surface area and simple separation with magnetic fields. For Analytical applications, they have been used mainly for sample preparation techniques (magnetic solid phase extraction with different advanced functional groups (layered double hydroxide, β-cyclodextrin, carbon nanotube, graphen, polymer, octadecylsilane and automation of it, microextraction techniques enantioseparation and chemosensors. This review summarizes the basic principles and achievements of magnetic nanoparticles in sample preparation techniques, enantioseparation and chemosensors. Also, some selected articles recently published (2010-2016 have been reviewed and discussed.

  14. Field-dependent dynamic responses from dilute magnetic nanoparticle dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, Jeppe; Balceris, Christoph; Costo, Rocio

    2018-01-01

    The response of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to an oscillating magnetic field outside the linear response region is important for several applications including magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging and biodetection. The size and magnetic moment are two critical parameters for the pe...

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution following intratumoral administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giustini, A J; Hoopes, P J [Dartmouth Medical School and the Thayer School of Engineering, 8000 Cummings Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Ivkov, R, E-mail: andrew.j.giustini@dartmouth.edu [Triton BioSystems, Inc. , Chelmsford, MA 01824 (United States)

    2011-08-26

    Recently, heat generated by iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) stimulated by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) has shown promise in the treatment of cancer. To determine the mechanism of nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity, the physical association of the cancer cells and the nanoparticles must be determined. We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to define the time dependent cellular uptake of intratumorally administered dextran-coated, core-shell configuration IONP having a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 100-130 nm in a murine breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MTG-B) in vivo. Tumors averaging volumes of 115 mm{sup 3} were injected with iron oxide nanoparticles. The tumors were then excised and fixed for TEM at time 0.1-120 h post-IONP injection. Intracellular uptake of IONPs was 5.0, 48.8 and 91.1% uptake at one, 2 and 4 h post-injection of IONPs, respectively. This information is essential for the effective use of IONP hyperthermia in cancer treatment.

  16. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles.

  17. Cellulase immobilization on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Janaina S; Araújo, Pedro H H; Sayer, Claudia; Souza, Antonio A U; Viegas, Alexandre C; de Oliveira, Débora

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of cellulases on magnetic nanoparticles, especially magnetite nanoparticles, has been the main approach studied to make this enzyme, economically and industrially, more attractive. However, magnetite nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, are very reactive and easily oxidized in air, which has strong impact on their useful life. Thus, it is very important to provide proper surface coating to avoid the mentioned problems. This study aimed to investigate the immobilization of cellulase on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymeric nanospheres. The support was characterized in terms of morphology, average diameter, magnetic behavior and thermal decomposition analyses. The polymer nanospheres containing encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior and intensity average diameter about 150 nm. Immobilized cellulase exhibited broader temperature stability than in the free form and great reusability capacity, 69% of the initial enzyme activity was maintained after eight cycles of use. The magnetic support showed potential for cellulase immobilization and allowed fast and easy biocatalyst recovery through a single magnet.

  18. Microfluidic magnetic switching valves based on aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles: Effects of aggregate length and nanoparticle sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiemsakul, Thanakorn [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Thanon Phahonyothin, Tambon Khlong Nueng, Amphoe Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Manakasettharn, Supone, E-mail: supone@nanotec.or.th [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Thanon Phahonyothin, Tambon Khlong Nueng, Amphoe Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Kanharattanachai, Sivakorn; Wanna, Yongyuth [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Road, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Wangsuya, Sujint [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Road, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 272 Rama VI Road, Ratchathewi District, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pratontep, Sirapat [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Road, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2017-01-15

    We demonstrate microfluidic switching valves using magnetic nanoparticles blended within the working fluid as an alternative microfluidic flow control in microchannels. Y-shaped microchannels have been fabricated by using a CO{sub 2} laser cutter to pattern microchannels on transparent poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sheets covered with thermally bonded transparent polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sheets. To examine the performance of the microfluidic magnetic switching valves, an aqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspension was injected into the microchannels by a syringe pump. Neodymium magnets were then employed to attract magnetic nanoparticles and form an aggregate that blocked the microchannels at a required position. We have found that the maximum volumetric flow rate of the syringe pump that the magnetic nanoparticle aggregate can withstand scales with the square of the external magnetic flux density. The viscosity of the fluid exhibits dependent on the aggregate length and the size of the magnetic nanoparticles. This microfluidic switching valve based on aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles has strong potentials as an on-demand flow control, which may help simplifying microfluidic channel designs. - Highlights: • We demonstrate microfluidic switching valves based on aggregates of magnetic particles. • Maximum flow rate that the aggregate can withstand scales with the square of the external magnetic flux density. • Aggregates with smaller magnetic nanoparticle size can withstand higher flow rate. • Aggregate length exhibits a linear dependence with flow resistance of a viscous fluid.

  19. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of the Total Magnetic Moments of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Kinetics-based Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyi; Sun, Jianfei; Wang, Haoyao; Wang, Peng; Song, Lina; Li, Yang; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-06-08

    A kinetics-based method is proposed to quantitatively characterize the collective magnetization of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles. The method is based on the relationship between the magnetic force on a colloidal droplet and the movement of the droplet under a gradient magnetic field. Through computational analysis of the kinetic parameters, such as displacement, velocity, and acceleration, the magnetization of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles can be calculated. In our experiments, the values measured by using our method exhibited a better linear correlation with magnetothermal heating, than those obtained by using a vibrating sample magnetometer and magnetic balance. This finding indicates that this method may be more suitable to evaluate the collective magnetism of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles under low magnetic fields than the commonly used methods. Accurate evaluation of the magnetic properties of colloidal nanoparticles is of great importance for the standardization of magnetic nanomaterials and for their practical application in biomedicine. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic multi-core nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, Vincent; Wahnstroem, Goeran; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Enoksson, Peter; Johansson, Christer

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to evaluate the equilibrium magnetization of magnetic multi-core nanoparticles in a liquid and subjected to a static magnetic field. The particles contain a magnetic multi-core consisting of a cluster of magnetic single-domains of magnetite. We show that the magnetization of multi-core nanoparticles cannot be fully described by a Langevin model. Inter-domain dipolar interactions and domain magnetic anisotropy contribute to decrease the magnetization of the particles, whereas the single-domain size distribution yields an increase in magnetization. Also, we show that the interactions affect the effective magnetic moment of the multi-core nanoparticles.

  2. Engineered magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfarotta, Francesco; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2014-02-01

    In the past decades, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in wide range of diverse applications, ranging from separation to sensing. Here, synthesis and applications of functionalized MNPs in the biomedical field are discussed, in particular in drug delivery, imaging, and cancer therapy, highlighting also recent progresses in the development of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive MNPs. The role of their size, composition, and surface functionalization is analyzed, together with their biocompatibility issues. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles as potential candidates for biomedical and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Majidi, Sima; Nikzamir, Nasrin; Nikzamir, Nasim; Nikzamir, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have become the main candidates for biomedical and biological applications, and the application of small iron oxide nanoparticles in in vitro diagnostics has been practiced for about half a century. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), in combination with an external magnetic field and/or magnetizable grafts, allow the delivery of particles to the chosen target area, fix them at the local site while the medication is released, and act locally. In this review, we focus mostly on the potential use of MNPs for biomedical and biotechnological applications, and the improvements made in using these nanoparticles (NPs) in biological applications.

  4. Core/Shell Structured Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biological Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, drug delivery and cell signaling. The surface modification of the nanomaterials is required for biomedical use to give physiogical stability, surface reactivity and targeting properties. Among many approaches for the surface modification with materials, such as polymers, organic ligands and metals, one of the most attractive ways is using metals. The fabrication of metal-based, monolayer-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively studied. However, the synthesis of metal-capped magnetic nanoparticles with monodispersities and controllable sizes is still challenged. Recently, gold-capped magnetic nanoparticles have been reported to increase stability and to provide biocompatibility. Magnetic nanoparticle with gold coating is an attractive system, which can be stabilized in biological conditions and readily functionalized in biological conditions and readily functionalized through well-established surface modification (Au-S) chemistry. The Au coating offers plasmonic properties to magnetic nanoparticles. This makes the magnetic/Au core/shell combinations interesting for magnetic and optical applications. Herein, the synthesis and characterization of gold capped-magnetic core structured nanomaterials with different gold sources, such as gold acetate and chloroauric acid have been reported. The core/shell nanoparticles were transferred from organic to aqueous solutions for biomedical applications. Magnetic core/shell structured nanoparticles have been prepared and transferred from organic phase to aqueous solutions. The resulting Au-coated magnetic core nanoparticles might be an attractive system for biomedical applications, which are needed both magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging

  5. Biochemical and biomedical applications of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shih-Hung; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for future medical diagnosis and therapy. Various types of nanoparticles have been extensively studied for numerous biochemical and biomedical applications. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated by an external magnetic field, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications including bacterial detection, protein purification, enzyme immobilization, contamination decorporation, drug delivery, hyperthermia, etc. All these biochemical and biomedical applications require that these nanoparticles should satisfy some prerequisites including high magnetization, good stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, in this account highlights some general strategies to generate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. After these magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with proper ligands (e.g., nitrilotriacetate), polymers (e.g., polyacrylic acid, chitosan, temperature- and pH-sensitive polymers), antibodies, enzymes, and inorganic metals (e.g., gold), such biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit many advantages in biomedical applications. In addition, the multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles have been widely applied in biochemical fields including enzyme immobilization and protein purification.

  6. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. ► They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. ► They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Correlation between physical structure and magnetic anisotropy of a magnetic nanoparticle colloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, C. L.; Jackson, A. J.; Borchers, J. A.; Gruettner, C.; Ivkov, R.

    2018-05-01

    We show the effects of a time-invariant magnetic field on the physical structure and magnetic properties of a colloid comprising 44 nm diameter magnetite magnetic nanoparticles, with a 24 nm dextran shell, in water. Structural ordering in this colloid parallel to the magnetic field occurs simultaneously with the onset of a colloidal uniaxial anisotropy. Further increases in the applied magnetic field cause the nanoparticles to order perpendicular to the field, producing unexpected colloidal unidirectional and trigonal anisotropies. This magnetic behavior is distinct from the cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the magnetite and has its origins in the magnetic interactions among the mobile nanoparticles within the colloid. Specifically, these field-induced anisotropies and colloidal rearrangements result from the delicate balance between the magnetostatic and steric forces between magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic and structural rearrangements are anticipated to influence applications that rely upon time-dependent relaxation of the magnetic colloids and fluid viscosity, such as magnetic hyperthermia and shock absorption.

  8. Exploiting BSA to Inhibit the Fibrous Aggregation of Magnetic Nanoparticles under an Alternating Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The alternating magnetic field was discovered to be capable of inducing the fibrous aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles. However, this anisotropic aggregation may be unfavorable for practical applications. Here, we reported that the adsorption of BSA (bovine serum albumin on the surfaces of magnetic nanoparticles can effectively make the fibrous aggregation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles turn into a more isotropic aggregation in the presence of the alternating magnetic field. Also, the heating curves with and without BSA adsorption under different pH conditions were measured to show the influence of the colloidal aggregation states on the collective calorific behavior of magnetic nanoparticles.

  9. Optical detection of magnetic nanoparticles in colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, Alejandro J.; Ramirez-Wong, Diana G.; Favela-Camacho, Sarai E. [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional Unidad Querétaro, Querétaro, México (Mexico); Sanchez, Isaac C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Yáñez-Limón, J.M.; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional Unidad Querétaro, Querétaro, México (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    This study reports the change of light transmittance and light scattering dispersion by colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles. Optical changes were observed during the application of transversal magnetic fields to magnetic nanoparticles and nanowires at concentrations spanning from 20 µg/mL to 2 ng/mL. Results show that light scattering modulation is a simple, fast and inexpensive method for detection of magnetic nanoparticles at low concentrations. Frequency and time response of the optical modulation strongly depends on the geometry of the particles. In this regard, light transmittance and scattering measurements may prove useful in characterizing the morphology of suspended nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A simple route to characterize magnetic nanowire suspension is proposed. • Studied concentration as low as 2 ng/mL compares with more complex techniques. • Transmission and scattering modes allow full characterization of nanoparticles.

  10. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Hemaunt, E-mail: hvatsal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Srivastava, R.C. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Pal Singh, Jitendra [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Negi, P. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Agrawal, H.M. [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR Kolkata Centre, Kolkata 700098 (India); Hwa Chae, Keun [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy{sup 3+}concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution. - Highlights: • Slight decrease in crystallite size after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in the samples.

  11. Dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in viscoelastic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmer, Hilke, E-mail: h.remmer@tu-bs.de [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Roeben, Eric; Schmidt, Annette M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Universität zu Köln, Köln (Germany); Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    We compare different models for the description of the complex susceptibility of magnetic nanoparticles in an aqueous gelatin solution representing a model system for a Voigt-Kelvin scheme. The analysis of susceptibility spectra with the numerical model by Raikher et al. is compared with the analysis applying a phenomenological, modified Debye model. The fit of the models to the measured data allows one to extract the viscoelastic parameter dynamic viscosity η and shear modulus G. The experimental data were recorded on single-core thermally blocked CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in an aqueous solution with 2.5 wt% gelatin. Whereas the dynamic viscosities obtained by fitting the model – extended by distributions of hydrodynamic diameters and viscosities – agree very well, the derived values for the shear modulus show the same temporal behavior during the gelation process, but vary approximately by a factor of two. To verify the values for viscosity and shear modulus obtained from nanorheology, macrorheological measurements are in progress. - Highlights: • Ac susceptibility spectra of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in aqueous gelatin solution. • Analysis of spectra with different approaches of Voigt-Kelvin model. • Comparison of modified Debye model with numerical model. • Both models provide similar values for viscoelastic parameters.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer nanodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf Muhammad Zubair; Yu Jing; Hou Yang-Long; Gao Song

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis facilitates the discovery of an impending disease. A complete and accurate treatment of cancer depends heavily on its early medical diagnosis. Cancer, one of the most fatal diseases world-wide, consistently affects a larger number of patients each year. Magnetism, a physical property arising from the motion of electrical charges, which causes attraction and repulsion between objects and does not involve radiation, has been under intense investigation for several years. Magnetic materials show great promise in the application of image contrast enhancement to accurately image and diagnose cancer. Chelating gadolinium (Gd III) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have the prospect to pave the way for diagnosis, operative management, and adjuvant therapy of different kinds of cancers. The potential of MNP-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (CAs) now makes it possible to image portions of a tumor in parts of the body that would be unclear with the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple functionalities like variety of targeting ligands and image contrast enhancement have recently been added to the MNPs. Keeping aside the additional complexities in synthetic steps, costs, more convoluted behavior, and effects in-vivo, multifunctional MNPs still face great regulatory hurdles before clinical availability for cancer patients. The trade-off between additional functionality and complexity is a subject of ongoing debate. The recent progress regarding the types, design, synthesis, morphology, characterization, modification, and the in-vivo and in-vitro uses of different MRI contrast agents, including MNPs, to diagnose cancer will be the focus of this review. As our knowledge of MNPs' characteristics and applications expands, their role in the future management of cancer patients will become very important. Current hurdles are also discussed, along with future prospects of MNPs as the savior of cancer victims. (topical review - magnetism

  13. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles and their application to magnetic targeting drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guiping; Wang Yongxian

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles barrier is a novel kind of drug delivery system for magnetic targeting drugs, which can effectively deliver the drug to a tumor target site and increase therapeutic benefit, with the side effects minimized. This article summarizes the most outstanding papers on the of magnetic nanoparticles used as the targeting drug's delivery systems. (authors)

  14. Synthesis and magnetic properties of prussian blue modified Fe nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, T.; Prakash, K.; Justin Joseyphus, R.

    2013-01-01

    Fe nanoparticles are prepared using a unique polyol process and modified with prussian blue (PB) at various concentrations. The presence of PB in the Fe nanoparticles are confirmed from thermal, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electron microscopic analyses. The prussian blue existed on ;the surface of the nanoparticles when the concentration is 200 μM and in excess with 1000 μM. ;Fe nanoparticles are reduced in size using Pt as nucleating agent and modified with the optimum concentration of PB. The saturation magnetization decreases with the concentration of PB whereas the coercivity is influenced by the size of the Fe nanoparticles. The presence of oxide layer in Fe nanoparticles helps in the surface modification with PB. The Fe nanoparticles of particle size 53 nm modified with 200 μM of PB showed a saturation magnetization of 110 emu/g. The magnetic properties suggest that the PB modified Fe nanoparticles are better candidates for detoxification applications. - Highlights: • Fe nanoparticles surface modified with prussian blue (PB) were synthesized. • Optimum PB concentration on size reduced Fe showed better magnetic properties. • Coercivity decreased with increasing concentration of PB. • Fe-PB nanoparticles could be used for detoxification applications

  15. pH sensitive quantum dot-anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pKa ranging ˜5-8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated.

  16. pH sensitive quantum dot–anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pK a ranging ∼5–8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated

  17. Magnetic behavior of biosynthesized Co_3O_4 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diallo, A.; Doyle, T.B.; Mothudi, B.M.; Manikandan, E.

    2017-01-01

    This contribution reports for the 1st time on the magnetic behavior of CO_3O_4 nanoparticles synthesized by a “green” process using an Aspalathus linearis’ leaves natural extract. More accurately magnetic behavior of CO_3O_4 nanoparticles successfully biosynthesized was investigated using vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetization behavior for the samples manifests a combination of size dependent antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic behaviors, respectively, for the core and shell of the nanoparticles. - Highlights: • 1"s"t report on magnetic behavior of Co3O4 nanoparticles via Aspalathus linearis. • Co_3O_4 nanoparticles manifest size-dependent antiferromagnetic & paramagnetic behaviors. • Antiferromagnetic & paramagnetic behaviors were confirmed by VSM.

  18. Promising iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Vo, Toi Van; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades biomedical engineering has imprinted its significant impact on the map of science through its wide applications on many other fields. An important example obviously proving this fact is the versatile application of magnetic nanoparticles in theranostics. Due to preferable properties such as biocompatibility, non-toxicity compared to other metal derivations, iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles was chosen to be addressed in this review. Aim of this review is to give the readers a whole working window of these magnetic nanoparticles in the current context of science. Thus, preparation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the so-far techniques, methods of characterizing the nanoparticles as well as their most recent biomedical applications will be stated.

  19. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  20. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles and Methods of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    The present invention relates to magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites and methods of preparing the same. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and surfactant. The composites may have enhanced mechanical, thermal, and/or electrical properties.

  1. Synthesis and magnetic characterizations of uniform iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, FuYi; Li, XiaoYi; Zhu, Yuan; Tang, ZiKang

    2014-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles with a cubic shape were prepared by the decomposition of homemade iron oleate in 1-octadecene with the presence of oleic acid. The particle shape and size uniformity are sensitive to the quantity of oleic acid. XRD, HRTEM and SAED results indicated that the main phase content of as-prepared iron oxide nanoparticles is Fe 3 O 4 with an inverse spinel structure. Magnetic measurements revealed that the as-prepared iron oxide nanoparticles display a ferromagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 295 K. At low temperatures the magnetic anisotropy of the aligned nanoparticles caused the appearance of a hysteresis loop.

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted much attention in the past decades because of their potential applications in high-density magnetic recording, magnetic fluids, data storage, spin-tronics, solar cells, sensors and catalysis. Among the magnetic nanoparticles, cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) has been widely studied due to high electromagnetic performance, excellent chemical stability, mechanical hardness, and high cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy. These properties make it a promising candidate for many applications in commercial electronics such as video, audio tapes, high-density digital recording media, and magnetic fluids. Other interesting application is the use of magnetic nanocompounds in the design of magneto elastomers. Magnetoelastomers are dispersions of magnetic particles into an elastomer polymer matrix. These materials are highly promising for applications in the development of sensors and actuators, mainly because of the possibility to optimize the quality parameters of the devices by systematically changing the chemical nature of both the inorganic particles and the organic polymeric matrix, with the consequent modification of the magnetic, electric and elastic properties. Moreover, nanoparticles of cobalt-iron oxides (cobalt ferrite, CoFe 2 O 4 ) appears as very interesting compounds for magnetoelasticity, not only because present magnetic anisotropy, moderate-high magnetization and high coercitivity at room temperature, but also because the possibility to modulate its magnetic properties by chemical synthesis, that is by synthesizing nanoparticles of different sizes having thus not only different magnetic parameters but also different magnetic behavior (superparamagnetism or ferromagnetism). That means that most of the magnetic properties of CoFe 2 O 4 ferrite strongly depend on the size and shape of the nanoparticles, which are closely related to the method of preparation. On the other hand, nickel nanoparticles are very interesting

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fluidos Complexos; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin [Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted much attention in the past decades because of their potential applications in high-density magnetic recording, magnetic fluids, data storage, spin-tronics, solar cells, sensors and catalysis. Among the magnetic nanoparticles, cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) has been widely studied due to high electromagnetic performance, excellent chemical stability, mechanical hardness, and high cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy. These properties make it a promising candidate for many applications in commercial electronics such as video, audio tapes, high-density digital recording media, and magnetic fluids. Other interesting application is the use of magnetic nanocompounds in the design of magneto elastomers. Magnetoelastomers are dispersions of magnetic particles into an elastomer polymer matrix. These materials are highly promising for applications in the development of sensors and actuators, mainly because of the possibility to optimize the quality parameters of the devices by systematically changing the chemical nature of both the inorganic particles and the organic polymeric matrix, with the consequent modification of the magnetic, electric and elastic properties. Moreover, nanoparticles of cobalt-iron oxides (cobalt ferrite, CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) appears as very interesting compounds for magnetoelasticity, not only because present magnetic anisotropy, moderate-high magnetization and high coercitivity at room temperature, but also because the possibility to modulate its magnetic properties by chemical synthesis, that is by synthesizing nanoparticles of different sizes having thus not only different magnetic parameters but also different magnetic behavior (superparamagnetism or ferromagnetism). That means that most of the magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite strongly depend on the size and shape of the nanoparticles, which are closely related to the method of preparation. On the other hand, nickel

  4. Fluid Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Simulated Blood Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Lauren; Sewell, Mary Kathryn; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can be used to locally target therapies and offer the benefit of using an AC magnetic field to combine hyperthermia treatment with the triggered release of therapeutic agents. Here, we investigate localization of MNPs in a simulated environment to understand the relationship between magnetic field intensity and bulk fluid dynamics to determine MNP retention in a simulated blood vessel. As MNPs travel through blood vessels, they can be slowed or trapped in a specific area by applying a magnetic field. Magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized and labeled with a fluorescent rhodamine tag to visualize patterns in a flow cell, as monitored by a fluorescence microscope. Particle retention was determined as a function of flow rate, concentration, and magnetic field strength. Understanding the relationship between magnetic field intensity, flow behavior and nanoparticle characteristics will aid in the development of therapeutic systems specifically targeted to diseased tissue.

  5. Barium hexaferrite nanoparticles: Synthesis and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosyan, K.S.; Galstyan, E.; Hossain, S.M.; Wang Yiju; Litvinov, D.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon combustion synthesis is applied to rapid and energy efficient fabrication of crystalline barium hexaferrite nanoparticles with the average particle size of 50-100 nm. In this method, the exothermic oxidation of carbon nanoparticles with an average size of 5 nm with a surface area of 80 m 2 /g generates a self-propagating thermal wave with maximum temperatures of up to 1000 deg. C. The thermal front rapidly propagates through the mixture of solid reactants converting it to the hexagonal barium ferrite. Carbon is not incorporated in the product and is emitted from the reaction zone as a gaseous CO 2 . The activation energy for carbon combustion synthesis of BaFe 12 O 19 was estimated to be 98 kJ/mol. A complete conversion to hexagonal barium ferrite is obtained for carbon concentration exceeding 11 wt.%. The magnetic properties H c ∼3000 Oe and M s ∼50.3 emu/g of the compact sintered ferrites compare well with those produced by other synthesis methods.

  6. Magnetic properties of heat treated bacterial ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaev, D.A.; Krasikov, A.A.; Dubrovskiy, A.A.; Popkov, S.I.; Stolyar, S.V.; Bayukov, O.A.; Iskhakov, R.S.; Ladygina, V.P.; Yaroslavtsev, R.N.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, which are products of vital functions of Klebsiella oxitoca bacteria, have been studied. The initial powder containing the nanoparticles in an organic shell was subjected to low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment for up to 240 h. The bacterial ferrihydrite particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior. Their characteristic blocking temperature increases from 26 to 80 K with the heat treatment. Analysis of the magnetization curves with regard to the magnetic moment distribution function and antiferromagnetic contribution shows that the low-temperature heat treatment enhances the average magnetic moment of a particle; i.e., the nanoparticles coarsen, probably due to their partial agglomeration during heat treatment. It was established that the blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. Therefore, a model was proposed that takes into account both the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy. Using this model, the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants K V ≈1.7×10 5 erg/cm 3 and K S ≈0.055 erg/cm 2 have been determined. The effect of the surface magnetic anisotropy of ferrihydrite nanoparticles on the observed magnetic hysteresis loops is discussed. - Highlights: • Ferrihydrite nanoparticles of biogenic origin are obtained. • Magnetic characterization reveals superparamagnetic behavior. • The blocking temperature increases upon the low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment. • The blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. • The bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants have been determined.

  7. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya, E-mail: satoh@appi.keio.ac.jp

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10{sup −2} μ{sub B}/Au atom, respectively. - Highlights: • Au nanoparticles with clean surface were prepared by the gas evaporation method. • The spontaneous magnetization was observed in Au nanoparticles. • Temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization of smaller Au particles was not monotonic. • The magnetic behavior was interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell model. • The shell thickness and the magnetic moment per Au atom were estimated.

  8. Gelatine-assisted synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, André F.; Mendo, Sofia G. [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Ferreira, Liliana P. [Universidade de Lisboa, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Mendonça, Maria Helena [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Ferreira, Paula [University of Aveiro, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Godinho, Margarida; Cruz, Maria Margarida [Universidade de Lisboa, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Carvalho, Maria Deus, E-mail: mdcarvalho@ciencias.ulisboa.pt [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal)

    2016-01-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method exploring the use of gelatine and agar as additives. For comparison, magnetite nanoparticles were also prepared by standard co-precipitation, by co-precipitation with the addition of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Their magnetic properties were studied by SQUID magnetometry and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The nanoparticles potential for applications in magnetic hyperthermia was evaluated through heating efficiency under alternating magnetic field. The results show that all synthesis methods produce Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with similar sizes. The nanoparticles synthesized in the gelatine medium display the narrowest particle size distribution, the lowest oxidation degree, one of the highest saturation magnetization values and the best hyperthermia efficiency, proving that this gelatine-assisted synthesis is an efficient, environmental friendly, and low-cost method to produce magnetite nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract: A new gelatine-assisted method is an efficient and low-cost way to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic hyperthermia.

  9. Targeting to carcinoma cells with chitosan- and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of hyperthermic thermoseeds to a specific target site with minimal side effects is an important challenge in targeted hyperthermia, which employs magnetic method and functional polymers. An external magnetic field is used to control the site-specific targeting of the magnetic nanoparticles. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles can confer a higher affinity to the biological cell membranes. In this study, uncoated, chitosan-coated, and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized for use as a hyperthermic thermoseed. Each sample was examined with respect to their applications to hyperthermia using XRD, VSM, and FTIR. In addition, the temperature changes under an alternating magnetic field were observed. As in vitro tests, the magnetic responsiveness of chitosan- and starch-coated magnetite was determined by a simple blood vessel model under various intensities of magnetic field. L929 normal cells and KB carcinoma cells were used to examine the cytotoxicity and affinity of each sample using the MTT method. The chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles generated a higher DeltaT of 23 degrees C under an AC magnetic field than the starch-coated magnetite, and the capturing rate of the particles was 96% under an external magnetic field of 0.4 T. The highest viability of L929 cells was 93.7%. Comparing the rate of KB cells capture with the rate of L929 cells capture, the rate of KB cells capture relatively increased with 10.8% in chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible and have a selective affinity to KB cells. The targeting of magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia was improved using a controlled magnetic field and a chitosan-coating. Therefore, chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles are expected to be promising materials for use in magnetic targeted hyperthermia. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Towards a versatile platform based on magnetic nanoparticles for in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted wide attention because of their usefulness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or colloidal mediators for cancer magnetic hyperthermia. This paper examines these in vivo applications through an understanding of the problems involved and the current and future ...

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles: surface effects and properties related to biomedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M; Albiss, Borhan A; Haik, Yousef

    2013-10-25

    Due to finite size effects, such as the high surface-to-volume ratio and different crystal structures, magnetic nanoparticles are found to exhibit interesting and considerably different magnetic properties than those found in their corresponding bulk materials. These nanoparticles can be synthesized in several ways (e.g., chemical and physical) with controllable sizes enabling their comparison to biological organisms from cells (10-100 μm), viruses, genes, down to proteins (3-50 nm). The optimization of the nanoparticles' size, size distribution, agglomeration, coating, and shapes along with their unique magnetic properties prompted the application of nanoparticles of this type in diverse fields. Biomedicine is one of these fields where intensive research is currently being conducted. In this review, we will discuss the magnetic properties of nanoparticles which are directly related to their applications in biomedicine. We will focus mainly on surface effects and ferrite nanoparticles, and on one diagnostic application of magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

  12. Magnetic characterization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles pulled through model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Allison L; Wassel, Ronald A; Mondalek, Fadee; Chen, Kejian; Dormer, Kenneth J; Kopke, Richard D

    2007-01-04

    To quantitatively compare in-vitro and in vivo membrane transport studies of targeted delivery, one needs characterization of the magnetically-induced mobility of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Flux densities, gradients, and nanoparticle properties were measured in order to quantify the magnetic force on the SPION in both an artificial cochlear round window membrane (RWM) model and the guinea pig RWM. Three-dimensional maps were created for flux density and magnetic gradient produced by a 24-well casing of 4.1 kilo-Gauss neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) disc magnets. The casing was used to pull SPION through a three-layer cell culture RWM model. Similar maps were created for a 4 inch (10.16 cm) cube 48 MGOe NdFeB magnet used to pull polymeric-nanoparticles through the RWM of anesthetized guinea pigs. Other parameters needed to compute magnetic force were nanoparticle and polymer properties, including average radius, density, magnetic susceptibility, and volume fraction of magnetite. A minimum force of 5.04 x 10(-16) N was determined to adequately pull nanoparticles through the in-vitro model. For the guinea pig RWM, the magnetic force on the polymeric nanoparticles was 9.69 x 10-20 N. Electron microscopy confirmed the movement of the particles through both RWM models. As prospective carriers of therapeutic substances, polymers containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were succesfully pulled through the live RWM. The force required to achieve in vivo transport was significantly lower than that required to pull nanoparticles through the in-vitro RWM model. Indeed very little force was required to accomplish measurable delivery of polymeric-SPION composite nanoparticles across the RWM, suggesting that therapeutic delivery to the inner ear by SPION is feasible.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for bio-analytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedlapalli, Sri Lakshmi

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely being used in various fields of medicine, biology and separations. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and use of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and analytical separations. The goals of this research include synthesis of biocompatible surface modified monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) by novel techniques for targeted drug delivery and use of SPIONs as analytical sensing tools. Surface modification of SPIONs was performed with two different co-polymers: tri block co-polymer Pluronics and octylamine modified polyacrylic acid. Samples of SPIONs were subsequently modified with 4 different commercially available, FDA approved tri-block copolymers (Pluronics), covering a wide range of molecular weights (5.75-14.6 kDa). A novel, technically simpler and faster phase transfer approach was developed to surface modify the SPIONs with Pluronics for drug delivery and other biomedical applications. The hydrodynamic diameter and aggregation properties of the Pluronic modified SPIONs were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The coverage of SPIONs with Pluronics was supported with IR Spectroscopy and characterized by Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The drug entrapment capacity of SPIONs was studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy using a hydrophobic carbocyanine dye, which serves as a model for hydrophobic drugs. These studies resulted in a comparison of physical properties and their implications for drug loading capacities of the four types of Pluronic coated SPIONs for drug delivery assessment. These drug delivery systems could be used for passive drug targeting. However, Pluronics lack the functional group necessary for bioconjugation and hence cannot achieve active targeting. SPIONs were functionalized with octylamine modified polyacrylic acid-based copolymer, providing water solubility and facile biomolecular conjugation. Epirubicin was loaded onto SPIONs and the drug entrapment was

  14. Electronic and magnetic properties of MnAu nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, Safi 46000 (Morocco); LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Mounkachi, O; El moussaoui, H. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2014-03-15

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on DFT (Density Functional Theory) approach and using FLAPW (Full potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu nanoparticles. Polarized spin is included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic. The Mn magnetic moments where considered to be along c axes. Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculations to compute other magnetic parameters. The zero-field high temperature static susceptibility series of the magnetic moment (m) and nearest-neighbour Heisenberg and XY models on a MnAu nanoparticles is thoroughly analyzed by means of a power series coherent anomaly method (CAM) for different nanoparticles. The exchanges interactions between the magnetic atoms are obtained for MnAu nanoparticles. - Highlights: • The electronic properties of the MnAu nanoparticles are studied using the DFT and FLAPW. • Magnetic moment is computed. • The ab initio calculations are used as input for HTSEs to compute other magnetic parameters. • The exchanges interactions and blocking temperature are obtained for MnAu nanoparticles.

  15. Electronic and magnetic properties of MnAu nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrour, R.; Hlil, E.K.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Mounkachi, O; El moussaoui, H.

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on DFT (Density Functional Theory) approach and using FLAPW (Full potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu nanoparticles. Polarized spin is included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic. The Mn magnetic moments where considered to be along c axes. Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculations to compute other magnetic parameters. The zero-field high temperature static susceptibility series of the magnetic moment (m) and nearest-neighbour Heisenberg and XY models on a MnAu nanoparticles is thoroughly analyzed by means of a power series coherent anomaly method (CAM) for different nanoparticles. The exchanges interactions between the magnetic atoms are obtained for MnAu nanoparticles. - Highlights: • The electronic properties of the MnAu nanoparticles are studied using the DFT and FLAPW. • Magnetic moment is computed. • The ab initio calculations are used as input for HTSEs to compute other magnetic parameters. • The exchanges interactions and blocking temperature are obtained for MnAu nanoparticles

  16. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  17. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  18. Recent progress in biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2010-01-01

    . Yet, it is the recent, impressive advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology which caused the breakthrough in their successful application in biomedicine. This paper aims at reviewing some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

  19. Extraordinary Hall-effect in colloidal magnetic nanoparticle films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Gur, Leah; Tirosh, Einat [School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Segal, Amir [School of Physics, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Markovich, Gil, E-mail: gilmar@post.tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Gerber, Alexander, E-mail: gerber@post.tau.ac.il [School of Physics, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel)

    2017-03-15

    Colloidal nickel nanoparticles (NPs) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were synthesized. The nanoparticle dispersions were deposited on substrates and dried under mild heating to form conductive films. The films exhibited very small coercivity, nearly metallic conductivity, and a significant extraordinary Hall effect signal. This method could be useful for preparing simple, printed magnetic field sensors with the advantage of relatively high sensitivity around zero magnetic field, in contrast to magnetoresistive sensors, which have maximal field sensitivity away from zero magnetic field. - Highlights: • Ni nanoparticle ink capable of forming conductive films on drying. • The Ni nanoparticle films exhibit significant extraordinary Hall effect. • This system could be used for preparing printed magnetic field sensors integrated in 3D printed structures.

  20. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  1. Towards a versatile platform based on magnetic nanoparticles for in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted wide attention because of their usefulness as contrast agents for .... selective extracellular distribution before their excretion .... antibodies (~ 20 nm), which cause particles to diffuse poorly.

  2. Inter-particle and interfacial interaction of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Che Jin; Hwang, Yosun; Park, Jongnam; An, Kwangjin; Lee, Youjin; Lee, Jinwoo; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Park, J.-G.

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand inter-particle as well as interfacial interaction of magnetic nanoparticles, we have prepared several Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in the ranges from 3 to 50 nm. These nanoparticles are particularly well characterized in terms of size distribution with a standard deviation (σ) in size less than 0.4 nm. We investigated the inter-particle interaction by measuring the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles while controlling inter-particle distances by diluting the samples with solvents. According to this study, blocking temperatures dropped by 8-17 K with increasing the inter-particle distances from a few nm to 140 nm while the overall shape and qualitative behavior of the magnetization remain unchanged. It implies that most features observed in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are due to the intrinsic properties of the nanoparticles, not due to the inter-particle interaction. We then examined possible interfacial magnetic interaction in the core-shell structure of our Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Surface Effects and Properties Related to Biomedicine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Albiss, Borhan A.; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Due to finite size effects, such as the high surface-to-volume ratio and different crystal structures, magnetic nanoparticles are found to exhibit interesting and considerably different magnetic properties than those found in their corresponding bulk materials. These nanoparticles can be synthesized in several ways (e.g., chemical and physical) with controllable sizes enabling their comparison to biological organisms from cells (10–100 μm), viruses, genes, down to proteins (3–50 nm). The opti...

  4. Thin films on the basis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alimbekova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is to study the adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles in the structure of nanohybrid films by layer-by-layer (LbL method. Obtained by UV-VIS absorption spectra of 5% magnetic nanoparticles and the aqueous solution polyvinyl alcohol consisting of 5 and 10 nanohybrid layers. Analysis of the optical absorption spectra shows the homogeneity and mechanical stability of the nanohybrid films.

  5. Application of biomolecular recognition via magnetic nanoparticle in nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Montemagno, Carlo

    2018-05-01

    The marriage of biomolecular recognition and magnetic nanoparticle creates tremendous opportunities in the development of advanced technology both in academic research and in industrial sectors. In this paper, we review current progress on the magnetic nanoparticle-biomolecule hybrid systems, particularly employing the recognition pairs of DNA-DNA, DNA-protein, protein-protein, and protein-inorganics in several nanobiotechnology application areas, including molecular biology, diagnostics, medical treatment, industrial biocatalysts, and environmental separations.

  6. Classification of analysis methods for characterization of magnetic nanoparticle properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, O.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Steinhoff, U.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a roadmap for the standardization of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) characterization. We have assessed common MNP analysis techniques under various criteria in order to define the methods that can be used as either standard techniques for magnetic particle...... characterization or those that can be used to obtain a comprehensive picture of a MNP system. This classification is the first step on the way to develop standards for nanoparticle characterization....

  7. Application of magnetic nanoparticles in smart enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghari, Hamideh; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Mohammadlou, Mojgan; Berenjian, Aydin; Anarjan, Navideh; Jafari, Nahideh; Nasiri, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    Immobilization of enzymes enhances their properties for efficient utilization in industrial processes. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio and easy separation under external magnetic fields, are highly valued. Significant progress has been made to develop new catalytic systems that are immobilized onto magnetic nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of recent developments in enzyme immobilization and stabilization protocols using this technology. The current applications of immobilized enzymes based on magnetic nanoparticles are summarized and future growth prospects are discussed. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research.

  8. Magnetic properties and morphology of manganese ferrite nanoparticles in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, I; Ivanova, O; Ivantsov, I; Velikanov, D; Petrakovskaja, E; Artemenko, A; Curély, J; Kliava, J; Zaikovskiy, V; Stepanov, S

    2011-01-01

    Static magnetization (SM), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies are reported of borate glasses 22.5 K 2 O-22.5 Al 2 O 3 -55 B 2 O 3 co-doped with iron and manganese oxides. In as-prepared glasses the paramagnetic ions usually are in diluted state; however, if the ratio of the iron and manganese oxides in the charge is 3/2, magnetic nanoparticles are found already in as-prepared glass. After additional thermal treatment all glasses show magnetic behaviour, MCD and EMR due to the presence of magnetic nanoparticles with characteristics close to those of manganese ferrite. By computer simulating the EMR spectra at variable temperatures, their morphological characteristics are deduced: relatively broad size and shape distribution with average diameter of ca. 3-4 nm. The characteristic temperature-dependent shift of the apparent resonance field is explained by a strong temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the nanoparticles. The potassium-alumina-borate glasses containing magnetic nanoparticles represent a novel class of materials: t ransparent magnets . Indeed, they remain transparent in a part of visible and near infrared spectral range while showing magnetic and magneto-optical properties characteristic of magnetically ordered materials.

