WorldWideScience

Sample records for permeability soils present

  1. Soils - Mean Permeability

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital spatial data set provides information on the magnitude and spatial pattern of depth-weighted, mean soil permeability throughout the State of Kansas. The...

  2. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF VARIABILITY IN PERMEABILITY OF SANDY SILT SOIL MIXED WITH FLY ASH IN PROPORTIONATE

    OpenAIRE

    Rasna Sharma*, Dr. M.K. Trivedi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental determination of variability in permeability of sandy silt soil by blending with fly ash. The grain size, porosity, structure of the soil, specific gravity of the soil, viscosity and temperature are important factors in varying the permeability of the soil. Permeability is the flow conduction property of the soil. The void ratio with in the soil plays a vital role in varying the permeability. By blending with finer grains like fly ash in the soil with sand...

  3. Preliminary study of soil permeability properties using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, M.; Sudriani, Y.; Rustini, H. A.

    2018-02-01

    Soil permeability measurement is undoubtedly important in carrying out soil-water research such as rainfall-runoff modelling, irrigation water distribution systems, etc. It is also known that acquiring reliable soil permeability data is rather laborious, time-consuming, and costly. Therefore, it is desirable to develop the prediction model. Several studies of empirical equations for predicting permeability have been undertaken by many researchers. These studies derived the models from areas which soil characteristics are different from Indonesian soil, which suggest a possibility that these permeability models are site-specific. The purpose of this study is to identify which soil parameters correspond strongly to soil permeability and propose a preliminary model for permeability prediction. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to 16 parameters analysed from 37 sites consist of 91 samples obtained from Batanghari Watershed. Findings indicated five variables that have strong correlation with soil permeability, and we recommend a preliminary permeability model, which is potential for further development.

  4. Long-term bioventing performance in low-permeability soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.B.; Stanin, F.T.; Downey, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term and long-term bioventing treatability testing has shown that in situ air injection and extraction is a practical method for sustaining increased oxygen levels and enhancing aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in low-permeability soils. At several test sites, initial physical parameter analysis of soils and air permeability tests indicated that impacted soils (fine sandy silts and clays) had low air permeabilities. Measurements of depleted soil-gas oxygen levels and increased soil-gas carbon dioxide levels indicated that the natural process of aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was oxygen-limited. Initial treatability testing consisted of air permeability tests to measure the permeability of the soils to air and in situ respiration tests to measure the rates at which native microorganisms could biodegrade the contaminants when provided with sufficient oxygen. During the long-term treatment period, active air injection or extraction systems were operated for 1 year or longer. Soil gas was periodically monitored within the treatment zone to evaluate the success of the bioventing systems in increasing soil-gas oxygen levels in the low-permeability soils. Follow-up respiration tests and soil and soil-gas sampling were conducted to evaluate changes in respiration rates and contaminant concentrations with time

  5. Integrated vacuum extraction/pneumatic soil fracturing system for remediation of low permeability soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaines, A.L.; Piniewski, R.J.; Yarbrough, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    There is wide use of vacuum extraction to remove volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from unsaturated soil. At sites with soil of low permeability, VOC extraction rates may not be sufficient to meet soil clean-up objectives within the desired time frame. During vacuum extraction in low permeability soil, the diffusion rates of VOCs through the soil matrix may limit VOC removal rates. An increase in the number of subsurface paths for advective flow through the contaminated zone results in a larger mass of contaminant being removed in a shorter time frame, accelerating site remediation. One technique for increasing the number of subsurface flow paths is Terra Vac's process of pneumatic soil fracturing (PSF). In this process, pressurized air is injected into the subsurface, creating micro-fractures for the vacuum extraction system to withdraw contaminants. Similar to hydraulic fracturing techniques long used in the petroleum industry for increasing yield from oil and gas production wells, this technique has applications for soil remediation in low permeability conditions. Two case studies, one in Louisiana at a gasoline service station and one at a manufacturing plant in New York, are presented

  6. Soil gas measurements at high permeabilities and below foundation depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, H.U; Surbeck, H.

    2000-01-01

    We started a project of soil gas measurements beneath houses. Since the foundations of houses often lie deeper than 0.5 to 1 m - the depth where soil gas measurements are often made - the first approach was to apply the method developed previously to deeper soil layers. The radon availability index (RAI), which was defined empirically, proved to be a reliable indicator for radon problems in nearby houses. The extreme values of permeability, non-Darcy flow and scale dependence of permeability stimulated the development of a multi-probe method. A hydrological model was applied to model the soil gas transport. The soil gas measurements below foundation depth provided a wealth of new information. A good classification of soil properties could be achieved. If soil gas measurements are to be made, the low permeability layer has to be traversed. A minimum depth of 1 .5 m is suggested, profiles to below the foundation depth are preferable. There are also implications for mitigation works. A sub-slab suction system should reach the permeable layer to function well. This also holds for radon wells. If a house is located on a slope, it is most convenient to install the sub-slab suction system on the hillside, as the foundation reaches the deepest levels there

  7. Linking soil permeability and soil aggregate stability with root development: a pots experiment (preliminary results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, Chiara; Graf, Frank; Gerber, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying and monitoring the contribution of vegetation to the stability of the slopes is a key issue for implementing effective soil bioengineering measures. This topic is being widely investigated both from the hydrological and mechanical point of view. Nevertheless, due to the high variability of the biological components, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of the role of plants in slope stabilization, especially if the different succession phases and the temporal development of vegetation is considered. Graf et al., 2014, found within the scope of aggregate stability investigations that the root length per soil volume of alder specimen grown for 20 weeks under laboratory conditions is comparable to the one of 20 years old vegetation in the field. This means that already relatively short time scales can provide meaningful information at least for the first stage of colonization of soil bioengineering measures, which is also the most critical. In the present study we analyzed the effect of root growth on two soil properties critical to evaluate the performance of vegetation in restoring and re-stabilizing slopes: permeability and soil aggregate stability. We set up a laboratory experiment in order to work under controlled conditions and limit as much as possible the natural variability. Alnus incana was selected as the study species as it is widely used in restoration projects in the Alps, also because of its capacity to fix nitrogen and its symbiosis with both ecto and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. After the first month of growth in germination pots, we planted one specimen each in big quasi cylindrical pots of 34 cm diameter and 35 cm height. The pots were filled with the soil fraction smaller than 10 mm coming from an oven dried moraine collected in a subalpine landslide area (Hexenrübi catchment, central Switzerland). The targeted dry unit weight was 16 kN/m3. The plants have been maintained at a daily temperature of 25°C and relative

  8. Resistive heating enhanced soil vapor extraction of chlorinated solvents from trichloroethylene contaminated silty, low permeable soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutphen, M. van; Heron, G.; Enfield, C.G.; Christensen, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    A 2D-laboratory box experiment (12 x 56 x 116 cm) was conducted to simulate the enhancement of soil vapor extraction by the application of low frequency electrical heating Uoule heating) for the remediation of a low permeable, silty soil contaminated with trichloroethylene. Joule heating enlarged

  9. Uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters for structured soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of dual permeability models (DPM) to predict contaminant transport is contingent upon measured or inversely estimated soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters. The difficulty in unique identification of parameters for the additional macropore- and matrix-macropore interface regions, and knowledge about requisite experimental data for DPM has not been resolved to date. Therefore, this study quantifies uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters of experimental soil columns with different macropore distributions (single macropore, and low- and high-density multiple macropores). Uncertainty evaluation is conducted using adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (AMCMC) and conventional Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithms while assuming 10 out of 17 parameters to be uncertain or random. Results indicate that AMCMC resolves parameter correlations and exhibits fast convergence for all DPM parameters while MH displays large posterior correlations for various parameters. This study demonstrates that the choice of parameter sampling algorithms is paramount in obtaining unique DPM parameters when information on covariance structure is lacking, or else additional information on parameter correlations must be supplied to resolve the problem of equifinality of DPM parameters. This study also highlights the placement and significance of matrix-macropore interface in flow experiments of soil columns with different macropore densities. Histograms for certain soil hydraulic parameters display tri-modal characteristics implying that macropores are drained first followed by the interface region and then by pores of the matrix domain in drainage experiments. Results indicate that hydraulic properties and behavior of the matrix-macropore interface is not only a function of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the macroporematrix interface (Ksa) and macropore tortuosity (lf) but also of other parameters of the matrix and macropore domains.

  10. Electrokinetic Enhanced Permanganate Delivery for Low Permeability Soil Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, A. I.; Gerhard, J.; Reynolds, D. A.; Sleep, B. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Contaminant mass sequestered in low permeability zones (LPZ) in the subsurface has become a significant concern due to back diffusion of contaminants, leading to contaminant rebound following treatment of the high permeability strata. In-situ remediation technologies such as in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) are promising, however, successful delivery of oxidants into silts and clays remains a challenge. Electrokinetics (EK) has been proposed as a technique that can overcome this challenge by delivering oxidants into low permeability soils. This study demonstrates the ability of EK to facilitate permanganate delivery into silt for treatment of trichloroethene (TCE). A two-dimensional sandbox was packed with alternate vertical layers of coarse sand and silt contaminated with high concentrations of aqueous phase TCE. Nine experiments were conducted to compare EK-enhanced in-situ chemical oxidation (EK-ISCO) to ISCO alone or EK alone. Frequent groundwater sampling at multiple locations combined with image analysis provided detailed mapping of TCE, permanganate, and manganese dioxide mass distributions. EK-ISCO successfully delivered the permanganate throughout the silt cross-section while ISCO without EK resulted in permanganate delivery only to the edges of the silt layer. EK-ISCO resulted in a 4.4 order-of-magnitude (OoM) reduction in TCE concentrations in the coarse sand compared to a 3.5 OoM reduction for ISCO alone. This study suggests that electrokinetics coupled with ISCO can achieve enhanced remediation of lower permeability strata, where remediation technologies for successful contaminant mass removal would otherwise be limited.

  11. METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATION OF HORIZONTAL WATER PERMEABILITY COEFFICIENT IN SOIL CAPILLARY BORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Michnevich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that for overall estimation of soil water permeability it is necessary to know a horizontal water permeability value of a soil capillary border in addition to coefficients of filtration and permeability. Relations allowing to determine soil permeability in the area of incomplete saturation, are given in the paper. For a fully developed capillary border some calculation formulae have been obtained in the form of algebraic polynomial versus soil grading (grain composition. These formulae allow to make more accurate calculations while designing and operating  reclamation works.

  12. LEAK AND GAS PERMEABILITY TESTING DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING AT HAL'S CHEVRON LUST SITE IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results of gas permeability and leak testing during active soil-gas sampling at Hal’s Chevron LUST Site in Green River, Utah are presented. This study was conducted to support development of a passive soil-gas sampling method. Gas mixtures containing helium and methane were...

