WorldWideScience

Sample records for personalized medicine extending

  1. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  2. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  3. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... in "omics"; 2. Additional training for the current personnel focused on the new methodologies; 3. Incorporation in the Laboratory of new competencies in data interpretation and counselling; 4. Improving cooperation and collaboration between professionals of different disciplines to integrate information...

  4. Personalized medicine in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient’s unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention.  Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors......, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention.  Discussion and conclusion: Personalized medicine in psychiatry....... The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine....

  5. Personalized physiological medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ince, Can

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of personalized physiological medicine that is specifically directed at the needs of the critically ill patient. This differs from the conventional view of personalized medicine, characterized by biomarkers and gene profiling, instead focusing on time-variant

  6. Personalized medicine in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa S Pudakalkatti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is a branch of medicine that proposes customization of healthcare in which decisions and treatment are tailored according to individual patient needs. The field of personalized medicine relies on genetic information, proteomic information and clinical patient characteristics to individualize treatment. With advances in genetics, proteomics, pharmacogenetics and knowledgeable patient population, the opportunity exists to deliver never before levels of personalized care. Although general dentists may consider personalized medicine a concept for the future, the reality is that its direct application to everyday dentistry is closer than one might think. Use of personalized medicine in dentistry, especially in periodontology is progressing rapidly, and dentist should consider this approach while treating patients. Google and PubMed search was done to select articles for present review. Total 17 articles were used to compile information.

  7. Personalized Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Arjmand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine as a novel field of medicine refers to the prescription of specific therapeutics procedure for an individual. This approach has established based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information and data. The terms precision and personalized medicines are sometimes applied interchangeably. However, there has been a shift from “personalized medicine” towards “precision medicine”. Although personalized medicine emerged from pharmacogenetics, nowadays it covers many fields of healthcare. Accordingly, regenerative medicine and cellular therapy as the new fields of medicine use cell-based products in order to develop personalized treatments. Different sources of stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been considered in targeted therapies which could give many advantages. iPSCs as the novel and individual pluripotent stem cells have been introduced as the appropriate candidates for personalized cell therapies. Cellular therapies can provide a personalized approach. Because of person-to-person and population differences in the result of stem cell therapy, individualized cellular therapy must be adjusted according to the patient specific profile, in order to achieve best therapeutic results and outcomes. Several factors should be considered to achieve personalized stem cells therapy such as, recipient factors, donor factors, and the overall body environment in which the stem cells could be active and functional. In addition to these factors, the source of stem cells must be carefully chosen based on functional and physical criteria that lead to optimal outcomes.

  8. [Precision and personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipka, Sándor

    2016-10-01

    The author describes the concept of "personalized medicine" and the newly introduced "precision medicine". "Precision medicine" applies the terms of "phenotype", "endotype" and "biomarker" in order to characterize more precisely the various diseases. Using "biomarkers" the homogeneous type of a disease (a "phenotype") can be divided into subgroups called "endotypes" requiring different forms of treatment and financing. The good results of "precision medicine" have become especially apparent in relation with allergic and autoimmune diseases. The application of this new way of thinking is going to be necessary in Hungary, too, in the near future for participants, controllers and financing boards of healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(44), 1739-1741.

  9. Personalized physiological medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Can

    2017-12-28

    This paper introduces the concept of personalized physiological medicine that is specifically directed at the needs of the critically ill patient. This differs from the conventional view of personalized medicine, characterized by biomarkers and gene profiling, instead focusing on time-variant changes in the pathophysiology and regulation of various organ systems and their cellular and subcellular constituents. I propose that personalized physiological medicine is composed of four pillars relevant to the critically ill patient. Pillar 1 is defined by the frailty and fitness of the patient and their physiological reserve to cope with the stress of critical illness and therapy. Pillar 2 involves monitoring of the key physiological variables of the different organ systems and their response to disease and therapy. Pillar 3 concerns the evaluation of the success of resuscitation by assessment of the hemodynamic coherence between the systemic and microcirculation and parenchyma of the organ systems. Finally, pillar 4 is defined by the integration of the physiological and clinical data into a time-learning adaptive model of the patient to provide feedback about the function of organ systems and to guide and assess the response to disease and therapy. I discuss each pillar and describe the challenges to research and development that will allow the realization of personalized physiological medicine to be practiced at the bedside for critically ill patients.

  10. Personalized medicine and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josko, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    An entire series could be dedicated to the topic of ethics in personalized medicine. Due to the advancements in NGS and genetic testing, personalized medicine is no longer something that will occur in the future, the reality is upon us now. Sequencing an individual's genome can have a substantial impact on the patient's treatment and overall quality of life. However, this can open "Pandora's box" especially if an individual does not want to know the information obtained. In addition, will insurance companies require genetic testing in order to pay for a targeted treatment? If the patient refuses to have the genetic testing, will they have to pay for their treatment out of pocket? In the human interest story presented, the researcher and his team discovered over activity of the FTL3 protein through RNA sequencing which resulted in rapid proliferation of his leukemic cells. He identified a drug marketed for advanced kidney cancer which was a FTL3 inhibitor. However, his insurance company refused to pay for the drug because it was not a known treatment for his condition of ALL. He incurred numerous out of pocket expenses in order to go into remission. Was it unethical for the insurance company to not pay for a treatment that ultimately worked but was not marketed or FDA cleared for his type of leukemia? There are so many questions and concerns when personalized medicine is implemented. Only time will tell the effects next generation sequencing and its role in personalized medicine will have in the future.

  11. Personalized Medicine and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, and more than 1.5 million new cases and more than 0.5 million deaths were reported during 2010 in the United States alone. Following completion of the sequencing of the human genome, substantial progress has been made in characterizing the human epigenome, proteome, and metabolome; a better understanding of pharmacogenomics has been developed, and the potential for customizing health care for the individual has grown tremendously. Recently, personalized medicine has mainly involved the systematic use of genetic or other information about an individual patient to select or optimize that patient’s preventative and therapeutic care. Molecular profiling in healthy and cancer patient samples may allow for a greater degree of personalized medicine than is currently available. Information about a patient’s proteinaceous, genetic, and metabolic profile could be used to tailor medical care to that individual’s needs. A key attribute of this medical model is the development of companion diagnostics, whereby molecular assays that measure levels of proteins, genes, or specific mutations are used to provide a specific therapy for an individual’s condition by stratifying disease status, selecting the proper medication, and tailoring dosages to that patient’s specific needs. Additionally, such methods can be used to assess a patient’s risk factors for a number of conditions and to tailor individual preventative treatments. Recent advances, challenges, and future perspectives of personalized medicine in cancer are discussed.

  12. Balancing personalized medicine and personalized care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Brown, Candy Gunther

    2013-03-01

    The current description of personalized medicine by the National Institutes of Health is "the science of individualized prevention and therapy." Although physicians are beginning to see the promise of genetic medicine coming to fruition, the rapid pace of sequencing technology, informatics, and computer science predict a revolution in the ability to care for patients in the near future. The enthusiasm expressed by researchers is well founded, but the expectations voiced by the public do not center on advancing technology. Rather, patients are asking for personalized care: a holistic approach that considers physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. This perspective considers psychological, religious, and ethical challenges that may arise as the precision of preventive medicine improves. Psychological studies already highlight the barriers to single gene testing and suggest significant barriers to the predictive testing envisioned by personalized medicine. Certain religious groups will likely mount opposition if they believe personalized medicine encourages embryo selection. If the technology prompts cost-containment discussions, those concerned about the sanctity of life may raise ethical objections. Consequently, the availability of new scientific developments does not guarantee advances in treatment because patients may prove unwilling to receive and act on personalized genetic information. This perspective highlights current efforts to incorporate personalized medicine and personalized care into the medical curriculum, genetic counseling, and other aspects of clinical practice. Because these efforts are generally independent, the authors offer recommendations for physicians and educators so that personalized medicine can be implemented in a manner that meets patient expectations for personalized care.

  13. Metabolomics and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Nadia; Du Preez, Ilse; Loots, Du Toit

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical practice strongly relies on the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases using methods determined and averaged for the specific diseased cohort/population. Although this approach complies positively with most patients, misdiagnosis, treatment failure, relapse, and adverse drug effects are common occurrences in many individuals, which subsequently hamper the control and eradication of a number of diseases. These incidences can be explained by individual variation in the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of a patient. Various "omics" approaches have investigated the influence of these factors on a molecular level, with the intention of developing personalized approaches to disease diagnosis and treatment. Metabolomics, the newest addition to the "omics" domain and the closest to the observed phenotype, reflects changes occurring at all molecular levels, as well as influences resulting from other internal and external factors. By comparing the metabolite profiles of two or more disease phenotypes, metabolomics can be applied to identify biomarkers related to the perturbation being investigated. These biomarkers can, in turn, be used to develop personalized prognostic, diagnostic, and treatment approaches, and can also be applied to the monitoring of disease progression, treatment efficacy, predisposition to drug-related side effects, and potential relapse. In this review, we discuss the contributions that metabolomics has made, and can potentially still make, towards the field of personalized medicine. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Wearable personalized medicinal platform

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-11-16

    An apparatus for personal health maintenance has a sensor attached at least indirectly to a carrier member in turn attachable to a user or subject and configured for measurement of at least one physiological parameter of the user. A reservoir contains a preselected composition. An electronic processor is operatively connected to the sensor for receiving a signal therefrom encoding a measurement of the physiological parameter, the processor being configured for determining a divergence of the physiological parameter from a predetermined magnitude, the processor being operatively connected to a dispensing mechanism for ejecting, from the reservoir, an amount of the composition to be administered to the user to reduce divergence of the physiological parameter from the predetermined magnitude. The dispensing mechanism includes an expandable polymer composite layer with gas-filled micro-bubbles or microspheres expandable by operation of a heating element.

  15. [Personalized medicine in transplantation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Kaname

    2013-05-01

    Personalized medicine based on pharmacogenomics is being developed at the clinical stage. Various evidence is accumulating in transplantation therapy. Tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, is usually used for immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation. Tacrolimus is mainly metabolized by cytochrome P450 isozymes, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, expressed in the intestine as well as in the liver. Recent studies of pharmacogenomics have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CYP3A5 are correlated with gene expression and enzyme activity. Phenotypes of CYP3A5 are typed as expressors (*1/*1 and *1/*3) or non-expressors (*3/*3) . In living-donor liver transplantation, CYP3A5 phenotypes could predict the blood concentration of tacrolimus. In particular, preoperative assessment of CYP3A5 genotypes in both recipients (intestine) and donors (graft liver) is required for predicting tacrolimus pharmacokinetics. In kidney transplantation, blood tacrolimus concentrations were significantly different between expressors and non-expressors. Genotyping and phenotyping of recipients were useful to predict blood tacrolimus levels in early phase of post-transplantation. Furthermore, phenotypes of CYP3A5 could predict the initial dose of tacrolimus. Combination therapy was performed after bone marrow transplantation to prevent complications. Genotyping and phenotyping of metabolic enzymes for combination dugs would be useful for predicting drug actions. In conclusion, phenotyping based on pharmacogenomics supports personalized medicine in transplantation therapy. In future, multiplex testing should be developed to support personalized medicine in various fields.

  16. Personalized Medicine: Matching Treatments to Your Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe December 2013 Print this issue Personalized Medicine Matching Treatments to Your Genes Send us your ... for disease, and the ways you respond to medicines are also unique. Medicines that work well for ...

  17. FROM PERSONALIZED TO PRECISION MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Raskina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to maintain a high quality of life against a backdrop of its inevitably increasing duration is one of the main problems of modern health care. The concept of "right drug to the right patient at the right time", which at first was bearing the name "personalized", is currently unanimously approved by international scientific community as "precision medicine". Precision medicine takes all the individual characteristics into account: genes diversity, environment, lifestyles, and even bacterial microflora and also involves the use of the latest technological developments, which serves to ensure that each patient gets assistance fitting his state best. In the United States, Canada and France national precision medicine programs have already been submitted and implemented. The aim of this review is to describe the dynamic integration of precision medicine methods into routine medical practice and life of modern society. The new paradigm prospects description are complemented by figures, proving the already achieved success in the application of precise methods for example, the targeted therapy of cancer. All in all, the presence of real-life examples, proving the regularity of transition to a new paradigm, and a wide range  of technical and diagnostic capabilities available and constantly evolving make the all-round transition to precision medicine almost inevitable.

  18. Personalized medicine: new genomics, old lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Offit, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine uses traditional, as well as emerging concepts of the genetic and environmental basis of disease to individualize prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Personalized genomics plays a vital, but not exclusive role in this evolving model of personalized medicine. The distinctions between genetic and genomic medicine are more quantitative than qualitative. Personalized genomics builds on principles established by the integration of genetics into medical practice. Principles s...

  19. Crowdfunding for Personalized Medicine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Danielle C; Gouw, Arvin M

    2015-12-01

    Given the current funding situation of the National Institutes of Health, getting funding for rare disease research is extremely difficult. In light of the enormous potential for research in the rare diseases and the scarcity of research funding, we provide a case study of a novel successful crowdfunding approach at a non-profit organization called Rare Genomics Institute. We partner with biotechnology companies willing to donate their products, such as mouse models, gene editing software, and sequencing services, for which researchers can apply. First, we find that personal stories can be powerful tools to seek funding from sympathetic donors who do not have the same rational considerations of impact and profit. Second, for foundations facing funding restrictions, company donations can be a valuable tool in addition to crowdfunding. Third, rare disease research is particularly rewarding for scientists as they proceed to be pioneers in the field during their academic careers. Overall, by connecting donors, foundations, researchers, and patients, crowdfunding has become a powerful alternative funding mechanism for personalized medicine.

  20. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  1. Pharmacogenomics and Nanotechnology Toward Advancing Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.; Amanatiadou, Elsa P.

    The target of personalized medicine to achieve major benefits for all patients in terms of diagnosis and drug delivery can be facilitated by creating a sincere multidisciplinary information-based infrastructure in health care. To this end, nanotechnology, pharmacogenomics, and informatics can advance the utility of personalized medicine, enable clinical translation of genomic knowledge, empower healthcare environment, and finally improve clinical outcomes.

  2. Synthetic Biology and Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology, application of synthetic chemistry to biology, is a broad term that covers the engineering of biological systems with structures and functions not found in nature to process information, manipulate chemicals, produce energy, maintain cell environment and enhance human health. Synthetic biology devices contribute not only to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms, but also provide novel diagnostic tools. Methods based on synthetic biology enable the design of novel strategies for the treatment of cancer, immune diseases metabolic disorders and infectious diseases as well as the production of cheap drugs. The potential of synthetic genome, using an expanded genetic code that is designed for specific drug synthesis as well as delivery and activation of the drug in vivo by a pathological signal, was already pointed out during a lecture delivered at Kuwait University in 2005. Of two approaches to synthetic biology, top-down and bottom-up, the latter is more relevant to the development of personalized medicines as it provides more flexibility in constructing a partially synthetic cell from basic building blocks for a desired task. PMID:22907209

  3. Personalized medicine: a confluence of traditional and contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Samineh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Saeidnia, Soodabeh

    2014-01-01

    Traditional systems of medicine have attained great popularity among patients in recent years. Success of this system in the treatment of disease warrants consideration, particularly in cases for which conventional medicine has been insufficient. This study investigates the similarities in principles and approaches of 3 traditional systems and explores whether conventional medicine is able to exploit the advantages of traditional systems. This study first identifies and explores the advantages of 3 well-known systems-traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), ayurveda, and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)-that are similar in their basic principles and methods. Second, it clarifies whether and how conventional medicine could exploit the advantages of traditional systems as it modernizes, to become more personalized. Finally, this study investigates the possibility that conventional medicine could benefit from traditional typology to improve its personalization. The acknowledgment of the unity of humans and nature, applying rational methods, and personalized approaches is fundamentally similar in the 3 systems. Additionally, they all promote the holistic view that health is harmony and disease is disharmony of the body. Other similarities include their recognition of the unique nature of every person and their categorization of people into different body types. Although conventional medicine has mostly failed to incorporate the advantages of traditional medicine, its integration with traditional medicine is achievable. For instance, exploiting traditional typologies in genomic and other studies may facilitate personalization of conventional medicine. From its review, the research team concludes that prospects are bright for the integration of traditional and conventional medicines and, consequently, for a dramatic improvement in health systems.

  4. Fundamentals of Pharmacogenetics in Personalized, Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Roland; Yin, DeLu Tyler

    2016-09-01

    This article introduces fundamental principles of pharmacogenetics as applied to personalized and precision medicine. Pharmacogenetics establishes relationships between pharmacology and genetics by connecting phenotypes and genotypes in predicting the response of therapeutics in individual patients. We describe differences between precision and personalized medicine and relate principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to applications in laboratory medicine. We also review basic principles of pharmacogenetics, including its evolution, how it enables the practice of personalized therapeutics, and the role of the clinical laboratory. These fundamentals are a segue for understanding specific clinical applications of pharmacogenetics described in subsequent articles in this issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Personalized medicine for individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2011-01-01

    As the cost of whole genome analysis decreases, we have the opportunity to explore the interactions of various gene changes in an individual that lead to their particular phenotype. This will provide the ability to move from the epidemiologic study of groups, in which, the individuals are treated collectively and homogenously, to personalized medicine, and a model in which the individual is recognized and treated as a distinct entity. We will be applying personalized medicine to individuals with Down syndrome in order to understand and develop biomarkers for increased risk of co-morbidities. Personalized medicine will change the "culture of intractability" of Down syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Conference Scene: Personalized Medicine comes to Harvard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Tarryn

    2012-01-01

    The Seventh Annual Harvard Personalized Medicine Conference was held at The Joseph B Martin Conference Center at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA on the 9-10 November 2011. The 2-day conference program was designed to highlight the impact that personalized medicine is currently making clinically as it enters the healthcare delivery system. Going forward, policies, plans and actions of stakeholders including those from government, academia and the private sector need to be informed and guided by recent experience - all of which the conference program set out to explore. The conference attracted over 600 national and international thought leaders all involved in personalized healthcare.

  7. [Personalized medicine, privatized medicine? legal and public health stakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Personalized medicine is booming. It tends to provide a medical management "tailored" for groups of patients, or for one unique patient, but also to identify risk groups to develop public health strategies. In this context, some radicalization phenomenon can emerge, leading to not only personalized medicine but also privatized medicine, which can lead to a capture of the medical public resource. If the "privatization" of medicine is not limited to producing adverse effects, several potentially destabilizing phenomena for patients still remain. First, some objective factors, like the adjustment of scientific prerequisites, are emerging from personalized medicine practices (clinical trial, public health policy) and are interfering with the medical doctor/patient relationship. Another risk emerges for patients concomitantly to their demand for controlling their own health, in terms of patients' security although these risks are not clearly identified and not effectively communicated. These practices, related to a privatized medicine, develop within the healthcare system but also outside, and the government and legislators will have to take into account these new dimensions in drafting their future regulations and policies. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  8. Human cytochrome P450 and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Wei, Dongqing

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine has become a hot topic ascribed to the development of Human Genome Project. And currently, bioinformatics methodology plays an essential role in personal drug design. Here in this review we mainly focused on the basic introduction of the SNPs of human drug metabolic enzymes and their relationships with personalized medicine. Some common bioinformatics analysis methods and latest progresses and applications in personal drug design have also been discussed. Thus bioinformatics studies on SNPs of human CYP450 genes will contribute to indicate the most possible genes that are associated with human diseases and relevant therapeutic targets, identify and predict the drug efficacy and adverse drug response, investigate individual gene specific properties and then provide personalized and optimal clinic therapies.

  9. [PERSONALIZED MEDICINE AND EBM: ETHICAL ASPECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radermecker, R P

    2015-01-01

    More patients are actually treated due to the incredible improvements of medical care, especially in the field of pharmacotherapy. Medical guidelines are based on the results of controlled trials. This kind of medicine, also called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), is actually the cornerstone of good clinical practice. Nevertheless, it remains a lot of patients disappointed by the fact that they have no medical gain of their treatment. The reason is that each patient has his/her own metabolic characteristics. Better is, the characterization of such patients, better will be the treatment targeting them. It is what is called the personalized medicine. To reach this challenge, pharmacogenetic advances would be helpful. From an antagonism between EBM and personalized medicine, this new medical paradigm has to consider these approaches as partners. To reach this goal, medical doctors, legal authorities and pharmaceutical companies have to be responsible in front of these new ethical challenges.

  10. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice.

  11. Personalized medicine: reality and reality checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, J Steven; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2009-05-01

    The evolving era of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine is greeted with optimism by many, but this sentiment is not universally shared. The existence of diametrically opposed opinions concerning the potential benefits and obstacles facing the widespread implementation of genomic medicine should stimulate discussion and guide the design of studies to establish the value of interventions targeted at the level of individual patients. One of the more controversial aspects of personalized medicine is whether the anticipated benefits will be realized at an acceptable cost. Recently released analyses suggest that the returns on investment depend on the particular scenario and are different for different stakeholders. On the other hand, cost is only one of the challenges regarding implementation of personalized medicine. Among these are the development of universal standards for managing genomic information in electronic medical records, improvement in the collection and interpretation of clinical phenotype data, and new strategies to educate practitioners and patients/consumers. The reality is that personalized medicine is upon us; open discourse and periodic reality checks will be necessary as we confront it.

  12. Personalized Medicine and Infectious Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Slade O; van Hal, Sebastiaan J

    2017-11-01

    A recent study identified pathogen factors associated with an increased mortality risk in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, using predictive modelling and a combination of genotypic, phenotypic, and clinical data. This study conceptually validates the benefit of personalized medicine and highlights the potential use of whole genome sequencing in infectious disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hresko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related and pharmacogenetic (PGx tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  14. 'Personalized medicine': what's in a name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorska-Bocci, Anna; Stewart, Alison; Sagoo, Gurdeep S; Hall, Alison; Kroese, Mark; Burton, Hilary

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade genomics and other molecular biosciences have enabled new capabilities that, according to many, have the potential to revolutionize medicine and healthcare. These developments have been associated with a range of terminologies, including 'precision', 'personalized', 'individualized' and 'stratified' medicine. In this article, based on a literature review, we examine how the terms have arisen and their various meanings and definitions. We discuss the impact of the new technologies on disease classification, prevention and management. We suggest that although genomics and molecular biosciences will undoubtedly greatly enhance the power of medicine, they will not lead to a conceptually new paradigm of medical care. What is new is the portfolio of modern tools that medicine and healthcare can use for better targeted approaches to health and disease management, and the sociopolitical contexts within which these tools are applied.

  15. Blood transcriptomics and metabolomics for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuzhao; Todor, Andrei; Luo, Ruiyan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of blood samples is pivotal to clinical diagnosis and has been intensively investigated since the rise of systems biology. Recent developments have opened new opportunities to utilize transcriptomics and metabolomics for personalized and precision medicine. Efforts from human immunology have infused into this area exquisite characterizations of subpopulations of blood cells. It is now possible to infer from blood transcriptomics, with fine accuracy, the contribution of immune activation and of cell subpopulations. In parallel, high-resolution mass spectrometry has brought revolutionary analytical capability, detecting > 10,000 metabolites, together with environmental exposure, dietary intake, microbial activity, and pharmaceutical drugs. Thus, the re-examination of blood chemicals by metabolomics is in order. Transcriptomics and metabolomics can be integrated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human biological states. We will review these new data and methods and discuss how they can contribute to personalized medicine.

  16. Personalized medicine and human genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-07-24

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. From genomic variation to personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesolowska, Agata; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    Genomic variation is the basis of interindividual differences in observable traits and disease susceptibility. Genetic studies are the driving force of personalized medicine, as many of the differences in treatment efficacy can be attributed to our genomic background. The rapid development...... a considerable amount of the phenotype variability, hence the major difficulty of interpretation lies in the complexity of molecular interactions. This PhD thesis describes the state-of-art of the functional human variation research (Chapter 1) and introduces childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL...... the thesis and includes some final remarks on the perspectives of genomic variation research and personalized medicine. In summary, this thesis demonstrates the feasibility of integrative analyses of genomic variations and introduces large-scale hypothesis-driven SNP exploration studies as an emerging...

  18. [Circulating tumor cells: cornerstone of personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, A; Vidal, F; Rathat, G; Alix-Panabières, C

    2014-11-01

    Cancer treatment has evolved toward personalized medicine. It is mandatory for clinicians to ascertain tumor biological features in order to optimize patients' treatment. Identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells demonstrated a prognostic value in many solid tumors. Here, we describe the main technologies for identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells and their clinical application in gynecologic and breast cancers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual Biomarkers Using Molecular Personalized Medicine Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Hans P

    2017-01-01

    Molecular personalized medicine tries to generate individual predictive biomarkers to assist doctors in their decision making. These are thought to improve the efficacy and lower the toxicity of a treatment. The molecular basis of the desired high-precision prediction is modern "omex" technologies providing high-throughput bioanalytical methods. These include genomics and epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, microbiomics, imaging, and functional analyses. In most cases, producing big data also requires a complex biomathematical analysis. Using molecular personalized medicine, the conventional physician's check of biomarker results may no longer be sufficient. By contrast, the physician may need to cooperate with the biomathematician to achieve the desired prediction on the basis of the analysis of individual big data typically produced by omex technologies. Identification of individual biomarkers using molecular personalized medicine approaches is thought to allow a decision-making for the precise use of a targeted therapy, selecting the successful therapeutic tool from a panel of preexisting drugs or medical products. This should avoid the treatment of nonresponders and responders that produces intolerable unwanted effects. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Personality profile and coping resources of family medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personality profile and coping resources of family medicine vocational trainees at ... (81.8%) indicated that they mainly experienced work-related stress. ... Keywords: personality; coping resources; family medicine; stress; vocational trainees ...

  2. Personalized RNA Medicine for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Maud-Emmanuelle; Hao, Liangliang; Huang, Ling; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P; Pulver, Emilia; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Muthuswamy, Senthil K; Hidalgo, Manuel; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Slack, Frank J

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: Since drug responses vary between patients, it is crucial to develop pre-clinical or co-clinical strategies that forecast patient response. In this study, we tested whether RNA-based therapeutics were suitable for personalized medicine by using patient-derived-organoid (PDO) and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) models. Experimental Design: We performed microRNA (miRNA) profiling of PDX samples to determine the status of miRNA deregulation in individual pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. To deliver personalized RNA-based-therapy targeting oncogenic miRNAs that form part of this common PDAC miRNA over-expression signature, we packaged antimiR oligonucleotides against one of these miRNAs in tumor-penetrating nanocomplexes (TPN) targeting cell surface proteins on PDAC tumors. Results: As a validation for our pre-clinical strategy, the therapeutic potential of one of our nano-drugs, TPN-21, was first shown to decrease tumor cell growth and survival in PDO avatars for individual patients, then in their PDX avatars. Conclusions: This general approach appears suitable for co-clinical validation of personalized RNA medicine and paves the way to prospectively identify patients with eligible miRNA profiles for personalized RNA-based therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 24(7); 1734-47. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Liposome imaging agents in personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Hansen, Anders Elias; Gabizon, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the importance of molecular and diagnostic imaging has increased dramatically in the treatment planning of many diseases and in particular in cancer therapy. Within nanomedicine there are particularly interesting possibilities for combining imaging and therapy. Engineered liposomes...... that selectively localize in tumor tissue can transport both drugs and imaging agents, which allows for a theranostic approach with great potential in personalized medicine. Radiolabeling of liposomes have for many years been used in preclinical studies for evaluating liposome in vivo performance and has been...... start to consider how to use imaging for patient selection and treatment monitoring in connection to nanocarrier based medicines. Nanocarrier imaging agents could furthermore have interesting properties for disease diagnostics and staging. Here, we review the major advances in the development...

  4. Personalized Medicine: Pharmacogenomics and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Mirsadeghi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine aims is to supply the proper drug to the proper patient within the right dose. Pharmacogenomics (PGx is to recognize genetic variants that may influence drug efficacy and toxicity. All things considered, the fields cover a wide area, including basic drug discovery researches, the genetic origin of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel drug improvement, patient genetic assessment and clinical patient administration. At last, the objective of Pharmacogenomics is to anticipate a patient’s genetic response to a particular drug as a way of presenting the best possible medical treatment. By predicting the drug response of an individual, it will be possible to increase the success of therapies and decrease the incidence of adverse side effect.

  5. Pharmacomicrobiomics: a novel route towards personalized medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doestzada, Marwah; Vila, Arnau Vich; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Koonen, Debby P Y; Weersma, Rinse K; Touw, Daan J; Kuipers, Folkert; Wijmenga, Cisca; Fu, Jingyuan

    2018-05-01

    Inter-individual heterogeneity in drug response is a serious problem that affects the patient's wellbeing and poses enormous clinical and financial burdens on a societal level. Pharmacogenomics has been at the forefront of research into the impact of individual genetic background on drug response variability or drug toxicity, and recently the gut microbiome, which has also been called the second genome, has been recognized as an important player in this respect. Moreover, the microbiome is a very attractive target for improving drug efficacy and safety due to the opportunities to manipulate its composition. Pharmacomicrobiomics is an emerging field that investigates the interplay of microbiome variation and drugs response and disposition (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion). In this review, we provide a historical overview and examine current state-of-the-art knowledge on the complex interactions between gut microbiome, host and drugs. We argue that combining pharmacogenomics and pharmacomicrobiomics will provide an important foundation for making major advances in personalized medicine.

  6. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Personalized medicine and access to genetic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Exter, André

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine started after the Human Genome Project and is a relatively new concept that will dramatically change clinical practice. It offers clear clinical advantages by applying genetic diagnostic tests and then treating the patient with targeted medicines based on his or her genetic make-up. Its potential seems promising but there are quite a few legal concerns. One of these questions deals with the right to health care and access to genetic technologies. In this paper, the author explains the meaning of such a right to health care under international human rights law, its relevance for making genetic services eligible for public funding, how to cope with quality concerns of commercial testing, and finally, the patentability controversy and clinical access to genetic information. Apart from more traditional human rights concerns (consent, privacy, confidentiality) and genetics, States should be aware of the meaning of the equal access concept under international law and its consequences when introducing new technologies such genetic testing and services.

  8. From art to science: a new epistemological status for medicine? On expectations regarding personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesing, Urban

    2017-12-20

    Personalized medicine plays an important role in the development of current medicine. Among the numerous statements regarding the future of personalized medicine, some can be found that accord medicine a new scientific status. Medicine will be transformed from an art to a science due to personalized medicine. This prognosis is supported by references to models of historical developments. The article examines what is meant by this prognosis, what consequences it entails, and how feasible it is. It refers to the long tradition of epistemological thinking in medicine and the use of historical models for the development of medicine. The possible answers to the question "art or science" are systematized with respect to the core question about the relationship between knowledge and action. The prediction for medicine to develop from an 'empirical healing art' to a 'rational, molecular science' is nonsensical from an epistemological point of view. The historical models employed to substantiate the development of personalized medicine are questionable.

  9. Personalized medicine in Alzheimer's disease and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souslova, Tatiana; Marple, Teresa C; Spiekerman, A Michael; Mohammad, Amin A

    2013-11-01

    Latest research in the mental health field brings new hope to patients and promises to revolutionize the field of psychiatry. Personalized pharmacogenetic tests that aid in diagnosis and treatment choice are now becoming available for clinical practice. Amyloid beta peptide biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease are now available. For the first time, radiologists are able to visualize amyloid plaques specific to Alzheimer's disease in live patients using Positron Emission Tomography-based tests approved by the FDA. A novel blood-based assay has been developed to aid in the diagnosis of depression based on activation of the HPA axis, metabolic, inflammatory and neurochemical pathways. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors have shown increased remission rates in specific ethnic subgroups and Cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms can predict antidepressant tolerability. The latest research will help to eradicate "trial and error" prescription, ushering in the most personalized medicine to date. Like all major medical breakthroughs, integration of new algorithms and technologies requires sound science and time. But for many mentally ill patients, diagnosis and effective therapy cannot happen fast enough. This review will describe the newest diagnostic tests, treatments and clinical studies for the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and unipolar, major depressive disorder. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Commitment of mathematicians in medicine: a personal experience, and generalisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2011-12-01

    I will present here a personal point of view on the commitment of mathematicians in medicine. Starting from my personal experience, I will suggest generalisations including favourable signs and caveats to show how mathematicians can be welcome and helpful in medicine, both in a theoretical and in a practical way.

  11. Genome technologies and personalized dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, G; Chen, A; Vess, T; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-04-01

    The addition of genomic information to our understanding of oral disease is driving important changes in oral health care. It is anticipated that genome-derived information will promote a deeper understanding of disease etiology and permit earlier diagnosis, allowing for preventative measures prior to disease onset rather than treatment that attempts to repair the diseased state. Advances in genome technologies have fueled expectations for this proactive healthcare approach. Application of genomic testing is expanding and has already begun to find its way into the practice of clinical dentistry. To take full advantage of the information and technologies currently available, it is vital that dental care providers, consumers, and policymakers be aware of genomic approaches to understanding of oral diseases and the application of genomic testing to disease diagnosis and treatment. Ethical, legal, clinical, and educational initiatives are also required to responsibly incorporate genomic information into the practice of dentistry. This article provides an overview of the application of genomic technologies to oral health care and introduces issues that require consideration if we are to realize the full potential of genomics to enable the practice of personalized dental medicine. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Stroke genetics: prospects for personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hugh S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidemiologic evidence supports a genetic predisposition to stroke. Recent advances, primarily using the genome-wide association study approach, are transforming what we know about the genetics of multifactorial stroke, and are identifying novel stroke genes. The current findings are consistent with different stroke subtypes having different genetic architecture. These discoveries may identify novel pathways involved in stroke pathogenesis, and suggest new treatment approaches. However, the already identified genetic variants explain only a small proportion of overall stroke risk, and therefore are not currently useful in predicting risk for the individual patient. Such risk prediction may become a reality as identification of a greater number of stroke risk variants that explain the majority of genetic risk proceeds, and perhaps when information on rare variants, identified by whole-genome sequencing, is also incorporated into risk algorithms. Pharmacogenomics may offer the potential for earlier implementation of 'personalized genetic' medicine. Genetic variants affecting clopidogrel and warfarin metabolism may identify non-responders and reduce side-effects, but these approaches have not yet been widely adopted in clinical practice.

  13. Personalized medicine: CCO's vision, accomplishments and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jennifer; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Rutherford, Michael; Hart, Jennifer; Melamed, Saul; Pollett, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a rapidly expanding field, with the potential to improve patient care. Its benefits include increasing efficiency in cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment through early detection, targeted therapy and identifying individuals with an underlying genetic risk for cancer or adverse outcomes. Through the work of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO)'s Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Program, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to support developments in personalized medicine. In keeping with the momentum of recent accomplishments, CCO has led the formation of the Personalized Medicine Steering Committee to develop a comprehensive provincial genetics strategy for the future of cancer care. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  14. Extending a Hybrid Tag-Based Recommender System with Personalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    extension for a hybrid tag-based recommender system, which suggests similar Web pages based on the similarity of their tags. The semantic extension aims at discovering tag relations which are not considered in basic syntax similarity. With the goal of generating more semantically grounded recommendations......, the proposal extends a hybrid tag-based recommender system with a semantic factor, which looks for tag relations in different semantic sources. In order to evaluate the benefits acquired with the semantic extension, we have compared the new findings with results from a previous experiment involving 38 people......Tagging activity has been recently identified as a potential source of knowledge about personal interests, preferences, goals, and other attributes known from user models. Tags themselves can be therefore used for finding personalized recommendations of items. This paper proposes a semantic...

  15. Ethical Issues Surrounding Personalized Medicine: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooneh Salari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade ago, personalized medicine was presented in modern medicine. Personalized medicine means that the right drug should be prescribed for the right patient based on genetic data. No doubt is developing medical sciences, and its shift into personalized medicine complicates ethical challenges more than before. In this review, we categorized all probable ethical considerations of personalized medicine in research and development and service provision. Based on our review, extensive changes in healthcare system including ethical changes are needed to overcome the ethical obstacles including knowledge gap and informed consent, privacy and confidentiality and availability of healthcare services. Furthermore social benefit versus science development and individual benefit should be balanced. Therefore guidelines and regulations should be compiled to represent the ethical framework; also ethical decision making should be day-to-day and individualized.

  16. Ethical Issues Surrounding Personalized Medicine: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Pooneh; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-03-01

    More than a decade ago, personalized medicine was presented in modern medicine. Personalized medicine means that the right drug should be prescribed for the right patient based on genetic data. No doubt is developing medical sciences, and its shift into personalized medicine complicates ethical challenges more than before. In this review, we categorized all probable ethical considerations of personalized medicine in research and development and service provision. Based on our review, extensive changes in healthcare system including ethical changes are needed to overcome the ethical obstacles including knowledge gap and informed consent, privacy and confidentiality and availability of healthcare services. Furthermore social benefit versus science development and individual benefit should be balanced. Therefore guidelines and regulations should be compiled to represent the ethical framework; also ethical decision making should be day-to-day and individualized.

  17. Personalized Lifestyle Medicine: Relevance for Nutrition and Lifestyle Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M. Minich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Public health recommendations for lifestyle modification, including diet and physical activity, have been widely disseminated for the prevention and treatment of disease. These guidelines are intended for the overall population without significant consideration for the individual with respect to one’s genes and environment. Personalized lifestyle medicine is a newly developed term that refers to an approach to medicine in which an individual’s health metrics from point-of-care diagnostics are used to develop lifestyle medicine-oriented therapeutic strategies for improving individual health outcomes in managing chronic disease. Examples of the application of personalized lifestyle medicine to patient care include the identification of genetic variants through laboratory tests and/or functional biomarkers for the purpose of designing patient-specific prescriptions for diet, exercise, stress, and environment. Personalized lifestyle medicine can provide solutions to chronic health problems by harnessing innovative and evolving technologies based on recent discoveries in genomics, epigenetics, systems biology, life and behavioral sciences, and diagnostics and clinical medicine. A comprehensive, personalized approach to medicine is required to promote the safety of therapeutics and reduce the cost of chronic disease. Personalized lifestyle medicine may provide a novel means of addressing a patient’s health by empowering them with information they need to regain control of their health.

  18. Critical Care and Personalized or Precision Medicine: Who needs whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeir, Shihab; Naylor, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    The current paradigm of modern healthcare is a reactive response to patient symptoms, subsequent diagnosis and corresponding treatment of the specific disease(s). This approach is predicated on methodologies first espoused by the Cnidean School of Medicine approximately 2500years ago. More recently escalating healthcare costs and relatively poor disease treatment outcomes have fermented a rethink in how we carry out medical practices. This has led to the emergence of "P-Medicine" in the form of Personalized and Precision Medicine. The terms are used interchangeably, but in fact there are significant differences in the way they are implemented. The former relies on an "N-of-1" model whereas the latter uses a "1-in-N" model. Personalized Medicine is still in a fledgling and evolutionary phase and there has been much debate over its current status and future prospects. A confounding factor has been the sudden development of Precision Medicine, which has currently captured the imagination of policymakers responsible for modern healthcare systems. There is some confusion over the terms Personalized versus Precision Medicine. Here we attempt to define the key differences and working definitions of each P-Medicine approach, as well as a taxonomic relationship tree. Finally, we discuss the impact of Personalized and Precision Medicine on the practice of Critical Care Medicine (CCM). Practitioners of CCM have been participating in Personalized Medicine unknowingly as it takes the protocols of sepsis, mechanical ventilation, and daily awakening trials and applies it to each individual patient. However, the immediate next step for CCM should be an active development of Precision Medicine. This developmental process should break down the silos of modern medicine and create a multidisciplinary approach between clinicians and basic/translational scientists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrera, Percivil Melendez; Olver, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and

  20. Molecular medicine: a path towards a personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Debora Marques de; Mamede, Marcelo; Souza, Bruno Rezende de; Almeida Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de; Magno, Luiz Alexandre; Alvim-Soares, Antônio; Rosa, Daniela Valadão; Castro, Célio José de; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro; Gomez, Marcus Vinícius; Marco, Luiz Armando De; Correa, Humberto; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2012-03-01

    Psychiatric disorders are among the most common human illnesses; still, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying their complex pathophysiology remain to be fully elucidated. Over the past 10 years, our group has been investigating the molecular abnormalities in major signaling pathways involved in psychiatric disorders. Recent evidences obtained by the Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Medicina Molecular (National Institute of Science and Technology - Molecular Medicine, INCT-MM) and others using behavioral analysis of animal models provided valuable insights into the underlying molecular alterations responsible for many complex neuropsychiatric disorders, suggesting that "defects" in critical intracellular signaling pathways have an important role in regulating neurodevelopment, as well as in pathophysiology and treatment efficacy. Resources from the INCT have allowed us to start doing research in the field of molecular imaging. Molecular imaging is a research discipline that visualizes, characterizes, and quantifies the biologic processes taking place at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems through the results of image within the reality of the physiological environment. In order to recognize targets, molecular imaging applies specific instruments (e.g., PET) that enable visualization and quantification in space and in real-time of signals from molecular imaging agents. The objective of molecular medicine is to individualize treatment and improve patient care. Thus, molecular imaging is an additional tool to achieve our ultimate goal.

  1. The Human Dimension: Putting the Person into Personalised Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Technological advances enabling us to personalise medical interventions at the biological level must be matched by parallel advances in how we support the informed choices essential to patient and public participation. We cannot take participation for granted. To be truly personalised, medicine must take account of the perceptions and capabilities that shape participation. To do this, we need a better understanding of how people perceive personalised medicine and how they judge its value and risks. To realise the promise of 4P medicine we need to personalise at the psychosocial as well as biological dimension, putting the person into personalised medicine.

  2. Cynophobic fear adaptively extends peri-personal space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine eTaffou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peri-personal space (PPS is defined as the space immediately surrounding our bodies, which is critical in the adaptation of our social behavior. As a space of interaction with the external world, PPS is involved in the control of motor action as well as in the protection of the body. The boundaries of this PPS are known to be flexible but so far, little is known about how PPS boundaries are influenced by unreasonable fear. We hypothesized that unreasonable fear extends the neural representation of the multisensory space immediately surrounding the body in the presence of a feared object, with the aim of expanding the space of protection around the body. To test this hypothesis, we explored the impact of unreasonable fear on the size of PPS in two groups of non-clinical participants: dog-fearful and non-fearful participants. The sensitivity to cynophobia was assessed with a questionnaire. We measured participants’ PPS extent in the presence of threatening (dog growling and non-threatening (sheep bleating auditory stimuli. The sound stimuli were processed through binaural rendering so that the virtual sound sources were looming towards participants from their rear hemi-field. We found that, when in the presence of the auditory dog stimulus, the PPS of dog-fearful participants is larger than that of non-fearful participants. Our results demonstrate that PPS size is adaptively modulated by cynophobia and suggest that anxiety tailors PPS boundaries when exposed to fear-relevant features. Anxiety, with the exception of social phobia, has rarely been studied as a disorder of social interaction. These findings could help develop new treatment strategies for anxious disorders, by involving the link between space and interpersonal interaction in the approach of the disorder.

  3. Personomics: The Missing Link in the Evolution from Precision Medicine to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy C. Ziegelstein

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical practice guidelines have been developed for many common conditions based on data from randomized controlled trials. When medicine is informed solely by clinical practice guidelines, however, the patient is not treated as an individual, but rather a member of a group. Precision medicine, as defined herein, characterizes unique biological characteristics of the individual or of specimens obtained from an individual to tailor diagnostics and therapeutics to a specific patient. These unique biological characteristics are defined by the tools of precision medicine: genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, epigenomics, pharmacogenomics, and other “-omics.” Personalized medicine, as defined herein, uses additional information about the individual derived from knowing the patient as a person. These unique personal characteristics are defined by tools known as personomics which takes into account an individual’s personality, preferences, values, goals, health beliefs, social support network, financial resources, and unique life circumstances that affect how and when a given health condition will manifest in that person and how that condition will respond to treatment. In this paradigm, precision medicine may be considered a necessary step in the evolution of medical care to personalized medicine, with personomics as the missing link.

  4. Interprofessional education for personalized medicine through technology-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Susanne B; Mills, Rachel; Aucoin, Julia; Taekman, Jeff

    2015-06-01

    The delivery of personalized medicine utilizing genetic and genomic technologies is anticipated to involve many medical specialties. Interprofessional education will be key to the delivery of personalized medicine in order to reduce disjointed or uncoordinated clinical care, and optimize effective communication to promote patient understanding and engagement regarding the use of or need for these services. While several health professional organizations have endorsed and/or developed core competencies for genetics and genomics, the lack of interprofessional guidelines and training may hamper the delivery of coordinated personalized medicine. In this perspective, we consider the potential for interprofessional education and training using technology-based approaches, such as virtual simulation and gaming, compared with traditional educational approaches.

  5. [The invention of personalized medicine, between technological upheavals and utopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaud, Marc; Guchet, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The idea of personalized medicine raises a series of questions. If one considers that the physician takes into account the uniqueness of his patient in the frame of the medical consultation, is the definition of medicine as "personalized" not a pleonasm? If not, why has this ambiguous denomination been adopted? In addition, is this form of medicine a novel discipline capable of revolutionizing therapeutic approaches as claimed in its accompanying discourses or is it in continuity with the molecular conception of biomedicine? Rather than attempting to directly answer these questions, we focused our attention on the organizing concepts, the technological breakthroughs and the transformations in medical practices that characterize this medicine. Following this brief analysis, it appears that the choice of a term as equivocal as personalized medicine and the emphasis on the antagonistic notions of revolution and continuity in medicine are the signs of reshuffling that is emerging between actors in the health care system, in academia and in pharmaceutical companies. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  6. The microeconomics of personalized medicine: today's challenge and tomorrow's promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jerel C; Furstenthal, Laura; Desai, Amar A; Norris, Troy; Sutaria, Saumya; Fleming, Edd; Ma, Philip

    2009-04-01

    'Personalized medicine' promises to increase the quality of clinical care and, in some cases, decrease health-care costs. Despite this, only a handful of diagnostic tests have made it to market, with mixed success. Historically, the challenges in this field were scientific. However, as discussed in this article, with the maturation of the '-omics' sciences, it now seems that the major barriers are increasingly related to economics. Overcoming the poor microeconomic alignment of incentives among key stakeholders is therefore crucial to catalysing the further development and adoption of personalized medicine, and we propose several actions that could help achieve this goal.

  7. Personalized Herbal Medicine? A Roadmap for Convergence of Herbal and Precision Medicine Biomarker Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomford, Nicholas Ekow; Dzobo, Kevin; Chimusa, Emile; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Chirikure, Shadreck; Wonkam, Ambroise; Dandara, Collet

    2018-06-01

    While drugs remain the cornerstone of medicine, herbal medicine is an important comedication worldwide. Thus, precision medicine ought to face this clinical reality and develop "companion diagnostics" for drugs as well as herbal medicines. Yet, many are in denial with respect to the extent of use of traditional/herbal medicines, overlooking that a considerable number of contemporary therapeutic drugs trace their discovery from herbal medicines. This expert review underscores that absent such appropriate attention on both classical drug therapy and herbal medicines, precision medicine biomarkers will likely not stand the full test of clinical practice while patients continue to use both drugs and herbal medicines and, yet the biomarker research and applications focus only (or mostly) on drug therapy. This asymmetry in biomarker innovation strategy needs urgent attention from a wide range of innovation actors worldwide, including governments, research funders, scientists, community leaders, civil society organizations, herbal, pharmaceutical, and insurance industries, policymakers, and social/political scientists. We discuss the various dimensions of a future convergence map between herbal and conventional medicine, and conclude with a set of concrete strategies on how best to integrate biomarker research in a realm of both herbal and drug treatment. Africa, by virtue of its vast experience and exposure in herbal medicine and a "pregnant" life sciences innovation ecosystem, could play a game-changing role for the "birth" of biomarker-informed personalized herbal medicine in the near future. At this critical juncture when precision medicine initiatives are being rolled out worldwide, precision/personalized herbal medicine is both timely and essential for modern therapeutics, not to mention biomarker innovations that stand the test of real-life practices and implementation in the clinic and society.

  8. Precision or Personalized Medicine for Cancer Chemotherapy: Is there a Role for Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Liu, Xuefeng; Ho, Rebecca Lucinda Ka Yan; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei; Chow, Moses Sing Sum

    2016-07-07

    Although over 100 chemotherapeutic agents are currently available for the treatment of cancer patients, the overall long term clinical benefit is disappointing due to the lack of effectiveness or severe side effects from these agents. In order to improve the therapeutic outcome, a new approach called precision medicine or personalized medicine has been proposed and initiated by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. However, the limited availability of effective medications and the high cost are still the major barriers for many cancer patients. Thus alternative approaches such as herbal medicines could be a feasible and less costly option. Unfortunately, scientific evidence for the efficacy of a majority of herbal medicines is still lacking and their development to meet FDA approval or other regulatory agencies is a big challenge. However, herbal medicines may be able to play an important role in precision medicine or personalized medicine. This review will focus on the existing and future technologies that could speed the development of herbal products for treatment of resistant cancer in individual patients. Specifically, it will concentrate on reviewing the phenotypic (activity based) rather than genotypic (mechanism based) approach to develop herbal medicine useful for personalized cancer chemotherapy.

  9. Personalized medicine: from genotypes, molecular phenotypes and the quantified self, towards improved medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Joel T; Listgarten, Jennifer; Stegle, Oliver; Brenner, Steven E; Parts, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular profiling and sensor technologies are expanding the scope of personalized medicine beyond genotypes, providing new opportunities for developing richer and more dynamic multi-scale models of individual health. Recent studies demonstrate the value of scoring high-dimensional microbiome, immune, and metabolic traits from individuals to inform personalized medicine. Efforts to integrate multiple dimensions of clinical and molecular data towards predictive multi-scale models of individual health and wellness are already underway. Improved methods for mining and discovery of clinical phenotypes from electronic medical records and technological developments in wearable sensor technologies present new opportunities for mapping and exploring the critical yet poorly characterized "phenome" and "envirome" dimensions of personalized medicine. There are ambitious new projects underway to collect multi-scale molecular, sensor, clinical, behavioral, and environmental data streams from large population cohorts longitudinally to enable more comprehensive and dynamic models of individual biology and personalized health. Personalized medicine stands to benefit from inclusion of rich new sources and dimensions of data. However, realizing these improvements in care relies upon novel informatics methodologies, tools, and systems to make full use of these data to advance both the science and translational applications of personalized medicine.

  10. Extending the frontiers: Justice and the reincarnated person in Akan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the contrary, not much is heard specifically of the rights of those who are not just human but also claim or are claimed to be reincarnated persons. These are persons who, having experienced both life and death before, believers of reincarnation would assert we are fortunate to have in our midst. This paper does not ...

  11. Managing the innovation supply chain to maximize personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine epitomizes an evolving model of care tailored to the individual patient. This emerging paradigm harnesses radical technological advances to define each patient's molecular characteristics and decipher his or her unique pathophysiological processes. Translated into individualized algorithms, personalized medicine aims to predict, prevent, and cure disease without producing therapeutic adverse events. Although the transformative power of personalized medicine is generally recognized by physicians, patients, and payers, the complexity of translating discoveries into new modalities that transform health care is less appreciated. We often consider the flow of innovation and technology along a continuum of discovery, development, regulation, and application bridging the bench with the bedside. However, this process also can be viewed through a complementary prism, as a necessary supply chain of services and providers, each making essential contributions to the development of the final product to maximize value to consumers. Considering personalized medicine in this context of supply chain management highlights essential points of vulnerability and/or scalability that can ultimately constrain translation of the biological revolution or potentiate it into individualized diagnostics and therapeutics for optimized value creation and delivery.

  12. EU policies in personalized medicine-related technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaisser, S.; Vignola-Gagné, E.; Hüsing, B.; Enzing, C.; Valk, T. van der

    2009-01-01

    Against the background of a number of first drug-diagnostic co-products developed and introduce into the European market, European decision-makers feel impelled to react and position themselves in the field of personalized medicine. Their reactions cover a broad range, from the analysis of knowledge

  13. Translational research of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Ma, X; Tian, J

    2013-12-01

    In the medical imaging field, molecular imaging is a rapidly developing discipline and forms many imaging modalities, providing us effective tools to visualize, characterize, and measure molecular and cellular mechanisms in complex biological processes of living organisms, which can deepen our understanding of biology and accelerate preclinical research including cancer study and medicine discovery. Among many molecular imaging modalities, although the penetration depth of optical imaging and the approved optical probes used for clinics are limited, it has evolved considerably and has seen spectacular advances in basic biomedical research and new drug development. With the completion of human genome sequencing and the emergence of personalized medicine, the specific drug should be matched to not only the right disease but also to the right person, and optical molecular imaging should serve as a strong adjunct to develop personalized medicine by finding the optimal drug based on an individual's proteome and genome. In this process, the computational methodology and imaging system as well as the biomedical application regarding optical molecular imaging will play a crucial role. This review will focus on recent typical translational studies of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future development of optical molecular imaging are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the review is then concluded.