  9. Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation With Magnetically Directed Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy T; Tzou, Wendy S; Zheng, Lijun; Barham, Waseem; Schuller, Joseph L; Shillinglaw, Benjamin; Quaife, Robert A; Sauer, William H

    2016-05-01

    Remote heating of metal located near a radiofrequency ablation source has been previously demonstrated. Therefore, ablation of cardiac tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles may improve local radiofrequency heating and lead to larger ablation lesions. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tissue sensitivity to radiofrequency energy. Ablation was performed using an ablation catheter positioned with 10 g of force over prepared ex vivo specimens. Tissue temperatures were measured and lesion volumes were acquired. An in vivo porcine thigh model was used to study systemically delivered magnetically guided iron oxide (FeO) nanoparticles during radiofrequency application. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological staining of ablated tissue were subsequently performed as a part of ablation lesion analysis. Ablation of ex vivo myocardial tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles resulted in significantly larger lesions with greater impedance changes and evidence of increased thermal conductivity within the tissue. Magnet-guided localization of FeO nanoparticles within porcine thigh preps was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging and iron staining. Irrigated ablation in the regions with greater FeO, after FeO infusion and magnetic guidance, created larger lesions without a greater incidence of steam pops. Metal nanoparticle infiltration resulted in significantly larger ablation lesions with altered electric and thermal conductivity. In vivo magnetic guidance of FeO nanoparticles allowed for facilitated radiofrequency ablation without direct infiltration into the targeted tissue. Further research is needed to assess the clinical applicability of this ablation strategy using metallic nanoparticles for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. The preparation of magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tartaj, Pedro; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Gonzalez-Carreno, Teresita; Serna, Carlos J

    2003-01-01

    This review is focused on describing state-of-the-art synthetic routes for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles useful for biomedical applications. In addition to this topic, we have also described in some detail some of the possible applications of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of biomedicine with special emphasis on showing the benefits of using nanoparticles. Finally, we have addressed some relevant findings on the importance of having well-defined synthetic routes to produce materials not only with similar physical features but also with similar crystallochemical characteristics. (topical review)

  11. Design of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. T. Pong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic particle imaging (MPI is a promising medical imaging technique producing quantitative images of the distribution of tracer materials (superparamagnetic nanoparticles without interference from the anatomical background of the imaging objects (either phantoms or lab animals. Theoretically, the MPI platform can image with relatively high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. In practice, the quality of the MPI images hinges on both the applied magnetic field and the properties of the tracer nanoparticles. Langevin theory can model the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and predict the crucial influence of nanoparticle core size on the MPI signal. In addition, the core size distribution, anisotropy of the magnetic core and surface modification of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles also determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the MPI images. As a result, through rational design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the performance of MPI could be effectively optimized. In this review, the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in MPI is investigated. Rational synthesis and modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and summarized. The potential medical application areas for MPI, including cardiovascular system, oncology, stem cell tracking and immune related imaging are also analyzed and forecasted.

  12. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznickova, A.; Orendac, M.; Kolska, Z.; Cizmar, E.; Dendisova, M.; Svorcik, V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  13. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, A., E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Orendac, M., E-mail: martin.orendac@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Kolska, Z., E-mail: zdenka.kolska@seznam.cz [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Cizmar, E., E-mail: erik.cizmar@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Dendisova, M., E-mail: vyskovsm@vscht.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V., E-mail: vaclav.svorcik@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  14. Synthesis of streptavidin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Peijun; Peng Zheyang; Wang Yao; Qiao Ru; Mao Weixing; Qian Haisheng; Zhang Mengya; Li Congcong; Shi Shenyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a fabrication of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for DNA detection. Initially, amino-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization are prepared by a photopolymerization method using allylamine as monomer. It is followed by covalent immobilization of streptavidin onto the particle surface via a two-step reaction using glutaraldehyde as coupling agent. Streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles are characterized and further tested for their ability to capture DNA target after binding biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. The results show that the products (∼27.2 nm) have a maximum biotin-binding capacity of 0.71 nmol mg −1 when the immobilization reaction is conducted with a mass ratio of streptavidin to magnetic carriers above 0.2 in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) for 24 h. In addition, highly negative ζ-potential and good magnetic susceptibility of the nanocomposites make them applicable for DNA collection and detection, which is verified by the results from the preliminary application of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles in DNA detection. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles provide a promising approach for rapid collection and detection of gene.

  15. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, A; Arcos, D; Vallet-Regí, M

    2013-01-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia. (topical review)

  16. Photodegradation of Eosin Y Using Silver-Doped Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Eman

    2015-01-01

    The purification of industrial wastewater from dyes is becoming increasingly important since they are toxic or carcinogenic to human beings. Nanomaterials have been receiving significant attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties compared with their larger-size counterparts. The aim of the present investigation was to fabricate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using a coprecipitation method, followed by coating with silver (Ag) in order to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the MNPs by loading metal onto them. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag were characterised using different instruments such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average size of the magnetic nanoparticles had a mean diameter of about 48 nm, and the average particle size changed to 55 nm after doping. The fabricated Ag-doped magnetic nanoparticles were used for the degradation of eosin Y under UV-lamp irradiation. The experimental results revealed that the use of fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag can be considered as reliable methods for the removal of eosin Y since the slope of evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constant from the slope of the plot between ln⁡(C o /C) and the irradiation time was found to be linear. Ag-Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be considered an efficient photocatalyst to degrade textile dyes avoiding the tedious filtration step.

  17. Photodegradation of Eosin Y Using Silver-Doped Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Alzahrani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purification of industrial wastewater from dyes is becoming increasingly important since they are toxic or carcinogenic to human beings. Nanomaterials have been receiving significant attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties compared with their larger-size counterparts. The aim of the present investigation was to fabricate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs using a coprecipitation method, followed by coating with silver (Ag in order to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the MNPs by loading metal onto them. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag were characterised using different instruments such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The average size of the magnetic nanoparticles had a mean diameter of about 48 nm, and the average particle size changed to 55 nm after doping. The fabricated Ag-doped magnetic nanoparticles were used for the degradation of eosin Y under UV-lamp irradiation. The experimental results revealed that the use of fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag can be considered as reliable methods for the removal of eosin Y since the slope of evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constant from the slope of the plot between ln⁡(Co/C and the irradiation time was found to be linear. Ag-Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be considered an efficient photocatalyst to degrade textile dyes avoiding the tedious filtration step.

  18. Structural and magnetic properties of hcp and fcc Ni nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, J.; Wang, L.L.; Liu, Y.; Yang, J.H.; Zong, Z.G.

    2008-01-01

    The face-centered-cubic (fcc) and hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Ni nanoparticles were synthesized with citrate by sol-gel method and heat-treating technique. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Our XRD and TEM results suggested that hcp Ni nanoparticles were successfully synthesized when the heating temperature reaches 300 deg. C. With a further increase in temperature to 400 deg. C, a temperature-induced phase transformation of hcp to fcc was observed. Moreover, the VSM results demonstrated the existence of ferromagnetic behavior in the synthesized fcc and hcp Ni nanoparticles. Nevertheless, the magnetic measurement suggested that the magnetic properties in hcp nanoparticles is probably the sum of two contributions: superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic one. The unsaturated magnetization is much smaller than 47.6 emu/g for the fcc nanoparticles obtained at 400 deg. C and 55 emu/g for the bulk material. It was also found that changes of the stress, grain size and crystal structure during heat-treating have significant influences on the magnetic properties of the Ni nanoparticles

  19. Magnetic and resonance properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles doped with cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyar, S. V.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Bayukov, O. A.; Balaev, D. A.; Dubrovskii, A. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Ladygina, V. P.; Vorotynov, A. M.; Volochaev, M. N.

    2017-03-01

    Powders of undoped ferrihydrite nanoparticles and ferrihydrite nanoparticles doped with cobalt in the ratio of 5: 1 have been prepared by hydrolysis of 3 d-metal salts. It has been shown using Mössbauer spectroscopy that cobalt is uniformly distributed over characteristic crystal-chemical positions of iron ions. The blocking temperatures of ferrihydrite nanoparticles have been determined. The nanoparticle sizes, magnetizations, surface anisotropy constants, and bulk anisotropy constants have been estimated. The doping of ferrihydrite nanoparticles with cobalt leads to a significant increase in the anisotropy constant of a nanoparticle and to the formation of surface rotational anisotropy with the surface anisotropy constant K u = 1.6 × 10-3 erg/cm2.

  20. Laser ablation synthesis of monodispersed magnetic alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Takafumi; Koga, Kenji; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Orii, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Monodispersed CoPt alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique coupled with a low-pressure operating differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The CoPt alloy nanoparticles were generated by laser ablating a solid Co-Pt target. In CoPt alloy nanoparticles synthesized from a target with a Co composition of 75 at%, the nanoparticle surfaces were covered by an oxide layer and exhibited a core-shell structure. In contrast, no shell was observed in particles generated from a target with a Co:Pt ratio of 50:50 at%. According to an EDX analysis, the compositions of the individual nanoparticles were almost the same as that of the target material. Finally, the magnetic hysteresis loops of the CoPt alloy nanoparticles exhibited ferromagnetism

  1. Laser ablation synthesis of monodispersed magnetic alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, Takafumi, E-mail: t.seto@aist.go.jp; Koga, Kenji; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Orii, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Makoto [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF) (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    Monodispersed CoPt alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique coupled with a low-pressure operating differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The CoPt alloy nanoparticles were generated by laser ablating a solid Co-Pt target. In CoPt alloy nanoparticles synthesized from a target with a Co composition of 75 at%, the nanoparticle surfaces were covered by an oxide layer and exhibited a core-shell structure. In contrast, no shell was observed in particles generated from a target with a Co:Pt ratio of 50:50 at%. According to an EDX analysis, the compositions of the individual nanoparticles were almost the same as that of the target material. Finally, the magnetic hysteresis loops of the CoPt alloy nanoparticles exhibited ferromagnetism.

  2. Finding the magnetic size distribution of magnetic nanoparticles from magnetization measurements via the iterative Kaczmarz algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Daniel, E-mail: frank.wiekhorst@ptb.de; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Steinhoff, Uwe; Wiekhorst, Frank

    2017-06-01

    The characterization of the size distribution of magnetic nanoparticles is an important step for the evaluation of their suitability for many different applications like magnetic hyperthermia, drug targeting or Magnetic Particle Imaging. We present a new method based on the iterative Kaczmarz algorithm that enables the reconstruction of the size distribution from magnetization measurements without a priori knowledge of the distribution form. We show in simulations that the method is capable of very exact reconstructions of a given size distribution and, in that, is highly robust to noise contamination. Moreover, we applied the method on the well characterized FeraSpin™ series and obtained results that were in accordance with literature and boundary conditions based on their synthesis via separation of the original suspension FeraSpin R. It is therefore concluded that this method is a powerful and intuitive tool for reconstructing particle size distributions from magnetization measurements. - Highlights: • A new method for the size distribution fit of magnetic nanoparticles is proposed. • Employed Kaczmarz algorithm does not need a priori input or eigenwert regularization. • The method is highly robust to noise contamination. • Size distributions are reconstructed from simulated and measured magnetization curves.

  3. Dynamic analysis of magnetic nanoparticles crossing cell membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedram, Maysam Z. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Tech., Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamloo, Amir, E-mail: shamloo@sharif.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Tech., Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim [Biologically-Inspired Sensors and Actuators Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer science, York University, Keel Street, Toronto (Canada); Alasty, Aria, E-mail: aalasti@sharif.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Tech., Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a variety of biomedical applications including brain disease diagnostics and subsequent treatments. Among the various types of NPs, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been implemented by many research groups for an array of life science applications. In this paper, we studied MNPs controlled delivery into the endothelial cells using a magnetic field. Dynamics equations of MNPs were defined in the continuous domain using control theory methods and were applied to crossing the cell membrane. This study, dedicated to clinical and biomedical research applications, offers a guideline for the generation of a magnetic field required for the delivery of MNPs.

  4. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  5. Enhancement in magnetic properties of magnesium substituted bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianlong; Xie, Dan, E-mail: xiedan@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Teng, Changjiu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Yilin; Ren, Tian-Ling, E-mail: xiedan@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology (TNList), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zeng, Min; Gao, Xingsen [Institute for Advanced Materials and Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhao, Yonggang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-14

    We report a potential way to effectively improve the magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) nanoparticles through Mg{sup 2+} ion substitution at the Fe-sites of BFO lattice. The high purity and structural changes induced by Mg doping are confirmed by X-ray powder diffractometer and Raman spectra. Enhanced magnetic properties are observed in Mg substituted samples, which simultaneously exhibit ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. A physical model is proposed to support the observed ferromagnetism of Mg doped samples, and the superparamagnetic properties are revealed by the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The improved magnetic properties and soft nature obtained by Mg doping in BFO nanoparticles demonstrate the possibility of BFO nanoparticles to practical applications.

  6. A solution phase fabrication of magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Xianwen; Zhu Guoxing; Xia Chuanjun; Ye Yin

    2006-01-01

    To avoid high energy consumption, intensive use of hardware and high cost in the manufacture of nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon, a simple, efficient and economical solution-phase method for the fabrication of FeNi at C nanostructures has been explored. The reaction to the magnetic metal at C structures here is conducted at a relatively low temperature (160 deg. C) and this strategy can be transferred to prepare other transition metal at C core-shell nanostructures. The saturation magnetization of metal in metal at C nanostructures is similar to those of the corresponding buck metals. Magnetic metal at C nanostructures with magnetic metal nanoparticles inside and a functionalized carbon surface outside may not only provide the opportunity to tailor the magnetic properties for magnetic storage devices and therapeutics but also make possible the loading of other functional molecules (e.g. enzymes, antigens) for clinic diagnostics, molecular biology, bioengineering, and catalysis

  7. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Katiyar, V.K.; Singh, Uaday

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software. - Highlights: • A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles. • The dominant magnetic, drag and buoyancy forces are considered. • All particles are captured when distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) is up to 4.5 cm. • Further increase in d value (above 4.5 cm) results the free movement of magnetic particles

  8. Hyperthermic effect of magnetic nanoparticles under electromagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Baldi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasingly attention due to their potential applications in many industrial fields, even extending their use in biomedical applications. In the latter contest the main features of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility to be driven by external magnetic fields, the ability to pass through capillaries without occluding them and to absorb and convert electromagnetic radiation in to heat (Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia. The main challenges of the current works on hyperthermia deal with the achievement of highly efficiency magnetic nanoparticles, the surface grafting with ligands able to facilitate their specific internalisation in tumour cells and the design of stealth nanocomposites able to circulate in the blood compartment for a long time. This article presents the synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in diethylene glycol via the so called polyol strategy and the crystal size control through successive synthesis steps. Preliminary heat dissipation evaluations on the prepared samples were carried out and the question of how particles sizes affect their magnetic and hyperthermic properties was addressed as well. Furthermore we will present how surface chemistry can be modified in order to change the dispersity of the product without affecting magnetic and hyperthermic properties.

  9. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Design and Evaluation of Chitosan-Based Novel pH- Sensitive Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: pH sensitive interpenetrating network (IPN) cefixime microspheres based on chitosan, its grafted copolymer, and hydrolyzed grafted copolymer were prepared by precipitation and .... hydrochloric acid, glutaradehyde, acetic acid and.

  11. Synthesis of pure iron magnetic nanoparticles in large quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, C S; Kashyap, S; Chattopadhyay, K; Biswas, K

    2013-01-01

    Free nanoparticles of iron (Fe) and their colloids with high saturation magnetization are in demand for medical and microfluidic applications. However, the oxide layer that forms during processing has made such synthesis a formidable challenge. Lowering the synthesis temperature decreases rate of oxidation and hence provides a new way of producing pure metallic nanoparticles prone to oxidation in bulk amount (large quantity). In this paper we have proposed a methodology that is designed with the knowledge of thermodynamic imperatives of oxidation to obtain almost oxygen-free iron nanoparticles, with or without any organic capping by controlled milling at low temperatures in a specially designed high-energy ball mill with the possibility of bulk production. The particles can be ultrasonicated to produce colloids and can be bio-capped to produce transparent solution. The magnetic properties of these nanoparticles confirm their superiority for possible biomedical and other applications. (paper)

  12. The unusual magnetism of nanoparticle LaCoO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, A M; Belanger, D P; Hamil, T J; Ye, F; Chi, S; Fernandez-Baca, J A; Booth, C H; Abdollahian, Y; Bhat, M

    2015-01-01

    Bulk and nanoparticle powders of LaCoO 3 (LCO) were synthesized and their magnetic and structural properties were studied using SQUID magnetometry and neutron diffraction. The bulk and large nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetism (FM) below T ≈ 85 K and a crossover from strong to weak antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlations near a transition expressed in the lattice parameters, T o ≈40 K. This crossover does not occur in the smallest nanoparticles; instead, the magnetic behavior is predominantly ferromagnetic. The amount of FM in the nanoparticles depends on the amount of Co 3 O 4 impurity phase, which induces tensile strain on the LCO lattice. A core-interface model is introduced, with the core region exhibiting the AFM crossover and with FM in the interface region near surfaces and impurity phases. (paper)

  13. Oxygen transport enhancement by functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (FMP) in bioprocesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Filipe Andre Prata

    The enhancement of fluid properties, namely thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity for a wide range of applications, through the use of nanosized particles' suspensions has been gathering increasing interest in the scientific community. In previous studies, Olle et al. (2006) showed an enhancement in oxygen absorption to aqueous solutions of up to 6-fold through the use of functionalized nanosized magnetic particles with oleic acid coating. Krishnamurthy et al. (2006) showed a remarkable 26-fold enhancement in dye diffusion in water. These two publications are landmarks in mass transfer enhancement in chemical systems through the use of nanoparticles. The central goal of this Ph.D. thesis was to develop functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to enhance oxygen transport in bioprocesses. The experimental protocol for magnetic nanoparticles synthesis and purification adopted in this thesis is a modification of that reported by Olle et al. (2006). This is facilitated by employing twice the quantity of ammonia, added at a slower rate, and by filtering the final nanoparticle solution in a cross-flow filtration modulus against 55 volumes of distilled water. This modification in the protocol resulted in improved magnetic nanoparticles with measurably higher mass transfer enhancement. Magnetic nanoparticles with oleic acid and Hitenol-BC coating were screened for oxygen transfer enhancement, since these particles are relatively inexpensive and easy to synthesize. A glass 0.5-liter reactor was custom manufactured specifically for oxygen transport studies in magnetic nanoparticles suspensions. The reactor geometry, baffles and Rushton impeller are of standard dimensions. Mass transfer tests were conducted through the use of the sulphite oxidation method, applying iodometric back-titration. A 3-factor central composite circumscribed design (CCD) was adopted for design of experiments in order to generate sufficiently informative data to model the effect of magnetic

  14. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Multifunctional pH sensitive 3D scaffolds for treatment and prevention of bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicuéndez, Mónica; Doadrio, Juan C; Hernández, Ana; Portolés, M Teresa; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2018-01-01

    Multifunctional-therapeutic three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds have been prepared. These biomaterials are able to destroy the S. aureus bacterial biofilm and to allow bone regeneration at the same time. The present study is focused on the design of pH sensitive 3D hierarchical meso-macroporous 3D scaffolds based on MGHA nanocomposite formed by a mesostructured glassy network with embedded hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, whose mesopores have been loaded with levofloxacin (Levo) as antibacterial agent. These 3D platforms exhibit controlled and pH-dependent Levo release, sustained over time at physiological pH (7.4) and notably increased at infection pH (6.7 and 5.5), which is due to the different interaction rate between diverse Levo species and the silica matrix. These 3D systems are able to inhibit the S. aureus growth and to destroy the bacterial biofilm without cytotoxic effects on human osteoblasts and allowing an adequate colonization and differentiation of preosteoblastic cells on their surface. These findings suggest promising applications of these hierarchical MGHA nanocomposite 3D scaffolds for the treatment and prevention of bone infection. Multifunctional 3D nanocomposite scaffolds with the ability for loading and sustained delivery of an antimicrobial agent, to eliminate and prevent bone infection and at the same time to contribute to bone regeneration process without cytotoxic effects on the surrounding tissue has been proposed. These 3D scaffolds exhibit a sustained levofloxacin delivery at physiological pH (pH 7.4), which increasing notably when pH decreases to characteristic values of bone infection process (pH 6.7 and pH 5.5). In vitro competitive assays between preosteoblastic and bacteria onto the 3D scaffold surface demonstrated an adequate osteoblast colonization in entire scaffold surface together with the ability to eliminate bacteria contamination. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for molecular imaging in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    For over twenty years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been developed for a number of medical applications ranging from bioseparations, magnetic drug targeting, hyperthermia and imaging. Recent studies have shown that they can be functionalized for in vivo biological targeting, potentially enabling nanoagents for molecular imaging and site-localized drug delivery. Here we review several imaging technologies developed using functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as targeted molecular agents. Several imaging modalities have exploited the large induced magnetic moment of SPIONs to create local mechanical force. Magnetic force microscopy can probe nanoparticle uptake in single cells. For in vivo applications, magnetomotive modulation of primary images in ultrasound (US), photoacoustics (PA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) can help identify very small concentrations of nanoagents while simultaneously suppressing intrinsic background signals from tissue.

  17. Recent progress in biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for biomedical applications for several years. Various research groups worldwide have focused on improving their synthesis, their characterization techniques and the specific tailoring of their properties. Yet, it is the recent, impressive advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology which caused the breakthrough in their successful application in biomedicine. This paper aims at reviewing some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles as well as some recent patents in this field. Special emphasis is placed on i) hyperthermia, ii) therapeutics iii) diagnostics. Future prospects are also discussed. © 2010 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  18. Magnetic dipolar ordering and hysteresis of geometrically defined nanoparticle clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kure, Mathias; Beleggia, Marco; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle clusters have several biomedical and engineering applications, and revealing the basic interplay between particle configuration and magnetic properties is important for tuning the clusters for specific uses. Here, we consider the nanoparticles as macrospins and use computer...... of the polyhedra, the central moment relaxes along one of the principal axes and induces partial alignment of the surrounding moments. The resulting net moment is up to nearly four times that of the single moment added. Furthermore, we model quasi-static hysteresis loops for structures with and without a central...

  19. Progress in functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, Catherine C

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) ranging from the nanometre and micrometre scale have been widely applied in recent years in the area of biomedicine. They contain unique magnetic properties and due to their size can function at a cellular level, making them attractive candidates for cell labelling, imaging, tracking and as carriers. A recent surge of interest in nanotechnology has boosted the breadth and depth of the nanoparticle research field. This review aims to supplement a previously published review in 2003 and address more recent advances in the uses and bioapplications of mNPs and future interesting perspectives. (topical review)

  20. Structure and magnetism in Cr-embedded Co nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S H; Kurt, M S; Roy, M; Lees, M R; Binns, C

    2016-02-03

    We present the results of an investigation into the atomic structure and magnetism of 2 nm diameter Co nanoparticles embedded in an antiferromagnetic Cr matrix. The nanocomposite films used in this study were prepared by co-deposition directly from the gas phase, using a gas aggregation source for the Co nanoparticles and a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) source for the Cr matrix material. Co K and Cr K edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments were performed in order to investigate atomic structure in the embedded nanoparticles and matrix respectively, while magnetism was investigated by means of a vibrating sample magnetometer. The atomic structure type of the Co nanoparticles is the same as that of the Cr matrix (bcc) although with a degree of disorder. The net Co moment per atom in the Co/Cr nanocomposite films is significantly reduced from the value for bulk Co, and decreases as the proportion of Co nanoparticles in the film is decreased; for the sample with the most dilute concentration of Co nanoparticles (4.9% by volume), the net Co moment was 0.25 μ B/atom. After field cooling to below 30 K all samples showed an exchange bias, which was largest for the most dilute sample. Both the structural and magnetic results point towards a degree of alloying at the nanoparticle/matrix interface, leading to a core/shell structure in the embedded nanoparticles consisting of an antiferromagnetic CoCr alloy shell surrounding a reduced ferromagnetic Co core.

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with a Thermosensitive Polymer with Hyperthermia Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felisa Reyes-Ortega

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, largely through passive accumulation provided by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Their incorporation into biopolymer coatings enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive, biocompatible nanoparticles that are well dispersed in aqueous media. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare functionalized, stable magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs coated with a temperature-responsive polymer, by means of the hydrothermal method combined with an oil/water (o/w emulsion process. The effects of both pH and temperature on the electrophoretic mobility and surface charge of these MNPs are investigated. The magnetite/polymer composition of these systems is detected by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and quantified by thermogravimetric analysis. The therapeutic possibilities of the designed nanostructures as effective heating agents for magnetic hyperthermia are demonstrated, and specific absorption rates as high as 150 W/g, with 20 mT magnetic field and 205 kHz frequency, are obtained. This magnetic heating response could provide a promising nanoparticle system for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy.

  2. Structural and magnetic domains characterization of magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Castellanos-Roman, M.A.; Beatriz Gomez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, important advances have been achieved in application, reproducibility and response ability of magnetic materials due to the relationships among processing, structure and nanometric size particle. Features like homogeneity of compounds and nanoparticle-sizing have improved some magnetic properties of materials and their field application. Of particular interest is the study of magnetic materials at the atomic and microstuctural level because the orientation and magnetic domains (large numbers of atoms moments coupled together in a preferential direction) can be observed. In this work, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) powders which were obtained by precipitation route in alkaline medium are analyzed to identify the structure and mechanism formation of domains over the core and border of nanoparticles. Results obtained by XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) showed a structural phase corresponding to Fe 3 O 4 and nanoparticles in a range of 20-40 nm. Samples scanned by MFM in nanometric resolution and profile images showed orientation of magnetic domains in the border and cores of the material. Finally, an analysis of repulsion and attraction in magnetic field and direction changes of domains formed by magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) powders were done

  3. Thermal activation in statistical clusters of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovorka, O

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a kinetic Monte-Carlo study of thermally activated magnetisation dynamics in clusters of statistically distributed magnetic nanoparticles. The structure of clusters is assumed to be of fractal nature, consistently with recent observations of magnetic particle aggregation in cellular environments. The computed magnetisation relaxation decay and frequency-dependent hysteresis loops are seen to significantly depend on the fractal dimension of aggregates, leading to accelerated magnetisation relaxation and reduction in the size of hysteresis loops as the fractal dimension increases from one-dimensional-like to three-dimensional-like clusters. Discussed are implications for applications in nanomedicine, such as magnetic hyperthermia or magnetic particle imaging. (paper)

  4. Biocompatibility Research of a Novel pH Sensitive Ion Exchange Resin Microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfei; Shi, Shuangshuang; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Zou, Xiaomian; Fu, Min; Feng, Yingshu; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and provide in-vivo pharmacological and toxicological evidence for further investigation of the possibility of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere for clinical utilizations. Acute toxicity study and general pharmacological studies were conducted on the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere we prepared. The general pharmacological studies consist of the effects of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere on the nervous system of mice, the functional coordination of mice, the hypnosis of mice treated with nembutal at subliminal dose, the autonomic activities of tested mice, and the heart rate, blood pressure, ECG and breathing of the anesthetic cats. The LD50 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere after oral administration was more than 18.84 g·Kg(-1). Mice were orally administered with 16 mg·Kg(-1), 32 mg·Kg(-1) and 64 mg·Kg(-1) of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere and there was no significant influence on mice nervous system, general behavior, function coordination, hypnotic effect treated with nembutal at subliminal dose and frequency of autonomic activities. Within the 90 min after 5 mg·Kg(-1), 10 mg·Kg(-1), 20 mg·Kg(-1) pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere was injected to cat duodenum, the heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and ECG of the cats didn't make significant changes in each experimental group compared with the control group. The desirable pharmacological and toxicological behaviors of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere exhibited that it has safe biocompatibility and is possible for clinical use.

  5. 188Re labeling and biodistribution of magnetic nanoparticles for the tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guiping; Zhang Hui; Wang Yongxian; Zhang Chunfu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To prepare 188 Re labeled monoclonal antibody (Herceptin)-coated magnetic nanoparticles for tumor targeting and to study its biodistribution in mice. Methods: Herceptin and histidine were covalently linked to the amine group upon silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles modified by N-[3-(trimethyoxysilyl)prowl]-ethylenediamine using glutaraldehyde method. The Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles and Herceptin were radiolabeled with 188 Re by a direct labelling method, whereas the histidine-coated magnetic nanoparticles was radiolabeled with 188 Re using fac-[ 188 Re(CO) 3 (H 2 0) 3 ] + as a precursor. The labelling efficiency and immunoreactivity as well as labelling stability were determined. Also, the biodistribution of 188 Re-magnetic and 188 Re-Herceptin-magnetic nanoparticles were observed in mice. Results: Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) with diameter about 60 nm, while histidine-coated magnetic nanoparticles about 30 nm. The labeling efficiency for 188 Re-Herceptin, 188 Re-magnetic nanoparticles and 188 Re-Herceptin-magnetic nanoparticles were all > 90% and had a better stability in vitro. The immunoreactivity of Herceptin linked to magnetic nanoparticles was still high. The biodistribution in mice was shown that 188 Re-magnetic nanoparticles and 188 Re-Herceptin- magnetic nanoparticles had higher radioactivity levels in blood. Magnetic nanoparticles with diameter of 30 or 60 nm had a long half-life in blood stream and were accumulated in liver. Conclusion: The efficiency and stability of labelling Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles and labelling magnetic nanoparticles with 188 Re are suitable for in vivo study in tumor-beating nude mice models. (authors)

  6. Structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties of Co doped CuS diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreelekha, N.; Subramanyam, K.; Amaranatha Reddy, D.; Murali, G.; Ramu, S.; Rahul Varma, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu_1_−_xCo_xS nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. • Structural, band gap, magnetization and photocatalysis studies were carried out. • All the doped samples exhibited intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism. • Effect of magnetic properties on photocatalytic activity was analyzed. • CuS:Co nanoparticles may find applications in photocatalytic and spintronic devices. - Abstract: Pristine and Co doped covellite CuS nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution by facile chemical co-precipitation method with Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) as a stabilizing agent. EDAX measurements confirmed the presence of Co in the CuS host lattice. Hexagonal crystal structure of pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were authenticated by XRD patterns. TEM images indicated that sphere-shape of nanoparticles through a size ranging from 5 to 8 nm. The optical absorption edge moved to higher energies with increase in Co concentration as indicated by UV–vis spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed that bare CuS sample show sign of diamagnetic character where as in Co doped nanoparticles augmentation of room temperature ferromagnetism was observed with increasing doping precursor concentrations. Photocatalytic performance of the pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were assessed by evaluating the degradation rate of rhodamine B solution under sun light irradiation. The 5% Co doped CuS nanoparticles provide evidence for high-quality photocatalytic activity.

  7. Structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties of Co doped CuS diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreelekha, N.; Subramanyam, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Department of Physics, Raghu Engineering College, Visakhapatnam, Andrapradesh 531162 (India); Amaranatha Reddy, D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609735 (Korea, Republic of); Murali, G. [Department of BIN Fusion Technology & Department of Polymer-Nano Science and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Ramu, S. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Rahul Varma, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Vijayalakshmi, R.P., E-mail: vijayaraguru@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}S nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. • Structural, band gap, magnetization and photocatalysis studies were carried out. • All the doped samples exhibited intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism. • Effect of magnetic properties on photocatalytic activity was analyzed. • CuS:Co nanoparticles may find applications in photocatalytic and spintronic devices. - Abstract: Pristine and Co doped covellite CuS nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution by facile chemical co-precipitation method with Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) as a stabilizing agent. EDAX measurements confirmed the presence of Co in the CuS host lattice. Hexagonal crystal structure of pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were authenticated by XRD patterns. TEM images indicated that sphere-shape of nanoparticles through a size ranging from 5 to 8 nm. The optical absorption edge moved to higher energies with increase in Co concentration as indicated by UV–vis spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed that bare CuS sample show sign of diamagnetic character where as in Co doped nanoparticles augmentation of room temperature ferromagnetism was observed with increasing doping precursor concentrations. Photocatalytic performance of the pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were assessed by evaluating the degradation rate of rhodamine B solution under sun light irradiation. The 5% Co doped CuS nanoparticles provide evidence for high-quality photocatalytic activity.

  8. Simulation of magnetophoresis of magnetic nanoparticles in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Zongqian; Sun, Jiajia; Jia, Shenli; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-01-01

    Magnetophoresis, which is known as a process of driving magnetic particles to depart from the dispersion in the presence of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field, has gained substantial investigations due to its significance in various fields. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the magnetophoretic mechanism of magnetic nanoparticles in fluids with a Lagrangian approach. The equivalent current source method is used to calculate the magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet, which provides a feasible way to simulate the magnetophoresis process. Then the magnetophoretic velocity of particles and the influence of various key factors, e.g. the dimension of a cylindrical permanent magnet, the saturation magnetization of particles and the viscosity of fluid, are investigated. Furthermore, an efficient algorithm is proposed to calculate the trajectory of particles, and to describe the capture efficiency of the particles and the distribution of the captured particles at different times. In addition, the applicability of the Lagrangian approach is also discussed. (paper)

  9. Micromagnetic simulation of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jincheng; Yang, Yu; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2017-05-01

    Field-induced magnetization dynamics was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value on nanometer scale in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The same results were observed when varying the radius of particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles could be implemented as a composite information bit.

  10. Rationalisation of distribution functions for models of nanoparticle magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hilo, M.; Chantrell, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    A formalism is presented which reconciles the use of different distribution functions of particle diameter in analytical models of the magnetic properties of nanoparticle systems. For the lognormal distribution a transformation is derived which shows that a distribution of volume fraction transforms into a lognormal distribution of particle number albeit with a modified median diameter. This transformation resolves an apparent discrepancy reported in Tournus and Tamion [Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 323 (2011) 1118]. - Highlights: ► We resolve a problem resulting from the misunderstanding of the nature. ► The nature of dispersion functions in models of nanoparticle magnetism. ► The derived transformation between distributions will be of benefit in comparing models and experimental results.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles for precision oncology: theranostic magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for image-guided and targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Zhiyang; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have shown promise in the development of new personalized therapeutic approaches for clinical management of cancer patients. The unique physicochemical properties of MNPs endow them with novel multifunctional capabilities for imaging, drug delivery and therapy, which are referred to as theranostics. To facilitate the translation of those theranostic MNPs into clinical applications, extensive efforts have been made on designing and improving biocompatibility, stability, safety, drug-loading ability, targeted delivery, imaging signal and thermal- or photodynamic response. In this review, we provide an overview of the physicochemical properties, toxicity and theranostic applications of MNPs with a focus on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  12. X-space MPI: magnetic nanoparticles for safe medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Patrick William; Saritas, Emine Ulku; Croft, Laura Rose; Kim, Tyson N; Krishnan, Kannan M; Schaffer, David V; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-07-24

    One quarter of all iodinated contrast X-ray clinical imaging studies are now performed on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. Unfortunately, the iodine contrast agent used in X-ray is often toxic to CKD patients' weak kidneys, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, we are pioneering a new medical imaging method, called Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), to replace X-ray and CT iodinated angiography, especially for CKD patients. MPI uses magnetic nanoparticle contrast agents that are much safer than iodine for CKD patients. MPI already offers superb contrast and extraordinary sensitivity. The iron oxide nanoparticle tracers required for MPI are also used in MRI, and some are already approved for human use, but the contrast agents are far more effective at illuminating blood vessels when used in the MPI modality. We have recently developed a systems theoretic framework for MPI called x-space MPI, which has already dramatically improved the speed and robustness of MPI image reconstruction. X-space MPI has allowed us to optimize the hardware for fi ve MPI scanners. Moreover, x-space MPI provides a powerful framework for optimizing the size and magnetic properties of the iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used in MPI. Currently MPI nanoparticles have diameters in the 10-20 nanometer range, enabling millimeter-scale resolution in small animals. X-space MPI theory predicts that larger nanoparticles could enable up to 250 micrometer resolution imaging, which would represent a major breakthrough in safe imaging for CKD patients.

  13. Perovskite nanoparticles: Preparation by reactive milling and magnetic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuc, N.X.; Nguyen, Ha M.; Manh, D.H.; Hung, L.T.; Tuong, L.T.C.; Hong, L.V.; Yao, Yeong-Der

    2006-01-01

    La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 and La 0.7 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 nanoparticles were synthesized by reactive milling method. Grain size determined from XRD, TEM, and magnetization measurements show an average diameter ≤18 nm and decreasing with increasing milling time. DC and AC magnetic measurements evidenced an interacting superparamagnetism due to clustering of perovskite nanoferromagnets with spin dynamic time in range of 10 -9 -10 -10 s

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles: A multifunctional vehicle for modern theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakeris, M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles provide a unique multifunctional vehicle for modern theranostics since they can be remotely and non-invasively employed as imaging probes, carrier vectors and smart actuators. Additionally, special delivery schemes beyond the typical drug delivery such as heat or mechanical stress may be magnetically triggered to promote certain cellular pathways. To start with, we need magnetic nanoparticles with several well-defined and reproducible structural, physical, and chemical features, while bio-magnetic nanoparticle design imposes several additional constraints. Except for the intrinsic requirement for high quality of magnetic properties in order to obtain the maximum efficiency with the minimum dose, the surface manipulation of the nanoparticles is a key aspect not only for transferring them from the growth medium to the biological environment but also to bind functional molecules that will undertake specific targeting, drug delivery, cell-specific monitoring and designated treatment without sparing biocompatibility and sustainability in-vivo. The ability of magnetic nanoparticles to interact with matter at the nanoscale not only provides the possibility to ascertain the molecular constituents of a disease, but also the way in which the totality of a biological function may be affected as well. The capacity to incorporate an array of structural and chemical functionalities onto the same nanoscale architecture also enables more accurate, sensitive and precise screening together with cure of diseases with significant pathological heterogeneity such as cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editor: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, J. C., E-mail: jackeline-maciel@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Roraima (Brazil); Mercês, A. A. D.; Cabrera, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (Brazil); Shigeyosi, W. T. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física (Brazil); Souza, S. D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D. [Universidade Federal dos Vales de Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (Brazil); Cardoso, C. A. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física (Brazil); Neri, D. F. M. [Universidade Federal do Vale do São Francisco (Brazil); Silva, M. P. C.; Carvalho, L. B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe {sup 3+} ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ∼15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and {sup 57}Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite (γFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled “mPANI”) presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample “mPANIG-Trypsin”). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 {sup ∘}C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  16. Intracellular manipulation of chromatin using magnetic nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanger, Johannes S.; Subramaniam, Vinod; van Driel, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are widely used for manipulating small magnetic beads inside the cell cytoplasm in order to gain insight into the structural and mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. Here we discuss the use of magnetic tweezers for the study of nuclear architecture and the mechanical

  17. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced magnetic resonance and multimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikma, Elise Ann Schultz

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for noninvasive tomographic imaging of biological systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles have emerged as highly effective MR contrast agents due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and magnetic properties. Conventional nanoparticle contrast agents suffer from difficult synthetic reproducibility, polydisperse sizes and weak magnetism. Numerous synthetic techniques and nanoparticle formulations have been developed to overcome these barriers. However, there are still major limitations in the development of new nanoparticle-based probes for MR and multimodal imaging including low signal amplification and absence of biochemical reporters. To address these issues, a set of multimodal (T2/optical) and dual contrast (T1/T2) nanoparticle probes has been developed. Their unique magnetic properties and imaging capabilities were thoroughly explored. An enzyme-activatable contrast agent is currently being developed as an innovative means for early in vivo detection of cancer at the cellular level. Multimodal probes function by combining the strengths of multiple imaging techniques into a single agent. Co-registration of data obtained by multiple imaging modalities validates the data, enhancing its quality and reliability. A series of T2/optical probes were successfully synthesized by attachment of a fluorescent dye to the surface of different types of nanoparticles. The multimodal nanoparticles generated sufficient MR and fluorescence signal to image transplanted islets in vivo. Dual contrast T1/T2 imaging probes were designed to overcome disadvantages inherent in the individual T1 and T2 components. A class of T1/T2 agents was developed consisting of a gadolinium (III) complex (DTPA chelate or DO3A macrocycle) conjugated to a biocompatible silica-coated metal oxide nanoparticle through a disulfide linker. The disulfide linker has the ability to be reduced

  18. Magnetic and topographic correlations in Co nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciria, M.; Arnaudas, J.I.; Huttel, Y.; Gomez, H.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G.