  13. Experimental study on the soil structure and permeability in aerated zone at CIRP's field test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zhongde; Zhao Yingjie; Guo Zhiming

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of soil grain and pore size distribution, observation of soil microstructure and permeability test are used to study soil structure and permeability. The results show that soil heterogeneity in vertical soil profile is much great. The mean heterogeneity coefficient is 14.7. The eccentric rate of saturated permeability coefficient in vertical and horizontal direction is from 0.65 to 1.00. The mean coefficient is 0.93. So the soil can be considered to be isotropic from the view point of the groundwater dynamics. The permeability coefficient has more difference in different soil layers. In vertical profile, the saturated permeability coefficient is relatively great in upper and under layers. It is relatively small in middle layers

  14. Study on Erosion Factors Affecting Kuroboku Soil Loss I. Water Permeability of Stratified Soil and Slope Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    田熊, 勝利; 猪迫, 耕二; 中原 恒,

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the factors of bed soil affecting the loss of surface soil and the effects of these factors on the extent of the soil loss. They conducted a multivariate analysis using actual measurement value at a laboratory erosion experiment. They also conducted a simulation of erosion in soil loss using the bed soil factors. Soil loss quantity is dependent on the coefficient of permeability of bed soil; the steeper the latter is, the more the former increases. Lateral soil scattering...

  15. Modeling Air Permeability in Variably Saturated Soil from Two Natural Clay Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda T K K; Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    measurements from two Danish arable fields, each located on natural clay gradients, this study presents a pore tortuosity–disconnectivity analysis to characterize the soil–gas phase. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil–moisture condition, clay content, and other potential......Understanding soil–gas phase properties and processes is important for finding solutions to critical environmental problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and transport of gaseous-phase contaminants in soils. Soil–air permeability, ka (μm2), is the key parameter governing advective gas movement...... in soil and is controlled by soil physical characteristics representing soil texture and structure. Models predicting ka as a function of air-filled porosity (ɛ) often use a reference-point measurement, for example, ka,1000 at ɛ1000 (where the measurement is done at a suction of –1000 cm H2O). Using ka...

  16. Impact of chemical leaching on permeability and cadmium removal from fine-grained soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongbing; Zhang, Renduo; Huang, Shuang; Wang, Kang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical leaching on permeability and Cd removal from fine-grained polluted soils. Column leaching experiments were conducted using two types of soils (i.e., artificially Cd-polluted loam and historically polluted silty loam). Chemical agents of CaCl 2 , FeCl 3 , citric acid, EDTA, rhamnolipid, and deionized water were used to leach Cd from the soils. Results showed that organic agents reduced permeability of both soils, and FeCl 3 reduced permeability of loam soil, compared with inorganic agents and deionized water. Entrapment and deposition of colloids generated from the organic agents and FeCl 3 treatments reduced the soil permeability. The peak Cd effluence from the artificially polluted loam columns was retarded. For the artificially polluted soils treated with EDTA and the historically polluted soils with FeCl 3 , Cd precipitates were observed at the bottom after chemical leaching. When Cd was associated with large colloid particles, the reduction of soil permeability caused Cd accumulation in deeper soil. In addition, the slow process of disintegration of soil clay during chemical leaching might result in the retardation of peak Cd effluence. These results suggest the need for caution when using chemical-leaching agents for Cd removal in fine-grained soils.

  17. Integrating Electrokinetic and Bioremediation Process for Treating Oil Contaminated Low Permeability Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Ramadan Bimastyaji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional oil mining activities always ignores environmental regulation which may cause contamination in soil and environment. Crude oil contamination in low-permeability soil complicates recovery process because it requires substantial energy for excavating and crushing the soil. Electrokinetic technology can be used as an alternative technology to treat contaminated soil and improve bioremediation process (biostimulation through transfer of ions and nutrient that support microorganism growth. This study was conducted using a combination of electrokinetic and bioremediation processes. Result shows that the application of electrokinetic and bioremediation in low permeability soils can provide hydrocarbon removal efficiency up to 46,3% in 7 days operation. The highest amount of microorganism can be found in 3-days operation, which is 2x108 CFU/ml using surfactant as flushing fluid for solubilizing hydrocarbon molecules. Enhancing bioremediation using electrokinetic process is very potential to recover oil contaminated low permeability soil in the future.

  18. Integrating Electrokinetic and Bioremediation Process for Treating Oil Contaminated Low Permeability Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Bimastyaji Surya; Effendi, Agus Jatnika; Helmy, Qomarudin

    2018-02-01

    Traditional oil mining activities always ignores environmental regulation which may cause contamination in soil and environment. Crude oil contamination in low-permeability soil complicates recovery process because it requires substantial energy for excavating and crushing the soil. Electrokinetic technology can be used as an alternative technology to treat contaminated soil and improve bioremediation process (biostimulation) through transfer of ions and nutrient that support microorganism growth. This study was conducted using a combination of electrokinetic and bioremediation processes. Result shows that the application of electrokinetic and bioremediation in low permeability soils can provide hydrocarbon removal efficiency up to 46,3% in 7 days operation. The highest amount of microorganism can be found in 3-days operation, which is 2x108 CFU/ml using surfactant as flushing fluid for solubilizing hydrocarbon molecules. Enhancing bioremediation using electrokinetic process is very potential to recover oil contaminated low permeability soil in the future.

  19. Integrating Electrokinetic and Bioremediation Process for Treating Oil Contaminated Low Permeability Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Surya Ramadan Bimastyaji; Jatnika Effendi Agus; Helmy Qomarudin

    2018-01-01

    Traditional oil mining activities always ignores environmental regulation which may cause contamination in soil and environment. Crude oil contamination in low-permeability soil complicates recovery process because it requires substantial energy for excavating and crushing the soil. Electrokinetic technology can be used as an alternative technology to treat contaminated soil and improve bioremediation process (biostimulation) through transfer of ions and nutrient that support microorganism gr...

  20. Estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability from soil physical properties using state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe; Møldrup, Per; Nielsen, Don

    2003-01-01

    and gaseous chemicals in the vadose zone. In this study, three modeling approaches were used to identify the dependence of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-S) and air permeability at -100 cm H2O soil-water potential (k(a100)) on soil physical properties in undisturbed soil: (i) Multiple regression, (ii......) ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) modeling, and (iii) State-space modeling. In addition to actual soil property values, ARIMA and state-space models account for effects of spatial correlation in soil properties. Measured data along two 70-m-long transects at a 20-year old constructed......Estimates of soil hydraulic conductivity (K) and air permeability (k(a)) at given soil-water potentials are often used as reference points in constitutive models for K and k(a) as functions of moisture content and are, therefore, a prerequisite for predicting migration of water, air, and dissolved...

  1. Novel method to measure the soil clay’s permeability by laser interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asselman H.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we’ll present a new method to measure the permeability of clay soils (or infiltration rate by laser interferometry. The device is a modified Michelson interferometer. Indeed on the movable mirror is glued a clay sample in the form of a parallelepiped, dried, of length L, height H and shaped to retain the drops of water on its surface to control water’s content .When injecting a volume of distilled water (a few drops to the surface of the sample, it swells and moves the mirror, then we can measure the swelling depending on the depth of a clay soil and its permeability. Therefore we measure time that takes water to reach a depth of Z and we determine the infiltration rate: V=6μm/s ± 3% in concordance with literal values included between 2,8 and 13,9μm/s in clayey silt. For this comparison, we used the study of the characterization of the clay fraction to our sample by XRD.

  2. Study on the Permeability Characteristics of Polyurethane Soil Stabilizer Reinforced Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymer material of polyurethane soil stabilizer (PSS is used to reinforce the sand. To understand the permeability characteristics of PSS reinforced sand, a series of reinforcement layer form test, single-hole permeability test, and porous permeability test of sand reinforced with PSS have been performed. Reinforcement mechanism is discussed with scanning electron microscope images. The results indicated that the permeability resistance of sand reinforced with polyurethane soil stabilizer is improved through the formation of reinforcement layer on the sand surface. The thickness and complete degree of the reinforcement layer increase with the increasing of curing time and PSS concentration. The water flow rate decreases with the increasing of curing time or PSS concentration. The permeability coefficient decreases with the increasing of curing time and PSS concentration and increases with the increasing of depth in specimen. PSS fills up the voids of sand and adsorbs on the surface of sand particle to reduce or block the flowing channels of water to improve the permeability resistance of sand. The results can be applied as the reference for chemical reinforcement sandy soil engineering, especially for surface protection of embankment, slope, and landfill.

  3. Invited presentations. College on soil physics 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriels, D.M.; Ghirardi, G.; Nielsen, D.R.; Pla Sentis, I.; Skidmore, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    The present book is a partial compilation of contributions from selected former participants of the College on Soil Physics invited to make presentations related to their achievements as a result of attending the College. It also serves as a testimony of the existing links between soil physicists throughout the world strengthened by the support and programs of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics originally envisioned by Abdus Salam to foster the growth of advanced studies and physics research in developing countries

  4. Invited presentations. College on soil physics 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriels, D M [Univ. Ghent (Belgium); Ghirardi, G [Univ. Trieste (Italy); Nielsen, D R [Univ. California (United States); Pla Sentis, I [Univ. Lleida (Spain); Skidmore, E L [Kansas State Univ. (United States)

    2004-05-15

    The present book is a partial compilation of contributions from selected former participants of the College on Soil Physics invited to make presentations related to their achievements as a result of attending the College. It also serves as a testimony of the existing links between soil physicists throughout the world strengthened by the support and programs of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics originally envisioned by Abdus Salam to foster the growth of advanced studies and physics research in developing countries.

  5. Effective diffusion coefficients of DNAPL waste components in saturated low permeability soil materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayral-Cinar, Derya; Demond, Avery H.

    2017-12-01

    Diffusion is regarded as the dominant transport mechanism into and out of low permeable subsurface lenses and layers in the subsurface. But, some reports of mass storage in such zones are higher than what might be attributable to diffusion, based on estimated diffusion coefficients. Despite the importance of diffusion to efforts to estimate the quantity of residual contamination in the subsurface, relatively few studies present measured diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in saturated low permeability soils. This study reports the diffusion coefficients of a trichloroethylene (TCE), and an anionic surfactant, Aerosol OT (AOT), in water-saturated silt and a silt-montmorillonite (25:75) mixture, obtained using steady-state experiments. The relative diffusivity ranged from 0.11 to 0.17 for all three compounds for the silt and the silt-clay mixture that was allowed to expand. In the case in which the swelling was constrained, the relative diffusivity was about 0.07. In addition, the relative diffusivity of 13C-labeled TCE through a water saturated silt-clay mixture that had contacted a field dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) for 18 months was measured and equaled 0.001. These experimental results were compared with the estimates generated using common correlations, and it was found that, in all cases, the measured diffusion coefficients were significantly lower than the estimated. Thus, the discrepancy between mass accumulations observed in the field and the mass storage that can attributable to diffusion may be greater than previously believed.

  6. Study of the Permeability of Foam Conditioned Soils with Laboratory Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Borio, Luca; Peila, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: EPB tunneling requires that the excavated soil has a plastic and pulpy behavior to be able to apply a stabilizing pressure to the face, but it should also be impervious to counteract filtration forces that could develop ahead of the face. The evaluation of this parameter in granular soil, before and after conditioning, is therefore of key importance for a correct conditioning agents choice. Approach: A new laboratory procedure for testing the permeability of conditioned soi...