  14. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  15. Epigenome-based personalized medicine in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenji; Herman, James G; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has created an opportunity for precision medicine. Thus far, genetic alterations can only be used to guide treatment for small subsets of certain cancer types with these key alterations. Similar to mutations, epigenetic events are equally suitable for personalized medicine. DNA methylation alterations have been used to identify tumor-specific drug responsive markers. Methylation of MGMT sensitizes gliomas to alkylating agents is an example of epigenetic personalized medicine. Recent studies have revealed that 5-azacytidine and decitabine show activity in myelodysplasia, lung and other cancers. There are currently at least 20 kinds of histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical testing. Inhibitors targeting other epigenetic regulators are being clinically tested, such as EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438.

  16. Pre-graduate and post-graduate education in personalized medicine in the Czech Republic: statistics, analysis and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Jiri; Polivka, Jiri; Karlikova, Marie; Topolcan, Ondrej

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of personalized medicine is the individualized approach to the patient's treatment. It could be achieved only by the integration of the complexity of novel findings in diverse "omics" disciplines, new methods of medical imaging, as well as implementation of reliable biomarkers into the medical care. The implementation of personalized medicine into clinical practice is dependent on the adaptation of pre-graduate and post-graduate medical education to these principles. The situation in the education of personalized medicine in the Czech Republic is analyzed together with novel educational tools that are currently established in our country. The EPMA representatives in the Czech Republic in cooperation with the working group of professionals at the Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague have implemented the survey of personalized medicine awareness among students of Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen-the "Personalized Medicine Questionnaire". The results showed lacking knowledge of personalized medicine principles and students' will of education in this domain. Therefore, several educational activities addressed particularly to medical students and young physicians were realized at our facility with very positive evaluation. These educational activities (conferences, workshops, seminars, e-learning and special courses in personalized medicine (PM)) will be a part of pre-graduate and post-graduate medical education, will be extended to other medical faculties in our country. The "Summer School of Personalized Medicine in Plzen 2015" will be organized at the Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital in Pilsen as the first event on this topic in the Czech Republic.

  17. Personalized or Precision Medicine? The Example of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Fernando A. L.; Bertuzzo, Carmen S.; Ribeiro, José D.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of the knowledge on human genetics, by the identification of disease-associated variants, culminated in the understanding of human variability. With the genetic knowledge, the specificity of the clinical phenotype and the drug response of each individual were understood. Using the cystic fibrosis (CF) as an example, the new terms that emerged such as personalized medicine and precision medicine can be characterized. The genetic knowledge in CF is broad and the presence of a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene enables the phenotype–genotype association studies (including the response to drugs), considering the wide clinical and laboratory spectrum dependent on the mutual action of genotype, environment, and lifestyle. Regarding the CF disease, personalized medicine is the treatment directed at the symptoms, and this treatment is adjusted depending on the patient’s phenotype. However, more recently, the term precision medicine began to be widely used, although its correct application and understanding are still vague and poorly characterized. In precision medicine, we understand the individual as a response to the interrelation between environment, lifestyle, and genetic factors, which enabled the advent of new therapeutic models, such as conventional drugs adjustment by individual patient dosage and drug type and response, development of new drugs (read through, broker, enhancer, stabilizer, and amplifier compounds), genome editing by homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nuclease), CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated endonuclease 9), and gene therapy. Thus, we introduced the terms personalized medicine and precision medicine based on the CF. PMID:28676762

  18. Implementation and utilization of genetic testing in personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul-Husn NS

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noura S Abul-Husn,1,* Aniwaa Owusu Obeng,2,3,* Saskia C Sanderson,1 Omri Gottesman,2 Stuart A Scott11Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, 2The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 3Department of Pharmacy, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this manuscriptAbstract: Clinical genetic testing began over 30 years ago with the availability of mutation detection for sickle cell disease diagnosis. Since then, the field has dramatically transformed to include gene sequencing, high-throughput targeted genotyping, prenatal mutation detection, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, population-based carrier screening, and now genome-wide analyses using microarrays and next-generation sequencing. Despite these significant advances in molecular technologies and testing capabilities, clinical genetics laboratories historically have been centered on mutation detection for Mendelian disorders. However, the ongoing identification of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequence variants associated with common diseases prompted the availability of testing for personal disease risk estimation, and created commercial opportunities for direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies that assay these variants. This germline genetic risk, in conjunction with other clinical, family, and demographic variables, are the key components of the personalized medicine paradigm, which aims to apply personal genomic and other relevant data into a patient's clinical assessment to more precisely guide medical management. However, genetic testing for disease risk estimation is an ongoing topic of debate, largely due to inconsistencies in the results, concerns over clinical validity and utility, and the variable mode of delivery when returning genetic results to patients in the absence of traditional counseling. A related class of genetic testing with analogous issues of clinical utility and

  19. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Smoller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians.

  20. Personal and professional profile of mountain medicine physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define and describe the personal and professional profile of mountain medicine physicians including general physical training information and to include a detailed overview of the practice of mountain sports. A group of physicians participating in a specialized mountain medicine education program filled out a standardized questionnaire. The data obtained from this questionnaire were first analyzed in a descriptive way and then by statistical methods (chi2 test, t test, and analysis of variance). Detailed results have been provided for gender, age, marital status, general training frequency and methods, professional status, additional medical qualifications, memberships in professional societies and alpine clubs, mountain sports practice, and injuries sustained during the practice of mountain sports. This study has provided a detailed overview concerning the personal and professional profile of mountain medicine physicians. Course organizers as well as official commissions regulating the education in mountain medicine will be able to use this information to adapt and optimize the courses and the recommendations/requirements as detailed by the UIAA-ICAR-ISMM (Union Internationale des Associations Alpinistes, International Commission for Alpine Rescue, International Society for Mountain Medicine).

  1. Integrating personal medicine into service delivery: empowering people in recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L; Deegan, Patricia E; Hutchison, Shari L; Parrotta, Nancy; Schuster, James M

    2013-12-01

    Illness management and recovery strategies are considered evidence-based practices. The article describes how a web-based application, CommonGround, has been used to support implementation of such strategies in outpatient mental health services and assess its impact. The specific focus of this article is Personal Medicine, self-management strategies that are a salient component of the CommonGround intervention. With support from counties and a not-for-profit managed care organization, CommonGround has been introduced in 10 medication clinics, one Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) team, and one peer support center across Pennsylvania. Methods include analysis of data from the application's database and evaluation of health functioning, symptoms, and progress toward recovery. Health functioning improved over time and use of self-management strategies was associated with fewer concerns about medication side effects, fewer concerns about the impact of mental health medicine on physical health, more reports that mental health medicines were helping, and greater progress in individuals' recovery. Using Personal Medicine empowers individuals to work with their prescribers to find a "right balance" between what they do to be well and what they take to be well. This program helps individuals and their service team focus on individual strengths and resilient self-care strategies. More research is needed to assess factors that may predict changes in outcomes and how a web-based tool focused on self-management strategies may moderate those factors. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Culturomics: A New Kid on the Block of OMICS to Enable Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambouris, Manousos E; Pavlidis, Cristiana; Skoufas, Efthymios; Arabatzis, Michael; Kantzanou, Maria; Velegraki, Aristea; Patrinos, George P

    2018-02-01

    This innovation analysis highlights the underestimated and versatile potential of the new field of culturomics and examines its relation to other OMICS system sciences such as infectiomics, metabolomics, phenomics, and pharmacomicrobiomics. The advent of molecular biology, followed by the emergence of various disciplines of the genomics, and most importantly metagenomics, brought about the sharp decline of conventional microbiology methods. Emergence of culturomics has a natural synergy with therapeutic and clinical genomic approaches so as to realize personalized medicine. Notably, the concept of culturomics expands on that of phenomics and allows a reintroduction of the culture-based phenotypic characterization into the 21st century research repertoire, bolstered by robust technology for automated and massive execution, but its potential is largely unappreciated at present; the few available references show unenthusiastic pursuit and in narrow applications. This has not to be so: depending on the specific brand of culturomics, the scope of applications may extend to medicine, agriculture, environmental sciences, pharmacomicrobiomics, and biotechnology innovation. Moreover, culturomics may produce Big Data. This calls for a new generation of data scientists and innovative ways of harnessing and valorizing Big Data beyond classical genomics. Much more detailed and objective classification and identification of microbiota may soon be at hand through culturomics, thus enabling precision diagnosis toward truly personalized medicine. Culturomics may both widen the scope of microbiology and improve its contributions to diagnostics and personalized medicine, characterizing microbes and determining their associations with health and disease dynamics.

  3. Personalized medicine: A step forward in dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of variations of DNA and RNA characteristics as related to drug response is known as pharmacogenomics. The application of pharmacogenomics to the clinical management of an individual is referred to as "personalized medicine." Personalized medicine aims to individualize care based on a person′s unique genetic profile by using advanced molecular tools like DNA profiling, gene mapping, receptor gene amplification test, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, microarray test, Hercep Test, AmpliChip CYP450 Test, etc. This is relatively a new field that combines genomics (the study of genes and their functions and pharmacology (the science of drugs to develop effective, safe medications and doses that will be tailored to a person′s genetic makeup. Now personalized medicine has a wide range of applications such as management of cancer, cardiovascular disorders, depression, bipolar disorders, attention deficit disorders, HIV, tuberculosis, asthma, diabetes, and also in the management of pain. This is the first article focusing on its mechanism, overview of the developments, benefits, challenges, and its applications, particularly in dentistry.

  4. Artificial heart pumps: bridging the gap between science, technology and personalized medicine by relational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, Federica; Deng, Mario C

    2017-01-01

    In the US population of 300 million, 3 million have heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and 300,000 have advanced heart failure. Long-term mechanical circulatory support will, within the next decade, be recommended to 30,000 patients annually in the USA, 3000 undergo heart transplantation annually. What do these advances mean for persons suffering from advanced heart failure and their loved ones/caregivers? In this perspective article, we discuss - by exemplifying a case report of a 27-year-old man receiving a Total Artificial Heart - a practice concept of modern medicine that fully incorporates the patient's personhood perspective which we have termed Relational Medicine™. From this case study, it becomes apparent that the successful practice of modern cardiovascular medicine requires the person-person encounter as a core practice element.

  5. Economic evaluations of personalized medicine: existing challenges and current developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabaruddin FH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatiha H Shabaruddin,1 Nigel D Fleeman,2 Katherine Payne3 1Department of Pharmacy, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; 3Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Personalized medicine, with the aim of safely, effectively, and cost-effectively targeting treatment to a prespecified patient population, has always been a long-time goal within health care. It is often argued that personalizing treatment will inevitably improve clinical outcomes for patients and help achieve more effective use of health care resources. Demand is increasing for demonstrable evidence of clinical and cost-effectiveness to support the use of personalized medicine in health care. This paper begins with an overview of the existing challenges in conducting economic evaluations of genetics- and genomics-targeted technologies, as an example of personalized medicine. Our paper illustrates the complexity of the challenges faced by these technologies by highlighting the variations in the issues faced by diagnostic tests for somatic variations, generally referring to genetic variation in a tumor, and germline variations, generally referring to inherited genetic variation in enzymes involved in drug metabolic pathways. These tests are typically aimed at stratifying patient populations into subgroups on the basis of clinical effectiveness (response or safety (avoidance of adverse events. The paper summarizes the data requirements for economic evaluations of genetics and genomics-based technologies while outlining that the main challenges relating to data requirements revolve around the availability and quality of existing data. We conclude by discussing current developments aimed to address the challenges of assessing the cost-effectiveness of genetics and genomics-based technologies, which revolve around two central issues that are

  6. Personality and Longevity: Knowns, Unknowns, and Implications for Public Health and Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Roberts, Brent; Duberstein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We review evidence for links between personality traits and longevity. We provide an overview of personality for health scientists, using the primary organizing framework used in the study of personality and longevity. We then review data on various aspects of personality linked to longevity. In general, there is good evidence that higher level of conscientiousness and lower levels of hostility and Type D or “distressed” personality are associated with greater longevity. Limited evidence suggests that extraversion, openness, perceived control, and low levels of emotional suppression may be associated with longer lifespan. Findings regarding neuroticism are mixed, supporting the notion that many component(s) of neuroticism detract from life expectancy, but some components at some levels may be healthy or protective. Overall, evidence suggests various personality traits are significant predictors of longevity and points to several promising directions for further study. We conclude by discussing the implications of these links for epidemiologic research and personalized medicine and lay out a translational research agenda for integrating the psychology of individual differences into public health and medicine. PMID:21766032

  7. [Personalization in the medicine of the future : Opportunities and risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, N P

    2017-07-01

    Personalized medicine is not a new concept. The renaissance of the term is due to the enormous progress in gene sequencing technology and functional imaging, as well as the development of targeted therapies. Application of these technologies in clinical medicine will necessitate infrastructural as well as organizational and educational changes in the healthcare system. An important change required already in the short-term is the introduction of centralized structures, preferably in university clinics, which adopt these innovations and incorporate them into clinical care. Simultaneously, the collation and use of large quantities of relevant data from highly variable sources must be successfully mastered, in order to pave the way for disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence.

  8. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott T. Weiss

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1 Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM, a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2 Translational Genomics Core (TGC, a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3 Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4 Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5 a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care.

  9. Personalized Cancer Medicine: Molecular Diagnostics, Predictive biomarkers, and Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez de Castro, D; Clarke, P A; Al-Lazikani, B; Workman, P

    2013-01-01

    The progressive elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has fueled the rational development of targeted drugs for patient populations stratified by genetic characteristics. Here we discuss general challenges relating to molecular diagnostics and describe predictive biomarkers for personalized cancer medicine. We also highlight resistance mechanisms for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in lung cancer. We envisage a future requiring the use of longitudinal genome sequencing and other omics technologies alongside combinatorial treatment to overcome cellular and molecular heterogeneity and prevent resistance caused by clonal evolution. PMID:23361103

  10. Use of indigenous and indigenised medicines to enhance personal well-being: a South African case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Michelle; Møller, Valerie

    2002-02-01

    An estimated 27 million South Africans use indigenous medicines (Mander, 1997, Medicinal plant marketing and strategies for sustaining the plant supply in the Bushbuckridge area and Mpumalanga Province. Institute for Natural Resources, University of Natal. Pietermaritzburg, South Africa). Although herbal remedies are freely available in amayeza stores, or Xhosa chemists, for self-medication, little is known about the motivations of consumers. According to African belief systems, good health is holistic and extends to the person's social environment. The paper makes a distinction between traditional medicines which are used to enhance personal well-being generally and for cultural purposes, on the one hand, and medicines used to treat physical conditions only, on the other. Drawing on an eight-month study of Xhosa chemists in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, in 1996, the paper identifies 90 medicines in stock which are used to enhance personal well-being. Just under one-third of all purchases were of medicines to enhance well-being. Remedies particularly popular included medicines believed to ward off evil spirits and bring good luck. The protection of infants with medicines which repel evil spirits is a common practice. Consumer behaviours indicate that the range of medicines available is increased by indigenisation of manufactured traditional medicines and cross-cultural borrowing. Case studies confirm that self- and infant medication with indigenous remedies augmented by indigenised medicines plays an important role in primary health care by allaying the fears and anxieties of everyday life within the Xhosa belief system. thereby promoting personal well-being.

  11. Personalized medicine: the absence of 'model-changing' financial incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Peter

    2007-02-01

    This perspective biases on the side that personalized medicine can contribute to a more efficient collective model; however, the hard economics need and deserve significantly more critical analysis and new data input than they are currently being given, to determine their role, or not, in driving change. Put simply, as with the birth of all new and promising developments in healthcare, myth, hope and trend-spotting are driving this market forward, rather than any hard evidence of a sustainable commercial business model for all stakeholders. While there are clear economic benefits to aspects of delivery along the way to personalized care, there may in fact be no compelling economic drivers for radical change for payers and the pharmaceutical industry. The best they can hope to achieve is that the balance sheet is, just that, in balance.

  12. Military Internal Medicine Resident Decision to Apply to Fellowship and Extend Military Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoumian, Alice E; Hartzell, Joshua D; Bonura, Erin M; Ressner, Roseanne A; Whitman, Timothy J; Yun, Heather C

    2018-02-06

    Nationally, the number of internal medicine physicians practicing in primary care has decreased amidst increasing interest in hospitalist medicine. Current priorities in the Military Health System include access to primary care and retention of trained personnel. Recently, we have conducted a study of military internal medicine residents' decision to enter infectious disease. As part of our larger effort, we saw an opportunity to characterize factors impacting decision making of internal medicine residents' desire to apply for subspecialty training and to extend active duty service obligations. Questions were developed after discussion with various military graduate medical education and internal medicine leaders, underwent external review, and were added to a larger question set. The survey link was distributed electronically to all U.S. military affiliated residencies' graduating internal medicine residents in December 2016-January 2017. Data were analyzed by decision to apply to fellowship and decision to extend military obligation using Fisher's exact test or Pearon's chi-square test. Sixty-eight residents from 10 of 11 military residency programs responded, for a response rate of 51%. The majority (62%) applied to fellowship to start after residency completion. Reasons cited for applying to fellowship included wanting to become a specialist as soon as possible (74%), wishing to avoid being a general internist (57%), and because they are unable to practice as a hospitalist in the military (52%). Fellowship applicants were more likely to plan to extend their military obligation than non-applicants, as did those with longer duration of military commitments. No other factors, including Uniformed Services University attendance or participation in undergraduate military experiences, were found to impact plan to extend active duty service commitment. The majority of graduating internal medicine residents apply for fellowship and report a desire to avoid being a

  13. Pharmacogenomics in cardiovascular disorders: Steps in approaching personalized medicine in cardiovascular medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Barone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Barone, Shaymaa S Mousa, Shaker A MousaThe Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USAAbstract: Some of the most commonly prescribed medications are those for cardiovascular maladies. The beneficial effects of these medications have been well documented. However, there can be substantial variation in response to these medications among patients, which may be due to genetic variation. For this reason pharmacogenomic studies are emerging across all aspects of cardiovascular medicine. The goal of pharmacogenomics is to tailor treatment to an individual’s genetic makeup in order to improve the benefit-to-risk ratio. This review examines the potential pharmacogenomic parameters which may lead to a future of personalized medicine. For example, it has been found that patients with CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene variations have a different response to warfarin. Other studies looking at β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, diuretics and statins have shown some results linking genetic variations to pharmacologic response. However these studies have not impacted clinical use yet, unlike warfarin findings, as the small retrospective studies need to be followed up by larger prospective studies for definitive results.Keywords: cardiovascular, pharmacogenomics, genetics, cardiovascular medicine, personalized medicine, polymorphism

  14. Molecular imaging in the era of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Clinical imaging creates visual representations of the body interior for disease assessment. The role of clinical imaging significantly overlaps with that of pathology, and diagnostic workflows largely depend on both fields. The field of clinical imaging is presently undergoing a radical change through the emergence of a new field called molecular imaging. This new technology, which lies at the intersection between imaging and molecular biology, enables noninvasive visualization of biochemical processes at the molecular level within living bodies. Molecular imaging differs from traditional anatomical imaging in that biomarkers known as imaging probes are used to visualize target molecules-of-interest. This ability opens up exciting new possibilities for applications in oncologic, neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Molecular imaging is expected to make major contributions to personalized medicine by allowing earlier diagnosis and predicting treatment response. The technique is also making a huge impact on pharmaceutical development by optimizing preclinical and clinical tests for new drug candidates. This review will describe the basic principles of molecular imaging and will briefly touch on three examples (from an immense list of new techniques) that may contribute to personalized medicine: receptor imaging, angiogenesis imaging, and apoptosis imaging.

  15. Translational research: precision medicine, personalized medicine, targeted therapies: marketing or science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Pierre; Longeray, Pierre-Henry; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ameye, Véronique; Augé, Pascale; Cazeneuve, Béatrice; Chatelut, Etienne; Diaz, Isabelle; Diviné, Marine; Froguel, Philippe; Goni, Sylvia; Gueyffier, François; Hoog-Labouret, Natalie; Mourah, Samia; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Perche, Olivier; Perin-Dureau, Florent; Pigeon, Martine; Tisseau, Anne; Verstuyft, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is based on: 1) improved clinical or non-clinical methods (including biomarkers) for a more discriminating and precise diagnosis of diseases; 2) targeted therapies of the choice or the best drug for each patient among those available; 3) dose adjustment methods to optimize the benefit-risk ratio of the drugs chosen; 4) biomarkers of efficacy, toxicity, treatment discontinuation, relapse, etc. Unfortunately, it is still too often a theoretical concept because of the lack of convenient diagnostic methods or treatments, particularly of drugs corresponding to each subtype of pathology, hence to each patient. Stratified medicine is a component of personalized medicine employing biomarkers and companion diagnostics to target the patients likely to present the best benefit-risk balance for a given active compound. The concept of targeted therapy, mostly used in cancer treatment, relies on the existence of a defined molecular target, involved or not in the pathological process, and/or on the existence of a biomarker able to identify the target population, which should logically be small as compared to the population presenting the disease considered. Targeted therapies and biomarkers represent important stakes for the pharmaceutical industry, in terms of market access, of return on investment and of image among the prescribers. At the same time, they probably represent only the first generation of products resulting from the combination of clinical, pathophysiological and molecular research, i.e. of translational research. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  16. Personal reflections on exploring social media in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Brent

    2015-04-01

    Social media is difficult to explain to a physician who has never used it. The medical literature on its pitfalls and abuses has overshadowed its positive applications and made many physicians wary of it. While I was initially reluctant to develop my own presence on social media, since embracing it as a tool for teaching and learning I have developed a different perspective. I see it as a tool that can be used positively or negatively. Much like a megaphone, it can amplify our voice so that the impact of our work can extend beyond the borders of our institutions and countries. Aided by the guidance and support of mentors who used social media before and alongside me, it has helped me to become a more competent, professional, engaged, and impactful physician. Within this article I will share my story to illustrate the many ways that social media can be used to enhance the profession of medicine.

  17. Development and Validation of a Personality Assessment Instrument for Traditional Korean Medicine: Sasang Personality Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chae

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sasang typology is a traditional Korean medicine based on the biopsychosocial perspectives of Neo-Confucianism and utilizes medical herbs and acupuncture for type-specific treatment. This study was designed to develop and validate the Sasang Personality Questionnaire (SPQ for future use in the assessment of personality based on Sasang typology. Design and Methods. We selected questionnaire items using internal consistency analysis and examined construct validity with explorative factor analysis using 245 healthy participants. Test-retest reliability as well as convergent validity were examined. Results. The 14-item SPQ showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha=.817 and test-retest reliability (=.837. Three extracted subscales, SPQ-behavior, SPQ-emotionality, and SPQ-cognition, were found, explaining 55.77% of the total variance. The SPQ significantly correlated with Temperament and Character Inventory novelty seeking (=.462, harm avoidance (=−.390, and NEO Personality Inventory extraversion (=.629. The SPQ score of the So-Eum (24.43±4.93, Tae-Eum (27.33±5.88, and So-Yang (30.90±5.23 types were significantly different from each other (<.01. Conclusion. Current results demonstrated the reliability and validity of the SPQ and its subscales that can be utilized as an objective instrument for conducting personalized medicine research incorporating the biopsychosocial perspective.

  18. Translating Personality Psychology to Help Personalize Preventive Medicine for Young-Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Hancox, Robert J.; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by healthcare reform will soon increase demands on primary-care physicians. Physicians will face more young-adult patients which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the current study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults’ personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the Dunedin Study cohort of 1,000 individuals, we show that very brief measures of young adults’ personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness-to-Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health-risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for healthcare professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing healthcare electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient outcomes. PMID:24588093

  19. p-Medicine: From data sharing and integration via VPH models to personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, S; Christ-Neumann, ML; Rüping, S; Buffa, FM; Wegener, D; McVie, G; Coveney, PV; Graf, N; Delorenzi, M

    2011-01-01

    The Worldwide innovative Networking in personalized cancer medicine (WIN) initiated by the Institute Gustave Roussy (France) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (USA) has dedicated its 3rd symposium (Paris, 6–8 July 2011) to discussion on gateways to increase the efficacy of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics (http://www.winconsortium.org/symposium.html). Speakers ranged from clinical oncologist to researchers, industrial partners, and tools developers; a famous patient was present: Janelle Hail, a 30-year breast cancer survivor, founder and CEO of the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. (NBCF). The p-medicine consortium found this venue a perfect occasion to present a poster about its activities that are in accordance with the take home message of the symposium. In this communication, we summarize what we presented with particular attention to the interaction between the symposium’s topic and content and our project. PMID:22276060

  20. p-Medicine: From data sharing and integration via VPH models to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, S; Christ-Neumann, Ml; Rüping, S; Buffa, Fm; Wegener, D; McVie, G; Coveney, Pv; Graf, N; Delorenzi, M

    2011-01-01

    The Worldwide innovative Networking in personalized cancer medicine (WIN) initiated by the Institute Gustave Roussy (France) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (USA) has dedicated its 3rd symposium (Paris, 6-8 July 2011) to discussion on gateways to increase the efficacy of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics (http://www.winconsortium.org/symposium.html).Speakers ranged from clinical oncologist to researchers, industrial partners, and tools developers; a famous patient was present: Janelle Hail, a 30-year breast cancer survivor, founder and CEO of the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. (NBCF).The p-medicine consortium found this venue a perfect occasion to present a poster about its activities that are in accordance with the take home message of the symposium.In this communication, we summarize what we presented with particular attention to the interaction between the symposium's topic and content and our project.

  1. Eliminating barriers to personalized medicine: learning from neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, David H

    2014-07-29

    With the emergence of high-throughput discovery platforms, robust preclinical small-animal models, and efficient clinical trial pipelines, it is becoming possible to envision a time when the treatment of human neurologic diseases will become personalized. The emergence of precision medicine will require the identification of subgroups of patients most likely to respond to specific biologically based therapies. This stratification only becomes possible when the determinants that contribute to disease heterogeneity become more fully elucidated. This review discusses the defining factors that underlie disease heterogeneity relevant to the potential for individualized brain tumor (optic pathway glioma) treatments arising in the common single-gene cancer predisposition syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In this regard, NF1 is posited as a model genetic condition to establish a workable paradigm for actualizing precision therapeutics for other neurologic disorders. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Advances in imaging to allow personalized medicine in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, Markus F

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease is a destructive inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin that may lead to various complications such as strictures, stenosis, fistulas and colitis-associated neoplasias. However, the course of the disease varies substantially among patients and disease behaviour may also change with time. At diagnosis behaviour is inflammatory in the majority of patients, while penetrating or structuring behaviour become more prominent at later time points. Thus, medication in Crohn's disease needs frequent optimization over time. Therefore, new strategies for prediction of response to therapy are urgently needed. Here, recent advantages in imaging techniques for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease are reviewed. Such advantages include ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and new endoscopic approaches such as molecular endoscopy. It is expected that these novel techniques will lead to marked improvements in the assessment of disease behaviour and the prediction of response to clinical therapy with biologicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Medical social responsibility in an era of personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijer, M L M

    2017-01-01

    How much social responsibility do physicians have? Historically, care for collective health and well-being has been part and parcel of the responsibility of the medical profession. The changes in the urban environment to which physicians contributed at the end of the 19th century bear witness to this. During the 20th century, however, the medical search for extra health gain has focused increasingly on the individual. This has reached a provisional zenith in personalized medicine. This article argues that physician are letting patients, society and themselves down by paying so much attention to the individual and so little to social factors that cause disease or promote health. The exceptional position that physicians occupy in identifying and tackling pathological processes advocates an increase in societal and political engagement.

  4. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.

    2015-01-01

    Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  5. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Harris

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today’s intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source.

  6. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today’s intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source. PMID:28548060

  7. Evidence that personal genome testing enhances student learning in a course on genomics and personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyan Salari

    Full Text Available An emerging debate in academic medical centers is not about the need for providing trainees with fundamental education on genomics, but rather the most effective educational models that should be deployed. At Stanford School of Medicine, a novel hands-on genomics course was developed in 2010 that provided students the option to undergo personal genome testing as part of the course curriculum. We hypothesized that use of personal genome testing in the classroom would enhance the learning experience of students. No data currently exist on how such methods impact student learning; thus, we surveyed students before and after the course to determine its impact. We analyzed responses using paired statistics from the 31 medical and graduate students who completed both pre-course and post-course surveys. Participants were stratified by those who did (N = 23 or did not (N = 8 undergo personal genome testing. In reflecting on the experience, 83% of students who underwent testing stated that they were pleased with their decision compared to 12.5% of students who decided against testing (P = 0.00058. Seventy percent of those who underwent personal genome testing self-reported a better understanding of human genetics on the basis of having undergone testing. Further, students who underwent personal genome testing demonstrated an average 31% increase in pre- to post-course scores on knowledge questions (P = 3.5×10(-6; this was significantly higher (P = 0.003 than students who did not undergo testing, who showed a non-significant improvement. Undergoing personal genome testing and using personal genotype data in the classroom enhanced students' self-reported and assessed knowledge of genomics, and did not appear to cause significant anxiety. At least for self-selected students, the incorporation of personal genome testing can be an effective educational tool to teach important concepts of clinical genomic testing.

  8. Electrodeless electro-hydrodynamic gentle printing of personalized medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusid, Boris; Elele, Ezinwa; Shen, Yueyang

    2010-11-01

    Drop-on-demand (DOD) principle appears to be a particular promising approach for manufacturing personalized treatments carefully tailored to a patient's genetic background. The authors have recently developed a DOD method for gentle printing of personalized medicines. A fluid is infused into an electrically insulating nozzle to form a pendant drop. A sufficiently strong voltage pulse is applied to external electrodes to stretch the pendant drop until it touches an electrically insulating film and forms a liquid bridge. As the liquid bridge is intentionally formed in an unstable configuration, it breaks up, creating two drops, one on the film and the other hanging from the nozzle. To prove the validity and versatility of the method, experiments are conducted on fluids whose viscosity, conductivity, dielectric constant, and surface tension vary over a broad range, respectively: 1-1045 cP, 0.02-290 μS/cm, 9-78, and 41-72 dyn/cm. We present a scaling analysis that captures the essential physics of drop evolution and provides the critical design guidelines. The work was supported by NSF Engineering Research Center on Structured Organic Particulate Systems.

  9. [Billroth and Brahms: personal encounter of medicine and music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaschik, B A; Hadaschik, E N; Hohenfellner, M

    2012-02-01

    Theodor Billroth and Johannes Brahms shared a decades long personal friendship. The music-loving Billroth influenced the work of the famous composer and in turn Brahms also left traces within Billroth's lifetime achievements. To shed light on the close relationship of medicine and music, this manuscript describes both Billroth's life and surgical career as they were influenced and stimulated by his close friendship to Brahms.Theodor Billroth and Johannes Brahms first met in 1865 in Zurich, Switzerland. After Billroth accepted the chair of surgery at the University of Vienna in 1867, Brahms moved to Vienna in 1869. During the following years, Billroth analyzed most of Brahms' compositions prior to publication. Similar to his effective way of teaching medical students and assistants, Billroth stimulated Brahms to publish many of his later compositions. Brahms on the other hand supported Billroth in writing his essay"Who is musical?". Furthermore, music helped Billroth to cope with the demanding working life of a surgeon.Music and surgery share both structural and emotional analogies. While both professions require meticulous techniques, personal interaction is a prerequisite for success. "Science and art scoop from the same well."

  10. Towards Personalized Medicine: Leveraging Patient Similarity and Drug Similarity Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance. PMID:25717413

  11. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Ethical, legal and social implications of incorporating personalized medicine into healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Kyle B; Rothstein, Mark A

    As research focused on personalized medicine has developed over the past decade, bioethics scholars have contemplated the ethical, legal and social implications of this type of research. In the next decade, there will be a need to broaden the focus of this work as personalized medicine moves into clinical settings. We consider two broad issues that will grow in importance and urgency. First, we analyze the consequences of the significant increase in health information that will be brought about by personalized medicine. Second, we raise concerns about the potential of personalized medicine to exacerbate existing disparities in healthcare.

  13. Efficient biometric authenticated key agreements based on extended chaotic maps for telecare medicine information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Der-Chyuan; Lee, Tian-Fu; Lin, Tsung-Hung

    2015-05-01

    Authenticated key agreements for telecare medicine information systems provide patients, doctors, nurses and health visitors with accessing medical information systems and getting remote services efficiently and conveniently through an open network. In order to have higher security, many authenticated key agreement schemes appended biometric keys to realize identification except for using passwords and smartcards. Due to too many transmissions and computational costs, these authenticated key agreement schemes are inefficient in communication and computation. This investigation develops two secure and efficient authenticated key agreement schemes for telecare medicine information systems by using biometric key and extended chaotic maps. One scheme is synchronization-based, while the other nonce-based. Compared to related approaches, the proposed schemes not only retain the same security properties with previous schemes, but also provide users with privacy protection and have fewer transmissions and lower computational cost.

  14. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Personal, Electronic, Secure: National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records ... One suggestion for saving money is to implement electronic personal health records. With this in mind, the ...

  15. Perceptions of Personalized Medicine in an Academic Health System: Educational Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Katsanis, Sara Huston; Minear, Mollie A; Yang, Nancy; Rakhra-Burris, Tejinder; Reeves, Jason W; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Ann Simmons, Leigh

    Prior reports demonstrate that personalized medicine implementation in clinical care is lacking. Given the program focus at Duke University on personalized medicine, we assessed health care providers' perspectives on their preparation and educational needs to effectively integrate personalized medicine tools and applications into their clinical practices. Data from 78 health care providers who participated in a larger study of personalized and precision medicine at Duke University were analyzed using Qualtrics (descriptive statistics). Individuals age 18 years and older were recruited for the larger study through broad email contacts across the university and health system. All participants completed an online 35-question survey that was developed, pilot-tested, and administered by a team of interdisciplinary researchers and clinicians at the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine. Overall, providers reported being ill-equipped to implement personalized medicine in clinical practice. Many respondents identified educational resources as critical for strengthening personalized medicine implementation in both research and clinical practice. Responses did not differ significantly between specialists and primary providers or by years since completion of the medical degree. Survey findings support prior calls for provider and patient education in personalized medicine. Respondents identified focus areas in training, education, and research for improving personalized medicine uptake. Given respondents' emphasis on educational needs, now may be an ideal time to address these needs in clinical training and public education programs.

  16. Introducing Pharmacogenetics and Personalized Medicine via a Weblog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin Bova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate a weblog (blog-based course introducing pharmacogenetics (PGt and personalized medicine (PM relative to freshmen pharmacy students' knowledge base. Methods: Incoming freshmen pharmacy students were invited by email to enroll in a one semester-hour, elective, on-line blog-based course entitled "Personal Genome Evaluation". The course was offered during the students' first semester in college. A topic list related to PGt and PM was developed by a group of faculty with topics being presented via the blog once or twice weekly through week 14 of the 15 week semester. A pre-course and post-course survey was sent to the students to compare their knowledge base relative to general information, drug response related to PGt, and PM. Results: Fifty-one freshmen pharmacy students enrolled in the course and completed the pre-course survey and 49 of the 51 students completed the post-course survey. There was an increase in the students' general, PGt and PM knowledge base as evidenced by a statistically significant higher number of correct responses for 17 of 21 questions on the post-course survey as compared to the pre-course survey. Notably, following the course, students had an increased knowledge base relative to "genetic privacy", drug dosing based on metabolizer phenotype, and the breadth of PM, among other specific points. Conclusions: The study indicated that introducing PGt and PM via a blog format was feasible, increasing the students' knowledge of these emerging areas. The blog format is easily transferable and can be adopted by colleges/schools to introduce PGt and PM.   Type: Case Study

  17. Personalizing Medicine Through Hybrid Imaging and Medical Big Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Papp

    2018-06-01

    imaging in view of personalized medicine, whereby a focus will be given to the derivation of prediction models as part of clinical decision support systems, to which machine learning approaches and hybrid imaging can be anchored.

  18. Extending the search for folk personality constructs: the dimensionality of the personality-relevant proverb domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Heather A

    2002-04-01

    College students (95 men and 264 women) rated how well 211 familiar proverbs described their behavior and beliefs. A factor analysis of these data yielded 7 major dimensions; many of the factors were similar to recognized lexical personality factors. Big Five Conscientiousness and Neuroticism were each strongly associated with a single proverb dimension (interpreted as Restraint and Enjoys Life, respectively). Big Five Agreeableness, Extraversion, and Intellect/Imagination were all associated with several proverb dimensions. Agreeableness was most strongly associated with proverb dimensions representing Machiavellian behavior and strong Group Ties, and both Extraversion and Intellect showed particularly notable associations with an Achievement Striving dimension. The 2 remaining proverb dimensions, which represented a belief that Life is Fair and an attitude of Cynicism, could not be accounted for by the Big Five.

  19. Using patient-reported measurement to pave the path towards personalized medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Hall, Per; Morisky, Donald E.; Narrow, William E.; Dapueto, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Given the potential and importance of personalized or individualized medicine for health care delivery and its effects on patients' quality of life, a plenary session was devoted to personalized medicine during the 19th Annual Conference of the International Society for Quality of Life Research held

  20. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents ... your healthcare provider communicate better in the digital future? What is personalized medicine? Some of the nation's top health researchers, computer ...

  1. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  2. Systems Biology of Metabolism: A Driver for Developing Personalized and Precision Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    for advancing the development of personalized and precision medicine to treat metabolic diseases like insulin resistance, obesity, NAFLD, NASH, and cancer. It will be illustrated how the concept of genome-scale metabolic models can be used for integrative analysis of big data with the objective of identifying...... novel biomarkers that are foundational for personalized and precision medicine....

  3. From big data analysis to personalized medicine for all: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyass, Akram; Turcotte, Michelle; Meyre, David

    2015-06-27

    Recent advances in high-throughput technologies have led to the emergence of systems biology as a holistic science to achieve more precise modeling of complex diseases. Many predict the emergence of personalized medicine in the near future. We are, however, moving from two-tiered health systems to a two-tiered personalized medicine. Omics facilities are restricted to affluent regions, and personalized medicine is likely to widen the growing gap in health systems between high and low-income countries. This is mirrored by an increasing lag between our ability to generate and analyze big data. Several bottlenecks slow-down the transition from conventional to personalized medicine: generation of cost-effective high-throughput data; hybrid education and multidisciplinary teams; data storage and processing; data integration and interpretation; and individual and global economic relevance. This review provides an update of important developments in the analysis of big data and forward strategies to accelerate the global transition to personalized medicine.

  4. Personalized medicine enrichment design for DHA supplementation clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine aims to match patient subpopulation to the most beneficial treatment. The purpose of this study is to design a prospective clinical trial in which we hope to achieve the highest level of confirmation in identifying and making treatment recommendations for subgroups, when the risk levels in the control arm can be ordered. This study was motivated by our goal to identify subgroups in a DHA (docosahexaenoic acid supplementation trial to reduce preterm birth (gestational age<37 weeks rate. We performed a meta-analysis to obtain informative prior distributions and simulated operating characteristics to ensure that overall Type I error rate was close to 0.05 in designs with three different models: independent, hierarchical, and dynamic linear models. We performed simulations and sensitivity analysis to examine the subgroup power of models and compared results to a chi-square test. We performed simulations under two hypotheses: a large overall treatment effect and a small overall treatment effect. Within each hypothesis, we designed three different subgroup effects scenarios where resulting subgroup rates are linear, flat, or nonlinear. When the resulting subgroup rates are linear or flat, dynamic linear model appeared to be the most powerful method to identify the subgroups with a treatment effect. It also outperformed other methods when resulting subgroup rates are nonlinear and the overall treatment effect is big. When the resulting subgroup rates are nonlinear and the overall treatment effect is small, hierarchical model and chi-square test did better. Compared to independent and hierarchical models, dynamic linear model tends to be relatively robust and powerful when the control arm has ordinal risk subgroups.

  5. Personalized Medicine Enrichment Design for DHA Supplementation Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yang; Mayo, Matthew S; Carlson, Susan E; Gajewski, Byron J

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine aims to match patient subpopulation to the most beneficial treatment. The purpose of this study is to design a prospective clinical trial in which we hope to achieve the highest level of confirmation in identifying and making treatment recommendations for subgroups, when the risk levels in the control arm can be ordered. This study was motivated by our goal to identify subgroups in a DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) supplementation trial to reduce preterm birth (gestational agerate. We performed a meta-analysis to obtain informative prior distributions and simulated operating characteristics to ensure that overall Type I error rate was close to 0.05 in designs with three different models: independent, hierarchical, and dynamic linear models. We performed simulations and sensitivity analysis to examine the subgroup power of models and compared results to a chi-square test. We performed simulations under two hypotheses: a large overall treatment effect and a small overall treatment effect. Within each hypothesis, we designed three different subgroup effects scenarios where resulting subgroup rates are linear, flat, or nonlinear. When the resulting subgroup rates are linear or flat, dynamic linear model appeared to be the most powerful method to identify the subgroups with a treatment effect. It also outperformed other methods when resulting subgroup rates are nonlinear and the overall treatment effect is big. When the resulting subgroup rates are nonlinear and the overall treatment effect is small, hierarchical model and chi-square test did better. Compared to independent and hierarchical models, dynamic linear model tends to be relatively robust and powerful when the control arm has ordinal risk subgroups.

  6. G-DOC: A Systems Medicine Platform for Personalized Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Madhavan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, cancer therapy remains limited by a “one-size-fits-all” approach, whereby treatment decisions are based mainly on the clinical stage of disease, yet fail to reference the individual's underlying biology and its role driving malignancy. Identifying better personalized therapies for cancer treatment is hindered by the lack of high-quality “omics” data of sufficient size to produce meaningful results and the ability to integrate biomedical data from disparate technologies. Resolving these issues will help translation of therapies from research to clinic by helping clinicians develop patient-specific treatments based on the unique signatures of patient's tumor. Here we describe the Georgetown Database of Cancer (G-DOC, a Web platform that enables basic and clinical research by integrating patient characteristics and clinical outcome data with a variety of high-throughput research data in a unified environment. While several rich data repositories for high-dimensional research data exist in the public domain, most focus on a single-data type and do not support integration across multiple technologies. Currently, G-DOC contains data from more than 2500 breast cancer patients and 800 gastrointestinal cancer patients, G-DOC includes a broad collection of bioinformatics and systems biology tools for analysis and visualization of four major “omics” types: DNA, mRNA, microRNA, and metabolites. We believe that G-DOC will help facilitate systems medicine by providing identification of trends and patterns in integrated data sets and hence facilitate the use of better targeted therapies for cancer. A set of representative usage scenarios is provided to highlight the technical capabilities of this resource.

  7. “What Goes Around Comes Around”: Lessons Learned from Economic Evaluations of Personalized Medicine Applied to Digital Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kathryn A.; Douglas, Michael P.; Trosman, Julia R.; Marshall, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Two key trends that emerge from the growth of “Big Data” and the emphasis on patient-centered healthcare are the increasing use of personalized medicine and digital medicine. In order for these technologies to move into mainstream health care and be reimbursed by insurers, it will be essential to have evidence that their benefits provide reasonable value relative to their costs. However, these technologies have complex characteristics that present challenges to assessment of their economic value. Previous work has identified these challenges for personalized medicine and thus this work can inform the more nascent topic of digital medicine. Our objective is to examine the methodological challenges and future opportunities for assessing the economic value of digital medicine, using personalized medicine as a comparison. We focus specifically on “digital biomarker technologies” and “multigene tests”. We identified similarities in these technologies that can present challenges to economic evaluation: multiple results, results with different types of utilities, secondary findings, downstream impact (including on family members), and interactive effects. Using a structured review, we found that there are few economic evaluations of digital biomarker technologies, with limited results. We conclude that more evidence on effectiveness of digital medicine will be needed but that the experiences with personalized medicine can inform what data will be needed and how such analyses can be conducted. Our study points out the critical need for typologies and terminology for digital medicine technologies that would enable them to be classified in ways that will facilitate research on their effectiveness and value. PMID:28212968

  8. Practicing pathology in the era of big data and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiang; Taylor, Clive R

    2014-01-01

    The traditional task of the pathologist is to assist physicians in making the correct diagnosis of diseases at the earliest possible stage to effectuate the optimal treatment strategy for each individual patient. In this respect surgical pathology (the traditional tissue diagnosis) is but a tool. It is not, of itself, the purpose of pathology practice; and change is in the air. This January 2014 issue of Applied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology (AIMM) embraces that change by the incorporation of the agenda and content of the journal Diagnostic Molecular Morphology (DMP). Over a decade ago AIMM introduced and promoted the concept of "molecular morphology," and has sought to publish molecular studies that correlate with the morphologic features that continue to define cancer and many diseases. That intent is now reinforced and extended by the merger with DMP, as a logical and timely response to the growing impact of a wide range of genetic and molecular technologies that are beginning to reshape the way in which pathology is practiced. The use of molecular and genomic techniques already demonstrates clear value in the diagnosis of disease, with treatment tailored specifically to individual patients. Personalized medicine is the future, and personalized medicine demands personalized pathology. The need for integration of the flood of new molecular data, with surgical pathology, digital pathology, and the full range of pathology data in the electronic medical record has never been greater. This review describes the possible impact of these pressures upon the discipline of pathology, and examines possible outcomes. There is a sense of excitement and adventure. Active adaption and innovation are required. The new AIMM, incorporating DMP, seeks to position itself for a central role in this process.

  9. Deep brain stimulation, brain maps and personalized medicine: lessons from the human genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J; Shapiro, Zachary E

    2014-01-01

    Although the appellation of personalized medicine is generally attributed to advanced therapeutics in molecular medicine, deep brain stimulation (DBS) can also be so categorized. Like its medical counterpart, DBS is a highly personalized intervention that needs to be tailored to a patient's individual anatomy. And because of this, DBS like more conventional personalized medicine, can be highly specific where the object of care is an N = 1. But that is where the similarities end. Besides their differing medical and surgical provenances, these two varieties of personalized medicine have had strikingly different impacts. The molecular variant, though of a more recent vintage has thrived and is experiencing explosive growth, while DBS still struggles to find a sustainable therapeutic niche. Despite its promise, and success as a vetted treatment for drug resistant Parkinson's Disease, DBS has lagged in broadening its development, often encountering regulatory hurdles and financial barriers necessary to mount an adequate number of quality trials. In this paper we will consider why DBS-or better yet neuromodulation-has encountered these challenges and contrast this experience with the more successful advance of personalized medicine. We will suggest that personalized medicine and DBS's differential performance can be explained as a matter of timing and complexity. We believe that DBS has struggled because it has been a journey of scientific exploration conducted without a map. In contrast to molecular personalized medicine which followed the mapping of the human genome and the Human Genome Project, DBS preceded plans for the mapping of the human brain. We believe that this sequence has given personalized medicine a distinct advantage and that the fullest potential of DBS will be realized both as a cartographical or electrophysiological probe and as a modality of personalized medicine.

  10. [PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO PATIENT WITH CHRONIC WOUND IN FAMILY MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinožić, T; Katić, M; Kovačević, J

    2016-01-01

    It can be said that the occurrence and development of wounds, healing, delayed healing, and the notion of chronic wound are some of the basic characteristics of all living beings. When it comes to people, there are a number of processes that take place during wound healing, and even under ideal circumstances, they create a functionally less valuable skin tissue, along with structural and functional changes. Fibrosis in the form of hypertrophic scars and keloids, contractures and adhesions are examples of excessive healing. Microcirculation is significantly different from healthy skin circulation with consequential formation of local hypoxia and stagnation in lymph flow with edema. Poor functionality of the scar tissue, particularly in the areas exposed to stronger forces, can cause forming of wounds. Such wounds are hard to heal despite the inexistence of other possible reasons for delayed healing, precisely because of their poor functionality and placement. The presence of wound requiring long-term treatment affects all areas of patient life and leads to decline in the quality of life. Exemplified by case presentation of a patient with post-traumatic wound in the scar area, in our office we showed a model of care based on the principle of overall personalized care with the biopsychosocial approach. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures included wound assessment, biofilm and lymphedema detection, assessment of the patient’s psychosocial status, risk factors for wound healing, vascular ultrasound diagnostics, carboxytherapy as specialized adjuvant therapy, use of modern wound dressings, and compression therapy. Supportive psychotherapy was conducted in positive communication environment during treatment. In this way, in an atmosphere of cooperation with the patient, it was possible not only to influence the process of wound healing as the primary objective, but also to improve the quality of the patient’s life, as well as to influence our professional

  11. Omic personality: implications of stable transcript and methylation profiles for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rubina; Sivadas, Ambily; Agrawal, Vartika; Tian, Haozheng; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg

    2015-08-13

    Personalized medicine is predicated on the notion that individual biochemical and genomic profiles are relatively constant in times of good health and to some extent predictive of disease or therapeutic response. We report a pilot study quantifying gene expression and methylation profile consistency over time, addressing the reasons for individual uniqueness, and its relation to N = 1 phenotypes. Whole blood samples from four African American women, four Caucasian women, and four Caucasian men drawn from the Atlanta Center for Health Discovery and Well Being study at three successive 6-month intervals were profiled by RNA-Seq, miRNA-Seq, and Illumina Methylation 450 K arrays. Standard regression approaches were used to evaluate the proportion of variance for each type of omic measure among individuals, and to quantify correlations among measures and with clinical attributes related to wellness. Longitudinal omic profiles were in general highly consistent over time, with an average of 67 % variance in transcript abundance, 42 % in CpG methylation level (but 88 % for the most differentiated CpG per gene), and 50 % in miRNA abundance among individuals, which are all comparable to 74 % variance among individuals for 74 clinical traits. One third of the variance could be attributed to differential blood cell type abundance, which was also fairly stable over time, and a lesser amount to expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) effects. Seven conserved axes of covariance that capture diverse aspects of immune function explained over half of the variance. These axes also explained a considerable proportion of individually extreme transcript abundance, namely approximately 100 genes that were significantly up-regulated or down-regulated in each person and were in some cases enriched for relevant gene activities that plausibly associate with clinical attributes. A similar fraction of genes had individually divergent methylation levels, but these did not overlap with the

  12. Social deprivation, population dependency ratio and an extended hospital episode - Insights from acute medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, Seán; Dalton, Ann; Byrne, Declan; Conway, Richard; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission; this study aimed to investigate the extent to which Deprivation status and the population Dependency Ratio influenced extended hospital episodes. All Emergency Medical admissions (75,018 episodes of 41,728 patients) over 12 years (2002-2013) categorized by quintile of Deprivation Index and Population Dependency Rates (proportion of non-working/working) were evaluated against length of stay (LOS). Patients with an Extended LOS (ELOS), >30 days, were investigated, by Deprivation status, Illness Severity and Co-morbidity status. Univariate and multi-variable risk estimates (Odds Rates or Incidence Rate Ratios) were calculated, using truncated Poisson regression. Hospital episodes with ELOS had a frequency of 11.5%; their median LOS (IQR) was 55.0 (38.8, 97.6) days utilizing 57.6% of all bed days by all 75,018 emergency medical admissions. The Deprivation Index independently predicted the rate of such ELOS admissions; these increased approximately five-fold (rate/1000 population) over the Deprivation Quintiles with model adjusted predicted admission rates of for Q1 0.93 (95% CI: 0.86, 0.99), Q22.63 (95% CI: 2.55, 2.71), Q3 3.84 (95% CI: 3.77, 3.91), Q4 3.42 (95% CI: 3.37, 3.48) and Q5 4.38 (95% CI: 4.22, 4.54). Similarly the Population Dependency Ratio Quintiles (dependent to working structure of the population by small area units) independently predicted extended LOS admissions. The admission of patients with an ELOS is strongly influenced by the Deprivation status and the population Dependency Ratio of the catchment area. These factors interact, with both high deprivation and Dependency cohorts having a major influence on the numbers of emergency medical admission patients with an extended hospital episode. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Personalized Medicine in Pediatrics : The Clinical Potential of Orodispersible Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J. Carolina; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Hanff, Lidwien M; Frijlink, Henderik W

    Children frequently receive medicines that are designed for adults. The dose of commercially available products is adapted, mostly based on the child's bodyweight, thereby neglecting differences in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics parameters. If commercial products are unsuitable for

  14. Personality profile and coping resources of family medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-14

    Sep 14, 2009 ... A cross-sectional study of 44 out of 45 (98% response rate) family medicine vocational trainees at the Medical ... b Department of Psychology, University of Limpopo (Medunsa Campus), Pretoria ... The cultural diversity of the.