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the magnetic domains structure in Co films grown on AlN composed of particles with nominal thicknesses between 3 and 15 nm. The images taken by using a scanning force microscope show that as the film thickness increases the domains have the magnetization vector pointing out of the plane, and that the magnetization in the particle tends to be in a single domain state with the particle boundaries being the main source for domains boundaries. The variation of the magnetic and topographic correlation functions in terms of the particle thickness suggests that the magnetic state is formed by a correlated super-spin glass structure

  19. Design and synthesis of plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jit Kang; Tilton, Robert D.; Eggeman, Alexander; Majetich, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles containing both iron oxide and gold are proposed for bioseparation applications. The surface plasmon resonance of gold makes it possible to track the positions of individual particles, even when they are smaller than the optical diffraction limit. The synthesis of water-dispersible iron oxide-gold nanoparticles is described. Absorption spectra show the plasmon peaks for Au shells on silica particles, suggesting that thin shells may be sufficient to impart a strong surface plasmon resonance to iron oxide-gold nanoparticles. Dark field optical microscopy illustrates the feasibility of single-particle detection. Calculations of magnetophoretic and drag forces for particles of different sizes reveal design requirements for effective separation of these small particles

  20. Building high-coverage monolayers of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mackenzie G.; Teplyakov, Andrew V., E-mail: andrewt@udel.edu

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A method for forming a layer of covalently bound nanoparticles is offered. • A nearly perfect monolayer of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles was formed on gold. • Spectroscopic techniques confirmed covalent binding by the “click” reaction. • The influence of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage was investigated. - Abstract: This work presents an approach for producing a high-coverage single monolayer of magnetic nanoparticles using “click chemistry” between complementarily functionalized nanoparticles and a flat substrate. This method highlights essential aspects of the functionalization scheme for substrate surface and nanoparticles to produce exceptionally high surface coverage without sacrificing selectivity or control over the layer produced. The deposition of one single layer of magnetic particles without agglomeration, over a large area, with a nearly 100% coverage is confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectroscopic techniques, supplemented by computational predictions, are used to interrogate the chemistry of the attachment and to confirm covalent binding, rather than attachment through self-assembly or weak van der Waals bonding. Density functional theory calculations for the surface intermediate of this copper-catalyzed process provide mechanistic insight into the effects of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage. Based on this analysis, it appears that steric limitations of the intermediate structure affect nanoparticle coverage on a flat solid substrate; however, this can be overcome by designing a functionalization scheme in such a way that the copper-based intermediate is formed on the spherical nanoparticles instead. This observation can be carried over to other approaches for creating highly controlled single- or multilayered nanostructures of a wide range of materials to result in high coverage and possibly, conformal filling.

  1. Biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles-the SEON-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexiou Christoph

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of different applications for magnetic nanoparticles were already investigated. Most prominent are drug delivery, imaging and several diagnostic in-vitro methods. To implement nanotechnological applications into clinics it is advantageous to cover all development stages starting from synthesis over characterization to the production of respective material under quality controlled conditions (cGMP

  2. Computational evaluation of amplitude modulation for enhanced magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Frederik; Dupré, Luc; Ivkov, Robert; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can interact with alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) to deposit localized energy for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. Hyperthermia is useful in the context of multimodality treatments with radiation or chemotherapy to enhance disease control without increased toxicity. The unique attributes of heat deposition and transfer with MNPs have generated considerable attention and have been the focus of extensive investigations to elucidate mechanisms and optimize performance. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations are often conducted with the finite element method (FEM) using the Pennes' bioheat equation. In the current study, the Pennes' equation was modified to include a thermal damage-dependent perfusion profile to improve model predictions with respect to known physiological responses to tissue heating. A normal distribution of MNPs in a model liver tumor was combined with empirical nanoparticle heating data to calculate tumor temperature distributions and resulting survival fraction of cancer cells. In addition, calculated spatiotemporal temperature changes were compared among magnetic field amplitude modulations of a base 150-kHz sinusoidal waveform, specifically, no modulation, sinusoidal, rectangular, and triangular modulation. Complex relationships were observed between nanoparticle heating and cancer tissue damage when amplitude modulation and damage-related perfusion profiles were varied. These results are tantalizing and motivate further exploration of amplitude modulation as a means to enhance efficiency of and overcome technical challenges associated with magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH).

  3. Structure and magnetic properties of nickel nanoparticles preparedby selective leaching

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, A.; Svobodová, P.; Nováková, R.; Len, A.; Heczko, Oleg; Vojtěch, D.; Marek, I.; Novák, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 137, Dec (2014), s. 221-224 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03044S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanoparticles * magnetic materials * metals and alloys * route * size Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.489, year: 2014

  4. Surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles for cell labeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zasońska, Beata Anna; Patsula, Vitalii; Stoika, R.; Horák, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2014), s. 63-73 ISSN 2305-7815 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14318 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * surface-modified * cell labeling Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  5. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Diagnosis and Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungureanu, Bogdan Silviu; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary tumor of the liver, ranking as the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used so far in tumor diagnosis and treatment, demonstrating great potential and promising results...

  6. Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticles Studied by Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen

    1997-01-01

    We present the first triple-axis neutron scattering measurements of magnetic fluctuations in nanoparticles using an antiferromagnetic reflection. Both the superparamagnetic relaxation and precession modes in similar to 15 nm hematite particles are: observed. The results have been consistently...... analyzed on the basis of a simple model with uniaxial anisotropy and the Neel-Brown theory for the relaxation....

  7. Magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coatings from one-pot synthesized hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hongxia; Xue, Yuhua; Wang, Xungai; Lin, Tong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the production of superhydrophobic coatings on various substrates (e.g., glass slide, silicon wafer, aluminum foil, plastic film, nanofiber mat, textile fabrics) using hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles and a magnet-assembly technique. Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with a thin layer of fluoroalkyl silica on the surface were synthesized by one-step coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) under an alkaline condition in the presence of a fluorinated alkyl silane. Under a magnetic field, the magnetic nanoparticles can be easily deposited on any solid substrate to form a thin superhydrophobic coating with water contact angle as high as 172 degrees , and the surface superhydrophobicity showed very little dependence on the substrate type. The particulate coating showed reasonable durability because of strong aggregation effect of nanoparticles, but the coating layer can be removed (e.g., by ultrasonication) to restore the original surface feature of the substrates. By comparison, the thin particle layer deposited under no magnetic field showed much lower hydrophobicity. The main reason for magnet-induced superhydrophobic surfaces is the formation of nano- and microstructured surface features. Such a magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coating may have wide applications in electronic, biomedical, and defense-related areas.

  8. Structure and magnetic properties of Cr nanoparticles and Cr2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.S.; Brueck, E.; Zhang, Z.D.; Tegus, O.; Li, W.F.; Si, P.Z.; Geng, D.Y.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have synthesized Cr nanoparticles by arc-discharge and Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles by subsequent annealing the as-prepared Cr nanoparticles. The structure of these nanoparticles is studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Most of the particles show a good crystal habit of well-defined cubic or orthorhombic shape, while some small particles show spherical shape. The as-prepared Cr nanoparticles have a BCC Cr core coated with a thin Cr 2 O 3 layer. Cr in the core of the particles heated at 873 K for 4 h is changed to Cr 2 O 3 . The results of magnetic measurements show that the Cr nanoparticles exhibit mainly antiferromagnetic properties, in addition to a weak-ferromagnetic component at lower fields. The weak-ferromagnetic component may be ascribed to uncompensated surface spins. For the field-cooled Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles, an exchange bias is observed in the hysteresis loops, which can be interpreted as the exchange coupling between the uncompensated spins at the surface and the spins in the core of the Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles

  9. Size analysis of single-core magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Frank, E-mail: f.ludwig@tu-bs.de [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Balceris, Christoph; Viereck, Thilo [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Posth, Oliver; Steinhoff, Uwe [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Gavilan, Helena; Costo, Rocio [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Zeng, Lunjie; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer [ACREO Swedish ICT AB, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Single-core iron-oxide nanoparticles with nominal core diameters of 14 nm and 19 nm were analyzed with a variety of non-magnetic and magnetic analysis techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), static magnetization vs. magnetic field (M-H) measurements, ac susceptibility (ACS) and magnetorelaxometry (MRX). From the experimental data, distributions of core and hydrodynamic sizes are derived. Except for TEM where a number-weighted distribution is directly obtained, models have to be applied in order to determine size distributions from the measurand. It was found that the mean core diameters determined from TEM, M-H, ACS and MRX measurements agree well although they are based on different models (Langevin function, Brownian and Néel relaxation times). Especially for the sample with large cores, particle interaction effects come into play, causing agglomerates which were detected in DLS, ACS and MRX measurements. We observed that the number and size of agglomerates can be minimized by sufficiently strong diluting the suspension. - Highlights: • Investigation of size parameters of single-core magnetic nanoparticles with nominal core diameters of 14 nm and 19 nm utilizing different magnetic and non-magnetic methods • Hydrodynamic size determined from ac susceptibility measurements is consistent with the DLS findings • Core size agrees determined from static magnetization curves, MRX and ACS data agrees with results from TEM although the estimation is based on different models (Langevin function, Brownian and Néel relaxation times).

  10. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles embedded in polystyrene microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hoang Hai; Nguyen Hoang Luong; Nguyen Chau; Ngo Quy Tai

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic particles are widely used for biological applications such as cell separation. The size of the particles is normally in the range of 10 - 20 nm which is much smaller than the size of a cell. Therefore small particles create small force which is not strong enough to separate the cells from solution. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in Polystyrene microspheres (magnetic beads) are very useful for cell separation. Magnetic beads have been prepared by solvent evaporation of an emulsion. The beads with size of 0.2 μm - 1.0 μm have a saturation magnetization of 10 - 25 emu/g. The change of the amount of surfactants, volatile solvent, magnetic particles resulted to the change of size, magnetic properties of the magnetic beads.

  11. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Zhang, Pu [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Wenzhong, E-mail: lwz7410@hust.edu.cn [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Image Processing and Intelligent Control, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  12. Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging to detect intracellular accumulation of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Qu Min; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Emelianov, Stanislav Y; Ma, Li L; Johnston, Keith P; Romanovicz, Dwight K

    2011-01-01

    As applications of nanoparticles in medical imaging and biomedicine rapidly expand, the interactions of nanoparticles with living cells have become an area of active interest. For example, intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles-an important part of cell-nanoparticle interaction-has been well studied using plasmonic nanoparticles and optical or optics-based techniques due to the change in optical properties of the nanoparticle aggregates. However, magnetic nanoparticles, despite their wide range of clinical applications, do not exhibit plasmonic-resonant properties and therefore their intracellular aggregation cannot be detected by optics-based imaging techniques. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a novel imaging technique-pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS)-to identify intracellular accumulation of endocytosed magnetic nanoparticles. In pMMUS imaging a focused, high intensity, pulsed magnetic field is used to excite the cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, and ultrasound imaging is then used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue. We demonstrated previously that clusters of magnetic nanoparticles amplify the pMMUS signal in comparison to the signal from individual nanoparticles. Here we further demonstrate that pMMUS imaging can identify interaction between magnetic nanoparticles and living cells, i.e. intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles within the cells. The results of our study suggest that pMMUS imaging can not only detect the presence of magnetic nanoparticles but also provides information about their intracellular accumulation non-invasively and in real-time.

  13. TASK-2 Channels Contribute to pH Sensitivity of Retrotrapezoid Nucleus Chemoreceptor Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Benamer, Najate; Zanella, Sébastien; Kumar, Natasha N.; Shi, Yingtang; Bévengut, Michelle; Penton, David; Guyenet, Patrice G.; Lesage, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Phox2b-expressing glutamatergic neurons of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) display properties expected of central respiratory chemoreceptors; they are directly activated by CO2/H+ via an unidentified pH-sensitive background K+ channel and, in turn, facilitate brainstem networks that control breathing. Here, we used a knock-out mouse model to examine whether TASK-2 (K2P5), an alkaline-activated background K+ channel, contributes to RTN neuronal pH sensitivity. We made patch-clamp recordings in brainstem slices from RTN neurons that were identified by expression of GFP (directed by the Phox2b promoter) or β-galactosidase (from the gene trap used for TASK-2 knock-out). Whereas nearly all RTN cells from control mice were pH sensitive (95%, n = 58 of 61), only 56% of GFP-expressing RTN neurons from TASK-2−/− mice (n = 49 of 88) could be classified as pH sensitive (>30% reduction in firing rate from pH 7.0 to pH 7.8); the remaining cells were pH insensitive (44%). Moreover, none of the recorded RTN neurons from TASK-2−/− mice selected based on β-galactosidase activity (a subpopulation of GFP-expressing neurons) were pH sensitive. The alkaline-activated background K+ currents were reduced in amplitude in RTN neurons from TASK-2−/− mice that retained some pH sensitivity but were absent from pH-insensitive cells. Finally, using a working heart–brainstem preparation, we found diminished inhibition of phrenic burst amplitude by alkalization in TASK-2−/− mice, with apneic threshold shifted to higher pH levels. In conclusion, alkaline-activated TASK-2 channels contribute to pH sensitivity in RTN neurons, with effects on respiration in situ that are particularly prominent near apneic threshold. PMID:24107938

  14. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J.; Westervelt, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T 2 CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T 2 CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T 2 CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T 2 CP ∝Ν -0.44 for aggregates with d=2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T 2 CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times.

  15. Magnetic properties of a single transverse Ising ferrimagnetic nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhou, S.; El Hamri, M.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Ahuja, R.

    2015-01-01

    Using the effective field theory with a probability distribution technique that accounts for the self-spin correlation function, the thermal and the magnetic properties of a single Ising nanoparticle consisting of a ferromagnetic core, a ferromagnetic surface shell and a ferrimagnetic interface coupling are examined. The effect of the transverse field in the surface shell, the exchange interactions between core/shell and in surface shell on the free energy, thermal magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility are studied. A number of interesting phenomena have been found such as the existence of the compensation phenomenon and the magnetization profiles exhibit P-type, N-type and Q-type behaviors

  16. Surface spin tunneling and heat dissipation in magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakkal, Jasnamol P.; Obula Reddy, Chinna; Paulose, Ajeesh P.; Sankar, Cheriyedath Raj

    2018-03-01

    Quantum superparamagnetic state is observed in ultra-fine magnetic particles, which is often experimentally identified by a significant hike in magnetization towards low temperatures much below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. Here, we report experimentally observed surface spin relaxation at low temperatures in hydrated magnesium ferrite nanoparticles of size range of about 5 nm. We observed time dependent oscillatory magnetization of the sample below 2.5 K, which is attributed to surface spin tunneling. Interestingly, we observed heat dissipation during the process by using an external thermometer.

  17. Amine-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for DNA separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Junjian; Qi, Xiaoliang; Zuo, Gancheng; Chen, Qi; Pan, Xihao; Dong, Wei, E-mail: weidong@njust.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@EDPS with uniform size and good dispersity is prepared. • We fabricated MMSN@EDPS with distinct core-shell–shell triple-layer composition. • DNA adsorption capacity of MMSN@EDPS is considerable. - Abstract: We report a modified approach for the functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSN) using polymer microspheres incorporated with magnetic nanoparticles in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the core-shell magnetic silica nanoparticles (MSN). These particles were functionalized with amino groups via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol. We then evaluate their DNA separation abilities and find the capacity of DNA binding significantly increased (210.22 μg/mg) compared with normal magnetic silica spheres (138.44 μg/mg) by using an ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer (UV). The morphologies, magnetic properties, particle size, pore size, core-shell structure and Zeta potential are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). This work demonstrates that our MMSN own an excellent potential application in bioseparation and drug delivery.

  18. Structure and Magnetism of Mn5Ge3 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Tosun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the magnetic and structural properties of isolated Mn5Ge3 nanoparticles prepared by the cluster-beam deposition technique. Particles with sizes between 7.2 and 12.6 nm were produced by varying the argon pressure and power in the cluster gun. X-ray diffraction (XRDand selected area diffraction (SAD measurements show that the nanoparticles crystallize in the hexagonal Mn5Si3-type crystal structure, which is also the structure of bulk Mn5Ge3. The temperature dependence of the magnetization shows that the as-made particles are ferromagnetic at room temperature and have slightly different Curie temperatures. Hysteresis-loop measurements show that the saturation magnetization of the nanoparticles increases significantly with particle size, varying from 31 kA/m to 172 kA/m when the particle size increases from 7.2 to 12.6 nm. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant K at 50 K, determined by fitting the high-field magnetization data to the law of approach to saturation, also increases with particle size, from 0.4 × 105 J/m3 to 2.9 × 105 J/m3 for the respective sizes. This trend is mirrored by the coercivity at 50 K, which increases from 0.04 T to 0.13 T. A possible explanation for the magnetization trend is a radial Ge concentration gradient.

  19. Uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells for cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Christiane; Hodenius, Michael; Blendinger, Gitta; Sechi, Antonio; Hieronymus, Thomas; Mueller-Schulte, Detlef; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Zenke, Martin

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for future applications in nanotechnology is the functional integration of nano-sized materials into cellular structures. Here we investigated superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a lipid bilayer for uptake into cells and for targeting subcellular compartments. It was found that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are effectively taken up into cells and make cells acquire magnetic activity. Biotin-conjugated MNPs were further functionalized by binding of the fluorescent tag streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and, following uptake into cells, shown to confer magnetic activity and fluorescence labeling. Such FITC-MNPs were localized in the lysosomal compartment of cells which suggests a receptor-mediated uptake mechanism

  20. Polarization of Magnetic Dipole Emission and Spinning Dust Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode signal. To obtain theoretical constraints on the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that, in realistic conditions of the interste...

  1. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  2. Particle size- and concentration-dependent separation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Kerstin, E-mail: witte@micromod.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Müller, Knut; Grüttner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Johansson, Christer [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, 40014 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are of great interest for several biomedical applications. When the size of the particles decreases, the magnetic moment of the particles decreases. This leads to a significant increase in the separation time by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, in the present study the separation processes of bionized nanoferrites (BNF) with different sizes and concentrations were investigated with the commercial Sepmag Q system. It was found that an increasing initial particle concentration leads to a reduction of the separation time for large nanoparticles due to the higher probability of building chains. Small nanoparticles showed exactly the opposite behavior with rising particle concentration up to 0.1 mg(Fe)/ml. For higher iron concentrations the separation time remains constant and the measured Z-average decreases in the supernatant at same time intervals. At half separation time a high yield with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter of particles can be obtained using higher initial particle concentrations. - Highlights: • Size dependent separation processes of multicore nanoparticles. • Concentration dependent separation processes of multicore nanoparticles. • Increasing separation time with rising concentrations for small particles. • Large particles show typical cooperative magnetophoresis behavior.

  3. Cellular transfer of magnetic nanoparticles via cell microvesicles: impact on cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda K Andriola; Wilhelm, Claire; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-05-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles can be used to monitor the fate of transplanted cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. However, nanoparticles initially internalized in administered cells might end up in other cells of the host organism. We investigated a mechanism of intercellular cross-transfer of magnetic nanoparticles to different types of recipient cells via cell microvesicles released under cellular stress. Three cell types (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cells and macrophages) were labeled with 8-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. Then cells underwent starvation stress, during which they produced microvesicles that were subsequently transferred to unlabeled recipient cells. The analysis of the magnetophoretic mobility of donor cells indicated that magnetic load was partially lost under cell stress. Microvesicles shed by stressed cells participated in the release of magnetic label. Moreover, such microvesicles were uptaken by naïve cells, resulting in cellular redistribution of nanoparticles. Iron load of recipient cells allowed their detection by MRI. Cell microvesicles released under stress may be disseminated throughout the organism, where they can be uptaken by host cells. The transferred cargo may be sufficient to allow MRI detection of these secondarily labeled cells, leading to misinterpretations of the effectiveness of transplanted cells.

  4. Doping induced magnetism in Co-ZnS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambasivam, S.; Paul Joseph, D.; Lin, J.G.; Venkateswaran, C.

    2009-01-01

    Zn 1-x Co x S nanoparticles with x=0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 were synthesized by the co-precipitation method using thiophenol as capping agent. The effect of Co doping on the structural, optical and magnetic properties are investigated. The X-ray diffraction patterns show single phase with cubic structure and the images of Transmission Electron Microscopy indicate an average particle size of 39 nm. Significant blue shift in the optical absorbing band edge was observed with increasing Co doping. In the Co doped samples, room-temperature (RT) magnetic hysteresis is observed and the magnetization reduces with increasing Co content. However, these samples show paramagnetic resonance instead of ferromagnetic resonance at both 300 and 80 K, suggesting that the origin of RT magnetization in these Zn 1-x Co x S nanoparticles involves with the frustration of antiferromagnetic interactions. - Graphical abstract: Figure shows the magnetization data of Zn 1-x Co x S (0.1≤x≤0.3) nanoparticles annealed at 573 K/2 h in vacuum and measured at 300 K. This interesting feature of systematic reduction in magnetization may be due to introduction of antiferromagnetic ordering with increasing 'Co' concentration which may be due to competition between the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ordering within the sample. One could also observe the exchange bias effect which is an interface interaction observed in a ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic mixture. The exchange bias field (loop shift) towards negative field was around 63 Oe for the Zn 1-x Co x S (0.1≤x≤0.3) nanoparticles.

  5. Magnetic ordering in arrays of one-dimensional nanoparticle chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serantes, D; Baldomir, D; Pereiro, M; Hernando, B; Prida, V M; Sanchez Llamazares, J L; Zhukov, A; Ilyn, M; Gonzalez, J

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic order in parallel-aligned one-dimensional (1D) chains of magnetic nanoparticles is studied using a Monte Carlo technique. If the easy anisotropy axes are collinear along the chains a macroscopic mean-field approach indicates antiferromagnetic (AFM) order even when no interparticle interactions are taken into account, which evidences that a mean-field treatment is inadequate for the study of the magnetic order in these highly anisotropic systems. From the direct microscopic analysis of the evolution of the magnetic moments, we observe spontaneous intra-chain ferromagnetic (FM)-type and inter-chain AFM-type ordering at low temperatures (although not completely regular) for the easy-axes collinear case, whereas a random distribution of the anisotropy axes leads to a sort of intra-chain AFM arrangement with no inter-chain regular order. When the magnetic anisotropy is neglected a perfectly regular intra-chain FM-like order is attained. Therefore it is shown that the magnetic anisotropy, and particularly the spatial distribution of the easy axes, is a key parameter governing the magnetic ordering type of 1D-nanoparticle chains.

  6. Use of magnetic nanoparticles in the fight against cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera Castillo, Deyvit

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology and biotechnology have come together to form the nanobiotechnology; so, they are used as tools to prevent and treat diseases in the human body, even when they are little advanced. Also they have been used in regenerative medicine for the repair or replacement of damaged tissues or organs mainly the electronic nanodevices. The nanotherapy is used as an anticancer therapy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease and nano-systems are used as nanoparticles and nanodevices. The magnetic nanoparticles are exploited for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer where malignant and benign tumors are detected. (author) [es

  7. Magnetic circular dichroism of CdTe nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Sokolov, A. E.; Tsipotan, A. S.; Zharkov, S. M.; Zabluda, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of water-soluble CdTe nanoparticles was observed in the visible spectral range for the first time. Diameter of nanoparticles varied from 2.3 to 4.5 nm. Absorption and photoluminescence spectra were also recorded. Absorption line at 19400 cm-1 and luminescent line at 18200 cm-1 were observed. Splitting of value 960 cm-1 was revealed in the MCD spectrum. Approximately the same splitting was extracted from the absorption spectrum. The MCD was identified as the temperature independent paramagnetic mixing effect. Nature of the absorption line and of its splitting are discussed.

  8. Magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic system for drug delivery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agiotis, L.; Theodorakos, I.; Samothrakitis, S.; Papazoglou, S.; Zergioti, I.; Raptis, Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS), have attracted major interest, due to their small size and unique magnetic properties, for drug delivery applications. In this context, iron oxide nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) (150 nm magnetic core diameter), were used as drug carriers, aiming to form a magnetically controlled nano-platform. The navigation capabilities of the iron oxide nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel were investigated by simulating the magnetic field and the magnetic force applied on the magnetic nanoparticles inside a microfluidic chip. The simulations have been performed using finite element method (ANSY’S software). The optimum setup which intends to simulate the magnetic navigation of the nanoparticles, by the use of MRI-type fields, in the human circulatory system, consists of two parallel permanent magnets to produce a homogeneous magnetic field, in order to ensure the maximum magnetization of the magnetic nanoparticles, an electromagnet for the induction of the magnetic gradients and the creation of the magnetic force and a microfluidic setup so as to simulate the blood flow inside the human blood vessels. The magnetization of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the consequent magnetic torque developed by the two permanent magnets, together with the mutual interactions between the magnetized nanoparticles lead to the creation of rhabdoid aggregates in the direction of the homogeneous field. Additionally, the magnetic gradients introduced by the operation of the electromagnet are capable of directing the aggregates, as a whole, to the desired direction. By removing the magnetic fields, the aggregates are disrupted, due to the super paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles, avoiding thus the formation of undesired thrombosis. - Highlights: • Homogeneous field yields an aggregation of particles along the lines of the field. • Additional electromagnet field rotates the

  9. Magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic system for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agiotis, L.; Theodorakos, I.; Samothrakitis, S.; Papazoglou, S.; Zergioti, I.; Raptis, Y.S.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS), have attracted major interest, due to their small size and unique magnetic properties, for drug delivery applications. In this context, iron oxide nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) (150 nm magnetic core diameter), were used as drug carriers, aiming to form a magnetically controlled nano-platform. The navigation capabilities of the iron oxide nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel were investigated by simulating the magnetic field and the magnetic force applied on the magnetic nanoparticles inside a microfluidic chip. The simulations have been performed using finite element method (ANSY’S software). The optimum setup which intends to simulate the magnetic navigation of the nanoparticles, by the use of MRI-type fields, in the human circulatory system, consists of two parallel permanent magnets to produce a homogeneous magnetic field, in order to ensure the maximum magnetization of the magnetic nanoparticles, an electromagnet for the induction of the magnetic gradients and the creation of the magnetic force and a microfluidic setup so as to simulate the blood flow inside the human blood vessels. The magnetization of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the consequent magnetic torque developed by the two permanent magnets, together with the mutual interactions between the magnetized nanoparticles lead to the creation of rhabdoid aggregates in the direction of the homogeneous field. Additionally, the magnetic gradients introduced by the operation of the electromagnet are capable of directing the aggregates, as a whole, to the desired direction. By removing the magnetic fields, the aggregates are disrupted, due to the super paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles, avoiding thus the formation of undesired thrombosis. - Highlights: • Homogeneous field yields an aggregation of particles along the lines of the field. • Additional electromagnet field rotates the

  10. Numerical Simulation of Magnetic Nanoparticles Injection into Two–phase Flow in a Porous Medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2017-06-09

    In this paper, the problem of magnetic nanoparticles injection into a water–oil two–phase flow under an external permanent magnetic field is investigated. The mathematical model of the problem under consideration has been developed. We treat the water-nanoparticles suspension as a miscible mixture while it is immiscible with the oil phase. The magnetized phase pressure includes an additional pressure term with the conventional thermodynamic pressure. The countercurrent imbibition flow problem is taken as an example. Physical variables including water–nanoparticles suspension saturation, nanoparticles concentration, and pore wall/throat deposited nanoparticles are investigated under the influence of the magnetic field.

  11. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majetich, Sara [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle-loaded electrospun polymeric nanofibers for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heng [Department of Oncology, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Xia, JiYi [Department of Science and Technology, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Pang, XianLun [Health Management Center, The Affiliated Hospital (TCM) of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Zhao, Ming; Wang, BiQiong; Yang, LingLin [Department of Oncology, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Wan, HaiSu [Experiment Center of Basic Medicine, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Wu, JingBo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Fu, ShaoZhi, E-mail: shaozhifu513@163.com [Department of Oncology, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been one of the most attractive nanomaterials for various biomedical applications including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnostic contrast enhancement, magnetic cell separation, and targeted drug delivery. Three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffolds have broad application prospects in the biomedical field, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. In this work, a novel three-dimensional composite membrane composed of the tri-block copolymer poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL, PCEC) and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs) were fabricated using electrospinning technology. The physico-chemical properties of the PCEC/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} membranes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Morphological observation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the composite fibers containing 5% Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles had a diameter of 250 nm. In vitro cell culture of NIH 3T3 cells on the PCEC/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} membranes showed that the PCEC/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} fibers might be a suitable scaffold for cell adhesion. Moreover, MTT analysis also demonstrated that the membranes possessed lower cytotoxicity. Therefore, this study revealed that the magnetic PCEC/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} fibers might have great potential for using in skin tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: In this study, we prepared a kind of magnetic three-dimensional scaffolds (PCEC/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) using iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs) and poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer through electrospinning technique. Their crystallization property, thermal property, in vitro degradation, and morphology were investigated. Furthermore, the cell compatibility and toxicity were also evaluated using NIH 3T3 cells. The results showed that the Fe{sub 3}O

  13. Properties of magnetic nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1997-01-01

    The intrinsic thermodynamic magnetic properties of clusters are discussed using spin wave theory for a Heisenberg model, with a fixed magnitude of the spins S-i = S and site independent nearest neighbor exchange interaction. The consequences of the more realistic Hubbard model is considered...... in which we allow for a magnetization profile at T = 0 and a structural relaxation, which in turn will give rise to a site dependent exchange interaction. Et is concluded that correlation effects among the electrons play a very important role in small clusters, albeit not modifying the thermodynamic...... properties drastically. The finite cluster size gives foremost rise to a discrete excitation spectrum with a large energy gap to the ground state. The relaxation of the magnetization during the reversal of the external magnetic field is discussed. A first step towards a quantitative understanding...

  14. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (Prooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  15. GMR sensors and magnetic nanoparticles for immuno-chromatographic assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquina, C.; Teresa, J.M. de; Serrate, D.; Marzo, J.; Cardoso, F.A.; Saurel, D.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional tests based on immunorecognition and on the use of coloured colloidal particles have still some drawbacks that limit their use: they do not provide a quantitative determination of the analyte, and their sensitivity is limited. Our strategy to overcome these disadvantages consists in the use of superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles to tag the analyte. The use of these magnetic labels allows us to quantify the amount of analyte present in our sample with a very high sensitivity, detecting their magnetic response by means of the suitable magnetic sensor. Our method is based on measuring the magnetoresistive response of a spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor placed in proximity to the magnetic nanoparticles present in the lateral flow strip. Here, a brief description of our prototype and of the measurement procedure will be presented, as well as preliminary assays using our biosensor to detect the hCG pregnancy hormone in a solution. A crucial aspect to take into account in order to increase the sensitivity is the proper functionalisation of the nanoparticle shell, in order to achieve an oriented immobilisation of the antibodies to be used in the immunorecognition process. Several strategies to further increase the sensor sensitivity are suggested.

  16. Glycol stabilized magnetic nanoparticles for photocatalytic degradation of xylenol orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ikram; Ali, Farman; Ali, Zarshad; Humayun, Muhammad; wahab, Zain Ul

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have successfully prepared ZnFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles as photocatalysts via co-precipitation method using triethylene glycol as a stabilizing agent. The resultant nanoparticles were annealed at 400 °C and then acid etched and surface functionalized with 3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl amine (APTES). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were used to characterize these magnetic photocatalysts. XRD patterns revealed that the size of annealed and functionalized ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles falls in the range of 23.3 and 13.9 nm, respectively. The optical band gaps of the magnetic photocatalysts were calculated from UV–Visible absorption spectra using Tauc plots. The band gap of the ZnFe2O4 photocatalyst in acidic and basic medium was 2.47 and 2.7 eV, respectively. The performance of the magnetic photocatalysts was evaluated for xylenol orange (XO) degradation. The degradation rates of XO dye for the blank, annealed and functionalized photocatalysts at pH = 4 were 76%, 85%, and 90%, respectively. In addition, the influence of important parameters such as contact time, pH, catalyst, and dye dose were also investigated for all the three photocatalysts. The applied kinetics models demonstrated that the degradation followed pseudo 1st order.

  17. Ni doped Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larumbe, S; Gómez-Polo, C; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; García-Prieto, A; Alonso, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Cordero, D; Gómez, J

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the effect of nickel doping on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is analysed. Ni(x)Fe(3-x)O4 nanoparticles (x = 0, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.11) were obtained by chemical co-precipitation method, starting from a mixture of FeCl2 x 4H2O and Ni(AcO)2 x 4H2O salts. The analysis of the structure and composition of the synthesized nanoparticles confirms their nanometer size (main sizes around 10 nm) and the inclusion of the Ni atoms in the characteristic spinel structure of the magnetite Fe3O4 phase. In order to characterize in detail the structure of the samples, X-ray absorption (XANES) measurements were performed on the Ni and Fe K-edges. The results indicate the oxidation of the Ni atoms to the 2+ state and the location of the Ni2+ cations in the Fe2+ octahedral sites. With respect to the magnetic properties, the samples display the characteristic superparamagnetic behaviour, with anhysteretic magnetic response at room temperature. The estimated magnetic moment confirms the partial substitution of the Fe2+ cations by Ni2+ atoms in the octahedral sites of the spinel structure.

  18. GMR sensors and magnetic nanoparticles for immuno-chromatographic assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquina, C., E-mail: clara@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Teresa, J.M. de [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Serrate, D. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Marzo, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cardoso, F.A. [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Saurel, D. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P.P. [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); and others

    2012-10-15

    Conventional tests based on immunorecognition and on the use of coloured colloidal particles have still some drawbacks that limit their use: they do not provide a quantitative determination of the analyte, and their sensitivity is limited. Our strategy to overcome these disadvantages consists in the use of superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles to tag the analyte. The use of these magnetic labels allows us to quantify the amount of analyte present in our sample with a very high sensitivity, detecting their magnetic response by means of the suitable magnetic sensor. Our method is based on measuring the magnetoresistive response of a spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor placed in proximity to the magnetic nanoparticles present in the lateral flow strip. Here, a brief description of our prototype and of the measurement procedure will be presented, as well as preliminary assays using our biosensor to detect the hCG pregnancy hormone in a solution. A crucial aspect to take into account in order to increase the sensitivity is the proper functionalisation of the nanoparticle shell, in order to achieve an oriented immobilisation of the antibodies to be used in the immunorecognition process. Several strategies to further increase the sensor sensitivity are suggested.

  19. Pleiotropic functions of magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, Daisuke; Kitani, Tomoya; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Toyoda, Masashi; Tomitaka, Asahi; Ota, Satoshi; Ishii, Ryuga; Takemura, Yasushi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    Gene transfer technique has various applications, ranging from cellular biology to medical treatments for diseases. Although nonviral vectors, such as episomal vectors, have been developed, it is necessary to improve their gene transfer efficacy. Therefore, we attempted to develop a highly efficient gene delivery system combining an episomal vector with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). In comparison with the conventional method using transfection reagents, polyethylenimine-coated MNPs introduced episomal vectors more efficiently under a magnetic field and could express the gene in mammalian cells with higher efficiency and for longer periods. This novel in vitro separation method of gene-introduced cells utilizing the magnetic property of MNPs significantly facilitated the separation of cells of interest. Transplanted cells in vivo were detected using magnetic resonance. These results suggest that MNPs play multifunctional roles in ex vivo gene transfer, such as improvement of gene transfer efficacy, separation of cells, and detection of transplanted cells. This study convincingly demonstrates enhanced efficiency of gene transfer via magnetic nanoparticles. The method also enables magnetic sorting of cells positive for the transferred gene, and in vivo monitoring of the process with MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrathin Interface Regime of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles for Effective Magnetism Tailoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seung Ho; Noh, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Hyun; Lim, Yongjun; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2017-02-08

    The magnetic exchange coupling interaction between hard and soft magnetic phases has been important for tailoring nanoscale magnetism, but spin interactions at the core-shell interface have not been well studied. Here, we systematically investigated a new interface phenomenon termed enhanced spin canting (ESC), which is operative when the shell thickness becomes ultrathin, a few atomic layers, and exhibits a large enhancement of magnetic coercivity (H C ). We found that ESC arises not from the typical hard-soft exchange coupling but rather from the large magnetic surface anisotropy (K S ) of the ultrathin interface. Due to this large increase in magnetism, ultrathin core-shell nanoparticles overreach the theoretical limit of magnetic energy product ((BH) max ) and exhibit one of the largest values of specific loss power (SLP), which testifies to their potential capability as an effective mediator of magnetic energy conversion.

  1. Highly Water-Soluble Magnetic Nanoparticles as Novel Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis for Water Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Ming Ming

    2010-06-16

    Highly hydrophilic magnetic nanoparticles have been molecularly designed. For the first time, the application of highly water-soluble magnetic nanoparticles as novel draw solutes in forward osmosis (FO) was systematically investigated. Magnetic nanoparticles functionalized by various groups were synthesized to explore the correlation between the surface chemistry of magnetic nanoparticles and the achieved osmolality. We verified that magnetic nanoparticles capped with polyacrylic acid can yield the highest driving force and subsequently highest water flux among others. The used magnetic nanoparticles can be captured by the magnetic field and recycled back into the stream as draw solutes in the FO process. In addition, magnetic nanoparticles of different diameters were also synthesized to study the effect of particles size on FO performance. We demonstrate that the engineering of surface hydrophilicity and magnetic nanoparticle size is crucial in the application of nanoparticles as draw solutes in FO. It is believed that magnetic nanoparticles will soon be extensively used in this area. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. Quantification of drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in rabbit liver and tumor after in vivo administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, Rainer; Jurgons, Roland; Lyer, Stefan; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Richter, Heike; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: C.Alexiou@web.de

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is imminent in medical research, especially for treating cancer and vascular diseases. We used drug-labeled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were attracted to an experimental tumor in rabbits with an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting, MDT). Aim of this study was to detect and quantify the biodistribution of the magnetic nanoparticles by magnetorelaxometry. The study shows higher amount of nanoparticles in the tumor after intraarterial application and MDT compared to intravenous administration.

  3. Highly Water-Soluble Magnetic Nanoparticles as Novel Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis for Water Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Ming Ming; Wang, Kai Yu; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2010-01-01

    of different diameters were also synthesized to study the effect of particles size on FO performance. We demonstrate that the engineering of surface hydrophilicity and magnetic nanoparticle size is crucial in the application of nanoparticles as draw solutes

  4. Ferromagnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia and thermoablation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Eiji; Kayano, Takeru; Sato, Suguru; Minagawa, Makoto; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kishimoto, Mikio [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Yamada, Keiichi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro [Department of Surgery, Advanced Biomedical Applications, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Mitsumata, Chiharu, E-mail: kita@bk.tsukuba.ac.j [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2010-12-01

    The use of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia and thermoablation therapies has shown great promise in the field of nanobiomedicine. Even local hyperthermia offers numerous advantages as a novel cancer therapy; however, it requires a remarkably high heating power of more than 1 kW g{sup -1} for heat agents. As a candidate for high heat generation, we focus on ferromagnetic nanoparticles and compare their physical properties with those of superparamagnetic substances. Numerical simulations for ideal single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles with cubic and uniaxial magnetic symmetries were carried out and MH curves together with minor loops were obtained. From the simulation, the efficient use of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) having a limited amplitude was discussed. Co-ferrite nanoparticles with various magnitudes of coercive force were produced by co-precipitation and a hydrothermal process. A maximum specific loss power of 420 W g{sup -1} was obtained using an AMF at 117 kHz with H{sub 0} = 51.4 kA m{sup -1} (640 Oe). The relaxation behaviour in the ferromagnetic state below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature was examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  5. Magnetic properties of multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles with alternating magnetic wire and tube segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Aravena, D.; Corona, R.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Escrig, J., E-mail: jescrigm@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile)

    2013-11-15

    The magnetic properties in multisegmented cylindrical nanostructures comprised of nanowire and nanotube segments are investigated numerically as a function of their geometry. In this work we report systematic changes in the coercivity and remanence in these systems. Besides, we have found the ideal conditions for a magnetic configuration with two antiparallel domains that could be used to help to stabilize magnetic nanoparticles inside ferromagnetic multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles. This magnetic behavior is due to the fact that the tube segment reverses its magnetization before the wire segment, allowing the control of the magnetic domain walls motion between two segments. In this way, these magnetic nanoobjects can be an alternative to store information or even perform logic functions. - Highlights: • Magnetic states of wire/tube were investigated as a function of their geometry. • Multisegmented systems present two well-defined jumps in the hysteresis curve. • It is possible to prepare an antiparallel magnetic configuration. • The step width for the optimum condition reaches 60 mT. • The tube segments reverse their magnetization first than the wire segments.