  7. Micaceous Soil Strength And Permeability Improvement Induced By Microbacteria From Vegetable Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, R. C.; Roslan, R.; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Hanafiah, M. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    Green technology method using vegetable waste are introduced in this paper for improvement of phyllite residual soil from UNITEN, Campus. Residual soil from phyllite are known as micaceous soils and it give problem in managing the stability of the slope especially in wet and extensively dry seasons. Micaceous soil are collected using tube sampler technique and mixed with liquid contain microorganism from fermented vegetable waste name as vege-grout to form remolded sample. The remolded sample are classify as 15.0%, 17.5%, 20.00% and 22.5% based on different incremental percentages of vege-grout. The curing time for the sample are 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days before the tests were conducted. Observation of the effect of treatment shows 20.0% of liquid contain Bacillus pasteurii and Bacillus Subtilis with 21 days curing time is the optimum value in strengthening the soil and improve the permeability.

  8. Heavy metal uptake and leaching from polluted soil using permeable barrier in DTPA-assisted phytoextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shulan; Shen, Zhiping; Duo, Lian

    2015-04-01

    Application of sewage sludge (SS) in agriculture is an alternative technique of disposing this waste. But unreasonable application of SS leads to excessive accumulation of heavy metals in soils. A column experiment was conducted to test the availability of heavy metals to Lolium perenne grown in SS-treated soils following diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) application at rates of 0, 10 and 20 mmol kg(-1) soil. In order to prevent metal leaching in DTPA-assisted phytoextraction process, a horizontal permeable barrier was placed below the treated soil, and its effectiveness was also assessed. Results showed that DTPA addition significantly increased metal uptake by L. perenne shoots and metal leaching. Permeable barriers increased metal concentrations in plant shoots and effectively decreased metal leaching from the treated soil. Heavy metals in SS-treated soils could be gradually removed by harvesting L. perenne many times in 1 year and adding low dosage of DTPA days before each harvest.

  9. Influence of transport infrastructure on water permeability of soils of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, Dmitry; Eremina, Diana

    2017-10-01

    Correctly designed transport infrastructure should support the current economic relations. It should provide a reserve for development of economy of the region in the future. In Western Siberia, new highways are actively being built and major repairs of the operating roads are being conducted. Local materials are often used in the roadbed construction. In the Tyumen region, it is usually sandy silt and clayey sand. The soil has unfavourable physico-mechanical properties. The soil is prone to water and wind erosion. This type of ground gets on the adjacent to the road territory. Studies on the influence of highways on soil permeability were carried out on the basis of the federal highway Tyumen-Omsk. Three types of soils, which are actively used in the agricultural sector, were considered. It is found that the content of particles with the size less than 0.01 mm reaches 32% in the soil used in road construction. It is noted that a part of these particles accumulates on the adjacent to the road territory since it is being washed out from roadbed. The content of physical clay (initial values. The width of active accumulation of silt particles reaches 15-20 m along the roads. The soils at the distance up to 10 m from the highway are almost impermeable to water. Absence of a natural hydrological drain, results in the territory bogging. An inverse close correlation was established between the content of physical clay (<0.01 mm) and water permeability (r = 0.90).

  10. Bioventing feasibility study of low permeability soils for remediation of petroleum contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackney, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    A site characterization of leaking underground gasoline and diesel storage tanks at the University of Idaho, West Farm Operations Center, identified approximately 800 cubic yards of petroleum-contaminated soil exceedingly regulatory action limits of 100 ppm TPH. Bioventing, a combination of in situ soil vapor extraction and microbial degradation, was selected as a remedial alternative on the basis of the presumably unsaturated paleo-soil with a 45-foot depth to groundwater, and a microbial study which concluded that indigenous petroleum-degrading microorganisms existed throughout the contamination. Soil vapor extraction tests were conducted by applying a 60-inch water column vacuum to a soil vapor extraction well and monitoring pneumatic pressure drawdown in 12 adjacent pneumatic piezometers and vertically distributed piezometer clusters. Pressure drawdown vs time data plots indicated that air permeability is inadequate everywhere at the site except at 20 feet below ground surface. Low soil permeability creates conditions for a perched water table that was documented during the investigation, resulting in unsatisfactory conditions for in situ bioventing. 8 refs., 14 figs

  11. Bioslurping pilot test in a silty low-permeability soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millette, D.; Thibault, R.; Charlebois, S.; Samson, R.; Orban, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiency of bioslurping as a remedial technology for hydrocarbon contaminated sites was discussed. Bioslurping combines the two remedial technologies of bioventing and vacuum-enhanced free-product recovery. Bioslurping does not require a cone of depression in the groundwater table around a well to draw the light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) contaminant to the well. LNAPLs are recovered by applying a low to medium vacuum on the recovery wells. The rate of LNAPL recovery is higher with bioslurping than with a dual-pump system. A 26-day bioslurping pilot study was conducted at a decommissioned Montreal gas station contaminated by gasoline. The site was on soil composed mainly of silt. The depth of hydrocarbons measured was 1.17 m. Bioslurping was capable of removing about 50 kg/day per well of hydrocarbons from this site. The bulk of the product extracted was in the form of vapors. The cost associated with the treatment of air emissions could be reduced by partial reinjection within the radius of influence of the slurping wells. The indigenous microbial population was able to biodegrade the hydrocarbons. About eight per cent of the total mass of hydrocarbons was eliminated by biodegradation. 13 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs

  12. Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Optimization, Clare Water Supply Superfund Site, Permeable Reactive Barrier and Soil Remedy Areas, Clare, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report contains a review of the long-term groundwater monitoring network for the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) and Soil Remedy Areas at the Clare Water Supply Superfund Site in Clare, Michigan.

  13. Laboratory test investigations on soil water characteristic curve and air permeability of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianyong; Wu, Xun; Ai, Yingbo; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-05-01

    The air permeability coefficient has a high correlation with the water content of municipal solid waste. In this study, continuous drying methodology using a tension meter was employed to construct the soil water characteristic curve of municipal solid waste (M-SWCC). The municipal solid waste air permeability test was conducted by a newly designed apparatus. The measured M-SWCC was well reproduced by the van Genuchten (V-G) model and was used to predict the parameters of typical points in M-SWCC, including saturated water content, field capacity, residual water content and water content at the inflection point. It was found that the M-SWCC was significantly influenced by void ratio. The final evaporation and test period of M-SWCC increase with the increase in void ratio of municipal solid waste. The evolution of air permeability coefficient with water content of municipal solid waste depicted three distinct characteristic stages. It was observed that the water contents that corresponded to the two cut-off points of the three stages were residual water content and water content at the inflection point, respectively. The air permeability coefficient of municipal solid waste decreased with the increase of the water content from zero to the residual water content. The air permeability coefficient was almost invariable when the water content increased from residual water content to the water content at the inflection point. When the water content of municipal solid waste exceeded the water content at the inflection point, the air permeability coefficient sharply decreased with the increase of water content.

  14. The permeability and loss of potassium in three types of Yunnan soil measured by using 86Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dayong; Bie Zhilong; Wan Zhaoliang

    1997-01-01

    The permeability and loss of potassium in three types of soil (purple, paddy and red soil) used for planting tobacco in Yunnan province were studied by using 86 Rb tracer method. The results showed that for the treatment of 0.1 gK 2 O/kg soil, the potassium loss in soils was in order of purple soil>paddy soil>red soil. The loss of potassium in purple soil and paddy soil increased with sampling time. In the same soil, the loss of potassium was fast with the treatment of 0.1 gK 2 O/kg soil, but it was slow with the treatment of 0.2 gK 2 O/kg soil and 0.3 gK 2 O/kg soil. The potassium residues in soil surface was in order of red soil>paddy soil>purple soil. And the amounts of potassium in soil surface was positively correlated with potassium added. With the increase of soil depth, a slight decrease of potassium residue was found for the treatment of 0.2 gK 2 O/kg soil and 0.3 gK 2 O/kg soil, while a slight increase for the treatment of 0.1 gK 2 O/kg soil

  15. Estimating soil hydraulic properties from soil moisture time series by inversion of a dual-permeability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Meyer, Stefanie; Potthast, Karin; Michalzik, Beate

    2017-04-01

    Dual-permeability type models are widely used to simulate water fluxes and solute transport in structured soils. These models contain two spatially overlapping flow domains with different parameterizations or even entirely different conceptual descriptions of flow processes. They are usually able to capture preferential flow phenomena, but a large set of parameters is needed, which are very laborious to obtain or cannot be measured at all. Therefore, model inversions are often used to derive the necessary parameters. Although these require sufficient input data themselves, they can use measurements of state variables instead, which are often easier to obtain and can be monitored by automated measurement systems. In this work we show a method to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from high frequency soil moisture time series data gathered at two different measurement depths by inversion of a simple one dimensional dual-permeability model. The model uses an advection equation based on the kinematic wave theory to describe the flow in the fracture domain and a Richards equation for the flow in the matrix domain. The soil moisture time series data were measured in mesocosms during sprinkling experiments. The inversion consists of three consecutive steps: First, the parameters of the water retention function were assessed using vertical soil moisture profiles in hydraulic equilibrium. This was done using two different exponential retention functions and the Campbell function. Second, the soil sorptivity and diffusivity functions were estimated from Boltzmann-transformed soil moisture data, which allowed the calculation of the hydraulic conductivity function. Third, the parameters governing flow in the fracture domain were determined using the whole soil moisture time series. The resulting retention functions were within the range of values predicted by pedotransfer functions apart from very dry conditions, where all retention functions predicted lower matrix potentials

  16. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION WITH SOIL PERMEABILITY IN THE AREA OF VELIKA GORICA WELL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Kovač

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic parameters affects behaviour of various ions in soils. The goal of this paper was to get better understanding of relationship between physical and chemical properties and soil permeability at the location of case study profile Velika Gorica, based on the physical and chemical data. Soil profile is situated in the Eutric Cambisol of the Zagreb aquifer, Croatia. Zagreb aquifer represents the only source of potable water for inhabitants of the City of Zagreb and Zagreb County. Based on the data obtained from particle size analysis, soil hydraulic parameters and measured water content, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity values were calculated for the estimation of soil profile permeability. Soil water retention curves and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are very similar for all depths because soil content does not change significantly through the depth. Determination of anions and cations on soil samples was performed using the method of ion chromatography. Results showed decrease of ions concentrations after 0.6 m depth. SAR distribution in the soil profile shows that SAR values are not significantly changing at the soil profile. The highest CEC and EC values are determined in horizon Bw developed in 0.6 m depth which is consistent with highest SAR value and ions concentrations. All results suggest that physical and chemical properties of investigated profile are in relationship with soil permeability.