  15. Extending Halogen-based Medicinal Chemistry to Proteins: IODO-INSULIN AS A CASE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, Krystel; Pandyarajan, Vijay; Phillips, Nelson B; Smith, Brian J; Menting, John G; Whittaker, Jonathan; Lawrence, Michael C; Meuwly, Markus; Weiss, Michael A

    2016-12-30

    Insulin, a protein critical for metabolic homeostasis, provides a classical model for protein design with application to human health. Recent efforts to improve its pharmaceutical formulation demonstrated that iodination of a conserved tyrosine (Tyr B26 ) enhances key properties of a rapid-acting clinical analog. Moreover, the broad utility of halogens in medicinal chemistry has motivated the use of hybrid quantum- and molecular-mechanical methods to study proteins. Here, we (i) undertook quantitative atomistic simulations of 3-[iodo-Tyr B26 ]insulin to predict its structural features, and (ii) tested these predictions by X-ray crystallography. Using an electrostatic model of the modified aromatic ring based on quantum chemistry, the calculations suggested that the analog, as a dimer and hexamer, exhibits subtle differences in aromatic-aromatic interactions at the dimer interface. Aromatic rings (Tyr B16 , Phe B24 , Phe B25 , 3-I-Tyr B26 , and their symmetry-related mates) at this interface adjust to enable packing of the hydrophobic iodine atoms within the core of each monomer. Strikingly, these features were observed in the crystal structure of a 3-[iodo-Tyr B26 ]insulin analog (determined as an R 6 zinc hexamer). Given that residues B24-B30 detach from the core on receptor binding, the environment of 3-I-Tyr B26 in a receptor complex must differ from that in the free hormone. Based on the recent structure of a "micro-receptor" complex, we predict that 3-I-Tyr B26 engages the receptor via directional halogen bonding and halogen-directed hydrogen bonding as follows: favorable electrostatic interactions exploiting, respectively, the halogen's electron-deficient σ-hole and electronegative equatorial band. Inspired by quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics, such "halogen engineering" promises to extend principles of medicinal chemistry to proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Personal Construction of Cough Medicine among Young Substance Abusers in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cough medicine abuse is a growing problem in many places, there is no study examining the views of young substance abusers toward cough medicine. The objective of this study was to examine personal constructions of cough medicine abusers via the repertory grid tests (=11. Several observations are highlighted from the study. First, personal constructions of cough medicine were mixed, including the benefits and harmful effects of its abuse. Second, although the informants perceived cough medicine to be addictive and harmful, they perceived cough medicine to be less addictive and less harmful than did heroin. Third, while the informants construed cough medicine to be similar to ketamine and marijuana, they also perceived cough medicine to possess some characteristics of heroin. Fourth, relative to the construed similarity between heroin and the gateway drugs (cigarette, beer, and liquor, the informants construed cough medicine to be more similar to the gateway drugs. Finally, a higher level of perceived dissimilarity between cough medicine and gateway drugs was related to a higher level of perceived harm of cough medicine abuse.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine used by persons with functional gastrointestinal disorders to alleviate symptom distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stake-Nilsson, Kerstin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Unge, Peter; Wengström, Yvonne

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the complementary and alternative medicine methods most commonly used to alleviate symptom distress in persons with functional gastrointestinal disorders. People with functional gastrointestinal disorders face many challenges in their everyday lives, and each individual has his/her own way of dealing with this illness. The experience of illness often leads persons with functional gastrointestinal disorders to complementary and alternative medicine as a viable healthcare choice. Quantitative and describing design. A study-specific complementary and alternative medicine questionnaire was used, including questions about complementary and alternative medicine methods used and the perceived effects of each method. Efficacy assessments for each method were preventive effect, partial symptom relief, total symptom relief or no effect. A total of 137 persons with functional gastrointestinal disorders answered the questionnaire, 62% (n = 85) women and 38% (n = 52) men. A total of 28 different complementary and alternative medicine methods were identified and grouped into four categories: nutritional, drug/biological, psychological activity and physical activity. All persons had tried at least one method, and most methods provided partial symptom relief. Persons with functional gastrointestinal disorders commonly use complementary and alternative medicine methods to alleviate symptoms. Nurses have a unique opportunity to expand their roles in this group of patients. Increased knowledge of complementary and alternative medicine practices would enable a more comprehensive patient assessment and a better plan for meaningful interventions that meet the needs of individual patients. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Implementation of comparative effectiveness research in personalized medicine applications in oncology: current and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Manca, Andrea; Keizer, Julia; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine (PM) or precision medicine has been defined as an innovative approach that takes into account individual differences in people's genes, environments, and lifestyles in prevention and treatment of disease. In PM, genomic information may contribute to the molecular understanding

  19. The Yang-Tonifying Herbal Medicine Cynomorium songaricum Extends Lifespan and Delays Aging in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ping Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is highly correlated with the progressive loss of physiological function, including cognitive behavior and reproductive capacity, as well as an increased susceptibility to diseases; therefore, slowing age-related degeneration could greatly contribute to human health. Cynomorium songaricum Rupr. (CS is traditionally used to improve sexual function and treat kidney dysfunction in traditional Chinese medicine, although little is known about whether CS has effects on longevity. Here, we show that CS supplementation in the diet extends both the mean and maximum lifespan of adult female flies. The increase in lifespan with CS was correlated with higher resistance to oxidative stress and starvation and lower lipid hydroperoxides (LPO levels. Additionally, the lifespan extension was accompanied by beneficial effects, such as improved mating readiness, increased fecundity, and suppression of age-related learning impairment in aged flies. These findings demonstrate the important antiaging effects of CS and indicate the potential applicability of dietary intervention with CS to enhance health and prevent multiple age-related diseases.

  20. Franz Anton Mesmer, an introverted personality in medicine and film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Enrique D’OTTAVIO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a controversial figure in Medicine: Franz Anton Mesmer, who lived during the 18th century and the early 19th century. A biographical context, supported in different authors, explains his professional heterodoxy and his eventual legacy to Medicine, providing simultaneously a referential framework for the equally debatable film Mesmer (1994 and allowing a comparison between the historical truthfulness and the non historical changes made in favour of cinematographic language. Historical film with well-matched wardrobe, approaches to us a polemic physician considered just a medical pioneer or, in contrast, a mere fake linked with occultism and swindle.

  1. Metabolomics-based systems biology and personalized medicine: Moving towards n = 1 clinical trials?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J. van der; Hankemeier, T.; McBurney, R.N.

    2006-01-01

    Personalized medicine - defined as customized medical care for each patient's unique condition - in the broader context of personalized health, will make significant strides forward when a systems approach is implemented to achieve the ultimate in disease phenotyping and to create novel therapeutics

  2. Novel Applications of Metabolomics in Personalized Medicine: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingbing; He, Xuyun; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2017-07-13

    Interindividual variability in drug responses and disease susceptibility is common in the clinic. Currently, personalized medicine is highly valued, the idea being to prescribe the right medicine to the right patient. Metabolomics has been increasingly applied in evaluating the therapeutic outcomes of clinical drugs by correlating the baseline metabolic profiles of patients with their responses, i.e., pharmacometabonomics, as well as prediction of disease susceptibility among population in advance, i.e., patient stratification. The accelerated advance in metabolomics technology pinpoints the huge potential of its application in personalized medicine. In current review, we discussed the novel applications of metabolomics with typical examples in evaluating drug therapy and patient stratification, and underlined the potential of metabolomics in personalized medicine in the future.

  3. The Symbiotic Relationship Between Operational Military Medicine, Tactical Medicine, and Wilderness Medicine: A View Through a Personal Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Craig H

    2017-06-01

    There are direct and indirect linkages and a form of symbiosis between operational military medicine from World War II and present wilderness medicine, from the beginnings to contemporary practice, and the more recently evolved field of tactical emergency medical support. Each of these relationships will be explored from the historical perspective of the Department of Military & Emergency Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences from 1982 to the present. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Scientific-practical and legal problems of implementation of the personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdieniezhnykh, N O; Reznikova, V V; Rossylna, O V

    2017-09-01

    The article is devoted to the comprehensive analysis of scientific, practical and legal issues of personalized medicine that is a rapidly developing science-driven approach to healthcare. It is concluded that there is lack of general legal framework for the encouragement of scientific researches and practical implementation in this field. The article shows foreign experience and prospects for the introduction of personalized medicine as a key concept of healthcare system, which is based on a selection of diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive measures that would be the most effective for a particular person in view of individual characteristics. The conclusions and proposals to improve the current legislation and development of personalized medicine in Ukraine are suggested.

  5. Major depressive disorder: mechanism-based prescribing for personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saltiel PF

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Philip F Saltiel,1 Daniel I Silvershein2 1Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine/Langone Medical Center New York University Behavioral Health Programs, New York University Pearl Barlow Center for Memory Evaluation and Treatment, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine/Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Individual patients with depression present with unique symptom clusters – before, during, and even after treatment. The prevalence of persistent, unresolved symptoms and their contribution to patient functioning and disease progression emphasize the importance of finding the right treatment choice at the onset and the utility of switching medications based on suboptimal responses. Our primary goal as clinicians is to improve patient function and quality of life. In fact, feelings of well-being and the return to premorbid levels of functioning are frequently rated by patients as being more important than symptom relief. However, functional improvements often lag behind resolution of mood, attributed in large part to persistent and functionally impairing symptoms – namely, fatigue, sleep/wake disturbance, and cognitive dysfunction. Thus, patient outcomes can be optimized by deconstructing each patient’s depressive profile to its component symptoms and specifically targeting those domains that differentially limit patient function. This article will provide an evidence-based framework within which clinicians may tailor pharmacotherapy to patient symptomatology for improved treatment outcomes. Keywords: MDD, tailored pharmacotherapy, patient-specific profile, individualized pharmacotherapy

  6. International conference on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    During the last decade, technological innovations have been introduced into medical practice to support new diagnostic and treatment modalities that involve the use of radiation. These innovations frequently depend on advanced, high-speed computer systems that operate with digitally processed information right up to the analogue display presented to the decision maker. The safety and effectiveness of the diagnosis and treatment provided to patients demand multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to develop and monitor the equipment and confirm the integrity of its output. Quality control (QC) of individual components is used to ensure these new devices are functioning properly at each step in the chain. Nevertheless, a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) system is required to guarantee to patients that these medical procedures will yield valuable information or provide needed treatment that can be implemented properly and used to achieve a positive impact on their health. This conference focused on the QC tests and QA systems used in radiation medicine, particularly for new and emerging technologies. The conference provided a unique opportunity to deal with QA within several disciplines: In radiation oncology, a systematic approach is being developed to examine the impact of introducing new technologies in terms of treatment outcomes. The evidence will be based on assessing improved quality of life due to fewer complications and increased longevity due to better local control of disease. In nuclear medicine, QA objectives are the improvement of the quality and reproducibility of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic treatments, which should bring the necessary information and therapeutic results with the smallest amount of administered activity. Overall, the system implemented should be customer (patient) oriented in order to guarantee a service that meets the highest achievable professional standards. Departmental organization should include QC

  7. International conference on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, technological innovations have been introduced into medical practice to support new diagnostic and treatment modalities that involve the use of radiation. These innovations frequently depend on advanced, high-speed computer systems that operate with digitally processed information right up to the analogue display presented to the decision maker. The safety and effectiveness of the diagnosis and treatment provided to patients demand multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to develop and monitor the equipment and confirm the integrity of its output. Quality control (QC) of individual components is used to ensure these new devices are functioning properly at each step in the chain. Nevertheless, a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) system is required to guarantee to patients that these medical procedures will yield valuable information or provide needed treatment that can be implemented properly and used to achieve a positive impact on their health. This conference focused on the QC tests and QA systems used in radiation medicine, particularly for new and emerging technologies. The conference provided a unique opportunity to deal with QA within several disciplines: In radiation oncology, a systematic approach is being developed to examine the impact of introducing new technologies in terms of treatment outcomes. The evidence will be based on assessing improved quality of life due to fewer complications and increased longevity due to better local control of disease. In nuclear medicine, QA objectives are the improvement of the quality and reproducibility of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic treatments, which should bring the necessary information and therapeutic results with the smallest amount of administered activity. Overall, the system implemented should be customer (patient) oriented in order to guarantee a service that meets the highest achievable professional standards. Departmental organization should include QC

  8. What does big data mean for personalized medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieverink, Floor; Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth; Braakman-Jansen, Louise Marie Antoinette; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The rapid and ongoing digitalization of society leads to an exponential growth of both structured and unstructured data, so-called Big Data. This wealth of information opens the door to the development of more sophisticated personalized health technologies. The analysis of log data from

  9. Systems biology technologies enable personalized traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), an alternative medicine, focuses on the treatment of human disease via the integrity of the close relationship between body and syndrome analysis. It remains a form of primary care in most Asian countries and its characteristics showcase the great advantages of personalized medicine. Although this approach to disease diagnosis, prognosis and treatment has served the medical establishment well for thousands of years, it has serious shortcomings in the era of modern medicine that stem from its reliance on reductionist principles of experimentation and analysis. In this way, systems biology offers the potential to personalize medicine, facilitating the provision of the right care to the right patient at the right time. We expect that systems biology will have a major impact on future personalized therapeutic approaches which herald the future of medicine. Here we summarize current trends and critically review the potential limitations and future prospects of such treatments. Some characteristic examples are presented to highlight the application of this groundbreaking platform to personalized TCM as well as some of the necessary milestones for moving systems biology of a state-of-the-art nature into mainstream health care.

  10. Asthma pharmacogenetics and the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega VE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Victor E Ortega, Deborah A Meyers, Eugene R Bleecker Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, Pulmonary Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Human genetics research will be critical to the development of genetic profiles for personalized or precision medicine in asthma. Genetic profiles will consist of gene variants that predict individual disease susceptibility and risk for progression, predict which pharmacologic therapies will result in a maximal therapeutic benefit, and predict whether a therapy will result in an adverse response and should be avoided in a given individual. Pharmacogenetic studies of the glucocorticoid, leukotriene, and β2-adrenergic receptor pathways have focused on candidate genes within these pathways and, in addition to a small number of genome-wide association studies, have identified genetic loci associated with therapeutic responsiveness. This review summarizes these pharmacogenetic discoveries and the future of genetic profiles for personalized medicine in asthma. The benefit of a personalized, tailored approach to health care delivery is needed in the development of expensive biologic drugs directed at a specific biologic pathway. Prior pharmacogenetic discoveries, in combination with additional variants identified in future studies, will form the basis for future genetic profiles for personalized tailored approaches to maximize therapeutic benefit for an individual asthmatic while minimizing the risk for adverse events. Keywords: asthma, pharmacogenetics, response heterogeneity, single nucleotide polymorphism, genome-wide association study

  11. A review of international coverage and pricing strategies for personalized medicine and orphan drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiar, Irina

    2017-12-01

    Personalized medicine and orphan drugs share many characteristics-both target small patient populations, have uncertainties regarding efficacy and safety at payer submission, and frequently have high prices. Given personalized medicine's rising importance, this review summarizes international coverage and pricing strategies for personalized medicine and orphan drugs as well as their impact on therapy development incentives, payer budgets, and therapy access and utilization. PubMed, Health Policy Reference Center, EconLit, Google Scholar, and references were searched through February 2017 for articles presenting primary data. Sixty-nine articles summarizing 42 countries' strategies were included. Therapy evaluation criteria varied between countries, as did patient cost-share. Payers primarily valued clinical effectiveness; cost was only considered by some. These differences result in inequities in orphan drug access, particularly in smaller and lower-income countries. The uncertain reimbursement process hinders diagnostic testing. Payer surveys identified lack of comparative effectiveness evidence as a chief complaint, while manufacturers sought more clarity on payer evidence requirements. Despite lack of strong evidence, orphan drugs largely receive positive coverage decisions, while personalized medicine diagnostics do not. As more personalized medicine and orphan drugs enter the market, registries can provide better quality evidence on their efficacy and safety. Payers need systematic assessment strategies that are communicated with more transparency. Further studies are necessary to compare the implications of different payer approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Intelligent Techniques Using Molecular Data Analysis in Leukaemia: An Opportunity for Personalized Medicine Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjar, Haneen; Adelson, David; Brown, Fred; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2017-01-01

    The use of intelligent techniques in medicine has brought a ray of hope in terms of treating leukaemia patients. Personalized treatment uses patient's genetic profile to select a mode of treatment. This process makes use of molecular technology and machine learning, to determine the most suitable approach to treating a leukaemia patient. Until now, no reviews have been published from a computational perspective concerning the development of personalized medicine intelligent techniques for leukaemia patients using molecular data analysis. This review studies the published empirical research on personalized medicine in leukaemia and synthesizes findings across studies related to intelligence techniques in leukaemia, with specific attention to particular categories of these studies to help identify opportunities for further research into personalized medicine support systems in chronic myeloid leukaemia. A systematic search was carried out to identify studies using intelligence techniques in leukaemia and to categorize these studies based on leukaemia type and also the task, data source, and purpose of the studies. Most studies used molecular data analysis for personalized medicine, but future advancement for leukaemia patients requires molecular models that use advanced machine-learning methods to automate decision-making in treatment management to deliver supportive medical information to the patient in clinical practice.

  13. Personalized Medicine in a New Genomic Era: Ethical and Legal Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Maria; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Hussain, Syed Ather; Madadin, Mohammed; Menezes, Ritesh G

    2017-08-01

    The genome of two completely unrelated individuals is quite similar apart from minor variations called single nucleotide polymorphisms which contribute to the uniqueness of each and every person. These single nucleotide polymorphisms are of great interest clinically as they are useful in figuring out the susceptibility of certain individuals to particular diseases and for recognizing varied responses to pharmacological interventions. This gives rise to the idea of 'personalized medicine' as an exciting new therapeutic science in this genomic era. Personalized medicine suggests a unique treatment strategy based on an individual's genetic make-up. Its key principles revolve around applied pharmaco-genomics, pharmaco-kinetics and pharmaco-proteomics. Herein, the ethical and legal aspects of personalized medicine in a new genomic era are briefly addressed. The ultimate goal is to comprehensively recognize all relevant forms of genetic variation in each individual and be able to interpret this information in a clinically meaningful manner within the ambit of ethical and legal considerations. The authors of this article firmly believe that personalized medicine has the potential to revolutionize the current landscape of medicine as it makes its way into clinical practice.

  14. Printing Tablets with Fully Customizable Release Profiles for Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yajuan; Soh, Siowling

    2015-12-16

    Personalizing the release profiles of drugs is important for different people with different medical and biological conditions. A technically simple and low-cost method to fabricate fully customizable tablets that can deliver drugs with any type of release profile is described. The customization is intuitively straightforward: the desired profile can simply be "drawn" and printed by a 3D printer. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. An inter-professional approach to personalized medicine education: one institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formea, Christine M; Nicholson, Wayne T; Vitek, Carolyn Rohrer

    2015-03-01

    Personalized medicine offers the promise of better diagnoses, targeted therapies and individualized treatment plans. Pharmacogenomics is an integral component of personalized medicine; it aids in the prediction of an individual's response to medications. Despite growing public acceptance and emerging clinical evidence, this rapidly expanding field of medicine is slow to be adopted and utilized by healthcare providers, although many believe that they should be knowledgeable and able to apply pharmacogenomics in clinical practice. Institutional infrastructure must be built to support pharmacogenomic implementation. Multidisciplinary education for healthcare providers is a critical component for pharmacogenomics to achieve its full potential to optimize patient care. We describe our recent experience at the Mayo Clinic implementing pharmacogenomics education in a large, academic healthcare system facilitated by the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

  16. Risk management profile of etoricoxib: an example of personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Patrignani

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Paola Patrignani, Stefania Tacconelli, Marta L CaponeDepartment of Medicine and Center of Excellence on Aging, “G. D’Annunzio” University School of Medicine, and “Gabriele D’Annunzio” University Foundation, CeSI, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: The development of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs selective for cyclooxygenase (COX-2 (named coxibs has been driven by the aim of reducing the incidence of serious gastrointestinal (GI adverse events associated with the administration of traditional (t NSAIDs – mainly dependent on the inhibition of COX-1 in GI tract and platelets. However, their use has unravelled the important protective role of COX-2 for the cardiovascular (CV system, mainly through the generation of prostacyclin. In a recent nested-case control study, we found that patients taking NSAIDs (both coxibs and tNSAIDs had a 35% increase risk of myocardial infarction. The increased incidence of thrombotic events associated with profound inhibition of COX-2-dependent prostacyclin by coxibs and tNSAIDs can be mitigated, even if not obliterated, by a complete suppression of platelet COX-1 activity. However, most tNSAIDs and coxibs are functional COX-2 selective for the platelet (ie, they cause a profound suppression of COX-2 associated with insufficient inhibition of platelet COX-1 to translate into inhibition of platelet function, which explains their shared CV toxicity. The development of genetic and biochemical markers will help to identify the responders to NSAIDs or who are uniquely susceptible at developing thrombotic or GI events by COX inhibition. We will describe possible strategies to reduce the side effects of etoricoxib by using biochemical markers of COX inhibition, such as whole blood COX-2 and the assessment of prostacyclin biosynthesis in vivo.Keywords: etoricoxib, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, COX-2, gastrointestinal toxicity, cardiovascular toxicity, prostacyclin

  17. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-09-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  18. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L. [Valladolid Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E. [Hospital Clinico Univ., Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of {sup 131}I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  19. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L.; Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E.

    2006-01-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of 131 I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  20. Psychiatry and emergency medicine: medical student and physician attitudes toward homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden curriculum" in medical education, in which values are communicated from teacher to student outside of the formal instruction. A group of 79 students on Psychiatry and 66 on Emergency Medicine clerkships were surveyed at the beginning and end of their rotation regarding their attitudes toward homeless persons by use of the Health Professionals' Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI). The HPATHI was also administered to 31 Psychiatry residents and faculty and 41 Emergency Medicine residents and faculty one time during the course of this study. For Psychiatry clerks, t-tests showed significant differences pre- and post-clerkship experiences on 2 of the 23 items on the HPATHI. No statistically significant differences were noted for the Emergency Medicine students. An analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences on 7 out of the 23 survey questions for residents and faculty in Psychiatry, as compared with those in Emergency Medicine. Results suggest that medical students showed small differences in their attitudes toward homeless people following clerkships in Psychiatry but not in Emergency Medicine. Regarding resident and faculty results, significant differences between specialties were noted, with Psychiatry residents and faculty exhibiting more favorable attitudes toward homeless persons than residents and faculty in Emergency Medicine. Given that medical student competencies should be addressing the broader social issues of homelessness, medical schools need to first understand the attitudes of medical students to such issues, and then develop curricula to overcome inaccurate or stigmatizing beliefs.

  1. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers.

  2. Getting personal: can systems medicine integrate scientific and humanistic conceptions of the patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Henrik; Ulvestad, Elling; Eriksen, Thor Eirik; Getz, Linn

    2014-12-01

    The practicing doctor, and most obviously the primary care clinician who encounters the full complexity of patients, faces several fundamental but intrinsically related theoretical and practical challenges - strongly actualized by so-called medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and multi-morbidity. Systems medicine, which is the emerging application of systems biology to medicine and a merger of molecular biomedicine, systems theory and mathematical modelling, has recently been proposed as a primary care-centered strategy for medicine that promises to meet these challenges. Significantly, it has been proposed to do so in a way that at first glance may seem compatible with humanistic medicine. More specifically, it is promoted as an integrative, holistic, personalized and patient-centered approach. In this article, we ask whether and to what extent systems medicine can provide a comprehensive conceptual account of and approach to the patient and the root causes of health problems that can be reconciled with the concept of the patient as a person, which is an essential theoretical element in humanistic medicine. We answer this question through a comparative analysis of the theories of primary care doctor Eric Cassell and systems biologist Denis Noble. We argue that, although systems biological concepts, notably Noble's theory of biological relativity and downward causation, are highly relevant for understanding human beings and health problems, they are nevertheless insufficient in fully bridging the gap to humanistic medicine. Systems biologists are currently unable to conceptualize living wholes, and seem unable to account for meaning, value and symbolic interaction, which are central concepts in humanistic medicine, as constraints on human health. Accordingly, systems medicine as currently envisioned cannot be said to be integrative, holistic, personalized or patient-centered in a humanistic medical sense. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical

  3. Analysis of Personal Dosimetry for Nuclear Medicine Staff in Ten-Year Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poropat, M.; Dodig, D.; Ciglar, M.; Tezak, S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of personal dosimetry for nuclear medicine personnel in our department in a ten-year period. We have analyzed personal doses for 80 employees in nuclear medicine in a ten year period that we divided into two five year periods (from 2000 to 2004 and from 2005 to 2009). The personnel was dived into 8 groups according to their working assignments due to different radiation exposure from various radioisotopes in different wards in nuclear medicine: nuclear medicine specialists, technologists in scintigraphy ward, personnel of physics ward, ward for radiochemistry and radioimmunology, clinical ward and ultrasound ward, cleaning personnel, administrative personnel. We have compared average dose per person in particular ward in two five year periods. All doses for all personnel were in the permissible limits prescribed by the authorities. Higher average dose per person in a first five year period was detected in two wards, scintigraphy ward and ward for radiochemistry and radioimmunology due to the nature of their working assignments (preparation and application of radiopharmaceuticals, contact with patients who have received radiopharmaceutical). The decrease in the average dose per person was noticed in a second five-year period, especially in the wards with personnel that had no prior education in ionizing radiation protection. The decrease of dose was from 7.5 % to 84.2 %. We think that the decrease of average dose per person in a second five-year period was not only the result of the increased personal protection measures but also the result of continuing education of nuclear medicine personnel that is obligatory by the Law for ionizing radiation protection from year 1999, and the results from a ten-year period show its positive effect on radiation protection. (author)

  4. Regulation of pharmacokinetics and targeting-confirmative personalized medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Describedare the current developmental state of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs), trials to control the biobehavior (pharmacokinetics, PK) of RP based on molecular targeting strategy, and application of imaging to personalized medicare. RPs are currently used for imaging diagnosis mainly by positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and for treatment of various diseases. Molecular imaging, visualization of PK of RP molecule, is expected to greatly contribute to medicare hereafter. For instance, 123 I-IAMT (3-iodo-alpha-methyl-tyrosine), made resistant to metabolic degradation, has been found to be a selective probe of cerebral transporter (Tp) function of amino acids (AA). Dopamine analogues are under development aiming to diagnosis of dopaminergic function before, during and post therapy of Parkinsonism by such molecular imaging. The diagnostic problem of the distribution of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in PET to other normal organs than tumor may be solved by recent active studies of RP post-FDG for AA analogues as an AA Tp probe like 18 F-FAMT (3-fluoro-AMT). RP imaging where its PK in an individual patient can be quantitated, is also applicable to decide the personalized effective, safe dose. Control of RP PK by Tp inhibitor and by serum protein binding replacing agent has been shown possible for 125 I-IAMT in the mouse tumor and for 123 I-IMP (N-isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine) in the monkey brain, respectively. Internal RP therapy is effective for cancers without specifying their lesion site. 131 I-iodide is prescribed for thyroid diseases and the diagnostic 123 I-iodide is used for decision of the most appropriate dose in the same patient. Treatment/monitoring use of recent 90 Y-/ 111 In-CD20 antibody anti-cancer assures the safety of patients. Next generation personalized medicare, the targeting confirmative therapy, will be in practice to avoid adverse effect and promote efficacy with therapeutic strategy decided by

  5. [Biomechanical modeling of pelvic organ mobility: towards personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Michel; Rubod, Chrystèle; Vallet, Alexandra; Witz, Jean-François; Brieu, Mathias

    2011-11-01

    Female pelvic mobility is crucial for urinary, bowel and sexual function and for vaginal delivery. This mobility is ensured by a complex organ suspension system composed of ligaments, fascia and muscles. Impaired pelvic mobility affects one in three women of all ages and can be incapacitating. Surgical management has a high failure rate, largely owing to poor knowledge of the organ support system, including the barely discernible ligamentous system. We propose a 3D digital model of the pelvic cavity based on MRI images and quantitative tools, designed to locate the pelvic ligaments. We thus obtain a coherent anatomical and functional model which can be used to analyze pelvic pathophysiology. This work represents a first step towards creating a tool for localizing and characterizing the source of pelvic imbalance. We examine possible future applications of this model, in terms of personalized therapy and prevention.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing: From Understanding Biology to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Meder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within just a few years, the new methods for high-throughput next-generation sequencing have generated completely novel insights into the heritability and pathophysiology of human disease. In this review, we wish to highlight the benefits of the current state-of-the-art sequencing technologies for genetic and epigenetic research. We illustrate how these technologies help to constantly improve our understanding of genetic mechanisms in biological systems and summarize the progress made so far. This can be exemplified by the case of heritable heart muscle diseases, so-called cardiomyopathies. Here, next-generation sequencing is able to identify novel disease genes, and first clinical applications demonstrate the successful translation of this technology into personalized patient care.

  7. Combining medical informatics and bioinformatics toward tools for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachan, B D; Simmons, M K; Subramanian, P; Temkin, J M

    2003-01-01

    Key bioinformatics and medical informatics research areas need to be identified to advance knowledge and understanding of disease risk factors and molecular disease pathology in the 21 st century toward new diagnoses, prognoses, and treatments. Three high-impact informatics areas are identified: predictive medicine (to identify significant correlations within clinical data using statistical and artificial intelligence methods), along with pathway informatics and cellular simulations (that combine biological knowledge with advanced informatics to elucidate molecular disease pathology). Initial predictive models have been developed for a pilot study in Huntington's disease. An initial bioinformatics platform has been developed for the reconstruction and analysis of pathways, and work has begun on pathway simulation. A bioinformatics research program has been established at GE Global Research Center as an important technology toward next generation medical diagnostics. We anticipate that 21 st century medical research will be a combination of informatics tools with traditional biology wet lab research, and that this will translate to increased use of informatics techniques in the clinic.

  8. Science, humanism, judgement, ethics: person-centered medicine as an emergent model of modern clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Medical University of Plovdiv (MUP) has as its motto 'Committed to humanity". But what does humanity in modern medicine mean? Is it possible to practise a form of medicine that is without humanity? In the current article, it is argued that modern medicine is increasingly being practised in a de-personalised fashion, where the patient is understood not as a unique human individual, a person, but rather as a subject or an object and more in the manner of a complex biological machine. Medicine has, it is contended, become distracted from its duty to care, comfort and console as well as to ameliorate, attenuate and cure and that the rapid development of medicine's scientific knowledge is, paradoxically, principally causative. Signal occurrences in the 'patient as a person' movement are reviewed, together with the emergence of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) and patient-centered care (PCC) movements. The characteristics of a model of medicine evolving in response to medicine's current deficiencies--person-centered healthcare (PCH)--are noted and described. In seeking to apply science with humanism, via clinical judgement, within an ethical framework, it is contended that PCH will prove to be far more responsive to the needs of the individual patient and his/her personal circumstances than current models of practice, so that neither a reductive anatomico-pathological, disease-centric model of illness (EBM), nor an aggressive patient-directed, consumerist form of care (PCC) is allowed continued dominance within modern healthcare systems. In conclusion, it is argued that PCH will enable affordable advances in biomedicine and technology to be delivered to patients within a humanistic framework of clinical practice that recognises the patient as a person and which takes full account of his/her stories, values, preferences, goals, aspirations, fears, worries, hopes, cultural context and which responds to his/her psychological, emotional, spiritual and social necessities

  9. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates.

  10. [Relevance of personal contextual factors of the ICF for use in practical social medicine and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotkamp, S; Cibis, W; Bahemann, A; Baldus, A; Behrens, J; Nyffeler, I D; Echterhoff, W; Fialka-Moser, V; Fries, W; Fuchs, H; Gmünder, H P; Gutenbrunner, C; Keller, K; Nüchtern, E; Pöthig, D; Queri, S; Rentsch, H P; Rink, M; Schian, H-M; Schian, M; Schmitt, K; Schwarze, M; Ulrich, P; von Mittelstaedt, G; Seger, W

    2014-03-01

    Personal contextual factors play an essential part in the model of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The WHO has not yet classified personal factors for global use although they impact on the functioning of persons positively or negatively. In 2010, the ICF working group of the German Society of Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP) presented a proposal for the classification of personal factors into 72 categories previously arranged in 6 chapters. Now a positioning paper has been added in order to stimulate a discussion about the fourth component of the ICF, to contribute towards a broader and common understanding about the nature of personal factors and to incite a dialogue among all those involved in health care as well as those people with or with-out health problems in order to gain a comprehensive perspective about a person's condition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Personality and social adjustment of medical cadets, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaichumchuen, Tassana; Jarmornmarn, Sirinapa; Leelayoova, Saovanee; Mungthin, Mathirut

    2009-02-01

    To determine personality and ability of social adjustment of medical cadets, Phramongkutkao College of Medicine. In addition, the factors influencing social adjustment in these medical cadets were evaluated. The study population consisted of 45 medical cadets in their second year of a 6-year medical curriculum of Phramongkutkao College of Medicine. All study medical cadets gave written informed consent. The medical cadets completed a baseline assessment including a standardized questionnaire for general information and social adjustment. Personality traits were determined by a standard personality test, the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF). The personalities of medical cadets were in between reserved and outgoing socially aware, concerns, shrewd and practical. The ability of social adjustment in these medical cadets was high. Social adjustment was significantly different between medical cadets who received different scholarships. Social adjustment of the medical cadets was positively correlated with personalities: factor C (emotionally stable), factor I (sensitivity), factor G (group conformity), factor H (social boldness), and factor Q3 (self-control), but negatively correlated with factor M (abstractedness), and factor Q2 (self-sufficiency). This study presents the unique personalities of medical cadets. Social adjustment is significantly different between medical cadets with different source of scholarships. Longitudinal study of the influence of personality and social adjustment on academic performance needs to be performed.

  12. Modelling vital success factors in adopting personalized medicine system in healthcare technology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhas C. Misra

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical engineering has grown as a vast field of research that includes many areas of engineering and technology also. Personalized Medicine is an emerging approach in today’s medicare system. It bears a very strong potential to consolidate modern e-health systems fundamentally. Scientists have already discovered some of the personalized drugs that can shift the whole medicare system into a new dimension. However, bringing the change in the whole medicare system is not an easy task. There are several factors that can affect the successful adoption of Personalized Medicine systems in the healthcare management sector. This paper aims at identifying the critical factors with the help of an empirical study. A questionnaire was distributed amongst some clinicians, clinical researchers, practitioners in pharmaceutical industries, regulatory board members, and a larger section of patients. The response data collected thereby were analyzed by using appropriate statistical methods. Based on the statistical analysis, an attempt is made to prepare a list of critical success factors in the adoption of personalized medicine in healthcare management. The study indicates that eight of the thirteen hypothesized factors have statistical relationship with “Success”. The important success factors detected are: data management, team work and composition, privacy and confidentiality, mind-set, return on investment, sufficient time, R&D and alignment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first academic paper in which an attempt has been made to model the vital critical factors for the successful implementation of Personalized Medicine in healthcare management. The study bears the promise of important applications in healthcare engineering and technology. Keywords: Healthcare management, Personalized medicine, E-health, Success factors, Medicare systems, Regression analysis

  13. PMD: designing a portable medicine dispenser for persons suffering from Alzheimer’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Roel C.J.M.; Keijers, R.; Shahid, S.; Al Mahmud, A.; Mubin, O.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the user-centred design of a medicine dispenser for persons suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The prototype was evaluated in two phases with two caregivers and two Alzheimer’s patients. Caregivers evaluated the device positively. The Alzheimer’s patients faced usability

  14. Teaching medicine of the person to medical students during the beginning of their clerkships.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Anita; Dekker, Hanke

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how medicine of the person is taught to 4th year medical students in Groningen, The Netherlands, as part of the teaching programme ‘Professional Development’. In that year, the students start with their clerkships. In this transitional phase from medical student to young

  15. Towards optimal decision making in personalized medicine : Potential value assessment of biomarkers in heart failure exemplars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Treatment selection based on average effects observed in entire target population masks variation among patients (heterogeneity) and may result in less than optimal decision making. Personalized medicine is a new and complex concept, which aims to improve health by offering more tailored and

  16. Challenges posed to the European pharmaceutical regulatory system by highly personalized medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John D; Feldschreiber, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The European pharmaceutical regulatory system has not yet been challenged by issues related to highly personalized medicines such as those to be found with active substances that affect RNA biochemistry. We review the current status of RNA-based pharmacology and present three possible case histories. The implications for the European pharmaceutical regulatory system are discussed. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Navigating legal constraints in clinical data warehousing: a case study in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Benjamin R; Nwankwo, Iheanyi; Neri, Elias; Chang, David C W; Shamardin, Lev; Hänold, Stefanie; Graf, Norbert; Forgó, Nikolaus; Coveney, Peter

    2013-04-06

    Personalized medicine relies in part upon comprehensive data on patient treatment and outcomes, both for analysis leading to improved models that provide the basis for enhanced treatment, and for direct use in clinical decision-making. A data warehouse is an information technology for combining and standardizing multiple databases. Data warehousing of clinical data is constrained by many legal and ethical considerations, owing to the sensitive nature of the data being stored. We describe an unconstrained clinical data warehousing architecture, some of the legal constraints that have led us to reconsider this architecture, and the legal and technical solutions to these constraints developed for the clinical data warehouse in the personalized medicine project p-medicine. We also propose some changes to the legal constraints that will further enable clinical research.

  18. Comparative Effectiveness Research, Genomics-Enabled Personalized Medicine, and Rapid Learning Health Care: A Common Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Kuderer, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite stunning advances in our understanding of the genetics and the molecular basis for cancer, many patients with cancer are not yet receiving therapy tailored specifically to their tumor biology. The translation of these advances into clinical practice has been hindered, in part, by the lack of evidence for biomarkers supporting the personalized medicine approach. Most stakeholders agree that the translation of biomarkers into clinical care requires evidence of clinical utility. The highest level of evidence comes from randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). However, in many instances, there may be no RCTs that are feasible for assessing the clinical utility of potentially valuable genomic biomarkers. In the absence of RCTs, evidence generation will require well-designed cohort studies for comparative effectiveness research (CER) that link detailed clinical information to tumor biology and genomic data. CER also uses systematic reviews, evidence-quality appraisal, and health outcomes research to provide a methodologic framework for assessing biologic patient subgroups. Rapid learning health care (RLHC) is a model in which diverse data are made available, ideally in a robust and real-time fashion, potentially facilitating CER and personalized medicine. Nonetheless, to realize the full potential of personalized care using RLHC requires advances in CER and biostatistics methodology and the development of interoperable informatics systems, which has been recognized by the National Cancer Institute's program for CER and personalized medicine. The integration of CER methodology and genomics linked to RLHC should enhance, expedite, and expand the evidence generation required for fully realizing personalized cancer care. PMID:23071236

  19. Structured Decision-Making: Using Personalized Medicine to Improve the Value of Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer care is often inconsistently delivered with inadequate incorporation of patient values and objective evidence into decision-making. Utilization of time limited trials of care with predefined decision points that are based on iteratively updated best evidence, tools that inform providers about a patient’s experience and values, and known information about a patient’s disease will allow superior matched care to be delivered. Personalized medicine does not merely refer to the incorporation of genetic information into clinical care, it involves utilization of the wide array of data points relevant to care, many of which are readily available at the bedside today. By pushing uptake of personalized matching available today, clinicians can better address the triple aim of improved health, lowers costs, and enhanced patient experience, and we can prepare the health care landscape for the iterative inclusion of progressively more sophisticated information as newer tests and information become available to support the personalized medicine paradigm. PMID:25562407

  20. Person-centered approaches in medicine: clinical tasks, psychological paradigms, and postnonclassic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezzich J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to demonstrate advances in methodological means suggested by Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept in association with a theoretical model of a Person-centered diagnosis and practical use of the construct for clinical psychology and medicine. This, to a greater extent, arises from the fact that the cultural-historical concept (due to its humanistic nature and epistemological content is closely related to the person-centered integrative approach. But for all that the concept corresponds to the ideals of postnonclassical model of scientific rationality with a number of ‘key’ features. Above all it manifests its “methodological maturity” to cope with open self-developing systems, which is most essential at the modern stage of scientific knowledge.The work gives consideration to ‘defining pillars’ of Person-centered approach in modern medicine, to humanistic traditions of the Russian clinical school, and high prospects in diagnostics of such mental constructs as “subjective pattern of disease” and “social situation of personal development in disease” - within the context of person-centered integrative diagnosis.This article discusses the need for implementation a cross-cultural study of subjective pattern of disease and its correlation with a particular “social situation of personality development under disease conditions”. It aims at development and substantiation of the model of person-centered integrative approach, enhancement of its diagnostic scope and, consequently, improvement of the model of person-centered care in modern psychiatry and medicine.

  1. Personalized Medicine Applied to Forensic Sciences: New Advances and Perspectives for a Tailored Forensic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santurro, Alessandro; Vullo, Anna Maria; Borro, Marina; Gentile, Giovanna; La Russa, Raffaele; Simmaco, Maurizio; Frati, Paola; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine (PM), included in P5 medicine (Personalized, Predictive, Preventive, Participative and Precision medicine) is an innovative approach to the patient, emerging from the need to tailor and to fit the profile of each individual. PM promises to dramatically impact also on forensic sciences and justice system in ways we are only beginning to understand. The application of omics (genomic, transcriptomics, epigenetics/imprintomics, proteomic and metabolomics) is ever more fundamental in the so called "molecular autopsy". Emerging fields of interest in forensic pathology are represented by diagnosis and detection of predisposing conditions to fatal thromboembolic and hypertensive events, determination of genetic variants related to sudden death, such as congenital long QT syndromes, demonstration of lesions vitality, identification of biological matrices and species diagnosis of a forensic trace on crime scenes without destruction of the DNA. The aim of this paper is to describe the state-of-art in the application of personalized medicine in forensic sciences, to understand the possibilities of integration in routine investigation of these procedures with classical post-mortem studies and to underline the importance of these new updates in medical examiners' armamentarium in determining cause of death or contributing factors to death. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Gregory J; Boyle, Scott N; Brinner, Kristin M; Osheroff, Jerome A

    2009-10-08

    Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures), and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In addition, to represent meaningful benefits to personalized

  3. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  4. Costs, Productivity, and the Utilization of Physicians’s Extenders in Air Force Primary Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    to physicians.7 Using the actual casemix and attitudes toward extenders prevailing at each demonstra- tion base and applying this least constraining...Fairchild, 17 percent; Nellis, 16 percent. The Chanute estimate is lower because its large student population presents a simple casemix , and its patients

  5. Nanomedicine-Based Neuroprotective Strategies in Patient Specific-iPSC and Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Fan Jang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, nanotechnology has attracted major interests in view of drug delivery systems and therapies against diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and many others. Nanotechnology provides the opportunity for nanoscale particles or molecules (so called “Nanomedicine” to be delivered to the targeted sites, thereby, reducing toxicity (or side effects and improving drug bioavailability. Nowadays, a great deal of nano-structured particles/vehicles has been discovered, including polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanoparticles, and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Nanomedical utilizations have already been well developed in many different aspects, including disease treatment, diagnostic, medical devices designing, and visualization (i.e., cell trafficking. However, while quite a few successful progressions on chemotherapy using nanotechnology have been developed, the implementations of nanoparticles on stem cell research are still sparsely populated. Stem cell applications and therapies are being considered to offer an outstanding potential in the treatment for numbers of maladies. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Although the exact mechanisms underlying are still unclear, iPSCs are already being considered as useful tools for drug development/screening and modeling of diseases. Recently, personalized medicines have drawn great attentions in biological and pharmaceutical studies. Generally speaking, personalized medicine is a therapeutic model that offers a customized healthcare/cure being tailored to a specific patient based on his own genetic information. Consequently, the combination of nanomedicine and iPSCs could actually be the potent arms for remedies in transplantation medicine and personalized medicine. This review will focus on current use of nanoparticles on therapeutical applications, nanomedicine

  6. [Personalized molecular medicine: new paradigms in the treatment of cochlear implant and cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, H P; Pfister, M; Friese, N; Zrenner, E; Röcken, M

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate present options for the indication of cochlear implants (CI) and new forms of treatment for head and neck cancer, melanomas and basal cell carcinomas, with emphasis on future perspectives. A literature search was performed in the PubMed database. Search parameters were "personalized medicine", "individualized medicine" and "molecular medicine". Personalized medicine based on molecular-genetic evaluation of functional proteins such as otoferlin, connexin 26 and KCNQ4 or the Usher gene is becoming increasingly important for the indication of CI in the context of infant deafness. Determination of HER2/EGFR mutations in the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene may be an important prognostic parameter for therapeutic decisions in head and neck cancer patients. In basal cell carcinoma therapy, mutations in the Hedgehog (PCTH1) and Smoothened (SMO) pathways strongly influence the indication of therapeutic Hedgehog inhibition, e.g. using small molecules. Analyses of c-Kit receptor, BRAF-600E and NRAS mutations are required for specific molecular therapy of metastasizing melanomas. The significant advances in the field of specific molecular therapy are best illustrated by the availability of the first gene therapeutic procedures for treatment of RPE65-induced infantile retinal degradation. The aim of personalized molecular medicine is to identify patients who will respond particularly positively or negatively (e.g. in terms of adverse side effects) to a therapy using the methods of molecular medicine. This should allow a specific therapy to be successfully applied or preclude its indication in order to avoid serious adverse side effects. This approach serves to stratify patients for adequate treatment.

  7. CCR+: Metadata Based Extended Personal Health Record Data Model Interoperable with the ASTM CCR Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Jang, Tae Hun; Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-01-01

    Extension of the standard model while retaining compliance with it is a challenging issue because there is currently no method for semantically or syntactically verifying an extended data model. A metadata-based extended model, named CCR+, was designed and implemented to achieve interoperability between standard and extended models. Furthermore, a multilayered validation method was devised to validate the standard and extended models. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Community Care Record (CCR) standard was selected to evaluate the CCR+ model; two CCR and one CCR+ XML files were evaluated. In total, 188 metadata were extracted from the ASTM CCR standard; these metadata are semantically interconnected and registered in the metadata registry. An extended-data-model-specific validation file was generated from these metadata. This file can be used in a smartphone application (Health Avatar CCR+) as a part of a multilayered validation. The new CCR+ model was successfully evaluated via a patient-centric exchange scenario involving multiple hospitals, with the results supporting both syntactic and semantic interoperability between the standard CCR and extended, CCR+, model. A feasible method for delivering an extended model that complies with the standard model is presented herein. There is a great need to extend static standard models such as the ASTM CCR in various domains: the methods presented here represent an important reference for achieving interoperability between standard and extended models.

  8. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term "theranostics" was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging.

  9. Plications of extended ultra-violet circular dichroism spectroscopy in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth R; Clarke, David T

    2004-01-01

    Deep ultra-violet circular dichroism is fast becoming an important technique in structural biology. The exponential increase in the number of protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank together with programs that extract protein secondary structure from atomic coordinates and the advancement of the software to analyse circular dichroic spectra, have revolutionised the technique. In addition, the extended short wavelength data afforded by synchrotron radiation is set to have a major impact on the development of the area. We have selected three diverse areas of research and development in the biomedical sciences to illustrate the ubiquity of the technique for future applications in the area of biomedical research. For example, the high flux of synchrotron radiation has provided a gold standard for the assay of the lipoprotein HDL in serum which has been proven to reverse the effects of coronary heart disease. In a second example, the high flux of synchrotron radiation enables the recording of millisecond data during the conformational changes in proteins over their spectrum, mapping out changes to protein secondary structure and thus providing absolute structural measurements in the millisecond time regime. In the third example, subtle conformational changes are interpreted from the extended CD spectra on protein drug binding, distinguishing between induced binding effects and the conformational changes in the target protein. The strengths and weaknesses of extended ultra-violet circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation are discussed using these examples as a template.

  10. Impact of personal goals on the internal medicine R4 subspecialty match: a Q methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vijay J; Kassam, Narmin

    2013-12-21

    There has been a decline in interest in general internal medicine that has resulted in a discrepancy between internal medicine residents' choice in the R4 subspecialty match and societal need. Few studies have focused on the relative importance of personal goals and their impact on residents' choice. The purpose of this study was to assess if internal medicine residents can be grouped based on their personal goals and how each group prioritizes these goals compared to each other. A secondary objective was to explore whether we could predict a resident's desired subspecialty choice based on their constellation of personal goals. We used Q methodology to examine how postgraduate year 1-3 internal medicine residents could be grouped based on their rankings of 36 statements (derived from our previous qualitative study). Using each groups' defining and distinguishing statements, we predicted their subspecialties of interest. We also collected the residents' first choice in the subspecialty match and used a kappa test to compare our predicted subspecialty group to the residents' self-reported first choice. Fifty-nine internal medicine residents at the University of Alberta participated between 2009 and 2010 with 46 Q sorts suitable for analysis. The residents loaded onto four factors (groups) based on how they ranked statements. Our prediction of each groups' desired subspecialties with their defining and/or distinguishing statements are as follows: group 1 - general internal medicine (variety in practice); group 2 - gastroenterology, nephrology, and respirology (higher income); group 3 - cardiology and critical care (procedural, willing to entertain longer training); group 4 - rest of subspecialties (non-procedural, focused practice, and valuing more time for personal life). There was moderate agreement (kappa = 0.57) between our predicted desired subspecialty group and residents' self-reported first choice (p internal medicine subspecialty. The key goals that define

  11. [OMICS AND BIG DATA, MAJOR ADVANCES TOWARDS PERSONALIZED MEDICINE OF THE FUTURE?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest for personalized medicine evolves together with two major technological advances. First, the new-generation, rapid and less expensive, DNA sequencing method, combined with remarkable progresses in molecular biology leading to the post-genomic era (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics). Second, the refinement of computing tools (IT), which allows the immediate analysis of a huge amount of data (especially, those resulting from the omics approaches) and, thus, creates a new universe for medical research, that of analyzed by computerized modelling. This article for scientific communication and popularization briefly describes the main advances in these two fields of interest. These technological progresses are combined with those occurring in communication, which makes possible the development of artificial intelligence. These major advances will most probably represent the grounds of the future personalized medicine.

  12. Down syndrome and personalized medicine: changing paradigms from genotype to phenotype to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2013-03-01

    Personalized Medicine represents a paradigm shift in the conceptual framework of research and clinical care. This shift argues that Down syndrome is a treatable condition, and therefore we must invest in research to improve outcomes. Individuals with Down syndrome have varying levels of increased risk for a number of co-morbidities, including infantile spasms and early onset Alzheimer's disease. We will review research in these associated conditions to show how investigators are attempting to identify biomarkers, including genomic, epigenomic, proteomic and metabolomic "signatures" that will predict who may be at risk to develop a specific co-morbidity prior to onset and will provide novel targets for therapeutic development. This Personalized Medicine approach will permit predictive and preventive approaches for individuals at increased risk for co-morbidities. The support for clinical trials among individuals with Down syndrome is beginning to overcome the "culture of intractability" that has surrounded this disorder. © 2012 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  13. A person-centred approach in medicine to reduce the psychosocial and existential burden of chronic and life-threatening medical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Mezzich, Juan E; Nanni, Maria Giulia; Riba, Michelle B; Sabato, Silvana; Caruso, Rosangela

    2017-10-01

    The psychiatric, psychosocial, and existential/spiritual pain determined by chronic medical disorders, especially if in advanced stages, have been repeatedly underlined. The right to approach patients as persons, rather than symptoms of organs to be repaired, has also been reported, from Paul Tournier to Karl Jaspers, in opposition and contrast with the technically-enhanced evidence-based domain of sciences that have reduced the patients to 'objects' and weakened the physician's identity deprived of its ethical value of meeting, listening, and treating subjects. The paper will discuss the main psychosocial and existential burden related to chronic and advanced medical illnesses, and the diagnostic and therapeutic implications for a dignity preserving care within a person-centred approach in medicine, examined in terms of care of the person (of the person's whole health), for the person (for the fulfilment of the person's health aspirations), by the person (with physicians extending themselves as total human beings), and with the person (working respectfully with the medically ill person).

  14. Handbook of safety assessment of nanomaterials from toxicological testing to personalized medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    "The Handbook of Safety Assessment of Nanomaterials: From Toxicological Testing to Personalized Medicine provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of nanotoxicology and is a unique resource that fills up many knowledge gaps in the toxicity issue of nanomaterials in medical applications. The book is distinguished by up-to-date insights into creating a science-based framework for safety assessment of nanomedicines." -Prof. Yuliang Zhao, National Center for Nanosciences and Technology, China.

  15. Protecting and Evaluating Genomic Privacy in Medical Tests and Personalized Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ayday, Erman; Raisaro, Jean Louis; Rougemont, Jacques; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose privacy-enhancing technologies for medical tests and personalized medicine methods that use patients' genomic data. Focusing on genetic disease-susceptibility tests, we develop a new architecture (between the patient and the medical unit) and propose a "privacy-preserving disease susceptibility test" (PDS) by using homomorphic encryption and proxy re-encryption. Assuming the whole genome sequencing to be done by a certified institution, we propose to store patients' ...