  6. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  7. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: aesmaeili@sci.ui.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-15

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  8. Understanding the physics of magnetic nanoparticles and their applications in the biomedical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Suvra Santa

    The study of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest because of their potential uses in magnetic-recording, medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Additionally, they also offer an opportunity to understand the physics underlying the complex behavior exhibited by these materials. Two of the most important relaxation phenomena occurring in magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic blocking and spin-glass-like freezing. In addition to features attributed to superparamagnetism, these nanoparticles can also exhibit magnetic relaxation effects at very low temperatures (≤ 50 K). Our studies suggest that all structural defects, and not just surface spins, are responsible for the low-temperature glass-like relaxation observed in many magnetic nanoparticles. The characteristic dipolar interaction energy existing in an ensemble of magnetic nanoparticles does not apparently depend on the average spacing between the nanoparticles but is likely to be strongly influenced by the fluctuations in the nanoparticle distribution. Our findings revealed that incorporating a small percentage of boron can stabilize the spinel structure in Mn 3O4 nanoparticles. We have also demonstrated that the dipolar interactions between the magnetic cores can be tuned by introducing non-magnetic nanoparticles. In particular, we studied the magnetic properties of Gd-doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles, a potential applicant for T1--T2 dual-modal MRI contrast agent. We have explored the interactions of BiFeO3 nanoparticles on live cells and the binding of FITC-conjugated Fe3O 4 nanoparticles with artificial lipid membranes to investigate these materials as candidates in medical imaging. Taken together, these studies have advanced our understanding of the fundamental physical principles that governs magnetism in magnetic materials with a focus on developing these nanoparticles for advanced biomedical applications. The materials developed and studied expand the repertoire of tools available for

  9. Size-controlled magnetic nanoparticles with lecithin for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. I.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, C. G.; Kim, C. O.

    2007-05-01

    Lecithin-adsorbed magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by three-step process that the thermal decomposition was combined with ultrasonication. Experimental parameters were three items—molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, keeping time at decomposition temperature and lecithin concentration. As the molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, and keeping time at decomposition temperature increased, the particle size increased. However, the change of lecithin concentration did not show the remarkable particle size variation.

  10. Size-controlled magnetic nanoparticles with lecithin for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.I.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, C.G.; Kim, C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Lecithin-adsorbed magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by three-step process that the thermal decomposition was combined with ultrasonication. Experimental parameters were three items-molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, keeping time at decomposition temperature and lecithin concentration. As the molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, and keeping time at decomposition temperature increased, the particle size increased. However, the change of lecithin concentration did not show the remarkable particle size variation

  11. Critical dynamics of an interacting magnetic nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jonsson, P.E.; Nordblad, P.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of dipole-dipole interactions on the magnetic relaxation have been investigated for three Fe-C nanoparticle samples with volume concentrations of 0.06, 5 and 17 vol%. While both the 5 and 17 vol% samples exhibit collective behaviour due to dipolar interactions, only the 17 vol% sample dis...... displays critical behaviour close to its transition temperature. The behaviour of the 5 vol% sample can be attributed to a mixture of collective and single-particle dynamics....

  12. Carbohydrate-modified magnetic nanoparticles for radical scavenging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moskvin, Maksym; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S243-S251 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * silica * glucose Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S243.pdf

  13. Magnetic structure of a nanoparticle in mean-field approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usov, N.A.; Gudoshnikov, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum mechanical Hartree-Fock approximation is used to calculate a magnetic state of a nanoparticle. The cases of ferromagnetic (FM), antiferromagnetic (AFM) and composite particles having an FM core surrounded by an AFM shell are considered in a unified manner. It is shown that effective interaction at the boundary between FM and AFM areas rotates FM and AFM spins perpendicular to each other. The coercive force of a composite particle increases as a function of the AFM shell thickness

  14. Hybrid, silica-coated, Janus-like plasmonic-magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Hirt, Ann M.; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Teleki, Alexandra; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-magnetic nanoparticles possess properties that are attractive in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, in vivo diagnosis and therapy. The stability and toxicity, however, of such nanoparticles challenge their safe use today. Here, biocompatible, SiO2-coated, Janus-like Ag/Fe2O3 nanoparticles are prepared by one-step, scalable flame aerosol technology. A nanothin SiO2 shell around these multifunctional nanoparticles leaves intact their morphology, magnetic and plasmonic properti...

  15. Polarized neutron reflectivity from monolayers of self-assembled magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D; Petracic, O; Devishvili, A; Theis-Bröhl, K; Toperverg, B P; Zabel, H

    2015-04-10

    We prepared monolayers of iron oxide nanoparticles via self-assembly on a bare silicon wafer and on a vanadium film sputter deposited onto a plane sapphire substrate. The magnetic configuration of nanoparticles in such a dense assembly was investigated by polarized neutron reflectivity. A theoretical model fit shows that the magnetic moments of nanoparticles form quasi domain-like configurations at remanence. This is attributed to the dipolar coupling amongst the nanoparticles.

  16. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1030 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1030 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, 1275 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI. - Highlights: • SAR predictions based on a field-dependent magnetization relaxation model.

  17. Magnetic anisotropy and quantized spin waves in hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lefmann, Kim; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of high-frequency collective magnetic excitations, (h) over bar omegaapproximate to1.1 meV, in hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. The neutron scattering experiments include measurements at temperatures in the range 6-300 K and applied fields up to 7.5 T as well...... as polarization analysis. We give an explanation for the field- and temperature dependence of the excitations, which are found to have strongly elliptical out-of-plane precession. The frequency of the excitations gives information on the magnetic anisotropy constants in the system. We have in this way determined...

  18. Magnetic dynamics of weakly and strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of two differently treated samples of hematite nanoparticles from the same batch with a particle size of about 20 nm have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The dynamics of the first sample, in which the particles are coated and dispersed in water, is in accordance with...... down by interparticle interactions and a magnetically split spectrum is retained at room temperature. The temperature variation or the magnetic hyperfine field, corresponding to different quantiles in the hyperfine field distribution, can be consistently described by a mean field model...... for "superferromagnetism" in which the magnetic anisotropy is included. The coupling between the particles is due to exchange interactions and the interaction strength can be accounted for by just a few exchange bridges between surface atoms in neighboring crystallites....

  19. Multimodal Magnetic-Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Stafford

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic plasmonic nanomaterials are of great interest in the field of biomedicine due to their vast number of potential applications, for example, in molecular imaging, photothermal therapy, magnetic hyperthermia and as drug delivery vehicles. The multimodal nature of these nanoparticles means that they are potentially ideal theranostic agents—i.e., they can be used both as therapeutic and diagnostic tools. This review details progress in the field of magnetic-plasmonic nanomaterials over the past ten years, focusing on significant developments that have been made and outlining the future work that still needs to be done in this fast emerging area. The review describes the main synthetic approaches to each type of magnetic plasmonic nanomaterial and the potential biomedical applications of these hybrid nanomaterials.

  20. Co-encapsulation of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and doxorubicin into biodegradable PLGA nanocarriers for intratumoral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yanhui Jia1, Mei Yuan1, Huidong Yuan1, Xinglu Huang2, Xiang Sui1, Xuemei Cui1, Fangqiong Tang2, Jiang Peng1, Jiying Chen1, Shibi Lu1, Wenjing Xu1, Li Zhang1, Quanyi Guo11Institute of Orthopedics, General Hospital of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Laboratory of Controllable Preparation and Application of Nanomaterials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this study, the authors constructed a novel PLGA [poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid]-based polymeric nanocarrier co-encapsulated with doxorubicin (DOX and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs using a single emulsion evaporation method. The DOX-MNPs showed high entrapment efficiency, and they supported a sustained and steady release of DOX. Moreover, the drug release was pH sensitive, with a faster release rate in an acidic environment than in a neutral environment. In vitro, the DOX-MNPs were easily internalized into murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells and they induced apoptosis. In vivo, the DOX-MNPs showed higher antitumor activity than free DOX solution. Furthermore, the antitumor activity of the DOX-MNPs was higher with than without an external magnetic field; they were also associated with smaller tumor volume and a lower metastases incidence rate. This work may provide a new modality for developing an effective drug delivery system.Keywords: antitumor activity, external magnetic field, intratumoral injection, apoptosis, Lewis lung carcinoma

  1. Size dependence of non-magnetic thickness in YIG nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyaifar, M., E-mail: md.niyaifar@gmail.com; Mohammadpour, H.; Dorafshani, M.; Hasanpour, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study is focused on particle size dependence of structural and magnetic properties in yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) nanoparticles. A series of YIG samples with different particle size were produced by varying the annealing temperatures. The X-ray analysis revealed an inverse correlation between lattice parameter and the crystallite size. The normal distribution is used for fitting the particles size distribution which is extracted from scanning electron micrographs. Also, by using the results of vibrating sample magnetometer, the magnetic diameter was calculated based on Langevin model in order to investigate the variation of dead layer thickness. Furthermore, the observed line broadening in Mössbauer spectra confirmed the increase of non-magnetic thickness due to the reduction of particle size. - Highlights: • Pure phase Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} nanoparticles are fabricated in different particle size by a thermal treatment. • The size effect on magnetic properties is studied with a core/shell (magnetic/nonmagnetic) model. • The logarithmic variation of (dead layer thickness)/(particle size) ratio with the particle size is investigated. • The results of Mossbauer are explained based on the correlation between lattice constant and particle size variation.

  2. Magnetic properties of crystalline nanoparticles with different sizes and shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Ana T.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido, Campus de Caraubas, RN 333, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Dantas, Ana L.; Almeida, N.S. [Departamento de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, 59610-210 Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil)

    2017-03-01

    The effects of shape and finite size on the physical behavior of nanostructured antiferromagnetic particles are investigated. They were modeled as ellipsoidal systems which preserve the crystalline structure of the correspondent bulk material. In our analysis we consider nanoparticles composed by magnetic ions which are themselves insensitive to the presence of surfaces and/or interfaces. Results are shown for structures similar to MnF{sub 2} and NiO crystals. Special attention is given to these last once their singular magnetic arrangement, as well as, their use at different technological and/or biomedical applications, has motivated intense experimental studies at different laboratories. We use the parameters that describe the correspondent bulk material to discuss the magnetic behavior of these particles for different volumes and shapes. - Highlights: • The number of magnetic phases of tetragonal AFM nanoparticles depends on their shape. • Hysteresis loops of NiO particles depends on the direction of the dc magnetic field. • The high frequencies normal modes of NiO particles are insensitive to their geometry.

  3. Electron tomography of porous materials and magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uusimäki, T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron tomography, as carried out in a transmission electron microscope is a method to reveal the three dimensional structure of the sample at the nanometer scale. It is based on tilting the sample and recording subsequent images at different projections angles. Using specific reconstruction algorithms the density distribution of the sample can then be reproduced. In this thesis, electron tomography has been implemented for material science specimens and more rigorously to porous media infiltrated with magnetic nanoparticles. The volume and spatial distribution along with the knowledge of the demagnetizing factors were then used within a magnetic Monte Carlo simulation to predict the magnetic response of the nanoparticle assembly. The local curvature of nanoparticles within the template, known to be a critical geometrical parameter influencing material properties, was extracted with two distinctive methods. Furthermore, new capabilities needed for image analysis and processing of the tilt series had to be implemented for improved alignments and segmentation. A new method to align the tilt series without depending on markers was written for obtaining high quality reconstructions. Also a comparison was made between different scanning TEM acquisition modes such as incoherent bright field and high angle annular dark field imaging modes with respect to resolution and contrast changes. (author) [de

  4. Progress in electrochemical synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramimoghadam, Donya; Bagheri, Samira; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnetic iron oxide particles have been emerged as significant nanomaterials due to its extensive range of application in various fields. In this regard, synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles with desirable properties and high potential applications are greatly demanded. Therefore, investigation on different iron oxide phases and their magnetic properties along with various commonly used synthetic techniques are remarked and thoroughly described in this review. Electrochemical synthesis as a newfound method with unique advantages is elaborated, followed by design approaches and key parameters to control the properties of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Additionally, since the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles is as important as its preparation, surface modification issue has been a serious challenge which is comprehensively discussed using different surfactants. Despite the advantages of the electrochemical synthesis method, this technique has been poorly studied and requires deep investigations on effectual parameters such as current density, pH, electrolyte concentration etc. - Highlights: • IONPs are applied in chemical industries, medicine, magnetic storage etc. • Electrochemical synthesis (EC) is convenient, eco-friendly, selective and low-cost. • EC key factors are current density, pH, electrolyte concentration, electrode type. • Organic, inorganic and biological materials can be used to modify IONPs’ surface. • The physicochemical properties of IONPs can be controlled by adding surfactants

  5. Sensor and method for measuring the areal density of magnetic nanoparticles on a micro-array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for magnetic detection of binding of biological molecules on a biochip. A magnetoresistive sensor device for measuring an areal density of magnetic nanoparticles on a micro-array, the magnetic nanoparticles (15) being directly or indirectly

  6. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles colourization by a mixing-frequency method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Liang; Wu, Kai; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Brownian and Néel relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can be characterized by a highly sensitive mixing-frequency method using a search-coil based detection system. The unique magnetic properties of MNPs have been used for biomarkers detection. In this paper, we present a theory and implement an experimental detection scheme using the mixing-frequency method to identify different MNPs simultaneously. A low-frequency sinusoidal magnetic field is applied to saturate the MNPs periodically. A high-frequency sinusoidal magnetic field is then applied to generate mixing-frequency signals that are highly specific to the magnetization of MNPs. The spectra of each MNP can be defined as the complex magnetization of the MNPs over the field frequency. The magnetic spectra of various MNPs and magnetic beads have been characterized and compared. The differences between the MNPs spectra enable us to identify the individual MNPs at the same time. A test has been done to verify the ratio of two different MNPs in mixed samples based on the proposed theory. The experimental results show that the mixing-frequency method is a promising method for MNPs colourization. (paper)

  8. Real time monitoring of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly on surfaces of magnetic recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Crawford, T. M.; Qi, B.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle self-assembly dynamics are monitored in real-time by detecting optical diffraction from an all-nanoparticle grating as it self-assembles on a grating pattern recorded on a magnetic medium. The diffraction efficiency strongly depends on concentration, pH, and colloidal stability of nanoparticle suspensions, demonstrating the nanoparticle self-assembly process is highly tunable. This metrology could provide an alternative for detecting nanoparticle properties such as colloidal stability

  9. Size and thickness effect on magnetic structures of maghemite hollow magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, Fatima; Labaye, Yvan; Sayed Hassan, Rodaina; El Haj Hassan, Fouad; Yaacoub, Nader; Greneche, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface anisotropy on the magnetic ground state of hollow maghemite nanoparticles is investigated using atomistic Monte Carlo simulation. The computer modeling is carried on hollow nanostructures as a function of size and shell thickness. It is found that the large contribution of the surface anisotropy imposes a “throttled” spin structure where the moments located at the outer surface tend to orient normal to the surface while those located at the inner surface appear to be more aligned. For increasing values of surface anisotropy in the frame of a radial model, the magnetic moments become radially oriented either inward or outward giving rise to a “hedgehog” configuration with nearly zero net magnetization. We also show the effect of the size of hollow nanoparticle on the spin behavior where the spin non-collinearity increases (for fixed value of surface anisotropy) as the diameter of the hollow nanoparticle increases due to the significant increase in surface-to-volume ratio, the thickness being constant. Moreover, the thickness of the hollow nanoparticle shell influences the spin configuration and thus the relation between surface anisotropy and the size or the thickness of the hollow nanoparticle is established.

  10. Size and thickness effect on magnetic structures of maghemite hollow magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed, Fatima; Labaye, Yvan, E-mail: yvan.labaye@univ-lemans.fr [Université du Maine, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans CNRS UMR-6283 (France); Sayed Hassan, Rodaina; El Haj Hassan, Fouad [Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences Section I, MPLAB (Lebanon); Yaacoub, Nader, E-mail: nader.yaacoub@univ-lemans.fr; Greneche, Jean-Marc [Université du Maine, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans CNRS UMR-6283 (France)

    2016-09-15

    The effect of surface anisotropy on the magnetic ground state of hollow maghemite nanoparticles is investigated using atomistic Monte Carlo simulation. The computer modeling is carried on hollow nanostructures as a function of size and shell thickness. It is found that the large contribution of the surface anisotropy imposes a “throttled” spin structure where the moments located at the outer surface tend to orient normal to the surface while those located at the inner surface appear to be more aligned. For increasing values of surface anisotropy in the frame of a radial model, the magnetic moments become radially oriented either inward or outward giving rise to a “hedgehog” configuration with nearly zero net magnetization. We also show the effect of the size of hollow nanoparticle on the spin behavior where the spin non-collinearity increases (for fixed value of surface anisotropy) as the diameter of the hollow nanoparticle increases due to the significant increase in surface-to-volume ratio, the thickness being constant. Moreover, the thickness of the hollow nanoparticle shell influences the spin configuration and thus the relation between surface anisotropy and the size or the thickness of the hollow nanoparticle is established.

  11. Magnetic properties in BaFe12O19 nanoparticles prepared under a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Chen Qianwang; Che Shan

    2004-01-01

    It was observed that the nanocrystallites of BaFe 12 O 19 formed at 140 deg. C under a 0.25 T magnetic field exhibited a higher saturation magnetization (6.1 emu/g at room temperature) than that of the sample (1.1 emu/g) obtained under zero magnetic field. Both of the two approaches yielded plain-like particles with an average particle size of 12 nm. However, the Curie temperature (T c ), a direct measuring of the strength of superexchange interaction of Fe 3+ -O 2- -Fe 3+ , increased from 410 deg. C for the nanoparticles prepared without an external field applied to 452 deg. C for the particles formed under a 0.25 T magnetic field, which indicates that external magnetic fields can improve the occupancy of magnetic ions and then increase the superexchange interaction. This was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance and Moessbauer spectrum analysis. The results present in this paper suggest that in addition to oxygen defects, surface non-magnetic layer and a fraction of finer particles in the superparamagnetic range, cation vacancies should be responsible for the decreasing of saturation magnetization in magnetic nanoparticles

  12. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovin, Y., E-mail: nano@tsutmb.ru [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, School of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovin, D. [G.R. Derzhavin Tambov State University (Russian Federation); Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, School of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  13. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, Y.; Golovin, D.; Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  14. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chekina, Nataliya; Horák, Daniel; Jendelová, Pavla; Trchová, Miroslava; Beneš, Milan J.; Hrubý, Martin; Herynek, V.; Turnovcová, Karolína; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 21 (2011), s. 7630-7639 ISSN 0959-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E09109; GA ČR GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : magnetic * fluorescent * stem cells Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.968, year: 2011

  15. Non-equilibrium effects in the magnetic behavior of Co_3O_4 nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Bisht, Vijay; Rajeev, K. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report detailed studies on non-equilibrium magnetic behavior of antiferromagnetic Co_3O_4 nanoparticles. Temperature and field dependence of magnetization, wait time dependence of magnetic relaxation (aging), memory effects and temperature dependence of specific heat have been investigated to understand the magnetic behavior of these particles. We find that the system shows some features characteristic of nanoparticle magnetism such as bifurcation of field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled...

  16. Magnetic susceptibility, nanorheology, and magnetoviscosity of magnetic nanoparticles in viscoelastic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Patrick; Evangelopoulos, Apostolos E. A. S.

    2018-03-01

    While magnetic nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian solvents (ferrofluids) have been intensively studied in recent years, the effects of viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium on the nanoparticle dynamics are much less understood. Here we investigate a mesoscopic model for the orientational dynamics of isolated magnetic nanoparticles subject to external fields, viscous and viscoelastic friction, as well as the corresponding random torques. We solve the model analytically in the overdamped limit for weak viscoelasticity. By comparison to Brownian dynamics simulations we establish the limits of validity of the analytical solution. We find that viscoelasticity not only slows down the magnetization relaxation, shifts the peak of the imaginary magnetic susceptibility χ″ to lower frequencies, and increases the magnetoviscosity but also leads to nonexponential relaxation and a broadening of χ″. The model we study also allows us to test a recent proposal for using magnetic susceptibility measurements as a nanorheological tool using a variant of the Germant-DiMarzio-Bishop relation. We find for the present model and certain parameter ranges that the relation of the magnetic susceptibility to the shear modulus is satisfied to a good approximation.

  17. Size and surface effects on the magnetism of magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, V. N., E-mail: pppnvn@yandex.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Ignatenko, A. N.; Irkhin, V. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The size effects of magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles on their magnetic properties (magnetic moment, Curie temperature, blocking temperature, etc.) have been investigated. Magnetic separation and centrifugation of an aqueous solution of nanoparticles were used for their separation into fractions; their sizes were measured by atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy. A change in the size leads to a change in the Curie temperature and magnetic moment per formula unit. Both native nanoparticles and those covered with a bioresorbable layer have been considered. The magnetic properties have been calculated by the Monte Carlo method for the classical Heisenberg model with various bulk and surface magnetic moments.

  18. Magnetic properties of ultra-small goethite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brok, E; Frandsen, C; Madsen, D E; Mørup, S; Jacobsen, H; Birk, J O; Lefmann, K; Bendix, J; Pedersen, K S; Boothroyd, C B; Berhe, A A; Simeoni, G G

    2014-01-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) is a common nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic mineral. However, it is typically difficult to study the properties of isolated single-crystalline goethite nanoparticles, because goethite has a strong tendency to form particles of aggregated nanograins often with low-angle grain boundaries. This nanocrystallinity leads to complex magnetic properties that are dominated by magnetic fluctuations in interacting grains. Here we present a study of the magnetic properties of 5.7 nm particles of goethite by use of magnetization measurements, inelastic neutron scattering and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ‘ultra-small’ size of these particles (i.e. that the particles consist of one or only a few grains) allows for more direct elucidation of the particles' intrinsic magnetic properties. We find from ac and dc magnetization measurements a significant upturn of the magnetization at very low temperatures most likely due to freezing of spins in canted spin structures. From hysteresis curves we estimate the saturation magnetization from uncompensated magnetic moments to be σ s  = 0.044 A m 2  kg −1 at room temperature. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements show a strong signal from excitations of the uniform mode (q = 0 spin waves) at temperatures of 100–250 K and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies show that the magnetic fluctuations are dominated by ‘classical’ superparamagnetic relaxation at temperatures above ∼170 K. From the temperature dependence of the hyperfine fields and the excitation energy of the uniform mode we estimate a magnetic anisotropy constant of around 1.0 × 10 5  J m −3 . (paper)

  19. Synthesizing and Playing with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Comprehensive Approach to Amazing Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalverny, Anne-Laure; Leyral, Géraldine; Rouessac, Florence; Bernaud, Laurent; Filhol, Jean-Sébastien

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and stabilized using ammonium cations or poly(vinyl alcohol) to produce amazing materials such as safer aqueous ferrofluids, ferrogels, ferromagnetic inks, plastics, and nanopowders illustrating how versatile materials can be produced just by simple modifications. The synthesis is fast, reliable,…

  20. The Magnetic Nanoparticle Movement in Magnetic Fluid Characterized by the Laser Dynamic Speckle Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual scanning laser speckle interferometry experiment was designed to observe the dynamic behavior of the magnetic fluid actuated by a magnetic field. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the dynamic speckle measurement, the phase delay scanning was used to compensate the additional phase variation which was caused by the transverse scanning. The correlation coefficients corresponding to the temporal dynamic speckle patterns within the same time interval scattering from the nanoparticles were calculated in the experiment on nanoscale magnetic clusters. In the experiment, the speckle of the magnetic nanoparticle fluid movement has been recorded by the lens unmounted CCD within the interferometry strips, although the speckle led to the distinguished annihilation of the light coherence. The results have showed that the nanoparticle fluid dynamic properties appeared synergistically in the fringe speckles. The analyses of the nanoparticle's relative speed and the speckle pattern moving amount in the fringes have proved the nanoparticle’s movement in a laminar flow in the experiment.

  1. pH sensitive thiolated cationic hydrogel for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia, T A; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the efficacy of pH sensitive thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate for oral delivery of insulin. Synthesis of pH sensitive thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDCPA) was carried out by crosslinking Polymethacrylic acid with thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDCys) via carbodiimide chemistry. Prior to in vivo experiment, various physicochemical and biological characterisation were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of PDCPA. Modification was confirmed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The particle size was found to be 284 nm with a zeta potential of 37.3+/-1.58 mV. Texture analyser measurements showed that PDCPA is more mucoadhesive than the parent polymer. Transepithelial electrical measurements showed a reduction of greater than 50% on incubation with PDCPA particles. Permeation studies showed that PDCPA is more permeable than the parent polymer. On in vivo evaluation on male diabetic rats, insulin loaded PDCPA exhibited a blood glucose reduction of 19%.

  2. Moessbauer spectroscopy for characterizing biodegradation of magnetic nanoparticles in a living organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mischenko, Ilya Nikitich, E-mail: IlyaMischenko@rambler.ru; Chuev, Michail Alexandrovich; Cherepanov, Valeriy Mihailovich; Polikarpov, Michail Alexeevich [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    We have developed a model for describing nanoparticles magnetic dynamics. This allows us to fit self-consistently the wide set of the experimental data, particularly, the evolution of Moessbauer spectral shape with temperature and external magnetic field as well as the magnetization curves for nanoparticles injected into mice. Thus, we reliably evaluate changes in characteristics of the nanoparticles and their chemical transformation to ferritin-like forms in mouse's organs as a function of time after injection of nanoparticles. Actually, the approach allows one to quantitatively characterize biodegradation and biotransformation of magnetic particles in a body.

  3. Mössbauer spectroscopy for characterizing biodegradation of magnetic nanoparticles in a living organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mischenko, Ilya Nikitich; Chuev, Michail Alexandrovich; Cherepanov, Valeriy Mihailovich; Polikarpov, Michail Alexeevich

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a model for describing nanoparticles magnetic dynamics. This allows us to fit self-consistently the wide set of the experimental data, particularly, the evolution of Mössbauer spectral shape with temperature and external magnetic field as well as the magnetization curves for nanoparticles injected into mice. Thus, we reliably evaluate changes in characteristics of the nanoparticles and their chemical transformation to ferritin-like forms in mouse’s organs as a function of time after injection of nanoparticles. Actually, the approach allows one to quantitatively characterize biodegradation and biotransformation of magnetic particles in a body.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of cationic lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles using multiple emulsions as microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbaba, Hasan; Karagöz, Uğur; Selamet, Yusuf; Kantarcı, A. Gülten

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis method with in-situ surface coating. For this purpose multiple emulsions were used as microreactors for the first time and magnetic iron oxide particles synthesized in the core of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles. DLS, SEM, TEM, VSM, Raman Spectrometer, XRD, and XPS techniques were performed for characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles. Obtained magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic and no additional process was needed for surface adjustments. They are positively charged as a result of cationic lipid coating and has appropriate particle size (<30 nm) for drug or nucleic acid delivery. Structure analysis showed that magnetic core material is in the form of magnetite. Saturation magnetization value was measured as 15-17 emu g-1 for lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles obtained by multiple emulsion method which is reasonably sufficient for magnetic targeting.

  5. Recent Advances in the Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Support for Homogeneous Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govan, Joseph; Gun’ko, Yurii K.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are a highly valuable substrate for the attachment of homogeneous inorganic and organic containing catalysts. This review deals with the very recent main advances in the development of various nanocatalytic systems by the immobilisation of homogeneous catalysts onto magnetic nanoparticles. We discuss magnetic core shell nanostructures (e.g., silica or polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles) as substrates for catalyst immobilisation. Then we consider magnetic nanoparticles bound to inorganic catalytic mesoporous structures as well as metal organic frameworks. Binding of catalytically active small organic molecules and polymers are also reviewed. After that we briefly deliberate on the binding of enzymes to magnetic nanocomposites and the corresponding enzymatic catalysis. Finally, we draw conclusions and present a future outlook for the further development of new catalytic systems which are immobilised onto magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:28344220

  6. Highly magnetic Co nanoparticles fabricated by X-ray radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Dustin M.; Castano, Carlos E.; Rojas, Jessika V.

    2018-03-01

    Advanced routes for the synthesis of nanomaterials, such as ferromagnetic nanoparticles, are being explored that are easy to perform using cost-effective and non-toxic precursors. Radiolytic syntheses based on the use of X-rays as ionizing radiation are promising towards this effort. X-rays were used to produce highly magnetic cobalt nanoparticles (NPs), stable in air up to 200 °C, from the radiolysis of water. Crystal structure analysis by XRD indicates a mixture of Cofcc, 63%, and Cohcp, 37%, phases. Magnetic analysis by VSM gave a saturation magnetization (Ms) 136 emu/g at 1 T and coercivity (Hc) = 325 Oe when the reaction solution was purged with N2 while an air-purged treatment resulted in Co NPs having 102 emu/g with a coercivity (Hc) 270 Oe. Overall, the reduction of Co2+ occurred in an aqueous reaction environment without addition of chemical reductants resulting in Co NPs with size distribution from 20 to 140 nm. This clean approach at ambient temperature produced highly magnetic Co NPs that may be used for switching devices (i.e. reed switches) or as additives for alloys that require high Curie points.

  7. Dynamical Origin of Highly Efficient Energy Dissipation in Soft Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Sim, Jaegun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2018-05-01

    We explore robust magnetization-dynamic behaviors in soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-domain states and find their related high-efficiency energy-dissipation mechanism using finite-element micromagnetic simulations. We also make analytical derivations that provide deeper physical insights into the magnetization dynamics associated with Gilbert damping parameters under applications of time-varying rotating magnetic fields of different strengths and frequencies and static magnetic fields. Furthermore, we find that the mass-specific energy-dissipation rate at resonance in the steady-state regime changes remarkably with the strength of rotating fields and static fields for given damping constants. The associated magnetization dynamics are well interpreted with the help of the numerical calculation of analytically derived explicit forms. The high-efficiency energy-loss power can be obtained using soft magnetic nanoparticles in the single-domain state by tuning the frequency of rotating fields to the resonance frequency; what is more, it is controllable via the rotating and static field strengths for a given intrinsic damping constant. We provide a better and more efficient means of achieving specific loss power that can be implemented in magnetic hyperthermia applications.

  8. Magnetic proximity effects in nanoparticle composite systems and macrocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbs, Genevieve

    2017-07-01

    Assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles are of major interest for future applications e.g. in spintronic devices, high density data storage systems or biomedical applications. The reason is not only the obvious miniaturization, but also their novel properties emerging only at the nanoscale. Hence, arranging nanoparticles like atoms in a crystal enables the fabrication of a new class of materials. To gain in-depth understanding of these systems, it is necessary to investigate them on all length scales. The present work provides a novel and extensive contribution to the understanding of the selfassembly of iron oxide nanoparticle superstructures and their influence on polarizable matrix materials. Through the investigation of the samples at all stages of preparation, a comprehensive picture of the unique phenomena observed at the end is derived. For this purpose, oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles were deposited on silicon substrates by spincoating to manufacture two-dimensional arrangements. Hereby, the influence of several parameters has been investigated and optimized. Afterwards, the organic surfactant shell was removed by oxygen plasma treatment. This process has been studied in detail, because it initiates a phase transformation that significantly influences the magnetic properties of the system (e.g. by reducing the blocking temperature). Thin palladium or platinum films were then respectively deposited to create a matrix material. Aside from magnetometry measurements, first order reversal curves were obtained in cooperation with the Max-Planck-Institute for Intelligent Systems, both revealing that the matrix materials significantly influence the inter-particle interaction and vice versa. However, only by performing X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments at the Advanced Photon Source of the Argonne National Laboratory, it could be evidenced unambiguously that platinum can be polarized by an oxide. Additionally, these systems were investigated

  9. Magnetic proximity effects in nanoparticle composite systems and macrocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbs, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    Assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles are of major interest for future applications e.g. in spintronic devices, high density data storage systems or biomedical applications. The reason is not only the obvious miniaturization, but also their novel properties emerging only at the nanoscale. Hence, arranging nanoparticles like atoms in a crystal enables the fabrication of a new class of materials. To gain in-depth understanding of these systems, it is necessary to investigate them on all length scales. The present work provides a novel and extensive contribution to the understanding of the selfassembly of iron oxide nanoparticle superstructures and their influence on polarizable matrix materials. Through the investigation of the samples at all stages of preparation, a comprehensive picture of the unique phenomena observed at the end is derived. For this purpose, oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles were deposited on silicon substrates by spincoating to manufacture two-dimensional arrangements. Hereby, the influence of several parameters has been investigated and optimized. Afterwards, the organic surfactant shell was removed by oxygen plasma treatment. This process has been studied in detail, because it initiates a phase transformation that significantly influences the magnetic properties of the system (e.g. by reducing the blocking temperature). Thin palladium or platinum films were then respectively deposited to create a matrix material. Aside from magnetometry measurements, first order reversal curves were obtained in cooperation with the Max-Planck-Institute for Intelligent Systems, both revealing that the matrix materials significantly influence the inter-particle interaction and vice versa. However, only by performing X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments at the Advanced Photon Source of the Argonne National Laboratory, it could be evidenced unambiguously that platinum can be polarized by an oxide. Additionally, these systems were investigated

  10. Measuring and modeling the magnetic settling of superparamagnetic nanoparticle dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Ko, Saebom; Huh, Chun; Bryant, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present settling experiments and mathematical modeling to study the magnetic separation of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) from a brine. The experiments were performed using SPIONs suspensions of concentration between 3 and 202g/L dispersed in water and separated from the liquid under the effect of a permanent magnet. A 1D model was developed in the framework of the sedimentation theory with a conservation law for SPIONs and a mass flux function based on the Newton's law for motion in a magnetic field. The model describes both the hindering effect of suspension concentration (n) during settling due to particle collisions and the increase in settling rate due to the attraction of the SPIONs towards the magnet. The flux function was derived from the settling experiments and the numerical model validated against the analytical solution and the experimental data. Suspensions of SPIONs were of 2.8cm initial height, placed on a magnet, and monitored continuously with a digital camera. Applying a magnetic field of 0.5T of polarization, the SPION's velocity was of approximately 3·10(-5)m/s close to the magnet and decreases of two orders of magnitude across the domain. The process was characterized initially by a classical sedimentation behavior, i.e., an upper interface between the clear water and the suspension slowly moving towards the magnet and a lower interface between the sediment layer and the suspension moving away from the magnet. Subsequently, a rapid separation of nanoparticle occured suggesting a non-classical settling phenomenon induced by magnetic forces which favor particle aggregation and therefore faster settling. The rate of settling decreased with n and an optimal condition for fast separation was found for an initial n of 120g/L. The model agrees well with the measurements in the early stage of the settling, but it fails to describe the upper interface movement during the later stage, probably because of particle

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging using multiple electron paramagnetic resonance activation sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in several biomedical applications such as hyperthermia, drug targeting, and disease detection. To realize an effective working of these applications, the spatial distribution of the particles needs to be accurately known, in a non-invasive way. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a promising and sensitive measurement technique for recovering these distributions. In the conventional approach, EPR is applied with a homogeneous magnetic field. In this paper, we employ different heterogeneous magnetic fields that allow to stabilize the solution of the associated inverse problem and to obtain localized spatial information. A comparison is made between the two approaches and our novel adaptation shows an average increase in reconstruction quality by 5% and is 12 times more robust towards noise. Furthermore, our approach allows to speed up the EPR measurements while still obtaining reconstructions with an improved accuracy and noise robustness compared to homogeneous EPR

  12. Evidence for quantization of mechanical rotation of magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J; Zysler, R D; Molins, E; Chudnovsky, E M

    2010-01-15

    We report evidence of the quantization of the rotational motion of solid particles containing thousands of atoms. A system of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles confined inside polymeric cavities has been studied. The particles have been characterized by the x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, plasma mass spectroscopy, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), and magnetization measurements. Magnetic and FMR data confirm the presence of particles that are free to rotate inside the cavities. Equidistant, temperature-independent jumps in the dependence of the microwave absorption on the magnetic field have been detected. This observation is in accordance with the expectation that orbital motion splits the low-field absorption line into multiple lines.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antònia Busquets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  14. Fabrication of DNA nanotubes with an array of exterior magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Adele; Zarrabi, Ali; Gill, Pooria

    2017-10-01

    Described here a methodology for arraying of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on the surface of DNA nanotubes (DNTs). Positioning of magnetic nanoparticles at exterior surface of DNTs were shaped after self-assembling of oligonucleotide staples within an M13mp18 DNA scaffold via an origami process. The staples were partially labeled with biotin to be arrayed at the surface of DNTs. Gel retardation assay of the DNTs carrying magnetic nanoparticles indicated a reversely behavioral electrophoretic movement in comparison to the nanotubes have been demonstrated previously. Also, high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed positioning magnetic nanoparticles at the exterior surface of DNTs, correctly. Ultrastructural characteristics of these DNA nanotubes using atomic force microscopy demonstrated topographic heights on their surfaces formed through positioning of magnetic nanoparticles outside the tubules. This nanoarchitecture would be potential for multiple arraying of nanoparticles that those be useful as functionalized chimeric nanocarriers for developing novel nanodrugs and nanobiosensors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R 2 =0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R 2 =0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R 2 =0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. - Highlights: • Development of an AC susceptibility imaging model. • Comparison of AC susceptibility imaging (ASI) and susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI). • Demonstration of ASI and spectroscopic ASI (sASI) using three different magnetic nanoparticle types. • SASI scan separation of three different magnetic nanoparticles samples using 5 spectroscopic frequencies. • Demonstration of biological feasibility of sASI

  16. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using magnetic carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardarajan, V.; Gu, L.; Kanneganti, A.; Mohanty, S. K.; Koymen, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal therapy offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. Several attempts are underway in using carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and nanotubes due to their excellent absorption properties in the near-infrared spectrum of biological window. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles, to ensure minimal cytotoxicity, is a major challenge. We report on the introduction of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) onto cancer cells, localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic field and irradiating them with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in Benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5-10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  17. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  18. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stirling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake.

  19. Effect of magnetic field on self-assembling of colloidal Co magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitu, L.; Chushkin, Y.; Luby, S.; Majkova, E.; Leo, G.; Satka, A.; Giersig, M.; Hilgendorff, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the formation of 3-D structures composed of Co nanoparticles (NPs) is reported. Structures were obtained by drying a droplet of a colloidal solution of NPs in a magnetic field perpendicular to the substrate. The Co nanoparticles were prepared by thermolysis of Co 2 (CO) 8 . The 3-D NP structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic and magnetic force microscopy (AFM/MFM). It has been found that at the border of the droplet, NPs assemble into hexagonally ordered 3-D columns or they form a labyrinthine structure. The formation of the 3-D structures can be explained by the outflow of NPs to the border of the droplet during the drying process. Within this model the pattern formation is dependent on the concentration of the NPs and the degree of alignment of the magnetic moments of NPs in the 3-D columns

  20. Physics responsible for heating efficiency and self-controlled temperature rise of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as heat-generating nanosources in hyperthermia treatment are still faced with many drawbacks for achieving sufficient clinical potential. In this context, increase in heating ability of magnetic nanoparticles in a biologically safe alternating magnetic field and also approach to a precise control on temperature rise are two challenging subjects so that a significant part of researchers' efforts has been devoted to them. Since a deep understanding of Physics concepts of heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is essential to develop hyperthermia as a cancer treatment with non-adverse side effects, this review focuses on different mechanisms responsible for heat dissipation in a radio frequency magnetic field. Moreover, particular attention is given to ferrite-based nanoparticles because of their suitability in radio frequency magnetic fields. Also, the key role of Curie temperature in suppressing undesired temperature rise is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic lipid nanoparticles loading doxorubicin for intracellular delivery: Preparation and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Xiaoying; Du Yongzhong; Hong Linghong; Yuan Hong; Hu Fuqiang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor intracellular delivery is an effective route for targeting chemotherapy to enhance the curative effect and minimize the side effect of a drug. In this study, the magnetic lipid nanoparticles with an uptake ability by tumor cells were prepared dispersing ferroso-ferric oxide nanoparticles in aqueous phase using oleic acid (OA) as a dispersant, and following the solvent dispersion of lipid organic solution. The obtained nanoparticles with 200 nm volume average diameter and -30 mV surface zeta potential could be completely removed by external magnetic field from aqueous solution. Using doxorubicin (DOX) as a model drug, the drug-loaded magnetic lipid nanoparticles were investigated in detail, such as the effects of OA, drug and lipid content on volume average diameter, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug loading, and in vitro drug release. The drug loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency were enhanced with increasing drug or lipid content, reduced with increasing OA content. The in vitro drug release could be controlled by changing drug or lipid content. Cellular uptake by MCF-7 cells experiment presented the excellent internalization ability of the prepared magnetic lipid nanoparticles. These results evidenced that the present magnetic lipid nanoparticles have potential for targeting therapy of antitumor drugs. - Research highlights: → A simple solvent diffusion method was developed to prepare magnetic lipid nanoparticles. → The doxorubicin-loaded magnetic lipid nanoparticles could be controlled by preparation recipe. → Magnetic lipid nanoparticles had internalization ability into tumor cells.