  17. Effects of triethyl phosphate and nitrate on electrokinetically enhanced biodegradation of diesel in low permeability soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G T; Ro, H M; Lee, S M

    2007-08-01

    Bench-scale experiments for electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation of diesel in low permeability soils were conducted. An electrokinetic reactor (ER) was filled with kaolin that was artificially contaminated with diesel at a level of 2500 mg kg(-1). A constant voltage gradient of 1.0 V cm(-1) was applied. In phosphorus transport experiments, KH2PO4 was not distributed homogeneously along the ER, and most of the transported phosphorus was converted to water-insoluble aluminum phosphate after 12 days of electrokinetic (EK) operation. However, the advancing P front of triethyl phosphate (TEP) progressed with time and resulted in uniform P distribution. The treatments employed in the electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation of diesel were control (no addition of nitrogen and phosphorus), NP (KNO3+ KH2PO4), NT (KNO3+ TEP), UP (urea+ KH2PO4), and UT (urea+TEP). Analysis of effluent collected during the first 12 days of EK operation showed that diesel was not removed from the kaolin. After nutrient delivery, using the EK operation, the ER was transferred into an incubator for the biodegradation process. After 60 days of biodegradation, the concentrations of diesel in the kaolin for the NP, NT, UP, UT, and control treatments were 1356, 1002, 1658, 1612, and 2003 mg kg(-1), respectively. The ratio of biodegraded diesel concentration to initial concentration (2465 mg kg(-1)) in NP, NT, UP, UT, and control were 45.0%, 59.4%, 32.7%, 34.6%, and 18.7%, respectively. This result showed that TEP, treated along with NO3-, was most effective for the biodegradation of diesel. TEP was delivered more efficiently to the target zones and with less phosphorus loss than KH2PO4. However, this facilitated phosphorus delivery was effective in biodegrading diesel under anaerobic conditions only when electron acceptors, such as NO3-, were present.

  18. Characterization of 222Rn entry into a basement structure surrounded by low permeability soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental facility has been developed to monitor the entry rate and concentration of 222 Rn in two basement type structures surrounded by soil having a permeability on the order of 1- -12 m 2 . A data acquisition system recorded environmental conditions outside and inside the structures, including basement air exchange rates, every 15 min. Indoor 222 Rn concentrations ranged from 400 to 1400 Bq m -3 . The observed 222 Rn entry rate is highly variable and has two primary components; a constant input rate caused by diffusion of 222 Rn through the concrete walls and floor, and a variable rate that depends upon indoor-soil pressure differentials of only a few pascals. Pressure differentials are dependent upon wind speed and wind direction. Stack effect was not significant. During a two week period, with relatively calm winds, diffusion through the concrete walls and floor plus the floor-wall joint accounted for more than 80% of the total 222 Rn entry

  19. Generating enhanced site topography data to improve permeable pavement performance assessment methods - presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeable pavement surfaces are infiltration based stormwater control measures (SCM) commonly applied in parking lots to decrease impervious area and reduce runoff volume. Many are not optimally designed however, as little attention is given to draining a large enough contributin...

  20. Integration of pneumatic fracturing with bioremediation from the enhanced removal of BTX from low permeability gasoline-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatraman, S.N.; Kosson, D.S.; Schuring, J.R.; Boland, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    A pilot-scale evaluation of the integrated pneumatic fracturing and bioremediation system was carried out to demonstrate the enhanced removal of BTX from a gasoline contaminated, low permeability soil formation. The fracturing enhanced subsurface permeability by an average of over 36 times, and established an extended bioremediation zone supporting aerobic, denitrifying and methanogenic populations. Subsurface amendment injections consisting of phosphate and nitrogen were made periodically over a 50-week period to stimulate microbial activity. Results indicate that 79% of the soil-phase BTX was removed during the field test, with over 85% of the mass removed attributable to bioremediation

  1. Soils as records of past and present environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    This contribution reflects selected pedological concepts that are helpful for interpreting soil properties related to past and present environments. These concepts are illustrated by examples from various landscapes, and their combination finally leads to some further conclusions. The concept of Targulian and Gerasimova (2009) distinguishes soil system and soil body. Soil system is defined as "open multiphase system functioning in any solid-phase substrate at its interface with the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biota", and soil body as "solid-phase part of a soil system produced by its long-term functioning and composed of a vertical sequence of genetic horizons". Soil system functioning corresponds to the recent environmental factors and includes heat and moisture dynamics, biomass production, biogeochemical cycles, and other processes. In contrast, a soil body is a record of the long-term functioning of a soil system. It thus provides a record not only of the functioning of the soil system under the present environmental conditions but also under past, possibly different, conditions. Hence, Targulian and Goryachkin (2004) called it the "memory" of the landscape. Richter and Yaalon (2012) argued that most soils comprise both, features that developed under the present environmental conditions and features that reflect different conditions that the soils experienced in the past; they concluded that most soils are polygenetic. Although the current functioning of the soil system in the concept of Targulian and Gerasimova (2009) is mainly controlled by the present-day combination of environmental factors, it should be added that past processes also influence the soil system, because past processes changed the soil properties in a way that also the present-day functioning of the soil system is affected by these changes. Earlier, Yaalon (1971) had categorised soil properties according to the time-span required for their adjustment to the actual environment, distinguishing

  2. Biological permeable reactive barriers coupled with electrokinetic soil flushing for the treatment of diesel-polluted clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Esperanza; Ruiz, Clara; Villaseñor, José; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Cañizares, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Removal of diesel from spiked kaolin has been studied in the laboratory using coupled electrokinetic soil flushing (EKSF) and bioremediation through an innovative biological permeable reactive barriers (Bio-PRBs) positioned between electrode wells. The results show that this technology is efficient in the removal of pollutants and allows the soil to maintain the appropriate conditions for microorganism growth in terms of pH, temperature, and nutrients. At the same time, EKSF was demonstrated to be a very interesting technology for transporting pollutants, microorganisms and nutrients, although results indicate that careful management is necessary to avoid the depletion of nutrients, which are effectively transported by electro-migration. After two weeks of operation, 30% of pollutants are removed and energy consumption is under 70 kWh m(-3). Main fluxes (electroosmosis and evaporation) and changes in the most relevant parameters (nutrients, diesel, microorganisms, surfactants, moisture conductivity and pH) during treatment and in a complete post-study analysis are studied to give a comprehensive description of the most relevant processes occurring in the soil (pollutant transport and biodegradation). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Wheel traffic effect on air-filled porosity and air permeability in a soil catena across the wheel rut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    might induce different effects on soil physical properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of vehicle traffic on soil physical properties and air permeability by systematic collection of samples in a transect running from the center to the outside of the wheel rut. A field...... catena running from center of the wheel rut to un wheeled part of the field ( 0, 20, 40, 50,60 and 400 cm horizontal distance). We measured water retention and air permeability (ka) at -30, -100 and -300 hPa matric potentials. At -100 hPa, we obtained consistently lower air filled under the wheel rut......The impact of wheel traffic on soil physical properties is usually quantified by randomly collecting soil cores at specific depths below the wheeled surface. However, modeling studies as well as few measurements indicated a non-uniform stress distribution in a catena across the wheel rut, which...

  4. Investigation of Stabilised Batu Pahat Soft Soil Pertaining on its CBR and Permeability Properties for Road Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Idrus, M. M.; Singh, J. S. M.; Musbah, A. L. A.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization by adding materials such as cement, lime and bitumen is one of the effective methods for improving the geotechnical properties of soils [11] Nano-particle is one of the newest additives and many studies about using nano-particle in soil improvement has been done but it was given less attention when soft clay soils stabilization is concerned. To evaluate the strength characteristics of stabilized Batu Pahat soft clay, laboratory investigation on early strength gained by the stabilized soil must be conducted to formulate a suitable and economical mix design [10]. To achieve such purpose, the study examined the effect of NanoClay on the California Bearing Ratio and the Permeability of soft clay. The results gained shows that the Nano-Clay is able to increase the strength of the soft clay [9]. The California Bearing Ratio of the soil is increase significantly where the results for the highest percentage of admixture is 14.4% while the permeability of the soil decreases significantly with increasing Nano-Clay whereby the results of the highest percentage of admixture is 2.0187x10-11 m/s. After doing this research, it is proven that Nano-clay can contribute towards better soil stabilization and enhance the quality of soil as subgrade and foundation at large.

  5. Permeable Pavement Monitoring at the Edison Environmental Center Demonstration Site - presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch has been monitoring an instrumented 110-space pervious pavement parking lot. The lot is used by EPA personnel and visitors to the Edison Environmental Center. The design includes 28-space rows of three permeable pavement types: asphal...

  6. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF MODERN LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE COEFFICIENT OF PERMEABILITY FOR SOIL MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Veinović, Želimir; Kovačević-Zelić, Biljana; Kvasnička, Predrag

    2003-01-01

    Permeability tests are one of the most often performed experiments in geotechnics. Conventional methods conducted by oedometer and triaxial apparatus have many disadvantages, the most significant being the test duration. As a consequence, errors in permeability measurements could occur. On the contrary, by applying modern flow-pump method, permeability measurements can be obtained much more rapidly. Moreover, the permeability/void ratio relation can be obtained by using adequate laboratory de...

  7. Density and permeability of a loess soil: long-term organic matter effect and the response to compressive stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    to compressive stress, undisturbed soil cores were collected from a long-term fertilisation experiment in Bad Lauchstädt in Germany, including combinations of animal manure and mineral fertilisers. The cores were drained to -100 hPa matric potential and exposed to uniaxial confined compression (200k......Pa). Investigated indicators for compression resistance included compression index, precompression stress, and resistance and resilience indices based on measured soil physical properties (bulk density, air-filled porosity, air permeability, and void ratio). Soil resilience was assessed following exposure...... but the correlation was not significant. However, initial bulk density (ρbi) and initial gravimetric water content (wi) were significantly positively correlated to the indices of soil compression resistance, with the effect of ρbi being significantly stronger. Significant recovery of airfilled porosity and air...

  8. Characterization of tillage effects on soil permeability using different measures of macroporosity derived from tension infiltrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, G.; Schwen, A.; Scholl, P.; Kammerer, G.; Buchan, G.; Kaul, H.-P.; Loiskandl, W.

    2010-05-01

    Soil macroporosity is a highly dynamic property influenced by environmental factors, such as raindrop impact, wetting-drying and freezing-thawing cycles, soil biota and plant roots, as well as agricultural management measures. Macroporosity represents an important indicator of soil physical quality, particularly in relation to the site specific water transmission properties, and can be used as a sensitive measure to assess soil structural degradation. Its quantification is also required for the parameterization of dual porosity models that are frequently used in environmental impact studies on erosion and solute (pesticide, nitrate) leaching. The importance of soil macroporosity for the water transport properties of the soil and its complexity due to high spatio-temporal heterogeneity make its quantitative assessment still a challenging task. Tension infiltrometers have been shown to be adequate measurement devices to obtain data in the near-saturated range of water flow where structural (macro)pores are dominating the transport process. Different methods have been used to derive water transmission characteristics from tension infiltrometer measurements. Moret and Arrúe (2007) differentiated between using a minimum equivalent capillary pore radius and a flow weighted mean pore radius to obtain representative macropore flow properties from tension infiltrometer data. Beside direct approaches based on Wooding's equation, also inverse methods have been applied to obtain soil hydraulic properties (Šimůnek et al. 1998). Using a dual porosity model in the inverse procedure allows estimating parameters in the dynamic near-saturated range by numerical optimization to the infiltration measurements, while fixing parameters in the more stable textural range of small pores using e.g. pressure plate data or even pedotransfer functions. The present work presents a comparison of quantitative measures of soil macroporosity derived from tension infiltrometer data by different

  9. The Fingerprint of Present and Past Rainfall on Soil Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, R.; Owen, J.; Ewing, S.; Nishiizumi, K.; Finkel, R.; Chadwick, O.; Dietrich, W.