  16. Statistical design of personalized medicine interventions: The Clarification of Optimal Anticoagulation through Genetics (COAG trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gage Brian F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently much interest in pharmacogenetics: determining variation in genes that regulate drug effects, with a particular emphasis on improving drug safety and efficacy. The ability to determine such variation motivates the application of personalized drug therapies that utilize a patient's genetic makeup to determine a safe and effective drug at the correct dose. To ascertain whether a genotype-guided drug therapy improves patient care, a personalized medicine intervention may be evaluated within the framework of a randomized controlled trial. The statistical design of this type of personalized medicine intervention requires special considerations: the distribution of relevant allelic variants in the study population; and whether the pharmacogenetic intervention is equally effective across subpopulations defined by allelic variants. Methods The statistical design of the Clarification of Optimal Anticoagulation through Genetics (COAG trial serves as an illustrative example of a personalized medicine intervention that uses each subject's genotype information. The COAG trial is a multicenter, double blind, randomized clinical trial that will compare two approaches to initiation of warfarin therapy: genotype-guided dosing, the initiation of warfarin therapy based on algorithms using clinical information and genotypes for polymorphisms in CYP2C9 and VKORC1; and clinical-guided dosing, the initiation of warfarin therapy based on algorithms using only clinical information. Results We determine an absolute minimum detectable difference of 5.49% based on an assumed 60% population prevalence of zero or multiple genetic variants in either CYP2C9 or VKORC1 and an assumed 15% relative effectiveness of genotype-guided warfarin initiation for those with zero or multiple genetic variants. Thus we calculate a sample size of 1238 to achieve a power level of 80% for the primary outcome. We show that reasonable departures from these

  17. Verifier-based three-party authentication schemes using extended chaotic maps for data exchange in telecare medicine information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tian-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Telecare medicine information systems provide a communicating platform for accessing remote medical resources through public networks, and help health care workers and medical personnel to rapidly making correct clinical decisions and treatments. An authentication scheme for data exchange in telecare medicine information systems enables legal users in hospitals and medical institutes to establish a secure channel and exchange electronic medical records or electronic health records securely and efficiently. This investigation develops an efficient and secure verified-based three-party authentication scheme by using extended chaotic maps for data exchange in telecare medicine information systems. The proposed scheme does not require server's public keys and avoids time-consuming modular exponential computations and scalar multiplications on elliptic curve used in previous related approaches. Additionally, the proposed scheme is proven secure in the random oracle model, and realizes the lower bounds of messages and rounds in communications. Compared to related verified-based approaches, the proposed scheme not only possesses higher security, but also has lower computational cost and fewer transmissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. From Metabonomics to Pharmacometabonomics: The Role of Metabolic Profiling in Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Variable patient responses to drugs are a key issue for medicine and for drug discovery and development. Personalized medicine, that is the selection of medicines for subgroups of patients so as to maximize drug efficacy and minimize toxicity, is a key goal of twenty-first century healthcare. Currently, most personalized medicine paradigms rely on clinical judgment based on the patient's history, and on the analysis of the patients' genome to predict drug effects i.e., pharmacogenomics. However, variability in patient responses to drugs is dependent upon many environmental factors to which human genomics is essentially blind. A new paradigm for predicting drug responses based on individual pre-dose metabolite profiles has emerged in the past decade: pharmacometabonomics, which is defined as “the prediction of the outcome (for example, efficacy or toxicity) of a drug or xenobiotic intervention in an individual based on a mathematical model of pre-intervention metabolite signatures.” The new pharmacometabonomics paradigm is complementary to pharmacogenomics but has the advantage of being sensitive to environmental as well as genomic factors. This review will chart the discovery and development of pharmacometabonomics, and provide examples of its current utility and possible future developments. PMID:27660611

  19. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  20. [Attitudes of polish physicians towards extending competencies of nurses and midwives with respect to prescribing medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Nicole; Zarzeka, Aleksander; Dąbrowski, Filip; Panczyk, Mariusz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Gotlib, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Due to the amendment of the Nurse and Midwife professions Act, since 1st of January 2016 Polish nurses and midwives with certain qualifications are able to prescribe medicines and referral for diagnostic tests. To analyse attitudes of physicians on new professional competencies of nurses and midwives regarding: prescribing medicines and referring patients for certain diagnostic tests. In the study took part 436 physicians (245 women, 193 man). The average age was 36,6 years old (min.: 21; max.: 76; SD: 11,65; median: 31). 274 people lived in a city with over 500 thousand citizens, 70 people - city below 100 thousand citizens, 54 people - city between 100-500 thousands citizens and 14 people lived in a country. Most of people lived in masovian district. Authors prepared and validated own questionnaire, which contained statements assessed in Likert scale (1-strongly disagree, 5-stronlgy agree). It contained 22 questions about opinions of new abilities of nurses and midwives. The questionnaire was sent three times to Regional Medical Chamber in Warsaw via an online questionnaire: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1cxiaJFPxDVphByhBTk4gDIBsm6bQsxGLVXDK-RtpGnk/ The reliability of the questionnaire used was tested in a pilot study by the coefficient α-Cronbach, which amounted to 0.937. Due to the fact that the study was performed in a group of doctors they did not require the consent of the Bioethics Committee, of Medical University of Warsaw to carry them out. The results are presented using descriptive statistics, which were obtained through statistical analysis using Microsoft Excel and StatSoft Statistica 12.0 (license Medical University of Warsaw). 53% of doctors claim that the new powers do not improve patient care. 35% of respondents disagreed with the opinion that the new powers will raise the prestige of professional nurses and midwives. At the same time 49% believe that prescriptions for nurses and midwives reduce the responsibilities of doctors. Only 9% agreed

  1. Traditional Chinese medicine and new concepts of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine in diagnosis and treatment of suboptimal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Russell, Alyce; Yan, Yuxiang

    2014-02-13

    The premise of disease-related phenotypes is the definition of the counterpart normality in medical sciences. Contrary to clinical practices that can be carefully planned according to clinical needs, heterogeneity and uncontrollability is the essence of humans in carrying out health studies. Full characterization of consistent phenotypes that define the general population is the basis to individual difference normalization in personalized medicine. Self-claimed normal status may not represent health because asymptomatic subjects may carry chronic diseases at their early stage, such as cancer, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Currently, treatments for non-communicable chronic diseases (NCD) are implemented after disease onset, which is a very much delayed approach from the perspective of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM). A NCD pandemic will develop and be accompanied by increased global economic burden for healthcare systems throughout both developed and developing countries. This paper examples the characterization of the suboptimal health status (SHS) which represents a new PPPM challenge in a population with ambiguous health complaints such as general weakness, unexplained medical syndrome (UMS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS) and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS). We applied clinical informatic approaches and developed a questionnaire-suboptimal health status questionnaire-25 (SHSQ-25) for measuring SHS. The validity and reliability of this approach were evaluated in a small pilot study and then in a cross-sectional study of 3,405 participants in China. We found a correlation between SHS and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol among men, and a correlation between SHS and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides

  2. Implementation of comparative effectiveness research in personalized medicine applications in oncology: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IJzerman MJ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maarten J IJzerman,1,3 Andrea Manca,2,3 Julia Keizer,1 Scott D Ramsey4 1Department of Health Technology and Services Research, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands; 2Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK; 3Department of Population Health, Luxembourg Institute of Health, Strassen, Luxembourg, 4Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Personalized medicine (PM or precision medicine has been defined as an innovative approach that takes into account individual differences in people's genes, environments, and lifestyles in prevention and treatment of disease. In PM, genomic information may contribute to the molecular understanding of disease, to optimize preventive health care strategies, and to fit the best drug therapies to the patient's individual characteristics. Evidence development in the era of genomic medicine is extremely challenging due to a number of factors. These include the rapid technological innovation in molecular diagnostics and targeted drug discoveries, and hence the large number of mutations and multiple ways these may influence treatment decisions. Although the evidence base for PM is evolving rapidly, the main question to be explored in this article is whether existing evidence is also fit for comparative effectiveness research (CER. As a starting point, this paper therefore reflects on the evidence required for CER and the evidence gaps preventing decisions on market access and coverage. The paper then discusses challenges and potential barriers for applying a CER paradigm to PM, identifies common methodologies for designing clinical trials in PM, discusses various approaches for analyzing clinical trials to infer from population to individual level, and presents an example of a clinical trial in PM (The RxPONDER TRIAL demonstrating good practice. The paper concludes with a future perspective, including modeling approaches for evidence synthesis.Keywords: personalized

  3. Does the Concept of the “Flipped Classroom” Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Corey; Prusakowski, Melanie; Willis, George; Franck, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM) clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a “flipped classroom” model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Methods Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a “flipped fashion,” and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students’ discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Results Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494.) A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5). Almost one third (31.1%) of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Conclusion Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning modules followed by an

  4. Does the Concept of the "Flipped Classroom" Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Corey; Prusakowski, Melanie; Willis, George; Franck, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM) clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a "flipped classroom" model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a "flipped fashion," and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students' discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494.) A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5). Almost one third (31.1%) of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning modules followed by an attempt at chief-complaint-focused learning during a

  5. Does the Concept of the “Flipped Classroom” Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Heitz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a “flipped classroom” model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Methods: Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a “flipped fashion,” and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students’ discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Results: Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494. A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5. Almost one third (31.1% of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Conclusion: Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning

  6. Video-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture for Instructing Emergency Medicine Residents in Disaster Medicine Principles of Mass Triage, Decontamination, and Personal Protective Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Henry A; Trang, Karen; Chason, Kevin W; Biddinger, Paul D

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Great demands have been placed on disaster medicine educators. There is a need to develop innovative methods to educate Emergency Physicians in the ever-expanding body of disaster medicine knowledge. The authors sought to demonstrate that video-based learning (VBL) could be a promising alternative to traditional learning methods for teaching disaster medicine core competencies. Hypothesis/Problem The objective was to compare VBL to traditional lecture (TL) for instructing Emergency Medicine residents in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP; Irving, Texas USA) disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination. A randomized, controlled pilot study compared two methods of instruction for mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Emergency Medicine resident learning was measured with a knowledge quiz, a Likert scale measuring comfort, and a practical exercise. An independent samples t-test compared the scoring of the VBL with the TL group. Twenty-six residents were randomized to VBL (n=13) or TL (n=13). Knowledge score improvement following video (14.9%) versus lecture (14.1%) did not differ significantly between the groups (P=.74). Comfort score improvement also did not differ (P=.64) between video (18.3%) and lecture groups (15.8%). In the practical skills assessment, the VBL group outperformed the TL group overall (70.4% vs 55.5%; Plearning vs traditional lecture for instructing emergency medicine residents in disaster medicine principles of mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):7-12.

  7. Robust and efficient biometrics based password authentication scheme for telecare medicine information systems using extended chaotic maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanrong; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Xie, Dong; Yang, Yixian

    2015-06-01

    The Telecare Medicine Information Systems (TMISs) provide an efficient communicating platform supporting the patients access health-care delivery services via internet or mobile networks. Authentication becomes an essential need when a remote patient logins into the telecare server. Recently, many extended chaotic maps based authentication schemes using smart cards for TMISs have been proposed. Li et al. proposed a secure smart cards based authentication scheme for TMISs using extended chaotic maps based on Lee's and Jiang et al.'s scheme. In this study, we show that Li et al.'s scheme has still some weaknesses such as violation the session key security, vulnerability to user impersonation attack and lack of local verification. To conquer these flaws, we propose a chaotic maps and smart cards based password authentication scheme by applying biometrics technique and hash function operations. Through the informal and formal security analyses, we demonstrate that our scheme is resilient possible known attacks including the attacks found in Li et al.'s scheme. As compared with the previous authentication schemes, the proposed scheme is more secure and efficient and hence more practical for telemedical environments.

  8. Graphic Pathographies and the Ethical Practice of Person-Centered Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kimberly R; Goldenberg, Michael D F

    2018-02-01

    Graphic medicine is a swiftly growing movement that explores, theoretically and practically, the use of comics in medical education and patient care. At the heart of graphic medicine are graphic pathographies, stories of illness conveyed in comic form. These stories are helpful tools for health care professionals who seek new insight into the personal, lived experience of illness and for patients who want to learn more about their disease from others who have actually experienced it. Featuring excerpts from five graphic pathographies, this essay illustrates how the medium can be used to educate patients and enhance empathy in health care professionals, particularly with regard to informed consent and end-of-life issues. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Personalized Medicine for Chronic Respiratory Infectious Diseases: Tuberculosis, Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Diseases, and Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Wassilew, Nasstasja; Köhler, Niklas; Olaru, Ioana D; Günther, Gunar; Herzmann, Christian; Kalsdorf, Barbara; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Terhalle, Elena; Rolling, Thierry; Lange, Christoph; Heyckendorf, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infectious diseases are causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculosis, a major cause of chronic pulmonary infection, is currently responsible for approximately 1.5 million deaths per year. Although important advances in the fight against tuberculosis have been made, the progress towards eradication of this disease is being challenged by the dramatic increase in multidrug-resistant bacilli. Nontuberculous mycobacteria causing pulmonary disease and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis are emerging infectious diseases. In contrast to other infectious diseases, chronic respiratory infections share the trait of having highly variable treatment outcomes despite longstanding antimicrobial therapy. Recent scientific progress indicates that medicine is presently at a transition stage from programmatic to personalized management. We explain current state-of-the-art management concepts of chronic pulmonary infectious diseases as well as the underlying methods for therapeutic decisions and their implications for personalized medicine. Furthermore, we describe promising biomarkers and techniques with the potential to serve future individual treatment concepts in this field of difficult-to-treat patients. These include candidate markers to improve individual risk assessment for disease development, the design of tailor-made drug therapy regimens, and individualized biomarker-guided therapy duration to achieve relapse-free cure. In addition, the use of therapeutic drug monitoring to reach optimal drug dosing with the smallest rate of adverse events as well as candidate agents for future host-directed therapies are described. Taken together, personalized medicine will provide opportunities to substantially improve the management and treatment outcome of difficult-to-treat patients with chronic respiratory infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Innovative payer engagement strategies: will the convergence lead to better value creation in personalized medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetov, Ildar; Bubnov, Rostyslav V

    2017-12-01

    As reimbursement authorities are gaining greater power to influence the prescription behavior of physicians, it remains critical for life science companies focusing on personalized medicine to develop "tailor-made" payer engagement strategies to secure reimbursement and assure timely patient access to their innovative products. Depending on the types of such engagement, pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies may benefit by obtaining access to medical and pharmacy claims data, getting invaluable upfront inputs on evidence requirements and clinical trial design, and strengthening trust by payers, therefore avoiding uncertainties with regards to pricing, reimbursement, and research and development reinvestment. This article aims to study the evolving trend of partnering among two interdependent, yet confronting, stakeholder groups-payers and producers-as well as to identify the most promising payer engagement strategies based on cocreation of value introduced by life science companies in the past few years. We analyzed the recent case studies from both therapeutic and diagnostic realms considered as the "best practices" in payer engagement. The last 5 years were a breakout period for deals between life science companies and reimbursement authorities in the area of personalized medicine with a number of felicitous collaborative practices established already, and many more yet to emerge. We suggest that there are many ways for producers and payers to collaborate throughout the product life cycle-from data exchange and scientific counseling to research collaboration aimed at reducing healthcare costs, addressing adherence issues, and diminishing risks associated with future launches. The presented case studies provide clear insights on how successful personalized medicine companies customize their state-of-the-art payer engagement strategies to ensure closer proximity with payers and establish longer-term trust-based relationships.

  11. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  12. A biosocial developmental model of borderline personality: Elaborating and extending Linehan's theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sheila E; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Linehan, Marsha M

    2009-05-01

    Over the past several decades, research has focused increasingly on developmental precursors to psychological disorders that were previously assumed to emerge only in adulthood. This change in focus follows from the recognition that complex transactions between biological vulnerabilities and psychosocial risk factors shape emotional and behavioral development beginning at conception. To date, however, empirical research on the development of borderline personality is extremely limited. Indeed, in the decade since M. M. Linehan initially proposed a biosocial model of the development of borderline personality disorder, there have been few attempts to test the model among at-risk youth. In this review, diverse literatures are reviewed that can inform understanding of the ontogenesis of borderline pathology, and testable hypotheses are proposed to guide future research with at-risk children and adolescents. One probable pathway is identified that leads to borderline personality disorder; it begins with early vulnerability, expressed initially as impulsivity and followed by heightened emotional sensitivity. These vulnerabilities are potentiated across development by environmental risk factors that give rise to more extreme emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dysregulation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Extending Participatory Sensing to Personal Exposure Using Microscopic Land Use Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Dekoninck

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Personal exposure is sensitive to the personal features and behavior of the individual, and including interpersonal variability will improve the health and quality of life evaluations. Participatory sensing assesses the spatial and temporal variability of environmental indicators and is used to quantify this interpersonal variability. Transferring the participatory sensing information to a specific study population is a basic requirement for epidemiological studies in the near future. We propose a methodology to reduce the void between participatory sensing and health research. Instantaneous microscopic land-use regression modeling (µLUR is an innovative approach. Data science techniques extract the activity-specific and route-sensitive spatiotemporal variability from the data. A data workflow to prepare and apply µLUR models to any mobile population is presented. The µLUR technique and data workflow are illustrated with models for exposure to traffic related Black Carbon. The example µLURs are available for three micro-environments; bicycle, in-vehicle, and indoor. Instantaneous noise assessments supply instantaneous traffic information to the µLURs. The activity specific models are combined into an instantaneous personal exposure model for Black Carbon. An independent external validation reached a correlation of 0.65. The µLURs can be applied to simulated behavioral patterns of individuals in epidemiological cohorts for advanced health and policy research.

  14. A Biosocial Developmental Model of Borderline Personality: Elaborating and Extending Linehan’s Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, research has focused increasingly on developmental precursors to psychological disorders that were previously assumed to emerge only in adulthood. This change in focus follows from the recognition that complex transactions between biological vulnerabilities and psychosocial risk factors shape emotional and behavioral development beginning at conception. To date, however, empirical research on the development of borderline personality is extremely limited. Indeed, in the decade since M. M. Linehan initially proposed a biosocial model of the development of borderline personality disorder, there have been few attempts to test the model among at-risk youth. In this review, diverse literatures are reviewed that can inform understanding of the ontogenesis of borderline pathology, and testable hypotheses are proposed to guide future research with at-risk children and adolescents. One probable pathway is identified that leads to borderline personality disorder; it begins with early vulnerability, expressed initially as impulsivity and followed by heightened emotional sensitivity. These vulnerabilities are potentiated across development by environmental risk factors that give rise to more extreme emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dysregulation. PMID:19379027

  15. Open Access Integrated Therapeutic and Diagnostic Platforms for Personalized Cardiovascular Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd T. Schlegel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is undeniable that the increasing costs in healthcare are a concern. Although technological advancements have been made in healthcare systems, the return on investment made by governments and payers has been poor. The current model of care is unsustainable and is due for an upgrade. In developed nations, a law of diminishing returns has been noted in population health standards, whilst in the developing world, westernized chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease have become emerging problems. The reasons for these trends are complex, multifactorial and not easily reversed. Personalized medicine has the potential to have a significant impact on these issues, but for it to be truly successful, interdisciplinary mass collaboration is required. We propose here a vision for open-access advanced analytics for personalized cardiac diagnostics using imaging, electrocardiography and genomics.

  16. An interdisciplinary approach to personalized medicine: case studies from a cardiogenetics clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Kathleen E; Griffith, Eleanor; Degroat, Nicole; Stolerman, Marina; Silverstein, Louise B; Hidayatallah, Nadia; Wasserman, David; Paljevic, Esma; Cohen, Lilian; Walsh, Christine A; McDonald, Thomas; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2013-01-01

    In the genomic age, the challenges presented by various inherited conditions present a compelling argument for an interdisciplinary model of care. Cardiac arrhythmias with a genetic basis, such as long QT syndrome, require clinicians with expertise in many specialties to address the complex genetic, psychological, ethical and medical issues involved in treatment. The Montefiore-Einstein Center for CardioGenetics has been established to provide personalized, interdisciplinary care for families with a history of sudden cardiac death or an acute cardiac event. Four vignettes of patient care are presented to illustrate the unique capacity of an interdisciplinary model to address genetic, psychological, ethical and medical issues. Because interdisciplinary clinics facilitate collaboration among multiple specialties, they allow for individualized, comprehensive care to be delivered to families who experience complex inherited medical conditions. As the genetic basis of many complex conditions is discovered, the advantages of an interdisciplinary approach for delivering personalized medicine will become more evident.

  17. Postinjury personality and outcome in acquired brain injury: the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kelley D; Franks, Susan F; Hall, James R

    2010-03-01

    To examine the relationship between postinjury personality and outcome in individuals with acquired brain injury. It was hypothesized that patients with differing levels of Introversive, Dejected, and Oppositional coping styles as described by Millon's Theory of Personality would show different outcomes after completion of a rehabilitation program. A retrospective chart review and completion of an outcome assessment was undertaken to examine study hypotheses. A postacute brain injury rehabilitation program. Fifty patients who completed the rehabilitation program between 2005 and 2008, who were 18 years of age or older, who possessed at least a sixth-grade reading level, and who completed a valid Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD) were selected. Rehabilitation therapists who worked with these patients were also recruited to assess patient outcomes. Charts of patients that met inclusion criteria were reviewed. Rehabilitation therapists completed the outcome measure retrospectively. The MBMD was used to predict outcome. The MBMD is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess psychosocial factors that relate to the course of medical treatment in chronic illness. The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) was used to assess patient outcome. It is a 29-item assessment designed to evaluate the common physical, cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social issues after acquired brain injury. Findings supported our hypotheses that patients with differing levels of Introversive and Oppositional Coping Styles would have significantly different outcomes after rehabilitation. Thus, individuals with mild/moderate to moderate/severe limitations had significantly greater scores on the Introversive and Oppositional coping compared with individuals with more successful outcomes. The results of this study support the idea that postinjury personality is an important factor in understanding outcome after completion of a brain-injury rehabilitation program

  18. Extending technology-aided leisure and communication programs to persons with spinal cord injury and post-coma multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ricciuti, Riccardo A; Trignani, Roberto; Oliva, Doretta; Signorino, Mario; D'Amico, Fiora; Sasanelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    These two studies extended technology-aided programs to promote leisure and communication opportunities to a man with cervical spinal cord injury and a post-coma man with multiple disabilities. The studies involved the use of ABAB designs, in which A and B represented baseline and intervention phases, respectively. The programs focused on enabling the participants to activate songs, videos, requests, text messages, and telephone calls. These options were presented on a computer screen and activated through a small pressure microswitch by the man with spinal cord injury and a special touch screen by the post-coma man. To help the latter participant, who had no verbal skills, with requests and telephone calls, series of words and phrases were made available that he could activate in those situations. Data showed that both participants were successful in managing the programs arranged for them. The man with spinal cord injury activated mean frequencies of above five options per 10-min session. The post-coma man activated mean frequencies of about 12 options per 20-min session. Technology-aided programs for promoting leisure and communication opportunities might be successfully tailored to persons with spinal cord injury and persons with post-coma multiple disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Technology-aided programs may be critical to enable persons with pervasive motor impairment to engage in leisure activities and communication events independently. Persons with spinal cord injury, post-coma extended brain damage, and forms of neurodegenerative disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, may benefit from those programs. The programs could be adapted to the participants' characteristics, both in terms of technology and contents, so as to improve their overall impact on the participants' functioning and general mood.

  19. Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicines can treat diseases and improve your health. If you are like most people, you need to take medicine at some point in your life. You may need to take medicine every day, or you may only need to ...

  20. The impact of extended longitudinal observation on the assessment of personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, G; Karterud, S; Hummelen, B; Wilberg, T

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sources of information are necessary for a valid assessment of personality disorders (PDs). This study investigates the impact of longitudinal observation. The sample comprised 1217 patients from 15 different treatment units. PDs were assessed at admission to treatment using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) and additional clinical information (best estimate diagnosis). After approximately 18 weeks of treatment, the SCID-II protocols were re-examined at clinical conferences and the diagnostic status reassessed on the basis of longitudinal observations in multiple group situations (longitudinal, expert, all data principle). Using this procedure, 78% of the patients' diagnostic criteria sets were changed, and 32% of patients' diagnostic statuses were changed. Many (32%) patients who were evaluated initially as not having a PD received a PD diagnosis after re-examination. The information provided by customary clinical assessment has important limitations, and longitudinal observation provides additional information that may change the diagnostic status in approximately one-third of PD cases. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Economic incentives for evidence generation: promoting an efficient path to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towse, Adrian; Garrison, Louis P

    2013-01-01

    The preceding articles in this volume have identified and discussed a wide range of methodological and practical issues in the development of personalized medicine. This concluding article uses the resulting insights to identify implications for the economic incentives for evidence generation. It argues that promoting an efficient path to personalized medicine is going to require appropriate incentives for evidence generation including: 1) a greater willingness on the part of payers to accept prices that reflect value; 2) consideration of some form of intellectual property protection (e.g., data exclusivity) for diagnostics to incentivize generation of evidence of clinical utility; 3) realistic expectations around the standards for evidence; and 4) public investment in evidence collection to complement the efforts of payers and manufacturers. It concludes that such incentives could build and maintain a balance among: 1) realistic thresholds for evidence and the need for payers to have confidence in the clinical utility of the drugs and tests they use; 2) payment for value, with prices that ensure cost-effectiveness for health systems; and 3) levels of intellectual property protection for evidence generation that provide a return for those financing research and development, while encouraging competition to produce both better and more efficient tests. Copyright © 2013, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Bissonnette

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients.

  3. Empowering Personalized Medicine with Big Data and Semantic Web Technology: Promises, Challenges, and Use Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Taslimitehrani, Vahid; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2014-10-01

    In healthcare, big data tools and technologies have the potential to create significant value by improving outcomes while lowering costs for each individual patient. Diagnostic images, genetic test results and biometric information are increasingly generated and stored in electronic health records presenting us with challenges in data that is by nature high volume, variety and velocity, thereby necessitating novel ways to store, manage and process big data. This presents an urgent need to develop new, scalable and expandable big data infrastructure and analytical methods that can enable healthcare providers access knowledge for the individual patient, yielding better decisions and outcomes. In this paper, we briefly discuss the nature of big data and the role of semantic web and data analysis for generating "smart data" which offer actionable information that supports better decision for personalized medicine. In our view, the biggest challenge is to create a system that makes big data robust and smart for healthcare providers and patients that can lead to more effective clinical decision-making, improved health outcomes, and ultimately, managing the healthcare costs. We highlight some of the challenges in using big data and propose the need for a semantic data-driven environment to address them. We illustrate our vision with practical use cases, and discuss a path for empowering personalized medicine using big data and semantic web technology.

  4. Advances in the Molecular Analysis of Breast Cancer: Pathway Toward Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Marilin

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that encompasses a wide range of clinical behaviors and histological and molecular variants. It is the most common type of cancer affecting women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer death. A comprehensive literature search was performed to explore the advances in molecular medicine related to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. During the last few decades, advances in molecular medicine have changed the landscape of cancer treatment as new molecular tests complement and, in many instances, exceed traditional methods for determining patient prognosis and response to treatment options. Personalized medicine is becoming the standard of care around the world. Developments in molecular profiling, genomic analysis, and the discovery of targeted drug therapies have significantly improved patient survival rates and quality of life. This review highlights what pathologists need to know about current molecular tests for classification and prognostic/ predictive assessment of breast carcinoma as well as their role as part of the medical team.

  5. The 3 H and BMSEST Models for Spirituality in Multicultural Whole-Person Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE The explosion of evidence in the last decade supporting the role of spirituality in whole-person patient care has prompted proposals for a move to a biopsychosocial-spiritual model for health. Making this paradigm shift in today’s multicultural societies poses many challenges, however. This article presents 2 theoretical models that provide common ground for further exploration of the role of spirituality in medicine. METHODS The 3 H model (head, heart, hands) and the BMSEST models (body, mind, spirit, environment, social, transcendent) evolved from the author’s 12-year experience with curricula development regarding spirituality and medicine, 16-year experience as an attending family physician and educator, lived experience with both Hinduism and Christianity since childhood, and a lifetime study of the world’s great spiritual traditions. The models were developed, tested with learners, and refined. RESULTS The 3 H model offers a multidimensional definition of spirituality, applicable across cultures and belief systems, that provides opportunities for a common vocabulary for spirituality. Therapeutic options, from general spiritual care (compassion, presence, and the healing relationship), to specialized spiritual care (eg, by clinical chaplains), to spiritual self-care are discussed. The BMSEST model provides a conceptual framework for the role of spirituality in the larger health care context, useful for patient care, education, and research. Interactions among the 6 BMSEST components, with references to ongoing research, are proposed. CONCLUSIONS Including spirituality in whole-person care is a way of furthering our understanding of the complexities of human health and well-being. The 3 H and BMSEST models suggest a multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach based on universal concepts and a foundation in both the art and science of medicine. PMID:18779550

  6. Challenges, Solutions, and Quality Metrics of Personal Genome Assembly in Advancing Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming Xiao

    2016-04-01

    immune-response, tailoring drug therapy and detecting tumors. We believe the precision medicine would largely benefit from bioinformatics solutions, particularly for personal genome assembly.

  7. Extending color psychology to the personality realm: interpersonal hostility varies by red preferences and perceptual biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Adam K; Liu, Tianwei; Robinson, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    The color psychology literature has made a convincing case that color is not just about aesthetics, but also about meaning. This work has involved situational manipulations of color, rendering it uncertain as to whether color-meaning associations can be used to characterize how people differ from each other. The present research focuses on the idea that the color red is linked to, or associated with, individual differences in interpersonal hostility. Across four studies (N = 376 undergraduates), red preferences and perceptual biases were measured along with individual differences in interpersonal hostility. It was found that (a) a preference for the color red was higher as interpersonal hostility increased, (b) hostile people were biased to see the color red more frequently than nonhostile people, and (c) there was a relationship between a preference for the color red and hostile social decision making. These studies represent an important extension of the color psychology literature, highlighting the need to attend to person-based, as well as situation-based, factors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Extending decision making competence to special populations: a pilot study of persons on the autism spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Irwin P; Gaeth, Gary J; Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Yegorova, Vitaliya; Cederberg, Charles; Yan, Haoyang

    2015-01-01

    The area of decision making has much to offer in our effort to understand special populations. This pilot study is an example of just such a project, where we illustrate how traditional decision making tools and tasks can be used to uncover strengths and weaknesses within a growing population of young adults with autism. In this pilot project we extended accounts of autistic behavior such as those derived from "theory of mind" to predict key components of decision making in high-functioning young adults on the autism spectrum. A battery of tests was administered to 15 high-functioning college students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), focusing on decision making competence (DMC) and other aspects of decision making related to known deficits associated with autism. Data from this group were compared to data from unselected college students receiving the same measures. First, as a test of a key social deficit associated with autism, the target group scored much lower on the Empathy Quotient scale. Traditional elements of decision making competency such as Numeracy and application of decision rules were comparable across groups. However, there were differences in thinking style, with the ASD group showing lesser ability and engagement in intuitive thinking, and they showed lower levels of risk taking. For comparisons within the ASD group, autobiographical reports concerning individual lifestyles and outcomes were used to derive a scale of Social Functioning. The lowest scoring individuals showed the lowest levels of intuitive thinking, the lowest perceived levels of others' endorsement of socially undesirable behaviors, and the lowest ability to discriminate between "good" and "bad" risks. Results are discussed in terms of interventions that might aid high-functioning young adults with ASD in their everyday decision making.

  9. Personalized medicine and the role of health economics and outcomes research: issues, applications, emerging trends, and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The decade since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome has witnessed significant advances in the incorporation of genomic information in diagnostic, treatment, and reimbursement practices. Indeed, as case in point, there are now several dozen commercially available genomic tests routinely applied across a wide range of disease states in predictive or prognostic applications. Moreover, many involved in the advancement of personalized medicine would view emerging approaches to stratify patients in meaningful ways beyond genomic information as a signal of the progress made. Yet despite these advances, there remains a general sense of dissatisfaction about the progress of personalized medicine in terms of its contribution to the drug development process, to the efficiency and effectiveness of health care delivery, and ultimately to the provision of the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Academicians, payers, and manufacturers alike are struggling not only with how to embed the new insights that personalized medicine promises but also with the fundamental issues of application in early drug development, implications for health technology assessment, new demands on traditional health economic and outcomes research methods, and implications for reimbursement and access. In fact, seemingly prosaic issues such as the definition and composition of the term "personalized medicine" are still unresolved. Regardless of these issues, practitioners are increasingly compelled to find practical solutions to the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving face of personalized medicine today. Accordingly, the articles comprising this Special Issue offer applied perspectives geared toward professionals and policymakers in the field grappling with developing, assessing, implementing, and reimbursing personalized medicine approaches. Starting with a framework with which to characterize personalized medicine, this Special Issue proceeds to

  10. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    proteomics. The proposed nested governance structure is comprised of (a) scientists, (b) ethicists, and (c) scholars in the nascent field of "ethics-of-ethics", and aims to cultivate a robust social proteome for personalized medicine. Ostrom often noted that such nested governance designs offer assurance that political power embedded in innovation processes is distributed evenly and is not concentrated disproportionately in a single overbearing stakeholder or person. We agree with this assessment and conclude by underscoring the synergistic value of social and biological proteomes to realize the full potentials of proteomics science for personalized medicine in psychiatry in the present era of Big Data.

  11. Relationship between Personality Profiles and Suicide Attempt via Medicine Poisoning among Hospitalized Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee-Kandjani, Ali Reza; Amiri, Shahrokh; Arfaie, Asghar; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Farvareshi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Inflexible personality traits play an important role in the development of maladaptive behaviors among patients who attempt suicide. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between personality profiles and suicide attempt via medicine poisoning among the patients hospitalized in a public hospital. Materials and Methods. Fifty-nine patients who attempted suicide for the first time and hospitalized in the poisoning ward were selected as the experimental group. Sixty-three patients hospitalized in the other wards for a variety of reasons were selected as the adjusted control group. Millon Clinical Multiaxial Personality Inventory, 3rd version (MCMI-III) was used to assess the personality profiles. Results. The majority of the suicide attempters were low-level graduates (67.8% versus 47.1%, OR = 2.36). 79.7% of the suicide attempters were suffering from at least one maladaptive personality profile. The most common maladaptive personality profiles among the suicide attempters were depressive personality disorder (40.7%) and histrionic personality disorder (32.2%). Among the syndromes the most common ones were anxiety clinical syndrome (23.7%) and major depression (23.7%). Conclusion. Major depression clinical syndrome, histrionic personality disorder, anxiety clinical syndrome, and depressive personality disorder are among the predicators of first suicide attempts for the patients hospitalized in the public hospital due to the medicine poisoning.

  12. An Intelligent System Prototype to support and sharing diagnoses of maligned tumours, based on personalized medicine philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel Flores Fonseca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Circulatory systems diseases are one of the most important causes of death in Chilean population according to a report presented by the Chilean National Bureau of Statistics (INE. Undoubtedly, these sad numbers arise an opportunity to analyse ways to improve this situation. Personalized Medicine is a new approach used to adapt standard medical treatments to individual characteristics of patients. Currently, several kinds of personalized-medicine software applications are building using Artificial Intelligent techniques and supported by techniques as Cloud Computing and Big Data. This architecture provides complex and varied information access, such as clinical data, genome data, patients’ treatment or drugs information, among others. This document describes a proposal to produce a method for generating and sharing medical information, particularly of maligned tumors in Chile. The prototype will be developed within the framework of the personalized medicine.

  13. Keeping up with the times: revising the dermatology residency curriculum in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, Avery; Murphy, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The clinical use of molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine is increasing and improving rapidly over time. However, medical education incorporating the practical application of these techniques is lagging behind. Although instruction in these areas should be expanded upon and improved at all levels of training, residency provides a concentrated period of time in which to hone in on skills that are practically applicable to a trainee's specialty of choice. Although residencies in some fields, such as pathology, have begun to incorporate practical molecular diagnostics training, this area remains a relative gap in dermatology residency programs. Herein, we advocate for the incorporation of training in molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine into dermatology residency programs and propose a basic curriculum template for how to begin approaching these topics. By incorporating molecular diagnostics into dermatology residency training, dermatologists have the opportunity to lead the way and actively shape the specialty's transition into the era of personalized medicine. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine.

  15. Towards a balanced value business model for personalized medicine: an outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Christof; Przewrocka, Joanna; Keeling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Novel targeted drugs, mainly in oncology, have commanded substantial price premiums in the recent past. Consequently, the attention of pharmaceutical companies has shifted away from the traditional low-price and high-volume blockbuster business model to drugs that command high, and sometimes extremely high, prices in limited markets defined by targeted patient populations. This model may have already passed its zenith, as the impact of more and more high-priced drugs coming to market substantially increases their combined burden on payors and public health finances. This article introduces a new 'balanced value' business model for personalized medicine, leveraging the emerging opportunities to reduce drug development cost and time for targeted therapies. This model allows pharmaceutical companies to charge prices for targeted therapy below the likely future thresholds for payors' willingness to pay, at the same time preserving attractive margins for the drug developers.

  16. Research ethics in the era of personalized medicine: updating science's contract with society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, Eric M; Cho, Mildred K

    2010-01-01

    With the completed sequence of the human genome has come the prospect of substantially improving the quality of life for millions through personalized medicine approaches. Still, any advances in this direction require research involving human subjects. For decades science and ethics have enjoyed an allegiance reflected in a common set of ethical principles and procedures guiding the conduct of research with human subjects. Some of these principles emphasize avoiding harm over maximizing benefit. In this paper we revisit the priority given to these ethical principles - particularly the principles that support a cautious approach to science - and propose a reframing of the 'social contract' between science and society that emphasizes reciprocity and meeting public needs.

  17. Harnessing Preclinical Molecular Imaging to Inform Advances in Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter M; Ebiana, Victoria A; Gosa, Laura; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Nathanson, David A

    2017-05-01

    Comprehensive molecular analysis of individual tumors provides great potential for personalized cancer therapy. However, the presence of a particular genetic alteration is often insufficient to predict therapeutic efficacy. Drugs with distinct mechanisms of action can affect the biology of tumors in specific and unique ways. Therefore, assays that can measure drug-induced perturbations of defined functional tumor properties can be highly complementary to genomic analysis. PET provides the capacity to noninvasively measure the dynamics of various tumor biologic processes in vivo. Here, we review the underlying biochemical and biologic basis for a variety of PET tracers and how they may be used to better optimize cancer therapy. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  18. Psychological underpinning of personalized approaches in modern medicine: syndrome analysis of mitral valve prolapsed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko, Yury P.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to demonstrate a high efficiency of the methodological means suggested by psychological syndrome analysis approach (Vygotsky-Luria school for solving theoretical and applied issues in contemporary person-centered medicine. This is achieved through an example of empirical study meant to construct a psychosomatic syndrome for 290 patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP. Analysis of all collected data was based on psychological syndrome analysis concept (Vygotsky–Luria school and A.R. Luria’s principles for psychological factors (causes selection, which determine the logic and structure of a neuropsychological syndrome. It demonstrated the association between characteristics of emotional experiences and clinical symptoms manifested in MVP patients. This correlation was statistically verified. The results proved that the most important syndrome-establishment factor (radical is a specific emotionality and dysfunction of emotion regulation and emotional control in MVP patients (excessive emotional repression with insufficient reflection of emotional experiences. Features of the motivation sphere of MVP patients appear as a second psychological syndrome-establishment factor: these are domination of the motive of failure avoidance and unsatisfied self-approval need. We argue that psychological syndrome analysis can be used as a means to approach not only diagnostic but also prognostic tasks both in clinical psychology and medicine, as well as for the development and implementation of the person-centered integrative diagnosis model. We maintained that this approach, applied in theoretical and practical fields of clinical psychology and mental health care is highly efficient at the current stage of the science evolution due to prospects revealed by s new methodological context of postnonclassical model of rationality and a comprehensive character of the cultural-historical concept regarding an individual and his mind as a self

  19. From animal models to human disease: a genetic approach for personalized medicine in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher-Martel, Vincent; Valdmanis, Paul N; Gould, Peter V; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas

    2016-07-11

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequent motor neuron disease in adults. Classical ALS is characterized by the death of upper and lower motor neurons leading to progressive paralysis. Approximately 10 % of ALS patients have familial form of the disease. Numerous different gene mutations have been found in familial cases of ALS, such as mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), C9ORF72, ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2), optineurin (OPTN) and others. Multiple animal models were generated to mimic the disease and to test future treatments. However, no animal model fully replicates the spectrum of phenotypes in the human disease and it is difficult to assess how a therapeutic effect in disease models can predict efficacy in humans. Importantly, the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of ALS leads to a variety of responses to similar treatment regimens. From this has emerged the concept of personalized medicine (PM), which is a medical scheme that combines study of genetic, environmental and clinical diagnostic testing, including biomarkers, to individualized patient care. In this perspective, we used subgroups of specific ALS-linked gene mutations to go through existing animal models and to provide a comprehensive profile of the differences and similarities between animal models of disease and human disease. Finally, we reviewed application of biomarkers and gene therapies relevant in personalized medicine approach. For instance, this includes viral delivering of antisense oligonucleotide and small interfering RNA in SOD1, TDP-43 and C9orf72 mice models. Promising gene therapies raised possibilities for treating differently the major mutations in familial ALS cases.

  20. Pharmacogenomics in type II diabetes mellitus management: Steps toward personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Avery

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Peter Avery, Shaymaa S Mousa, Shaker A MousaThe Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USAAbstract: Advances in genotype technology in the last decade have put the pharmacogenomics revolution at the forefront of future medicine in clinical practice. Discovery of novel gene variations in drug transporters, drug targets, effector proteins and metabolizing enzymes in the form of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs continue to provide insight into the biological phenomena that govern drug efficacy and toxicity. To date, novel gene discoveries extracted from genome-wide association scans and candidate gene studies in at least four antidiabetic drug classes have helped illuminate possible causes of interindividual variability in response. Inadequate protocol guidelines for pharmacogenomics studies often leads to poorly designed studies, making it hard to formulate a definitive conclusion regarding the clinical relevance of the information at hand. These issues, along with the ethical, social, political, legislative, technological, and economic challenges associated with pharmacogenomics have only delayed its entry to mainstream clinical practice. On the other hand, these issues are being actively pursued and rapid progress is being made in each area which assures the possibility of gaining widespread acceptance in clinical practice.Keywords: pharmacogenomics, genetics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, personalized medicine, type 2 diabetes, pharmacotherapy, antidiabetic drugs, efficacy, and safety

  1. The role of informatics in patient-centered care and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2017-06-01

    The practice of cytopathology has dramatically changed due to advances in genomics and information technology. Cytology laboratories have accordingly become increasingly dependent on pathology informatics support to meet the emerging demands of precision medicine. Pathology informatics deals with information technology in the laboratory, and the impact of this technology on workflow processes and staff who interact with these tools. This article covers the critical role that laboratory information systems, electronic medical records, and digital imaging plays in patient-centered personalized medicine. The value of integrated diagnostic reports, clinical decision support, and the use of whole-slide imaging to better evaluate cytology samples destined for molecular testing is discussed. Image analysis that offers more precise and quantitative measurements in cytology is addressed, as well as the role of bioinformatics tools to cope with Big Data from next-generation sequencing. This article also highlights the barriers to the widespread adoption of these disruptive technologies due to regulatory obstacles, limited commercial solutions, poor interoperability, and lack of standardization. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125(6 suppl):494-501. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Development of a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael J; Shahriari, Neda; Payette, Michael; Mnayer, Laila; Elaba, Zendee

    2016-10-01

    Results of molecular studies are redefining the diagnosis and management of a wide range of skin disorders. Dermatology training programs maintain a relative gap in relevant teaching. To develop a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees at our institution. The aim is to provide trainees with a specialty-appropriate, working knowledge in clinical molecular dermatology. The Departments of Dermatology and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine collaborated on the design and implementation of educational objectives and teaching modalities for the new curriculum. A multidisciplinary curriculum was developed. It comprises: (i) assigned reading from the medical literature and reference textbook; (ii) review of teaching sets; (iii) two 1 hour lectures; (iv) trainee presentations; (v) 1-week rotation in a clinical molecular pathology and cytogenetics laboratory; and (vi) assessments and feedback. Residents who participated in the curriculum to date have found the experience to be of value. Our curriculum provides a framework for other dermatology residency programs to develop their own specific approach to molecular diagnostics education. Such training will provide a foundation for lifelong learning as molecular testing evolves and becomes integral to the practice of dermatology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Are modern health worries, personality and attitudes to science associated with the use of complementary and alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian

    2007-05-01

    To investigate whether personality traits, modern health worries (MHWs) and attitudes to science predict attitudes to, and beliefs about, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This study set out to test whether belief in, and use of CAM was significantly associated with high levels of MHWs, a high level of neuroticism and sceptical attitudes towards science. Two hundred and forty-three British adults completed a four part questionnaire that measured MHWs, the Big Five personality traits and beliefs about science and medicine and attitudes to CAM. There were many gender differences in MHWs (females expressed more), though results were similar to previous studies. Contrary to prediction, personality traits were not related to MHWs, CAM usage or beliefs about CAM. Regular and occasional users of CAM did have higher MHWs than those non or infrequent users. Those with high totalled MHWs also tended to believe in the importance of psychological factors in health and illness, as well as the potential harmful effects of modern medicine. Young males who had positive attitudes to science were least likely to be CAM users. Further, positive attitudes to science were associated with increased scepticism about CAM. Concern about health, belief about modern medicine and CAM are logically inter-related. Those who have high MHWs tend to be more sceptical about modern medicine and more convinced of the possible role of psychological factors in personal health and illness.

  4. Lifestyle medicine course for family medicine residents: preliminary assessment of the impact on knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and personal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatskey, Lilach; Bar Zeev, Yael; Tzuk-Onn, Adva; Polak, Rani

    2017-09-01

    The WHO estimates that by 2020 two-thirds of the diseases worldwide will be the result of unhealthy lifestyle habits. Less than half of primary care physician graduates feel prepared to give lifestyle behaviour counselling. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of lifestyle medicine (LM) course on self-reported knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and health behaviour of family medicine residents. Based on the Israeli syllabus for the study of LM, we delivered five face to face 20 H courses. Pre/post data were collected by knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and personal health survey: RESULTS: A total of 112 family medicine residents participated in one of the five courses, of which 91 (81.3%) filled both pre and post surveys. Participates showed an improvement in self-reported knowledge and capacity to manage patients in regard to smoking, weight management and physical activity. An improvement was noted in personal health behaviour of overweight participant's in regard to self-reported physical activity. A comprehensive LM syllabus based course has a positive impact on family medicine residents LM counselling abilities. We suggest that LM course should be considered as a potential permanent addition to the family medicine residency programme. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE AS AN UPDATED MODEL OF NATIONAL HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM.PART 1. STRATEGIC ASPECTS OF INFRASTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Suchkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the key problems of the transition of the national health-care system to a new platform of personalized medicine and, in particular, pediatrics. The first part, published in this issue, analyzes the most important of the necessary aspects of the infrastructure of the new model. Evidence is given of the extreme urgency of introducing a new model of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM. The result of implementation should be breakthrough success in solving many epidemiological, diagnostic, curative, preventive, social and economic problems. It is emphasized that neonatology and pediatrics are the most important link in this paradigm. When considering the potential architectonics of the model, important characteristics of its main segments are revealed. Diagnostic principles (genotyping, targeting, and dynamic screening of biomarkers and arsenal (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, mathematical modeling tools, etc. of personalized medicine are presented. Attention is focused on the need to create information (global, regional and target-specific banks that are necessary for monitoring individual health. The need to create a new social decision-making mechanism for selecting a preventive protocol that minimizes the risks of the disease or prevents its development is discussed. Four categories of basic programs of medical and social support of persons from the risk category are considered. The necessary conditions for translating these programs into practice are presented. The main tasks and problems of developing the principles for the preparation of preventive-prophylactic and protocols of medical rehabilitation for personalized medicine were discussed. 

  6. Three-Dimensional Printing of Medicinal Products and the Challenge of Personalized Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zema, Lucia; Melocchi, Alice; Maroni, Alessandra; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    By 3-dimensional (3D) printing, solid objects of any shape are fabricated through layer-by-layer addition of materials based on a digital model. At present, such a technique is broadly exploited in many industrial fields because of major advantages in terms of reduced times and costs of development and production. In the biomedical and pharmaceutical domains, the interest in 3D printing is growing in step with the needs of personalized medicine. Printed scaffolds and prostheses have partly replaced medical devices produced by more established techniques, and more recently, 3D printing has been proposed for the manufacturing of drug products. Notably, the availability of patient-tailored pharmaceuticals would be of utmost importance for children, elderly subjects, poor and high metabolizers, and individuals undergoing multiple drug treatments. 3D printing encompasses a range of differing techniques, each involving advantages and open issues. Particularly, solidification of powder, extrusion, and stereolithography have been applied to the manufacturing of drug products. The main challenge to their exploitation for personalized pharmacologic therapy is likely to be related to the regulatory issues involved and to implementation of production models that may allow to efficiently turn the therapeutic needs of individual patients into small batches of appropriate drug products meeting preset quality requirements. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient and interest organizations' views on personalized medicine: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budin-Ljøsne, Isabelle; Harris, Jennifer R

    2016-05-13

    Personalized medicine (PM) aims to tailor disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment to individuals on the basis of their genes, lifestyle and environments. Patient and interest organizations (PIOs) may potentially play an important role in the realization of PM. This paper investigates the views and perspectives on PM of a variety of PIOs. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted among leading representatives of 13 PIOs located in Europe and North-America. The data collected were analysed using a conventional content analysis approach. The PIO representatives supported the realization of PM but feared that many financial, structural and organizational challenges may delay its realization. They encouraged strategies to modernize drug licencing mechanisms, develop research and data sharing infrastructures, and educate patients and health care professionals in PM. Notably, they emphasized the importance of developing PM in an equitable way and taking into consideration the patients' needs, values and personal situation. Despite varying levels of awareness regarding PM, the PIO representatives expressed willingness to engage in the PM agenda and recommended that PIOs work closely with policy-makers to design PM in a way that truly addresses the needs and concerns of patients. PIOs have the potential to become central drivers of the PM agenda. Collaborations should be further developed between PIOs, researchers, drug developers and health care authorities.

  8. Self-management strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a first step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrecheguren, Miriam; Bourbeau, Jean

    2018-03-01

    Self-management has gained increased relevance in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. The heterogeneity in self-management interventions has complicated the development of recommendations for clinical practice. In this review, we present the latest findings regarding conceptual definition, effectiveness of self-management interventions and self-management strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a first step toward personalized medicine: what, how and to whom? Self-management interventions have shown benefits in improving health-related quality of life and reducing hospital admissions. Favorable outcomes can only be achieved if patients have an ultimate goal, that is their desired achievements in their life. In the continuum of care, the components of the self-management program will vary to adapt to the condition of the patient (disease severity, comorbidities) and to factors such as patient motivation, confidence (self-efficacy), access to health care, family and social support. A combination of education, case management and patient-centric action plan has shown the best chance of success. The individual patient's needs, own preferences and personal goals should inform the design of any intervention with a behavioral component. A continuous loop process has to be implemented to constantly assess what work and does not work, aiming at achieving the desired outcomes for a given patient.

  9. Paving the way to personalized medicine. Production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  10. Relationship between Personality Profiles and Suicide Attempt via Medicine Poisoning among Hospitalized Patients: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiee-Kandjani, Ali Reza; Amiri, Shahrokh; Arfaie, Asghar; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Farvareshi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Inflexible personality traits play an important role in the development of maladaptive behaviors among patients who attempt suicide. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between personality profiles and suicide attempt via medicine poisoning among the patients hospitalized in a public hospital. Materials and Methods. Fifty-nine patients who attempted suicide for the first time and hospitalized in the poisoning ward were selected as the experimental group. Sixty...

  11. Personalized Medicine: New Perspectives for the Diagnosis and the Treatment of Renal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gluba-Brzózka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of renal diseases is rising and reaching 5–15% of the adult population. Renal damage is associated with disturbances of body homeostasis and the loss of equilibrium between exogenous and endogenous elements including drugs and metabolites. Studies indicate that renal diseases are influenced not only by environmental but also by genetic factors. In some cases the disease is caused by mutation in a single gene and at that time severity depends on the presence of one or two mutated alleles. In other cases, renal disease is associated with the presence of alteration within a gene or genes, but environmental factors are also necessary for the development of disease. Therefore, it seems that the analysis of genetic aspects should be a natural component of clinical and experimental studies. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine the right drug, for the right patient, at the right time. Whole-genome examinations may help to change the approach to the disease and the patient resulting in the creation of “personalized medicine” with new diagnostic and treatment strategies designed on the basis of genetic background of each individual. The identification of high-risk patients in pharmacogenomics analyses will help to avoid many unwarranted side effects while optimizing treatment efficacy for individual patients. Personalized therapies for kidney diseases are still at the preliminary stage mainly due to high costs of such analyses and the complex nature of human genome. This review will focus on several areas of interest: renal disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rate of progression and the prediction of prognosis.

  12. Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

  13. Optimization of radiation protection in nuclear medicine: from reference dosimetry to personalized dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadid, Lama

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, radiopharmaceuticals are distributed in the body through biokinetic processes. Thus, each organ can become a source of radiation delivering a fraction of emitted energy in tissues. Therefore, dose calculations must be assessed accurately and realistically to ensure the patient radiation protection. Absorbed doses were until now based on mathematical standard models and electron transport approximations. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently adopted voxel phantoms as a more realistic representation of the reference adult. The main goal of this thesis was to study the influence of the use of the new reference models and Monte Carlo methods on the major dosimetric quantities. In addition, the contribution of patients? specific geometry to the absorbed dose was compared to a standard geometry, enabling the evaluation of uncertainties arising from the reference values. Particular attention was paid to the bone marrow which is characterized by a high radiosensitivity and a complex microscopic structure. An accurate alpha dosimetry was assessed for bone marrow using microscopic images of several trabecular bone sites. The results showed variations in the absorbed fractions as a function of the particles? energy, the skeletal site and the amount of fat within marrow cavities, three parameters which are not taken into account in the values published by the ICRP. Finally, the heterogeneous activity distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals was considered within the framework of the treatment of a hepato-cellular carcinoma with selective internal radiotherapy using Yttrium-90 through the analysis of dose-volume histograms. The developments made in this thesis show the importance and the feasibility of performing a personalized dosimetry for nuclear medicine patients. (author)

  14. Narrowing the gap of personalized medicine in emerging countries: the case of multiple endocrine neoplasias in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Sekiya, Tomoko; Longuini, Viviane C; Coutinho, Flavia L; Lourenço, Delmar M; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2012-01-01

    The finished version of the human genome sequence was completed in 2003, and this event initiated a revolution in medical practice, which is usually referred to as the age of genomic or personalized medicine. Genomic medicine aims to be predictive, personalized, preventive, and also participative (4Ps). It offers a new approach to several pathological conditions, although its impact so far has been more evident in mendelian diseases. This article briefly reviews the potential advantages of this approach, and also some issues that may arise in the attempt to apply the accumulated knowledge from genomic medicine to clinical practice in emerging countries. The advantages of applying genomic medicine into clinical practice are obvious, enabling prediction, prevention, and early diagnosis and treatment of several genetic disorders. However, there are also some issues, such as those related to: (a) the need for approval of a law equivalent to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which was approved in 2008 in the USA; (b) the need for private and public funding for genetics and genomics; (c) the need for development of innovative healthcare systems that may substantially cut costs (e.g. costs of periodic medical followup); (d) the need for new graduate and postgraduate curricula in which genomic medicine is emphasized; and (e) the need to adequately inform the population and possible consumers of genetic testing, with reference to the basic aspects of genomic medicine.