  2. Multifunctional pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles for simultaneous imaging, sensing and targeted intracellular anticancer drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Chen, D-H

    2008-01-01

    A novel multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier was fabricated for synchronous cancer therapy and sensing. The nanocarrier, programed to display a response to environmental stimuli (pH value), was synthesized by coupling doxorubicin (DOX) to adipic dihydrazide-grafted gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (ADH-GAMNP) via the hydrolytically degradable pH-sensitive hydrazone bond. The resultant nanocarrier, DOX-ADH-GAMNP, had a mean diameter of 13.8 nm and the amount of DOX coupled was about 6.52 mg g -1 . Also, it exhibited pH triggered release of DOX in an acidic environment (pH 5.0) but was relatively stable at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Furthermore, both GAMNP and DOX were found to possess fluorescence properties when excited in the near-infrared region due to the two-photon absorption mechanism. The coupling of DOX to GAMNP resulted in a reversible self-quenching of fluorescence through the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between the donor GAMNP and acceptor DOX. The release of DOX from DOX-ADH-GAMNP when exposed to acidic media indicated the recovery of fluorescence from both GAMNP and DOX. The change in the fluorescence intensity of DOX-ADH-GAMNP on the release of DOX can act as a potential sensor to sense the delivery of the drug. The analysis of zeta potential and plasmon absorbance in different pH conditions also confirmed the pH sensitivity of the product. This multifunctional nanocarrier is a significant breakthrough in developing a drug delivery vehicle that combines drug targeting as well as sensing and therapy at the same time.

  3. Uniform magnetic excitations in NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, C.R.H.; Kuhn, L.T.; Lefmann, K.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of isolated disc shaped NiO nanoparticles was studied at the RITA-II triple axis spectrometer at SINQ (PSI) using the newly implemented multi-analyser blade imaging mode. The particles were 13 nm in diameter and had a thickness of about 2.5 nm. A non-dispersive spin excitation was observed...... at the antiferromagnetic ((1)/(2) (1)/(2) (1)/(2)) reflection at a scattering vector of kappa = 1.30 angstrom(-1), at an energy of 2 0.51 +/- 0.02 meV. This is shown to be due to uniform magnetic excitations in the nanoparticles. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Improved delivery of magnetic nanoparticles with chemotherapy cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Gottesman, Rachel E.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Most nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutic strategies seek to develop an effective individual cancer cell or metastatic tumor treatment. Critical to the success of these therapies is to direct as much of the agent as possible to the targeted tissue while avoiding unacceptable normal tissue complications. In this light, three different cisplatinum/magnetic nanoparticle (mNP) administration regimens were investigated. The most important finding suggests that clinically relevant doses of cisplatinum result in a significant increase in the tumor uptake of systemically delivered mNP. This enhancement of mNP tumor uptake creates the potential for an even greater therapeutic ratio through the addition of mNP based, intracellular hyperthermia.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Magnetic Nanoparticles Injection into Two–phase Flow in a Porous Medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Saad, Ahmed M.; Sun, Shuyu; Salama, Amgad

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of magnetic nanoparticles injection into a water–oil two–phase flow under an external permanent magnetic field is investigated. The mathematical model of the problem under consideration has been developed. We treat

  6. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié , Sté phane C.; Kahawong, Patarawan; Duan, Xiaonan; Bowser, Daniel; Edward, Joseph B.; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs

  7. Investigation properties of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and magnetic field-dependent hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatnasab, Z.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. Wan

    2018-03-01

    The application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles as heating agents in hyperthermia therapy has made a therapeutic breakthrough in cancer treatment. The high efficiency of this magnetic hyperthermia therapy has derived from a great capability of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to generate focused heat in inaccessible tumors being effectively inactivated. The main challenges of this therapy are the improvement of the induction heating power of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the control of the hyperthermia temperature in a secure range of 42 °C to 47 °C, at targeted area. The variation of these hyperthermia properties is principally dependent on the magnetic nanoparticles as well as the magnetic field leading to enhance the efficiency of magnetic hyperthermia therapy at targeted area and also avoid undue heating to healthy cells. The present study evaluates the magnetic hyperthermia therapy through the determination of superparamagnetic nanoparticles properties and magnetic field’ parameters.

  8. Synthesis and bio-applications of targeted magnetic-fluorescent composite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Hui; Tong, Ruijie; Song, Yanling; Xiong, Fang; Li, Jiman; Wang, Shichao; Fu, Huihui; Wen, Jirui; Li, Dongze; Zeng, Ye; Zhao, Zhiwei; Wu, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles have a tremendous potential in biology. As the benefits of these materials gained recognition, increasing attention has been given to the conjugation of magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles with targeting ligands. The magnetic and fluorescent properties of nanoparticles offer several functionalities, including imaging, separation, and visualization, while the presence of a targeting ligand allows for selective cell and tissue targeting. In this review, methods for the synthesis of targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles are explored, and recent applications of these nanocomposites to the detection and separation of biomolecules, fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging, and cancer diagnosis and treatment will be summarized. As these materials are further optimized, targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles hold great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of some diseases.

  9. Magnetic field strength requirements to capture superparamagnetic nanoparticles within capillary flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallmark, B.; Darton, N. J.; James, T.; Agrawal, P.; Slater, N. K. H.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the development of a model, with supporting experimental data, which can predict the magnitude of the magnetic flux required to capture superparamagnetic nanoparticles flowing through a plastic capillary micro array. The model takes into account the shape of the magnetic field, the magnetically induced aggregation of the nanoparticles and a criterion to determine whether nanoparticles are held at the capillary wall or not. It was found that the model gave a semi-quantitative match to experimental data showing that, once steered out of the core of the fluid flow, nanoparticles could be held at a capillary wall within a weaker region of magnetic field. This result may have implications for the design of magnets for use in magnetic directed therapy in addition to having implications concerning the design of nanoparticle dosage regimes.

  10. Synthesis and bio-applications of targeted magnetic-fluorescent composite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Tong, Ruijie; Song, Yanling; Xiong, Fang; Li, Jiman; Wang, Shichao; Fu, Huihui; Wen, Jirui; Li, Dongze; Zeng, Ye; Zhao, Zhiwei; Wu, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles have a tremendous potential in biology. As the benefits of these materials gained recognition, increasing attention has been given to the conjugation of magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles with targeting ligands. The magnetic and fluorescent properties of nanoparticles offer several functionalities, including imaging, separation, and visualization, while the presence of a targeting ligand allows for selective cell and tissue targeting. In this review, methods for the synthesis of targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles are explored, and recent applications of these nanocomposites to the detection and separation of biomolecules, fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging, and cancer diagnosis and treatment will be summarized. As these materials are further optimized, targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles hold great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of some diseases.

  11. Synthesis and bio-applications of targeted magnetic-fluorescent composite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Hui; Tong, Ruijie [Sichuan University, West China Medical Center (China); Song, Yanling [Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, College of Pharmaceutical and Biological Engineering (China); Xiong, Fang [Sichuan University, West China College of Stomatology (China); Li, Jiman [Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Pathology Department (China); Wang, Shichao; Fu, Huihui; Wen, Jirui; Li, Dongze; Zeng, Ye; Zhao, Zhiwei, E-mail: zzw2002400@126.com; Wu, Jiang, E-mail: jw@scu.edu.cn [Sichuan University, West China Medical Center (China)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles have a tremendous potential in biology. As the benefits of these materials gained recognition, increasing attention has been given to the conjugation of magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles with targeting ligands. The magnetic and fluorescent properties of nanoparticles offer several functionalities, including imaging, separation, and visualization, while the presence of a targeting ligand allows for selective cell and tissue targeting. In this review, methods for the synthesis of targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles are explored, and recent applications of these nanocomposites to the detection and separation of biomolecules, fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging, and cancer diagnosis and treatment will be summarized. As these materials are further optimized, targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles hold great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of some diseases.

  12. EIS immunosensor based on magnetic nanoparticles for ochratoxim A determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biraruti, Irina; Tudorache, Madalina; Rotariu, Lucian; Bala, Camelia; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium fungi. It occurs in a variety of foodstuff, including cereals, coffee, wine, grape juice and fruits juice. Maximum permitted levels have been established by the EU and several countries. Currently, there are several methods available for OTA monitoring in real samples, e.g. TLC, HPLC, ELISA immunosensors. Liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD), coupled with immunoaffinity column or solid phase extraction as pretreatment method, has been validated and adopted as official standard for OTA determination. Also, an immunosensor based on electrochemical detection has been reported for rapid analysis of OTA in food and beverages. Our work proposes the development of a new sensitive immunosensor combining the use of magnetic nanoparticles and EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) detection principle. Anti-OTA antibody immobilised on magnetic nanoparticles were deposited on the EIS electrode surface by applying a magnetic field. Then, OTA sample solutions were added in the detection cell. Quantitative determination of OTA content was performed based on EIS detection. Experimental parameters of the immunosensor were set-up at the optimum values. Based on those values, the immunosensor allows to detect OTA in the range 1-10 ng/mL. The future perspective is to validate this immunochemical method using HPLC-FLD. (authors)

  13. Peptide-functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle for gold mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Sharma, Kumakshi; Borujeny, Elham Rafie; Montemagno, Carlo, E-mail: montemag@ualberta.ca [Ingenuity Lab, 1-070C (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    Here, we present our work on preparing a novel nanomaterial composed of inorganic binding peptides and magnetic nanoparticles for inorganic mining. Two previously selected and well-characterized gold-binding peptides from cell surface display, AuBP1 and AuBP2, were exploited. This nanomaterial (AuBP-MNP) was designed to fulfill the following two significant functions: the surface conjugated gold-binding peptide will recognize and selectively bind to gold, while the magnetic nano-sized core will respond and migrate according to the applied external magnetic field. This will allow the smart nanomaterial to mine an individual material (gold) from a pool of mixture, without excessive solvent extraction, filtration, and concentration steps. The working efficiency of AuBP-MNP was determined by showing a dramatic reduction of gold nanoparticle colloid concentration, monitored by spectroscopy. The binding kinetics of AuBP-MNP onto the gold surface was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, which exhibits around 100 times higher binding kinetics than peptides alone. The binding capacity of AuBP-MNP was demonstrated by a bench-top mining test with gold microparticles.

  14. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  15. Annealing of magnetic nanoparticles for their encapsulation into microcarriers guided by vascular magnetic resonance navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Segura, Vincent [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (EPM), NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering and Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada); Savadogo, Oumarou [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (EPM), Laboratoire de Nouveaux Materiaux pour l' electrochimie et l' energie (Canada); Leroux, Jean-Christophe [Universite de Montreal, Faculty of Pharmacy (Canada); Martel, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.martel@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (EPM), NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering and Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    Iron, cobalt and iron-cobalt nanoparticle properties, such as diameter, saturation magnetization (Ms), crystal structure, surface composition and stability in physiological solutions, were investigated according to the annealing temperature used prior to their encapsulation into poly(d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcarriers. These new 60-{mu}m microparticles should exhibit an Ms around 70 emu g{sup -1} to be guided in real time from their intravascular injection site to a tumor with a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The challenge in the preparation of the nanoparticles consisted in limiting Ms loss by oxidation and the release of metallic ions. It was found that when the annealing temperature reached 650 Degree-Sign C, Fe nanoparticles coalesced, the mean diameter reached (O) 361 {+-} 138 nm and Ms increased to 171 emu g{sup -1}. These nanoparticles exhibited a core of {alpha}-Fe and a shell of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. On the opposite, Co nanoparticle properties were not affected by the annealing temperature: O and Ms were around 120 nm and 140 emu g{sup -1}, respectively. FeCo (60:40, atomic percent) nanoparticles coalesced at an annealing temperature >550 Degree-Sign C, O and Ms reached 217 nm and 213 emu g{sup -1}, respectively. Co and FeCo nanoparticles with a Co atomic proportion >15 % were coated with a graphite shell when the temperature was set to 550 Degree-Sign C. In physiological solution, Fe and Co nanoparticles significantly released more ions than FeCo nanoparticles. After the preparation steps prior to their encapsulation, the Ms of Fe and FeCo nanoparticles decreased by 25 and 3 %, respectively. FeCo-PLGA microparticles possessed a relatively high Ms (73 emu g{sup -1}) while that of Fe-PLGA microparticle (20 emu g{sup -1}) was too low for efficient targeting. The graphite shell was efficient to preserve Ms during the encapsulation.

  16. Effect of sample container morphology on agglomeration dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Dae Seong; Kim, Hack Jin [Dept. of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been used extensively in medical and biological applications, and agglomeration of magnetic nanoparticles is employed in the purification of water and proteins. The magnetic weight can be measured with a conventional electronic balance. Details of the experimental setup have been previously reported. That is, complex energy landscape involved in the agglomeration is changing with progress. Simulation of colloidal magnetic particles under magnetic field shows that the chain of particles is energetically more favorable than the ring and that the transition barrier between the chain and the ring is very low. The energy barriers among entangled nanoparticles of the agglomerate seem to be much more complicated than those among colloidal particles. The energy barrier distributions at 1000 min are similar for the two containers; however, the trend of blue shift and broadening is much more evident in the case of conical tube. These results indicate that the potential energy surface for agglomeration is modified more significantly in the conical tube which makes the agglomerate denser.

  17. Sensitive magnetic biodetection using magnetic multi-core nanoparticles and RCA coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Sarwe, Anna [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls Backe 4, Göteborg (Sweden); Sepehri, Sobhan; Eriksson, Emil; Kalaboukhov, Alexei; Jesorka, Aldo; Winkler, Dag [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience – MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Schneiderman, Justin F. [Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg and MedTech West, Göteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, Mats [Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Albert, Jan [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Strømme, Maria [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Christer, E-mail: christer.johansson@acreo.se [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls Backe 4, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    We use functionalized iron oxide magnetic multi-core particles of 100 nm in size (hydrodynamic particle diameter) and AC susceptometry (ACS) methods to measure the binding reactions between the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and bio-analyte products produced from DNA segments using the rolling circle amplification (RCA) method. We use sensitive induction detection techniques in order to measure the ACS response. The DNA is amplified via RCA to generate RCA coils with a specific size that is dependent on the amplification time. After about 75 min of amplification we obtain an average RCA coil diameter of about 1 µm. We determine a theoretical limit of detection (LOD) in the range of 11 attomole (corresponding to an analyte concentration of 55 fM for a sample volume of 200 µL) from the ACS dynamic response after the MNPs have bound to the RCA coils and the measured ACS readout noise. We also discuss further possible improvements of the LOD. - Highlights: • Biosensing using Brownian relaxation of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. • Rolling circle amplification and magnetic nanoparticles enables biosensing. • Theoretical limit of detection estimated from the signal noise gives about 55 fM.

  18. Selective Magnetic Removal of Pb(II from Aqueous Solution by Porphyrin Linked-Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghanbarnejad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of lead containing effluents into the environment and water bodies is harmful for the human, animals, aquatic flora and fauna. Herein, a novel surface engineered magnetic nanoparticle for removing Pb2+  ions was studied. After surface modification of the magnetite by 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane (APTES magnetic nanoparticles with covalently linked porphyrins were synthesized. Two atropisomers of  meso-tetrakis(2-carboxy-4-nonylphenyl porphyrin (TCNP were tested to analyze the atropisomeric effect on lead uptake. For characterize the synthesized nanosorbents methods like: Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis were used. The effects of pH, contact time, sorbent dosage and some co-existing cations were investigated. Regeneration of lead adsorbed material could be possible and the modified magnetic nanoparticles exhibited good reusability. The use of such a system can provide fast and efficient removal of the lead ion by using an external magnetic field. The competitive adsorption tests showed good adsorption selectivity for lead ion.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles: reactive oxygen species generation and potential therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang; Hilt, J. Zach

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a major role in various cellular pathways, via Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. ROS act as a double-edged sword inside the body. At normal conditions, the generation of ROS is in balance with their elimination by scavenger systems, and they can promote cell proliferation as well as differentiation. However, at an increased level, they can cause damages to protein, lead to cellular apoptosis, and contribute to many diseases including cancer. Many recent studies proposed a variety of strategies to either suppress toxicity of ROS generation or exploit the elevated ROS levels for cancer therapy.

  20. Structure of nanoparticles in transformer oil-based magnetic fluids, anisotropy of acoustic attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kúdelčík, Jozef; Bury, Peter; Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The anisotropy of acoustic attenuation in transformer oil-based magnetic fluids upon the external magnetic field was studied to discover the structure of nanoparticles. When a magnetic field is increased, the interaction between the external magnetic field and the magnetic moments of the nanoparticles leads to the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles and following clusters formation. However, the temperature of magnetic fluids and the concentration of nanoparticles also have very important influence on the structural changes. The measurement of the dependence of the acoustic attenuation on the angle between the magnetic field direction and acoustic wave vector (anisotropy) can give the useful information about the structure of magnetic nanoparticles formations. In the present, the results of anisotropy measurements of the transformer oil-based magnetic fluids are described and using appropriate theory the basic parameters of clusters are calculated. On the basis of the performed calculations, the proportion of the acoustic wave energy used for excitation of the translational and rotational degrees of freedom was also established. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles formation in transformer oil-based magnetic fluids was investigated. • The anisotropy acoustic spectroscopy as the method of investigation was used. • The external conditions on the structure of magnetic fluids were studied. • The structure parameters using suitable theoretical model were determined

  1. Structure of nanoparticles in transformer oil-based magnetic fluids, anisotropy of acoustic attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kúdelčík, Jozef, E-mail: kudelcik@fyzika.uniza.sk [Department of Physics, University of Žilina, Univerzitná 1, 010 01 Žilina (Slovakia); Bury, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Žilina, Univerzitná 1, 010 01 Žilina (Slovakia); Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan [Department of Magnetism, IEP SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-15

    The anisotropy of acoustic attenuation in transformer oil-based magnetic fluids upon the external magnetic field was studied to discover the structure of nanoparticles. When a magnetic field is increased, the interaction between the external magnetic field and the magnetic moments of the nanoparticles leads to the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles and following clusters formation. However, the temperature of magnetic fluids and the concentration of nanoparticles also have very important influence on the structural changes. The measurement of the dependence of the acoustic attenuation on the angle between the magnetic field direction and acoustic wave vector (anisotropy) can give the useful information about the structure of magnetic nanoparticles formations. In the present, the results of anisotropy measurements of the transformer oil-based magnetic fluids are described and using appropriate theory the basic parameters of clusters are calculated. On the basis of the performed calculations, the proportion of the acoustic wave energy used for excitation of the translational and rotational degrees of freedom was also established. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles formation in transformer oil-based magnetic fluids was investigated. • The anisotropy acoustic spectroscopy as the method of investigation was used. • The external conditions on the structure of magnetic fluids were studied. • The structure parameters using suitable theoretical model were determined.

  2. Determination of magnetic characteristics of nanoparticles by low-temperature calorimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugulava, A.; Toklikishvili, Z. [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Chkhaidze, S., E-mail: simon.chkhaidze@tsu.ge [Department of Physics, I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University,I.Chavchavadze av. 3, 0179 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Kekutia, Sh. [V. Chavchanidze Institute of Cybernetics, at the Technical State University, S. Euli str. 5, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2017-05-15

    At low temperatures, the heat capacity of a superparamagnetic “ideal gas” determined by magnetic degrees of freedom can greatly exceed the lattice heat capacity. It is shown that in the presence of an external magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the magnetic part of the heat capacity has two maxima. The relations between the temperature at which these maxima are achieved, the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constant have been obtained. Measuring the heat capacity maxima temperatures by low-temperature calorimetry methods and using the obtained relations, we can obtain the numerical values both of the magnetic moment of nanoparticles and the magnetic anisotropy constants.

  3. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  4. Magnetic properties of GdMnO3 nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Takayuki; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

    Perovskite manganite GdMnO3 nanoparticles were synthesized using mesoporous silica as a template, and their magnetic properties and crystal structure were investigated. Powder X-ray diffraction data indicated successful synthesis of the GdMnO3 nanoparticles, with mean particle sizes of 13.9 and 20.9 nm. The lattice constants for the nanoparticles were slightly different from those for the bulk material and varied with the particle size. The magnetic transition temperatures for the nanoparticles were higher than those of the bulk crystal. The synthesized GdMnO3 nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behaviors: The blocking temperature, coercive field, and transition temperature depended on the particle size. Magnetic measurements and crystal structure analysis suggest that the changes in the magnetic properties for GdMnO3 nanoparticles can be attributed to the modulation of the crystallographic structure.

  5. The Nature of Magnetic State of Small Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dolinšek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the nature of the magnetic state of 4 nm and 7 nm magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles and show that they form a collective superspin glass state. Magnetic force on the nanoparticles relevant to the tumor targeting application was determined as well.

  6. Inulin hydrolysis by inulinase immobilized covalently on magnetic nanoparticles prepared with wheat gluten hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Homa Torabizadeh; Asieh Mahmoudi

    2018-01-01

    Inulinase can produce a high amount of fructose syrup from inulin in a one-step enzymatic process. Inulinase from Aspergillus niger was immobilized covalently on Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with wheat gluten hydrolysates (WGHs). Wheat gluten was enzymatically hydrolyzed by two endopeptidases Alcalase and Neutrase and related nanoparticles were prepared by desolvation method. Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with WGHs nanoparticles and then inulinase was immobilized onto it ...

  7. Suitability of magnetic single- and multi-core nanoparticles to detect protein binding with dynamic magnetic measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the binding of biotinylated proteins to various streptavidin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with different dynamic magnetic measurement techniques to examine their potential for homogeneous bioassays. As particle systems, single-core nanoparticles with a nominal core diameter of 30 nm as well as multi-core nanoparticles with hydrodynamic sizes varying between nominally 60 nm and 100 nm were chosen. As experimental techniques, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry (MRX), complex ac susceptibility (ACS) and measurements of the phase lag between rotating field and sample magnetization are applied. MRX measurements are only suited for the detection of small analytes if the multivalency of functionalized nanoparticles and analytes causes cross-linking, thus forming larger aggregates. ACS measurements showed for all nanoparticle systems a shift of the imaginary part's maximum towards small frequencies. In rotating field measurements only the single-core nanoparticle systems with dominating Brownian mechanism exhibit an increase of the phase lag upon binding in the investigated frequency range. The coexistence of Brownian and Néel relaxation processes can cause a more complex phase lag change behavior, as demonstrated for multi-core nanoparticle systems. - Highlights: • Cealization of homogeneous magnetic bioassays using different magnetic techniques. • Comparison of single- and multi-core nanoparticle systems. • ac Susceptibility favorable for detection of small analytes. • Magnetorelaxometry favorable for detection of large analytes or cross-linking assays

  8. Agglomeration, colloidal stability, and magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticles: collective influences on environmental engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Lim, JitKang; Ooi, Boon Seng; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) which exhibit magnetic and catalytic bifunctionalities have been widely accepted as one of the most promising nanoagents used in water purification processes. However, due to the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, MNPs can easily lose their colloidal stability and tend to agglomerate. Thus, it is necessary to enhance their colloidal stability in order to maintain the desired high specific surface area. Meanwhile, in order to successfully utilize MNPs for environmental engineering applications, an effective magnetic separation technology has to be developed. This step is to ensure the MNPs that have been used for pollutant removal can be fully reharvested back. Unfortunately, it was recently highlighted that there exists a conflicting role between colloidal stability and magnetic separability of the MNPs, whereby the more colloidally stable the particle is, the harder for it to be magnetically separated. In other words, attaining a win-win scenario in which the MNPs possess both good colloidal stability and fast magnetic separation rate becomes challenging. Such phenomenon has to be thoroughly understood as the colloidal stability and the magnetic separability of MNPs play a pivotal role on affecting their effective implementation in water purification processes. Accordingly, it is the aim of this paper to provide reviews on (i) the colloidal stability and (ii) the magnetic separation of MNPs, as well as to provide insights on (iii) their conflicting relationship based on recent research findings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to chiral imidazolidinone as recoverable catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondini, Sara [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (Italy); Puglisi, Alessandra; Benaglia, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.benaglia@unimi.it; Ramella, Daniela [Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Drago, Carmelo [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare (Italy); Ferretti, Anna M.; Ponti, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.ponti@istm.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    The immobilization of an ad hoc designed chiral imidazolidin-4-one onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is described, to afford MNP-supported MacMillan’s catalyst. Morphological and structural analysis of the materials, during preparation, use, and recycle, has been carried out by transmission electron microscopy. The supported catalyst was tested in the Diels–Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with cinnamic aldehyde, affording the products in good yields and enantiomeric excesses up to 93 %, comparable to those observed with the non-supported catalyst. Recovery of the chiral catalyst has been successfully performed by simply applying an external magnet to achieve a perfect separation of the MNPs from the reaction product. The recycle of the catalytic system has been also investigated. Noteworthy, this immobilized MacMillan’s catalyst proved to be able to efficiently promote the reaction in pure water.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to chiral imidazolidinone as recoverable catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondini, Sara; Puglisi, Alessandra; Benaglia, Maurizio; Ramella, Daniela; Drago, Carmelo; Ferretti, Anna M.; Ponti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The immobilization of an ad hoc designed chiral imidazolidin-4-one onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is described, to afford MNP-supported MacMillan’s catalyst. Morphological and structural analysis of the materials, during preparation, use, and recycle, has been carried out by transmission electron microscopy. The supported catalyst was tested in the Diels–Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with cinnamic aldehyde, affording the products in good yields and enantiomeric excesses up to 93 %, comparable to those observed with the non-supported catalyst. Recovery of the chiral catalyst has been successfully performed by simply applying an external magnet to achieve a perfect separation of the MNPs from the reaction product. The recycle of the catalytic system has been also investigated. Noteworthy, this immobilized MacMillan’s catalyst proved to be able to efficiently promote the reaction in pure water

  11. Characterization and Functionality of Immidazolium Ionic Liquids Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,3-Dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids were chemically synthesized and bonded on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs with easy one-step reaction. The obtained six kinds of ionic liquid modified MNPs were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, magnetization, and FTIR, which owned the high adsorption capacity due to the nanometer size and high-density modification with ionic liquids. Functionality of MNPs with ionic liquids greatly influenced the solubility of the MNPs with organic solvents depending on the alkyl chain length and the anions of the ionic liquids. Moreover, the obtained MNPs showed the specific extraction efficiency to organic pollutant, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, while superparamagnetic property of the MNPs facilitated the convenient separation of MNPs from the bulks water samples.

  12. Magnetic properties of Ni nanoparticles on microporous silica spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godsell, Jeffrey F.; Donegan, Keith P.; Tobin, Joseph M.; Copley, Mark P.; Rhen, Fernando M.F.; Otway, David J.; Morris, Michael A.; O'Donnell, Terence; Holmes, Justin D.; Roy, Saibal

    2010-01-01

    Ni nanoparticles (∼32 nm particle diameter) have been synthesized on the walls of microporous (∼1 nm pore diameter) silica spheres (∼2.6 μm sphere diameter) and characterised magnetically to potentially produce a new class of core (silica micro-spheres)-shell (nanometallic)-type nanocomposite material. These magnetic nanocomposite materials display a characteristic increase in coercivity with reducing temperature. The average particle size has been used to calculate the anisotropy constant for the system, K. The discussion postulates the potential mechanisms contributing to the difference between the calculated K value and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant of bulk Ni. Various factors such as surface anisotropy and interparticle interactions are discussed as possible contributing factors to the anisotropy values calculated in the paper.

  13. Homogeneous Precipitation Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation route using hexamethylenetetramine (HMT as the precipitant. The particle size, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the synthesized particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NPs are of cubic inverse spinel structure and nearly spherical shape. With the increase of oxidation time from 30 to 180 minutes in the reaction solution at 90∘C, the average particle size increases from ~30 nm to ~45 nm. The as-synthesized NPs ~30 nm in size show higher Ms (61.5 emu/g and moderate Hc (945 Oe and Mr/Ms (0.45 value compared with the materials synthesized by coprecipitation method using NaOH as precipitate at high pH value.

  14. Time-course assessment of the aggregation and metabolization of magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, José M; Gavilán, Helena; Del Dedo, Vanesa; Lorente-Sorolla, Eduardo; Sanz-Ortega, Laura; da Silva, Gustavo B; Costo, Rocío; Perez-Yagüe, Sonia; Talelli, Marina; Marciello, Marzia; Morales, M Puerto; Barber, Domingo F; Gutiérrez, Lucía

    2017-08-01

    To successfully develop biomedical applications for magnetic nanoparticles, it is imperative that these nanoreagents maintain their magnetic properties in vivo and that their by-products are safely metabolized. When placed in biological milieu or internalized into cells, nanoparticle aggregation degree can increase which could affect magnetic properties and metabolization. To evaluate these aggregation effects, we synthesized citric acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles whose magnetic susceptibility can be modified by aggregation in agar dilutions and dextran-layered counterparts that maintain their magnetic properties unchanged. Macrophage models were used for in vitro uptake and metabolization studies, as these cells control iron homeostasis in the organism. Electron microscopy and magnetic susceptibility studies revealed a cellular mechanism of nanoparticle degradation, in which a small fraction of the particles is rapidly degraded while the remaining ones maintain their size. Both nanoparticle types produced similar iron metabolic profiles but these profiles differed in each macrophage model. Thus, nanoparticles induced iron responses that depended on macrophage programming. In vivo studies showed that nanoparticles susceptible to changes in magnetic properties through aggregation effects had different behavior in lungs, liver and spleen. Liver ferritin levels increased in these animals showing that nanoparticles are degraded and their by-products incorporated into normal metabolic routes. These data show that nanoparticle iron metabolization depends on cell type and highlight the necessity to assess nanoparticle aggregation in complex biological systems to develop effective in vivo biomedical applications. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have great potential for biomedical applications. It is however imperative that these nanoreagents preserve their magnetic properties once inoculated, and that their degradation products can be eliminated. When placed in a

  15. Magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles loaded with aliskiren: A promising tool for hypertension treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, Iryna; Kubovcikova, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Koneracka, Martina; Pechanova, Olga; Barta, Andrej; Cebova, Martina; Antal, Vitaliy; Diko, Pavel; Zduriencikova, Martina; Pudlak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this study anti-hypertensive drug called aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles by the modified nanoprecipitation method. The effect of magnetite and drug concentrations on the size distribution and zeta potential of polymer nanoparticles was investigated. The optimized loadings were as follows: theoretical magnetite loading was 20 mg/100 mg polymer nanoparticles and aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles at theoretical loading 0.6 mg aliskiren/100 mg magnetic polymer nanoparticles. The physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles were studied, with spherical shape of nanoparticles sized between 58 and 227 nm being one of the observed results. Differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy confirmed that aliskiren was successfully identified in the magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles. The in vivo experiments indicated that encapsulated aliskiren decreased blood pressure of the studied male spontaneously hypertensive rat even more significantly than common administered drug. - Highlights: • Anti-hypertensive drug called aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles by modified nanoprecipitation method. • The optimisation of magnetite and drug loading with regard to the size distribution and zeta potential was investigated. • The physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles were studied by different techniques. • The in vivo experiments indicated that encapsulated aliskiren decreased blood pressure of the studied male spontaneously hypertensive rat even more significantly than common administered drug

  16. Magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles loaded with aliskiren: A promising tool for hypertension treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, Iryna, E-mail: iryna.antal@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Kubovcikova, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Koneracka, Martina [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Pechanova, Olga; Barta, Andrej; Cebova, Martina [Institute of Normal and Pathological Physiology, SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Antal, Vitaliy; Diko, Pavel [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Zduriencikova, Martina [Cancer Research Institute, SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pudlak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-04-15

    In this study anti-hypertensive drug called aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles by the modified nanoprecipitation method. The effect of magnetite and drug concentrations on the size distribution and zeta potential of polymer nanoparticles was investigated. The optimized loadings were as follows: theoretical magnetite loading was 20 mg/100 mg polymer nanoparticles and aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles at theoretical loading 0.6 mg aliskiren/100 mg magnetic polymer nanoparticles. The physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles were studied, with spherical shape of nanoparticles sized between 58 and 227 nm being one of the observed results. Differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy confirmed that aliskiren was successfully identified in the magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles. The in vivo experiments indicated that encapsulated aliskiren decreased blood pressure of the studied male spontaneously hypertensive rat even more significantly than common administered drug. - Highlights: • Anti-hypertensive drug called aliskiren was encapsulated in magnetic poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticles by modified nanoprecipitation method. • The optimisation of magnetite and drug loading with regard to the size distribution and zeta potential was investigated. • The physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles were studied by different techniques. • The in vivo experiments indicated that encapsulated aliskiren decreased blood pressure of the studied male spontaneously hypertensive rat even more significantly than common administered drug.

  17. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles and Flame Resistance Magnetic Poly styrene Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Hedayati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4 nanostructures were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal reaction. The effect of various surfactants such as cationic and anionic on the morphology of the product was investigated. Magnetic nanoparticles were added to poly styrene for preparation of magnetic nanocomposite. Nanostructures were then characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The magnetic properties of the samples were also investigated using vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnesium ferrite nanoparticles exhibit super paramagnetic behaviour at room temperature, with a saturation magnetization of 66 emu/g and a coercivity less than 5 Oe. Distribution of the magnetic nanoparticles into poly styrene matrix increases the coercivity. Nanoparticles appropriately enhanced flame retardant property of the PS matrix. Nanoparticles act as barriers which decrease thermal transport and volatilization during decomposition of the polymer.

  18. Size-dependent magnetic anisotropy of PEG coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles; comparing two magnetization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayek, C.; Manna, K.; Imam, A. A.; Alqasrawi, A. Y.; Obaidat, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the size dependent magnetic anisotropy of iron oxide nanoparticles is essential for the successful application of these nanoparticles in several technological and medical fields. PEG-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with core diameters of 12 nm, 15 nm, and 16 nm were synthesized by the usual co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Magnetic measurements were conducted using a SQUID. The effective magnetic anisotropy was calculated using two methods from the magnetization measurements. In the first method the zero-field-cooled magnetization versus temperature measurements were used at several applied magnetic fields. In the second method we used the temperature-dependent coercivity curves obtained from the zero-field-cooled magnetization versus magnetic field hysteresis loops. The role of the applied magnetic field on the effective magnetic anisotropy, calculated form the zero-field-cooled magnetization versus temperature measurements, was revealed. The size dependence of the effective magnetic anisotropy constant Keff obtained by the two methods are compared and discussed.

  19. Bimodal distribution of the magnetic dipole moment in nanoparticles with a monomodal distribution of the physical size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssel, Jozef; Kuipers, Bonny W M; Erne, Ben

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as therapeutic hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, are sensitive to nanoparticle size and dipole moment. Usually, it is assumed that magnetic nanoparticles with a log-normal distribution of the physical size also have a log-normal

  20. The synthesis, characterization, and application of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Ronald J.

    In recent years, the field of nanotechnology has been one of extreme activity. Among other things, this activity is driven by the push for consumer technologies that are lighter, stronger, and most importantly smaller. With this push from the everyday consumer, the need for a basic understanding of the underlying physics of nanoscale materials has never been more evident. In this dissertation, the author investigates the many physical differences, in particular the differences in the magnetic properties, between nanoscale materials and their bulk counterparts. Starting out with a brief overview of magnetism, the author sets out to explore the fantastic changes in the magnetic properties of materials that occur when the physical dimensions of the materials become smaller than typical magnetic length scales. Among the first differences noticed arises when nanoscale ferromagnets are investigated. While the magnetic properties of bulk ferromagnets are governed by magnetic domain dynamics, when a material becomes small enough that only one domain is possible, a new type of magnetic behavior known as superparamagnetism arises. While this superparamagnetic behavior is well understood in terms of thermally activated spin reversal through an energy barrier, many factors, such as interactions between separate nanoparticles, cause deviations from this simple picture. The effects of these factors are investigated. In addition to the effects of interactions, the relation of nanoscale magnetics and its coupling to the dielectric properties of nanoparticles is investigated. This investigation, motivated by recent research focusing on the search for materials whose magnetic and electronic properties are influenced by each other, shows that nanomaterials can show a coupling between these properties that isn't necessarily the intrinsic coupling of the two properties, but an effect from the surface layers of nanoparticles, which are generally ignored in bulk systems due to the fact

  1. Theoretical investigation of magnetic properties in interfaces of magnetic nanoparticles and amorphous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shih-Jye, E-mail: sjs@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hua-Shu [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University, Pingtung 900, Taiwan (China); Ovchinnikov, Sergei [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Chen, Guan-Long [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The interfaces of amorphous carbons will be graphited and antiferromagnetic. • The ferromagnetism on the Co interfaces is induced by the medium electrons. • The spin-wave excitation will change between the acoustic and optical modes. • The charge exchange in the interfaces changes the magnetism of the interfaces. - Abstract: Based on the experimental finding of the exchange bias in amorphous carbon samples with embedded Co nanoparticles and on the graphited character of the amorphous carbon interface confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations we have proposed the interface of graphited carbon to be antiferromagnetic. A theoretical model, which comprises the Kondo interactions in the interfaces of Co nanoparticles and the induced antiferromagnetic interactions in the graphited carbons, is employed to evaluate the ferromagnetism of the interfaces of Co nanoparticles. We have shown that the ferromagnetism of interfaces of Co nanoparticles will be enhanced by the increase of antiferromagnetic interaction as well as the increase of electron density in the graphited carbons. In particular, we found that the antiferromagnetic interactions in graphited carbons will change the spin-wave excitation in interfaces of Co nanoparticles from the quasiacoustic mode to the quasioptical one.

  2. Magnetic liposomes based on nickel ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Rita O; Gomes, I T; Almeida, Bernardo G; Araújo, J P; Castanheira, Elisabete M S; Coutinho, Paulo J G

    2015-07-21

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature were synthesized using a coprecipitation method. These magnetic nanoparticles were either covered with a lipid bilayer, forming dry magnetic liposomes (DMLs), or entrapped in liposomes, originating aqueous magnetoliposomes (AMLs). A new and promising method for the synthesis of DMLs is described. The presence of the lipid bilayer in DMLs was confirmed by FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer) measurements between the fluorescent-labeled lipids NBD-C12-HPC (NBD acting as a donor) included in the second lipid layer and rhodamine B-DOPE (acceptor) in the first lipid layer. An average donor-acceptor distance of 3 nm was estimated. Assays of the non-specific interactions of magnetoliposomes with biological membranes (modeled using giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs) were performed. Membrane fusion between both aqueous and dry magnetoliposomes and GUVs was confirmed by FRET, which is an important result regarding applications of these systems both as hyperthermia agents and antitumor drug nanocarriers.

  3. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer’s formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  4. Magnetic anomalies in Fe-doped NiO nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, R.; Gandhi, A. C.; Tejabhiram, Y.; Mathar Sahib, I. K. Md; Shimura, Y.; Karmakar, L.; Das, D.; Wu, Sheng Yun; Hayakawa, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Undoped and iron-doped NiO nanoparticle were synthesized by standard hydrothermal method. A detailed study is carried out on the effect of dopant concentration on morphology, structural, resonance and magnetic properties of NiO nanoparticle by varying the Fe concentration from 0.01 to 0.10 M. The synchrotron-x-ray diffraction confirmed that no secondary phase was observed other than NiO. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed that, Fe was primarily in the trivalent state, replacing the Ni2+ ion inside the octahedral crystal site of NiO. The Electron paramagnetic studies revealed the ferromagnetic cluster formation at high doping concentration (5 and 10%). The ZFC-FC curves displayed an average blocking temperature around 180 K due to particle size distribution. The anomalous behaviour of spontaneous exchange bias (H SEB) and magnetic remanence (M r) for all Fe-doped samples observed at 5 K showed an increase (0.1316-0.1384 emu g-1) in the moment of frozen spin (M p) as the dopant concentration increased. The role of frozen spin moment in spontaneous exchange bias behaviour was discussed.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles Featuring Polyzwitterionic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Biehl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the last decades, magnetic nanoparticles (MNP have gained tremendous interest in different fields of applications like biomedicine (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, drug delivery, hyperthermia, but also more technical applications (e.g., catalysis, waste water treatment have been pursued. Different surfactants and polymers are extensively used for surface coating of MNP to passivate the surface and avoid or decrease agglomeration, decrease or modulate biomolecule absorption, and in most cases increase dispersion stability. For this purpose, electrostatic or steric repulsion can be exploited and, in that regard, surface charge is the most important (hybrid particle property. Therefore, polyelectrolytes are of great interest for nanoparticle coating, as they are able to stabilize the particles in dispersion by electrostatic repulsion due to their high charge densities. In this review article, we focus on polyzwitterions as a subclass of polyelectrolytes and their use as coating materials for MNP. In the context of biomedical applications, polyzwitterions are widely used as they exhibit antifouling properties and thus can lead to minimized protein adsorption and also long circulation times.