    2007-12-01

    since that time has generally experienced its present condition of cold upwelling offshore waters and corresponding aridity. Presently, the soils are in arid to hyperarid regions where the main geochemical process is sulfate (north) and carbonate (south) retention, and the soils show enormous gains of these solutes. In stark contrast, the silicate matrix of the soils shows elemental losses of Si, Al, and Fe (and clay formation) that increase with southerly distance (and rainfall), illustrating that past (pre-late Pliocene) geochemical processes differed greatly from modern conditions. These starkly different geochemical signatures (salts over a weathered silicate matrix) reflect soil polygenesis, and have significant implications for Mars soils which contain both weathered silicates and secondary phyllosilicates, and a later stage overlay of sulfates and chlorides.

  10. Feasibility Of Coupling Permeable Bio-Barriers And Electrokinetics For The Treatment Of Diesel Hydrocarbons Polluted Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez, Esperanza Mena; Jiménez, Cristina Sáez; Camacho, José Villaseñor; Rodrigo, Manuel A.Rodrigo; Cañizares, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrokinetics and a biobarrier were combined to remediate of a diesel polluted soil. • pH gradients did not affect the biobarrier activity located in soil central position. • Microorganisms were partially detached from the biobarrier and moved across the soil. • An anionic surfactant helped the contact between pollutant and microorganisms. • A 39% of the diesel biodegradable fraction was homogeneously removed across the soil. - Abstract: In this study, the remediation of a diesel hydrocarbon-polluted clay soil using an electrochemical-biological combined technology is assessed. The polluted soil was subjected to an electrokinetic (EK) treatment with a biological permeable reactive barrier. A lab-scale electrochemical cell for soil treatment was used. The biological barrier placed in the soil was a biofilm reactor previously adapted for diesel degradation. A batch experiment of 336 h was conducted in a synthetic clay soil spiked with 10 g·kg −1 of diesel and a constant voltage gradient of 1.0 V cm −1 . Sodium dodecyl sulphate was used as an anionic surfactant in the cathodic well to allow for hydrocarbon emulsification during the treatment. At the end of the experiment, extreme pH values were observed near the electrodes. However, the pH remained constant at approximately 7.7 in the central biobarrier zone, which allowed for biological processes. Biological growth was observed in the biobarrier, and a part of the biofilm was detached and transported through the soil in both directions. Furthermore, the surfactant was transported across the soil due to electromigration and electroosmosis, which resulted in diesel emulsification. The combination of biological and EK phenomena finally resulted in a homogenous hydrocarbon removal of approximately 27% in the polluted soil, which indicated a 39% removal of the diesel biodegradable fraction. Due to the electroosmotic flow and the biological degradation, some of the water, surfactant and

  11. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Silkeborg Sand No. 0000. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. The apparatus, test procedures and the analysis method are described......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  12. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  13. Effect of temperature on damage and permeability of clayey soils and rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfared, M.

    2011-04-01

    Storage of exothermic radioactive waste in deep low permeability geological formations such as clayey rocks and plastic clays is a solution considered for long term repositories. However the excavation of underground galleries creates a damaged zone (EDZ). The effect of the damage zone on the transport properties of the geological barrier has been widely studied. Within the framework of the TIMODAZ European project, emphasis has been put on the effect of temperature. As a partner of this project, the current work is performed to investigate the coupling effect between temperature, damage and permeability on Boom clay and Opalinus clay through an experimental study. View to the experimental difficulties related to the low permeability materials, a new hollow cylinder triaxial cell with short drainage path specifically designed to study the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of very low permeable materials is developed during this work. The tests and the numerical analysis show that the short sample drainage path reduces significantly the time needed to re-saturate an initially unsaturated sample and it also permits to achieve drained conditions (i.e. negligible excess pore pressure during testing) with a higher loading rate. For Boom clay, the effect of the pore water thermal pressurisation on a sample with a pre-existing shear band is investigated. The undrained heating under shear stress decreases the effective stress on the sample which leads to its failure. An existing failure plane in the sample behaves like a preferential weakness plane which can be reactivated by pore water thermal pressurisation. The estimated shearing resistance along the sheared plane is smaller than that of the intact material. For the Opalinus clay-stone, drained heating on a saturated sample shows that this clay-stone behaves like a slightly over consolidated material (thermo-elasto-plastic behaviour) with transition from expansion to contraction at 65 C. The decrease of the permeability

  14. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  15. Effect of dissolved oxygen manipulation on diffusive emissions from NAPL-impacted low permeability soil layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Lisa M; Dahlen, Paul R; Johnson, Paul C

    2014-05-06

    Aquifer physical model experiments were performed to investigate if diffusive emissions from nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-impacted low-permeability layers into groundwater moving through adjacent NAPL-free high-permeability layers can be reduced by creating an aerobic biotreatment zone at the interface between the two, and if over time that leads to reduced emissions after treatment ceases. Experiments were performed in two 1.2-m long × 1.2-m high × 5.4 cm wide stainless steel tanks; each with a high-permeability sand layer overlying a low-permeability crushed granite layer containing a NAPL mixture of indane and benzene. Each tank was water-saturated with horizontal flow primarily through the sand layer. The influent water was initially deoxygenated and the emissions and concentration distributions were allowed to reach near-steady conditions. The influent dissolved oxygen (DO) level was increased stepwise to 6.5-8.5 mg/L and 17-20 mg/L, and then decreased back to deoxygenated conditions. Each condition was maintained for at least 45 days. Relative to the near-steady benzene emission at the initial deoxygenated condition, the emission was reduced by about 70% when the DO was 6.5-8.5 mg/L, 90% when the DO was 17-20 mg/L, and ultimately 60% when returning to low DO conditions. While the reductions were substantial during treatment, longer-term reductions after 120 d of elevated DO treatment, relative to an untreated condition predicted by theory, were low: 29% and 6% in Tank 1 and Tank 2, respectively. Results show a 1-2 month lag between the end of DO delivery and rebound to the final near-steady emissions level. This observation has implications for post-treatment performance monitoring sampling at field sites.

  16. Electrokinetic mobilisation of toluene and chlorinated ethenes in low permeable soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middeldorp, P.; Sinke, A. [TNO Environment Energy and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    An electrokinetic horizontal soil column setup was developed to study the effect of electric current on the mobilisation and biodegradation of organic pollutants in soil. Toluene and tetrachloroethene (PCE) were injected between the two electrodes in the center of the soil column and a DC current of 1 V/cm was applied. We observed a breakthrough of PCE and toluene at the cathode side after 8 days and 11 days respectively. This short experiment shows the possibility to enhance the mobility of non-ionic organic pollutants through electro-osmosis. (orig.)

  17. Study on 3D surfactant assisted electrokinetic remediation of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in low permeability soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, W.; Ye, S.; Wu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Electrickinetic(EK) is a promising remediation technology because of its capability to remediate soils with low permeability. It has been used for heavy metals and organic pollutant(OPs) contaminated soils. As the most OPs are poor solubility and strong sorption capacity, combined EK technology is usually used, for example, EK combined with surfactants. Numerous combined EK tests are done in one-dimension(1D) column, however, it is proved that there is a big gap between 1D tests and field application. The objectives of this study are to investigate the remediation efficiency and EK behavior of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene(1,2,4-TCB) contaminated clay enhanced by surfactants in a three-dimension reactor with 28cm length×15cm width×16cm height. 1,2,4-TCB was one of the main contaminants at a field site in Nanjing, China, where the polluted soils are clay. Soil filled in EK cell was divided into six layers in depth, and each layer was divided into six parts in length and three parts in width. There were 108 specimens in total which realized 3D monitoring the effects of EK. Triton X-100(Exp1) and Tween80(Exp2) dissolved in NaCO3/NaHCO3 buffer respectively, were used as the anode purging solution. The distributions of soil pH and water content showed that the buffer was sufficient to neutralize H+ produced at anode and the direction of electroosmotic flow(EOF) remained constant. Exp2 generated a higher EOF than Exp1, but remediation efficiencies were not satisfactory so far. The concentration of 1,2,4-TCB in soil reached a peak and nadir in the normalized distances of 0.75 and 0.9 from cathode after 5 days, respectively. The 1,2,4-TCB concentration in the peak was almost twice as much as the initial concentration. It suggested that 1,2,4-TCB was desorbed from soil by surfactants and was transported from anode to cathode by EOF, which proved the capability of EK with surfactants to move 1,2,4-TCB in clay. The concentration of 1,2,4-TCB in the normalized distances of 0

  18. Geotechnical behaviour of low-permeability soils in surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Navarro, Vicente; Alonso, Juan; Yustres, Ángel; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sáez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic processes provide the basis of a range of very interesting techniques for the remediation of polluted soils. These techniques consist of the application of a current field in the soil that develops different transport mechanisms capable of mobilizing several types of pollutants. However, the use of these techniques could generate nondesirable effects related to the geomechanical behavior of the soil, reducing the effectiveness of the processes. In the case of the remediation of polluted soils with plasticity index higher than 35, an excessive shrinkage can be observed in remediation test. For this reason, the continued evaporation that takes place in the sample top can lead to the development of cracks, distorting the electrokinetic transport regime, and consequently, the development of the operation. On the other hand, when analyzing silty soils, in the surroundings of injection surfactant wells, high seepages can be generated that give rise to the development of piping processes. In this article methods are described to allow a reduction, or to even eliminate, both problems.

  19. Estimation and upscaling of dual-permeability model parameters for the transport of E.coli D21g in soils with preferential flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dual-permeability models are increasingly used to quantify the transport of solutes and microorganisms in soils with preferential flow. An ability to accurately determine the model parameters and their variation with preferential pathway characteristics is crucial for predicting the transport of mi...

  20. Dual permeability soil water dynamics and water uptake by roots in irrigated potato fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolezal, Frantisek; Zumr, David; Vacek, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Water movement and uptake by roots in a drip-irrigated potato field was studied by combining field experiments, outputs of numerical simulations and summary results of an EU project (www.fertorganic.org). Detailed measurements of soil suction and weather conditions in the Bohemo-Moravian highland...

  1. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-11-04

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  2. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2010-09-28

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  3. Mapping of 222Rn and 4He in soil gas over a karstic limestone-granite boundary: correlation of high indoor 222Rn with zones of enhanced permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, P.J.; Gallagher, V.; Van den Boom, G.