  15. Narrowing the gap of personalized medicine in emerging countries: the case of multiple endocrine neoplasias in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Toledo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The finished version of the human genome sequence was completed in 2003, and this event initiated a revolution in medical practice, which is usually referred to as the age of genomic or personalized medicine. Genomic medicine aims to be predictive, personalized, preventive, and also participative (4Ps. It offers a new approach to several pathological conditions, although its impact so far has been more evident in mendelian diseases. This article briefly reviews the potential advantages of this approach, and also some issues that may arise in the attempt to apply the accumulated knowledge from genomic medicine to clinical practice in emerging countries. The advantages of applying genomic medicine into clinical practice are obvious, enabling prediction, prevention, and early diagnosis and treatment of several genetic disorders. However, there are also some issues, such as those related to: (a the need for approval of a law equivalent to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which was approved in 2008 in the USA; (b the need for private and public funding for genetics and genomics; (c the need for development of innovative healthcare systems that may substantially cut costs (e.g. costs of periodic medical followup; (d the need for new graduate and postgraduate curricula in which genomic medicine is emphasized; and (e the need to adequately inform the population and possible consumers of genetic testing, with reference to the basic aspects of genomic medicine.

  16. Understanding Medicines: Conceptual Analysis of Nurses' Needs for Knowledge and Understanding of Pharmacology (Part I). Understanding Medicines: Extending Pharmacology Education for Dependent and Independent Prescribing (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathard, Helen L.

    2001-01-01

    Part I reviews what nurses need to know about the administration and prescription of medicines. Part II addresses drug classifications, actions and effects, and interactions. Also discussed are the challenges pharmacological issues pose for nursing education. (SK)

  17. Looking for a Person-Centered Medicine: Non Conventional Medicine in the Conventional European and Italian Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Roberti di Sarsina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the use of non conventional medicines (NCMs is spreading among people as in the rest of Europe. Sales of alternative remedies are growing, and likewise the number of medical doctors (MDs who practise NCM/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. However, in Italy as in other countries of the European Union, at the present time the juridical/legal status of NCM/CAM is not well established, mainly due to the lack of any national law regulating NCM/CAM professional training, practice and public supply and the absence of government-promoted scientific research in this field. This is an obstacle to safeguarding the patient's interests and freedom of choice, especially now that dissatisfaction with biomedicine is inclining more and more people to look for a holistic and patient-centered form of medicine.

  18. Culture and Drug Profiling of Patient Derived Malignant Pleural Effusions for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Christian; Kustermann, Stefan; Pietilae, Elina; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Baschiera, Betty; Arabi, Leila; Lorber, Thomas; Oeggerli, Martin; Savic, Spasenija; Obermann, Ellen; Singer, Thomas; Rothschild, Sacha I; Zippelius, Alfred; Roth, Adrian B; Bubendorf, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    The use of patients' own cancer cells for in vitro selection of the most promising treatment is an attractive concept in personalized medicine. Human carcinoma cells from malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) are suited for this purpose since they have already adapted to the liquid environment in the patient and do not depend on a stromal cell compartment. Aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for the in-vitro culture of MPEs to analyze the effect of chemotherapeutic as well as targeted drugs. MPEs from patients with solid tumors were selected for this study. After morphological and molecular characterization, they were cultured in medium supplemented with patient-derived sterile-filtered effusion supernatant. Growth characteristics were monitored in real-time using the xCELLigence system. MPEs were treated with a targeted therapeutic (erlotinib) according to the mutational status or chemotherapeutics based on the recommendation of the oncologists. We have established a robust system for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro. The use of an antibody based magnetic cell separation system for epithelial cells before culture allowed treatment of effusions with only moderate tumor cell proportion. Experiments using drugs and drug-combinations revealed dose-dependent and specific growth inhibitory effects of targeted drugs. We developed a new approach for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro using real-time measuring of cell growth, which precisely reproduced the effect of clinically established treatments by standard chemotherapy and targeted drugs. This sets the stage for future studies testing agents against specific targets from genomic profiling of metastatic tumor cells and multiple drug-combinations in a personalized manner.

  19. Culture and Drug Profiling of Patient Derived Malignant Pleural Effusions for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ruiz

    Full Text Available The use of patients' own cancer cells for in vitro selection of the most promising treatment is an attractive concept in personalized medicine. Human carcinoma cells from malignant pleural effusions (MPEs are suited for this purpose since they have already adapted to the liquid environment in the patient and do not depend on a stromal cell compartment. Aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for the in-vitro culture of MPEs to analyze the effect of chemotherapeutic as well as targeted drugs.MPEs from patients with solid tumors were selected for this study. After morphological and molecular characterization, they were cultured in medium supplemented with patient-derived sterile-filtered effusion supernatant. Growth characteristics were monitored in real-time using the xCELLigence system. MPEs were treated with a targeted therapeutic (erlotinib according to the mutational status or chemotherapeutics based on the recommendation of the oncologists.We have established a robust system for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro. The use of an antibody based magnetic cell separation system for epithelial cells before culture allowed treatment of effusions with only moderate tumor cell proportion. Experiments using drugs and drug-combinations revealed dose-dependent and specific growth inhibitory effects of targeted drugs.We developed a new approach for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro using real-time measuring of cell growth, which precisely reproduced the effect of clinically established treatments by standard chemotherapy and targeted drugs. This sets the stage for future studies testing agents against specific targets from genomic profiling of metastatic tumor cells and multiple drug-combinations in a personalized manner.

  20. Does nurses' role, health or symptoms influence their personal use of ingestible complementary and alternative medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrelis, Sofia; Perry, Lin; Gallagher, Robyn; Duffield, Christine; Sibbritt, David; Nicholls, Rachel; Xu, Xiaoyue

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the influence of work-related characteristics, health, health behaviours and symptoms on ingestible biologically-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use within the Australian nursing and midwifery workforce. CAM use is widespread worldwide, but there is little research into nurses' and midwives' personal use of ingestible CAM in Australia. An online survey in 2014-15 used validated instruments and items to examine use of ingestible biologically-based CAM (herbs, foods and vitamins, minerals, amino acids, enzymes and other supplements), and the health and work-related characteristics of 5041 nurses and midwives recruited through the New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Association and professional networks. A small proportion of nurses (6.8%) identified as personal CAM users. Most were female, older, worked in foundational roles (frontline Registered and Enrolled Nurses/Midwives) and used one CAM, most commonly a multivitamin, although Vitamin D, Fish Oil, Calcium and Glucosamine±Chondroitin were also common. In comparison to non-users, CAM users were less likely to take sick days or indulge in risky drinking, but more likely to be symptomatic (with stiff joints, bodily/joint pain, severe tiredness, allergies, indigestion/heartburn), diagnosed with osteoarthritis and to adhere to healthy diet recommendations. Findings showed a credible pattern of front line workers with physically demanding workloads that impact their physical health and are linked to frequent symptoms, using CAM treatments and achieving some success in being able to continue working and avoid sickness absence. Further investigation is warranted to protect and maintain the health of the nursing and midwifery workforce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sarcoma Spheroids and Organoids—Promising Tools in the Era of Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Colella

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment is rapidly evolving toward personalized medicine, which takes into account the individual molecular and genetic variability of tumors. Sophisticated new in vitro disease models, such as three-dimensional cell cultures, may provide a tool for genetic, epigenetic, biomedical, and pharmacological research, and help determine the most promising individual treatment. Sarcomas, malignant neoplasms originating from mesenchymal cells, may have a multitude of genomic aberrations that give rise to more than 70 different histopathological subtypes. Their low incidence and high level of histopathological heterogeneity have greatly limited progress in their treatment, and trials of clinical sarcoma are less frequent than trials of other carcinomas. The main advantage of 3D cultures from tumor cells or biopsy is that they provide patient-specific models of solid tumors, and they overcome some limitations of traditional 2D monolayer cultures by reflecting cell heterogeneity, native histologic architectures, and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Recent advances promise that these models can help bridge the gap between preclinical and clinical research by providing a relevant in vitro model of human cancer useful for drug testing and studying metastatic and dormancy mechanisms. However, additional improvements of 3D models are expected in the future, specifically the inclusion of tumor vasculature and the immune system, to enhance their full ability to capture the biological features of native tumors in high-throughput screening. Here, we summarize recent advances and future perspectives of spheroid and organoid in vitro models of rare sarcomas that can be used to investigate individual molecular biology and predict clinical responses. We also highlight how spheroid and organoid culture models could facilitate the personalization of sarcoma treatment, provide specific clinical scenarios, and discuss the relative strengths and limitations

  2. Efficacy of extended-release divalproex combined with "condensed" dialectical behavior therapy for individuals with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Richelle; Freitag, Mary; Miller, Michael; Lee, Susanne; Romine, Ann; Song, Sue; Adityanjee, Adit; Schulz, S Charles

    2012-11-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a significant psychiatric illness for which medication treatments are still being explored. The goal of this study was to assess divalproex extended release (ER) vs placebo for patients receiving dialectal behavior therapy (DBT). Patients with BPD received 4 weeks of "condensed DBT." Those with Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) scores >150 after this treatment were then randomly and blindly assigned to placebo or divalproex ER for 12 weeks. Repeated measures analysis of variance utilizing last observation carried forward was used to assess the results. Seventeen participants completed the full assessment. Two patients had a significant decrease in SCL-90 in the first 4 weeks, leaving 15 patients for the medication phase of the trial. There were no significant differences between the participants assigned to divalproex ER compared with placebo. However, there was a significant improvement in both groups from baseline to endpoint (P = .001). The response of 2 of 17 participants in the first 4 weeks prior to medication may point to a practice strategy in approaching outpatients with BPD. Although the patients had a decrease in symptoms during the study, there was no advantage observed for divalproex ER and DBT over placebo and DBT.

  3. Personalized In Vitro and In Vivo Cancer Models to Guide Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Chantal; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Prandi, Davide; Shaw, Reid; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Sboner, Andrea; Sailer, Verena; Augello, Michael; Puca, Loredana; Rosati, Rachele; McNary, Terra J.; Churakova, Yelena; Cheung, Cynthia; Triscott, Joanna; Pisapia, David; Rao, Rema; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Robinson, Brian; Faltas, Bishoy M.; Emerling, Brooke E.; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K.; Bernard, Brady; Elemento, Olivier; Beltran, Himisha; Dimichelis, Francesca; Kemp, Christopher J.; Grandori, Carla; Cantley, Lewis C.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Precision Medicine is an approach that takes into account the influence of individuals' genes, environment and lifestyle exposures to tailor interventions. Here, we describe the development of a robust precision cancer care platform, which integrates whole exome sequencing (WES) with a living biobank that enables high throughput drug screens on patient-derived tumor organoids. To date, 56 tumor-derived organoid cultures, and 19 patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have been established from the 769 patients enrolled in an IRB approved clinical trial. Because genomics alone was insufficient to identify therapeutic options for the majority of patients with advanced disease, we used high throughput drug screening effective strategies. Analysis of tumor derived cells from four cases, two uterine malignancies and two colon cancers, identified effective drugs and drug combinations that were subsequently validated using 3D cultures and PDX models. This platform thereby promotes the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches that can be assessed in clinical trials and provides personalized therapeutic options for individual patients where standard clinical options have been exhausted. PMID:28331002

  4. How many molecular subtypes? Implications of the unique tumor principle in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2012-07-01

    Cancers are complex multifactorial diseases. For centuries, conventional organ-based classification system (i.e., breast cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, and so on) has been utilized. Recently, molecular diagnostics has become an essential component in clinical decision-making. However, tumor evolution and behavior cannot accurately be predicted, despite numerous research studies reporting promising tumor biomarkers. To advance molecular diagnostics, a better understanding of intratumor and intertumor heterogeneity is essential. Tumor cells interact with the extracellular matrix and host non-neoplastic cells in the tumor microenvironment, which is influenced by genomic variation, hormones, and dietary, lifestyle and environmental exposures, implicated by molecular pathological epidemiology. Essentially, each tumor possesses its own unique characteristics in terms of molecular make-up, tumor microenvironment and interactomes within and between neoplastic and host cells. Starting from the unique tumor concept and paradigm, we can better classify tumors by molecular methods, and move closer toward personalized cancer medicine and prevention.

  5. The biology of personalized cancer medicine: facing individual complexities underlying hallmark capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Michele; Hanahan, Douglas

    2012-04-01

    It is a time of great promise and expectation for the applications of knowledge about mechanisms of cancer toward more effective and enduring therapies for human disease. Conceptualizations such as the hallmarks of cancer are providing an organizing principle with which to distill and rationalize the abject complexities of cancer phenotypes and genotypes across the spectrum of the human disease. A countervailing reality, however, involves the variable and often transitory responses to most mechanism-based targeted therapies, returning full circle to the complexity, arguing that the unique biology and genetics of a patient's tumor will in the future necessarily need to be incorporated into the decisions about optimal treatment strategies, the frontier of personalized cancer medicine. This perspective highlights considerations, metrics, and methods that may prove instrumental in charting the landscape of evaluating individual tumors so to better inform diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Integral to the consideration is remarkable heterogeneity and variability, evidently embedded in cancer cells, but likely also in the cell types composing the supportive and interactive stroma of the tumor microenvironment (e.g., leukocytes and fibroblasts), whose diversity in form, regulation, function, and abundance may prove to rival that of the cancer cells themselves. By comprehensively interrogating both parenchyma and stroma of patients' cancers with a suite of parametric tools, the promise of mechanism-based therapy may truly be realized. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Awareness and attitude of the public toward personalized medicine in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iyn-Hyang; Kang, Hye-Young; Suh, Hae Sun; Lee, Sukhyang; Oh, Eun Sil

    2018-01-01

    Objectives As personalized medicine (PM) is expected to greatly improve health outcomes, efforts have recently been made for its clinical implementation in Korea. We aimed to evaluate public awareness and attitude regarding PM. Methods We performed a self-administered questionnaire survey to 703 adults, who participated in the survey on a voluntary basis. The primary outcome measures included public knowledge, attitude, and acceptance of PM. We conducted multinomial multivariate logistic analysis for outcome variables with three response categories and performed multivariate logistic regression analyses for dichotomous outcome variables. Results Only 28% of participants had knowledge that genetic factors can contribute to inter-individual variations in drug response and the definition of PM (199 out of 702). Higher family income was correlated with greater knowledge concerning PM (OR = 3.76, p = 0.034). A majority of respondents preferred integrated pharmacogenomic testing over drug-specific testing and agreed to inclusion of pharmacogenomic testing in the national health examination (64% and 77%, respectively), but only 51% were willing to pay for it. Discussion Our results identify the urgent need for public education as well as the potential health disparities in access to PM. This study helps to frame policies for implementing PM in clinical practice. PMID:29451916

  7. Implementation of personalized medicine in Central-Eastern Europe: pitfalls and potentials based on citizen's attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balicza, Peter; Terebessy, Andras; Grosz, Zoltan; Varga, Noemi Agnes; Gal, Aniko; Fekete, Balint Andras; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2018-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing is increasingly utilized worldwide as a research and diagnostic tool and is anticipated to be implemented into everyday clinical practice. Since Central-Eastern European attitude toward genetic testing, especially broad genetic testing, is not well known, we performed a survey on this issue among Hungarian participants. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among patients and patient relatives at our neurogenetic outpatient clinic. Members of the general population were also recruited via public media. We used chi-square testing and binary logistic regression to examine factors influencing attitude. We identified a mixed attitude toward genetic testing. Access to physician consultation positively influenced attitude. A higher self-determined genetic familiarity score associated with higher perceived genetic influence score, which in turn associated with greater willingness to participate in genetic testing. Medical professionals constituted a skeptical group. We think that given the controversies and complexities of the next-generation sequencing field, the optimal clinical translation of NGS data should be performed in institutions which have the unique capability to provide interprofessional health education, transformative biomedical research, and crucial patient care. With optimization of the clinical translational process, improvement of genetic literacy may increase patient engagement and empowerment. The paper highlights that in countries with relatively low-genetic literacy, a special strategy is needed to enhance the implementation of personalized medicine.

  8. Integrated Pathology Informatics Enables High-Quality Personalized and Precision Medicine: Digital Pathology and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volynskaya, Zoya; Chow, Hung; Evans, Andrew; Wolff, Alan; Lagmay-Traya, Cecilia; Asa, Sylvia L

    2018-03-01

    - The critical role of pathology in diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction demands high-quality subspecialty diagnostics that integrates information from multiple laboratories. - To identify key requirements and to establish a systematic approach to providing high-quality pathology in a health care system that is responsible for services across a large geographic area. - This report focuses on the development of a multisite pathology informatics platform to support high-quality surgical pathology and hematopathology using a sophisticated laboratory information system and whole slide imaging for histology and immunohistochemistry, integrated with ancillary tools, including electron microscopy, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and molecular diagnostics. - These tools enable patients in numerous geographic locations access to a model of subspecialty pathology that allows reporting of every specimen by the right pathologist at the right time. The use of whole slide imaging for multidisciplinary case conferences enables better communication among members of patient care teams. The system encourages data collection using a discrete data synoptic reporting module, has implemented documentation of quality assurance activities, and allows workload measurement, providing examples of additional benefits that can be gained by this electronic approach to pathology. - This approach builds the foundation for accurate big data collection and high-quality personalized and precision medicine.

  9. [Application of molecular diagnostic techniques in precision medicine of personalized treatment for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ji; Lin, Guole

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is to customize the treatment options for individual patient based on the personal genome information. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancer worldwide. Molecular heterogeneity of CRC, which includes the MSI phenotype, hypermutation phenotype, and their relationship with clinical preferences, is believed to be one of the main factors responsible for the considerable variability in treatment response. The development of powerful next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allows us to further understand the biological behavior of colorectal cancer, and to analyze the prognosis and chemotherapeutic drug reactions by molecular diagnostic techniques, which can guide the clinical treatment. This paper will introduce the new findings in this field. Meanwhile we integrate the new progress of key pathways including EGFR, RAS, PI3K/AKT and VEGF, and the experience in selective patients through associated molecular diagnostic screening who gain better efficacy after target therapy. The technique for detecting circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is introduced here as well, which can identify patients with high risk for recurrence, and demonstrate the risk of chemotherapy resistance. Mechanism of tumor drug resistance may be revealed by dynamic observation of gene alteration during treatment.

  10. The future role of personalized medicine in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2010-08-01

    proliferation, and recent research has found key molecules that regulate GBM cell migration that can be targeted by therapy. Current standard of care for GBM remains nonspecific; however, pharmacogenomic studies are underway to pave the way for patient-specific therapies that are based on the unique aberrant pathways in individual patients. In conclusion, recent studies in GBM have found many diverse molecular targets possible for therapy. The next obstacle in treating this fatal tumor is ascertaining which molecules in each patient should be targeted and how best to target them, so that we can move our current nonspecific therapies toward the realm of personalized medicine.Keywords: GBM, oncogenomics, genetics, signaling cascades, pharmacogenomics

  11. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. O’Rawe

    2013-10-01

    carries the p.Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come.Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care.

  12. Predictive biomarkers for type 2 of diabetes mellitus: Bridging the gap between systems research and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraniotou, Christina; Karadima, Vasiliki; Bellos, George; Tsangaris, George Th

    2018-03-05

    The global incidence of metabolic disorders like type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) has assumed epidemic proportions, leading to adverse health and socio-economic impacts. It is therefore of critical importance the early diagnosis of DM2 patients and the detection of those at increased risk of disease. In this respect, Precision Medicine (PM) is an emerging approach that includes practices, tests, decisions and treatments adapted to the characteristics of each patient. With regard to DM2, PM manages a wealth of "omics" data (genomic, metabolic, proteomic, environmental, clinical and paraclinical) to increase the number of clinically validated biomarkers in order to identify patients in early stage even before the prediabetic phase. In this paper, we discuss the epidemic dimension of metabolic disorders like type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and the urgent demand for novel biomarkers to reduce the incidence or even delay the onset of DM2. Recent research data produced by "multi-omics" technologies (genomics/epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics), suggest that many potential biomarkers might be helpful in the prediction and early diagnosis of DM2. Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine (PPPM) manages and integrates these data to apply personalized, preventive, and therapeutic approaches. This is significant because there is an emerging need for establishing channels for communication and personalized consultation between systems research and precision medicine, as the medicine of the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Personalized Medicine: how to Switch from the Concept to the Integration into the Clinical Development Plan to Obtain Marketing Authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becquemont, Laurent; Bordet, Régis; Cellier, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of the coming years is to personalize medicine in order to provide each patient with an individualized treatment plan. The three objectives of personalized medicine are to refine diagnosis, rationalize treatment and engage patients in a preventive approach. Personalization can be characterized by various descriptors whether related to the field, biology, imaging, type of lesion of the entity to be treated, comorbidity factors, coprescriptions or the environment As part of personalized medicine focused on biological markers including genetics or genomics, the integration of the clinical development plan to obtain marketing authorization may be segmented in 3 stages with a known descriptor identified before clinical development, a known descriptor discovered during clinical development or a known descriptor known after clinical development. For each stage, it is important to clearly define the technical optimization elements, to specify the expectations and objectives, to examine the methodological aspects of each clinical development phase and finally to consider the fast changing regulatory requirements in view of the few registered therapeutics complying with the definition of personalized medicine as well as the significant technological breakthroughs according to the screened and selected biomarkers. These considerations should be integrated in view of the time required for clinical development from early phase to MA, i.e. more than 10 years. Moreover, business models related to the economic environment should be taken into account when deciding whether or not to retain a biomarker allowing the selection of target populations in a general population. © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. Highlights lecture EANM 2016: ''Embracing molecular imaging and multi-modal imaging: a smart move for nuclear medicine towards personalized medicine''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Cancer Imaging Centre, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [Hotel Dieu University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Nantes (France); CRCINA, Inserm U1232, Nantes (France); ICO Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Herblain (France)

    2017-08-15

    The 2016 EANM Congress took place in Barcelona, Spain, from 15 to 19 October under the leadership of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. With more than 6,000 participants, this congress was the most important European event in nuclear medicine, bringing together a multidisciplinary community involved in the different fields of nuclear medicine. There were over 600 oral and 1,200 poster or e-Poster presentations with an overwhelming focus on development and application of imaging for personalized care, which is timely for the community. Beyond FDG PET, major highlights included progress in the use of PSMA and SSTR receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and associated theranostics in oncology. Innovations in radiopharmaceuticals for imaging pathologies of the brain and cardiovascular system, as well as infection and inflammation, were also highlighted. In the areas of physics and instrumentation, multimodality imaging and radiomics were highlighted as promising areas of research. (orig.)

  15. Highlights lecture EANM 2016: "Embracing molecular imaging and multi-modal imaging: a smart move for nuclear medicine towards personalized medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboagye, Eric O; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2017-08-01

    The 2016 EANM Congress took place in Barcelona, Spain, from 15 to 19 October under the leadership of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. With more than 6,000 participants, this congress was the most important European event in nuclear medicine, bringing together a multidisciplinary community involved in the different fields of nuclear medicine. There were over 600 oral and 1,200 poster or e-Poster presentations with an overwhelming focus on development and application of imaging for personalized care, which is timely for the community. Beyond FDG PET, major highlights included progress in the use of PSMA and SSTR receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and associated theranostics in oncology. Innovations in radiopharmaceuticals for imaging pathologies of the brain and cardiovascular system, as well as infection and inflammation, were also highlighted. In the areas of physics and instrumentation, multimodality imaging and radiomics were highlighted as promising areas of research.

  16. Capitalized design of smart medicine box for elderly person based on quality function deployment (QFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Brina Cindy; Dewi, Dyah Santhi; Widodo, Rusminto Tjatur

    2017-11-01

    The elderly who has a particular disease need to take some medicines in everyday with correct dosages and appropriate by time schedules. However, the elderly frequently forget to take medicines because of their memory weakened. Consequently, the product innovation of elderly healthcare is required for helping elderly takes some medicine more easily. This research aims to develop a smart medicine box by applying quality function deployment method. The first step is identifying elderly requirements through an ethnographic approach by interviewing thirty-two of elderly people as respondents. Then, the second step is translated elderly requirements to technical parameter for designing a smart medicine box. The smart box design is focused on two main requirements which have highest importance rating including alarm reminder for taking medicine and automatic medicine box. Finally, the prototype design has been created and tested by using usability method. The result shown that 90% from ten respondents have positive respond on the feature of smart medicine box. The voice of alarm reminder smart medicine box is easy to understand by elderly people for taking medicines.

  17. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deanna S; Ivacic, Lynn C; Stefanski, Elisha L; McCarty, Catherine A

    2010-06-17

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies.Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German.41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are important for the design and

  18. Serum Steroid Ratio Profiles in Prostate Cancer: A New Diagnostic Tool Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Adriana; Bruno, Antonino; Bassani, Barbara; D'Ambrosio, Gioacchino; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Consonni, Paolo; Castellani, Laura; Conti, Matteo; Cristoni, Simone; Noonan, Douglas M

    2018-01-01

    Serum steroids are crucial molecules altered in prostate cancer (PCa). Mass spectrometry (MS) is currently the elected technology for the analysis of steroids in diverse biological samples. Steroids have complex biological pathways and stoichiometry and it is important to evaluate their quantitative ratio. MS applications to patient hormone profiling could lead to a diagnostic approach. Here, we employed the Surface Activated Chemical Ionization-Electrospray-NIST (SANIST) developed in our laboratories, to obtain quantitative serum steroid ratio relationship profiles with a machine learning Bayesian model to discriminate patients with PCa. The approach is focused on steroid relationship profiles and disease association. A pilot study on patients affected by PCa, benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH), and control subjects [prostate-specific antigen (PSA) lower than 2.5 ng/mL] was done in order to investigate the classification performance of the SANIST platform. The steroid profiles of 71 serum samples (31 controls, 20 patients with PCa and 20 subjects with benign prostate hyperplasia) were evaluated. The levels of 10 steroids were quantitated on the SANIST platform: Aldosterone, Corticosterone, Cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol, Androstenedione, Testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), 17-OH-Progesterone and Progesterone. We performed both traditional and a machine learning analysis. We show that the machine learning approach based on the steroid relationships developed here was much more accurate than the PSA, DHEAS, and direct absolute value match method in separating the PCa, BPH and control subjects, increasing the sensitivity to 90% and specificity to 84%. This technology, if applied in the future to a larger number of samples will be able to detect the individual enzymatic disequilibrium associated with the steroid ratio and correlate it with the disease. This learning machine approach could be valid in a personalized medicine

  19. Concepts of ‘personalization’ in personalized medicine: implications for economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Wolf; Payne, Katherine; Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Manca, Andrea; Rochau, Ursula; Jahn, Beate; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Leidl, Reiner; Siebert, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Context This paper assesses if, and how, existing methods for economic evaluation are applicable to the evaluation of PM and if not, where extension to methods may be required. Method Structured workshop with a pre-defined group of experts (n=47), run using a modified nominal group technique. Workshop findings were recorded using extensive note taking and summarised using thematic data analysis. The workshop was complemented by structured literature searches. Results The key finding emerging from the workshop, using an economic perspective, was that two distinct, but linked, interpretations of the concept of PM exist (personalization by ‘physiology’ or ‘preferences’). These interpretations involve specific challenges for the design and conduct of economic evaluations. Existing evaluative (extra-welfarist) frameworks were generally considered appropriate for evaluating PM. When ‘personalization’ is viewed as using physiological biomarkers, challenges include: representing complex care pathways; representing spill-over effects; meeting data requirements such as evidence on heterogeneity; choosing appropriate time horizons for the value of further research in uncertainty analysis. When viewed as tailoring medicine to patient preferences, further work is needed regarding: revealed preferences, e.g. treatment (non)adherence; stated preferences, e.g. risk interpretation and attitude; consideration of heterogeneity in preferences; and the appropriate framework (welfarism vs. extra-welfarism) to incorporate non-health benefits. Conclusion Ideally, economic evaluations should take account of both interpretations of PM and consider physiology and preferences. It is important for decision makers to be cognizant of the issues involved with the economic evaluation of PM to appropriately interpret the evidence and target future research funding. PMID:25249200

  20. Understanding the microbiome: Emerging biomarkers for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpoot, Meenakshi; Sharma, Anil K; Sharma, Anil; Gupta, Girish Kumar

    2018-02-06

    The human body is a home to more than 1 trillion microbes with a diverse variety of commensal microbes that play a crucial role towards the health of the individual. These microbes occupy different habitats such as gut, skin, vagina, oral etc. Not only the types and abundance of microbes are different in different organs, but also these may differ in different individuals. The genome of these microbiota and their ecosystem constitute to form a microbiome. Factors such as diet, environment, host genetics etc. may be the reason behind the wide microbial diversity. A number of studies performed on human microbiome have revealed that microbiota present in healthy and diseased individuals are distinct. Altered microbiome is many a times the reason behind the overexpression of genes which may cause complex diseases including cancer. Manipulation of the human microbiome can be done by microbial supplements such as probiotics or synbiotics, diet or prebiotics and microbial suppression strategies using antibiotics. Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies and metagenomic analysis provide us the broader understanding of these commensal microbes and highlighting the distinctive features of microbiome during healthy and disease states. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) studies have been very helpful in providing insights into the pathological process behind disease evolution and progression by determining the specific etiological factors. New emerging field of research targets the microbiome for therapeutic purposes by which personalized medicines can be made for treating various types of tumors. Screening programmes might be helpful in identifying patients who are at the verge of developing cancer and in delivering appropriate approaches according to individual risk modes so that disease could be prevented. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Reactive Species Interactome: Evolutionary Emergence, Biological Significance, and Opportunities for Redox Metabolomics and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Koning, Anne; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Nagy, Peter; Bianco, Christopher L; Pasch, Andreas; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M; Jackson, Alan A; van Goor, Harry; Olson, Kenneth R; Feelisch, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to account for aberrant redox homeostasis and contribute to aging and disease. However, more often than not, administration of antioxidants is ineffective, suggesting that our current understanding of the underlying regulatory processes is incomplete. Recent Advances: Similar to reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, reactive sulfur species are now emerging as important signaling molecules, targeting regulatory cysteine redox switches in proteins, affecting gene regulation, ion transport, intermediary metabolism, and mitochondrial function. To rationalize the complexity of chemical interactions of reactive species with themselves and their targets and help define their role in systemic metabolic control, we here introduce a novel integrative concept defined as the reactive species interactome (RSI). The RSI is a primeval multilevel redox regulatory system whose architecture, together with the physicochemical characteristics of its constituents, allows efficient sensing and rapid adaptation to environmental changes and various other stressors to enhance fitness and resilience at the local and whole-organism level. To better characterize the RSI-related processes that determine fluxes through specific pathways and enable integration, it is necessary to disentangle the chemical biology and activity of reactive species (including precursors and reaction products), their targets, communication systems, and effects on cellular, organ, and whole-organism bioenergetics using system-level/network analyses. Understanding the mechanisms through which the RSI operates will enable a better appreciation of the possibilities to modulate the entire biological system; moreover, unveiling molecular signatures that characterize specific environmental challenges or other forms of stress will provide new prevention/intervention opportunities for personalized medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  2. Analysis of PET hypoxia imaging in the quantitative imaging for personalized cancer medicine program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Ivan; Driscoll, Brandon; Keller, Harald; Shek, Tina; Jaffray, David; Hedley, David

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging is an important tool in clinical trials of testing novel agents and strategies for cancer treatment. The Quantitative Imaging Personalized Cancer Medicine Program (QIPCM) provides clinicians and researchers participating in multi-center clinical trials with a central repository for their imaging data. In addition, a set of tools provide standards of practice (SOP) in end-to-end quality assurance of scanners and image analysis. The four components for data archiving and analysis are the Clinical Trials Patient Database, the Clinical Trials PACS, the data analysis engine(s) and the high-speed networks that connect them. The program provides a suite of software which is able to perform RECIST, dynamic MRI, CT and PET analysis. The imaging data can be assessed securely from remote and analyzed by researchers with these software tools, or with tools provided by the users and installed at the server. Alternatively, QIPCM provides a service for data analysis on the imaging data according developed SOP. An example of a clinical study in which patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were studied with dynamic PET-FAZA for hypoxia measurement will be discussed. We successfully quantified the degree of hypoxia as well as tumor perfusion in a group of 20 patients in terms of SUV and hypoxic fraction. It was found that there is no correlation between bulk tumor perfusion and hypoxia status in this cohort. QIPCM also provides end-to-end QA testing of scanners used in multi-center clinical trials. Based on quality assurance data from multiple CT-PET scanners, we concluded that quality control of imaging was vital in the success in multi-center trials as different imaging and reconstruction parameters in PET imaging could lead to very different results in hypoxia imaging. (author)

  3. Role of Statistical Random-Effects Linear Models in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisco J; Yeh, Hung-Wen; de Leon, Jose

    2012-03-01

    Some empirical studies and recent developments in pharmacokinetic theory suggest that statistical random-effects linear models are valuable tools that allow describing simultaneously patient populations as a whole and patients as individuals. This remarkable characteristic indicates that these models may be useful in the development of personalized medicine, which aims at finding treatment regimes that are appropriate for particular patients, not just appropriate for the average patient. In fact, published developments show that random-effects linear models may provide a solid theoretical framework for drug dosage individualization in chronic diseases. In particular, individualized dosages computed with these models by means of an empirical Bayesian approach may produce better results than dosages computed with some methods routinely used in therapeutic drug monitoring. This is further supported by published empirical and theoretical findings that show that random effects linear models may provide accurate representations of phase III and IV steady-state pharmacokinetic data, and may be useful for dosage computations. These models have applications in the design of clinical algorithms for drug dosage individualization in chronic diseases; in the computation of dose correction factors; computation of the minimum number of blood samples from a patient that are necessary for calculating an optimal individualized drug dosage in therapeutic drug monitoring; measure of the clinical importance of clinical, demographic, environmental or genetic covariates; study of drug-drug interactions in clinical settings; the implementation of computational tools for web-site-based evidence farming; design of pharmacogenomic studies; and in the development of a pharmacological theory of dosage individualization.

  4. G-DOC: A Systems Medicine Platform for Personalized Oncology1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Harris, Michael; Tanenbaum, David M; Gauba, Robinder; Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Shinohara, Andrew; Rosso, Kevin; Carabet, Lavinia A; Song, Lei; Riggins, Rebecca B; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Wang, Yue; Byers, Stephen W; Clarke, Robert; Weiner, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, cancer therapy remains limited by a “one-size-fits-all” approach, whereby treatment decisions are based mainly on the clinical stage of disease, yet fail to reference the individual's underlying biology and its role driving malignancy. Identifying better personalized therapies for cancer treatment is hindered by the lack of high-quality “omics” data of sufficient size to produce meaningful results and the ability to integrate biomedical data from disparate technologies. Resolving these issues will help translation of therapies from research to clinic by helping clinicians develop patient-specific treatments based on the unique signatures of patient's tumor. Here we describe the Georgetown Database of Cancer (G-DOC), a Web platform that enables basic and clinical research by integrating patient characteristics and clinical outcome data with a variety of high-throughput research data in a unified environment. While several rich data repositories for high-dimensional research data exist in the public domain, most focus on a single-data type and do not support integration across multiple technologies. Currently, G-DOC contains data from more than 2500 breast cancer patients and 800 gastrointestinal cancer patients, G-DOC includes a broad collection of bioinformatics and systems biology tools for analysis and visualization of four major “omics” types: DNA, mRNA, microRNA, and metabolites. We believe that G-DOC will help facilitate systems medicine by providing identification of trends and patterns in integrated data sets and hence facilitate the use of better targeted therapies for cancer. A set of representative usage scenarios is provided to highlight the technical capabilities of this resource. PMID:21969811

  5. Statin dose reduction with complementary diet therapy: A pilot study of personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Scolaro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Statin intolerance, whether real or perceived, is a growing issue in clinical practice. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of reduced-dose statin therapy complemented with nutraceuticals. Methods: First phase: Initially, 53 type 2 diabetic statin-treated patients received a supplementation with fish oil (1.7 g EPA + DHA/day, chocolate containing plant sterols (2.2 g/day, and green tea (two sachets/day for 6 weeks. Second phase: “Good responders” to supplementation were identified after multivariate analysis (n = 10, and recruited for a pilot protocol of statin dose reduction. “Good responders” were then provided with supplementation for 12 weeks: standard statin therapy was kept during the first 6 weeks and reduced by 50% from weeks 6–12. Results: First phase: After 6 weeks of supplementation, plasma LDL-C (−13.7% ± 3.7, P = .002 and C-reactive protein (−35.5% ± 5.9, P = .03 were reduced. Analysis of lathosterol and campesterol in plasma suggested that intensity of LDL-C reduction was influenced by cholesterol absorption rate rather than its synthesis. Second phase: no difference was observed for plasma lipids, inflammation, cholesterol efflux capacity, or HDL particles after statin dose reduction when compared to standard therapy. Conclusions: Although limited by the small sample size, our study demonstrates the potential for a new therapeutic approach combining lower statin dose and specific dietary compounds. Further studies should elucidate “good responders” profile as a tool for personalized medicine. This may be particularly helpful in the many patients with or at risk for CVD who cannot tolerate high dose statin therapy. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02732223. Keywords: Atherosclerosis, Omega-3 fatty acids, Plant sterols, Polyphenols, Responders

  6. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Boutin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure.

  7. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx Project: Linking Clinical Data with Molecular Analysis to Advance Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy C. Keen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of how genetic mutations or variability can directly affect phenotypic outcomes, the development of disease, or determination of a tailored treatment protocol is fundamental to advancing personalized medicine. To understand how a genotype affects gene expression and specific phenotypic traits, as well as the correlative and causative associations between such, the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx Project was initiated The GTEx collection of biospecimens and associated clinical data links extensive clinical data with genotype and gene expression data to provide a wealth of data and resources to study the underlying genetics of normal physiology. These data will help inform personalized medicine through the identification of normal variation that does not contribute to disease. Additionally, these data can lead to insights into how gene variation affects pharmacodynamics and individualized responses to therapy.

  8. Multiple choice questions are superior to extended matching questions to identify medicine and biomedical sciences students who perform poorly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Brand, T.L. van den; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, medical faculties at Dutch universities have implemented a legally binding study advice to students of medicine and biomedical sciences during their propaedeutic phase. Appropriate examination is essential to discriminate between poor (grade <6), moderate (grade 6-8) and excellent

  9. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga

    OpenAIRE

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-01-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad?s strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-co...

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from different cell sources and their potential for regenerative and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtrichman, R; Germanguz, I; Itskovitz-Eldor, J

    2013-06-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have great potential as a robust source of progenitors for regenerative medicine. The novel technology also enables the derivation of patient-specific cells for applications to personalized medicine, such as for personal drug screening and toxicology. However, the biological characteristics of iPSCs are not yet fully understood and their similarity to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is still unresolved. Variations among iPSCs, resulting from their original tissue or cell source, and from the experimental protocols used for their derivation, significantly affect epigenetic properties and differentiation potential. Here we review the potential of iPSCs for regenerative and personalized medicine, and assess their expression pattern, epigenetic memory and differentiation capabilities in relation to their parental tissue source. We also summarize the patient-specific iPSCs that have been derived for applications in biological research and drug discovery; and review risks that must be overcome in order to use iPSC technology for clinical applications.

  11. Extending extant models of the pathogenesis of borderline personality disorder to childhood borderline personality symptoms: the roles of affective dysfunction, disinhibition, and self- and emotion-regulation deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T; Reynolds, Elizabeth K; Bagge, Courtney L; Latzman, Robert D; Daughters, Stacey B; Lejuez, C W

    2009-01-01

    Although research has been conducted on the course, consequences, and correlates of borderline personality disorder (BPD), little is known about its emergence in childhood, and no studies have examined the extent to which theoretical models of the pathogenesis of BPD in adults are applicable to the correlates of borderline personality symptoms in children. The goal of this study was to examine the interrelationships between two BPD-relevant personality traits (affective dysfunction and disinhibition), self- and emotion-regulation deficits, and childhood borderline personality symptoms among 263 children aged 9 to 13. We predicted that affective dysfunction, disinhibition, and their interaction would be associated with childhood borderline personality symptoms, and that self- and emotion-regulation deficits would mediate these relationships. Results provided support for the roles of both affective dysfunction and disinhibition (in the form of sensation seeking) in childhood borderline personality symptoms, as well as their hypothesized interaction. Further, both self- and emotion-regulation deficits partially mediated the relationship between affective dysfunction and childhood borderline personality symptoms. Finally, results provided evidence of different gender-based pathways to childhood borderline personality symptoms, suggesting that models of BPD among adults are more relevant to understanding the factors associated with borderline personality symptoms among girls than boys.

  12. Personalized comprehensive molecular profiling of high risk osteosarcoma: Implications and limitations for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiah, Vivek; Wagner, Michael J; McGuire, Mary F; Sarwari, Nawid M; Devarajan, Eswaran; Lewis, Valerae O; Westin, Shanon; Kato, Shumei; Brown, Robert E; Anderson, Pete

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in molecular medicine over recent decades, there has been little advancement in the treatment of osteosarcoma. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling in two cases of metastatic and chemotherapy-refractory osteosarcoma to guide molecularly targeted therapy. Hybridization capture of >300 cancer-related genes plus introns from 28 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer was applied to >50 ng of DNA extracted from tumor samples from two patients with recurrent, metastatic osteosarcoma. The DNA from each sample was sequenced to high, uniform coverage. Immunohistochemical probes and morphoproteomics analysis were performed, in addition to fluorescence in situ hybridization. All analyses were performed in CLIA-certified laboratories. Molecularly targeted therapy based on the resulting profiles was offered to the patients. Biomedical analytics were performed using QIAGEN's Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis. In Patient #1, comprehensive next-generation exome sequencing showed MET amplification, PIK3CA mutation, CCNE1 amplification, and PTPRD mutation. Immunohistochemistry-based morphoproteomic analysis revealed c-Met expression [(p)-c-Met (Tyr1234/1235)] and activation of mTOR/AKT pathway [IGF-1R (Tyr1165/1166), p-mTOR [Ser2448], p-Akt (Ser473)] and expression of SPARC and COX2. Targeted therapy was administered to match the P1K3CA, c-MET, and SPARC and COX2 aberrations with sirolimus+ crizotinib and abraxane+ celecoxib. In Patient #2, aberrations included NF2 loss in exons 2-16, PDGFRα amplification, and TP53 mutation. This patient was enrolled on a clinical trial combining targeted agents temsirolimus, sorafenib and bevacizumab, to match NF2, PDGFRα and TP53 aberrations. Both the patients did not benefit from matched therapy. Relapsed osteosarcoma is characterized by complex signaling and drug resistance pathways. Comprehensive molecular profiling holds great promise for tailoring personalized therapies for cancer. Methods for such profiling are

  13. A Survey of Headache Medicine Physicians on the Likeability of Headaches and Their Personal Headache History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Randolph W; Ghosh, Kamalika

    2016-03-01

    Two prior studies have shown an increased prevalence of migraine among physicians who are headache medicine specialists (HMS). There have been no studies of the prevalence of other headache disorders among HMS. A prior survey showed that neurologists like to treat some headaches more than others but there has not been a similar survey of HMS. The aim of the survey was to learn more about the prevalence of headaches among HMS and which headache disorders they like to treat. An email survey was sent to 749 physician members of the American Headache Society who were asked to respond to the following statement using a 5-point Likert scale (from 1, strongly disagree to 5, strongly agree): "I like to treat patients with the following types of headaches or syndromes." They were asked, "Have you personally suffered from any of the following at any time during your life: episodic migraine (EM), chronic migraine (CM), refractory migraine (RM), episodic cluster (EC), chronic cluster (CC), new daily persistent headache (NDPH), and postconcussion syndrome (PCS)." The response rate was 15.8% (n = 118) with a mean age of 51.4 years, 64.4% males, and 85.6% neurologists. HMS reported likeability for treating disorders in rank order as follows: EM (mean = 4.69, SD = 0.61); CM (mean = 4.20, SD = 0.94); RM (mean = 3.62, SD = 1.17); EC (mean = 4.37, SD = 0.80); CC (mean = 3.68, SD = 1.10); NDPH (mean = 3.52, SD = 1.21); and PCS (mean = 3.66, SD = 1.18). The lifetime prevalence of disorders was as follows: EM, 69.5% (85.7% in females and 60.5% in males); CM, 13.6% (19% in females and 10.5% in males); RM, .9% (2.4% females and 0% males); EC, 1.7% (0% females and 2.6% males); CC, 0%; NDPH, 0%, and PCS, 4.2% (7.1% females and 2.6% males). HMS with a personal history of EM (mean = 4.73, SD = 0.51) showed a significant preference (t130  = 7.30, P headaches (mean = 3.90, SD = 0.77). HMS preferred to treat some

  14. Can empathy, other personality attributes, and level of positive social influence in medical school identify potential leaders in medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Michalec, Barret; Veloski, J Jon; Tykocinski, Mark L

    2015-04-01

    To test the hypotheses that medical students recognized by peers as the most positive social influencers would score (1) high on measures of engaging personality attributes that are conducive to relationship building (empathy, sociability, activity, self-esteem), and (2) low on disengaging personality attributes that are detrimental to interpersonal relationships (loneliness, neuroticism, aggression-hostility, impulsive sensation seeking). The study included 666 Jefferson Medical College students who graduated in 2011-2013. Students used a peer nomination instrument to identify classmates who had a positive influence on their professional and personal development. At matriculation, these students had completed a survey that included the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire short form and abridged versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and UCLA Loneliness Scale. In multivariate analyses of variance, the method of contrasted groups was used to compare the personality attributes of students nominated most frequently by their peers as positive influencers (top influencers [top 25% in their class distribution], n = 176) with those of students nominated least frequently (bottom influencers [bottom 25%], n = 171). The top influencers scored significantly higher on empathy, sociability, and activity and significantly lower on loneliness compared with the bottom influencers. However, the effect size estimates of the differences were moderate at best. The research hypotheses were partially confirmed. Positive social influencers appear to possess personality attributes conducive to relationship building, which is an important feature of effective leadership. The findings have implications for identifying and training potential leaders in medicine.

  15. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach1,2 1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital AP-HP, 2EA 3412, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Ile-de-France (CRNH-IDF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France Abstract: According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients’ nonadherence and doctors’ clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. Keywords: person

  16. Multiple choice questions are superior to extended matching questions to identify medicine and biomedical sciences students who perform poorly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; van den Brand, Tessa L; Hopman, Maria T E

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, medical faculties at Dutch universities have implemented a legally binding study advice to students of medicine and biomedical sciences during their propaedeutic phase. Appropriate examination is essential to discriminate between poor (grade age and examination preference on this score. Data were collected for 452 first-year medical and biomedical science students during three distinct course examinations: one examination with EMQ only, one with MCQ only and one mixed examination (including EMQ and MCQ). Logistic regression analysis revealed that MCQ examination was 3 times better in identifying poor students compared with EMQ (RR 3.0, CI 2.0-4.5), whereas EMQ better detected excellent students (average grade ≥8) (RR 1.93, CI 1.47-2.53). Mixed examination had comparable characteristics to MCQ. Sex and examination preference did not impact the score of the student. Students ≥20 years had a 4-fold higher risk ratio of obtaining a poor grade (<6) compared with students ≤18 years old (RR 4.1, CI 2.1-8.0). Given the strong discriminative capacity of MCQ examinations to identify poor students, we recommend the use of this type of examination during the propaedeutic phase of medicine and biomedical science study programmes, in the light of the binding study advice.

  17. Oncotyrol--Center for Personalized Cancer Medicine: Methods and Applications of Health Technology Assessment and Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Uwe; Jahn, Beate; Rochau, Ursula; Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Kisser, Agnes; Hunger, Theresa; Sroczynski, Gaby; Mühlberger, Nikolai; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Schnaiter, Simon; Endel, Gottfried; Huber, Lukas; Gastl, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    The Oncotyrol - Center for Personalized Cancer Medicine is an international and interdisciplinary alliance combining research and commercial competencies to accelerate the development, evaluation and translation of personalized healthcare strategies in cancer. The philosophy of Oncotyrol is to collaborate with relevant stakeholders and advance knowledge "from bench to bedside to population and back". Oncotyrol is funded through the COMET Excellence Program by the Austrian government via the national Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). This article focuses on the role of health technology assessment (HTA) and outcomes research in personalized cancer medicine in the context of Oncotyrol. Oncotyrol, which currently comprises approximately 20 individual projects, has four research areas: Area 1: Biomarker and Drug Target Identification; Area 2: Assay Development and Drug Screening; Area 3: Innovative Therapies; Area 4: Health Technology Assessment and Bioinformatics. Area 4 translates the results from Areas 1 to 3 to populations and society and reports them back to Area 3 to inform clinical studies and guidelines, and to Areas 1 and 2 to guide further research and development. In a series of international expert workshops, the Oncotyrol International Expert Task Force for Personalized Cancer Medicine developed the Methodological Framework for Early Health Technology Assessment and Decision Modeling in Cancer and practical guidelines in this field. Further projects included applications in the fields of sequential treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), benefit-harm and cost-effectiveness evaluation of prostate cancer screening, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of multiple cervical cancer screening strategies, and benefits and cost-effectiveness of genomic test-based treatment strategies in breast cancer. An interdisciplinary setting as generated in Oncotyrol provides unique opportunities such as systematically coordinating lab and bench

  18. An Improvement of Robust and Efficient Biometrics Based Password Authentication Scheme for Telecare Medicine Information Systems Using Extended Chaotic Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jongho; Choi, Younsung; Kim, Jiye; Won, Dongho

    2016-03-01

    Recently, numerous extended chaotic map-based password authentication schemes that employ smart card technology were proposed for Telecare Medical Information Systems (TMISs). In 2015, Lu et al. used Li et al.'s scheme as a basis to propose a password authentication scheme for TMISs that is based on biometrics and smart card technology and employs extended chaotic maps. Lu et al. demonstrated that Li et al.'s scheme comprises some weaknesses such as those regarding a violation of the session-key security, a vulnerability to the user impersonation attack, and a lack of local verification. In this paper, however, we show that Lu et al.'s scheme is still insecure with respect to issues such as a violation of the session-key security, and that it is vulnerable to both the outsider attack and the impersonation attack. To overcome these drawbacks, we retain the useful properties of Lu et al.'s scheme to propose a new password authentication scheme that is based on smart card technology and requires the use of chaotic maps. Then, we show that our proposed scheme is more secure and efficient and supports security properties.