  6. Rapid Immunoenzyme Assay of Aflatoxin B1 Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr E. Urusov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The main limitations of microplate-based enzyme immunoassays are the prolonged incubations necessary to facilitate heterogeneous interactions, the complex matrix and poorly soluble antigens, and the significant sample dilutions often required because of the presence of organic extractants. This study presents the use of antibody immobilization on the surface of magnetic particles to overcome these limitations in the detection of the mycotoxin, aflatoxin B1. Features of the proposed system are a high degree of nanoparticle dispersion and methodologically simple immobilization of the antibodies by adsorption. Reactions between the immobilized antibodies with native and labeled antigens are conducted in solution, thereby reducing the interaction period to 5 min without impairing the analytical outcome. Adsorption of immunoglobulins on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles increases their stability in aqueous-organic media, thus minimizing the degree of sample dilution required. Testing barley and maize extracts demonstrated a limit of aflatoxin B1 detection equal to 20 pg/mL and total assay duration of 20 min. Using this method, only the 3-fold dilution of the initial methanol/water (60/40 extraction mixture in the microplate wells is necessary. The proposed pseudo-homogeneous approach could be applied toward immunodetection of a wide range of compounds.

  7. Crystallization process and magnetic properties of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phu, N D; Luong, N H; Chau, N; Hai, N H; Ngo, D T; Hoang, L H

    2011-01-01

    This paper studied the crystallization process, phase transition and magnetic properties of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by the microwave heating technique. Thermal analysis and magnetodynamics studies revealed many interesting aspects of the amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles. The as-prepared sample was amorphous. Crystallization of the maghemite γ-Fe 2 O 3 (with an activation energy of 0.71 eV) and the hematite α-Fe 2 O 3 (with an activation energy of 0.97 eV) phase occurred at around 300 deg. C and 350 deg. C, respectively. A transition from the maghemite to the hematite occurred at 500 deg. C with an activation energy of 1.32 eV. A study of the temperature dependence of magnetization supported the crystallization and the phase transformation. Raman shift at 660 cm -1 and absorption band in the infrared spectra at 690 cm -1 showed the presence of disorder in the hematite phase on the nanoscale which is supposed to be the origin of the ferromagnetic behaviour of that antiferromagnetic phase.

  8. An aerosol-mediated magnetic colloid: Study of nickel nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Y.; He, Y.; Swihart, M. T.; Wang, S.; Luo, H.; Furlani, E.P.; Prasad, P.N.

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of high-quality nickel nanoparticles. Laser-driven decomposition of nickel carbonyl vapors is used to produce particles in the form of an aerosol, followed by exposure to a solvent containing an appropriate surfactant to yield a stable dispersion of particles. This method is scalable and yields a substantially monodisperse distribution of particles at a relatively high rate of production. The particles produced by this method are subjected to a detailed characterization using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and dc magnetization. They have an average diameter of 5 nm, and the observed magnetization curves show no hysteresis above 200 K. The normalized magnetization curves follow a scaling law proportional to the quotient of the applied field over temperature. This data indicates the presence of randomly oriented superparamagnetic particles. The measured magnetization is significantly smaller than that of the bulk, probably due to an effective surface anisotropy and spin canting. The coercivity is the same in either direction of the applied field which indicates that there is negligible exchange coupling between the nickel particles and any possible antiferromagnetic oxide layer on their surfaces

  9. Magnetic anisotropy considerations in magnetic force microscopy studies of single superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocera, Tanya M; Agarwal, Gunjan; Chen Jun; Murray, Christopher B

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in applications ranging from solid state memory devices to biomedical diagnostic and therapeutic tools. However, detection and characterization of the small and unstable magnetic moment of an SPN at the single particle level remains a challenge. Further, depending on their physical shape, crystalline structure or orientation, SPNs may also possess magnetic anisotropy, which can govern the extent to which their magnetic moments can align with an externally applied magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate how we can exploit the magnetic anisotropy of SPNs to enable uniform, highly-sensitive detection of single SPNs using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in ambient air. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques are utilized to characterize the collective magnetic behavior, morphology and composition of the SPNs. Our results show how the consideration of magnetic anisotropy can enhance the ability of MFM to detect single SPNs at ambient room temperature with high force sensitivity and spatial resolution. (paper)

  10. Synthesis and characterization of thiolated pectin stabilized gold coated magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Varun, E-mail: varun.arora3986@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Sector 16-C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078 (India); Sood, Ankur, E-mail: ankursood02@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Sector 16-C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078 (India); Shah, Jyoti, E-mail: shah.jyoti1@gmail.com [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kotnala, R.K., E-mail: rkkotnala@nplindia.org [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Jain, Tapan K., E-mail: tapankjain@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Sector 16-C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Core–shell nanoparticles, magnetic core and gold shell, were synthesized by reduction of gold chloride on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles; using tyrosine as a reducing agent. The formation of gold shell on magnetic nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The core–shell nanoparticles (CSn) were conjugated with thiolated pectin to form a stable aqueous dispersion. The hydrodynamic size of thiolated pectin stabilized core–shell nanoparticles (TP-CSn) measured by Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was 160.5 nm with a poly dispersity index (PDI) of 0.302, whereas the mean particle size of TP-CSn calculated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was 10.8 ± 2.7 nm. The value of zeta potential for TP-CSn was −13.6 mV. There was a decrease in the value of saturation magnetization upon formation of the gold shell on magnetic nanoparticles. The amount of thiolated pectin bound to the surface of core–shell nanoparticles, calculated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), was 6% of sample weight. - Highlights: • Use of side group of tyrosine (phenol) as a pH dependent reducing agent to synthesize gold coated magnetic nanoparticles. • Successful coating of gold shell on magnetic nanoparticles core. • Synthesis of thiolated pectin and stabilization of aqueous dispersion of core–shell nanoparticles with thiolated pectin. • The superparamagnetic behaviour of magnetic nanoparticles is retained after shell formation.

  11. Hydrogen-bond network and pH sensitivity in human transthyretin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Takeshi, E-mail: tyokoya3@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Nabeshima, Yuko [University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0914 (Japan); Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Yamada, Taro [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Naka-Narusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Ohhara, Takashi [Comprehensive Research Organization for Science and Society, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kurihara, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tanaka, Ichiro [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Naka-Narusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Niimura, Nobuo [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The neutron crystal structure of human transthyretin is presented. Transthyretin (TTR) is a tetrameric protein. TTR misfolding and aggregation are associated with human amyloid diseases. Dissociation of the TTR tetramer is believed to be the rate-limiting step in the amyloid fibril formation cascade. Low pH is known to promote dissociation into monomer and the formation of amyloid fibrils. In order to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH sensitivity and structural stabilities of TTR, neutron diffraction studies were conducted using the IBARAKI Biological Crystal Diffractometer with the time-of-flight method. Crystals for the neutron diffraction experiments were grown up to 2.5 mm{sup 3} for four months. The neutron crystal structure solved at 2.0 Å revealed the protonation states of His88 and the detailed hydrogen-bond network depending on the protonation states of His88. This hydrogen-bond network is involved in monomer–monomer and dimer–dimer interactions, suggesting that the double protonation of His88 by acidification breaks the hydrogen-bond network and causes the destabilization of the TTR tetramer. Structural comparison with the X-ray crystal structure at acidic pH identified the three amino acid residues responsible for the pH sensitivity of TTR. Our neutron model provides insights into the molecular stability related to amyloidosis.

  12. Photoconductivity, pH Sensitivity, Noise, and Channel Length Effects in Si Nanowire FET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Ferdinand; Zadorozhnyi, Ihor; Khondkaryan, Hrant; Arakelyan, Armen; Vitusevich, Svetlana

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanowire (NW) field-effect transistor (FET) sensors of various lengths were fabricated. Transport properties of Si NW FET sensors were investigated involving noise spectroscopy and current-voltage (I-V) characterization. The static I-V dependencies demonstrate the high quality of fabricated silicon FETs without leakage current. Transport and noise properties of NW FET structures were investigated under different light illumination conditions, as well as in sensor configuration in an aqueous solution with different pH values. Furthermore, we studied channel length effects on the photoconductivity, noise, and pH sensitivity. The magnitude of the channel current is approximately inversely proportional to the length of the current channel, and the pH sensitivity increases with the increase of channel length approaching the Nernst limit value of 59.5 mV/pH. We demonstrate that dominant 1/f-noise can be screened by the generation-recombination plateau at certain pH of the solution or external optical excitation. The characteristic frequency of the generation-recombination noise component decreases with increasing of illumination power. Moreover, it is shown that the measured value of the slope of 1/f-noise spectral density dependence on the current channel length is 2.7 which is close to the theoretically predicted value of 3.

  13. Structural and morphological investigation of magnetic nanoparticles based on iron oxides for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Paula S. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: pferreira@lnls.br; Martins, Tatiana M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin (IFGW), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); D' Souza-Li, Lilia [Laboratorio de Endocrinologia Pediatrica da Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas (FCM), UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Li, Li M. [Departamento de Neurologia da FCM, UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Metze, Konradin; Adam, Randall L. [Grupo interdisciplinar ' Patologia Analitica Celular' , Departamento de Anatomia Patologica da FCM, UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Knobel, Marcelo [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin (IFGW), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Zanchet, Daniela [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis, characterization and properties of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications, correlating the nanoscale tunabilities in terms of size, structure, and magnetism. Magnetic nanoparticles in different conditions were prepared through thermal decomposition of Fe(acac){sub 3} in the presence of 1,2 hexadecanodiol (reducing agent) and oleic acid and oleylamine (ligands) in a hot organic solvent. The 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was exchanged onto the nanocrystal surface making the particles stable in water. Nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Preliminary tests of incorporation of these nanoparticles in cells and their magnetic resonance image (MRI) were also carried out. The magnetization characterizations were made by isothermal magnetic measurements.

  14. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J. Zach, E-mail: zach.hilt@uky.edu

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. - Graphical abstract: Novel single step curcumin coated magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers for medical, environmental, and other applications. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is reported. • The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. • The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB).

  15. Synthesis and characterization of cationic lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles using multiple emulsions as microreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbaba, Hasan; Karagöz, Uğur [Ege University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, 35100 Izmir (Turkey); Selamet, Yusuf [Izmir Institute of Technology, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, 35433 Izmir (Turkey); Kantarcı, A. Gülten, E-mail: gulten.kantarci@ege.edu.tr [Ege University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis method with in-situ surface coating. For this purpose multiple emulsions were used as microreactors for the first time and magnetic iron oxide particles synthesized in the core of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles. DLS, SEM, TEM, VSM, Raman Spectrometer, XRD, and XPS techniques were performed for characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles. Obtained magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic and no additional process was needed for surface adjustments. They are positively charged as a result of cationic lipid coating and has appropriate particle size (<30 nm) for drug or nucleic acid delivery. Structure analysis showed that magnetic core material is in the form of magnetite. Saturation magnetization value was measured as 15–17 emu g{sup −1} for lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles obtained by multiple emulsion method which is reasonably sufficient for magnetic targeting. - Highlights: • A novel iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis method with in-situ surface coating. • Combining advantages of microemulsions and multiple emulsion methods. • Multiple emulsions were used as microreactors for magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. • Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles synthesized in the core of cationic lipids. • Possible delivery systems for nucleic acids, oil soluble compounds or drugs.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A. [NRC ' Kurchatov Institute,' 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zaikovskiy, V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Stepanov, S. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artemenko, A. [ICMCB, UPR CNRS 9048, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Curely, J.; Kliava, J. [LOMA, UMR 5798 Universite Bordeaux 1-CNRS, 33405 Talence cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe{sup 3+} ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by 'direct' techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe 3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by “direct” techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-10-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by "direct" techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization studies.

  19. Use of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Visualize Threadlike Structures inside Lymphatic Vessels of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Min Johng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel application of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles was made to visualize a new tissue which had not been detectable by using simple stereomicroscopes. This unfamiliar threadlike structure inside the lymphatic vessels of rats was demonstrated in vivo by injecting nanoparticles into lymph nodes and applying magnetic fields on the collecting lymph vessels so that the nanoparticles were taken up by the threadlike structures. Confocal laser scanning microscope images of cryosectioned specimens exhibited that the nanoparticles were absorbed more strongly by the threadlike structure than by the lymphatic vessels. Further examination using a transmission electron microscope revealed that the nanoparticles had been captured between the reticular fibers in the extracellular matrix of the threadlike structures. The emerging technology of nanoparticles not only allows the extremely elusive threadlike structures to be visualized but also is expected to provide a magnetically controllable means to investigate their physiological functions.

  20. Stabilisation effects of superparamagnetic nanoparticles on clustering in nanocomposite microparticles and on magnetic behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandel, K., E-mail: karl-sebastian.mandel@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research, ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); University Würzburg, Chair of Chemical Technology of Materials Synthesis, Röntgenring 11, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Hutter, F., E-mail: frank.hutter@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research, ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Gellermann, C., E-mail: carsten.gellermann@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research, ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Sextl, G., E-mail: gerhard.sextl@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research, ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); University Würzburg, Chair of Chemical Technology of Materials Synthesis, Röntgenring 11, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of magnetite were coprecipitated from iron salts, dispersed with nitric acid and stabilised either by lactic acid (LA) or by a polycarboxylate-ether polymer (MELPERS4343, MP). The differently stabilised nanoparticles were incorporated into a silica matrix to form nanocomposite microparticles. The silica matrix was prepared either from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) or from an aqueous sodium silicate (water glass) solution. Stabilisation of nanoparticles had a crucial influence on microparticle texture and nanoparticle distribution in the silica matrix. Magnetic measurements in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations suggest a uniform magnetic interaction of nanoparticles in case of LA stabilisation and magnetically interacting nanoparticle clusters of different sizes in case of MP stabilisation. Splitting of blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and irreversible temperature (T{sub ir}) in zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) measurements is discussed in terms of nanoparticle clustering. -- Highlights: ► Superparamagnetic nanoparticles were synthesised, dispersed and stabilised. ► Stabilisation is either via a polycarboxylate ether polymer or lactic acid. ► Stabilised nanoparticles were incorporated into silica to form composite particles. ► Depending on the stabilisation, nanoparticle clustering in the composites differed. ► Clustering influences zero field cooled/field cooled magnetic measurements.

  1. Molecular complexation of curcumin with pH sensitive cationic copolymer enhances the aqueous solubility, stability and bioavailability of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunny; Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Mathur, Himanshi; Tyagi, Mohit; Bhat, G Jayarama; Tummala, Hemachand

    2016-01-20

    Curcumin is a natural dietary compound with demonstrated potential in preventing/treating several chronic diseases in animal models. However, this success is yet to be translated to humans mainly because of its poor oral bioavailability caused by extremely low water solubility. This manuscript demonstrates that water insoluble curcumin (~1μg/ml) forms highly aqueous soluble complexes (>2mg/ml) with a safe pH sensitive polymer, poly(butyl-methacrylate-co-(2-dimethylaminoethyl) methacrylate-co-methyl-methacrylate) when precipitated together in water. The complexation process was optimized to enhance curcumin loading by varying several formulation factors. Acetone as a solvent and polyvinyl alcohol as a stabilizer with 1:2 ratio of drug to polymer yielded complexes with relatively high loading (~280μg/ml) and enhanced solubility (>2mg/ml). The complexes were amorphous in solid and were soluble only in buffers with pHs less than 5.0. Hydrogen bond formation and hydrophobic interactions between curcumin and the polymer were recorded by infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Molecular complexes of curcumin were more stable at various pHs compared to unformulated curcumin. In mice, these complexes increased peak plasma concentration of curcumin by 6 times and oral bioavailability by ~20 times. This is a simple, economic and safer strategy of enhancing the oral bioavailability of curcumin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electric-field responsive contrast agent based on liquid crystals and magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Lamar O.; Martinez-Miranda, Luz J.; Kurihara, Lynn K.; Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar; Ijanaten, Said; da Silva, Claudian; Baker-McKee, James; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2018-05-01

    The properties of liquid crystal-magnetic nanoparticle composites have potential for sensing in the body. We study the response of a liquid crystal-magnetic nanoparticle (LC-MNP) composite to applied potentials of hundreds of volts per meter. Measuring samples using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging composites using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we demonstrate that electric potentials applied across centimeter scale LC-MNP composite samples can be detected using XRD and MRI techniques.

  3. Antibacterial activity of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Abdulrahman, Safa A.; Marzoog, Thorria R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, (50–110 nm) magnetic iron oxide (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of iron target in dimethylformamide (DMF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The structural properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV–VIS absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of laser fluence on the characteristics of these nanoparticles was studied. Antibacterial activities of iron oxide nanoparticles were tested against Gram-positive; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The results showed a noteworthy inhibition on both bacterial strains. The preparation conditions were found to affect significantly the antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were used to capture rapidly S. aureus bacteria under the magnetic field effect. - Highlights: • Synthesis magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation • Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria • Captured magnetic nanoparticles by S. aureus bacteria under effect of magnetic field

  4. Antibacterial activity of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Raid A., E-mail: raidismail@yahoo.com [Laser Physics Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Sulaiman, Ghassan M. [Biotechnology Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Abdulrahman, Safa A. [Laser Physics Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Marzoog, Thorria R. [Biotechnology Division, Applied Science Department, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, (50–110 nm) magnetic iron oxide (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of iron target in dimethylformamide (DMF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The structural properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV–VIS absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of laser fluence on the characteristics of these nanoparticles was studied. Antibacterial activities of iron oxide nanoparticles were tested against Gram-positive; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The results showed a noteworthy inhibition on both bacterial strains. The preparation conditions were found to affect significantly the antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were used to capture rapidly S. aureus bacteria under the magnetic field effect. - Highlights: • Synthesis magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation • Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria • Captured magnetic nanoparticles by S. aureus bacteria under effect of magnetic field.

  5. Data in support of covalent attachment of tyrosinase onto cyanuric chloride crosslinked magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Abdollahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of cross linked amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as an appropriate support for covalent immobilization on tyrosinase was presented in the study "Covalent immobilization of tyrosinase onto cyanuric chloride crosslinked amine-functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles: synthesis and characterization of the recyclable nanobiocatalyst" (Abdollahi et al., 2016 [1]. Herein, complementary data regarding X-ray powder diffraction (XRD to characterize the synthesized magnetic nanoparticles, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM to determine the size and morphology of tyrosinase immobilized magnetic nanoparticles (tyrosinase-MNPs were reported. The purification results of the extracted tyrosinase from mushroom Agaricus bisporus were provided in a purification table. The covalent immobilization of tyrosinase onto cyanuric chloride functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was proved by performing thermo-gravimetric and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses. The operational stability of immobilized tyrosinase was investigated by incubating tyrosinase-MNPs at different pH and temperatures.

  6. Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction characterization methods for iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbasov, Raul, E-mail: gabbasov-raul@yandex.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, Michael; Cherepanov, Valery [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chuev, Michael; Mischenko, Iliya; Lomov, Andrey [Institute of Physics and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wang, Andrew [Ocean NanoTech. Springdale, AR (United States); Panchenko, Vladislav [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Water soluble magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with oleic polymer coating and average diameters in the range of 5–25 nm, previously determined by TEM, were characterized using Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction measurements. Comparative analysis of the results demonstrated a large diversity of magnetic relaxation regimes. Analysis showed the presence of an additional impurity component in the 25 nm nanoparticles, with principally different magnetic nature at the magnetite core. In some cases, X-ray diffraction measurements were unable to estimate the size of the magnetic core and Mössbauer data were necessary for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. - Highlights: • KV parameter, obtained from Mössbauer spectra can be used for nanoparticle size characterization. • Mössbauer spectra of 10–25 nm nanoparticles can be effectively described by ferromagnetic model. • Surface impurities can cause incorrect nanoparticle size determination.

  7. Magnetic behavior of biosynthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, A., E-mail: abdoulayediallosn@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation,1 Old Faure road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Centre for Nano Science and Nanotechnology, K.S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Tiruchengode 63721, Tamil Nadu (India); Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nano-Fabrication, Faculté des sciences et Techniques, Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), B.P. 25114, Dakar-Fann Dakar (Senegal); Doyle, T.B. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation,1 Old Faure road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Mothudi, B.M.; Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation,1 Old Faure road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); and others

    2017-02-15

    This contribution reports for the 1st time on the magnetic behavior of CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized by a “green” process using an Aspalathus linearis’ leaves natural extract. More accurately magnetic behavior of CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles successfully biosynthesized was investigated using vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetization behavior for the samples manifests a combination of size dependent antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic behaviors, respectively, for the core and shell of the nanoparticles. - Highlights: • 1{sup st} report on magnetic behavior of Co3O4 nanoparticles via Aspalathus linearis. • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles manifest size-dependent antiferromagnetic & paramagnetic behaviors. • Antiferromagnetic & paramagnetic behaviors were confirmed by VSM.

  8. One-Step Method for Preparation of Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla M. Gregorio-Jauregui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles coated with chitosan in one step by the coprecipitation method in the presence of different chitosan concentrations is reported here. Obtaining of magnetic superparamagnetic nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Scanning transmission electron microscopy allowed to identify spheroidal nanoparticles with around 10-11 nm in average diameter. Characterization of the products by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that composite chitosan-magnetic nanoparticles were obtained. Chitosan content in obtained nanocomposites was estimated by thermogravimetric analysis. The nanocomposites were tested in Pb2+ removal from a PbCl2 aqueous solution, showing a removal efficacy up to 53.6%. This work provides a simple method for chitosan-coated nanoparticles obtaining, which could be useful for heavy metal ions removal from water.

  9. Magnetism as indirect tool for carbon content assessment in nickel nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y.; Magnin, Y.; Martínez de Yuso, A.; Aguiar Hualde, J. M.; Amara, H.; Paul-Boncour, V.; Matei Ghimbeu, C.; Malouche, A.; Bichara, C.; Pellenq, R.; Zlotea, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study to ascertain carbon solubility in nickel nanoparticles embedded into a carbon matrix via the one-pot method. This original approach is based on the experimental characterization of the magnetic properties of Ni at room temperature and Monte Carlo simulations used to calculate the magnetization as a function of C content in Ni nanoparticles. Other commonly used experimental methods fail to accurately determine the chemical analysis of these types of nanoparticles. Thus, we could assess the C content within Ni nanoparticles and it decreases from 8 to around 4 at. % with increasing temperature during the synthesis. This behavior could be related to the catalytic transformation of dissolved C in the Ni particles into graphite layers surrounding the particles at high temperature. The proposed approach is original and easy to implement experimentally since only magnetization measurements at room temperature are needed. Moreover, it can be extended to other types of magnetic nanoparticles dissolving carbon.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles in different biological environments analyzed by magnetic particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löwa, Norbert, E-mail: norbert.loewa@ptb.de; Seidel, Maria; Radon, Patricia; Wiekhorst, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Quantification of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP) in biological systems like cells, tissue, or organs is of vital importance for development of novel biomedical applications, e.g. magnetofection, drug targeting or hyperthermia. Among others, the recently developed magnetic measurement technique magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) provides signals that are specific for MNP. MPS is based on the non–linear magnetic response of MNP exposed to a strong sinusoidal excitation field of up to 25 mT amplitude and 25 kHz frequency. So far, it has been proven a powerful tool for quantification of MNP in biological systems. In this study we investigated in detail the influence of typical biological media on the magnetic behavior of different MNP systems by MPS. The results reveal that amplitude and shape (ratio of harmonics) of the MPS spectra allow for perceptively monitoring changes in MNP magnetism caused by different physiological media. Additionally, the observed linear correlation between MPS amplitude and shape alterations can be used to reduce the quantification uncertainty for MNP suspended in a biological environment. - Highlights: • MPS signal amplitude: allows for MNP quantification in physiological environment. • MPS signal shape: specifically detects changes due to MNP interaction. • Correlation between changes in MPS amplitude and shape were found. • MPS signal (shape/amplitude) correlation allow for a quantification correction. • Reliable quantification result if the dynamic magnetic behavior of MNP do not change.

  11. Electrochemical sensor based on magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles modified magnetic electrode for determination of Hb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Binghua; Ni, Xinjiong; Cao, Yuhua; Cao, Guangqun

    2017-05-15

    A fast and selective electrochemical sensor for determination of hemoglobin (Hb) was developed based on magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles modified on the magnetic glassy carbon electrode. The nanoparticles Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 with a magnetic core and a molecularly imprinted shell had regular structures and good monodispersity. Hb could be determined directly by electrochemical oxidization with the modified electrode. A magnetic field increased electrochemical response to Hb by two times. Imprinting Hb on the surface of Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 shortened the response time within 7min. Under optimum conditions, the imprinting factor toward the non-imprinted sensor was 2.8, and the separation factor of Hb to horseradish peroxidase was 2.6. The oxidation peak current had a linear relationship with Hb concentration ranged from 0.005mg/ml to 0.1mg/ml with a detection limit (S/N =3) of 0.0010mg/ml. The sensors were successfully applied to analysis of Hb in whole blood samples with recoveries between 95.7% and 105%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adsorption of environmental pollutants using magnetic hybrid nanoparticles modified with β-cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Niejun; Zhou, Lilin; Guo, Jun; Ye, Qiquan; Lin, Jin-Ming; Yuan, Jinying

    2014-01-01

    Graft through strategy was utilized to coat magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) using ordinary radical polymerization and then β-cyclodextrin was linked onto the surface of nanoparticles. With these nanoparticles modified with cyclodextrin groups, adsorption of two model environmental pollutants, bisphenol A and copper ions, was studied. Host–guest interactions between cyclodextrin and aromatic molecules had a great contribution to the adsorption of bisphenol A, while multiple hydroxyls of cyclodextrin also helped the adsorption of copper ions. These magnetic nanoparticles could be applied in the elimination, enrichment and detection of some environmental pollutants.

  13. Influence of structure of iron nanoparticles in aggregates on their magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosická Dana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zero-valent iron nanoparticles rapidly aggregate. One of the reasons is magnetic forces among the nanoparticles. Magnetic field around particles is caused by composition of the particles. Their core is formed from zero-valent iron, and shell is a layer of magnetite. The magnetic forces contribute to attractive forces among the nanoparticles and that leads to increasing of aggregation of the nanoparticles. This effect is undesirable for decreasing of remediation properties of iron particles and limited transport possibilities. The aggregation of iron nanoparticles was established for consequent processes: Brownian motion, sedimentation, velocity gradient of fluid around particles and electrostatic forces. In our previous work, an introduction of influence of magnetic forces among particles on the aggregation was presented. These forces have significant impact on the rate of aggregation. In this article, a numerical computation of magnetic forces between an aggregate and a nanoparticle and between two aggregates is shown. It is done for random position of nanoparticles in an aggregate and random or arranged directions of magnetic polarizations and for structured aggregates with arranged vectors of polarizations. Statistical computation by Monte Carlo is done, and range of dominant area of magnetic forces around particles is assessed.

  14. Heat generation in agglomerated ferrite nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, E Jr; De Biasi, E; Mansilla, M Vasquez; Saleta, M E; Granada, M; Troiani, H E; Zysler, R D; Effenberger, F B; Rossi, L M; Rechenberg, H R

    2013-01-01

    The role of agglomeration and magnetic interparticle interactions in heat generation of magnetic ferrofluids in an ac magnetic field is still unclear, with apparent discrepancy between the results presented in the literature. In this work, we measured the heat generating capability of agglomerated ferrite nanoparticles in a non-invasive ac magnetic field with f = 100 kHz and H 0 = 13 kA m -1 . The nanoparticles were morphologically and magnetically characterized, and the specific absorption rate (SAR) for our ac magnetic field presents a clear dependence on the diameter of the nanoparticles, with a maximum SAR = 48 W g -1 for 15 nm. Our agglomerated nanoparticles have large hydrodynamic diameters, thus the mechanical relaxation can be neglected as a heat generation mechanism. Therefore, we present a model that simulates the SAR dependence of the agglomerated samples on the diameter of the nanoparticles based on the hysteresis losses that is valid for the non-linear region (with H 0 comparable to the anisotropy field). Our model takes into account the magnetic interactions among the nanoparticles in the agglomerate. For comparison, we also measured the SAR of non-agglomerated nanoparticles in a similar diameter range, in which Néel and Brown relaxations dominate the heat generation.

  15. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W; Nadar, Priyanka M; Hoopes, P Jack; Diamond, Solomon G

    2014-01-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R 2  > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml −1  mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. (paper)

  16. Influence of naturally occurring antioxidants on magnetic nanoparticles: risks, benefits, and possible therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdík, Stefan; Vrbovská, Hanka; Olas, Adam; Babincová, Melánia

    2013-06-01

    We have studied interaction of well known antioxidant L-ascorbic acid with magnetic nanoparticles containing insoluble Fe(III) in their core. In analogy with ferritin, mobilization of iron in the form of water soluble Fe(II) was observed, especially pronounced at higher temperatures. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals are produced. These results suggest possible harmful effects of widely used magnetic nanoparticles as a MRI contrast agents in combination with overload of organism with ascorbic acid in some specific conditions, like fever of patient. On the other hand combination of magnetic nanoparticles and ascorbic acid may be used for a cancer therapy using alternating magnetic field for the release of Fe(II) via Néel relaxation of magnetic moment of used nanoparticles. We have further found that lipoic acid is an efficient antioxidant scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by Fenton reaction from Fe(II).

  17. Dipolar magnetism in ordered and disordered low-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varón, M.; Beleggia, M; Kasama, T

    2013-01-01

    order at ambient temperature in assemblies of closely-spaced nanoparticles with magnetic moments of ≥ 100 μ(B). Here we use electron holography with sub-particle resolution to reveal the correlation between particle arrangement and magnetic order in self-assembled 1D and quasi-2D arrangements of 15 nm...... cobalt nanoparticles. In the initial states, we observe dipolar ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism and local flux closure, depending on the particle arrangement. Surprisingly, after magnetic saturation, measurements and numerical simulations show that overall ferromagnetic order exists in the present...... nanoparticle assemblies even when their arrangement is completely disordered. Such direct quantification of the correlation between topological and magnetic order is essential for the technological exploitation of magnetic quasi-2D nanoparticle assemblies....

  18. Interfacial magnetic coupling between Fe nanoparticles in Fe–Ag granular alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Sarmiento, G; Chaboy, J; Boada, R; García Prieto, A; Haskel, D; Laguna-Marco, M A; Lang, J C; Meneghini, C; Fernández Barquín, L; Neisius, T; Orue, I

    2012-01-01

    The role of the interface in mediating interparticle magnetic interactions has been analysed in Fe 50 Ag 50 and Fe 55 Ag 45 granular thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD). These samples are composed of crystalline bcc Fe (2–4 nm) nanoparticles and fcc Ag (10–12 nm) nanoparticles, separated by an amorphous Fe 50 Ag 50 interface, occupying around 20% of the sample volume, as determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Interfacial magnetic coupling between Fe nanoparticles is studied by dc magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at the Fe K and Ag L 2,3 edges. This paper reveals that these thin films present two magnetic transitions, at low and high temperatures, which are strongly related to the magnetic state of the amorphous interface, which acts as a barrier for interparticle magnetic coupling.

  19. Cobalt magnetic nanoparticles embedded in carbon matrix: biofunctional validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolow, Matheus Z., E-mail: matheuskrolow@ifsul.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Monte, Leonardo G.; Remiao, Mariana H.; Hartleben, Claudia P.; Moreira, Angela N.; Dellagostin, Odir A. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Piva, Evandro [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Faculdade de Odontologia (Brazil); Conceicao, Fabricio R. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Carreno, Neftali L. V. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites display versatile allotropic morphologies, physico-chemical properties and have a wide range of applications in mechanics, electronics, biotechnology, structural material, chemical processing, and energy management. In this study we report the synthesis, characterization, and biotechnological application of cobalt magnetic nanoparticles, with diameter approximately 15-40 nm, embedded in carbon structure (Co/C-MN). A single-step chemical process was used in the synthesis of the Co/C-MN. The Co/C-MN has presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature an essential property for immunoseparation assays carried out here. To stimulate interactions between proteins and Co/C-MN, this nanocomposite was functionalized with acrylic acid (AA). We have showed the bonding of different proteins onto Co/C-AA surface using immunofluorescence assay. A Co/C-AA coated with monoclonal antibody anti-pathogenic Leptospira spp. was able to capture leptospires, suggesting that it could be useful in immunoseparation assays.

  20. Cobalt magnetic nanoparticles embedded in carbon matrix: biofunctional validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolow, Matheus Z.; Monte, Leonardo G.; Remião, Mariana H.; Hartleben, Cláudia P.; Moreira, Ângela N.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Piva, Evandro; Conceição, Fabricio R.; Carreño, Neftalí L. V.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites display versatile allotropic morphologies, physico-chemical properties and have a wide range of applications in mechanics, electronics, biotechnology, structural material, chemical processing, and energy management. In this study we report the synthesis, characterization, and biotechnological application of cobalt magnetic nanoparticles, with diameter approximately 15–40 nm, embedded in carbon structure (Co/C-MN). A single-step chemical process was used in the synthesis of the Co/C-MN. The Co/C-MN has presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature an essential property for immunoseparation assays carried out here. To stimulate interactions between proteins and Co/C-MN, this nanocomposite was functionalized with acrylic acid (AA). We have showed the bonding of different proteins onto Co/C-AA surface using immunofluorescence assay. A Co/C-AA coated with monoclonal antibody anti-pathogenic Leptospira spp. was able to capture leptospires, suggesting that it could be useful in immunoseparation assays.

  1. Magnetic properties of Fe-doped NiO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, A.; Sakai, N.; Zhu, L.; Takeuchi, H.; Yano, S.; Yanoh, T.; Onuma, K.; Kondo, T.; Miike, K.; Miyasaka, T.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Ni1- x Fe x O ( x = 0, 0.05, 0.1) nanoparticles with several nanometers encapsulated with amorphous SiO2 were prepared by our novel preparation method. A NiO single phase structure was confirmed using the X-ray diffraction measurements. It is considered that Ni ions are replaced by Fe ions because it is observed that the lattice constant decreases. The temperature dependence behavior of the magnetization revealed that the blocking temperature, T B , shifted from 17 to 57 K as the amount of Fe ions increased, and that below T B , ferromagnetic behaviors were exhibited. The coercive force, H C , increased from 0.8 to 1.5 kOe as the amount of Fe ions increased.

  2. ISFET pH Sensitivity: Counter-Ions Play a Key Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizi, Kokab B; Xu, Xiaoqing; Pal, Ashish; Hu, Xiaolin; Wong, H S Philip

    2017-02-02

    The Field Effect sensors are broadly used for detecting various target analytes in chemical and biological solutions. We report the conditions under which the pH sensitivity of an Ion Sensitive Field Effect transistor (ISFET) sensor can be significantly enhanced. Our theory and simulations show that by using pH buffer solutions containing counter-ions that are beyond a specific size, the sensor shows significantly higher sensitivity which can exceed the Nernst limit. We validate the theory by measuring the pH response of an extended gate ISFET pH sensor. The consistency and reproducibility of the measurement results have been recorded in hysteresis free and stable operations. Different conditions have been tested to confirm the accuracy and validity of our experiment results such as using different solutions, various oxide dielectrics as the sensing layer and off-the-shelf versus IC fabricated transistors as the basis of the ISFET sensor.

  3. Calibration Phantom for Quantitative Tomography Analysis of Biodistribution of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Helen; Kettering, Melanie; Richter, Heike; Hilger, Ingrid; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    Ferrofluids are being investigated for cancer treatments such as magnetic drug targeting (MDT) and magnetic heating treatments with the aim of treating the cancer locally, since magnetic nanoparticles with attached drugs are concentrated within the target region. Thus, the side effects are considerably reduced. One of the crucial factors for the success of these therapies is the magnetic nanoparticle distribution. Microcomputed X-ray tomography (XμCT) has been introduced as adequate technique for non-destructive three-dimensional analysis of biological samples enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. The biological tissue specimens, in this case tumor bearing mice after intra-tumoral magnetic nanoparticle injection, have been analyzed by means of XμCT. Complementary measurements have been performed by magnetorelaxometry (MRX). This technique enables a sensitive quantification of magnetic nanoparticles down to few nanograms. For multi-phase samples, such as biological tissue enriched with magnetic nanoparticles the polychromasy and beam hardening artifacts occurring in XμCT with conventional X-ray tubes cause severe problems for quantitative density determination. This problem requires an appropriate calibration of the polychromatic tomography equipment enabling a semi-quantitative analysis of the data. For this purpose a phantom system has been implemented. These phantoms consist of a tissue substitute containing different amounts of magnetic nanoparticles. Since the attenuation of the beam also depends on the thickness i.e. the path length of the beam transmitting the object, the reference sample has been defined to a cone shape. Thus, with one phantom the information about the magnetic nanoparticle concentration as well as the attenuation in dependence of the path length can be determined. Two phantom systems will be presented, one based on agarose-gel and one based on soap.

  4. Effect of alignment of easy axes on dynamic magnetization of immobilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Matsugi, Yuki; Tsujimura, Naotaka; Sasayama, Teruyoshi; Enpuku, Keiji; Viereck, Thilo; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2017-04-01

    In some biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), the particles are physically immobilized. In this study, we explore the effect of the alignment of the magnetic easy axes on the dynamic magnetization of immobilized MNPs under an AC excitation field. We prepared three immobilized MNP samples: (1) a sample in which easy axes are randomly oriented, (2) a parallel-aligned sample in which easy axes are parallel to the AC field, and (3) an orthogonally aligned sample in which easy axes are perpendicular to the AC field. First, we show that the parallel-aligned sample has the largest hysteresis in the magnetization curve and the largest harmonic magnetization spectra, followed by the randomly oriented and orthogonally aligned samples. For example, 1.6-fold increase was observed in the area of the hysteresis loop of the parallel-aligned sample compared to that of the randomly oriented sample. To quantitatively discuss the experimental results, we perform a numerical simulation based on a Fokker-Planck equation, in which probability distributions for the directions of the easy axes are taken into account in simulating the prepared MNP samples. We obtained quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation. These results indicate that the dynamic magnetization of immobilized MNPs is significantly affected by the alignment of the easy axes.