    1992-01-01

    Recent indoor radon reconnaissance surveys in Ireland have identified buildings with high radon concentrations (up to 1700 Bq.m -3 ) overlying Carboniferous karstic limestone sequences in the western part of the country. A detailed investigation of indoor 222 Rn and soil gas 222 Rn and 4 He concentrations has been carried out over a karstic limestone-uraniferous granite boundary in County Galway. High indoor 222 Rn concentrations occur in dwellings over both lithologies. Radon migratory routes in bedrock and overburden appear to be controlled by zones of enhanced permeability, e.g. fractures, faults, etc. which are defined by linear arrays of elevated 4 He soil gas values. While the ultimate source of radon remains conjectural, the greatly enhanced permeability of karstified limestone is thought to be of fundamental importance in providing a means of rapid radon transport into overlying soils and buildings. (author)

  4. Acidification of forest soil in Russia: From 1893 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenis, A.G.; Lawrence, G.B.; Andreev, A.A.; Bobrov, A.A.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    It is commonly believed that fine-textured soils developed on carbonate parent material are well buffered from possible acidification. There are no data, however, that document resistance of such soils to acidic deposition exposure on a timescale longer than 30-40 years. In this paper, we report on directly testing the long-term buffering capacity of nineteenth century forest soils developed on calcareous silt loam. In a chemical analysis comparing archived soils with modern soils collected from the same locations ???100 years later, we found varying degrees of forest-soil acidification in the taiga and forest steppe regions. Land-use history, increases in precipitation, and acidic deposition were contributing factors in acidification. The acidification of forest soil was documented through decreases in soil pH and changes in concentrations of exchangeable calcium and aluminum, which corresponded with changes in communities of soil microfauna. Although acidification was found at all three analyzed locations, the trends in soil chemistry were most pronounced where the highest loading of acidic deposition had taken place. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  6. Nature based solutions to mitigate soil sealing in urban areas: Results from a 4-year study comparing permeable, porous, and impermeable pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, A; Frangi, P; Mori, J; Donzelli, D; Ferrini, F

    2017-07-01

    Soil sealing is one of the most pervasive forms of soil degradation that follows urbanization and, despite innovative pavements (i.e. pervious) are being installed in urban areas to mitigate it, there is little research on the effects of pervious pavements on soil water and carbon cycle and on the physiology of urban trees. The aim of this 4-year experiment was to assess the effects of three pavements, differing in permeability to water and gases, on some soil physical parameters, and on growth and physiology of newly planted Celtis australis and Fraxinus ornus. Treatments were: 1) impermeable pavement (asphalt on concrete sub-base); 2) permeable pavement (pavers on crushed rock sub-base); 3) porous design (porous pavement on crushed rock sub-base); 4) control (unpaved soil, kept free of weed by chemical control). Soil (temperature, moisture, oxygen content and CO 2 efflux) and plant (above- and below-ground growth, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, water relations) parameters were measured. All types of pavements altered the water cycle compared to unpaved soil plots, but this disturbance was less intense in porous pavements than in other soil cover types. Porous pavements allowed both higher infiltration and evaporation of water than both pavers and asphalt. Reduction of evaporative cooling from soil paved with permeable and impermeable pavements contributed to significant soil warming: at 20cm depth, soils under concrete pavers and asphalt were 4 and 5°C warmer than soil covered by porous pavements and unpaved soils, respectively. Thus, enhancing evaporation from paved soil by the use of porous pavements may contribute to mitigating urban heat islands. CO 2 greatly accumulated under impermeable and permeable pavements, but not under porous pavements, which showed CO 2 efflux rates similar to control. Soil oxygen slightly decreased only beneath asphalt. Growth of newly planted C. australis and F. ornus was little affected by pavement type. Tree

  7. A New approach for evaluate a sandy soil infiltration to calculate the permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechergui, M. Mohamed; Latifa Dhaouadi, Ms

    2016-04-01

    10 sites were chosen in the four ha field of Research Regional Center of Oasis Agriculture in Deguache (Tozeur). The soil is homogeneous to the depth of 120 cm; with a sandy texture (60% big sand, 20% small sand 13% silt and 7% clay); with a mean bulk density equal to 1.43g/cm3 and with field capacity and welting point equal respectively to 11.9 and 6 %. The time duration for each infiltration essay lasted between 352 and 554 minutes. The number of observation points for each infiltration curve varies between 31 and 40. The shape of the infiltration curves observed in all sites is in part similar to what observed in literature (high increase with time of cumulative infiltration for a short time and then a linear increase of this parameter to a time varying between 122 to 197 minutes depending on the site) and then something special a slowdown in the cumulative infiltration to the end of the essay. The (F(t) / t 1/2 versus t 1/2) plotted curves showed two distinguished parts: A linear relation to the time varying between 122 and 197 minutes confirming the validity of Philips model and a second part showed a slowdown in the slope to a time varying between 231 and 347 minutes depending on the site and then drop down to the end of the essay. This is may be due to the rearrangement of particles after a long time of infiltration which led to a decrease in hydraulic conductivity. To improve the calculation of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, we choose only the part that is validated by Philips model, the linear part. The number of omitted points in the cumulative infiltration varies between 11 and 22 points. By this method, the saturated hydraulic conductivity varies between 1 and 3.72 m/day with a mean equal to 2.35. However the previous technique used gave a mean value equal to 2.07. The new method is accurate and gives better results of K and sorbtivity.

  8. A study of the application of permeable pavements as a sustainable technique for the mitigation of soil sealing in cities: A case study in the south of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rojas, M I; Huertas-Fernández, F; Moreno, B; Martínez, G; Grindlay, A L

    2018-01-01

    The use of 'Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems' (SuDS) has become a more sustainable alternative for managing stormwater, greatly reducing the effects of soil sealing. However, the lack of monitored projects is a barrier to their implementation, as the companies which manage sewer systems cannot quantify the impact and cost-efficiency of SuDS. This paper presents a project developed in the south of Spain, in which the hydrological performance of 3 types of permeable pavements has been analyzed. The efficiencies obtained (over 70%), are higher than or similar to the efficiencies of vegetated SuDS, demonstrating the capacity of these pavements for delaying catchment area response and slow flow velocities, reducing the operating costs of sewer systems and the flood risk, while also ensuring service conditions for cities and safety for pedestrian and vehicular circulation. This pilot site has generated results which are sufficiently consistent so as to be representative, and serve as a reference for other cities with a similar climate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of phospholipid-based formulations of Boswellia serrata extract on the solubility, permeability, and absorption of the individual boswellic acid constituents present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsch, Jan; Gerbeth, Kathleen; Fricker, Gert; Setzer, Constanze; Zirkel, Jürgen; Rebmann, Herbert; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Abdel-Tawab, Mona

    2012-10-26

    Boswellia serrata gum resin extracts are used widely for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, very low concentrations in the plasma and brain were observed for the boswellic acids (1-6, the active constituents of B. serrata). The present study investigated the effect of phospholipids alone and in combination with common co-surfactants (e.g., Tween 80, vitamin E-TPGS, pluronic f127) on the solubility of 1-6 in physiologically relevant media and on the permeability in the Caco-2 cell model. Because of the high lipophilicity of 1-6, the permeability experiments were adapted to physiological conditions using modified fasted state simulated intestinal fluid as apical (donor) medium and 4% bovine serum albumin in the basolateral (receiver) compartment. A formulation composed of extract/phospholipid/pluronic f127 (1:1:1 w/w/w) increased the solubility of 1-6 up to 54 times compared with the nonformulated extract and exhibited the highest mass net flux in the permeability tests. The oral administration of this formulation to rats (240 mg/kg) resulted in 26 and 14 times higher plasma levels for 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (1) and acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (2), respectively. In the brain, five times higher levels for 2 compared to the nonformulated extract were determined 8 h after oral administration.

  10. Crustal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  11. Notional Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.; Van den Bos, J.P.; Maertens, J.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Different layer design of a rock slope and under layers has a large effect on the strengths on the rock slope itself. In the stability formula developed of VAN DER MEER [1988] this effect is represented by the term Notional Permeability with symbol P. A more open, or permeable, structure underneath

  12. Soil-Transmitted Helminth Eggs Are Present in Soil at Multiple Locations within Households in Rural Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Steinbaum

    Full Text Available Almost one-quarter of the world's population is infected with soil-transmitted helminths (STH. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence and location of STH-Ascaris, Trichuris, and hookworm spp.-egg contamination in soil within rural household plots in Kenya. Field staff collected soil samples from July to September 2014 from the house entrance and the latrine entrance of households in Kakamega County; additional spatial sampling was conducted at a subset of households (N = 22 samples from 3 households. We analyzed soil samples using a modified version of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA method for enumerating Ascaris in biosolids. We found 26.8% of households had one or more species of STH eggs present in the soil in at least one household location (n = 18 out of 67 households, and Ascaris was the most commonly detected STH (19.4%, n = 13 out of 67 households. Prevalence of STH eggs in soil was equally likely at the house entrance (19.4%, N = 67 as at the latrine entrance (11.3%, N = 62 (p = 0.41. We also detected STH eggs at bathing and food preparation areas in the three houses revisited for additional spatial sampling, indicating STH exposure can occur at multiple sites within a household plot, not just near the latrine. The highest concentration of eggs in one house occurred in the child's play area. Our findings suggest interventions to limit child exposure to household soil could complement other STH control strategies.

  13. Permeability Characteristics of Compacted and Stabilized Clay with Cement, Peat Ash and Silica Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Esmaeil Mousavi; Leong Sing Wong

    2016-01-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of stabilization with cement, peat ash, and silica sand on permeability coefficient (kv) of compacted clay, using a novel approach to stabilize the clay with peat ash as a supplementary material of cement in the compacted and stabilized soil. In order to assess the mentioned influence, test specimens of both untreated and stabilized soil have been tested in the laboratory so that their permeability could be evaluated. Falling head and one dimension...

  14. Simulation of salinity effects on past, present, and future soil organic carbon stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Raj; Smith, Pete; Marschner, Petra; Gottschalk, Pia; Baldock, Jeff; Verma, Vipan; Setia, Deepika; Smith, Jo

    2012-02-07

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models are used to predict changes in SOC stocks and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from soils, and have been successfully validated for non-saline soils. However, SOC models have not been developed to simulate SOC turnover in saline soils. Due to the large extent of salt-affected areas in the world, it is important to correctly predict SOC dynamics in salt-affected soils. To close this knowledge gap, we modified the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) to simulate SOC turnover in salt-affected soils, using data from non-salt-affected and salt-affected soils in two agricultural regions in India (120 soils) and in Australia (160 soils). Recently we developed a decomposition rate modifier based on an incubation study of a subset of these soils. In the present study, we introduce a new method to estimate the past losses of SOC due to salinity and show how salinity affects future SOC stocks on a regional scale. Because salinity decreases decomposition rates, simulations using the decomposition rate modifier for salinity suggest an accumulation of SOC. However, if the plant inputs are also adjusted to reflect reduced plant growth under saline conditions, the simulations show a significant loss of soil carbon in the past due to salinization, with a higher average loss of SOC in Australian soils (55 t C ha(-1)) than in Indian soils (31 t C ha(-1)). There was a significant negative correlation (p < 0.05) between SOC loss and osmotic potential. Simulations of future SOC stocks with the decomposition rate modifier and the plant input modifier indicate a greater decrease in SOC in saline than in non-saline soils under future climate. The simulations of past losses of SOC due to salinity were repeated using either measured charcoal-C or the inert organic matter predicted by the Falloon et al. equation to determine how much deviation from the Falloon et al. equation affects the amount of plant inputs generated by the model for the soils used in this study

  15. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base

  16. Remediation of persistent organic pollutant-contaminated soil using biosurfactant-enhanced electrokinetics coupled with a zero-valent iron/activated carbon permeable reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuchao; Gao, Ke; Zhang, Yun; Zou, Hua

    2017-12-01

    Zero-valent iron/activated carbon (Fe/C) particles can degrade persistent organic pollutants via micro-electrolysis and therefore, they may be used to develop materials for permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). In this study, surfactant-enhanced electrokinetics (EK) was coupled with a Fe/C-PRB to treat phenanthrene (PHE) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) co-contaminated clay soil. An environment-friendly biosurfactant, rhamnolipid, was selected as the solubility-enhancing agent. Five bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the performance of EK-PRB on PHE and TCP removal from soil as well as the impact of pH and rhamnolipid concentration. The results show that both PHE and TCP, driven by electro-osmotic flow (EOF), moved toward the cathode and reacted with the Fe/C-PRB. Catholyte acidification and rhamnolipid concentration increase improved the removal efficiencies of PHE and TCP. The highest removal efficiency of PHE in soil column was five times the efficiency of the control group on which only EK was applied (49.89 versus 9.40%). The highest removal efficiency of TCP in soil column was 4.5 times the efficiency of the control group (64.60 versus 14.30%). Desorption and mobility of PHE and TCP improved with the increase of rhamnolipid concentration when this exceeded the critical micelle concentration. This study indicates that the combination of EK and a Fe/C-PRB is efficient and promising for removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from contaminated soil with the enhancement of rhamnolipid.