  19. A systematic review and checklist presenting the main challenges for health economic modeling in personalized medicine : towards implementing patient-level models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degeling, Koen; Koffijberg, Hendrik; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The ongoing development of genomic medicine and the use of molecular and imaging markers in personalized medicine (PM) has arguably challenged the field of health economic modeling (HEM). This study aims to provide detailed insights into the current status of HEM in PM, in order to

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine contacts by persons with mental disorders in 25 countries: results from the World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, P; Wardenaar, K J; Hoenders, H R; Evans-Lacko, S; Kovess-Masfety, V; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Al-Hamzawi, A; Alonso, J; Andrade, L H; Benjet, C; Bromet, E J; Bruffaerts, R; Bunting, B; Caldas-de-Almeida, J M; Dinolova, R V; Florescu, S; de Girolamo, G; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Hu, C; Huang, Y; Karam, E G; Karam, G; Lee, S; Lépine, J-P; Levinson, D; Makanjuola, V; Navarro-Mateu, F; Pennell, B-E; Posada-Villa, J; Scott, K; Tachimori, H; Williams, D; Wojtyniak, B; Kessler, R C; Thornicroft, G

    2017-12-28

    A substantial proportion of persons with mental disorders seek treatment from complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professionals. However, data on how CAM contacts vary across countries, mental disorders and their severity, and health care settings is largely lacking. The aim was therefore to investigate the prevalence of contacts with CAM providers in a large cross-national sample of persons with 12-month mental disorders. In the World Mental Health Surveys, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was administered to determine the presence of past 12 month mental disorders in 138 801 participants aged 18-100 derived from representative general population samples. Participants were recruited between 2001 and 2012. Rates of self-reported CAM contacts for each of the 28 surveys across 25 countries and 12 mental disorder groups were calculated for all persons with past 12-month mental disorders. Mental disorders were grouped into mood disorders, anxiety disorders or behavioural disorders, and further divided by severity levels. Satisfaction with conventional care was also compared with CAM contact satisfaction. An estimated 3.6% (standard error 0.2%) of persons with a past 12-month mental disorder reported a CAM contact, which was two times higher in high-income countries (4.6%; standard error 0.3%) than in low- and middle-income countries (2.3%; standard error 0.2%). CAM contacts were largely comparable for different disorder types, but particularly high in persons receiving conventional care (8.6-17.8%). CAM contacts increased with increasing mental disorder severity. Among persons receiving specialist mental health care, CAM contacts were reported by 14.0% for severe mood disorders, 16.2% for severe anxiety disorders and 22.5% for severe behavioural disorders. Satisfaction with care was comparable with respect to CAM contacts (78.3%) and conventional care (75.6%) in persons that received both. CAM contacts are common in persons with severe mental

  1. Artificial intelligence in medicine and cardiac imaging: harnessing big data and advanced computing to provide personalized medical diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsizian, Steven E; Siegel, Eliot L

    2014-01-01

    Although advances in information technology in the past decade have come in quantum leaps in nearly every aspect of our lives, they seem to be coming at a slower pace in the field of medicine. However, the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in hospitals is increasing rapidly, accelerated by the meaningful use initiatives associated with the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services EHR Incentive Programs. The transition to electronic medical records and availability of patient data has been associated with increases in the volume and complexity of patient information, as well as an increase in medical alerts, with resulting "alert fatigue" and increased expectations for rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, these increased demands on health care providers create greater risk for diagnostic and therapeutic errors. In the near future, artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning will likely assist physicians with differential diagnosis of disease, treatment options suggestions, and recommendations, and, in the case of medical imaging, with cues in image interpretation. Mining and advanced analysis of "big data" in health care provide the potential not only to perform "in silico" research but also to provide "real time" diagnostic and (potentially) therapeutic recommendations based on empirical data. "On demand" access to high-performance computing and large health care databases will support and sustain our ability to achieve personalized medicine. The IBM Jeopardy! Challenge, which pitted the best all-time human players against the Watson computer, captured the imagination of millions of people across the world and demonstrated the potential to apply AI approaches to a wide variety of subject matter, including medicine. The combination of AI, big data, and massively parallel computing offers the potential to create a revolutionary way of practicing evidence-based, personalized medicine.

  2. Personal networks: a tool for gaining insight into the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean (Austrian) migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselmair, Ruth; Pirker, Heidemarie; Kuhn, Elisabeth; Vogl, Christian R

    2014-01-07

    Investigations into knowledge about food and medicinal plants in a certain geographic area or within a specific group are an important element of ethnobotanical research. This knowledge is context specific and dynamic due to changing ecological, social and economic circumstances. Migration processes affect food habits and the knowledge and use of medicinal plants as a result of adaptations that have to be made to new surroundings and changing environments. This study analyses and compares the different dynamics in the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru. A social network approach was used to collect data on personal networks of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyroleans who have migrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru and their descendants. A statistical analysis of the personal network maps and a qualitative analysis of the narratives were combined to provide insight into the process of transmitting knowledge about food and medicinal plants. 56 personal networks were identified in all (food: 30; medicinal plants: 26) across all the field sites studied here. In both sets of networks, the main source of knowledge is individual people (food: 71%; medicinal plants: 68%). The other sources mentioned are print and audiovisual media, organisations and institutions. Personal networks of food knowledge are larger than personal networks of medicinal plant knowledge in all areas of investigation. Relatives play a major role as transmitters of knowledge in both domains. Human sources, especially relatives, play an important role in knowledge transmission in both domains. Reference was made to other sources as well, such as books, television, the internet, schools and restaurants. By taking a personal network approach, this study reveals the mode of transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants within a migrational context.

  3. Personal networks: a tool for gaining insight into the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean (Austrian) migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigations into knowledge about food and medicinal plants in a certain geographic area or within a specific group are an important element of ethnobotanical research. This knowledge is context specific and dynamic due to changing ecological, social and economic circumstances. Migration processes affect food habits and the knowledge and use of medicinal plants as a result of adaptations that have to be made to new surroundings and changing environments. This study analyses and compares the different dynamics in the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru. Methods A social network approach was used to collect data on personal networks of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyroleans who have migrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru and their descendants. A statistical analysis of the personal network maps and a qualitative analysis of the narratives were combined to provide insight into the process of transmitting knowledge about food and medicinal plants. Results 56 personal networks were identified in all (food: 30; medicinal plants: 26) across all the field sites studied here. In both sets of networks, the main source of knowledge is individual people (food: 71%; medicinal plants: 68%). The other sources mentioned are print and audiovisual media, organisations and institutions. Personal networks of food knowledge are larger than personal networks of medicinal plant knowledge in all areas of investigation. Relatives play a major role as transmitters of knowledge in both domains. Conclusions Human sources, especially relatives, play an important role in knowledge transmission in both domains. Reference was made to other sources as well, such as books, television, the internet, schools and restaurants. By taking a personal network approach, this study reveals the mode of transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants within a migrational context. PMID:24398225

  4. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Personal Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Occupational Therapy Educators in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a baseline description of American occupational therapy educators' knowledge, attitudes, and personal use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a first step in exploring the larger issue of future occupational therapy practitioners' preparedness for meeting clients' occupational needs in today's evolving healthcare environment. Results of this cross-sectional survey highlighted limitations of occupational therapy educators' knowledge of common CAM concepts and therapies across all demographic variables, varying attitudes towards CAM in general and its inclusion in occupational therapy education, and personal use of common CAM therapies. Without increased occupational therapy educator knowledge about CAM and engagement in the current healthcare practices, occupational therapy practitioners are at risk for having a limited role in integrative healthcare.

  5. Development of a personalized dosimetric tool for radiation protection in case of internal contamination and targeted radiotherapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiavassa, S.

    2005-12-01

    Current internal dosimetric estimations are based on the M.I.R.D. formalism and used standard mathematical models. These standard models are often far from a given patient morphology and do not allow to perform patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this study was to develop a personalized dosimetric tool, which takes into account real patient morphology, composition and densities. This tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., a French acronym of Tool for the Evaluation of Personalized Internal Dose, is a user-friendly graphical interface. O.E.D.I.P.E. allows to create voxel-based patient-specific geometries and associates them with the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code. Radionuclide distribution and absorbed dose calculation can be performed at the organ and voxel scale. O.E.D.I.P.E. can be used in nuclear medicine for targeted radiotherapy and in radiation protection in case of internal contamination. (author)

  6. Bioprinting and Organ-on-Chip Applications Towards Personalized Medicine for Bone Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Gilardi, Mara; Bersini, Simone; Candrian, Christian; Moretti, Matteo

    2017-06-01

    The skeleton supports and confers structure to the whole body but several pathological and traumatic conditions affect the bone tissue. Most of those pathological conditions are specific and different among different patients, such as bone defects due to traumatic injuries or bone remodeling alterations due to congenital diseases. In this context, the development of personalized therapies would be highly desirable. In recent years the advent of innovative techniques like bioprinting and microfluidic organ-on-chip raised hopes of achieving key tools helping the application of personalized therapies for bone diseases. In this review we will illustrate the latest progresses in the bioprinting of personalized bone grafts and generation of patient-specific bone-on-chip devices, describing current approaches and limitations and possible future improvements for more effective personalized bone grafts and disease models.

  7. E-Science technologies in a workflow for personalized medicine using cancer screening as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjuth, Ola; Karlsson, Andreas; Clements, Mark; Humphreys, Keith; Ivansson, Emma; Dowling, Jim; Eklund, Martin; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Czene, Kamila; Grönberg, Henrik; Sparén, Pär; Wiklund, Fredrik; Cheddad, Abbas; Pálsdóttir, Þorgerður; Rantalainen, Mattias; Abrahamsson, Linda; Laure, Erwin; Litton, Jan-Eric; Palmgren, Juni

    2017-09-01

    We provide an e-Science perspective on the workflow from risk factor discovery and classification of disease to evaluation of personalized intervention programs. As case studies, we use personalized prostate and breast cancer screenings. We describe an e-Science initiative in Sweden, e-Science for Cancer Prevention and Control (eCPC), which supports biomarker discovery and offers decision support for personalized intervention strategies. The generic eCPC contribution is a workflow with 4 nodes applied iteratively, and the concept of e-Science signifies systematic use of tools from the mathematical, statistical, data, and computer sciences. The eCPC workflow is illustrated through 2 case studies. For prostate cancer, an in-house personalized screening tool, the Stockholm-3 model (S3M), is presented as an alternative to prostate-specific antigen testing alone. S3M is evaluated in a trial setting and plans for rollout in the population are discussed. For breast cancer, new biomarkers based on breast density and molecular profiles are developed and the US multicenter Women Informed to Screen Depending on Measures (WISDOM) trial is referred to for evaluation. While current eCPC data management uses a traditional data warehouse model, we discuss eCPC-developed features of a coherent data integration platform. E-Science tools are a key part of an evidence-based process for personalized medicine. This paper provides a structured workflow from data and models to evaluation of new personalized intervention strategies. The importance of multidisciplinary collaboration is emphasized. Importantly, the generic concepts of the suggested eCPC workflow are transferrable to other disease domains, although each disease will require tailored solutions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  8. Chasing the Dragon Away: Personality as a protective factor and extended-release naltrexone as a treatment for heroin dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaaijer, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid dependence causes severe problems for patients and their family members and imposes an enormous economic burden on society. The main objectives of this thesis were (a) to gain better insight in the process of getting addicted to heroin in order to develop personality-based prevention

  9. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-06-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 , which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad's strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-consumer advertising, diversification, and trade secrets. These business models have raised substantial ethical controversy and criticism, often related to the company's focus on market dominance and the potential conflict between private sector profitability and the promotion of public health. However, these strategies have enabled Myriad to survive the economic challenges that have affected the biotechnology sector and to become financially successful in the field of personalized medicine. Our critical assessment of the legal, economic and ethical aspects of Myriad's practices over this period allows the identification of the company's more effective business models. It also discusses of the consequences of implementing economically viable models without first carrying out broader reflection on the socio-cultural, ethical and political contexts in which they would apply.

  10. Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Personalized Genomic Medicine Research: Current Literature and Suggestions for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callier, Shawneequa L; Abudu, Rachel; Mehlman, Maxwell J; Singer, Mendel E; Neuhauser, Duncan; Caga-Anan, Charlisse; Wiesner, Georgia L

    2016-11-01

    This review identifies the prominent topics in the literature pertaining to the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) raised by research investigating personalized genomic medicine (PGM). The abstracts of 953 articles extracted from scholarly databases and published during a 5-year period (2008-2012) were reviewed. A total of 299 articles met our research criteria and were organized thematically to assess the representation of ELSI issues for stakeholders, health specialties, journals, and empirical studies. ELSI analyses were published in both scientific and ethics journals. Investigational research comprised 45% of the literature reviewed (135 articles) and the remaining 55% (164 articles) comprised normative analyses. Traditional ELSI concerns dominated the discourse including discussions about disclosure of research results. In fact, there was a dramatic increase in the number of articles focused on the disclosure of research results and incidental findings to research participants. Few papers focused on particular disorders, the use of racial categories in research, international communities, or special populations (e.g., adolescents, elderly patients, or ethnic groups). Considering that strategies in personalized medicine increasingly target individuals' unique health conditions, environments, and ancestries, further analysis is needed on how ELSI scholarship can better serve the increasingly global, interdisciplinary, and diverse PGM research community. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells and personalized medicine: current progress and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Yong Soon; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2011-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has revolutionized the field of regenerative medicine by providing researchers with a unique tool to derive disease-specific stem cells for study. iPSCs can self-renew and can differentiate into many cell types, offering a potentially unlimited source of cells for targeted differentiation into somatic effector cells. Hence, iPSCs are likely to be invaluable for therapeutic applications and disease-related research. In this review, we summar...

  12. Personalized vascular medicine: tailoring cardiovascular disease management to the individual patient

    OpenAIRE

    Dorresteijn, J.A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Applying group-level findings to individual patients is an absolute requisite for practicing evidence-based cardiovascular medicine. Yet, because individual patient characteristics may influence the pathophysiology and prognosis of disease and the likelihood of response to therapy, such generalization is often problematic. The difficulties that are related to generalization of group level evidence to individual patients are often not well appreciated and simple pragmatic approaches are usuall...

  13. The current situation of personal dose monitoring in Chinese medicine radiation and undamaged detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liangan; Zhang Wenyi; Yuan Shuyu; Song Shijun; Chang Hexin; Sun Kai

    1993-01-01

    The situation of personal dose monitoring in γ(X) external exposure in China is mainly outlined. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) was adopted for personal dose measurement of the radiation workers. The computer software and data base for the work have been developed and applied. National intercomparison of TLD, monitoring control of personal dose monitoring in field, and technical training were carried out for quality control. In China, the dominant occupational exposures is X-ray diagnosis and it increases year by year, the highest values is about 22.6%. The highest values of annual collective dose and annual average of individual dose (AAID) are 272.8 man·Sv and 3.21 mSv respectively. This work shows that the fraction of the population receiving high dose is decreased with time rapidly. The situation for whole occupational exposures is also described. (3 tabs.)

  14. Impact of early personal-history characteristics on the Pace of Aging: implications for clinical trials of therapies to slow aging and extend healthspan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Cohen, Harvey J; Kraus, William E; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2017-08-01

    Therapies to extend healthspan are poised to move from laboratory animal models to human clinical trials. Translation from mouse to human will entail challenges, among them the multifactorial heterogeneity of human aging. To inform clinical trials about this heterogeneity, we report how humans' pace of biological aging relates to personal-history characteristics. Because geroprotective therapies must be delivered by midlife to prevent age-related disease onset, we studied young-adult members of the Dunedin Study 1972-73 birth cohort (n = 954). Cohort members' Pace of Aging was measured as coordinated decline in the integrity of multiple organ systems, by quantifying rate of decline across repeated measurements of 18 biomarkers assayed when cohort members were ages 26, 32, and 38 years. The childhood personal-history characteristics studied were known predictors of age-related disease and mortality, and were measured prospectively during childhood. Personal-history characteristics of familial longevity, childhood social class, adverse childhood experiences, and childhood health, intelligence, and self-control all predicted differences in cohort members' adulthood Pace of Aging. Accumulation of more personal-history risks predicted faster Pace of Aging. Because trials of anti-aging therapies will need to ascertain personal histories retrospectively, we replicated results using cohort members' retrospective personal-history reports made in adulthood. Because many trials recruit participants from clinical settings, we replicated results in the cohort subset who had recent health system contact according to electronic medical records. Quick, inexpensive measures of trial participants' early personal histories can enable clinical trials to study who volunteers for trials, who adheres to treatment, and who responds to anti-aging therapies. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Supporting Faculty Development in Hospital Medicine: Design and Implementation of a Personalized Structured Mentoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarur, Amulya; O'Neill, Regina M; Lawton, Donna; Greenwald, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-01

    The guidance of a mentor can have a tremendous influence on the careers of academic physicians. The lack of mentorship in the relatively young field of hospital medicine has been documented, but the efficacy of formalized mentorship programs has not been well studied. We implemented and evaluated a structured mentorship program for junior faculty at a large academic medical center. Of the 16 mentees who participated in the mentorship program, 14 (88%) completed preintervention surveys and 10 (63%) completed postintervention surveys. After completing the program, there was a statistically significant improvement in overall satisfaction within 5 specific domains: career planning, professional connectedness, self-reflection, research skills, and mentoring skills. All mentees reported that they would recommend that all hospital medicine faculty participate in similar mentorship programs. In this small, single-center pilot study, we found that the addition of a structured mentorship program based on training sessions that focus on best practices in mentoring was feasible and led to increased satisfaction in certain career domains among early-career hospitalists. Larger prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed to assess the generalizability and durability of our findings. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Sustainable medical research by effective and comprehensive medical skills: overcoming the frontiers by predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research and practice require affordable objectives, sustainable tools, rewarding training strategies and meaningful collaboration. Our unit delivers courses on project design and management promoting ideas, useful skills, teaching and exploring implementation of networks and existing collaborations. We investigated the effectiveness of a sustainable approach of comprehensive diagnosis and care and its usefulness within concrete models of research project teaching methodology. The model of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM) of adolescent hypertension, developed since 1976 and still active, was displayed. This is a paradigm of comprehensive PPPM aimed at the management of a recognized, but actually neglected, societal and clinical problem. The second model was addressed to the analysis of performance of an outpatient diagnostic and therapy unit and its relationship with the emergency department. Part of the patients, 4,057 cancer patients presenting at the emergency care, were addressed to the outpatient diagnostic and therapy unit for further assessment, treatment and follow-up. The stay in DH was 6.3 ± 2.1 non-consecutive days, with shortage of costs, vs. in-hospital stays. Research planning courses, based on these models, ensued in an increase of competitive project submission and successful funding. Active promotion of interdisciplinary knowledge and skills is warranted. Misleading messages and information are detrimental not only to healthy and sick people but, equally, to all health professionals: efforts for basing on evidence by research any statement are needed. The actual pre-requisite of personalized medicine is the coherent and articulated promotion of the professional quality of staff. Health professionals should and can be skilled in sustainable non-invasive diagnostic procedures, in non-pharmacological intervention, in translational research (from epidemiology to personalized therapy) and in timely dissemination of

  17. [Current Research Activities on Person-Centered Medicine in Academic Institutes of General Practice in Germany and Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Annemarie; Schelling, Jörg; Kohls, Niko; van Dyck, Marcus; Poggenburg, Stephanie; Vajda, Christian; Hirsch, Jameson; Sirois, Fuschia; Toussaint, Loren; Offenbächer, Martin

    2017-10-11

    Aim of study Person-centered medicine (PCM) with its focus on humanistic-biographical-oriented medicine and integrated, positive-salutogenic health is a central aspect in the patient-physician relationship in general practice. The objective of this analysis is to assess the prevalence and type of research project in academic institutions of general practice in Germany (Ger) and Austria (At) and the thematic priorities of the projects in the areas PCM, health promotion (HP), prevention (PRE) and conventional medicine (CM). Methods A search was conducted (September-December 2015) on the websites of 30 institutes and divisions of general medicine for their current research projects. The retrieved projects were assigned to five categories: PCM, HP, PRE, CM and others. Subsequently, we identified the targeted patient groups of the projects as well as the thematic focus in the categories PCM, HP, PRE and CM with focus on PCM and HP. Results 541 research projects were identified, 452 in Germany and 89 in Austria. Research projects were only included if they were explicitly indicated as research-oriented. Seventy projects addressed PCM aspects, 15 projects HP aspects, 32 projects PRE aspects and 396 projects CM aspects. The most frequently target groups in the categories PCM (24 of 70) and HP (7 of 15) were chronically ill patients. The most common thematic focus in PCM was communication (13 of 70) and in HP, physical activity (6 of 15). Conclusion The vast majority of research projects investigated conventional medical topics. The percentage of research activities in the field of PCM (13%) or PCM including HP (16%) in Ger and At is below the European average of 20%. From our point of view, PCM and HP need to be implemented to a greater extent in general practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Can Self-Declared Personal Values Be Used to Identify Those with Family Medicine Career Aspirations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Renee A.; Eva, Kevin W.; Reiter, Harold I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Self-declaration of personal values has been suggested as a means of identifying students with greater predilection for future primary care careers. While statistically significant differences have been demonstrated, absolute differences between those interested in primary care and those interested in specialist careers tend to be small.…

  19. Personal values of exemplary family physicians: implications for professional satisfaction in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, B C; Schubot, D B

    1995-09-01

    Personal social values have been identified as important determinants of generalists' specialty choice. However, the personal values or "guiding principles" of generalist physicians have not been identified scientifically. To establish a benchmark, we measured the personal values of exemplary family physicians because they serve as role models for current and future physicians. We also explored the relationship between personal values and practice satisfaction. We obtained a list of 330 family physicians nominated for the American Academy of Family Physicians' (AAFP) Family Doctor of the Year award for the years 1988 through 1993. We asked them to complete the Schwartz Values Questionnaire, a 56-item instrument for measuring personal values. They also answered three questions concerning practice satisfaction. The return rate was 83%. The physicians' mean age was 63 years. They had been in practice an average of 34 years, 93% were male, and 52% practiced in rural areas. Honesty was rated as the most important of the 56 values, and social power as the least important. Of the 10 value types (groups of common values), the responding physicians rated "Benevolence" as most important and "Power" as least important. Practice satisfaction correlated positively with the Benevolence value type (r = .21, P = .001) and negatively with the Power value type (r = -.15, P = .023). Of the 10 value types, Benevolence was rated the most important and Power the least important by exemplary family physicians, and both value types also correlated, positively and negatively, respectively, with their practice satisfaction. These results have implications for the selection, training, and career satisfaction of generalist physicians.

  20. Personalized In Vitro and In Vivo Cancer Models to Guide Precision Medicine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine is an approach that takes into account the influence of individuals' genes, environment, and lifestyle exposures to tailor interventions. Here, we describe the development of a robust precision cancer care platform that integrates whole-exome sequencing with a living biobank that enables high-throughput drug screens on patient-derived tumor organoids. To date, 56 tumor-derived organoid cultures and 19 patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have been established from the 769 patients enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved clinical trial.

  1. An interdisciplinary approach to personalized medicine: case studies from a cardiogenetics clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Erskine, Kathleen E; Griffith, Eleanor; DeGroat, Nicole; Stolerman, Marina; Silverstein, Louise B; Hidayatallah, Nadia; Wasserman, David; Paljevic, Esma; Cohen, Lilian; Walsh, Christine A; McDonald, Thomas; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2013-01-01

    In the genomic age, the challenges presented by various inherited conditions present a compelling argument for an interdisciplinary model of care. Cardiac arrhythmias with a genetic basis, such as long QT syndrome, require clinicians with expertise in many specialties to address the complex genetic, psychological, ethical and medical issues involved in treatment. The Montefiore–Einstein Center for CardioGenetics has been established to provide personalized, interdisciplinary care for families...

  2. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Platform for Personalized and Precision Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsa, Elena; Ahrens, John H; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have revolutionized the field of human disease modeling, with an enormous potential to serve as paradigm shifting platforms for preclinical trials, personalized clinical diagnosis, and drug treatment. In this review, we describe how hiPSCs could transition cardiac healthcare away from simple disease diagnosis to prediction and prevention, bridging the gap between basic and clinical research to bring the best science to every patient. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The attractions of medicine: the generic motivations of medical school applicants in relation to demography, personality and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Livingston, G; Katona, Cornelius

    2006-02-21

    The motivational and other factors used by medical students in making their career choices for specific medical specialities have been looked at in a number of studies in the literature. There are however few studies that assess the generic factors which make medicine itself of interest to medical students and to potential medical students. This study describes a novel questionnaire that assesses the interests and attractions of different aspects of medical practice in a varied range of medical scenarios, and relates them to demographic, academic, personality and learning style measures in a large group of individuals considering applying to medical school. A questionnaire study was conducted among those attending Medlink, a two-day conference for individuals considering applying to medical school for a career in medicine. The main outcome measure was the Medical Situations Questionnaire, in which individuals ranked the attraction of three different aspects of medical practise in each of nine detailed, realistic medical scenarios in a wide range of medical specialities. As well as requiring clear choices, the questionnaire was also designed so that all of the possible answers were attractive and positive, thereby helping to eliminate social demand characteristics. Factor analysis of the responses found four generic motivational dimensions, which we labelled Indispensability, Helping People, Respect and Science. Background factors assessed included sex, ethnicity, class, medical parents, GCSE academic achievement, the 'Big Five' personality factors, empathy, learning styles, and a social desirability scale. 2867 individuals, broadly representative of applicants to medical schools, completed the questionnaire. The four generic motivational factors correlated with a range of background factors. These correlations were explored by multiple regression, and by path analysis, using LISREL to assess direct and indirect effects upon the factors. Helping People was

  4. The attractions of medicine: the generic motivations of medical school applicants in relation to demography, personality and achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katona Cornelius

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The motivational and other factors used by medical students in making their career choices for specific medical specialities have been looked at in a number of studies in the literature. There are however few studies that assess the generic factors which make medicine itself of interest to medical students and to potential medical students. This study describes a novel questionnaire that assesses the interests and attractions of different aspects of medical practice in a varied range of medical scenarios, and relates them to demographic, academic, personality and learning style measures in a large group of individuals considering applying to medical school. Methods A questionnaire study was conducted among those attending Medlink, a two-day conference for individuals considering applying to medical school for a career in medicine. The main outcome measure was the Medical Situations Questionnaire, in which individuals ranked the attraction of three different aspects of medical practise in each of nine detailed, realistic medical scenarios in a wide range of medical specialities. As well as requiring clear choices, the questionnaire was also designed so that all of the possible answers were attractive and positive, thereby helping to eliminate social demand characteristics. Factor analysis of the responses found four generic motivational dimensions, which we labelled Indispensability, Helping People, Respect and Science. Background factors assessed included sex, ethnicity, class, medical parents, GCSE academic achievement, the 'Big Five' personality factors, empathy, learning styles, and a social desirability scale. Results 2867 individuals, broadly representative of applicants to medical schools, completed the questionnaire. The four generic motivational factors correlated with a range of background factors. These correlations were explored by multiple regression, and by path analysis, using LISREL to assess direct and

  5. Determinants of personal protective equipment (PPE) use in UK motorcyclists: exploratory research applying an extended theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Emma; Myers, Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Despite evident protective value of motorcycle personal protective equipment (PPE), no research has assessed considerations behind its uptake in UK riders. A cross-sectional online questionnaire design was employed, with riders (n=268) recruited from online motorcycle forums. Principal component analysis found four PPE behavioural outcomes. Theoretical factors of intentions, attitudes, injunctive and descriptive subjective norms, risk perceptions, anticipated regret, benefits and habit were also identified for further analysis. High motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, middling high-visibility wear and low non-Personal Protective Equipment wear were found. Greater intentions, anticipated regret and perceived benefits were significantly associated with increased motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, with habit presence and scooter use significantly associated with increased high-visibility wear. Lower intentions, anticipated regret and risk perceptions, being female, not holding a car licence and urban riding were significantly associated with increased non-PPE wear. A need for freedom of choice and mixed attitudes towards PPE use were evident in additional comments. PPE determinants in this sample provide a preliminary basis for future uptake interventions. Larger scale and qualitative research is needed to further investigate relevant constructs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting adolescents' disclosure of personal information in exchange for commercial incentives: an application of an extended theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirman, Wannes; Walrave, Michel; Ponnet, Koen

    2013-02-01

    This study adopts a global theoretical framework to predict adolescents' disclosure of personal information in exchange for incentives offered by commercial Websites. The study postulates and tests the validity of a model based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), including antecedent factors of attitude and perceived behavioral control (PBC). A survey was conducted among 1,042 respondents. Results from SEM analyses show that the hypothesized model fits the empirical data well. The model accounts for 61.9 percent of the variance in adolescents' intention to disclose and 43.7 percent of the variance in self-reported disclosure. Perceived social pressure exerted by significant others (subjective norm) is the most important TPB factor in predicting intention to disclose personal information in exchange for incentives. This finding suggests that in discussions of adolescents' information privacy, the importance of social factors outweighs the individually oriented TPB factors of attitude and PBC. Moreover, privacy concern and trust propensity are significant predictors of respondents' attitudes toward online disclosure in exchange for commercial incentives, whereas the frequency of Internet use significantly affects their level of PBC.

  7. Personalized pain medicine: the clinical value of psychophysical assessment of pain modulation profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Yelena; Yarnitsky, David

    2013-01-01

    Experimental pain stimuli can be used to simulate patients' pain experience. We review recent developments in psychophysical pain testing, focusing on the application of the dynamic tests-conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and temporal summation (TS). Typically, patients with clinical pain of various types express either less efficient CPM or enhanced TS, or both. These tests can be used in prediction of incidence of acquiring pain and of its intensity, as well as in assisting the correct choice of analgesic agents for individual patients. This can help to shorten the commonly occurring long and frustrating process of adjusting analgesic agents to the individual patients. We propose that evaluating pain modulation can serve as a step forward in individualizing pain medicine.

  8. Personalized Pain Medicine: The Clinical Value of Psychophysical Assessment of Pain Modulation Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Granovsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental pain stimuli can be used to simulate patients’ pain experience. We review recent developments in psychophysical pain testing, focusing on the application of the dynamic tests—conditioned pain modulation (CPM and temporal summation (TS. Typically, patients with clinical pain of various types express either less efficient CPM or enhanced TS, or both. These tests can be used in prediction of incidence of acquiring pain and of its intensity, as well as in assisting the correct choice of analgesic agents for individual patients. This can help to shorten the commonly occurring long and frustrating process of adjusting analgesic agents to the individual patients. We propose that evaluating pain modulation can serve as a step forward in individualizing pain medicine.

  9. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: GENOME, ELECTRONIC HEALTH AND INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS. PART 2. MOLECULAR GENETICS AND METHODS OF INTELLECTUAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kobrinskii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition to personalized medicine in practical terms should combine the problems of molecular-genetic predisposition to diseases with transient states in the organism in the direction of possible pathology. Classification and monitoring of the state can be  effectively carried out using artificial intelligence methods. Various intellectual approaches are considered in different conditions for  monitoring patient.

  10. Personalized medicine: genome, e-health and intelligent systems. Part 1. Genomics and monitoring of clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kobrinskii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition to personalized medicine in practical terms should combine the solution of the genomics problems as the basis for possible diseases and phenotypic manifestations that are markers and early signs of emerging pathological changes. Most diseases have their first principles in childhood. Therefore, in all age groups, it is necessary to monitor the minimum deviations and their dynamics, use mobile devices for this purpose and accumulate the received data. Processing big data (Big Data will provide more informative information. On this basis it will be possible to identify analogs for targeted therapy in similar variants of diseases in large databases of publications on the problem of interest.

  11. Neuroscience in Psychiatry towards an integrative and personalized medicine in the DSM-V: a proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Emmanuel Pérez Solís

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last Century the concept of health and, with it, medical science, has suffered a profound, conceptual and ontological change. However, this revolution has not reached, in the same way the field of mental health. In the next pages it will be shown, taking Major Depressive Disorder as a model, how it is possible and necessary, for the field ofpsychopathology (behavior and “mental” functions: rational, executive, cognitive, emotional, etc. the return to its medical origins, which will allow it to respond how the brain functions and its interactions with the rest of the organism and the environment, with the goal of obtaining patterns that will help us to define disease from an etiopathogenic point of view, so it would be possible to provide therapeutic options to theorgan in question. The time has come to ask if we have invented a science (psychiatry that has little to do with reality, and to answer that, the creation of multicentric data bases is proposed, in which biological (not just brain based, social, personal, clinical, etc. variables are integrated, to finally obtain correlations that allow us a reclassification of brain pathology that would be useful to offer integral and personalized treatments.

  12. Extending the study of decision making competence to special populations: A case study of persons on the autism spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin eLevin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The area of decision making has much to offer in our effort to understand special populations. This pilot study is an example of just such a project, where we illustrate how traditional decision making tools and tasks can be used to uncover strengths and weaknesses within a growing population of young adults with autism. In this pilot project we extended accounts of autistic behavior such as those derived from theory of mind to predict key components of decision making in high-functioning young adults on the autism spectrum. A battery of tests was administered to 15 high-functioning college students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, focusing on Decision Making Competence (DMC and other aspects of decision making related to known deficits associated with autism. Data from this group were compared to data from unselected college students receiving the same measures. First, as a test of a key social deficit associated with autism, the target group scored much lower on the Empathy Quotient scale. Traditional elements of decision making competency such as Numeracy and application of decision rules were comparable across groups. However, there were differences in thinking style, with the ASD group showing lesser ability and engagement in intuitive thinking, and they showed lower levels of risk taking. For comparisons within the ASD group, autobiographical reports concerning individual lifestyles and outcomes were used to derive a scale of Social Functioning. The lowest scoring individuals showed the lowest levels of intuitive thinking, the lowest perceived levels of others' endorsement of socially undesirable behaviors, and the lowest ability to discriminate between good and bad risks. Results are discussed in terms of interventions that might aid high-functioning young adults with ASD in their everyday decision making.

  13. Metabolomics and Cardiology: Toward the Path of Perinatal Programming and Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintus, Roberta; Mercuro, Giuseppe; Fanos, Vassilios

    2017-01-01

    Heart diseases are one of the leading causes of death in Western Countries and tend to become chronic, lowering the quality of life of the patients and ending up in a massive cost for the Health Systems and the society. Thus, there is a growing interest in finding new technologies that would allow the physician to effectively treat and prevent cardiac illnesses. Metabolomics is one of the new “omics” sciences enabling creation of a photograph of the metabolic state of an individual exposed to different environmental factors and pathologies. This review analyzed the most recent literature about this technology and its application in cardiology in order to understand the metabolic shifts that occur even before the manifestation of these pathologies to find possible early predictive biomarkers. In this way, it could be possible to find better treatments, ameliorate the patient's quality of life, and lower the death rate. This technology seems to be so promising that several industries are trying to set up kits to immediately assess the metabolites variations in order to provide a faster diagnosis and the best treatment specific for that patient, offering a further step toward the path of the development of a tailored medicine. PMID:28758121

  14. Cancer: an emergent property of disturbed resource-rich environments? Ecology meets personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, Hugo; Arnal, Audrey; Vittecoq, Marion; Daoust, Simon P; Ujvari, Beata; Jacqueline, Camille; Tissot, Tazzio; Ewald, Paul; Gatenby, Robert A; King, Kayla C; Bonhomme, François; Brodeur, Jacques; Renaud, François; Solary, Eric; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    For an increasing number of biologists, cancer is viewed as a dynamic system governed by evolutionary and ecological principles. Throughout most of human history, cancer was an uncommon cause of death and it is generally accepted that common components of modern culture, including increased physiological stresses and caloric intake, favor cancer development. However, the precise mechanisms for this linkage are not well understood. Here, we examine the roles of ecological and physiological disturbances and resource availability on the emergence of cancer in multicellular organisms. We argue that proliferation of 'profiteering phenotypes' is often an emergent property of disturbed, resource-rich environments at all scales of biological organization. We review the evidence for this phenomenon, explore it within the context of malignancy, and discuss how this ecological framework may offer a theoretical background for novel strategies of cancer prevention. This work provides a compelling argument that the traditional separation between medicine and evolutionary ecology remains a fundamental limitation that needs to be overcome if complex processes, such as oncogenesis, are to be completely understood.

  15. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadakara J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Vadakara, Hossein BorghaeiFox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Chemotherapy has been the traditional backbone for the management of metastatic lung cancer. Multiple trials have shown the benefits of treatment with platinum doublets in lung cancer. This “one treatment fits all” approach was further refined by the introduction of targeted agents and discovery of subpopulations of patients who benefited from treatment with these agents. It has also become evident that certain histologic subtypes of non-small-cell lung cancer respond better to one cytotoxic chemotherapy versus others. This has led to the concept of using histology to guide therapy. With the introduction of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the discovery of activating mutations in the EGFR gene, further personalization of treatment for subgroups of patients has become a reality. More recently, the presence of a fusion gene, echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK, was identified as the driver mutation in yet another subgroup of patients, and subsequent studies have led to approval of crizotinib in this group of patients. In this article, efforts in personalizing delivery of care based on the histological subtypes of lung cancer and the role of K-RAS and EGFR mutations, EML4/ALK translocation, and ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementing 1 and EGFR expression in choosing appropriate treatments for patients with advanced lung cancer are discussed. This article also reviews the problem of resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the ongoing trials that target novel pathways and mechanisms that are implicated in resistance.Keywords: NSCLC, EGFR, cancer treatment

  16. Prospective molecular profiling of canine cancers provides a clinically relevant comparative model for evaluating personalized medicine (PMed trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Paoloni

    modeling of personalized medicine. Future comparative oncology studies optimizing the delivery of PMed strategies may aid cancer drug development.

  17. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE AS AN UPDATED MODEL OF NATIONAL HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM. PART 2. TOWARDS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Suchkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the key problems of the transition of the national health system to a new platform of personalized medicine and,  in particular, pediatrics. In the second part, published in this issue, the main mechanisms for building a new model are analyzed. The main  prerequisites (financial and economic, fundamental research and applied research, the emergence and construction in the structure  of global trends in the development of health care markets, actualized at the end of the last century, are presented. It is indicated  that one of the main incentives for the development of personalized medicine is a noticeable increase in individual and social demand  for preventive drugs and the corresponding tools. The development of programs for managing their own health is gaining in importance,  and new business-development models (including public and private partnerships are being developed and implemented. The evidence  is examined that a progressive scenario for the development of a model of personalized medicine will provide a significant reduction  in the cost of medical care. A large section of the article is devoted to the development of the provision that the understanding and awareness of the importance of the protection and management of one's own health by a modern state, medical audience and individual citizen  is the most important aspect of the educational and educational activities of a doctor and a nurse. The perspectives of personalized  pediatrics as a global instrument for restructuring the entire healthcare system are considered in detail.  

  18. In Search of the Perfect Business Model: As personalized medicine moves into the mainstream, makers of diagnostics must face a new economic reality. How to develop a value proposition in a healthcare market that is becoming increasingly elastic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bob

    2012-01-01

    As personalized medicine edges toward the mainstream, economic realities threaten its existence. But without companion diagnostics, "getting the right drug to the right person" could wind up being just a slogan. What's the right business model?

  19. Perceived functioning has ethnic-specific associations in systemic sclerosis: another dimension of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNearney, Terry A; Hunnicutt, Sonya E; Fischbach, Michael; Friedman, Alan W; Aguilar, Martha; Ahn, Chul W; Reveille, John D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Baethge, Bruce A; Goel, Niti; Mayes, Maureen D

    2009-12-01

    To measure self-reported physical and mental functioning and associated clinical features at study entry in 3 ethnic groups with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Sixty Hispanic, 39 African American, and 104 Caucasian patients with recent-onset SSc ( fatigue scores > IBQ > clinical variables (hypertension, skin score, and percentage predicted DLCO). Scleroderma-HAQ scores had ethnic-specific associations with IBQ > AHI scores > most clinical and laboratory variables. Decreased mental component summary (MCS) scores associated with AHI > ISEL. Ethnic-specific immunogenetic variables HLA-DQB1*0202 (Caucasian) and HLA-DRB 1*11 (African American), and HLA-DQA1*0501 (Hispanic) also associated with MCS. Antinuclear autoantibodies, anti-topoisomerase I, and RNA polymerases I and III also demonstrated associations with functioning in African American and Hispanic groups. Clinical, psychosocial, and immunogenetic variables had ethnic-specific associations with perceived physical and mental functioning. Consideration of ethnic-specific psychological and behavioral support in designing more personalized, relevant therapeutic interventions for the patient may improve therapeutic efficacy in SSc.

  20. Genetic data: The new challenge of personalized medicine, insights for rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulielmos, George N; Zervou, Maria I; Myrthianou, Effie; Burska, Agata; Niewold, Timothy B; Ponchel, Frederique

    2016-06-01

    Rapid advances in genotyping technology, analytical methods, and the establishment of large cohorts for population genetic studies have resulted in a large new body of information about the genetic basis of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Improved understanding of the root pathogenesis of the disease holds the promise of improved diagnostic and prognostic tools based upon this information. In this review, we summarize the nature of new genetic findings in human RA, including susceptibility loci and gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, as well as genetic loci associated with sub-groups of patients and those associated with response to therapy. Possible uses of these data are discussed, such as prediction of disease risk as well as personalized therapy and prediction of therapeutic response and risk of adverse events. While these applications are largely not refined to the point of clinical utility in RA, it seems likely that multi-parameter datasets including genetic, clinical, and biomarker data will be employed in the future care of RA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular inimitability amongst tumors: implications for precision cancer medicine in the age of personalized oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sandip P; Schwaederle, Maria; Daniels, Gregory A; Fanta, Paul T; Schwab, Richard B; Shimabukuro, Kelly A; Kesari, Santosh; Piccioni, David E; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Helsten, Teresa L; Lippman, Scott M; Parker, Barbara A; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-10-20

    Tumor sequencing has revolutionized oncology, allowing for detailed interrogation of the molecular underpinnings of cancer at an individual level. With this additional insight, it is increasingly apparent that not only do tumors vary within a sample (tumor heterogeneity), but also that each patient's individual tumor is a constellation of unique molecular aberrations that will require an equally unique personalized therapeutic regimen. We report here the results of 439 patients who underwent Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-certified next generation sequencing (NGS) across histologies. Among these patients, 98.4% had a unique molecular profile, and aside from three primary brain tumor patients with a single genetic lesion (IDH1 R132H), no two patients within a given histology were molecularly identical. Additionally, two sets of patients had identical profiles consisting of two mutations in common and no other anomalies. However, these profiles did not segregate by histology (lung adenocarcinoma-appendiceal cancer (KRAS G12D and GNAS R201C), and lung adenocarcinoma-liposarcoma (CDK4 and MDM2 amplification pairs)). These findings suggest that most advanced tumors are molecular singletons within and between histologies, and that tumors that differ in histology may still nonetheless exhibit identical molecular portraits, albeit rarely.

  2. Fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine? Systematic review and field synopsis of pharmacogenetic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Holmes

    2009-12-01

    , small sample sizes, a mainly candidate gene approach, surrogate markers, an excess of nominally positive to truly positive associations and paucity of meta-analyses. Recommendations based on these findings should inform future study design to help realise the goal of personalised medicines. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION NUMBER: Not Registered.

  3. From leeches to personalized medicine: evolving concepts in the management of polycythemia vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2017-01-01

    Polycythemia vera is a clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. It manifests as an expansion of red cell mass. It is the most common chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm. In virtually all cases, it is characterized by a V617F point mutation in JAK2 exon 14 or less common mutations in exon 12. The landmark discovery of the autonomously activated JAK/STAT signaling pathway paved the way for the clinical development of the first target drug, the JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. This is now approved for patients with resistance or intolerance to hydroxyurea. Phlebotomies and hydroxyurea are still the cornerstone of treatment, and aim to prevent the first appearance or recurrence of cardiovascular events that, together with progression to post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis and leukemia, represent the main causes of death. Interferon-α is an alternative drug and has been shown to induce molecular remissions. It is currently undergoing phase III trials that might eventually lead to its approval for clinical use. The last few years have witnessed important advances towards an accurate early diagnosis of polycythemia vera, greater understanding of its pathogenesis, and improved patient management. This review will focus on the most recent achievements and will aim to unify the different concepts involved in a personalized approach to the patient with polycythemia vera. In spite of many recent advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis and improved disease management, polycythemia vera remains a life-threatening myeloproliferative neoplasm for which there is no cure. This review will present a critical overview of evolving concepts in diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27884974

  4. Current practice in and considerations for personalized medicine in lung cancer: From the patient's molecular biology to patient values and preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrera, Percivil Melendez; Ormond, Meghann

    2015-01-01

    Both at the individual and health system levels, the burden of complex illnesses associated with and which rise in mid- to later life, such as cancer, is expected to increase further. The advent of personalized medicine, or the use of a patient's genetic profile to guide medical decisions, is touted

  5. Knowledge-Based Personal Health System to empower outpatients of diabetes mellitus by means of P4 Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresó, Adrián; Sáez, Carlos; Vicente, Javier; Larrinaga, Félix; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and it imposes a large economic burden on healthcare systems. We present a web patient empowering system (PHSP4) that ensures continuous monitoring and assessment of the health state of patients with DM (type I and II). PHSP4 is a Knowledge-Based Personal Health System (PHS) which follows the trend of P4 Medicine (Personalized, Predictive, Preventive, and Participative). It provides messages to outpatients and clinicians about the achievement of objectives, follow-up, and treatments adjusted to the patient condition. Additionally, it calculates a four-component risk vector of the associated pathologies with DM: Nephropathy, Diabetic retinopathy, Diabetic foot, and Cardiovascular event. The core of the system is a Rule-Based System which Knowledge Base is composed by a set of rules implementing the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) (American Diabetes Association: http://www.diabetes.org/ ) clinical guideline. The PHSP4 is designed to be standardized and to facilitate its interoperability by means of terminologies (SNOMED-CT [The International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization: http://www.ihtsdo.org/snomed-ct/ ] and UCUM [The Unified Code for Units of Measure: http://unitsofmeasure.org/ ]), standardized clinical documents (HL7 CDA R2 [Health Level Seven International: http://www.hl7.org/index.cfm ]) for managing Electronic Health Record (EHR). We have evaluated the functionality of the system and its users' acceptance of the system using simulated and real data, and a questionnaire based in the Technology Acceptance Model methodology (TAM). Finally results show the reliability of the system and the high acceptance of clinicians.

  6. Short-term spheroid culture of primary colorectal cancer cells as an in vitro model for personalizing cancer medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Maria; Hagel, Grith; Glenthoj, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatment of cancer remains a challenge due to the molecular and functional heterogeneity displayed by tumours originating from the same cell type. The pronounced heterogeneity makes it difficult for oncologists to devise an effective therapeutic strategy for the patient. One approac...... and combinations most commonly used for treatment of colorectal cancer. In summary, short-term spheroid culture of primary colorectal adenocarcinoma cells represents a promising in vitro model for use in personalized medicine....... for increasing treatment efficacy is to test the chemosensitivity of cancer cells obtained from the patient's tumour. 3D culture represents a promising method for modelling patient tumours in vitro. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate how closely short-term spheroid cultures of primary colorectal...... cancer cells resemble the original tumour. Colorectal cancer cells were isolated from human tumour tissue and cultured as spheroids. Spheroid cultures were established with a high success rate and remained viable for at least 10 days. The spheroids exhibited significant growth over a period of 7 days...

  7. An estimate of the maximal doses incurred by persons accompanying patients in the waiting area of a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzik-Jurasz, A.S.K.; Farwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to make an estimate of the maximal doses that might be incurred by persons accompanying active patients in a nuclear medicine department waiting area. This was in order to determine whether the dose to such individuals approached current legislative or recently recommended limits. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were taped to the walls of the waiting area at waist level to the sitting individual, such that their record would reflect as closely as possible the dose incurred by an individual sitting next to an active patient. Dividing the recorded dose with the total occupancy time of that seat derived an average dose rate. Maximal doses were estimated by the product of the latter and maximal occupancy times. It was assumed that an accompanying individual would have been sitting next to the active patient for their whole duration of stay. The maximum estimates were 278 μSv and 103.2 μSv. These values are likely to be overestimates by the virtue of the TLD integrating the whole dose of its surrounds, especially adjacent active individuals. By current legislation and recent recommendations the values are reassuringly low, but idiosyncrasies in local practice might need to be considered in individual departments. (author)

  8. Tailored Educational Approaches for Consumer Health: A Model to Address Health Promotion in an Era of Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Wendy F; Lyman, Jason; Broshek, Donna K; Guterbock, Thomas M; Hartman, David; Kinzie, Mable; Mick, David; Pannone, Aaron; Sturz, Vanessa; Schubart, Jane; Garson, Arthur T

    2018-01-01

    To develop a model, based on market segmentation, to improve the quality and efficiency of health promotion materials and programs. Market segmentation to create segments (groups) based on a cross-sectional questionnaire measuring individual characteristics and preferences for health information. Educational and delivery recommendations developed for each group. General population of adults in Virginia. Random sample of 1201 Virginia residents. Respondents are representative of the general population with the exception of older age. Multiple factors known to impact health promotion including health status, health system utilization, health literacy, Internet use, learning styles, and preferences. Cluster analysis and discriminate analysis to create and validate segments. Common sized means to compare factors across segments. Developed educational and delivery recommendations matched to the 8 distinct segments. For example, the "health challenged and hard to reach" are older, lower literacy, and not likely to seek out health information. Their educational and delivery recommendations include a sixth-grade reading level, delivery through a provider, and using a "push" strategy. This model addresses a need to improve the efficiency and quality of health promotion efforts in an era of personalized medicine. It demonstrates that there are distinct groups with clearly defined educational and delivery recommendations. Health promotion professionals can consider Tailored Educational Approaches for Consumer Health to develop and deliver tailored materials to encourage behavior change.

  9. Esophageal 3D Culture Systems as Modeling Tools in Esophageal Epithelial Pathobiology and Personalized MedicineSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Whelan

    Full Text Available The stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus shows a proliferative basal layer of keratinocytes that undergo terminal differentiation in overlying suprabasal layers. Esophageal pathologies, including eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma, cause perturbations in the esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Three-dimensional (3D culture platforms mimicking in vivo esophageal epithelial tissue architecture ex vivo have emerged as powerful experimental tools for the investigation of esophageal biology in the context of homeostasis and pathology. Herein, we describe types of 3D culture that are used to model the esophagus, including organotypic, organoid, and spheroid culture systems. We discuss the development and optimization of various esophageal 3D culture models; highlight the applications, strengths, and limitations of each method; and summarize how these models have been used to evaluate the esophagus under homeostatic conditions as well as under the duress of inflammation and precancerous/cancerous conditions. Finally, we present future perspectives regarding the use of esophageal 3D models in basic science research as well as translational studies with the potential for personalized medicine. Keywords: Organotypic Culture, Organoid, Spheroid Culture, Esophageal Disease

  10. Personalized Medicine in the U.S. and Germany: Awareness, Acceptance, Use and Preconditions for the Wide Implementation into the Medical Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Kichko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to collect comprehensive data about the public and physician awareness, acceptance and use of Personalized Medicine (PM, as well as their opinions on PM reimbursement and genetic privacy protection in the U.S. and Germany. In order to give a better overview, we compared our survey results with the results from other studies and discussed Personalized Medicine preconditions for its wide implementation into the medical standard. For the data collection, using the same methodology, we performed several surveys in Pennsylvania (U.S. and Bavaria (Germany. Physicians were contacted via letter, while public representatives in person. Survey results, analyzed by means of descriptive and non-parametric statistic methods, have shown that awareness, acceptance, use and opinions on PM aspects in Pennsylvania and Bavaria were not significantly different. In both states there were strong concerns about genetic privacy protection and no support of one genetic database. The costs for Personalized Medicine were expected to be covered by health insurances and governmental funds. Summarizing, we came to the conclusion that for PM wide implementation there will be need to adjust the healthcare reimbursement system, as well as adopt new laws which protect against genetic misuse and simultaneously enable voluntary data provision.

  11. Wearable personalized medicinal platform

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Gumus, Abdurrahman

    2017-01-01

    contains a preselected composition. An electronic processor is operatively connected to the sensor for receiving a signal therefrom encoding a measurement of the physiological parameter, the processor being configured for determining a divergence

  12. The state of cell block variation and satisfaction in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Crapanzano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the recent past, algorithms and recommendations to standardize the morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular classification of lung cancers on cytology specimens have been proposed, and several organizations have recommended cell blocks (CBs as the preferred modality for molecular testing. Based on the literature, there are several different techniques available for CB preparation-suggesting that there is no standard. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of CB preparation techniques utilized in various practice settings and analyze current issues, if any. Materials and Methods: A single E-mail with a link to an electronic survey was distributed to members of the American Society of Cytopathology and other pathologists. Questions pertaining to the participants′ practice setting and CBs-volume, method, quality and satisfaction-were included. Results: Of 95 respondents, 90/95 (94% completed the survey and comprise the study group. Most participants practice in a community hospital/private practice (44% or academic center (41%. On average, 14 CBs (range 0-50; median 10 are prepared by a laboratory daily. Over 10 methods are utilized: Plasma thrombin (33%, HistoGel (27%, Cellient automated cell block system (8% and others (31% respectively. Forty of 90 (44% respondents are either unsatisfied or sometimes satisfied with their CB quality, with low-cellular yield being the leading cause of dissatisfaction. There was no statistical significance between the three most common CB preparation methods and satisfaction with quality. Discussion: Many are dissatisfied with their current method of CB preparation, and there is no consistent method to prepare CBs. In today′s era of personalized medicine with an increasing array of molecular tests being applied to cytological specimens, there is a need for a standardized protocol for CB optimization to enhance cellularity.

  13. The state of cell block variation and satisfaction in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapanzano, John P; Heymann, Jonas J; Monaco, Sara; Nassar, Aziza; Saqi, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    In the recent past, algorithms and recommendations to standardize the morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular classification of lung cancers on cytology specimens have been proposed, and several organizations have recommended cell blocks (CBs) as the preferred modality for molecular testing. Based on the literature, there are several different techniques available for CB preparation-suggesting that there is no standard. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of CB preparation techniques utilized in various practice settings and analyze current issues, if any. A single E-mail with a link to an electronic survey was distributed to members of the American Society of Cytopathology and other pathologists. Questions pertaining to the participants' practice setting and CBs-volume, method, quality and satisfaction-were included. Of 95 respondents, 90/95 (94%) completed the survey and comprise the study group. Most participants practice in a community hospital/private practice (44%) or academic center (41%). On average, 14 CBs (range 0-50; median 10) are prepared by a laboratory daily. Over 10 methods are utilized: Plasma thrombin (33%), HistoGel (27%), Cellient automated cell block system (8%) and others (31%) respectively. Forty of 90 (44%) respondents are either unsatisfied or sometimes satisfied with their CB quality, with low-cellular yield being the leading cause of dissatisfaction. There was no statistical significance between the three most common CB preparation methods and satisfaction with quality. Many are dissatisfied with their current method of CB preparation, and there is no consistent method to prepare CBs. In today's era of personalized medicine with an increasing array of molecular tests being applied to cytological specimens, there is a need for a standardized protocol for CB optimization to enhance cellularity.