  5. Dynamics of colloidal systems of magnetic nanoparticles under influence of magnetic fields investigated by XPCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schavkan, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    This thesis investigates structural properties and the underlying microscopic dynamics of suspensions of α-FeOOH goethite platelets in water under the influence of magnetic fields. Goethite particles show unusual physical properties and a rich phase diagram, which makes their suspensions an object of high interest for research in the area of ''smart nanoparticles''. Five nanoparticle concentrations were chosen such that different liquid crystal phases could be studied. The suspensions of platelets of these chosen concentrations were exposed to magnetic fields of varying strength. Small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data were taken and evaluated. The appearing phases and phase transitions were studied as a function of concentration and applied magnetic field. For this purpose, order parameters, ellipticity, radial and azimuthal peak positions and widths of scattering features were investigated to clarify the structural properties in detail. For the analysis of the underlying dynamics, the relaxation rates and the shape of measured time correlation functions were evaluated. The results show that with increasing magnetic field a partial realignment of the platelets occurs. This realignment is connected to the magnetic properties of the particles. The dynamics of the corresponding phases revealed a dependence on the concentration of nanoparticles in the suspension. At a concentration of c=20 vol% the transition from the nematic to the anti-nematic phase traverses a mixed state. The nematic and anti-nematic phases show ballistic motion and very similar properties, even though a realignment of the particles from an orientation with the long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field in the nematic phase to an orientation with the long axis perpendicular to the magnetic field in the anti-nematic phase occurs. The mixed state of 20 vol%-suspension exhibits a diffusive motion of the particles and different characteristics. A significant

  6. Dynamics of colloidal systems of magnetic nanoparticles under influence of magnetic fields investigated by XPCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schavkan, Alexander

    2017-05-15

    This thesis investigates structural properties and the underlying microscopic dynamics of suspensions of α-FeOOH goethite platelets in water under the influence of magnetic fields. Goethite particles show unusual physical properties and a rich phase diagram, which makes their suspensions an object of high interest for research in the area of ''smart nanoparticles''. Five nanoparticle concentrations were chosen such that different liquid crystal phases could be studied. The suspensions of platelets of these chosen concentrations were exposed to magnetic fields of varying strength. Small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data were taken and evaluated. The appearing phases and phase transitions were studied as a function of concentration and applied magnetic field. For this purpose, order parameters, ellipticity, radial and azimuthal peak positions and widths of scattering features were investigated to clarify the structural properties in detail. For the analysis of the underlying dynamics, the relaxation rates and the shape of measured time correlation functions were evaluated. The results show that with increasing magnetic field a partial realignment of the platelets occurs. This realignment is connected to the magnetic properties of the particles. The dynamics of the corresponding phases revealed a dependence on the concentration of nanoparticles in the suspension. At a concentration of c=20 vol% the transition from the nematic to the anti-nematic phase traverses a mixed state. The nematic and anti-nematic phases show ballistic motion and very similar properties, even though a realignment of the particles from an orientation with the long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field in the nematic phase to an orientation with the long axis perpendicular to the magnetic field in the anti-nematic phase occurs. The mixed state of 20 vol%-suspension exhibits a diffusive motion of the particles and different

  7. Effect of alignment of easy axes on dynamic magnetization of immobilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Takashi, E-mail: t_yoshi@ees.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Matsugi, Yuki; Tsujimura, Naotaka; Sasayama, Teruyoshi; Enpuku, Keiji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Viereck, Thilo; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig 38106 (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    In some biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), the particles are physically immobilized. In this study, we explore the effect of the alignment of the magnetic easy axes on the dynamic magnetization of immobilized MNPs under an AC excitation field. We prepared three immobilized MNP samples: (1) a sample in which easy axes are randomly oriented, (2) a parallel-aligned sample in which easy axes are parallel to the AC field, and (3) an orthogonally aligned sample in which easy axes are perpendicular to the AC field. First, we show that the parallel-aligned sample has the largest hysteresis in the magnetization curve and the largest harmonic magnetization spectra, followed by the randomly oriented and orthogonally aligned samples. For example, 1.6-fold increase was observed in the area of the hysteresis loop of the parallel-aligned sample compared to that of the randomly oriented sample. To quantitatively discuss the experimental results, we perform a numerical simulation based on a Fokker-Planck equation, in which probability distributions for the directions of the easy axes are taken into account in simulating the prepared MNP samples. We obtained quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation. These results indicate that the dynamic magnetization of immobilized MNPs is significantly affected by the alignment of the easy axes. - Highlights: • We clarify how the alignment of easy axis of MNP affects the AC magnetization. • Parallel-aligned immobilized MNPs exhibit the largest AC hysteresis loop. • Parallel-aligned immobilized MNPs exhibit the largest harmonic magnetization spectra. • The AC magnetization is strongly affected by the alignment of the easy axes.

  8. Clusters of magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI: effect of aggregation on transverse relaxivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědourková, T.; Kaman, Ondřej; Veverka, Pavel; Koktan, Jakub; Veverka, Miroslav; Kuličková, Jarmila; Jirák, Zdeněk; Herynek, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 11 (2015), s. 5300804 ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10088S; GA MPO FR-TI3/521 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : contrast agents * magnetic resonance imaging * magnetic nanoparticles * manganites * transverse relaxivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.277, year: 2015

  9. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolkova, Ilona S. [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Polymer Centre, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, T.G. Masaryk Sq. 275, 762 72 Zlin (Czech Republic); Kazantseva, Natalia E., E-mail: nekazan@yahoo.com [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g{sup −1} to 48 emu g{sup −1}) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2–7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g{sup −1}. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy. - Highlights: • Mixed phase iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles were obtained by coprecipitation. • A part of nanoparticles was annealed at 300 °C to achieve the single-phase γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Nanoparticles revealed ferromagnetic-like behavior due to interparticle interactions. • Nanoparticles glycerol

  10. Microemulsion synthesis and magnetic properties of FexNi(1-x) alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygi, H.; Babakhani, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates synthesis of FexNi(1-x) bimetallic nanoparticles by microemulsion method. Through studying the mechanism of nanoparticles formation, it is indicated that synthesis of nanoparticles took placed by simultaneous reduction of metal ions and so nanoparticles structure is homogeneous alloy. FexNi(1-x) nanoparticles with different sizes, morphologies and compositions were synthesized by changing the microemulsion parameters such as water/surfactant/oil ratio, presence of co-surfactant and NiCl2·6H2O to FeCl2·4H2O molar ratio. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, particle size analysis, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption and thermogravimetric analyses. The results indicated that, presence of butanol as co-surfactant led to chain-like arrangement of nanoparticles. Also, finer nanoparticles were synthesized by decreasing the amount of oil and water and increasing the amount of CTAB. The results of vibrating sample magnetometer suggested that magnetic properties of FexNi(1-x) alloy nanoparticles were affected by composition, size and morphology of the particles. Spherical and chain-like FexNi(1-x) alloy nanoparticles were superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic, respectively. Furthermore, higher iron in the composition of nanoparticles increases the magnetic properties.

  11. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, monodispersed CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs of size 8.5 ± 1.0, 11.4 ± 1.0 and 15.4 ± 1.0 nm were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Size-dependent structural, optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements. The value of optical band gap is calculated for each particle size. The decrease in the value of optical band gap with increase of particle size may be attributed to the quantum confinement, which causes to produce localized states created by the oxygen vacancies due to the conversion of Ce4+ into Ce3+ at higher calcination temperature. The Raman spectra showed a peak at ∼461 cm-1 for the particle size 8.5 nm, which is attributed to the 1LO phonon mode. The shift in the Raman peak could be due to lattice strain developed due to variation in particle size. Weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is observed for each particle size. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms, coercivity (Hc and retentivity (Mr are increased with increase of particle size. The increase of Ms and Mr for larger particle size may be explained by increase of density of oxygen vacancies at higher calcination temperature. The latter causes high concentrations of Ce3+ ions activate more coupling between the individual magnetic moments of the Ce ions, leading to an increase of Ms value with the particle size. Moreover, the oxygen vacancies may also produce magnetic moment by polarizing spins of f electrons of cerium (Ce ions located around oxygen vacancies, which causes ferromagnetism in pure CeO2 samples.

  12. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiou, Christoph; Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline; Jurgons, Roland; Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz; Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: →Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. → Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. → Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. → HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  13. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiou, Christoph, E-mail: c.alexiou@web.d [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Jurgons, Roland [Franz Penzoldt Center, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz [PTB Berlin (Germany); Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan [TU Dresden, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lyer, Stefan [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  14. Magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for drug delivery by nebulization

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Verma, Navin Kumar

    2013-01-23

    AbstractBackgroundAerosolized therapeutics hold great potential for effective treatment of various diseases including lung cancer. In this context, there is an urgent need to develop novel nanocarriers suitable for drug delivery by nebulization. To address this need, we synthesized and characterized a biocompatible drug delivery vehicle following surface coating of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with a polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The polymeric shell of these engineered nanoparticles was loaded with a potential anti-cancer drug quercetin and their suitability for targeting lung cancer cells via nebulization was evaluated.ResultsAverage particle size of the developed MNPs and PLGA-MNPs as measured by electron microscopy was 9.6 and 53.2 nm, whereas their hydrodynamic swelling as determined using dynamic light scattering was 54.3 nm and 293.4 nm respectively. Utilizing a series of standardized biological tests incorporating a cell-based automated image acquisition and analysis procedure in combination with real-time impedance sensing, we confirmed that the developed MNP-based nanocarrier system was biocompatible, as no cytotoxicity was observed when up to 100 mug\\/ml PLGA-MNP was applied to the cultured human lung epithelial cells. Moreover, the PLGA-MNP preparation was well-tolerated in vivo in mice when applied intranasally as measured by glutathione and IL-6 secretion assays after 1, 4, or 7 days post-treatment. To imitate aerosol formation for drug delivery to the lungs, we applied quercitin loaded PLGA-MNPs to the human lung carcinoma cell line A549 following a single round of nebulization. The drug-loaded PLGA-MNPs significantly reduced the number of viable A549 cells, which was comparable when applied either by nebulization or by direct pipetting.ConclusionWe have developed a magnetic core-shell nanoparticle-based nanocarrier system and evaluated the feasibility of its drug delivery capability via aerosol administration. This study has

  15. Physiological effects of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles towards watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junli; Chang, Peter R; Huang, Jin; Wang, Yunqiang; Yuan, Hong; Ren, Hongxuan

    2013-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been exploited in a diverse range of products in the past decade or so. However, the biosafety/environmental impact or legislation pertaining to this newly created, highly functional composites containing NPs (otherwise called nanomaterials) is generally lagging behind their technological innovation. To advance the agenda in this area, our current primary interest is focused on using crops as model systems as they have very close relationship with us. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles towards watermelon seedlings. We have systematically studied the physiological effects of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (nano-Fe2O3) on watermelon, and present the first evidence that a significant amount of Fe2O3 nanoparticles suspended in a liquid medium can be taken up by watermelon plants and translocated throughout the plant tissues. Changes in important physiological indicators, such as root activity, activity of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), chlorophyll and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, ferric reductase activity, root apoplastic iron content were clearly presented. Different concentrations of nano-Fe2O3 all increased seed germination, seedling growth, and enhanced physiological function to some degree; and the positive effects increased quickly and then slowed with an increase in the treatment concentrations. Changes in CAT, SOD and POD activities due to nano-Fe2O3 were significantly larger than that of the control. The 20 mg/L treatment had the most obvious effect on the increase of root activity. Ferric reductase activity, root apoplastic iron content, and watermelon biomass were significantly affected by exposure to nano-Fe2O3. Results of statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences in all the above indexes between the treatment at optimal concentration and the control. This proved that the proper concentration of nano

  16. Effect of Cr doping on structural and magnetic properties of ZnS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virpal,; Singh, Jasvir; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2016-01-01

    The structural, optical and magnetic properties of pure and Cr doped ZnS nanoparticles were studied at room temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the absence of any mixed phase and the cubic structure of ZnS in pure and Cr doped ZnS nanoparticles. Fourier transfer infrared spectra confirmed the Zn-S stretching bond at 664 cm"−"1 of ZnS in all prepared nanoparticles. The UV-Visible absorption spectra showed blue shift which became even more pronounced in Cr doped ZnS nanoparticles. However, at relatively higher Cr concentrations a slower red shift was shown by the doped nanoparticles. This phenomenon is attributed to sp-d exchange interaction that becomes prevalent at higher doping concentrations. Further, magnetic hysteresis measurements showed that Cr doped ZnS nanoparticles exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Material Engineering and Emerging Applications in Lithography and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Wen, Tianlong; Samia, Anna Cristina S.; Khandhar, Amit; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an interdisciplinary overview of material engineering and emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We discuss material engineering of nanoparticles in the broadest sense, emphasizing size and shape control, large-area self-assembly, composite/hybrid structures, and surface engineering. This is followed by a discussion of several non-traditional, emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles, including nanoparticle lithography, magnetic particle imaging, magnetic guided drug delivery, and positive contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude with a succinct discussion of the pharmacokinetics pathways of iron oxide nanoparticles in the human body –– an important and required practical consideration for any in vivo biomedical application, followed by a brief outlook of the field. PMID:26586919

  18. Determining the size of nanoparticles in the example of magnetic iron oxide core-shell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzębski, Maciej; Kościński, Mikołaj; Białopiotrowicz, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    The size of nanoparticles is one of the most important factors for their possible applications. Various techniques for the nanoparticle size characterization are available. In this paper selected techniques will be considered base on the prepared core-shell magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite is one of the most investigated and developed magnetic material. It shows interesting magnetic properties which can be used for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, hypothermia and also as a contrast agent. To reduce the toxic effects of Fe3O4, magnetic core was covered by dextran and gelatin. Moreover, the shell was doped by fluorescent dye for confocal microscopy investigation. The main investigation focused on the methods for particles size determination of modified magnetite nanoparticles prepared with different techniques. The size distribution were obtained by nanoparticle tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and confocal microscopy were used to compare the results for particle size determination of core-shell systems.

  19. Repetitive heterocoagulation of oppositely charged particles for enhancement of magnetic nanoparticle loading into monodisperse silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Nagao, Daisuke; Konno, Mikio

    2010-03-16

    Oppositely charged particles were repetitively heterocoagulated to fabricate highly monodisperse magnetic silica particles with high loading of magnetic nanoparticles. Positively charged magnetic nanoparticles prepared by surface modification with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (TSA) were used to heterocoagulate with silica particles under basic conditions to give rise to negative silica surface charge and prevent the oxidation of the magnetic nanoparticles. The resultant particles of silica core homogeneously coated with the magnetic nanoparticles were further coated with thin silica layer with sodium silicate in order to enhance colloidal stability and avoid desorption of the magnetic nanoparticles from the silica cores. Five repetitions of the heterocoagulation and the silica coating could increase saturation magnetization of the magnetic silica particles to 27.7 emu/g, keeping the coefficient of variation of particle sizes (C(V)) less than 6.5%. Highly homogeneous loading of the magnetic component was confirmed by measuring Fe-to-Si atomic ratios of individual particles with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. Characterization and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swatsitang, Ekaphan [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Phokha, Sumalin, E-mail: sumalinphokha@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, Udon Thani, 41000 Thailand (Thailand); Hunpratub, Sitchai; Usher, Brian [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, Udon Thani, 41000 Thailand (Thailand); Bootchanont, Atipong [Division of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi (RMUTT), Pathumthani 12110 (Thailand); Maensiri, Santi [School of Physics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 Thailand (Thailand); Chindaprasirt, Prinya [Sustainable Infrastructure Research and Development Center, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand)

    2016-04-15

    Inverse spinel cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized by a polymer pyrolysis method and calcined at various temperatures from 800 to 1000 °C. The structure, morphology, valence states and magnetic properties of the calcined samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). All calcined samples had the cubic spinel type structure with average crystallite sizes increasing from 80 ± 2 to 100 ± 3 nm with increasing calcination temperature. The XANES spectra allowed the valence states of the Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions in the samples to be established and simulation of the XANES spectra suggested that the site occupancy of Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions was mixed, with the majority of Co{sup 2+} ions occupying octahedral sites and the majority of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupying tetrahedral sites within the spinel structure. All samples exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature with a maximum saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) of 3.42 μ{sub B} and a coercivity (H{sub C}) of 1100 Oe for crystallite sizes of 100 nm. The origin of the ferromagnetism is discussed in relation to the distribution of Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions within the lattice and the crystallite sizes. - Graphical abstract: In Figure shows ferromagnetism (FM) at room temperature (RT), simulation of the XANES spectra of (a) Fe and (b) Co edges (inset in the right) and TEM image (inset in the left) of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles prepared by polymer pyrolysis method. The bright field TEM image showed the aggregated particles. The simulation showed a cation combination with the majority of Co{sup 2+} ions occupying octahedral sites and the majority of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupying tetrahedral sites within the spinel structure. The distribution of Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions within the lattice and the crystallite sizes is discussed on

  1. Magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic nanoparticles induced by a stream of polarized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozhushner, M.A.; Gatin, A.K.; Grishin, M.V.; Shub, B.R. [Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics of RAS, 4, Kosygin Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kim, V.P.; Khomutov, G.B. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lenin Gory 1-2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ilegbusi, O.J. [University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Trakhtenberg, L.I. [Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics of RAS, 4, Kosygin Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The remagnetization of ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles of several thousand cubic nanometers by spin-polarized current is investigated. For this purpose, magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized and deposited on a conductive nonmagnetic substrate. The remagnetization is conducted in high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The STM tip from magnetized iron wire constitutes one electrode while the ferromagnetic nanoparticle on the graphite surface represents the second electrode. The measured threshold value of remagnetization current (I{sub thresh}=9 nA) is the lowest value of current at which remagnetization occurs. The change in nanoparticle magnetization is detected by the effect of giant magnetic resistance, specifically, the dependence of the weak polarized current (Imagnetization of the electrodes. The results indicate essential difference with available literature data on the influence of polarized current on magnetic moment of small ferromagnetic nanoclusters. The peculiarities of size dependence of the observed effects are explained. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic nanoparticle in STM with ferromagnetic tip. • Change of the direction of nanoparticle magnetization by current I>I{sub cr}=9 nA. • GMR effect used to control change of magnetization.

  2. Fabrication of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution using a block copolymer template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcrette, Mélissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Tallegas, Salomé; Joisten, Hélène; Tiron, Raluca; Baron, Thierry; Hou, Yanxia; Lequien, Stéphane; Bsiesy, Ahmad; Dieny, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes a fabrication process of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution, based on combined ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ approaches. The process involves the use of a self-assembled PS-PMMA block copolymer formed on a sacrificial layer. Such an approach was so far mostly explored for the preparation of patterned magnetic media for ultrahigh density magnetic storage. It is here extended to the preparation of released monodisperse nanoparticles for biomedical applications. A special sacrificial layer had to be developed compatible with the copolymer self-organization. The resulting nanoparticles exhibit very narrow size dispersion (≈7%) and can be good candidates as contrast agents for medical imaging i.e. magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic particle imaging. The approach provides a great freedom in the choice of the particles shapes and compositions. In particular, they can be made of biocompatible magnetic material.

  3. Fabrication of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution using a block copolymer template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcrette, Mélissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Joisten, Hélène; Dieny, Bernard; Tallegas, Salomé; Baron, Thierry; Bsiesy, Ahmad; Tiron, Raluca; Hou, Yanxia; Lequien, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a fabrication process of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution, based on combined ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ approaches. The process involves the use of a self-assembled PS-PMMA block copolymer formed on a sacrificial layer. Such an approach was so far mostly explored for the preparation of patterned magnetic media for ultrahigh density magnetic storage. It is here extended to the preparation of released monodisperse nanoparticles for biomedical applications. A special sacrificial layer had to be developed compatible with the copolymer self-organization. The resulting nanoparticles exhibit very narrow size dispersion (≈7%) and can be good candidates as contrast agents for medical imaging i.e. magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic particle imaging. The approach provides a great freedom in the choice of the particles shapes and compositions. In particular, they can be made of biocompatible magnetic material. (paper)

  4. Labelling of cultured macrophages with novel magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, J.-K. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Tai, M.-F. [Department of Electronic Engineering and Graduate School of Opto-Mechatronics and Materials, WuFeng Institute of Technology, 117, Chian-Kuo Rd., Sec. 2, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-yi 621, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: mftai@mail.wfc.edu.tw; Lee, Y.-C. [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-yi 621, Taiwan (China); Yang, C.-Y. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-Y. [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-yi 621, Taiwan (China); Liu, H.-M. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Fang, J.-S. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-T. [Musculoskeletal Disease Center, J.L. Pettis VA Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92357 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is capable of demonstrating human anatomy and pathological conditions. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in MR imaging as liver-specific contrast medium, cellular and molecular imaging probes. Because few studies focused on the MNPs other than iron oxides, we developed FeNi alloy MNPs coated with polyethylenimine (PEI). In this study, we demonstrated PEI-coated FeNi MNPs are able to label the cells, which could be detected in MR imaging. For labelling purpose, MNPs were incubated with mouse macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7) for 24 h and these PEI-labelled FeNi alloy MNPs can be uptaken by macrophages efficiently compared with Ferucarbotran, a commercialized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) under flow cytometry measurement. Besides, these cells labelled with MNPs could be imaged in MR with the identical potency as Ferucarbotran. Further investigation of the cells using Prussian blue staining revealed that FeNi alloy MNPs inside the cells is not oxidized. This phenomenon alleviated the consideration of potential risk of nickel toxicity. We conclude that PEI-coated FeNi MNPs could be candidate for MR contrast medium.

  5. Labelling of cultured macrophages with novel magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, J.-K.; Tai, M.-F.; Lee, Y.-C.; Yang, C.-Y.; Wang, H.-Y.; Liu, H.-M.; Fang, J.-S.; Chen, S.-T.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is capable of demonstrating human anatomy and pathological conditions. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in MR imaging as liver-specific contrast medium, cellular and molecular imaging probes. Because few studies focused on the MNPs other than iron oxides, we developed FeNi alloy MNPs coated with polyethylenimine (PEI). In this study, we demonstrated PEI-coated FeNi MNPs are able to label the cells, which could be detected in MR imaging. For labelling purpose, MNPs were incubated with mouse macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7) for 24 h and these PEI-labelled FeNi alloy MNPs can be uptaken by macrophages efficiently compared with Ferucarbotran, a commercialized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) under flow cytometry measurement. Besides, these cells labelled with MNPs could be imaged in MR with the identical potency as Ferucarbotran. Further investigation of the cells using Prussian blue staining revealed that FeNi alloy MNPs inside the cells is not oxidized. This phenomenon alleviated the consideration of potential risk of nickel toxicity. We conclude that PEI-coated FeNi MNPs could be candidate for MR contrast medium

  6. Bare Magnetic Nanoparticles: Sustainable Synthesis and Applications in Catalytic Organic Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic nanoparticles have become increasingly prominent in the field of catalysis over the last decade as they combine interesting reactivity with an easy, economical and environmentally benign mode of recovery. Early strategies focused on the use of such nanoparticles only as ...

  7. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Line; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Erik Holm

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted...... management when combined with MRI and drug delivery....

  8. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Magnetic Ink Development for Fully Printed Tunable Radio-Frequency Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Vaseem, Mohammad; Ghaffar, Farhan A.; Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2018-01-01

    . Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are successfully embedded in the SU8 matrix to make a magnetic substrate. The as-fabricated substrate is characterized for its magnetostatic and microwave properties. A frequency tunable printed patch antenna

  9. Multi-scale magnetic nanoparticle based optomagnetic bioassay for sensitive DNA and bacteria detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Zardán Gómez De La Torre, Teresa; Donolato, Marco

    2016-01-01

    nanoparticles (binding to the target) and thus the optomagnetic response of the sample, which is measured by an optomagnetic setup including a 405 nm laser and a photodetector. The limit of detection is mainly set by the lowest measurable concentration of magnetic nanoparticles. Herein, as new results compared...... with the target. We show that the optimization and lowering of the 100 nm magnetic nanoparticle concentration result in a limit of detection of 780 fM of DNA coils formed by rolling circle amplification (size of about 1 μm) and 105 CFU per mL Salmonella (for immunoassay). These values are 15 times lower than...... those reported previously for this readout principle. Finally, we show that the 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles can serve as a second detection label for qualitative biplex detection of DNA coils formed by rolling circle amplification from V. cholerae and E. coli DNA coils using 100 nm and 250 nm magnetic...

  10. Verification of novel magnetic nanoparticles as a contrast media for MRI-CT/SPECT imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostiv, Uliana; Laudová, B.; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Kučka, Jan; Franová, P.; Hrubý, Martin; Horák, Daniel; Šefc, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2017), s. 156 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /69./. 11.09.2017-15.09.2017, Horný Smokovec] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * diagnostics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for on-chip RF inductors

    KAUST Repository

    Koh, Kisik

    2013-01-01

    FeNi3 based core-shell magnetic nanoparticles are demonstrated as the magnetic core material for on-chip, radio frequency (RF) inductors. FeNi3 nanoparticles with 50-150 nm in diameter with 15-20 nm-thick SiO2 coating are chemically synthesized and deposited on a planar inductor as the magnetic core to enhance both inductance (L) and quality factor (Q) of the inductor. Experimentally, the ferromagnetic resonant frequency of the on-chip inductors based on FeNi3 core-shell nanoparticles has been shown to be over several GHz. A post-CMOS process has been developed to integrate the magnetic nanoparticles to a planar inductor and inductance enhancements up to 50% of the original magnitude with slightly enhanced Q-factor up to 1 GHz have been achieved. © 2013 IEEE.

  12. Sulphamic acid-functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as recyclable catalyst for synthesis of imidazoles under microwave irradiation ... functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (SA–MNPs) as a novel solid acid catalyst under solvent-free classical heating ..... green chemistry approach.

  13. Self-assembly and flux closure studies of magnetic nanoparticle rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Alexander; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Thermoremanent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can self-assemble into rings through dipolar interactions, when dispersed under appropriate conditions. Analysis of individual MNP rings and clusters by off-axis electron holography reveals bistable flux closure (FC) states at ambient temperatures...

  14. Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles with Low Chitosan Content Prepared in One-Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Osuna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMNP were obtained at 50°C in a one-step method comprising coprecipitation in the presence of low chitosan content. CMNP showed high magnetization and superparamagnetism. They were composed of a core of 9.5 nm in average diameter and a very thin chitosan layer in accordance with electron microscopy measurements. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectrometry demonstrated that CMNP were obtained and those from thermogravimetric analysis allowed to determine that they were composed of 95 wt% of magnetic nanoparticles and 5 wt% of chitosan. 67% efficacy in the Pb+2 removal test indicated that only 60% of amino groups on CMNP surface bound to Pb, probably due to some degree of nanoparticle flocculation during the redispersion. The very low weight ratio chitosan to magnetic nanoparticles obtained in this study, 0.053, and the high yield of the precipitation reactions (≈97% are noticeable.

  15. Size dependences of crystal structure and magnetic properties of DyMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, T., E-mail: tajiri@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Terashita, N.; Hamamoto, K.; Deguchi, H.; Mito, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu 804-8550 (Japan); Morimoto, Y.; Konishi, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kohno, A. [Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    We synthesized DyMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles with particle sizes of about 7.5–15.3 nm in the pores of mesoporous silica and investigated their crystal structure and magnetic properties. As the particle size decreased, the lattice constants of the DyMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles deviated from those of the bulk crystal, and the Jahn–Teller distortion in the nanoparticle systems decreased. In addition, the estimated lattice strain increased with decreasing particle size. The DyMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior. The blocking temperature and the coercive field increased with decreasing particle size, and this behavior was contrary to the usual magnetic size effects. It is deduced that these unique size dependences of the magnetic properties for the DyMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles were derived from the changes in lattice constants and lattice strain. The anisotropic lattice deformation in the crystal structure of the nanoparticles induces an enhancement of the magnetic anisotropy, which results in the increase in blocking temperature and coercive field with decreasing particle size. - Highlights: • We successfully synthesized DyMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles with particle size of 7.5–15.3 nm. • Lattice strain increases with decreasing particle size. • Lattice constants exhibit anisotropic change with decreasing particle size. • Distortion of crystal structure leads to enhancement of magnetic anisotropy constant. • Blocking temperature and coercive field increases with decreasing particle size.

  16. Effect of the number of iron oxide nanoparticle layers on the magnetic properties of nanocomposite LbL assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dincer, Ilker; Tozkoparan, Onur; German, Sergey V.; Markin, Alexey V.; Yildirim, Oguz; Khomutov, Gennady B.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Elerman, Yalcin

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous colloidal suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles has been synthesized. Z-potential of iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized by citric acid was −35±3 mV. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been characterized by the light scattering method and transmission electron microscopy. The polyelectrolyte/iron oxide nanoparticle thin films with different numbers of iron oxide nanoparticle layers have been prepared on the surface of silicon substrates via the layer-by-layer assembly technique. The physical properties and chemical composition of nanocomposite thin films have been studied by atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, magnetization measurements, Raman spectroscopy. Using the analysis of experimental data it was established, that the magnetic properties of nanocomposite films depended on the number of iron oxide nanoparticle layers, the size of iron oxide nanoparticle aggregates, the distance between aggregates, and the chemical composition of iron oxide nanoparticles embedded into the nanocomposite films. The magnetic permeability of nanocomposite coatings has been calculated. The magnetic permeability values depend on the number of iron oxide nanoparticle layers in nanocomposite film. - Highlights: ► The magnetic properties of nanocomposite films depended on the number of iron oxide nanoparticle layers. ► The iron oxide nanoparticle phase in nanocomposite coatings is a mixture of magnetite and maghemite phases. ► The magnetite and maghemite phases depend on a number of iron oxide nanoparticle layers because the iron oxide nanoparticles are oxidized from magnetite to maghemite.

  17. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, P.O. Box 352120, Seattle, Washington 98195-2120 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs’ size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ∼20.1 ± 0.98 to ∼18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  18. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles in acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene mesoporous template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, D. E-mail: denilson@quimica.ufg.br; Lima, E.C.D.; Barbosa, D.P.; Silva, V.J.; Silva, O.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lemos, A.P.C.; Morais, P.C

    2002-11-01

    Preparation and characterization of nanosized magnetic particles using alkaline oxidation of ferrous ion retained in acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene (AN-MMA-DVB) spherical micron-sized polymer template is described. Atomic absorption, transmission electron microscopy and magnetic resonance were used to investigate chemically cycled nanoparticle-based composites. The resonance field shifts towards higher values as the nanoparticle concentration reduces in the polymeric template, following two very distinct regimes.

  19. Increased osteoblast density in the presence of novel calcium phosphate coated magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Webster, Thomas J; Taylor, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Bone diseases (including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and bone cancer) are of great concern to the medical world. Drugs are available to treat such diseases, but often these drugs are not specifically targeted to the site of the disease and, thus, lack an immediate directed therapeutic effect. The optimal drug delivery system should enhance healthy bone growth with high specificity to the site of bone disease. It has been previously shown that magnetic nanoparticles can be directed in the presence of a magnetic field to any part of the body, allowing for site-specific drug delivery and possibly an immediate increase in bone density. The objective of the present study was to build off of this evidence and determine the density of osteoblasts (bone forming cells) in the presence of various uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles that could eventually be used in drug delivery applications. Results showed that some magnetic nanoparticles (specifically, γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) significantly promoted osteoblast density (that is, cells per well) after 5 and 8 days of culture compared to controls (no particles). These magnetic nanoparticles were further coated with calcium phosphate (CaP; the main inorganic component of bone) to tailor them for treating various bone diseases. The coatings were conducted in the presence of either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or citric acid (CA) to reduce magnetic nanoparticle agglomeration, a common problem resulting from the use of nanoparticles which decreases their effectiveness. Results with these coatings showed that magnetic nanoparticles, specifically (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ), coated in the presence of BSA significantly increased osteoblast density compared to controls after 1 day. In this manner, this study provided unexpected evidence that CaP-coated γ-Fe 2 O 3 magnetic nanoparticles increased osteoblast density (compared to no particles) and, thus, should be further studied to treat numerous bone diseases

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng; An, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. (paper)

  1. Sensing the quantum behaviour of magnetic nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, M; Mercatelli, R; Sottini, S; Ceci, P; Falvo, E; Gatteschi, D

    2016-02-07

    We have investigated Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs) of spinel type iron oxide (of approximately 8 nm) mineralized in the internal cavity of the bioreactor ferritin nanocage. In particular, we have used Electron Magnetic Resonance, EMR, spectroscopy and taken advantage of the capacity of the protein shells to control the size of the MNPs. EMR measurements in perpendicular and parallel configurations have been recorded at various temperatures. A model based on the giant spin is used to interpret the experimental results. The analysis indicates that the observed quantum behaviour has to be ascribed to the whole MNP and that the thermal population of excited spin states has a strong influence in the EMR behaviour of MNPs.

  2. Electrochemical analysis of gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting immunological interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Thao Thi-Hien; Sim, Sang Jun

    2010-01-01

    An electrochemical impedance immunosensor was developed for detecting the immunological interaction between human immunoglobulin (IgG) and protein A from Staphylococcus aureus based on the immobilization of human IgG on the surface of modified gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with an Au shell and Fe oxide cores were functionalized by a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. The electrochemical analysis was conducted on the modified magnetic carbon paste electrodes with the nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles were attached to the surface of the magnetic carbon paste electrodes via magnetic force. The cyclic voltammetry technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of the magnetic carbon paste electrodes coated with magnetic nanoparticles-human IgG complex showed changes in its alternating current (AC) response both after the modification of the surface of the electrode and the addition of protein A. The immunological interaction between human IgG on the surface of the modified magnetic carbon paste electrodes and protein A in the solution could be successfully monitored.

  3. Comparative study of magnetic ordering in bulk and nanoparticles of Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3: Magnetization and electron magnetic resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goveas, Lora Rita; Anuradha, K. N.; Bhagyashree, K. S.; Bhat, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effect of size reduction to nanoscale on the hole doped Sm 0.65 Ca 0.35 MnO 3 compound, dc magnetic measurements and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) were done on bulk and nanoparticle samples in the temperature range 10 ≤ T ≤ 300 K. Magnetization measurement showed that the bulk sample undergoes a charge ordering transition at 240 K and shows a mixed magnetic phase at low temperature. However, the nanosample underwent a ferromagnetic transition at 75 K, and the charge ordered state was destabilized on size reduction down to nanoscale. The low-temperature ferromagnetic component is found to be enhanced in nanoparticles as compared to their bulk counterpart. Interestingly around room temperature, bulk particles show higher magnetization where as at low temperature nanoparticles show higher magnetization. Ferromagnetism in the bulk is due to super exchange where as ferromagnetism in nanoparticles is due to uncompensated spins of the surface layer. Temperature variation of EMR parameters correlates well with the results of magnetic measurements. The magnetic behaviour of the nanoparticles is understood in terms of the core shell scenario

  4. Comparative study of magnetic ordering in bulk and nanoparticles of Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3: Magnetization and electron magnetic resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goveas, Lora Rita; Anuradha, K. N.; Bhagyashree, K. S.; Bhat, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    To explore the effect of size reduction to nanoscale on the hole doped Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3 compound, dc magnetic measurements and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) were done on bulk and nanoparticle samples in the temperature range 10 ≤ T ≤ 300 K. Magnetization measurement showed that the bulk sample undergoes a charge ordering transition at 240 K and shows a mixed magnetic phase at low temperature. However, the nanosample underwent a ferromagnetic transition at 75 K, and the charge ordered state was destabilized on size reduction down to nanoscale. The low-temperature ferromagnetic component is found to be enhanced in nanoparticles as compared to their bulk counterpart. Interestingly around room temperature, bulk particles show higher magnetization where as at low temperature nanoparticles show higher magnetization. Ferromagnetism in the bulk is due to super exchange where as ferromagnetism in nanoparticles is due to uncompensated spins of the surface layer. Temperature variation of EMR parameters correlates well with the results of magnetic measurements. The magnetic behaviour of the nanoparticles is understood in terms of the core shell scenario.

  5. Discrete Spin Vector Approach for Monte Carlo-based Magnetic Nanoparticle Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, Alexander; Peralta, Juan; Sahay, Rahul

    The study of magnetic nanoparticles has gained significant popularity due to the potential uses in many fields such as modern medicine, electronics, and engineering. To study the magnetic behavior of these particles in depth, it is important to be able to model and simulate their magnetic properties efficiently. Here we utilize the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a discrete spin vector model (in contrast to the standard continuous model) to model the magnetic hysteresis of a set of protected pure iron nanoparticles. We compare our simulations with the experimental hysteresis curves and discuss the efficiency of our algorithm.

  6. Reversal of Flux Closure States in Cobalt Nanoparticle Rings With Coaxial Magnetic Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, T; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Scheinfein, MR

    2008-01-01

    Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (H-z). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths.......Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (H-z). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths....

  7. The study of magnetic properties and relaxation processes in Co/Au bimetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrubovčák, Pavol [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Zeleňáková, Adriana, E-mail: adriana.zelenakova@upjs.sk [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Zeleňák, Vladimir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, Košice (Slovakia); Kováč, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 41, Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-11-15

    Co/Au bimetallic fine nanoparticles were prepared employing the method of microemulsion using reverse micelle as nanoreactor, controlling the particles size. Magnetic and structural properties of two different samples Co/Au1 and Co/Au2 with almost comparable size of Co core and different size of Au layer were studied. The investigation of magnetic relaxation processes present in the particles was carried out by means of ac and dc magnetization data obtained at different temperatures and magnitudes of magnetic field. We observed the existence of superspin glass state characterized by the strong inter-particle interactions in the nanoparticle systems. In this paper, we discuss the attributes of novel superspin glass magnetic state reflected on various features (saturated FC magnetization at low temperatures, shift of the Cole–Cole arc downwards) and calculated parameters (relaxation time, critical exponent zv ∼ 10 and frequency dependent criterion p < 0.05). Comparison of the magnetic properties of two studied samples show that the thickness of diamagnetic Au shell significantly influences the magnetic interactions and change the relaxation dynamics. - Highlights: • Co/Au fine nanoparticles prepared by reverse micelle as nanoreactor, controlling the size. • Existence of superspin glass state confirmed from ac magnetic susceptibility study. • Individual particles exhibit the collective behavior below glass temperature T{sub SSG}. • Influence of diamagnetic shell on the magnetic properties of core–shell nanoparticles.

  8. Spectroscopic and magnetic studies of highly dispersible superparamagnetic silica coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadyszak, Krzysztof [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Mariana Smo.luchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Kertmen, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmet.kertmen@pg.gda.pl [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Coy, Emerson [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Andruszkiewicz, Ryszard; Milewski, Sławomir [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Kardava, Irakli; Scheibe, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Chybczyńska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.chybczynska@ifmpan.poznan.pl [Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Mariana Smo.luchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Silica were obtained. • Magnetic response was studied by DC, AC magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy. • Nanoparticles show magnetite structure with a well-defined Verwey transition. • Samples show no inter particle magnetic interactions or agglomeration. - Abstract: Superparamagnetic behavior in aqueously well dispersible magnetite core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is presented. The magnetic properties of core-shell nanoparticles were measured with use of the DC, AC magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy. Particles where characterized by HR-TEM and Raman spectroscopy, showing a crystalline magnetic core of 11.5 ± 0.12 nm and an amorphous silica shell of 22 ± 1.5 nm in thickness. The DC, AC magnetic measurements confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of nanoparticles, additionally the EPR studies performed at much higher frequency than DC, AC magnetometry (9 GHz) have confirmed the paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles. Our results show the excellent magnetic behavior of the particles with a clear magnetite structure, which are desirable properties for environmental remediation and biomedical applications.

  9. Magnetic behavior of Co–Mn co-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hengda; Liu, Xinzhong; Zheng, Zhigong

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report on systematic studies of the magnetic properties of Co and Mn co-doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by a sol–gel technique. The effect of the concentration of the doping ions on the magnetic properties of Co and Mn co-doped ZnO nanoparticles is presented. X-ray diffraction characterizations (XRD) of co-doped ZnO nanoparticles are all wurtzite structure. The Zn 0.96 Co 0.02 Mn 0.02 O nanoparticles and Zn 0.94 Co 0.02 Mn 0.04 O nanoparticles display ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer figures show that with the concentration of the Mn ions increased, the saturation magnetic moment (M s ) increased, and the magnetic is probably due to the co-doping of the Mn ions. Our results demonstrate that the Mn ions doping concentration play an important role in the ferromagnetic properties of Co–Mn co-doped ZnO nanoparticles at room temperature. - Highlights: • The effect of the doping ions on the magnetic properties is presented. • The magnetic is probably due to the co-doping of the Mn ions. • The Mn ions concentration play an important role in the ferromagnetic properties

  10. The use of magnetite nanoparticles for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in thrombolytic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Maria; Kempe, Henrik; Snowball, Ian; Wallén, Rita; Arza, Carlos Rodriguez; Götberg, Matthias; Olsson, Tommy

    2010-12-01

    Implant-assisted targeting of magnetic particles under the influence of an external magnetic field has previously been verified through mathematical modeling, in vitro studies, and in vivo studies on rat carotid arteries as a feasible method for localized drug delivery. The present study focuses on the development of nanoparticles for the treatment of in-stent thrombosis. Magnetic nanoparticles in the size-range 10-30 nm were synthesized in a one-pot procedure by precipitation of ferrous hydroxide followed by oxidation to magnetite. The nanoparticles were silanized with tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of triethylene glycol and/or polyethylene glycol. The surface coated magnetite nanoparticles were activated with either N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide or tresyl chloride for covalent immobilization of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Hysteresis loops showed saturation magnetizations of 55.8, 44.1, and 43.0 emu/g for the naked nanoparticles, the surface coated nanoparticles, and the tPA-nanoparticle conjugates, respectively. The hemolytic activity of the nanoparticles in blood was negligible. An initial in vivo biocompatibility test in pig, carried out by intravascular injection of the nanoparticles in a stented brachial artery, showed no short-term adverse effects. In vitro evaluation in a flow-through model proved that the nanoparticles were captured efficiently to the surface of a ferromagnetic coiled wire at the fluid velocities typical for human arteries. A preliminary test of the tPA-nanoparticle conjugates in a pig model suggested that the conjugates may be used for treatment of in-stent thrombosis in coronary arteries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H. Y., E-mail: annetsai@csmu.edu.tw [Chung Shan Medical University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China); Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C., E-mail: cbfuh@ncnu.edu.tw [National Chi Nan University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China)

    2011-06-15

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ({approx}80 nm) and fluorescent ({approx}180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles for power absorption: Optimizing size, shape and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, M.A.; Torres, T.E.; Andres-Verges, M.; Costo, R.; Presa, P. de la; Serna, C.J.; Morales, M.P.; Marquina, C.; Ibarra, M.R.; Goya, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a study on the magnetic properties of naked and silica-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with sizes between 5 and 110 nm. Their efficiency as heating agents was assessed through specific power absorption (SPA) measurements as a function of particle size and shape. The results show a strong dependence of the SPA with the particle size, with a maximum around 30 nm, as expected for a Neel relaxation mechanism in single-domain particles. The SiO 2 shell thickness was found to play an important role in the SPA mechanism by hindering the heat outflow, thus decreasing the heating efficiency. It is concluded that a compromise between good heating efficiency and surface functionality for biomedical purposes can be attained by making the SiO 2 functional coating as thin as possible. - Graphical Abstract: The magnetic properties of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles from 5 to 110 nm are presented, and their efficiency as heating agents discussed as a function of particle size, shape and surface functionalization.