  17. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavements including interlocking concrete permeable pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. The permeable pavements are limited to parking spaces while adjacent driving lanes are impermeable and drain to the permeable surfaces. The parking lot is instrumented for continuous monitoring with thermistors and water content reflectometers that measure moisture as infiltrate passes through the storage gallery beneath the permeable pavements into the underlying native soil. Each permeable surface of the parking lot has four lined sections that capture infiltrate in tanks for water quality analyses; these tanks are capable of holding volumes up to 4.1 m3, which represents up to 38 mm (1.5 in.) for direct rainfall on the porous pavement and runoff from adjacent driving lanes that drain into the permeable surface.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, surface hydrology, and infiltration and evaporation rates. This presentation summarizes these past findings and addresses current water quality efforts including pH, solids analysis, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand. Stormwater runoff continues to be a major cause of water pollution in

  18. Insights into fluid flow and environmental conditions present in deep-sea hydrothermal vent deposits from measurements of permeability and porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbin, J. L.; Zhu, W.; Tivey, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    Evolution of permeability-porosity relationships (EPPRs) of different seafloor vent deposit sample types provide crucial information about how fluid flows within the deposits. In this study, we conducted permeability and porosity measurements on a wide range of vent sample types recovered from many different active seafloor vent fields. The sample set includes chalcopyrite-lined black smoker chimneys, Zn-rich diffusing spires (including white smokers), flanges/slabs/crusts (i.e., plate-like deposits that overlie pooled fluid), massive anhydrite, and cores recovered from the sides of vent structures. Using a probe permeameter, permeability measurements were systematically taken of each sample along several orientations. The measured permeability ranges over 6 orders of magnitude from 10-14 to 10-8 m2. Our data indicate that in general massive anhydrite samples are the least permeable with a mean at ~10-13 m2 and the samples from Zn-rich diffusing spires that were actively venting when collected are the most permeable with a mean at ~10-11 m2. With a mean at 10-11.5 m2, permeability data of flanges/slabs/crusts span over 4 orders of magnitude from 10-13 to 10-9 m2, the largest spread among all sample types tested. Permeability values of the outer portions of relict spires, ranging from ~10-13 m2 to 10-9.5 m2, displayed clear anisotropic trends: permeability along the radial directions is higher than that along the axial direction. Black smokers exhibit a strong layered heterogeneity, where inner chalcopyrite linings were significantly less permeable than outermost layers. To conduct porosity and directional permeability measurements, cylindrical cores will be taken from these vent samples. We will examine whether different sample types, or portions of samples, exhibit distinct permeability-porosity relationships, and will then use micro-structural observations of the cores to examine chimney growth processes (e.g., mineral deposition or cracking) that likely result

  19. Analytical solution for vacuum preloading considering the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Peng

    Full Text Available The vacuum preloading is an effective method which is widely used in ground treatment. In consolidation analysis, the soil around prefabricated vertical drain (PVD is traditionally divided into smear zone and undisturbed zone, both with constant permeability. In reality, the permeability of soil changes continuously within the smear zone. In this study, the horizontal permeability coefficient of soil within the smear zone is described by an exponential function of radial distance. A solution for vacuum preloading consolidation considers the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone is presented and compared with previous analytical results as well as a numerical solution, the results show that the presented solution correlates well with the numerical solution, and is more precise than previous analytical solution.

  20. Field investigation with regard to the impermeability of clay formations. Helium-4 soil gas surveys in sedimentary basins as a tentative study of secondary permeability in clayey sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, S.; Benvegnu, F.; Brondi, A.; Polizzano, C.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with a tentative study for the detection of the secondary permeability in clayey formations conducted in several sedimentary basins in Central Italy, by means of geochemical methods. The main purposes are: to try a geochemical method, based on the distribution of deep origin gases in soil gas ( 4 He and 222 Rn), to detect buried fault systems and to study the permeability of clay as a potential migration pathway for nuclides of radioactive waste deposits; to verify the effectiveness of this method for the selection of suitable sites for radwaste disposal. This research programme consists in a collaboration between ENEA and the University of Rome within the communitarian programme for the disposal of high level and long-live radwaste. Investigations concerned sedimentary basins filled by sand-clay formations 1000-2000 meters thick and characterized by different tectonic: Era and Chiani-Paglia Valleys (Tuscany and North Latium), structural trenches due to extensive tectonics along the tyrrhenian edge, and Vasto region, a basin in the 'Adriatic foretrench', characterized by compressive tectonics. The investigated areas are near or directly correspond to geothermal fields or to hydrocarbon reservoirs supplying gases which may migrate upward along fractures. Almost 4000 soil gas samples were collected in the three surveyed areas; the sampling density was of about 1.5 points / km 2 , normally used in the regional scale surveys. The obtained results show that the observed helium anomalies are distributed or elongated according to the main tectonic features of the substratum (fault systems, fractures, deep structures); the magnitude of anomalies seems to correlate with the nature of the deep gas reservoir (i.e. oil in Vasto), geothermal reservoir in the Paglia valley. These observations seem to confirm that the presence of deep origin gases in soils is controlled by tectonics. Clay thickness does not significantly control the uprising of deep gases: in

  1. Are porosity and permeability seismic structural parameter? An old idea is presented and scrutinized; Sind Porositaet und Permeabilitaet seismische Strukturparameter? Eine alte Idee kurz vorgestellt und hinterfragt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fertig, J. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik

    2008-10-23

    The exploration of hydrocarbons is confronted with the penetration into ever larger depths with increasingly more unfavorable reservoir characteristics. That means lower porosities and permeabilities. The geometry of a tectonic formation is a substantial size for the gap formation. It is expected that the observable curvature of a rock formation stands in direct connection with porosity and permeability of the rock. Under this aspect, the behaviour of a rock formation is examined at the demand above the yield strength by means of theoretical approaches from fracture mechanics. The author of the available contribution comes to the result: Secondary porosity is directly proportional to the curvature of the formation. In contrast to this, the secondary permeability is proportional to the third power of the curvature of the formation.

  2. Preliminary quantification of the permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of major aroma compounds present in herbs through various plastic packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelaphiwat, Pattarin; Auras, Rafael A; Burgess, Gary J; Harte, Janice B; Chonhenchob, Vanee

    2018-03-01

    Aroma permeation through packaging material is an important factor when designing a package for food products. The masses of aroma compounds permeating through films over time were measured at 25 °C using a quasi-isostatic system. A model was proposed for estimating the permeability coefficients (P) of key aroma compounds present in fresh herbs (i.e. eucalyptol, estragole, linalool and citral) through major plastic films used by the food industry [i.e. low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), nylon (Nylon), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), metalised-polyethylene terephthalate (MPET) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA)]. Solubility coefficients (S) were estimated from the amount of aroma compound sorbed in the films. Diffusion coefficients (D) were estimated following from the relation P = D*S. P and D for all four aroma compounds were highest in LDPE, except for eucalyptol, which P was slightly higher in PLA. The solubility coefficients and contact angles were highest in PLA suggesting the highest affinity of PLA to these aroma compounds. The theoretical solubility parameters were correlated with the solubility coefficients for estragole and citral, but not for eucalyptol and linalool. The preliminary P, D and S of eucalyptol, estragole, linalool and citral through LDPE, PP, Nylon, PET, MPET and PLA can be useful in selecting the proper packaging material for preserving these specific aroma compounds in food products and can potentially be used for estimating the shelf life of food products based on aroma loss. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies

  4. Dust in the wind: Soiling of solar devices : Is there a Holy Grail solution? (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence; Costa, Suellen C.; Machado, Marcelo; Diniz, Antonia Sonia A. C.

    2016-09-01

    Soiling, the sedimentation of particulate matter (on the size scale of 1/10 the diameter of a human hair) on the exposed surfaces of solar collectors, is a growing area of concern for solar-system performance, reliability, maintenance, and cost. In the case of photovoltaics (PV), the condition of this first-surface of interaction of the incident photons is critical for ensuring that the maximum-possible light reaches the conversion devices. This paper begins with a more than seven-decade historical look at the research invested into this problem, highlighting the motivation and milestones; the researchers and the progress. The current growing terrestrial markets for solar have brought a new focus on soiling and dust issues. That is because many of these new markets in the solar-rich geographic regions of our world are ironically also in the most dust-rich and soiling-prone ones as well. This paper continues to provide an overview of the status of current research efforts toward understanding the basic soiling mechanisms, the relationships to the PV technology approaches, the geographical differences (highlighting Brasil, India, and the MENA region) in the severity of the problem, the dust physics and chemistry—all relating to the current and future mitigation approaches. Included are some fundamental microscale through nanoscale examinations at how individual dust particles adhere to module glass surfaces—as well as how the particles might stick to each other under certain environmental conditions. These observations are used to show how fundamental science may lead to the macroscale engineering solutions of these soiling problems. This presentation is designed to both overview the soiling area and highlight some of the current and future research directions, speculate on short-term approaches preventing solar showstoppers, and speculate on some "holy-grail" schemes that might lead to the final solutions.

  5. Soil mapping and modelling for evaluation of the effects of historical and present-day soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanova, Anna; Szwarczewski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The loess hilly lands in Danube Lowland are characterized by patchy soil-scape. The soil erosion processes uncover the subsurface, bright loess horizon, while non-eroded and colluvial soils are of the dark colour, in the chernozem area. With the modernisation of agriculture since the 1950's and in the process of collectivization, when small fields were merged into bigger, the soil degradation progressed. However, the analysis of historical sources and sediment archives showed the proofs of historical soil erosion. The objective of this study is to map the soil erosion patterns in connection of both pre- and post-collectivization landscape and to understand the accordingly developed soil erosion patterns. The combined methods of soil mapping and soil erosion modelling were applied in the part of the Trnavska pahorkatina Hilly Land in Danube Lowland. The detailed soil mapping in a zero-order catchment (0.28 km²) uncovered the removal of surface soil horizon of 0.6m or more, while the colluvial soils were about 1.1m deep. The soil properties and dating helped to describe the original soil profile in the valley bottom, and reconstruct the history of soil erosion in the catchment. The soil erosion model was applied using the reconstructed land use patterns in order to understand the effect of recent and historical soil erosion in the lowland landscape. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract ESF-EC-0006-07 and APVV-0625-11; Anna Smetanová has received the support of the AgreenSkills fellowship (under grant agreement n°267196).