  14. The new physician as unwitting quantum mechanic: is adapting Dirac's inference system best practice for personalized medicine, genomics, and proteomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Barry

    2007-08-01

    What is the Best Practice for automated inference in Medical Decision Support for personalized medicine? A known system already exists as Dirac's inference system from quantum mechanics (QM) using bra-kets and bras where A and B are states, events, or measurements representing, say, clinical and biomedical rules. Dirac's system should theoretically be the universal best practice for all inference, though QM is notorious as sometimes leading to bizarre conclusions that appear not to be applicable to the macroscopic world of everyday world human experience and medical practice. It is here argued that this apparent difficulty vanishes if QM is assigned one new multiplication function @, which conserves conditionality appropriately, making QM applicable to classical inference including a quantitative form of the predicate calculus. An alternative interpretation with the same consequences is if every i = radical-1 in Dirac's QM is replaced by h, an entity distinct from 1 and i and arguably a hidden root of 1 such that h2 = 1. With that exception, this paper is thus primarily a review of the application of Dirac's system, by application of linear algebra in the complex domain to help manipulate information about associations and ontology in complicated data. Any combined bra-ket can be shown to be composed only of the sum of QM-like bra and ket weights c(), times an exponential function of Fano's mutual information measure I(A; B) about the association between A and B, that is, an association rule from data mining. With the weights and Fano measure re-expressed as expectations on finite data using Riemann's Incomplete (i.e., Generalized) Zeta Functions, actual counts of observations for real world sparse data can be readily utilized. Finally, the paper compares identical character, distinguishability of states events or measurements, correlation, mutual information, and orthogonal character, important issues in data mining and biomedical analytics, as in QM.

  15. From old concerns to new advances and personalized medicine in lupus: The end of the tunnel is approaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Andrea; Gershwin, M Eric; Selmi, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    The significant decrease in mortality rates worldwide, the increased proportion of patients achieving a durable remission, and the recent approval of a new drug after several decades are encouraging advances in the tangled history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, when data are observed more closely, the research findings on disease pathogenesis and targeted treatments have been quite misleading, as illustrated by the central role of B cells but the missed endpoints in rituximab clinical trials which are burdened by the wide variability of SLE manifestations or the ethnic determinants of disease severity. Other biologic therapies, on the other hand, inhibit B cell stimulating factor BAFF but are proving to be short of revolutionary, not yet overcoming high-dose long-term glucocorticoids still largely used without an agreement on what clinical targets are to be sought in the proposed treat-to-target approach. The large amount of data from genome-wide association studies, the detailed reports on T cell epigenetics, or the numerous established and novel animal models have also proven insufficient to change our understanding of the human disease. Nonetheless, we have now tools for a better and earlier SLE diagnosis, thanks to reliable biomarkers, improved care of kidney involvement, better pregnancy outcomes, while the neuropsychiatric manifestations remain challenging. These advances are well mirrored by some proposed synthetic drugs, such as tacrolimus, or biologics, including IFNα inhibitors and other drugs capable to modulate the immune system. Ultimately, we may foresee that genetic and epigenetic data, along with the variable clinical manifestations represent the bases for SLE to become an ideal candidate for the introduction of truly personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tradeoffs of Using Administrative Claims and Medical Records to Identify the Use of Personalized Medicine for Patients with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Su-Ying; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Wang, Grace; Keohane, Carol; Armstrong, Joanne; Morris, William M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Administrative claims and medical records are important data sources to examine healthcare utilization and outcomes. Little is known about identifying personalized medicine technologies in these sources. Objectives To describe agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of administrative claims compared to medical records for two pairs of targeted tests and treatments for breast cancer. Research Design Retrospective analysis of medical records linked to administrative claims from a large health plan. We examined whether agreement varied by factors that facilitate tracking in claims (coding and cost) and that enhance medical record completeness (records from multiple providers). Subjects Women (35 – 65 years) with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 2006–2007 (n=775). Measures Use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and gene expression profiling (GEP) testing, trastuzumab and adjuvant chemotherapy in claims and medical records. Results Agreement between claims and records was substantial for GEP, trastuzumab, and chemotherapy, and lowest for HER2 tests. GEP, an expensive test with unique billing codes, had higher agreement (91.6% vs. 75.2%), sensitivity (94.9% vs. 76.7%), and specificity (90.1% vs. 29.2%) than HER2, a test without unique billing codes. Trastuzumab, a treatment with unique billing codes, had slightly higher agreement (95.1% vs. 90%) and sensitivity (98.1% vs. 87.9%) than adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Higher agreement and specificity were associated with services that had unique billing codes and high cost. Administrative claims may be sufficient for examining services with unique billing codes. Medical records provide better data for identifying tests lacking specific codes and for research requiring detailed clinical information. PMID:21422962

  17. Towards personal health care with model-guided medicine: long-term PPPM-related strategies and realisation opportunities within 'Horizon 2020'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Heinz U; Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2014-01-01

    At the international EPMA Summit carried out in the EU Parliament (September 2013), the main challenges in Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine have been discussed and strategies outlined in order to implement scientific and technological innovation in medicine and healthcare utilising new strategic programmes such as 'Horizon 2020'. The joint EPMA (European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine) / IFCARS (International Foundation for Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery) paper emphasises the consolidate position of the leading experts who are aware of the great responsibility of being on a forefront of predictive, preventive and personalised medicine. Both societies consider long-term international partnerships and multidisciplinary projects to create PPPM relevant innovation in science, technological tools and practical implementation in healthcare. Personalisation in healthcare urgently needs innovation in design of PPPM-related medical services, new products, research, education, didactic materials, propagation of targeted prevention in the society and treatments tailored to the person. For the paradigm shift from delayed reactive to predictive, preventive and personalised medicine, a new culture should be created in communication between individual professional domains, between doctor and patient, as well as in communication with individual social (sub)groups and patient cohorts. This is a long-term mission in personalised healthcare with the whole spectrum of instruments available and to be created in the field.

  18. Efficient generation of patient-matched malignant and normal primary cell cultures from clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients: clinically relevant models for research and personalized medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Nazleen C.; Gedye, Craig; Apostoli, Anthony J.; Brown, Kevin R.; Paterson, Joshua; Stickle, Natalie; Robinette, Michael; Fleshner, Neil; Hamilton, Robert J.; Kulkarni, Girish; Zlotta, Alexandre; Evans, Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Moffat, Jason; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Ailles, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    to establish primary cultures of ccRCC cells and matched normal kidney epithelial cells from almost every patient provides a resource for future development of novel therapies and personalized medicine for ccRCC patients. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2539-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  19. Bernard Lerer: recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Vural; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Aynacıoğlu, Sükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J D; Llerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Umit

    2014-04-01

    This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21(st) century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry--pharmacoepigenetics--that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a long way

  20. Extending Big-Five Theory into Childhood: A Preliminary Investigation into the Relationship between Big-Five Personality Traits and Behavior Problems in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, David J.; McGhee, Ron L.; Evans, J. Gary

    1999-01-01

    Investigation conducted to link Big-Five personality traits with behavior problems identified in childhood. Results show distinct patterns of behavior problems associated with various personality characteristics. Preliminary data indicate that identifying Big-Five personality trait patterns may be a useful dimension of assessment for understanding…

  1. Big Five personality traits may inform public health policy and preventive medicine: Evidence from a cross-sectional and a prospective longitudinal epidemiologic study in a Swiss community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengartner, Michael P; Kawohl, Wolfram; Haker, Helene; Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2016-05-01

    Some evidence documents the importance of personality assessments for health research and practise. However, no study has opted to test whether a short self-report personality inventory may comprehensively inform health policy. Data were taken from a population-based epidemiologic survey in Zurich, Switzerland, conducted from 2010-2012. A short form of the Big Five Inventory was completed by n=1155 participants (54.4% women; mean age=29.6 years), while health-related outcomes were taken from a comprehensive semi-structured clinical interview. A convenience subsample averaging n=171 participants additionally provided laboratory measures and n=133 were subsequently followed-up at least once over a maximal period of 6 months. Personality traits, in particular high neuroticism and low conscientiousness, related significantly to poor environmental resources such as low social support (R(2)=0.071), health-impairing behaviours such as cannabis use (R(2)=0.071), and psychopathology, including negative affect (R(2)=0.269) and various mental disorders (R(2)=0.060-0.195). The proportion of total variance explained was R(2)=0.339 in persons with three or more mental disorders. Personality significantly related to some laboratory measures including total cholesterol (R(2)=0.095) and C-Reactive Protein (R(2)=0.062). Finally, personality prospectively predicted global psychopathological distress and vegetative symptoms over a 6-month observation period. Personality relates consistently to poor socio-environmental resources, health-impairing behaviours and psychopathology. We also found some evidence for an association with metabolic and immune functions that are assumed to influence health. A short personality inventory could provide valuable information for preventive medicine when used as a means to screen entire populations for distinct risk exposure, in particular with respect to psychopathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Viscoelasticity as a measurement of clot structure in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients: towards a precision and personalized medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette

    2016-08-09

    Type 2 diabetes patients (T2D) have a considerably higher cardiovascular risk, which is closely associated with systemic inflammation, and an accompanying pathologic coagulation system. Due to the complexity of the diabetic profile, we suggest that we need to look at each patient individually and particularly at his or her clotting profile; as the healthiness of the coagulation system gives us an indication of the success of clinical intervention. T2D coagulability varied markedly, although there were no clear difference in medication use and the standards of HbA1c levels. Our sample consisted of 90 poorly controlled T2D and 71 healthy individuals. We investigated the medication use and standards of HbA1c levels of T2D and we used thromboelastography (TEG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study their clot formation. The latest NIH guidelines suggest that clinical medicine should focus on precision medicine, and the current broad understanding is that precision medicine may in future, provide personalized targets for preventative and therapeutic interventions. Here we suggest a practical example where TEG can be used as an easily accessible point-of-care tool to establish a comprehensive clotting profile analysis for T2D patients; and additionally may provide valuable information that may be used in the envisaged precision medicine approach. Only by closely following each individual patient's progress and healthiness and thereby managing systemic inflammation, will we be able to reduce this pandemic.

  3. Personalizing Chinese medicine by integrating molecular features of diseases and herb ingredient information: application to acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Li, Haichang; Xie, Duoli; Shi, Tieliu; Wen, Chengping

    2017-06-27

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been widely used as a complementary medicine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) treatment. In this study, we proposed a new classification of Chinese Medicines (CMs) by integrating the latest discoveries in disease molecular mechanisms and traditional medicine theory. We screened out a set of chemical compounds on basis of AML differential expression genes and chemical-protein interactions and then mapped them to Traditional Chinese Medicine Integrated Database. 415 CMs contain those compounds and they were categorized into 8 groups according to the Traditional Chinese Pharmacology. Pathway analysis and synthetic lethality gene pairs were applied to analyze the dissimilarity, generality and intergroup relations of different groups. We defined hub CM pairs and alternative CM groups based on the analysis result and finally proposed a formula to form an effective anti-AML prescription which combined the hub CM pairs with alternative CMs according to patients' molecular features. Our method of formulating CMs based on patients' stratification provides novel insights into the new usage of conventional CMs and will promote TCM modernization.

  4. Extended objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1976-01-01

    After some disconnected comments on the MIT bag and string models for extended hadrons, I review current understanding of extended objects in classical conventional relativistic field theories and their quantum mechanical interpretation

  5. 4Ps medicine of the fatty liver: the research model of predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine-recommendations for facing obesity, fatty liver and fibrosis epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Francesca Maria; Catalano, Daniela; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between adipose tissue and fatty liver, and its possible evolution in fibrosis, is supported by clinical and research experience. Given the multifactorial pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), treatments for various contributory risk factors have been proposed; however, there is no single validated therapy or drug association recommended for all cases which can stand alone. Mechanisms, diagnostics, prevention and treatment of obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance are displayed along with recommendations and position points. Evidences and practice can get sustainable and cost-benefit valuable outcomes by participatory interventions. These recommendations can be enhanced by comprehensive research projects, addressed to societal issues and innovation, market appeal and industry development, cultural acceptance and sustainability. The basis of participatory medicine is a greater widespread awareness of a condition which is both a disease and an easy documented and inclusive clue for associated diseases and unhealthy lifestyle. This model is suitable for addressing prevention and useful for monitoring improvement, worsening and adherence with non-invasive imaging tools which allow targeted approaches. The latter include health psychology and nutritional and physical exercise prescription expertise disseminated by continuous medical education but, more important, by concrete curricula for training undergraduate and postgraduate students. It is possible and recommended to do it by early formal teaching of ultrasound imaging procedures and of practical lifestyle intervention strategies, including approaches aimed to healthier fashion suggestions. Guidelines and requirements of research project funding calls should be addressed also to NAFLD and allied conditions and should encompass the goal of training by research and the inclusion of participatory medicine topics. A deeper awareness of ethics of competences in health professionals

  6. A systematic review and checklist presenting the main challenges for health economic modeling in personalized medicine: towards implementing patient-level models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Koen; Koffijberg, Hendrik; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2017-02-01

    The ongoing development of genomic medicine and the use of molecular and imaging markers in personalized medicine (PM) has arguably challenged the field of health economic modeling (HEM). This study aims to provide detailed insights into the current status of HEM in PM, in order to identify if and how modeling methods are used to address the challenges described in literature. Areas covered: A review was performed on studies that simulate health economic outcomes for personalized clinical pathways. Decision tree modeling and Markov modeling were the most observed methods. Not all identified challenges were frequently found, challenges regarding companion diagnostics, diagnostic performance, and evidence gaps were most often found. However, the extent to which challenges were addressed varied considerably between studies. Expert commentary: Challenges for HEM in PM are not yet routinely addressed which may indicate that either (1) their impact is less severe than expected, (2) they are hard to address and therefore not managed appropriately, or (3) HEM in PM is still in an early stage. As evidence on the impact of these challenges is still lacking, we believe that more concrete examples are needed to illustrate the identified challenges and to demonstrate methods to handle them.

  7. Bernard Lerer: Recipient of the 2014 Inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynacıoğlu, Şükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J.D.; LLerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21st century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry—pharmacoepigenetics—that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a

  8. 2K09 and thereafter : the coming era of integrative bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing for functional genomics and personalized medicine research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Significant interest exists in establishing synergistic research in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. Supported by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.ISIBM.org), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD) and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, the ISIBM International Joint Conferences on Bioinformatics, Systems Biology and Intelligent Computing (ISIBM IJCBS 2009) attracted more than 300 papers and 400 researchers and medical doctors world-wide. It was the only inter/multidisciplinary conference aimed to promote synergistic research and education in bioinformatics, systems biology and intelligent computing. The conference committee was very grateful for the valuable advice and suggestions from honorary chairs, steering committee members and scientific leaders including Dr. Michael S. Waterman (USC, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Wing H. Wong (Stanford, Member of United States National Academy of Sciences), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (UC Berkeley, Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Qu Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Andrzej Niemierko (Harvard), Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Brian D. Athey (Michigan), Dr. Weida Tong (FDA, United States Department of Health and Human Services), Dr. Cathy H. Wu (Georgetown), Dr. Dong Xu (Missouri), Drs. Arif Ghafoor and Okan K Ersoy (Purdue), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech, President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid R. Arabnia (UGA, Vice-President of ISIBM), and other scientific leaders. The committee presented the 2009 ISIBM Outstanding Achievement Awards to Dr. Joydeep Ghosh (UT

  9. Prejudices and elderly patients' personality -- the problem of quality of care and quality of life in geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Aleksandra; Buliński, Leszek

    2013-08-16

    The article discusses the position of elderly patients in medical intervention context. The phenomenon of greying population has changed the attitude towards the old but common observations prove that quality of geriatric care is still unsatisfactory. In order to improve specialists' understanding of ageing, the comparative study on personality among people at different age was designed. The results are discussed in relation to the elderly patient-centred paradigm and in order to counterbalance still present ageist practices. The research involved 164 persons in the early and late adulthood stage ages. Among the old there were the young old (aged 65-74) and the older old (aged 75+). All participants were asked to fill the NEO-FFI. The results prove age-related differences in personality. In late adulthood in comparison to early adulthood there is the decline in openness to experiences. Two traits: agreeableness and conscientiousness increase significantly. Age did not differentiate significantly the level of neuroticism and of extraversion. The results of cluster analyses show the further differences in taxonomies of personality traits at different period of life. The results challenge the stereotypes that present older people as neurotic, and aggressive. The age did not differentiate significantly the level of neuroticism and of extraversion. In general, the obtained results prove that the ageist assumption that the geriatric patients are troublesome is not arguable. This article builds support for effective change in geriatric professional practices and improvement in the elderly patients' quality of life.

  10. Extended Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Joel; Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article, we consider different ways of understanding ExE in philosophy, psychology, and the cognitive sciences...

  11. A simplified baseline prediction model for joint damage progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Punder, Yvonne M R; van Riel, Piet L C M; Fransen, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    To compare the performance of an extended model and a simplified prognostic model for joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) based on 3 baseline risk factors: anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), erosions, and acute-phase reaction. Data were used from the Nijmegen early RA cohort. An extended model and a simplified baseline prediction model were developed to predict joint damage progression between 0 and 3 years. Joint damage progression was assessed using the Ratingen score. In the extended model, prediction factors were positivity for anti-CCP and/or rheumatoid factor, the level of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the quantity of erosions. The prediction score was calculated as the sum of the regression coefficients. In the simplified model, the prediction factors were dichotomized and the number of risk factors was counted. Performances of both models were compared using discrimination and calibration. The models were internally validated using bootstrapping. The extended model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 5.6 with an area under the receiver-operation characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77 (95% CI 0.72-0.81). The simplified model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 3. This model had an area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (95% CI 0.70-0.80). In internal validation, the 2 models showed reasonably well the agreement between observed and predicted probabilities for joint damage progression (Hosmer-Lemeshow test p > 0.05 and calibration slope near 1.0). A simple prediction model for joint damage progression in early RA, by only counting the number of risk factors, has adequate performance. This facilitates the translation of the theoretical prognostic models to daily clinical practice.

  12. Risk attitudes and personality traits predict perceptions of benefits and risks for medicinal products: a field study of European medical assessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andrea R; Fasolo, Barbara; de Graeff, P A; Hillege, H L

    2015-01-01

    Risk attitudes and personality traits are known predictors of decision making among laypersons, but very little is known of their influence among experts participating in organizational decision making. Seventy-five European medical assessors were assessed in a field study using the Domain Specific Risk Taking scale and the Big Five Inventory scale. Assessors rated the risks and benefits for a mock "clinical dossier" specific to their area of expertise, and ordinal regression models were used to assess the odds of risk attitude or personality traits in predicting either the benefit or the risk ratings. An increase in the "conscientiousness" score predicted an increase in the perception of the drug's benefit, and male assessors gave higher scores for the drug's benefit ratings than did female assessors. Extraverted assessors saw fewer risks, and assessors with a perceived neutral-averse or averse risk profile saw greater risks. Medical assessors perceive the benefits and risks of medicines via a complex interplay of the medical situation, their personality traits and even their gender. Further research in this area is needed to determine how these potential biases are managed within the regulatory setting. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Formative feedback from the first-person perspective using Google Glass in a family medicine objective structured clinical examination station in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youm, Julie; Wiechmann, Warren

    2018-01-01

    This case study explored the use of Google Glass in a clinical examination scenario to capture the first-person perspective of a standardized patient as a way to provide formative feedback on students' communication and empathy skills 'through the patient's eyes.' During a 3-year period between 2014 and 2017, third-year students enrolled in a family medicine clerkship participated in a Google Glass station during a summative clinical examination. At this station, standardized patients wore Google Glass to record an encounter focused on communication and empathy skills 'through the patient's eyes.' Students completed an online survey using a 4-point Likert scale about their perspectives on Google Glass as a feedback tool (N= 255). We found that the students' experiences with Google Glass 'through the patient's eyes' were largely positive and that students felt the feedback provided by the Google Glass recording to be helpful. Although a third of the students felt that Google Glass was a distraction, the majority believed that the first-person perspective recordings provided an opportunity for feedback that did not exist before. Continuing exploration of first-person perspective recordings using Google Glass to improve education on communication and empathy skills is warranted.

  14. Extended prediction rule to optimise early detection of heart failure in older persons with non-acute shortness of breath : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Riet, Evelien E S; Hoes, Arno W.; Limburg, Alexander; Landman, Marcel A J; Kemperman, Hans; Rutten, Frans H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is a need for a practical tool to aid general practitioners in early detection of heart failure in the elderly with shortness of breath. In this study, such a screening rule was developed based on an existing rule for detecting heart failure in older persons with a diagnosis of

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Italian Validation of a Questionnaire on Nurses' Personal and Professional Use, Knowledge, and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, Giada; Shorofi, Seyed Afshin; Arbon, Paul; Dal Molin, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    Patients are showing an increasing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Most nurses are open to the adoption of CAM into clinical nursing practice, but they may experience a lack of knowledge about the safe and effective use of these therapies. Several studies concerning nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward CAM have been published, but only in one, the authors (Shorofi and Arbon) used a validated questionnaire. In Italy, there are no validated questionnaires to investigate this aspect of nursing practice. To test the psychometric properties of the Italian Shorofi and Arbon questionnaire for use with Italian nurses. A forward-backward translation method was used to translate the questionnaire from English to Italian. Content validity, face validity and reliability were established. This study examined the potential usefulness of the Shorofi and Arbon questionnaire for the evaluation of CAM knowledge of Italian speaking nurses, which showed good content validity and good reliability.

  16. Study of the personal radiation dose received by nuclear medicine technologists working in a dedicated PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, C.N.; Wallace, A.B.; Young, A.B.; Ibbetson, V.J.

    2005-01-01

    The use of dedicated PET scanners is becoming more widespread throughout Australia and the world. PET imaging utilises short-lived (-108 min), high-energy (511 keV) gamma-ray emitters, that could result in a high radiation dose being received by staff. As part of a larger staff and area monitoring project, this paper discusses the personal dose equivalent, H p (10), received by PET staff working in a dedicated PET centre. The typical H (10) received by staff was approximately 31 μSv. The average daily administered activity to patients at Austin Health was 1280 MBq

  17. 'Personal Care' and General Practice Medicine in the UK: A qualitative interview study with patients and General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rachel

    2007-08-31

    Recent policy and organisational changes within UK primary care have emphasised graduated access to care, speed of access to the first available general practitioner (GP) and care being provided by a range of healthcare professionals. These trends have been strengthened by the current GP contract and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Concern has been expressed that the potential for personal care is being diminished as a result and that this will reduce quality standards. This paper presents data from a study that explored with patients and GPs what personal care means and whether it has continuing importance to them. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview participants and Framework Analysis supported analysis of emerging themes. Twenty-nine patients, mainly women with young children, and twenty-three GPs were interviewed from seven practices in Lothian, Scotland, ranged by practice size and relative deprivation score. Personal care was defined mainly, though not exclusively, as care given within the context of a continuing relationship in which there is an interpersonal connection and the doctor adopts a particular consultation style. Defined in this way, it was reported to have benefits for both health outcomes and patients' experience of care. In particular, such care was thought to be beneficial in attending to the emotions that can be elicited when seeking and receiving health care and in enabling patients to be known by doctors as legitimate seekers of care from the health service. Its importance was described as being dependent upon the nature of the health problem and patients' wider familial and social circumstances. In particular, it was found to provide support to patients in their parenting and other familial caring roles. Personal care has continuing salience to patients and GPs in modern primary care in the UK. Patients equate the experience of care, not just outcomes, with high quality care. As it is mainly conceptualised and

  18. The Diversity of REcent and Ancient huMan (DREAM): A New Microarray for Genetic Anthropology and Genealogy, Forensics, and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik, Eran; Yusuf, Leeban; Anderson, Ainan I J; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Arnellos, Dimitrios; Vilshansky, Gregory; Ercal, Gunes; Lu, Yontao; Webster, Teresa; Baird, Michael L; Esposito, Umberto

    2017-12-01

    The human population displays wide variety in demographic history, ancestry, content of DNA derived from hominins or ancient populations, adaptation, traits, copy number variation, drug response, and more. These polymorphisms are of broad interest to population geneticists, forensics investigators, and medical professionals. Historically, much of that knowledge was gained from population survey projects. Although many commercial arrays exist for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, their design specifications are limited and they do not allow a full exploration of biodiversity. We thereby aimed to design the Diversity of REcent and Ancient huMan (DREAM)-an all-inclusive microarray that would allow both identification of known associations and exploration of standing questions in genetic anthropology, forensics, and personalized medicine. DREAM includes probes to interrogate ancestry informative markers obtained from over 450 human populations, over 200 ancient genomes, and 10 archaic hominins. DREAM can identify 94% and 61% of all known Y and mitochondrial haplogroups, respectively, and was vetted to avoid interrogation of clinically relevant markers. To demonstrate its capabilities, we compared its FST distributions with those of the 1000 Genomes Project and commercial arrays. Although all arrays yielded similarly shaped (inverse J) FST distributions, DREAM's autosomal and X-chromosomal distributions had the highest mean FST, attesting to its ability to discern subpopulations. DREAM performances are further illustrated in biogeographical, identical by descent, and copy number variation analyses. In summary, with approximately 800,000 markers spanning nearly 2,000 genes, DREAM is a useful tool for genetic anthropology, forensic, and personalized medicine studies. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Androgen receptor mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome: a high content analysis approach leading to personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare disease associated with inactivating mutations of AR that disrupt male sexual differentiation, and cause a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities having as a common denominator loss of reproductive viability. No established treatment exists for these conditions, however there are sporadic reports of patients (or recapitulated mutations in cell lines that respond to administration of supraphysiologic doses (or pulses of testosterone or synthetic ligands. Here, we utilize a novel high content analysis (HCA approach to study AR function at the single cell level in genital skin fibroblasts (GSF. We discuss in detail findings in GSF from three historical patients with AIS, which include identification of novel mechanisms of AR malfunction, and the potential ability to utilize HCA for personalized treatment of patients affected by this condition.

  20. Prospective molecular profiling of canine cancers provides a clinically relevant comparative model for evaluating personalized medicine (PMed) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Melissa; Webb, Craig; Mazcko, Christina; Cherba, David; Hendricks, William; Lana, Susan; Ehrhart, E J; Charles, Brad; Fehling, Heather; Kumar, Leena; Vail, David; Henson, Michael; Childress, Michael; Kitchell, Barbara; Kingsley, Christopher; Kim, Seungchan; Neff, Mark; Davis, Barbara; Khanna, Chand; Trent, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly-guided trials (i.e. PMed) now seek to aid clinical decision-making by matching cancer targets with therapeutic options. Progress has been hampered by the lack of cancer models that account for individual-to-individual heterogeneity within and across cancer types. Naturally occurring cancers in pet animals are heterogeneous and thus provide an opportunity to answer questions about these PMed strategies and optimize translation to human patients. In order to realize this opportunity, it is now necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting molecularly-guided analysis of tumors from dogs with naturally occurring cancer in a clinically relevant setting. A proof-of-concept study was conducted by the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC) to determine if tumor collection, prospective molecular profiling, and PMed report generation within 1 week was feasible in dogs. Thirty-one dogs with cancers of varying histologies were enrolled. Twenty-four of 31 samples (77%) successfully met all predefined QA/QC criteria and were analyzed via Affymetrix gene expression profiling. A subsequent bioinformatics workflow transformed genomic data into a personalized drug report. Average turnaround from biopsy to report generation was 116 hours (4.8 days). Unsupervised clustering of canine tumor expression data clustered by cancer type, but supervised clustering of tumors based on the personalized drug report clustered by drug class rather than cancer type. Collection and turnaround of high quality canine tumor samples, centralized pathology, analyte generation, array hybridization, and bioinformatic analyses matching gene expression to therapeutic options is achievable in a practical clinical window (strategies may aid cancer drug development.

  1. Role of the pulmonologist in ordering post-procedure molecular markers in non-small-cell lung cancer: implications for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgu, Septimiu; Colt, Henri

    2013-11-01

    In the growing era of personalized medicine for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is becoming increasingly important that sufficient quality and quantity of tumor tissue are available for morphologic diagnosis and molecular analysis. As new treatment options emerge that might require more frequent and possibly higher volume biopsies, the role of the pulmonologist will expand, and it will be important for pulmonologists to work within a multidisciplinary team to provide optimal therapeutic management for patients with NSCLC. In this review, we discuss the rationale for individualized treatment decisions for patients with NSCLC, molecular pathways and specific molecular predictors relevant to personalized NSCLC therapy, assay technologies for molecular marker analysis, and specifics regarding tumor specimen selection, acquisition, and handling. Moreover, we briefly address issues regarding racial and socioeconomic disparities as they relate to molecular testing and treatment decisions, and cost considerations for molecular testing and targeted therapies in NSCLC. We also propose a model for an institution-based multidisciplinary team, including oncologists, pathologists, pulmonologists, interventional radiologists, and thoracic surgeons, to ensure adequate material is available for cytological and histological studies and to standardize methods of tumor specimen handling and processing in an effort to provide beneficial, individualized therapy for patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    Physicists firmly believe that the differential equations of nature should be hyperbolic so as to exclude action at a distance; yet the equations of irreversible thermodynamics - those of Navier-Stokes and Fourier - are parabolic. This incompatibility between the expectation of physicists and the classical laws of thermodynamics has prompted the formulation of extended thermodynamics. After describing the motifs and early evolution of this new branch of irreversible thermodynamics, the authors apply the theory to mon-atomic gases, mixtures of gases, relativistic gases, and "gases" of phonons and photons. The discussion brings into perspective the various phenomena called second sound, such as heat propagation, propagation of shear stress and concentration, and the second sound in liquid helium. The formal mathematical structure of extended thermodynamics is exposed and the theory is shown to be fully compatible with the kinetic theory of gases. The study closes with the testing of extended thermodynamics thro...

  3. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kand, Purushottam

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a specialized area of radiology that uses very small amounts of radioactive materials to examine organ function and structure. Nuclear medicine is older than CT, ultrasound and MRI. It was first used in patients over 60-70 years ago. Today it is an established medical specialty and offers procedures that are essential in many medical specialities like nephrology, pediatrics, cardiology, psychiatry, endocrinology and oncology. Nuclear medicine refers to medicine (a pharmaceutical) that is attached to a small quantity of radioactive material (a radioisotope). This combination is called a radiopharmaceutical. There are many radiopharmaceuticals like DTPA, DMSA, HIDA, MIBI and MDP available to study different parts of the body like kidneys, heart and bones etc. Nuclear medicine uses radiation coming from inside a patient's body where as conventional radiology exposes patients to radiation from outside the body. Thus nuclear imaging study is a physiological imaging, whereas diagnostic radiology is anatomical imaging. It combines many different disciplines like chemistry, physics mathematics, computer technology, and medicine. It helps in diagnosis and to treat abnormalities very early in the progression of a disease. The information provides a quick and accurate diagnosis of wide range of conditions and diseases in a person of any age. These tests are painless and most scans expose patients to only minimal and safe amounts of radiation. The amount of radiation received from a nuclear medicine procedure is comparable to, or often many times less than, that of a diagnostic X-ray. Nuclear medicine provides an effective means of examining whether some tissues/organs are functioning properly. Therapy using nuclear medicine in an effective, safe and relatively inexpensive way of controlling and in some cases eliminating, conditions such as overactive thyroid, thyroid cancer and arthritis. Nuclear medicine imaging is unique because it provides doctors with

  4. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T; Phillips, M; Hendrickson, K; Song, W; Kwok, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  5. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Phillips, M [Univ Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hendrickson, K [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Song, W; Kwok, P [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  6. Assessment of personal occupational radiation exposures received by nuclear medicine and oncology staff in Punjab (2003–2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, T.; Masood, K.; Zafar, J.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of occupational radiation exposures on oncology staff working in the disciplines of Nuclear Medicine (NM), Radiotherapy (RT), and Diagnostic Radiology (DR) is of significance to ensure a health risk free environment. In this study, occupationally received radiation doses amongst Pakistani oncology staff in NM, RT and DR during the period (2003–2012) were assessed. The Film Badge Dosimetry (FBD) technique has been utilized to process over 81,000 films (13,237 workers) concerning the occupationally exposed workers data (2003–2012) at a national scale. The annual effective doses were found to range between 0.30–0.97 mSv for NM, 0.44–1.02 mSv for RT and 0.31–1.09 mSv for DR. The annual effective doses averaged over a period of 10 years were assessed to be 0.63, 0.70 and 0.68 mSv for NM, RT and DR respectively. The exposure data were categorized into three exposure levels (≤0.99, 1–4.99 and 5–9.99 mSv) to establish the staff distribution in these categories. It was found that 89.8–96 % in NM, 82–94.5 % in RT and 76–96.8 % staff workers in DR have received doses within the range from the Minimum Detectable Limit (MDL)- 0.99 mSv. The annual effective doses, in all categories, were measured to be less than the recommended annual limit of 20 mSv.

  7. Personalization of the Immunosuppressive Treatment in Renal Transplant Recipients: The Great Challenge in “Omics” Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zaza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation represents the most favorable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure and it is followed, in most cases, by a significant enhancement in patients’ quality of life. Significant improvements in one-year renal allograft and patients’ survival rates have been achieved over the last 10 years primarily as a result of newer immunosuppressive regimens. Despite these notable achievements in the short-term outcome, long-term graft function and survival rates remain less than optimal. Death with a functioning graft and chronic allograft dysfunction result in an annual rate of 3%–5%. In this context, drug toxicity and long-term chronic adverse effects of immunosuppressive medications have a pivotal role. Unfortunately, at the moment, except for the evaluation of trough drug levels, no clinically useful tools are available to correctly manage immunosuppressive therapy. The proper use of these drugs could potentiate therapeutic effects minimizing adverse drug reactions. For this purpose, in the future, “omics” techniques could represent powerful tools that may be employed in clinical practice to routinely aid the personalization of drug treatment according to each patient’s genetic makeup. However, it is unquestionable that additional studies and technological advances are needed to standardize and simplify these methodologies.

  8. Cardiovascular genomics, personalized medicine, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: part I: the beginning of an era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Christopher J; Nabel, Elizabeth G

    2008-10-01

    The inaugural issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics arrives at a remarkable time in the history of genetic research and cardiovascular medicine. Despite tremendous progress in knowledge gained, cardiovascular disease(CVD) remains the leading cause of death in the United States,1 and it has overcome infectious diseases as the leading cause of death worldwide.2 In addition, rates of CVD remain higher in black and Hispanic populations in the United States.1 The recent Strategic Plan of the National Heart, Lung,and Blood Institute (NHLBI) emphasizes research areas to fill the significant knowledge gaps needed to improve the diagnosis,treatment, and control of known risk factors and clinically apparent disease. Simultaneously, the NHLBI Strategic Plan recognizes a tremendous opportunity that is available for use of genetic and genomic research to generate new knowledge that might reduce the morbidity and mortality from CVD in US populations.3 Public availability of vast amounts of detailed sequence information about the human genome, completed sequence data on dozens of other animal genomes, and private sector development of high-throughput genetic technologies has transformed in a few short years the conduct of cardiovascular genetics and genomics research from a primary focus on mendelian disorders to a current emphasis on genome-wide association studies (GWAS; Figure1). In this review, we describe the rationale for the current emphasis on large-scale genomic studies, summarize the evolving approaches and progress to date, and identify immediate-term research needs. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the NHLBI are supporting a portfolio of large-scale genetic and genomic programs in diverse US populations with the longer-term objective of translating knowledge into the prediction, prevention, and preemption of CVD, as well as lung, sleep, and blood disorders. Underlying this portfolio is a strong commitment to make available participant-level data and

  9. Utilizing the Total Design Method in medicine: maximizing response rates in long, non-incentivized, personal questionnaire postal surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazzazi, Fawz; Haggie, Rebecca; Forouhi, Parto; Kazzazi, Nazar; Malata, Charles M

    2018-01-01

    Maximizing response rates in questionnaires can improve their validity and quality by reducing non-response bias. A comprehensive analysis is essential for producing reasonable conclusions in patient-reported outcome research particularly for topics of a sensitive nature. This often makes long (≥7 pages) questionnaires necessary but these have been shown to reduce response rates in mail surveys. Our work adapted the "Total Design Method," initially produced for commercial markets, to raise response rates in a long (total: 11 pages, 116 questions), non-incentivized, very personal postal survey sent to almost 350 women. A total of 346 women who had undergone mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction from 2008-2014 (inclusive) at Addenbrooke's University Hospital were sent our study pack (Breast-Q satisfaction questionnaire and support documents) using our modified "Total Design Method." Participants were sent packs and reminders according to our designed schedule. Of the 346 participants, we received 258 responses, an overall response rate of 74.5% with a useable response rate of 72.3%. One hundred and six responses were received before the week 1 reminder (30.6%), 120 before week 3 (34.6%), 225 before the week 7 reminder (64.6%) and the remainder within 3 weeks of the final pack being sent. The median age of patients that the survey was sent to, and the median age of the respondents, was 54 years. In this study, we have demonstrated the successful implementation of a novel approach to postal surveys. Despite the length of the questionnaire (nine pages, 116 questions) and limitations of expenses to mail a survey to ~350 women, we were able to attain a response rate of 74.6%.

  10. A new generation of cancer genome diagnostics for routine clinical use: overcoming the roadblocks to personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuckmann, J M; Thomas, R K

    2015-09-01

    The identification of 'druggable' kinase gene alterations has revolutionized cancer treatment in the last decade by providing new and successfully targetable drug targets. Thus, genotyping tumors for matching the right patients with the right drugs have become a clinical routine. Today, advances in sequencing technology and computational genome analyses enable the discovery of a constantly growing number of genome alterations relevant for clinical decision making. As a consequence, several technological approaches have emerged in order to deal with these rapidly increasing demands for clinical cancer genome analyses. Here, we describe challenges on the path to the broad introduction of diagnostic cancer genome analyses and the technologies that can be applied to overcome them. We define three generations of molecular diagnostics that are in clinical use. The latest generation of these approaches involves deep and thus, highly sensitive sequencing of all therapeutically relevant types of genome alterations-mutations, copy number alterations and rearrangements/fusions-in a single assay. Such approaches therefore have substantial advantages (less time and less tissue required) over PCR-based methods that typically have to be combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of gene amplifications and fusions. Since these new technologies work reliably on routine diagnostic formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, they can help expedite the broad introduction of personalized cancer therapy into the clinic by providing comprehensive, sensitive and accurate cancer genome diagnoses in 'real-time'. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A national study of breast and colorectal cancer patients' decision-making for novel personalized medicine genomic diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Amalia M; Tufail, Waqas; Atehortua, Nelson; McKeever, John

    2013-05-01

    Molecular diagnostics are increasingly being used to help guide decision-making for personalized medical treatment of breast and colorectal cancer patients. The main aim of this study was to better understand and determine breast and colorectal cancer patients' decision-making strategies and the trade-offs they make in deciding about characteristics of molecular genomic diagnostics for breast and colorectal cancer. We surveyed a nationally representative sample of 300 breast and colorectal cancer patients using a previously developed web-administered instrument. Eligibility criteria included patients aged 18 years and older with either breast or colorectal cancer. We explored several attributes and attribute levels of molecular genomic diagnostics in 20 scenarios. Our analysis revealed that both breast and colorectal cancer patients weighted the capability of molecular genomic diagnostics to determine the probability of treatment efficacy as being of greater importance than information provided to detect adverse events. The probability of either false-positive or -negative results was ranked highly as a potential barrier by both breast and colorectal patients. However, 78.6% of breast cancer patients ranked the possibility of a 'false-negative test result leading to undertreatment' higher than the 'chance of a false positive, which may lead to overtreatment' (68%). This finding contrasted with the views of colorectal cancer patients who ranked the chance of a false positive as being of greater concern than a false negative (72.8 vs 63%). Overall, cancer patients exhibited a high willingness to accept and pay for genomic diagnostic tests, especially among breast cancer patients. Cancer patients seek a test accuracy rate of 90% or higher. Breast and colorectal cancer patients' decisions about genomic diagnostics are influenced more by the probability of being cured than by avoiding potential severe adverse events. This study provides insights into the relative weight

  12. Personality, a key factor in personalized medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Gretha J.; Benthem, Lambertus; van Beek, Andre P.; van Dijk, Gertjan; Scheurink, Anton J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of health problems resulting from obesity is growing and obesity and its related diseases has become one of the main causes in death in industrialized societies. Environmental influences are crucial for the interactions between genetic, neurohormonal and metabolic factors that may be

  13. Extending Puppet

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This book is a clear, detailed and practical guide to learn about designing and deploying you puppet architecture, with informative examples to highlight and explain concepts in a focused manner. This book is designed for users who already have good experience with Puppet, and will surprise experienced users with innovative topics that explore how to design, implement, adapt, and deploy a Puppet architecture. The key to extending Puppet is the development of types and providers, for which you must be familiar with Ruby.

  14. Towards a first implementation of the WLIMES approach in living system studies advancing the diagnostics and therapy in augmented personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Plamen L

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to advance an extensible theory of living systems using an approach to biomathematics and biocomputation that suitably addresses self-organized, self-referential and anticipatory systems with multi-temporal multi-agents. Our first step is to provide foundations for modelling of emergent and evolving dynamic multi-level organic complexes and their sustentative processes in artificial and natural life systems. Main applications are in life sciences, medicine, ecology and astrobiology, as well as robotics, industrial automation, man-machine interface and creative design. Since 2011 over 100 scientists from a number of disciplines have been exploring a substantial set of theoretical frameworks for a comprehensive theory of life known as Integral Biomathics. That effort identified the need for a robust core model of organisms as dynamic wholes, using advanced and adequately computable mathematics. The work described here for that core combines the advantages of a situation and context aware multivalent computational logic for active self-organizing networks, Wandering Logic Intelligence (WLI), and a multi-scale dynamic category theory, Memory Evolutive Systems (MES), hence WLIMES. This is presented to the modeller via a formal augmented reality language as a first step towards practical modelling and simulation of multi-level living systems. Initial work focuses on the design and implementation of this visual language and calculus (VLC) and its graphical user interface. The results will be integrated within the current methodology and practices of theoretical biology and (personalized) medicine to deepen and to enhance the holistic understanding of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence and predictors of traditional medicine utilization among persons living with AIDS (PLWA) on antiretroviral (ARV) and prophylaxis treatment in both rural and urban areas in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, G D; Puoane, T R; Clark, B L; Wondwossen, T L; Johnson, Q; Folk, W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that majority of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment-naïve patients use traditional medicine (TM). Given that TM use is ubiquitous in South Africa especially for chronic conditions, there is a potential for ARV non-adherence and serious drug interactions among patients with HIV/AIDs who use TM. The motivating factors for TM use in HIV/AIDS patients on ARV and prophylaxis treatment have not been well defined in South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, facilitators, predictors, and types of TM used among persons living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment. The study was a cross-sectional survey which involved 100 participants enrolled at ARV clinics in two South African provinces. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed to assess the relationships between variables and potential predictors of TM. Sixteen percent of participants on ARV reported TM use. Seventy-nine percent used TM prior to a diagnosis of HIV. Participants were more likely to use TM if they were from a rural province, female, older, unmarried, employed, had limited education, or were HIV-positive for less than five years. TM users reported utilizing herbal or medicinal mixtures that were claimed to heal all conditions. This study provides insights into the treatment modalities selected by patients with HIV/AIDS in South Africa who are receiving ARV. This study revealed that less than 20% of participants co-used TM and ARV. However, close to 80% of participants utilize TM before contracting HIV, which is in keeping with approximate estimates by the WHO.

  16. Personalized State-space Modeling of Glucose Dynamics for Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuously Monitored Glucose, Insulin Dose, and Meal Intake: An Extended Kalman Filter Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Molenaar, Peter; Harsh, Saurabh; Freeman, Kenneth; Xie, Jinyu; Gold, Carol; Rovine, Mike; Ulbrecht, Jan

    2014-03-01

    An essential component of any artificial pancreas is on the prediction of blood glucose levels as a function of exogenous and endogenous perturbations such as insulin dose, meal intake, and physical activity and emotional tone under natural living conditions. In this article, we present a new data-driven state-space dynamic model with time-varying coefficients that are used to explicitly quantify the time-varying patient-specific effects of insulin dose and meal intake on blood glucose fluctuations. Using the 3-variate time series of glucose level, insulin dose, and meal intake of an individual type 1 diabetic subject, we apply an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate time-varying coefficients of the patient-specific state-space model. We evaluate our empirical modeling using (1) the FDA-approved UVa/Padova simulator with 30 virtual patients and (2) clinical data of 5 type 1 diabetic patients under natural living conditions. Compared to a forgetting-factor-based recursive ARX model of the same order, the EKF model predictions have higher fit, and significantly better temporal gain and J index and thus are superior in early detection of upward and downward trends in glucose. The EKF based state-space model developed in this article is particularly suitable for model-based state-feedback control designs since the Kalman filter estimates the state variable of the glucose dynamics based on the measured glucose time series. In addition, since the model parameters are estimated in real time, this model is also suitable for adaptive control. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  17. A real-time monitoring study of the personal dose received by nuclear medicine technologists administering 18F-FDG in a high patient throughput PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Anthony; U, Paul; Hickson, Kevin; Bradley, Jason; Welch, Jessica; Pathmaraj, Kunthi

    2008-01-01

    The rapid growth in PET studies has resulted in an increasing occupational radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff. This project has used, a real-time, solid-state, 2 second resolution, personal dosimeter to monitor the occupational Hp(10) equivalent dose of nuclear medicine technologist (NMT) staff managing FDG patients. A detailed manual mapping of the patient management procedure, time dependence and distance relationships to the sources of exposure and their magnitudes was undertaken. Experimental results show, that a junior NMT may spend on average 52% of the close contact time (< 2 m) with the patient when administering an FDG dose compared to 36% of that time for the senior NMT. The average daily dose from isotope administration of a junior NMT and senior NMT is 15 μSv and 11.4 μSv respectively. Post-administration, escorting the patient into the scanner room and setting-up the patient on the PET scanner bed, takes approximately 27% of the junior NMT time to perform, which results in an average daily dose of 7.8 μSv. The senior NMT takes approximately 33% of their time for the same task, with an average daily dose of 10.3 μSv. Removing the patient from the scanner room and escorting them from the department takes about 21% of the junior NMT time giving 6.2 μSv of dose and 31% or 9.7 μSv for the senior NMT. At the conclusion of this study the typical daily dose received by NMT staff, working in close contact with FDG patients is approximately 29 μSv for junior NMT (4 - 5 mSv/yr) and 31.4 μSv (5 - 7 mSv/yr) for senior NMT. Currently this centre is performing approximately 3,400 FDG injections per year plus 50 research injections of various positron emitters. This occupational dose load is spread across 3 dedicated PET NMT staff and 1.5 EFT NMT staff rotating through PET centre from the nuclear medicine department and 1 EFT registrar physician. (author)

  18. Sleep stage distribution in persons with mild traumatic brain injury: a polysomnographic study according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Colantonio, Angela; Cassidy, J David; Vernich, Lee; Moineddin, Rahim; Shapiro, Colin M

    2017-06-01

    Sleep stage disruption in persons with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has received little research attention. We examined deviations in sleep stage distribution in persons with mTBI relative to population age- and sex-specific normative data and the relationships between such deviations and brain injury-related, medical/psychiatric, and extrinsic factors. We conducted a cross-sectional polysomnographic investigation in 40 participants diagnosed with mTBI (mean age 47.54 ± 11.30 years; 56% males). At the time of investigation, participants underwent comprehensive clinical and neuroimaging examinations and one full-night polysomnographic study. We used the 2012 American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommendations for recording, scoring, and summarizing sleep stages. We compared participants' sleep stage data with normative data stratified by age and sex to yield z-scores for deviations from available population norms and then employed stepwise multiple regression analyses to determine the factors associated with the identified significant deviations. In patients with mTBI, the mean duration of nocturnal wakefulness was higher and consolidated sleep stage N2 and REM were lower than normal (p sleep stage duration. No sex differences were observed in the mean proportion of non-REM or REM sleep. We observed longer relative nocturnal wakefulness and shorter relative N2 and REM sleep in patients with mTBI, and these outcomes were associated with potentially modifiable variables. Addressing disruptions in sleep architecture in patients with mTBI could improve their health status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extended, continuous measures of functional status in community dwelling persons with Alzheimer's and related dementia: Infrastructure, performance, tradeoffs, preliminary data, and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, Bradley; Netscher, George; Jacquemot, Julien; Schaffer, Michael; Shen, Galen; Bowhay, Angela D; Braley, Tamara L; Possin, Katherine L; Miller, Bruce L; Bayen, Alexandre M; Bonasera, Stephen J; Schenk, A Katrin

    2018-04-15

    The past decades have seen phenomenal growth in the availability of inexpensive and powerful personal computing devices. Efforts to leverage these devices to improve health care outcomes promise to remake many aspects of healthcare delivery, but remain in their infancy. We describe the development of a mobile health platform designed for daily measures of functional status in ambulatory, community dwelling subjects, including those who have Alzheimer's disease or related neurodegenerative disorders. Using Smartwatches and Smartphones we measure subject overall activity and outdoor location (to derive their lifespace). These clinically-relevant measures allow us to track a subject's functional status in their natural environment over prolonged periods of time without repeated visits to healthcare providers. Functional status metrics are integrated with medical information and caregiver reports, which are used by a caregiving team to guide referrals for physician/APRN/NP care. COMPARISON: with Existing Methods We describe the design tradeoffs involved in all aspects of our current system architecture, focusing on decisions with significant impact on system cost, performance, scalability, and user-adherence. We provide real-world data from current subject enrollees demonstrating system accuracy and reliability. We document real-world feasibility in a group of men and women with dementia that Smartwatches/Smartphones can provide long-term, relevant clinical data regarding individual functional status. We describe the underlying considerations of this system so that interested organizations can adapt and scale our approach to their needs. Finally, we provide a potential agenda to guide development of future systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 1. The radiation risk from CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. (orig.)

  1. The challenge to bring personalized cancer medicine from clinical trials into routine clinical practice: the case of the Institut Gustave Roussy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnedos, Monica; André, Fabrice; Farace, Françoise; Lacroix, Ludovic; Besse, Benjamin; Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2012-04-01

    Research with high throughput technologies has propitiated the segmentation of different types of tumors into very small subgroups characterized by the presence of very rare molecular alterations. The identification of these subgroups and the apparition of new agents targeting these infrequent alterations are already affecting the way in which clinical trials are being conducted with an increased need to identify those patients harboring specific molecular alterations. In this review we describe some of the currently ongoing and future studies at the Institut Gustave Roussy that aim for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for cancer patients with the incorporation of high throughput technologies into daily practice including aCGH, next generation sequencing and the creation of a software that allows for target identification specific for each tumor. The initial intention is to enrich clinical trials with cancer patients carrying certain molecular alterations in order to increase the possibility of demonstrating benefit from a targeted agent. Mid and long term aims are to facilitate and speed up the process of drug development as well as to implement the concept of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Moving toward Personalized Medicine in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program: A Pilot Study on the Evaluation of Treatment Responses in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ya Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study simultaneously evaluated the effects of various factors, including genetic variations of CYP2B6, CYP2C19, and ABCB1, demographic characteristics, disease states, methadone-drug interactions (MDIs, and poly-substance use, on the treatment responses among non-HIV patients in the methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP in Taiwan. A total of 178 patients were recruited from two major hospitals that provided MMTP services in southern Taiwan, and information regarding concomitant medications and diseases was acquired from the National Health Insurance (NHI program. The results demonstrated that the methadone maintenance dose, CYP2B6 785G allele, and ABCB1 2677T allele have positive effects on the methadone plasma concentration. In contrast, patients with HCV coinfection, alcohol problems, and psychiatric diseases may have a negative response to treatment. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of treatment responses in the MMTP should include not only genetic polymorphisms in methadone metabolism and transporter proteins, but also concomitant diseases, MDIs, and poly-substance use. The results also suggest that personalized medicine may be indispensable for a better outcome of the MMTP.