  13. Progress in the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, A G; Costo, R; Rebolledo, A F; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S; Tartaj, P; Gonzalez-Carreno, T; Morales, M P; Serna, C J, E-mail: puerto@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-21

    This review summarizes recent advances in synthesis routes for quickly and reliably making and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine. We put special emphasis on describing synthetic strategies that result in the production of nanosized materials with well-defined physical and crystallochemical characteristics as well as colloidal and magnetic properties. Rather than grouping the information according to the synthetic route, we have described methods to prepare water-dispersible equiaxial magnetic nanoparticles with sizes below about 10 nm, sizes between 10 and 30 nm and sizes around the monodomain-multidomain magnetic transition. We have also described some recent examples reporting the preparation of anisometric nanoparticles as well as methods to prepare magnetic nanosized materials other than iron oxide ferrites, for example Co and Mn ferrite, FePt and manganites. Finally, we have described examples of the preparation of multicomponent systems with purely inorganic or organic-inorganic characteristics. (topical review)

  14. Enhanced specific absorption rate of bi-magnetic nanoparticles for heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammad, Mohaned; Hempelmann, Rolf, E-mail: r.hempelmann@mx.uni-saarland.de

    2017-02-15

    Truncated octahedron bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles of Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with different size distributions have been synthesized, and their structural and magnetic properties have been studied. The structure and morphology of the core/shell nanostructures were established by using X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Dark field-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results confirmed the formation of bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The Curie temperature increases with the increase of particle size from 360 K to 394 K. The experimental results showed that core/shell nanoparticles have a higher specific absorption rate compared to the core ones. These nanoparticles are interfacial exchange coupled between hard and soft magnetic phases. We demonstrated that the specific absorption rate could be tuned by the concentration of precursor and the synthesis time. - Highlights: • Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by seed-mediated growth method. • Exchange-coupling between magnetic hard and soft phase of the magnetic nanoparticles affects the specific absorption rate. • The specific absorption rate could be tuned by the concentration of precursor and the synthesis time. • An increase of the core/shell magnetic nanoparticles size resulted in the increase of Curie temperature.

  15. In-situ synthesis of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle-nanofibre composites using electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Luke; Mortimer, Chris J.; Curtis, Daniel J.; Lewis, Aled R.; Williams, Rhodri; Hawkins, Karl; Maffeis, Thierry G.G.; Wright, Chris J.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile, one-step process to form polymer scaffolds composed of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) contained within electrospun nano- and micro-fibres of two biocompatible polymers, Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). This was achieved with both needle and free-surface electrospinning systems demonstrating the scalability of the composite fibre manufacture; a 228 fold increase in fibre fabrication was observed for the free-surface system. In all cases the nanoparticle-nanofibre composite scaffolds displayed morphological properties as good as or better than those previously described and fabricated using complex multi-stage techniques. Fibres produced had an average diameter (Needle-spun: 125 ± 18 nm (PEO) and 1.58 ± 0.28 μm (PVP); Free-surface electrospun: 155 ± 31 nm (PEO)) similar to that reported previously, were smooth with no bead defects. Nanoparticle-nanofibre composites were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS) (Nanoparticle average diameter ranging from 8 ± 3 nm to 27 ± 5 nm), XRD (Phase of iron oxide nanoparticles identified as magnetite) and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements (NMR) (T1/T2: 32.44 for PEO fibres containing MNPs) were used to verify the magnetic behaviour of MNPs. This study represents a significant step forward for production rates of magnetic nanoparticle-nanofibre composite scaffolds by the electrospinning technique. - Graphical abstract: We present a novel facile, one-step process for the in-situ synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-nanofibre composites using both needle and free-surface electrospinning. This is a significant step forward for production rates of magnetic nanoparticle-nanofibre scaffolds both in terms of fibre and nanoparticle production. - Highlights: • We present a novel process for the in-situ synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle

  16. Synthesis of magnetic CoPt/SiO{sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, Takafumi [Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Koga, Kenji [Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takano, Fumiyoshi [Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Akinaga, Hiroyuki [Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Orii, Takaaki [Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Hirasawa, Makoto [Research Consortium for Synthetic Nano-Function Materials Project (SYNAF), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Murayama, Mitsuhiro [National Institute for Material Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Core-shell nanoparticles composed of ferromagnetic cobalt platinum cores covered by non-magnetic silica shells were synthesized by laser ablating a composite target in a helium background gas. The average diameter of the CoPt core was controlled by adjusting the CoPt/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the ablation target. The particles were also classified in the gas phase using an electrical mobility classifier. The present method successfully synthesized nearly monodispersed nanoparticles with an average core diameter of 2.5nm. This article describes the synthesis of the core-shell nanoparticles and investigates their magnetic properties.

  17. Magnetic Cobalt and Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles in Hyperbranched Polyester Polyol Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Medvedeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of cobalt (Co and its oxides based nanoparticles were synthesized by using hyperbranched polyester polyol Boltorn H20 as a platform and sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. UV, FT-IR, XRD, NTA, and TEM methods were employed to obtain physicochemical characteristics of the products. The average diameter of Co nanoparticles was approximately 8.2±3.4 nm. Their magnetic properties, including hysteresis loop, field-cooled, and zero field-cooled curves were investigated. The nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetism at room temperature, accompanied by magnetic hysteresis below the blocking temperature.

  18. In-situ synthesis of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle-nanofibre composites using electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Luke; Mortimer, Chris J. [Biomaterials, Biofouling and Biofilms Engineering Laboratory (B3EL), Systems and Process Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Systems and Process Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Curtis, Daniel J.; Lewis, Aled R.; Williams, Rhodri [Systems and Process Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Karl [Centre for NanoHealth (CNH), Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Maffeis, Thierry G.G. [Systems and Process Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Wright, Chris J., E-mail: c.wright@swansea.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biofouling and Biofilms Engineering Laboratory (B3EL), Systems and Process Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Systems and Process Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Centre for NanoHealth (CNH), Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile, one-step process to form polymer scaffolds composed of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) contained within electrospun nano- and micro-fibres of two biocompatible polymers, Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). This was achieved with both needle and free-surface electrospinning systems demonstrating the scalability of the composite fibre manufacture; a 228 fold increase in fibre fabrication was observed for the free-surface system. In all cases the nanoparticle-nanofibre composite scaffolds displayed morphological properties as good as or better than those previously described and fabricated using complex multi-stage techniques. Fibres produced had an average diameter (Needle-spun: 125 ± 18 nm (PEO) and 1.58 ± 0.28 μm (PVP); Free-surface electrospun: 155 ± 31 nm (PEO)) similar to that reported previously, were smooth with no bead defects. Nanoparticle-nanofibre composites were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS) (Nanoparticle average diameter ranging from 8 ± 3 nm to 27 ± 5 nm), XRD (Phase of iron oxide nanoparticles identified as magnetite) and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements (NMR) (T1/T2: 32.44 for PEO fibres containing MNPs) were used to verify the magnetic behaviour of MNPs. This study represents a significant step forward for production rates of magnetic nanoparticle-nanofibre composite scaffolds by the electrospinning technique. - Graphical abstract: We present a novel facile, one-step process for the in-situ synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-nanofibre composites using both needle and free-surface electrospinning. This is a significant step forward for production rates of magnetic nanoparticle-nanofibre scaffolds both in terms of fibre and nanoparticle production. - Highlights: • We present a novel process for the in-situ synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle

  19. Magnetic stimulus responsive vancomycin drug delivery system based on chitosan microbeads embedded with magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Ankita; Harris, Michael A; LeVine, David; Ghimire, Madhav; Jennings, Jessica A; Morshed, Bashir I; Haggard, Warren O; Bumgardner, Joel D; Mishra, Sanjay R; Fujiwara, Tomoko

    2017-10-20

    Local antibiotic delivery can overcome some of the shortcomings of systemic therapy, such as low local concentrations and delivery to avascular sites. A localized drug delivery system (DDS), ideally, could also use external stimuli to modulate the normal drug release profile from the DDS to provide efficacious drug administration and flexibility to healthcare providers. To achieve this objective, chitosan microbeads embedded with magnetic nanoparticles were loaded with the antibiotic vancomycin and stimulated by a high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three such stimulation sessions separated by 1.5 h were applied to each test sample. The chromatographic analysis of the supernatant from these stimulated samples showed more than approximately 200% higher release of vancomycin from the DDS after the stimulation periods compared to nonstimulated samples. A 16-day long term elution study was also conducted where the DDS was allowed to elute drug through normal diffusion over a period of 11 days and stimulated on day 12 and day 15, when vancomycin level had dropped below therapeutic levels. Magnetic stimulation boosted elution of test groups above minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), as compared to control groups (with no stimulation) which remained below MIC. The drug release from test groups in the intervals where no stimulation was given showed similar elution behavior to control groups. These results indicate promising possibilities of controlled drug release using magnetic excitation from a biopolymer-based DDS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Chemical synthesis and characterization of hollow dopamine coated, pentagonal and flower shaped magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riasat, Rabia; Kaynat, Sumbal

    2018-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have gained attention recently in the field of nanoscience and technology due to their unique physicochemical properties. We hereby chemically synthesized novel pentagonal flower shaped iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron penta-carbonyl in a two way annealing process. Controlled oxidation by acid etching was performed for these nanoparticles. At first 13 nm core shell nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) were synthesized at 120°C annealing temperature that act as template material. The core shell nanoparticles then converted into porous hollow core shell nanoparticles (PH Fe/ Fe3O4) in a two way annealing process of heating, first at 100°C then at 250°C and heating rate of 5°C was kept constant throughout the reaction time. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) was done for the phase confirmation of as synthesized nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and higher resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) clearly shows the flower like nanoparticles that are approx. 16 nm-18 nm in size having the 4-5 nm core of Fe and 1-2 nm of the pores in the shell while the cavity between the shell and core is about 2 nm and the shell is 4-5 nm in diameter according to the TEM micrographs. The as prepared nanoparticles were then surface functionalized by dopamine polymer to make them water dispersible. Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the dopamine coating on the nanoparticles and the magnetic saturation of 38 emu/g of nanoparticles was analyzed by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetic saturation persists in the dopamine coated nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were surface functionalized with dopamine and show dispersity in the aqueous media and can further be exploited in many nano-biotechnological applications including target specific therapeutic applications for several diseases.

  1. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  2. Distinguishing magnetic particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles with first-order reversal curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Monika; Hirt, Ann M., E-mail: ann.hirt@erdw.ethz.ch [Department of Earth Sciences, Institute of Geophysics, ETH-Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Widdrat, Marc; Faivre, Damien [Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Science Park Golm, D-14424 Potsdam (Germany); Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, Mihály [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, H-8200 Veszprém (Hungary); Uebe, Rene; Schüler, Dirk [Department Biologie I, LMU Munich, Großhaderner Str. 2, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2014-09-28

    Magnetic nanoparticles encompass a wide range of scientific study and technological applications. The success of using the nanoparticles in various applications demands control over size, dispersibility, and magnetics. Hence, the nanoparticles are often characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, and magnetic hysteresis loops. TEM analysis requires a thin layer of dispersed particles on the grid, which may often lead to particle aggregation thus making size analysis difficult. Magnetic hysteresis loops on the other hand provide information on the bulk property of the material without discriminating size, composition, and interaction effects. First order reversal curves (FORCs), described as an assembly of partial hysteresis loops originating from the major loop are efficient in identifying the domain size, composition, and interaction in a magnetic system. This study presents FORC diagrams on a variety of well-characterized biogenic and synthetic magnetite nanoparticles. It also introduces deconvoluted reversible and irreversible components from FORC as an important method for obtaining a semi-quantitative measure of the effective magnetic particle size. This is particularly important in a system with aggregation and interaction among the particles that often leads to either the differences between physical size and effective magnetic size. We also emphasize the extraction of secondary components by masking dominant coercivity fraction on FORC diagram to explore more detailed characterization of nanoparticle systems.

  3. Magnetic stents retain nanoparticle-bound antirestenotic drugs transported by lipid microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räthel, T; Mannell, H; Pircher, J; Gleich, B; Pohl, U; Krötz, F

    2012-05-01

    Coating coronary stents with antirestenotic drugs revolutionized interventional cardiology. We developed a system for post-hoc drug delivery to uncoated stents. We coupled rapamycin or a chemically similar fluorescent dye to superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The antiproliferative activity of rapamycin coupled to nanoparticles was confirmed in vitro in primary porcine vascular cells. The particles were then incorporated into lipid based microbubbles. Commercially available stents were made magnetizable by nickel plating and used to induce strong field gradients in order to capture magnetic microbubbles from flowing liquids when placed in an external magnetic field. Nanoparticle bound Rapamycin dose dependently inhibited cell proliferation in vitro. Magnetic microcbubbles carrying coated nanoparticles were caught by magnets placed external to a flow-through tube. Plating commercial stents with nickel resulted in increased deposition at stent struts and allowed for widely increased distance of external magnets. Deposition depended on circulation time and velocity and distance of magnets. Deposited microbubbles were destroyed by ultrasound and delivered their cargo to targeted sites. Drugs can be incorporated into nanoparticle loaded microbubbles and thus be delivered to magnetizable stents from circulating fluids by applying external magnetic fields. This technology could allow for post-hoc drug coating of already implanted vascular stents.

  4. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results

  5. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Magnetic Ink Development for Fully Printed Tunable Radio-Frequency Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Vaseem, Mohammad

    2018-01-30

    The field of printed electronics is still in its infancy and most of the reported work is based on commercially available nanoparticle-based metallic inks. Although fully printed devices that employ dielectric/semiconductor inks have recently been reported, there is a dearth of functional inks that can demonstrate controllable devices. The lack of availability of functional inks is a barrier to the widespread use of fully printed devices. For radio-frequency electronics, magnetic materials have many uses in reconfigurable components but rely on expensive and rigid ferrite materials. A suitable magnetic ink can facilitate the realization of fully printed, magnetically controlled, tunable devices. This report presents the development of an iron oxide nanoparticle-based magnetic ink. First, a tunable inductor is fully printed using iron oxide nanoparticle-based magnetic ink. Furthermore, iron oxide nanoparticles are functionalized with oleic acid to make them compatible with a UV-curable SU8 solution. Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are successfully embedded in the SU8 matrix to make a magnetic substrate. The as-fabricated substrate is characterized for its magnetostatic and microwave properties. A frequency tunable printed patch antenna is demonstrated using the magnetic and in-house silver-organo-complex inks. This is a step toward low-cost, fully printed, controllable electronic components.

  6. Distinguishing magnetic particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles with first-order reversal curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Monika; Hirt, Ann M.; Widdrat, Marc; Faivre, Damien; Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, Mihály; Uebe, Rene; Schüler, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles encompass a wide range of scientific study and technological applications. The success of using the nanoparticles in various applications demands control over size, dispersibility, and magnetics. Hence, the nanoparticles are often characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, and magnetic hysteresis loops. TEM analysis requires a thin layer of dispersed particles on the grid, which may often lead to particle aggregation thus making size analysis difficult. Magnetic hysteresis loops on the other hand provide information on the bulk property of the material without discriminating size, composition, and interaction effects. First order reversal curves (FORCs), described as an assembly of partial hysteresis loops originating from the major loop are efficient in identifying the domain size, composition, and interaction in a magnetic system. This study presents FORC diagrams on a variety of well-characterized biogenic and synthetic magnetite nanoparticles. It also introduces deconvoluted reversible and irreversible components from FORC as an important method for obtaining a semi-quantitative measure of the effective magnetic particle size. This is particularly important in a system with aggregation and interaction among the particles that often leads to either the differences between physical size and effective magnetic size. We also emphasize the extraction of secondary components by masking dominant coercivity fraction on FORC diagram to explore more detailed characterization of nanoparticle systems.

  7. Enhancement of Radiotherapeutic Efficacy by Paclitaxel-Loaded ph-Sensitive Block Copolymer Micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinhyang, C.; Jaesook, P.; Dong-Hoon, J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a major modality for cancer treatment, but its efficacy is often compromised by the resistance caused by tumor-specific microenvironment including acidosis and hypoxia. For an effective RT, concurrent administration of radiosensitizer with RT has been emphasized. However, most anticancer agents enhancing radiotherapeutic efficacy have obstacles such as poor solubility and severe toxicity. Paclitaxel (PTX), a well-known radiosensitizer, is insoluble in water and needs toxic solvent like Cremophor EL. Nano materials in drug delivery systems have been utilized for improving the drawbacks of anti-cancer drugs. Solubilization, tumor accumulation, and toxicity attenuation of drug by nano materials are suitable for enhancement of radiotherapeutic efficacy. In this study, PTX was incorporated into ph-sensitive block copolymer micelle (psm-PTX), polyethylene glycol-graft-poly(β-amino ester), and pre clinically evaluated for its effect on RT. The size of psm-PTX was 125. 4.4±nm at ph 7.4. psm-PTX released PTX rapidly in the acidic condition (ph 6.5), while it was reasonably stable in the physiologic condition (ph 7.4). The clonogenic assay showed that psm-PTX greatly sensitized human non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells to radiation. In the xenograft tumor model, the combination of psm-PTX and radiation significantly delayed the tumor growth. These results demonstrated the feasibility of psm-PTX to enhance the chemo radiotherapeutic efficacy.

  8. A novel pH sensitive water soluble fluorescent nanomicellar sensor for potential biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Nikolai I; Bryaskova, Rayna; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Ugrinova, Iva; Detrembleur, Christophe; Miloshev, Stoyan; Asiri, Abdullah M; Qusti, Abdullah H; Bojinov, Vladimir B

    2013-11-01

    Herein we report on the synthesis and sensor activity of a novel pH sensitive probe designed as highly water-soluble fluorescent micelles by grafting of 1,8-naphthalimide-rhodamine bichromophoric FRET system (RNI) to the PMMA block of a well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(methacrylic acid) (PMMA48-b-PMAA27). The RNI-PMMA48-b-PMAA27 adduct is capable of self-assembling into micelles with a hydrophobic PMMA core, containing the anchored fluorescent probe, and a hydrophilic shell composed of PMAA block. Novel fluorescent micelles are able to serve as a highly sensitive pH probe in water and to internalize successfully HeLa and HEK cells. Furthermore, they showed cell specificity and significantly higher photostability than that of a pure organic dye label such as BODIPY. The valuable properties of the newly prepared fluorescent micelles indicate the high potential of the probe for future biological and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. pH Sensitivity of Novel PANI/PVB/PS3 Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Korostynska

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the results from the investigation into the pH sensitivity ofnovel PANI/PVB/PS3 composite films. The conductimetric sensing mode was chosen as itis one of the most promising alternatives to the mainstream pH-sensing methods and it is theleast investigated due to the popularity of other approaches. The films were deposited usingboth screen-printing and a drop-coating method. It was found that the best response to pHwas obtained from the screen-printed thick films, which demonstrated a change inconductance by as much as three orders of magnitude over the pH range pH2-pH11. Thedevices exhibited a stable response over 96 hours of operation. Several films were immersedin buffer solutions of different pH values for 96 hours and these were then investigated usingXPS. The resulting N 1s spectra for the various films confirmed that the change inconductance was due to deprotonation of the PANI polymer backbone. SEM andProfilometry were also undertaken and showed that no considerable changes in themorphology of the films took place and that the films did not swell or contract due toexposure to test solutions.

  10. pH sensitivity of emeraldine salt polyaniline and poly(vinyl butyral) blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Hoa Duyen; Hoang, Ngoc Vu; Le, Nguyen Ngan; Nguyen, Thi Ngoc Nhien; Doan, Duc Chanh Tin; Dang, Mau Chien; Nguyen, Thi Ha

    2014-01-01

    pH sensitivity of emeraldine salt polyaniline (ES-PANI) and poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) blend film was investigated. This blend film can be used as a pH sensing element in new-type pH sensors to replace traditional instruments based on fragile glass electrodes for pH measurement of water in aquaculture farming. Structural and optical characteristic of PANI were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV–vis). Electrical characterization of ES-PANI:PVB blend films versus pH was performed with chemiresistors fabricated by micro-lithography. A ES-PANI:PVB layer was drop-coated on comb-shaped platinum electrodes patterned on SiO 2 /Si substrates. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope were used to investigate morphology of the fabricated platinum electrodes and the coated polymer blend films. I–V measurements of the polymer-coated chemiresistors were performed at very low relative humidity after the polymer films were exposed to pH 1–8. The results showed that logarithm of electrical resistance of the ES-PANI:PVB films increased almost linearly as pH increased from 1 to 8. The initial results showed that the PANI blend-coated chemiresistors can be used as pH sensors for water quality monitoring. (paper)

  11. Using anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody and magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jing; Wuhua; Hang Deyan; Xie Changsheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the biodistribution of 131 I-anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody (Sc-7269)-dextran magnetic nanoparticles (DMN) in nude mice bearing human liver cancer where an external magnetic field was focused on, and to evaluate its therapeutic effects and safety. Methods: Eighteen nude mice bearing human liver cancer where an external magnetic field was focused on, were used for the bio-distribution study after intratumoral injection (n=9) or intravenous injection (n=9) of 131 I-Sc-7269-DMN. Another 25 tumor-bearing nude mice were divided into five groups, four groups of them were treated with 74 MBq/ml 131 I-Sc-7269-DMN, 131 I-Sc-7269, 131 I-DMN and 131 I by a single intratumoral injection, respectively. And an external magnetic field was bound to the tumor of the nude mice that were injected 131 I-Sc-7269-DMN or 131 I-DMN. For control study, the remaining one group was injected with physiological saline. Tumor growth delay (TGD) and tumor inhibition rate were observed as antitumor effects. Peripheral white cell counts and the loss of body weight were tested as indicators of systemic toxicity. Results: The retention percentages of radioactivity (%ID/g) in tumors after intratumoral injection were 104.06, 101.58 and 100.96%ID/g at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, while in the case of intravenous injection, the %ID/g values were lower (85.33, 89.67 and 90.00%ID/g, respectively, P 131 I-Sc-7269-DMN [ (13.3 ± 3.3) d] was the longest, and tumor inhibition rate (89.0%)was the highest compared with that in other groups (P 131 I-Sc-7269-DMN-treated mice as monitored by the decrease in peripheral white cell counts and the loss of body weight. Conclusions: The radioimmunotherapy with intratumoral injection of 131 I-Sc-7269-DMN may be safe and efficient for the treatment of liver cancer. Furthermore, the radioimmunotherapy using DMN as a carrier system may be a highly potential approach in targeted treatment of other kinds of tumors

  12. Monitoring of the aging of magnetic nanoparticles using Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Wagner, Friedrich E.; Gleich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles made of magnetite have the advantage to be biocompatible and to have a good saturation magnetisation. In this work we show that magnetite nanoparticles change their magnetic and chemical characteristics over time, depending on their storage conditions. To determine the oxidation state of the iron in the core of the nanoparticles Mössbauer spectroscopy was used at 4.2 K. This method is very accurate, especially in distinguishing maghemite and magnetite. The nanoparticles prepared by a co-precipitation method and peptized using acidic media had a core diameter of 5-7 nm. The aging process was monitored until the core was completely oxidised to maghemite and no further change occurred. The greatest change in the magnetite content of the particles was seen during the first 12 h after preparation. To preserve the good magnetic characteristics of magnetite nanoparticles a coating that prevents oxidation is therefore essential. Our results show that the point in time of the characterisation of small magnetic nanoparticles is crucial for the results. Even though magnetite nanoparticles have been formed nearly stoichiometrically, their chemical properties change over time.

  13. Maghemite nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties: one-pot preparation and ultrastable dextran shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Corato, Riccardo; Aloisi, Alessandra; Rella, Simona; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Pugliese, Giammarino; Pellegrino, Teresa; Malitesta, Cosimino; Rinaldi, Rosaria

    2018-05-10

    In the field on nanomedicine, superparamagnetic nanoparticles are one of the most studied nanomaterials for theranostics. In this paper, a one-pot synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is presented, with elevated control on particles size from 10 to 40 nm. The monitoring of vacuum level is here introduced as a crucial parameter for achieving a fine particle morphology. Magnetic properties of these nanoparticles are highly affected by disorders or mismatches in crystal structure. A prolonged oxidation step is applied to the obtained nanoparticles to transform the magnetic phases into a pure maghemite one, confirmed by a high resolution XPS analysis, by Mössbauer spectrometry and, indirectly, by increased performances in magnetization curves and in relaxation times. Afterward, the attained nanoparticles are transferred in water by a non-derivatized dextran coating. The thermogravimetric analysis confirms that the polysaccharide molecules replace the oleic acid on the surface by stabilizing the particles in aqueous phase and culture media. Preliminary in vitro test reveals as the dextran coated nanoparticles are not passively internalized from the cells. As proof of concept, a secondary layer of chitosan assures a positive charge to the nanoparticle surface, thus enhancing the cellular internalization.

  14. Hyperpolarized Porous Silicon Nanoparticles: Potential Theragnostic Material for ²⁹Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeonglim; Choi, Ikjang; Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Luu, Quy Son; Pudakalakatti, Shivanand; McCowan, Caitlin; Kim, Yaewon; Zacharias, Niki; Lee, Seunghyun; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Lee, Youngbok

    2018-05-20

    Porous silicon nanoparticles have recently garnered attention as potentially-promising biomedical platforms for drug delivery and medical diagnostics. Here, we demonstrate porous silicon nanoparticles as contrast agents for ²⁹Si magnetic resonance imaging. Size-controlled porous silicon nanoparticles were synthesized by magnesiothermic reduction of silica nanoparticles and were surface activated for further functionalization. Particles were hyperpolarized via dynamic nuclear polarization to enhance their ²⁹Si MR signals; the particles demonstrated long ²⁹Si spin-lattice relaxation (T₁) times (~ 25 mins), which suggests potential applicability for medical imaging. Furthermore, ²⁹Si hyperpolarization levels were sufficient to allow ²⁹Si MRI in phantoms. These results underscore the potential of porous silicon nanoparticles that, when combined with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging, can be a powerful theragnostic deep tissue imaging platform to interrogate various biomolecular processes in vivo. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Saebom, E-mail: saebomko@austin.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Kim, Eun Song [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Park, Siman [University of Texas, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Milner, Thomas E. [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Huh, Chun [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Bennetzen, Martin V. [Maersk Oil Corporate (Denmark); Geremia, Giuliano A. [Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (Qatar)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36∼72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  16. Preparation and characterization of alginate based-fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for fluorescence/magnetic resonance multimodal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Choi, Kee-Bong; Lim, Hyungjun; Lee, Sunghwi; Lee, Jae-Jong

    2018-06-01

    Simple and versatile methodologies have been reported that customize the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and impart additional fluorescence capabilities to these contrast agents. Herein, we present the rational design, synthesis, characterization, and biological applications of a new magnetic-based fluorescent probe. The dual modality imaging protocol was developed by labeling fluorophore with alginate natural polymers that have excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, and using gelification method to form nanocomposites containing SPIO. The formation of alginate-based fluorescent magnetic (AFM) nanoparticles was observed in spherical and elliptical forms with a diameter of less than 500 nm by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The fluorescent wavelength band in the range of 560 nm was also confirmed in the UV–visible spectrophotometer. In this study, we demonstrate that the multi-tasking design of AFM nanoparticles provides an ideal platform for building balanced dual-image probes of magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging.

  17. Synthesis of composite nanoparticles using co-precipitation of a magnetic iron-oxide shell onto core nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primc, Darinka; Belec, Blaž; Makovec, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles can be synthesized by coating a shell made of one material onto core nanoparticles made of another material. Here we report on a novel method for coating a magnetic iron oxide onto the surface of core nanoparticles in an aqueous suspension. The method is based on the heterogeneous nucleation of an initial product of Fe"3"+/Fe"2"+ co-precipitation on the core nanoparticles. The close control of the supersaturation of the precipitating species required for an exclusively heterogeneous nucleation and the growth of the shell were achieved by immobilizing the reactive Fe"3"+ ions in a nitrate complex with urea ([Fe((CO(NH_2)_2)_6](NO_3)_3) and by using solid Mg(OH)_2 as the precipitating reagent. The slow thermal decomposition of the complex at 60 °C homogeneously releases the reactive Fe"3"+ ions into the suspension of the core nanoparticles. The key stage of the process is the thermal hydrolysis of the released Fe"3"+ ions prior to the addition of Mg(OH)_2. The thermal hydrolysis results in the formation of γ-FeOOH, exclusively at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. After the addition of the solid hydroxide Mg(OH)_2, the pH increases and at pH ~ 5.7 the Fe"2"+ precipitates and reacts with the γ-FeOOH to form magnetic iron oxide with a spinel structure (spinel ferrite) at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. The proposed low-temperature method for the synthesis of composite nanoparticles is capable of forming well-defined interfaces between the two components, important for the coupling of the different properties. The procedure is environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and appropriate for scaling up to mass production.Graphical abstract

  18. Coercivity enhancement in Nd-Fe-B sintered permanent magnet by Dy nanoparticles doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.Q., E-mail: liuweiqiang77@hotmail.co [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Sun, H. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Yi, X.F. [Anhui Earth-panda Advance Magnetic Material Co., Ltd., Anhui 231500 (China); Liu, X.C.; Zhang, D.T. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Yue, M., E-mail: yueming@bjut.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Zhang, J.X. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2010-07-02

    Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets with a small amount of Dysprosium (Dy) nanoparticles doping were prepared by conventional sintered method, and the microstructure and magnetic properties of the magnets were studied. Investigation shows that the coercivity rises gradually, while the remanence decreases simultaneously with increased Dy doping amount. As a result, the magnet with 1.5 wt.% Dy exhibits optimal magnetic properties. Further investigation presumed that Dy is enriched as (Nd, Dy){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase in the surface region of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B matrix grains indicated by the enhancement of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy field of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase. As a result, the magnet doped with a small amount of Dy nanoparticles possesses remarkably enhanced coercivity without sacrificing its magnetization noticeably.

  19. Recent Advances of Graphene-based Hybrids with Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Nuria; Criado, Alejandro; Prato, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of graphene-based nanomaterials combined with magnetic nanoparticles offers key benefits in the modern biomedicine. In this minireview, we focus on the most recent advances in hybrids of magnetic graphene derivatives for biomedical applications. We initially analyze the several methodologies employed for the preparation of graphene-based composites with magnetic nanoparticles, more specifically the kind of linkage between the two components. In the last section, we focus on the biomedical applications where these magnetic-graphene hybrids are essential and pay special attention on how the addition of graphene improves the resulting devices in magnetic resonance imaging, controlled drug delivery, magnetic photothermal therapy and cellular separation and isolation. Finally, we highlight the use of these magnetic hybrids as multifunctional material that will lead to a next generation of theranostics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. The impact of the chemical synthesis on the magnetic properties of intermetallic PdFe nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos-Rubio, I.; Insausti, M.; Muro, I. Gil de [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Química Inorgánica (Spain); Arias-Duque, D. Carolina; Hernández-Garrido, Juan Carlos [Universidad de Cadiz, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Rojo, T.; Lezama, L., E-mail: luis.lezama@ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Química Inorgánica (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Palladium-rich Iron nanoparticles in the 4–8 nm range have been produced by a combination of two methods: the thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors and the reduction of metallic salts by a polyol. Herein, it is shown how the details of the synthesis have a striking impact on the magnetic and morphological properties of the final products. In the synthesis of these bimetallic nanoparticles, the use of high reaction temperatures plays an essential role in attaining good chemical homogeneity, which has proved to have a key influence on the magnetic properties. Magnetic characterization has been performed by electron magnetic resonance and magnetization measurements, which have confirmed the superparamagnetic-like behavior at room temperature. No clear traces of magnetic polarization in palladium atoms have been detected. The combination of long-term stability and homogeneous chemical and magnetic properties makes these particles very suitable for a wide range of applications in nanotechnology.

  1. The impact of the chemical synthesis on the magnetic properties of intermetallic PdFe nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos-Rubio, I.; Insausti, M.; Muro, I. Gil de; Arias-Duque, D. Carolina; Hernández-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Rojo, T.; Lezama, L.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium-rich Iron nanoparticles in the 4–8 nm range have been produced by a combination of two methods: the thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors and the reduction of metallic salts by a polyol. Herein, it is shown how the details of the synthesis have a striking impact on the magnetic and morphological properties of the final products. In the synthesis of these bimetallic nanoparticles, the use of high reaction temperatures plays an essential role in attaining good chemical homogeneity, which has proved to have a key influence on the magnetic properties. Magnetic characterization has been performed by electron magnetic resonance and magnetization measurements, which have confirmed the superparamagnetic-like behavior at room temperature. No clear traces of magnetic polarization in palladium atoms have been detected. The combination of long-term stability and homogeneous chemical and magnetic properties makes these particles very suitable for a wide range of applications in nanotechnology

  2. Study of magnetic and structural properties of ferrofluids based on cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J., E-mail: javierlo21@gmail.com [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Gonzalez-Bahamon, L.F. [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Prado, J.; Caicedo, J.C.; Zambrano, G.; Gomez, M.E. [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Prieto, P. [Center of Excellence for Novel Materials, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia)

    2012-02-15

    Ferrofluids are colloidal systems composed of a single domain of magnetic nanoparticles with a mean diameter around 30 nm, dispersed in a liquid carrier. Magnetic Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.25, 0.50, 0.75) ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via co-precipitation method from aqueous salt solutions in an alkaline medium. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized through Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies permitted determining nanoparticle size; grain size of nanoparticle conglomerates was established via Atomic Force Microscopy. The magnetic behavior of ferrofluids was characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM); and finally, a magnetic force microscope was used to visualize the magnetic domains of Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction patterns of Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} show the presence of the most intense peak corresponding to the (311) crystallographic orientation of the spinel phase of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the bonds associated to the spinel structures; particularly for ferrites. The mean size of the crystallite of nanoparticles determined from the full-width at half maximum of the strongest reflection of the (311) peak by using the Scherrer approximation diminished from (9.5{+-}0.3) nm to (5.4{+-}0.2) nm when the Zn concentration increases from 0.21 to 0.75. The size of the Co-Zn ferrite nanoparticles obtained by TEM is in good agreement with the crystallite size calculated from X-ray diffraction patterns, using Scherer's formula. The magnetic properties investigated with the aid of a VSM at room temperature presented super-paramagnetic behavior, determined by the shape of the hysteresis loop. In this study, we established that the coercive field of Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic

  3. Study of magnetic and structural properties of ferrofluids based on cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.; Gonzalez-Bahamon, L.F.; Prado, J.; Caicedo, J.C.; Zambrano, G.; Gomez, M.E.; Esteve, J.; Prieto, P.

    2012-01-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal systems composed of a single domain of magnetic nanoparticles with a mean diameter around 30 nm, dispersed in a liquid carrier. Magnetic Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 (x=0.25, 0.50, 0.75) ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via co-precipitation method from aqueous salt solutions in an alkaline medium. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized through Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies permitted determining nanoparticle size; grain size of nanoparticle conglomerates was established via Atomic Force Microscopy. The magnetic behavior of ferrofluids was characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM); and finally, a magnetic force microscope was used to visualize the magnetic domains of Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction patterns of Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 show the presence of the most intense peak corresponding to the (311) crystallographic orientation of the spinel phase of CoFe 2 O 4 . Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the bonds associated to the spinel structures; particularly for ferrites. The mean size of the crystallite of nanoparticles determined from the full-width at half maximum of the strongest reflection of the (311) peak by using the Scherrer approximation diminished from (9.5±0.3) nm to (5.4±0.2) nm when the Zn concentration increases from 0.21 to 0.75. The size of the Co-Zn ferrite nanoparticles obtained by TEM is in good agreement with the crystallite size calculated from X-ray diffraction patterns, using Scherer's formula. The magnetic properties investigated with the aid of a VSM at room temperature presented super-paramagnetic behavior, determined by the shape of the hysteresis loop. In this study, we established that the coercive field of Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles, the crystal and nanoparticle sizes determined by X-ray Diffraction and TEM

  4. Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Liquid Crystals Doped with Resonant Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Marzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many efforts to improve the electrooptical properties of liquid crystals by means of doping them with different types of nanoparticles. In addition, liquid crystals may be used as active media to dynamically control other interesting phenomena, such as light scattering resonances. In this sense, mixtures of resonant nanoparticles hosted in a liquid crystal could be a potential metamaterial with interesting properties. In this work, the artificial magnetism induced in a mixture of semiconductor nanoparticles surrounded by a liquid crystal is analyzed. Effective magnetic permeability of mixtures has been obtained using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory. Furthermore, permeability variations with nanoparticles size and their concentration in the liquid crystal, as well as the magnetic anisotropy, have been studied.

  5. Multimodal doxorubicin loaded magnetic nanoparticles for VEGF targeted theranostics of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkina, Alevtina S; Abakumov, Maxim A; Skorikov, Alexander S; Abakumova, Tatiana O; Melnikov, Pavel A; Grinenko, Nadejda F; Cherepanov, Sergey A; Vishnevskiy, Daniil A; Naumenko, Victor A; Ionova, Klavdiya P; Majouga, Alexander G; Chekhonin, Vladimir P

    2018-05-03

    In presented paper we have developed new system for cancer theranostics based on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) targeted magnetic nanoparticles. Conjugation of anti-VEGF antibodies with bovine serum albumin coated PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles allows for improved binding with murine breast adenocarcinoma 4T1 cell line and facilitates doxorubicin delivery to tumor cells. It was shown that intravenous injection of doxorubicin loaded VEGF targeted nanoparticles increases median survival rate of mice bearing 4T1 tumors up to 50%. On the other hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 4T1 tumors 24 h after intravenous injection showed accumulation of nanoparticles in tumors, thus allowing simultaneous cancer therapy and diagnostics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles with 3-aminopropyl silane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campelj, Stanislav; Makovec, Darko; Drofenik, Miha

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APS). The influence of the different experimental parameters (temperature, pH, and reactant concentration) on the efficiency of the APS bonding directly to the maghemite nanoparticles or after their coating with a thin layer of silica was systematically studied. The functionalization was followed with measurements of the ζ-potential and direct measurements of the surface APS concentration on the nanoparticles. The surface concentration of the APS was much higher in the case when the APS was bonded to the silica-coated nanoparticles compared to bonding directly to the surfaces of the iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  7. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein with deep eutectic solvent immobilized magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Ding, Xueqin; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    As a new type of green solvent, four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized, and then a core-shell structure magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4-NH2@GO) nanoparticles have been prepared and coated with the ChCl-based DESs. Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of proteins. The characteristic results of vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES. The concentrations of proteins in studies were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The advantages of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES in protein extraction were compared with Fe3O4-NH2@GO and Fe3O4-NH2, and Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. The influence factors of the extraction process such as the pH value, the temperature, the extraction time, the concentration of protein and the amount of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol were evaluated. Desorption experimental result showed 98.73% of BSA could be eluted from the solid extractant with 0.1 mol/L Na2HPO4 solution contained 1 mol/L NaCl. Besides, the conformation of BSA was not changed during the elution by the investigation of circular dichromism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample demonstrated that the prepared magnetic nanoparticles did have extraction ability on proteins in bovine whole blood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Realizing high magnetic moments in fcc Fe nanoparticles through atomic structure stretch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Thornton, S C; Binns, C

    2012-01-01

    We describe the realization of a high moment state in fcc Fe nanoparticles through a controlled change in their atomic structure. Embedding Fe nanoparticles in a Cu 1-x Au x matrix causes their atomic structure to switch from bcc to fcc. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements show that the structure in both the matrix and the Fe nanoparticles expands as the amount of Au in the matrix is increased, with the data indicating a tetragonal stretch in the Fe nanoparticles. The samples were prepared directly from the gas phase by co-deposition, using a gas aggregation source and MBE-type sources respectively for the nanoparticle and matrix materials. The structure change in the Fe nanoparticles is accompanied by a sharp increase in atomic magnetic moment, ultimately to values of ∼2.5 ± 0.3 μ B /atom. (paper)

  9. Ultrasonic hyperactivation of cellulase immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (Unit