  3. Risk factors and disease prevalence in 3331 personal check-ups performed in preventive medicine between 2006 and 2011. cross-sectional and follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keipes, M; Bellucci, A; Hansen, E

    2012-01-01

    The present data results from a retrospective analysis of 3331 check-ups made in the preventive medicine department of the "ZithaKlinik", named "ZithaGesondheetsZentrum". These check-ups are done for the employee's of several firm's and institutions. According to gender and age, several tests and examinations are performed and the results are given to the person's general practitioner or another doctor of his choice. We will present a global synthesis of all the results but also a follow-up study of persons having performed 2 check-ups or more over a 5-year period. In the cross-sectional part, the analysis is done on 3331 individual check-ups (1447 woman, 1884 men). The average age is 50.3 years +/- 11.4. In the follow-up study, 478 persons (191 women, 287 men) had at least 2 (maximum 5) check-ups in the 5-year period of our observation. Initial age was 54.1 +/- 10.9 years for woman and 51.4 +/- 11.4 for men, respectively 56.4 +/- 10.9 and 53.7+/- 11.2 at their last check-up. An alarming number of persons present with a weight or obesity problem (according to age ranging from 22.0% overweight and 7.3% obese from 18-29 years, respectively 37.5% and 11.3% from 30-49 years, finally 44.0% and 20.6% in the range 50-69 years). Associated risk factors and pathologies (Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, NASH, diabetes type 2 and complete metabolic syndromes) are extremely frequent and getting more so with growing age. Furthermore, physical activity is insufficient in grossly 2/3 of the studied population. The only positive point is a tendency of decreasing tobacco use in all age groups. The follow-up study is frustrating because most of the examined criteria get worse in-between check-ups instead of getting better with changes in lifestyle in an informed population. Asymptomatic diseases or risk factors for non-communicable diseases are extremely frequent in the population examined. The follow-up data shows that huge parts of this group are not sufficiently conscientious of their

  4. Consciousness extended

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrara-Augustenborg, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus yet regarding a conceptualization of consciousness able to accommodate all the features of such complex phenomenon. Different theoretical and empirical models lend strength to both the occurrence of a non-accessible informational broadcast, and to the mobilization of specific...... brain areas responsible for the emergence of the individual´s explicit and variable access to given segments of such broadcast. Rather than advocating one model over others, this chapter proposes to broaden the conceptualization of consciousness by letting it embrace both mechanisms. Within...... such extended framework, I propose conceptual and functional distinctions between consciousness (global broadcast of information), awareness (individual´s ability to access the content of such broadcast) and unconsciousness (focally isolated neural activations). My hypothesis is that a demarcation in terms...

  5. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relief to a person who's having trouble breathing! What Are Long-Term Control Medicines? Long-term control medicines (also called controller ... problems and they need to take long-term control medicines every day. If you have asthma, your doctor will decide which type ... an Asthma Flare-Up What Medicines Are and What They Do Asthma View ...

  6. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  7. Personalized nanomedicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Rizzo, L.Y.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Personalized medicine aims to individualize chemotherapeutic interventions on the basis of ex vivo and in vivo information on patient- and disease-specific characteristics. By noninvasively visualizing how well image-guided nanomedicines-that is, submicrometer-sized drug delivery systems

  8. The Promise of Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when I realized that it's great to send rockets to the moon, but perhaps the most important ... this constant intermarriage of the physical and biological sciences in which the whole is greater than the ...

  9. Personalizing medicine with clinical pharmacogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing has grown substantially over the past 30 years as the causative mutations for Mendelian diseases have been identified, particularly aided in part by the recent advances in molecular-based technologies. Importantly, the adoption of new tests and testing strategies (e.g., diagnostic confirmation, prenatal testing, and population-based carrier screening) has often been met with caution and careful consideration before clinical implementation, which facilitates the appropriate use of new genetic tests. Although the field of pharmacogenetics was established in the 1950s, clinical testing for constitutional pharmacogenetic variants implicated in interindividual drug response variability has only recently become available to help clinicians guide pharmacotherapy, in part due to US Food and Drug Administration-mediated product insert revisions that include pharmacogenetic information for selected drugs. However, despite pharmacogenetic associations with adverse outcomes, physician uptake of clinical pharmacogenetic testing has been slow. Compared with testing for Mendelian diseases, pharmacogenetic testing for certain indications can have a lower positive predictive value, which is one reason for underutilization. A number of other barriers remain with implementing clinical pharmacogenetics, including clinical utility, professional education, and regulatory and reimbursement issues, among others. This review presents some of the current opportunities and challenges with implementing clinical pharmacogenetic testing. PMID:22095251

  10. ‘N-of-1-pathways’ unveils personal deregulated mechanisms from a single pair of RNA-Seq samples: towards precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardeux, Vincent; Achour, Ikbel; Li, Jianrong; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Li, Haiquan; Pesce, Lorenzo; Parinandi, Gurunadh; Bahroos, Neil; Winn, Robert; Foster, Ian; Garcia, Joe G N; Lussier, Yves A

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of precision medicine allowed the incorporation of individual molecular data into patient care. Indeed, DNA sequencing predicts somatic mutations in individual patients. However, these genetic features overlook dynamic epigenetic and phenotypic response to therapy. Meanwhile, accurate personal transcriptome interpretation remains an unmet challenge. Further, N-of-1 (single-subject) efficacy trials are increasingly pursued, but are underpowered for molecular marker discovery. Method ‘N-of-1-pathways’ is a global framework relying on three principles: (i) the statistical universe is a single patient; (ii) significance is derived from geneset/biomodules powered by paired samples from the same patient; and (iii) similarity between genesets/biomodules assesses commonality and differences, within-study and cross-studies. Thus, patient gene-level profiles are transformed into deregulated pathways. From RNA-Seq of 55 lung adenocarcinoma patients, N-of-1-pathways predicts the deregulated pathways of each patient. Results Cross-patient N-of-1-pathways obtains comparable results with conventional genesets enrichment analysis (GSEA) and differentially expressed gene (DEG) enrichment, validated in three external evaluations. Moreover, heatmap and star plots highlight both individual and shared mechanisms ranging from molecular to organ-systems levels (eg, DNA repair, signaling, immune response). Patients were ranked based on the similarity of their deregulated mechanisms to those of an independent gold standard, generating unsupervised clusters of diametric extreme survival phenotypes (p=0.03). Conclusions The N-of-1-pathways framework provides a robust statistical and relevant biological interpretation of individual disease-free survival that is often overlooked in conventional cross-patient studies. It enables mechanism-level classifiers with smaller cohorts as well as N-of-1 studies. Software http://lussierlab.org/publications/N-of-1-pathways

  11. Genitourinary medicine/HIV services for persons with insecure immigration or seeking asylum in the United Kingdom: a British Co-operative Clinical Group survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanoharan, Sasikala; Monteiro, Eric F; Maw, Raymond; Carne, Christopher A; Robinson, Angela

    2004-08-01

    Over the past three years many genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics have anecdotally reported large numbers of persons with insecure immigration or seeking asylum (PIISA) attending their facilities. We conducted a national survey to assess the prevalence and demographic background of PIISA who were attending GUM clinics in the UK during 2001 and 2002 and the effect on service provision. A questionnaire was circulated in April 2003 to 182 consultants in the UK of whom 128 (70%) responded. Amongst those centres that responded, 89 (69%) had provided GUM/HIV services for PIISA in 2002. One-third of clinics had accurate data collection systems and less than a quarter used computerized databases in order to identify the associated workload. Of the HIV-positive patients attending these clinics during 2002, 1140 (42%) were identified as PIISA. Eighty-two (95.3%) and 62 (48.8%) clinics had cared for PIISA from Africa and Europe respectively. Co-infection with HIV and tuberculosis was higher in patients from the PIISA group compared with the non-PIISA group (85% vs 15%, P = 0.001) for both 2001 and 2002. Clinics reported many problems associated with the service for PIISA. Forty-five percent of the clinics reported difficulties with funding for the increased workload associated with PIISA. The survey shows that GUM services have an important role in the management of PIISA and that the programme of dispersal is having a significant impact on the workload of clinics outside London. Services report that they are significantly overstretched and underfunded. An immediate investment in GUM services is necessary to improve the health of this client group. Any delay in diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections and HIV will have implications for public health and acute services.

  12. Educational Gaps in Molecular Diagnostics, Genomics, and Personalized Medicine in Dermatopathology Training: A Survey of U.S. Dermatopathology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kristin; Russomanno, Kristen; Ferringer, Tammie; Elston, Dirk; Murphy, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Molecular technologies offer clinicians the tools to provide high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We evaluated education focused on molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine in dermatopathology fellowship training. A 20-question online survey was emailed to all (n = 53) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited dermatopathology training programs in the United States. Thirty-one of 53 program directors responded (response rate = 58%). Molecular training is undertaken in 74% of responding dermatopathology fellowships, with levels of instruction varying among dermatology-based and pathology-based programs. Education differed for dermatology- and pathology-trained fellows in approximately one-fifth (19%) of programs. Almost half (48%) of responding program directors believe that fellows are not currently receiving adequate molecular education, although the majority (97%) expect to incorporate additional instruction in the next 2-5 years. Factors influencing the incorporation of relevant education include perceived clinical utility and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/residency review committee (RRC) requirements. Potential benefits of molecular education include increased medical knowledge, improved patient care, and promotion of effective communication with other healthcare professionals. More than two-thirds (68%) of responding program directors believe that instruction in molecular technologies should be required in dermatopathology fellowship training. Although all responding dermatopathology fellowship program directors agreed that molecular education is important, only a little over half of survey participants believe that their fellows receive adequate instruction. This represents an important educational gap. Discussion among those who oversee fellow education is necessary to best integrate and evaluate teaching of molecular dermatopathology.

  13. Women in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, Dorothy Rosenthal

    1978-01-01

    Literature written since 1973 about the individual woman physician and the situation of United States women in medicine is examined and reviewed. Discrimination problems, identity conflicts, and a "typical" personality profile are some of the issues addressed. (Author/ KR)

  14. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  15. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 2. Benefits versus risk of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the ''sunk-cost'' bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities

  16. Bases genómicas del cáncer de mama: avances hacia la medicina personalizada Genomic basis for breast cancer: advances in personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Hidalgo-Miranda

    2009-01-01

    well as how these findings are being translated into clinical practice, contributing to development of personalized medicine.

  17. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 2. Benefits versus risk of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westra, Sjirk J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the ''sunk-cost'' bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities associated with the communication

  18. Development of a personalized dosimetric tool for radiation protection in case of internal contamination and targeted radiotherapy in nuclear medicine; Developpement d'un outil dosimetrique personnalise pour la radioprotection en contamination interne et la radiotherapie vectorisee en medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiavassa, S

    2005-12-15

    Current internal dosimetric estimations are based on the M.I.R.D. formalism and used standard mathematical models. These standard models are often far from a given patient morphology and do not allow to perform patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this study was to develop a personalized dosimetric tool, which takes into account real patient morphology, composition and densities. This tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., a French acronym of Tool for the Evaluation of Personalized Internal Dose, is a user-friendly graphical interface. O.E.D.I.P.E. allows to create voxel-based patient-specific geometries and associates them with the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code. Radionuclide distribution and absorbed dose calculation can be performed at the organ and voxel scale. O.E.D.I.P.E. can be used in nuclear medicine for targeted radiotherapy and in radiation protection in case of internal contamination. (author)

  19. Ad vesice dolorem et ad eos qui urinam non faciunt (For bladder pain and when a person cannot urinate): nephrological disorders in Anglo-Saxon medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aronco, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    The attitude of 19th century (and even of 20th century) scholars toward medieval and, particularly, Anglo-Saxon medicine has been of severe criticism. According to them it was filled with superstition and stupidities. However, in these last fifty years research has proved that, compared with the Continent, Anglo-Saxon England was not a backwater. At the end of the ninth century, medical compendia in Old English began to appear, similar in structure and contents to the Latin dynamidia and to the Latin herbals. These medical treatises were written in the vernacular of the Anglo-Saxons, not in Latin, the western European language for all significant and valuable works on medicine. Bladder, kidney and urinating problems are mentioned throughout the Old English medical treatises together with their cures, that is remedies from herbs and animals. These texts contain no theoretical reflections, only very concise descriptions of symptoms (pain in the bladder, in the kidneys, difficulty in urinating etc.), while prognosis is limited to affirmations such as "he will heal very quickly," "soon there will be no pain," "it will soon be healed," etc. Remedies are made basically out of a body of medicinal plants and materials which can be traced to Greek and Roman medicine. The remedies from plants reflect a wide rational and practical knowledge of medicinal herbs. As a matter of fact, not only there is no amuletic use of plants, but most of the herbs that appear in these recipes have diuretic or analgesic properties and have been in use for centuries.

  20. The introduction of practical exercises of rescuing a drowning person within the subject of basic clinic medicine and first aid for students of health sciences as a challenge for interdisciplinary cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slabe Damjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drowning, being one of the most common causes of death is a public health problem. The concept of the drowning chain of survival puts great emphasis on providing security. Rescuing a drowning person in the stage of impaired judgement is a dangerous action. A rescuer can put at risk their own life at this stage. Health workers are potentially more exposed to this risk. In the field of education of health workers interdisciplinarity is one of the key concepts. Within the subject Basics of the Clinical Medicine and First Aid, we provided students the experience of saving a drowning person in a simulated exercise, thus trying to persuade them to choose safer strategies of rescuing. The subject of our research were students of health sciences. 506 students solved the questionnaire. After having performed a practical exercise of saving a drowning person, students choose less risky strategies of rescuing a person in the stage of impaired judgement. Students thus gain the experience of rescuing drowning people in more difficult circumstances and their awareness of the importance of security increases after the exercise, which helps to reduce the number of lives risked in accidents.

  1. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  2. When the Reading Room Meets the Team Room: Resident Perspectives From Radiology and Internal Medicine on the Effect of Personal Communication After Implementing a Resident-Led Radiology Rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobuka, Andrew J; Lee, John; Buranosky, Raquel; Heller, Matthew

    2018-02-13

    Current radiology and internal medicine (IM) residents have trained to varying degrees depending on program in the post picture archiving and communication systems implementation era and thus have largely missed out on the benefits of in-person, 2-way communication between radiologists and consulting clinicians. The purpose of this study is to broadly explore resident perspectives from these groups on the desire for personal contact between radiologists and referring physicians and the effect of improved contact on clinical practice. A radiology rounds was implemented in which radiology residents travel to the IM teaching service teams to discuss their inpatients and review ordered imaging biweekly. Surveys were given to both cohorts following 9 months of implementation. A total of 23/49 diagnostic radiology (DR) and 72/197 IM residents responded. In all, 83% of DR and 96% of IM residents desired more personal contact between radiologists and clinicians. Of all, 92% of DR residents agree that contact with referring clinicians changes their approach to a study, 96% of IM residents agree that personal contact with a radiologist has changed patient management in a way that they otherwise would not have done having simply read a report, 85% of DR residents report that more clinician contact will improve resource use, and 96% report that it will improve care quality. Furthermore, 99% of IM residents report that increased access to a radiologist would make selecting the most appropriate imaging study easier in various clinical scenarios. A majority of IM residents prefer radiology reports that provide specific next-step recommendations and that include arrows/key-image series. We conclude that the newest generation of physicians is already attuned to the value of a radiologist who plays an active, in-person role in the clinical decision-making process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Law, Medicine, Veterinary Medicine: Issues in Supply and Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Expansion in the South for providing professional education in medicine, veterinary medicine, and law was undertaken to extend access to desirable professionals to young people and to increase the supply of needed professionals in underserved areas. How these objectives have been met is analyzed from an economist's perspective by relating supply…

  4. Systems biology of personalized nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, B. van; Broek, T. van den; Hoogh, I. de; Erk, M. van; Someren, E. van; Rouhani-Rankouhi, T.; Anthony, J.C.; Hogenelst, K.; Pasman, W.; Boorsma, A.; Wopereis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Personalized nutrition is fast becoming a reality due to a number of technological, scientific, and societal developments that complement and extend current public health nutrition recommendations. Personalized nutrition tailors dietary recommendations to specific biological requirements on the

  5. History, Medicine, and Culture: History for Science Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, C. Edward

    1980-01-01

    Describes college level history course entitled "Healers and Persons" for undergraduate medicine students. Topics include Greek medicine and Hippocrates, Galen of Pergamum, Islamic and Roman culture, medieval medicine, the Renaissance, Harvey, Pasteur, Lister, and Mendel. (KC)

  6. Behavior, nutrition and lifestyle in a comprehensive health and disease paradigm: skills and knowledge for a predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2012-03-22

    Health and disease of individuals and of populations are the result of three groups of risk factors: genetics, environment and behavior. Assessment, interventions and tailored changes are possible with integrated approaches more effective if respectful of individuals and different cultures. Assessment tools and integrated interventional strategies are available, but widespread knowledge, skills and competence of well trained individual Medical Doctors still lack. Mediterranean diet is an appropriate reference paradigm because encompasses consistent research background, affordable sustainability, widespread comprehensibility and attractiveness inside a cultural framework of competences and skills in which the Medical Doctors can personally manage the need of prediction (early diagnosis), prevention (intervention on healthy persons) and tailored therapy and follow-up for patients. This profile is flexible and adjustable according to specific needs and preferences due to different economic and ethno-cultural milieus. It can enhanced through on-site/e-learning Continuous Medical Education (CME), by training and using friendly and affordable equipments.

  7. Personal history and quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients: a cross-sectional study using narrative medicine and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Graffigna, Guendalina; Galimberti, Sara; Iurlo, Alessandra; Pungolino, Ester; Pizzuti, Michele; Maggi, Alessandro; Falzetti, Franca; Capalbo, Silvana Franca; Intermesoli, Tamara; Maffioli, Margherita; Elena, Chiara; Melosi, Alessandro; Simonetti, Federico; Capochiani, Enrico; Seta, Roberta Della; Pacilli, Matteo; Luppi, Mario; Di Renzo, Nicola; Mastrullo, Lucia; Trabacchi, Elena; Vallisa, Daniele; Rapezzi, Davide; Orlandi, Ester Maria; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Efficace, Fabio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) drastically changed the outcome of patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Several reports indicated the advantage of continue long-term adherence associated with positive outcome. Therefore, it is important to better understand from the patient's standpoint the experience of living with the disease and the related treatment. In this study, quantitative analysis and narrative medicine were combined to get insights on this issue in a population of 257 patients with CML in chronic phase treated with TKIs (43 % men, with a median age of 58 years, 27 % aged 31-50 years), followed for a median time of 5 years. Sixty-one percent of patients enrolled were treated in first line, whereas 37 % were treated in second line. The results showed more positive perceptions and acceptance in males compared to females, without impact of disease on relationships. Level of positive acceptance was more evident in elderly compared to younger patients, with a close connection with median time from diagnosis. Overall, female patients reported negative perceptions and an impact of disease on family daily living. The majority of patients understood the importance of continue adherence to treatment, with 27 % resulting less adherent (60 % for forgetfulness), even if well informed and supported by his/her physician. Narrative medicine, in association to quantitative analysis, can help physicians to understand needs of their patients in order to improve communication.

  8. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitguillaume, A.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.; Desbree, A.; Bernardini, M.; Labriolle Vaylet, C. de

    2014-01-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  9. How Far Can Extended Knowledge Be Extended?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wray, K. Brad

    2018-01-01

    by an artifact, like a notebook or telescope. The chapter illustrates this by applying Pritchard’s account of extended knowledge to collaborating scientists. The beliefs acquired through collaborative research cannot satisfy both of Pritchard’s conditions of creditability. Further, there is evidence......Duncan Pritchard (2010) has developed a theory of extended knowledge based on the notion of extended cognition initially developed by Clark and Chalmers (1998). Pritchard’s account gives a central role to the notion of creditability, which requires the following two conditions to be met: (i...... that scientists are not prepared to take responsibility for the actions of the scientists with whom they collaborate....

  10. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  11. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  12. Extended Enterprise performance Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbink, Maria Lammerdina; Hartmann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The allegiance of partnering organisations and their employees to an Extended Enterprise performance is its proverbial sword of Damocles. Literature on Extended Enterprises focuses on collaboration, inter-organizational integration and learning to avoid diminishing or missing allegiance becoming an

  13. Applications of electrochemistry in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Schlesinger, Mordechay

    2013-01-01

    Medical Applications of Electrochemistry, a volume of the series Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry, illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of modern science by indicating the many current issues in medicine that are susceptible to solution by electrochemical methods. This book also suggests how personalized medicine can develop.

  14. Perspectives on extended Deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno; Yost, David S.; Bunn, Elaine; Lee, Seok-soo; Levite, Ariel e.; Russell, James A.; Hokayem, Emile; Kibaroglu, Mustafa; Schulte, Paul; Thraenert, Oliver; Kulesa, Lukasz

    2010-05-01

    In November 2009, the Foundation for Strategic Research (Fondation pour la recherche strategique, FRS) convened a workshop on 'The Future of extended Deterrence', which included the participation of some of the best experts of this topic, from the United States, Europe, the Middle East and East Asia, as well as French and NATO officials. This document brings together the papers prepared for this seminar. Several of them were updated after the publication in April 2010 of the US Nuclear Posture Review. The seminar was organized with the support of the French Atomic energy Commission (Commissariat a l'energie atomique - CEA). Content: 1 - The future of extended deterrence: a brainstorming paper (Bruno Tertrais); 2 - US extended deterrence in NATO and North-East Asia (David S. Yost); 3 - The future of US extended deterrence (Elaine Bunn); 4 - The future of extended deterrence: a South Korean perspective (Seok-soo Lee); 5 - Reflections on extended deterrence in the Middle East (Ariel e. Levite); 6 - extended deterrence, security guarantees and nuclear weapons: US strategic and policy conundrums in the Gulf (James A. Russell); 7 - extended deterrence in the Gulf: a bridge too far? (Emile Hokayem); 8 - The future of extended deterrence: the case of Turkey (Mustafa Kibaroglu); 9 - The future of extended deterrence: a UK view (Paul Schulte); 10 - NATO and extended deterrence (Oliver Thraenert); 11 - extended deterrence and assurance in Central Europe (Lukasz Kulesa)

  15. Personalized medicine for non-small-cell lung cancer: implications of recent advances in tissue acquisition for molecular and histologic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Andre L; Thornton, Raymond H

    2012-09-01

    In light of recent advances in individualized therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), molecular and histologic profiling is essential for guiding therapeutic decisions. Results of these analyses may have implications for both response (eg, molecular testing for EGFR [epidermal growth factor receptor] mutations) and safety (eg, contraindications for squamous histology) in NSCLC. Most patients with NSCLC present with unresectable advanced disease; therefore, greater emphasis is being placed on minimally invasive tissue acquisition techniques, such as small biopsy and cytology specimens. Due to the need for increasing histologic and molecular information and increasingly smaller tissue sample sizes, efforts must be focused on optimizing tissue acquisition and the development of more sensitive molecular assays. Recent advances in tissue acquisition techniques and specimen preservation may help to address this challenge and lead to enhanced personalized treatment in NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  17. Medical Device Connectivity Challenges Outline the Technical Requirements and Standards For Promoting Big Data Research and Personalized Medicine in Neurocritical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Anna; Smielewski, Peter; Rosenthal, Eric; Moberg, Dick

    2018-03-01

    Brain injuries are complicated medical problems and their management requires data from disparate sources to extract actionable information. In neurocritical care, interoperability is lacking despite the perceived benefits. Several efforts have been underway, but none have been widely adopted, underscoring the difficulty of achieving this goal. We have identified the current pain points of data collection and integration based on the experience with two large multi-site clinical studies: Transforming Research And Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) in the United States and Collaborative European Neuro Trauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) in Europe. The variability of measurements across sites remains a barrier to uniform data collection. We found a need for annotation standards and for a standardized archive format for high-resolution data. Overall, the hidden cost for successful data collection was initially underestimated.Although the use of bedside data integration solutions, such as the Moberg's Component Neuromonitoring System (Moberg Research, Inc., Ambler, PA, USA) or ICM+ software (Cambridge Enterprise, Cambridge, UK), facilitated the homogenous collection of synchronized data, there remain issues that need to be addressed by the neurocritical care community. To this end, we have organized a Working Group on Neurocritical Care Informatics, whose next step is to create an overarching informatics framework that takes advantage of the collected information to answer scientific questions and to accelerate the translation of trial results to actions benefitting military medicine.

  18. Cancer 2015: a longitudinal whole-of-system study of genomic cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David M; Fox, Stephen; Lorgelly, Paula K; Ashley, David; Richardson, Gary; Lipton, Lara; Parisot, John P; Lucas, Mark; McNeil, John; Wright, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Genomic cancer medicine promises revolutionary change in oncology. The impacts of 'personalized medicine', based upon a molecular classification of cancer and linked to targeted therapies, will extend from individual patient outcomes to the health economy at large. To address the 'whole-of-system' impact of genomic cancer medicine, we have established a prospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed cancer in the state of Victoria, Australia, about whom we have collected a broad range of clinical, demographic, molecular, and patient-reported data, as well as data on health resource utilization. Our goal is to create a model for investigating public investment in genomic medicine that maximizes the cost:benefit ratio for the Australian community at large. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Management of diabetic children at the University Hospital Center of Rabat: an example of partnership or personal initiative on the periphery of the school of medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balafrej, A

    2003-04-01

    In Morocco there are at least 10,000 children under the age of 15 who suffer from type 1 diabetes who, due to the lack of appropriate management and care, are extremely susceptible to repeated hospital re-admission and long-term disabling degenerative complications. With the aim to reduce the frequency of complications, a specialised outpatient clinic was created at the children's hospital in Rabat in 1986. A multi-disciplinary team provides medical care as well as initial training and continuing education to the patients and their families according to a standardised protocol. The 700 young diabetics who are monitored in the clinic are at present autonomous in the delivery of their own daily treatment and continue to increasingly improve. After 10 years, this group of patients has experienced a diabetic retinopathy rate which is six times lower than since the onset of their illness. The programme is administered in partnership and with the financial support of a private sponsor and assistance of a parents' association. The programme is designed in compliance with the WHO Towards Unity for Health strategy and its core principles, namely: relevance, equity, quality, and effectiveness. In order to achieve sustainability, the programme needs an adopted geographic management structure and more formalised relationships linking the partners. Nevertheless, the programme could be considered as a laboratory experiment for the School of Medicine, in its search to create a wider social movement. This level of commitment implies recasting the foci of the medical training curriculum, promoting therapeutic patient education, giving more attention to the hospital's operations and building sustainable partnerships.

  20. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  1. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... extracts, and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  2. Building the Partners HealthCare Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine: Informed Consent, Return of Research Results, Recruitment Lessons and Operational Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth W. Karlson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Partners HealthCare Biobank is a Partners HealthCare enterprise-wide initiative whose goal is to provide a foundation for the next generation of translational research studies of genotype, environment, gene-environment interaction, biomarker and family history associations with disease phenotypes. The Biobank has leveraged in-person and electronic recruitment methods to enroll >30,000 subjects as of October 2015 at two academic medical centers in Partners HealthCare since launching in 2010. Through a close collaboration with the Partners Human Research Committee, the Biobank has developed a comprehensive informed consent process that addresses key patient concerns, including privacy and the return of research results. Lessons learned include the need for careful consideration of ethical issues, attention to the educational content of electronic media, the importance of patient authentication in electronic informed consent, the need for highly secure IT infrastructure and management of communications and the importance of flexible recruitment modalities and processes dependent on the clinical setting for recruitment.

  3. Molecular profiling of cancer--the future of personalized cancer medicine: a primer on cancer biology and the tools necessary to bring molecular testing to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Thomas; Catenacci, Daniel V T; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2011-04-01

    Cancers arise as a result of an accumulation of genetic aberrations that are either acquired or inborn. Virtually every cancer has its unique set of molecular changes. Technologies have been developed to study cancers and derive molecular characteristics that increasingly have implications for clinical care. Indeed, the identification of key genetic aberrations (molecular drivers) may ultimately translate into dramatic benefit for patients through the development of highly targeted therapies. With the increasing availability of newer, more powerful, and cheaper technologies such as multiplex mutational screening, next generation sequencing, array-based approaches that can determine gene copy numbers, methylation, expression, and others, as well as more sophisticated interpretation of high-throughput molecular information using bioinformatics tools like signatures and predictive algorithms, cancers will routinely be characterized in the near future. This review examines the background information and technologies that clinicians and physician-scientists will need to interpret in order to develop better, personalized treatment strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Folk Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead’s effects on health. How to tell if herbal medicines or folk medicines contain lead You only can ... as high as 90%. Ghasard, an Indian folk medicine, has also been found to contain lead. It is a brown powder used as a tonic. Ba-baw-san is a Chinese herbal remedy that contains lead. It is used to ...

  5. Heterogeneity of the cytokinome in undifferentiated arthritis progressing to rheumatoid arthritis and its change in the course of therapy. Move toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzustewicz, Edyta; Bzoma, Izabella; Daca, Agnieszka; Szarecka, Maria; Bykowska, Malgorzata Sochocka; Witkowski, Jacek M; Bryl, Ewa

    2017-09-01

    To conduct a comprehensive analysis of cytokine concentrations in sera and mononuclear cell supernatants in order to examine inter- and intra-individual cytokine variations in undifferentiated arthritis progressing to rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control groups. Patients with UA (undifferentiated arthritis) developing RA (rheumatoid arthritis) (UA→RA) (n=16) and healthy controls (n=16) were enrolled into the study. UA→RA patients were followed up for six months since the final RA diagnosis. Cytokines IFN-γ, IL-10, TNF, IL-17A, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-2 in sera and mononuclear cell supernatants in 72h and 120h culture variants with- and without anti-CD3 stimulations were assayed using flow cytometric bead array. The cytokine profile of UA→RA differs from the healthy individual cytokine profile. It is possible to observe specific cytokine pattern characterizing each patient, which alters during course of disease. Specifically, we can distinguish three UA→RA cohorts: the group of patients susceptible to the therapy, characterized by the drop of cytokine levels between 1st and 3rd visit with visible decrease of cytokines in 2nd visit and then secondary slighter increase in 3rd visit; the group of patients refractory or clinically worsening on the therapy, characterized by the highest cytokine levels at 2nd visit with secondary decrease in 3rd visit; and the group of patients with variable responses to the therapy without any specific common cytokine pattern. The cytokine patterns in supernatants of PBMC stimulated anti-CD3 for 72h and 120h are very similar. The personal profile including multiplexed cytokine patterns in serum and supernatant may be potentially used for optimization of therapy introduction and monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Extended icosahedral structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jaric, Marko V

    1989-01-01

    Extended Icosahedral Structures discusses the concepts about crystal structures with extended icosahedral symmetry. This book is organized into six chapters that focus on actual modeling of extended icosahedral crystal structures. This text first presents a tiling approach to the modeling of icosahedral quasiperiodic crystals. It then describes the models for icosahedral alloys based on random connections between icosahedral units, with particular emphasis on diffraction properties. Other chapters examine the glassy structures with only icosahedral orientational order and the extent of tra

  7. Extending Database Integration Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buneman, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Formal approaches to the semantics of databases and database languages can have immediate and practical consequences in extending database integration technologies to include a vastly greater range...

  8. Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prescription Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ... medicine are prescription and over-the-counter (OTC). Prescription medicines Prescription medicines are medicines you can get only ...

  9. Toward patient-centered, personalized and personal decision support and knowledge management: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, T-Y

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent trends and highlights the challenges and opportunities in decision support and knowledge management for patient-centered, personalized, and personal health care. The discussions are based on a broad survey of related references, focusing on the most recent publications. Major advances are examined in the areas of i) shared decision making paradigms, ii) continuity of care infrastructures and architectures, iii) human factors and system design approaches, iv) knowledge management innovations, and v) practical deployment and change considerations. Many important initiatives, projects, and plans with promising results have been identified. The common themes focus on supporting the individual patients who are playing an increasing central role in their own care decision processes. New collaborative decision making paradigms and information infrastructures are required to ensure effective continuity of care. Human factors and usability are crucial for the successful development and deployment of the relevant systems, tools, and aids. Advances in personalized medicine can be achieved through integrating genomic, phenotypic and other biological, individual, and population level information, and gaining useful insights from building and analyzing biological and other models at multiple levels of abstraction. Therefore, new Information and Communication Technologies and evaluation approaches are needed to effectively manage the scale and complexity of biomedical and health information, and adapt to the changing nature of clinical decision support. Recent research in decision support and knowledge management combines heterogeneous information and personal data to provide cost-effective, calibrated, personalized support in shared decision making at the point of care. Current and emerging efforts concentrate on developing or extending conventional paradigms, techniques, systems, and architectures for the new predictive, preemptive, and

  10. Regenerative medicine blueprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic, Andre; Harper, C Michel; Gores, Gregory J; Pfenning, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Regenerative medicine, a paragon of future healthcare, holds unprecedented potential in extending the reach of treatment modalities for individuals across diseases and lifespan. Emerging regenerative technologies, focused on structural repair and functional restoration, signal a radical transformation in medical and surgical practice. Regenerative medicine is poised to provide innovative solutions in addressing major unmet needs for patients, ranging from congenital disease and trauma to degenerative conditions. Realization of the regenerative model of care predicates a stringent interdisciplinary paradigm that will drive validated science into standardized clinical options. Designed as a catalyst in advancing rigorous new knowledge on disease causes and cures into informed delivery of quality care, the Mayo Clinic regenerative medicine blueprint offers a patient-centered, team-based strategy that optimizes the discovery-translation-application roadmap for the express purpose of science-supported practice advancement.

  11. Drugs and the older person

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-14

    Sep 14, 2007 ... Sebastiana Kalula is Head of Geriatric Medicine and Acting Director of The Albertina and Walter .... performance of cognitive and physical .... Older persons may need multiple drug therapy for an increased number of chronic.

  12. Robotics in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  13. Using personality neuroscience to study personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, Samantha V; DeYoung, Colin G

    2017-01-01

    Personality neuroscience integrates techniques from personality psychology and neuroscience to elucidate the neural basis of individual differences in cognition, emotion, motivation, and behavior. This endeavor is pertinent not only to our understanding of healthy personality variation, but also to the aberrant trait manifestations present in personality disorders and severe psychopathology. In the current review, we focus on the advances and limitations of neuroimaging methods with respect to personality neuroscience. We discuss the value of personality theory as a means to link specific neural mechanisms with various traits (e.g., the neural basis of the "Big Five"). Given the overlap between dimensional models of normal personality and psychopathology, we also describe how researchers can reconceptualize psychopathological disorders along key dimensions, and, in turn, formulate specific neural hypotheses, extended from personality theory. Examples from the borderline personality disorder literature are used to illustrate this approach. We provide recommendations for utilizing neuroimaging methods to capture the neural mechanisms that underlie continuous traits across the spectrum from healthy to maladaptive. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S M [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Medicine Centre

    1967-01-01

    The article deals with the growth of nuclear medicine in India. Radiopharmaceuticals both in elemental form and radiolabelled compounds became commercially available in India in 1961. Objectives and educational efforts of the Radiation Medicine Centre setup in Bombay are mentioned. In vivo tests of nuclear medicine such as imaging procedures, dynamic studies, dilution studies, thyroid function studies, renal function studies, linear function studies, blood flow, and absorption studies are reported. Techniques of radioimmunoassay are also mentioned.

  15. Evidence for extended age dependent maternal immunity in infected children: mother to child transmission of HIV infection and potential interventions including sulfatides of the human fetal adnexa and complementary or alternative medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargav, Hemant; Huilgol, Vidya; Metri, Kashinath; Sundell, I Birgitta; Tripathi, Satyam; Ramagouda, Nagaratna; Jadhav, Mahesh; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra; Koka, Prasad S

    2012-01-01

    The two neighboring southwestern states of India, Karnataka and Maharashtra, have high incidence of HIV/AIDS and are among the six most high prevalence HIV infected states. In Karnataka state, the northern districts of Bagalkot, Belgaum and Bijapur (the three Bs) and in Maharashtra state, the southern districts of Sangli, Satara, and Solapur (the three Ss) are the areas with the highest incidence of HIV/AIDS. We have evaluated the incidence of maternal to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 infection in Belgaum District which is more than 500 kilometers distance by road from the campus in greater Bangalore (Karnataka State). We have obtained the prenatal CD4 counts of HIV infected pregnant mothers. We have also screened the HIV infected children in two orphanages (rehabilitation centres for HIV infected children) in Belgaum District. The clinical conditions of these infected children were assessed for their CD4 counts, anti-retroviral therapy (ART) intake status, outpatient illnesses and body composition. We have observed that there is an influence of the age factor on the CD4 counts of the HIV infected children. Further, in view of the role of our recently found involvement of sulfatide, 3-O- galactosylceramide, in inhibition of HIV-1 replication and enhancement of hematopoiesis which is otherwise inhibited due to such infection, we have discussed the possible role of sulfatides that biologically occur in the fetal adnexa (placentatrophoblasts /amnion/chorion-umbilical cord), in containing HIV infection as a potential safer alternative to the ART regimens currently approved to be clinically practiced. Lastly, we have discussed the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies such as evidence based yoga and ayurveda as add-on to ART in potential elimination of MTCT of HIV infection. Out of a total of 150 children delivered by HIV infected mothers, 13 children were found to be positive as determined by the dried blood smear (DBS) for virological testing

  16. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  17. Four years of training in family medicine: implications for residency redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, J Lewis; McPherson, Vanessa; Little, John M

    2012-09-01

    In light of the ongoing consideration for extending the length of residency education in family medicine in the United States, this paper reports the findings from a retrospective, qualitative study of six family physicians that elected to extend their residency training from 3 to 4 years. Each participant completed a written questionnaire and a structured personal interview focusing on various aspects of career development resulting from the additional year of training. The authors independently evaluated these interviews to identify major themes. All the participants were found to have been involved in teaching medicine, valued a more flexible and expanded curriculum, and appreciated their individualized curricula-based on their respective career interests. Given the opportunity, each would opt again for a fourth year of training. There were mixed opinions as to whether the fourth year should be required of all family medicine residents. Other perceived benefits reported were: a better opportunity to find a personally satisfactory practice, additional time for gaining clarity about career plans, and a higher beginning salary as a result of the additional skills and experiences gained. This study of mid-career physicians supports that a fourth-year (PGY4) curriculum in family medicine may enhance subsequent career satisfaction. Further studies of residents in other PGY4 training programs are necessary to assess outcomes comparing our findings as well as guide the discipline's leaders in residency redesign.

  18. The Extended Enterprise concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan; Gobbi, Chiara

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the work that has been done regarding the Extended Enterprise concept in the Common Concept team of Globeman 21 including references to results deliverables concerning the development of the Extended Enterprise concept. The first section presents the basic concept...... picture from Globeman21, which illustrates the Globeman21 way of realising the Extended Enterprise concept. The second section presents the Globeman21 EE concept in a life cycle perspective, which to a large extent is based on the thoughts and ideas behind GERAM (ISO/DIS 15704)....

  19. An extended technicolor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelquist, T.; Terning, J.

    1994-01-01

    An extended technicolor model is constructed. Quark and lepton masses, spontaneous CP violation, and precision electroweak measurements are discussed. Dynamical symmetry breaking is analyzed using the concept of the big MAC (most attractive channel)

  20. Extending mine life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Mine layouts, new machines and techniques, research into problem areas of ground control and so on, are highlighted in this report on extending mine life. The main resources taken into account are coal mining, uranium mining, molybdenum and gold mining

  1. Rational extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1998-01-01

    Ordinary thermodynamics provides reliable results when the thermodynamic fields are smooth, in the sense that there are no steep gradients and no rapid changes. In fluids and gases this is the domain of the equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier. Extended thermodynamics becomes relevant for rapidly varying and strongly inhomogeneous processes. Thus the propagation of high­ frequency waves, and the shape of shock waves, and the regression of small-scale fluctuation are governed by extended thermodynamics. The field equations of ordinary thermodynamics are parabolic while extended thermodynamics is governed by hyperbolic systems. The main ingredients of extended thermodynamics are • field equations of balance type, • constitutive quantities depending on the present local state and • entropy as a concave function of the state variables. This set of assumptions leads to first order quasi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems of field equations; it guarantees the well-posedness of initial value problems and f...

  2. The dialogically extended mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Gangopadhyay, Nivedita; Tylén, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    A growing conceptual and empirical literature is advancing the idea that language extends our cognitive skills. One of the most influential positions holds that language – qua material symbols – facilitates individual thought processes by virtue of its material properties. Extending upon this model...... relate our approach to other ideas about collective minds and review a number of empirical studies to identify the mechanisms enabling the constitution of interpersonal cognitive systems....

  3. Extending Mondrian Memory Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    a kernel semaphore is locked or unlocked. In addition, we extended the system call interface to receive notifications about user-land locking...operations (such as calls to the mutex and semaphore code provided by the C library). By patching the dynamically loadable GLibC5, we are able to test... semaphores , and spinlocks. RTO-MP-IST-091 10- 9 Extending Mondrian Memory Protection to loading extension plugins. This prevents any untrusted code

  4. Extended Life Coolant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 06-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Report 3. DATES COVERED ... Corrosion Testing of Traditional and Extended Life Coolants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hansen, Gregory A. T...providing vehicle specific coolants. Several laboratory corrosion tests were performed according to ASTM D1384 and D2570, but with a 2.5x extended time

  5. Vulnerable Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  6. Medicinal claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Under EU medicinal law, substances presented as having properties for treating or preventing disease are medicinal products by virtue of their presentation. EU food law prohibits attributing to any food the property of preventing, treating or curing a disease. However, if certain conditions are

  7. [Evolutionary medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wjst, M

    2013-12-01

    Evolutionary medicine allows new insights into long standing medical problems. Are we "really stoneagers on the fast lane"? This insight might have enormous consequences and will allow new answers that could never been provided by traditional anthropology. Only now this is made possible using data from molecular medicine and systems biology. Thereby evolutionary medicine takes a leap from a merely theoretical discipline to practical fields - reproductive, nutritional and preventive medicine, as well as microbiology, immunology and psychiatry. Evolutionary medicine is not another "just so story" but a serious candidate for the medical curriculum providing a universal understanding of health and disease based on our biological origin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Designing and implementing a resiliency program for family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Julie; McGrady, Angele

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine residents are at risk for burnout due to extended work hours, lack of control over their work schedule, and challenging work situations and environments. Building resiliency can prevent burnout and may improve a resident's quality of life and health behavior. This report describes a program designed to build resiliency, the ability to bounce back from stress, in family medicine residents in a medium sized U.S. residency training program. Interactive sessions emphasized building self-awareness, coping skills, strengths and meaning in work, time management, self-care, and connections in and outside of medicine to support resident well-being. System changes which fostered wellness were also implemented. These changes included increasing the availability of fresh fruits in the conference and call room, purchasing an elliptical exercise machine for the on call room, and offering a few minutes of mindfulness meditation daily to the inpatient residents. Results to date show excellent acceptance of the program by trainees, increased consumption of nutritious foods, more personal exercise, and self-reported decreased overreactions to stress. Resiliency programs can effectively serve to meet accreditation requirements while fostering residents' abilities to balance personal and professional demands. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Blood Transcriptomics and Metabolomics for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-31

    involved in rheumatoid arthritis . PLoS Comput Biol 2011;7. [100] Zhu J. Stitching together multiple data dimensions reveals interacting metabolomic...capability, detecting N10,000 metabo- lites, together with environmental exposure, dietary intake, microbial activity, and pharmaceutical drugs. Thus...research to clinical care has constantly seen huge disap- pointments. With the accumulation of detailed, information-rich data, human subjects start to

  10. Hurdles on the road to personalized medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tursz, Thomas; Bernards, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatment is slowly shifting from an approach in which the tissue of origin and the histology were the guiding principles for the choice of chemotherapy towards a genotype-centric approach in which the changes in the cancer genome are used to select patients for treatment with highly

  11. An Indian eye to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhari, Shaurya; Rizvi, S A M

    2015-04-01

    Acknowledging the successful sequencing of the human genome and the valuable insights it has rendered, genetic drafting of non-human organisms can further enhance the understanding of modern biology. The price of sequencing technology has plummeted with time, and there is a noticeable enhancement in its implementation and recurrent usage. Sequenced genome information can be contained in a microarray chip, and then processed by a computer system for inferring analytics and predictions. Specifically, smart cards have been significantly applicable to assimilate and retrieve complex data, with ease and implicit mobility. Herein, we propose "The G-Card", a development with respect to the prevalent smart card, and an extension to the Electronic Health Record (EHR), that will hold the genome sequence of an individual, so that the medical practitioner can better investigate irregularities in a patient's health and hence recommend a precise prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human genetics: international projects and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellaniz-Ruiz, Maria; Gallego, Cristina; Ruiz-Pinto, Sara; Carracedo, Angel; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present the progress driven by the recent technological advances and new revolutionary massive sequencing technologies in the field of human genetics. We discuss this knowledge in relation with drug response prediction, from the germline genetic variation compiled in the 1000 Genomes Project or in the Genotype-Tissue Expression project, to the phenome-genome archives, the international cancer projects, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas or the International Cancer Genome Consortium, and the epigenetic variation and its influence in gene expression, including the regulation of drug metabolism. This review is based on the lectures presented by the speakers of the Symposium "Human Genetics: International Projects & New Technologies" from the VII Conference of the Spanish Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Society, held on the 20th and 21st of April 2015.

  13. Personality construct of Sasang Personality Questionnaire in an adolescent sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chae

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The validity of the SPQ construct was confirmed with adolescents. Further investigation on its personality construct would extend the clinical application of SPQ to young age groups including children.

  14. Nigerian Journal of Medicine: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    illuminates medical science or practice extending to all aspects of medicine. The NJM offers the greatest opportunity to manufacturers and marketers of drugs, medical equipment and consumables to reach over eighty percent of all doctors and ...

  15. Extended spider cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-05-01

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  16. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravinda, S; Srikanth, R

    2016-01-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure. (paper)

  17. Firebase medicine: extending the Role I aid station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ramey L; Truesdell, A G

    2014-09-01

    The unique nature of counterinsurgency warfare in Afghanistan highlights the tactical and technical challenges of the non-contiguous battlefield. Although remote military outposts distant from their support hubs help project NATO power, they also operate without the advantages of a secure rear area or interior lines of communication. Commonly referred to as 'firebases', these outposts typically house a platoon or company-sized element and present numerous challenges to the delivery of medical care and support. Medical planners and providers can mitigate many of these inherent risks through targeted interventions designed to increase the capabilities of these remote outposts. These interventions include focused higher-level trauma and non-trauma medical training for both medical and non-medical personnel, expanded equipment lists, ongoing medical education, training and rehearsals, and a proven and redundant communications plan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Ayurvedic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the biologic humors of the ancient Greek system. Using these concepts, Ayurvedic physicians prescribe individualized treatments, including compounds of herbs or proprietary ingredients, and diet, exercise, and lifestyle recommendations. The majority of India’s population uses Ayurvedic medicine ...

  19. COPD Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Treatment & Programs Medications COPD Medications COPD Medications Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer ... control the symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Most people with COPD take long-acting medicine ...

  20. [Teaching family medicine in Lausanne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Thomas; Junod, Michel; Cornuz, Jacques; Herzig, Lilli; Bonvin, Raphael

    2010-12-01

    The Faculty of Biology and Medicine of Lausanne has integrated education of family medicine all along its new undergraduate medical curriculum. The Institute of general medicine is in charge to implement those offers among which two are presented hereafter. In the new module "Generalism" several courses cover the specificities of the discipline as for example medical decision in the practice. A mandatory one-month internship in the medical practice offers an experiential immersion into family medicine for all students. In a meeting at the end of their internship, students discuss in group with their peers their individual experiences and are asked to identify, based on their personal experience, the general concepts of the specialty of family medicine and general practice.

  1. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, Paul; Blanc, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of radioisotopes in medical diagnostics are briefly reviewed. Each organ system is considered and the Nuclear medicine procedures pertinent to that system are discussed. This includes, the principle of the test, the detector and the radiopharmaceutical used, the procedure followed and the clinical results obtained. The various types of radiation detectors presently employed in Nuclear Medicine are surveyed, including scanners, gamma cameras, positron cameras and procedures for obtaining tomographic presentation of radionuclide distributions [fr

  2. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  3. Clinical holistic medicine: holistic adolescent medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Morad, Mohammed; Press, Joseph; Merrick, Joav; Shek, Daniel T L

    2004-08-04

    The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine--giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs--is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity--through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents--all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused by disturbances in the personal

  4. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Adolescent Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine — giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs — is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity — through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents — all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused

  5. An Extended Duopoly Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Illustrates how principles and intermediate microeconomic students can gain an understanding for strategic price setting by playing a relatively large oligopoly game. Explains that the game extends to a continuous price space and outlines appropriate applications. Offers the Mathematica code to instructors so that the assumptions of the game can…

  6. Transversally extended string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi

    1988-01-01

    Starting with the space-time action of the transversally extended string, we derive its world-sheet action, which is that of a gravitational and gauge theory with matter fields on the world-sheet, with additional effects of the second fundamental quantity. (author)

  7. Extended artistic appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    I propose that in at least some cases, objects of artistic appreciation are best thought of not simply as causes of artistic appreciation, but as parts of the cognitive machinery that drives aesthetic appreciation. In effect, this is to say that aesthetic appreciation operates via extended cognitive systems.

  8. Towards Extended Vantage Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaz, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of Vantage Theory (VT), a model of (colour) categorization, to linguistic data largely depends on the modifications and adaptations of the model for the purpose. An attempt to do so proposed here, called Extended Vantage Theory (EVT), slightly reformulates the VT conception of vantage by capitalizing on some of the entailments of…

  9. Análise dosimétrica de acompanhantes de pacientes de medicina nuclear internados em quarto terapêutico Dosimetric analysis of persons accompanying nuclear medicine patients in the therapeutic room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetro Pereira de Oliveira

    2008-02-01

    doped with magnesium, titanium and sodium were utilized for evaluating the doses. RESULTS: The results demonstrate that a person sharing a same therapeutic room, for two days, with a patient who had been given 3700 MBq or 5550 MBq of 131I, according to radioprotection recommendations, is exposed to a mean dose of (0.51 ± 0.02 mSv for a 99% confidence level. CONCLUSION: According to the Brazilian radiation protection standards there is no impediment for a person to accompany a nuclear medicine patient who has been given 3700 MBq or 5550 MBq of 131I during the patient stay in the therapeutic room.

  10. Computers in nuclear medicine: introductory concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Computers play an important role in image and data processing in nuclear medicine. Applications extend from relatively simple mathematical processing of in vitro specimen assays to more sophisticated image reconstruction procedures for emission tomography. The basic concepts and terminology associated with computer applications in image and data processing in nuclear medicine are presented here

  11. Cerebellum and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosini, Laura; Cutuli, Debora; Picerni, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Personality traits are multidimensional traits comprising cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, and a wide array of cerebral structures mediate individual variability. Differences in personality traits covary with brain morphometry in specific brain regions. A cerebellar role in emotional and affective processing and on personality characteristics has been suggested. In a large sample of healthy subjects of both sexes and differently aged, the macro- and micro-structural variations of the cerebellum were correlated with the scores obtained in the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) by Cloninger. Cerebellar volumes were associated positively with Novelty Seeking scores and negatively with Harm Avoidance scores. Given the cerebellar contribution in personality traits and emotional processing, we investigated the cerebellar involvement even in alexithymia, construct of personality characterized by impairment in cognitive, emotional, and affective processing. Interestingly, the subjects with high alexithymic traits had larger volumes in the bilateral Crus 1. The cerebellar substrate for some personality dimensions extends the relationship between personality and brain areas to a structure up to now thought to be involved mainly in motor and cognitive functions, much less in emotional processes and even less in personality individual differences. The enlarged volumes of Crus 1 in novelty seekers and alexithymics support the tendency to action featuring both personality constructs. In fact, Novelty Seeking and alexithymia are rooted in behavior and inescapably have a strong action component, resulting in stronger responses in the structures more focused on action and embodiment, as the cerebellum is.

  12. 75 FR 47710 - TRICARE; Extended Care Health Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... TRICARE; Extended Care Health Option AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense. ACTION: Final... Care Health Option (ECHO) from $2,500 per month to $36,000 per year, and for other non-legislated.... That program, known as the Extended Care Heath Option (ECHO), replaced the Program for Persons with...

  13. Extending Cultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Ted J.; Court, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    Advocates defining cultural literacy to recognize the mass media's role in transmitting and maintaining cultural stereotypes and shaping values and beliefs. Distinguishes between ideational and material aspects of culture. Advocates teaching critical thinking and respect for persons in light of questionable moral perspectives in certain media…

  14. Mesopotamian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots.

  15. Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jou, David

    2010-01-01

    This is the 4th edition of the highly acclaimed monograph on Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics, a theory that goes beyond the classical theory of irreversible processes. In contrast to the classical approach, the basic variables describing the system are complemented by non-equilibrium quantities. The claims made for extended thermodynamics are confirmed by the kinetic theory of gases and statistical mechanics. The book covers a wide spectrum of applications, and also contains a thorough discussion of the foundations and the scope of the current theories on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. For this new edition, the authors critically revised existing material while taking into account the most recent developments in fast moving fields such as heat transport in micro- and nanosystems or fast solidification fronts in materials sciences. Several fundamental chapters have been revisited emphasizing physics and applications over mathematical derivations. Also, fundamental questions on the definition of non-equil...

  16. Extended quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel Bona

    2000-01-01

    The work can be considered as an essay on mathematical and conceptual structure of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics which is related here to some other (more general, but also to more special and 'approximative') theories. Quantum mechanics is here primarily reformulated in an equivalent form of a Poisson system on the phase space consisting of density matrices, where the 'observables', as well as 'symmetry generators' are represented by a specific type of real valued (densely defined) functions, namely the usual quantum expectations of corresponding selfjoint operators. It is shown in this paper that inclusion of additional ('nonlinear') symmetry generators (i. e. 'Hamiltonians') into this reformulation of (linear) quantum mechanics leads to a considerable extension of the theory: two kinds of quantum 'mixed states' should be distinguished, and operator - valued functions of density matrices should be used in the role of 'nonlinear obse