  6. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  7. The Electric Field in an MHD Duct with Permeable Electrodes when the Hall Effect is Present in the Flow of the Moving Medium; 042d 041b 0414

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emec, Ju. P.; Panasevich, L. L. [Institut Elektrodinamiki AN USSR, Kiev, USSR (Ukraine)

    1968-11-15

    The authors provide a solution to the problem of current distribution in a magnetohydrodynamic duct with permeable electrodes in which the conductivity of the moving medium is assumed to have a tensorial character. Permeable electrodes strongly influence the current distribution in the neighbourhood of the conducting walls of the duct. By appropriate blowing or sucking of the electrically conducting medium, we can suppress the end effects on the electrodes (due to the Hall effect in the flow and to the geometry of the duct); in this way the current distribution can be evened out. The authors find in their paper the necessary and sufficient conditions for which the current density takes on limited values near both ends of a permeable electrode. The velocity distribution on the conducting wall will be variable in sign as in some places there will be a blowing effect, mothers a sucking one. Another effect associated with the use of permeable electrodes is related to the integral characteristics of MHD converters. Thus, given anisotropic conductivity (due to the Hall effect) in a linear MHD duct with two permeable electrodes, the properties of Hall and Faraday energy converters will be combined if the conducting medium is blown through one electrode and sucked through the second. A flow scheme of this kind is studied in the paper. Mathematically, when the electric field is found a solution is obtained to the Riemann-Gilbert heterogeneous boundary value problem with discontinuous coefficients. This problem reduces to the Riemann boundary value problem (in the case of a zone belonging to a class of automorphic functions) and its solution, based on the properties of Cauchy integrals, is obtained in closed form. (author) [Russian] Daetsja reshenie zadachi o raspredelenii toka v magnitogidrodinamicheskom kanale s pronicaemymi jelektrodami pri tenzornom haraktere provodimosti dvizhushhejsja sredy. Nalichie pronicaemyh jelektrodov okazyvaet sushhestvennoe vlijanie na

  8. Thermomagnetic identification of manganese and iron minerals present in soils and industrial dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawer, Małgorzata; Rachwał, Marzena; Jabłońska, Mariola; Krzykawski, Tomasz; Magiera, Tadeusz

    2017-04-01

    Many industries (e.g. metallurgy, power, cement, and coking plants) constitute a sources of industrial dusts containing technogenic magnetic particles (TMP). TMP are mostly iron oxides with ferrimagnetic or antiferromagnetic properties, therefore their presence in dusts, soils and sediments can be easily detected by magnetic susceptibility measurements. TMP, thanks their specific mineral and magnetic properties, and well developed specific surface area, are characterized by a chemical affinity for some elements like heavy metals. The main objective of this study was identification of manganese and iron (hydro)oxides occurring in industrial dusts and soils being under their deposition for long time period. In principle, Mn and Fe (hydro)oxides present in these samples originate from high-temperature technological processes. Soils samples (collected from different soil horizons) taken from surroundings of power station, iron/steel and non-ferrous plants as well as metallurgical dusts and fly ashes from power stations were subjected to investigation. During the studies temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray powder diffraction analyses were applied. Thermomagnetic analyses (K-T) revealed differences between samples from particular industries, however an inflexion at 450-500°C of all curves was observed indicating a probable occurrence of maghemite- or titanomagnetite-like phases. The curves of TMP emitted by power plants have inflection at 580 °C indicating that magnetite was the main magnetic phase. In case of TMP originated from non-ferrous metal smelting additional curve deflection at 130 and 210 °C occurred relating to intermediate titanomagnetite or iron sulfides. X-ray diffraction proved the occurrence of magnetite and maghemite in almost all samples, especially connected with power industry and iron/steel metallurgy. Mineral analysis revealed that kind of industrial process influenced on the dominating mineral forms found in

  9. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  10. Permeability Characteristics of Compacted and Stabilized Clay with Cement, Peat Ash and Silica Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmaeil Mousavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the influence of stabilization with cement, peat ash, and silica sand on permeability coefficient (kv of compacted clay, using a novel approach to stabilize the clay with peat ash as a supplementary material of cement in the compacted and stabilized soil. In order to assess the mentioned influence, test specimens of both untreated and stabilized soil have been tested in the laboratory so that their permeability could be evaluated. Falling head and one dimensional consolidation tests of laboratory permeability were performed on the clay specimens and the chemical compositions of the materials as well as microstructure of the stabilized soil with 18% cement, 2% peat ash, and 5% silica sand were investigated, using X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy respectively. Results show that for soil stabilization with up to 8% cement content (of the dry weight of the soil, the average value of coefficient of permeability (kv is very close to that of untreated soil, whereas the kv value decreases drastically for 18% cement under identical void ratio conditions. It is further revealed that addition of 18% cement, 2% peat ash, and 5% silica sand had decreased the coefficient of permeability by almost 2.2 folds after 24 h, while about 1.7 folds increase was observed in coefficient of permeability once 13.5% of cement, 1.5% of peat ash, and 20% of silica sand were added. The partial replacement of cement with the 2% peat ash can reduce the consumption of cement for soil stabilization.

  11. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  12. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  13. The past, present, and future of soils and human health studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, E. C.; Sauer, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that human health is tied to the soil is not a new one. As far back as circa 1400 BC the Bible depicts Moses as understanding that fertile soil was essential to the well-being of his people. In 400 BC the Greek philosopher Hippocrates provided a list of things that should be considered in a proper medical evaluation, including the properties of the local ground. By the late 1700s and early 1800s, American farmers had recognized that soil properties had some connection to human health. In the modern world, we recognize that soils have a distinct influence on human health. We recognize that soils influence (1) food availability and quality (food security), (2) human contact with various chemicals, and (3) human contact with various pathogens. Soils and human health studies include investigations into nutrient supply through the food chain and routes of exposure to chemicals and pathogens. However, making strong, scientific connections between soils and human health can be difficult. There are multiple variables to consider in the soil environment, meaning traditional scientific studies that seek to isolate and manipulate a single variable often do not provide meaningful data. The complete study of soils and human health also involves many different specialties such as soil scientists, toxicologists, medical professionals, anthropologists, etc. These groups do not traditionally work together on research projects, and do not always effectively communicate with one another. Climate change and how it will affect the soil environment/ecosystem going into the future is another variable affecting the relationship between soils and health. Future successes in soils and human health research will require effectively addressing difficult issues such as these.

  14. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  15. Developments in permeable and low permeability barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferis, S.A.; Norris, G.H.; Thomas, A.O.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the reactive treatment zone whereby pollutants are attenuated as they move along a pathway in the ground has enabled a re-thinking of many of the concepts of containment. In particular it offers the potential for the control of the flux from a contaminated area by controlling the contaminant concentration in the pathway(s) as well as or instead of using a low permeability barrier. The paper outlines the basic concepts of the reactive treatment zone and the use of permeable and low permeability reactive systems. The paper then gives a case history of the installation of a permeable barrier using an in-situ reaction chamber

  16. Modelling the effects of porous and semi-permeable layers on corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    Porous and semi-permeable layers play a role in many corrosion processes. Porous layers may simply affect the rate of corrosion by affecting the rate of mass transport of reactants and products to and from the corroding surface. Semi-permeable layers can further affect the corrosion process by reacting with products and/or reactants. Reactions in semi-permeable layers include redox processes involving electron transfer, adsorption, ion-exchange and complexation reactions and precipitation/dissolution processes. Examples of porous and semi-permeable layers include non-reactive salt films, precipitate layers consisting of redox-active species in multiple oxidation states (e.g., Fe oxide films), clay and soil layers and biofilms. Examples of these various types of processes will be discussed and modelling techniques developed from studies for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste presented. (author). 48 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  17. Presentation of the RESSAC research program (REhabilitation of Soils and Surfaces after an ACcident)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Parmentier, N.; Legrand, B.; Fache, P.

    1992-01-01

    If, despite all the precautions taken in nuclear power plants, a severe accident were to occur in France involving extensive release of radioactive materials to the environment, existing emergency plans would be implemented enabling urgent decisions to be made with regard to the immediate protection of the population: confinement indoors, evacuation, distribution of stable iodine, etc. But, at a later stage, mean and long term actions would have to be carried out to decontaminate the polluted areas and limit subsequent contamination of the food chain, with a view to enabling the populations concerned to return to normal life. These actions would concern, in decreasing order of priority and using the WHO and IAEA definitions, the near field, closest to the accident site, and the far field, subjected to the direct impact of fallout. They should be aimed at reducing external exposure due to deposition and internal exposure by inhalation of radioactive products re-suspended in the atmosphere and by ingestion of products for human consumption. In the context of IPSN research and development programs on severe accidents, the RESSAC program was defined in 1985 for the purpose of studying methods and means of rehabilitating the near field and controlling problems related to the far field. Elaboration of the program is presently proceeding at the Nuclear Research Center of Cadarache, focussed on the following main topics: assessment of what happens to the radionuclides deposited on the soil and vegetation, determination of priorities and how to intervene, management of the waste produced. (author). 4 refs

  18. Presentation of the ressac research program (rehabilitation of soils and surfaces after an accident)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.

    1989-11-01

    If, despite all the precautions taken in nuclear power plants, a severe accident was to occur in France involving extensive release of radioactive materials to the environment, existing emergency plans would be implemented enabling urgent decisions to be made with regard to the immediate protection of the population: confinement indoors, evacuation, distribution of stable iodine, etc. But, at a later stage, mean and long term actions would have to be carried out to decontaminate the polluted areas and limit subsequent contamination of the food chain, with a view to enabling the populations concerned to return to normal life. These actions would concern, in decreasing order of priority and using the WHO and IAEA definitions, the near field, closest to the accident site, and the far field, subjected to the direct impact of fallout. They should be aimed at reducing external exposure due to deposition and internal exposure by inhalation of radioactive products re-suspended in the atmosphere and by ingestion of products for human consumption. In the context of IPSN (Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety) research and development programs on severe accidents, the RESSAC program was defined in 1985 for the purpose of studying methods and means of rehabilitating the near field and controlling problems related to the far field. Elaboration of the program is presently proceeding at the Nuclear Research Center of CADARACHE, focussed on the following main topics: assessment of what happens to the radionuclides deposited on the soil and vegetation, determination of priorities and how to intervene, management of the waste produced

  19. A comprehensive guide of remediation technologies for oil contaminated soil - Present works and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mee Wei; Lau, Ee Von; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2016-08-15

    Oil spills result in negative impacts on the environment, economy and society. Due to tidal and waves actions, the oil spillage affects the shorelines by adhering to the soil, making it difficult for immediate cleaning of the soil. As shoreline clean-up is the most costly component of a response operation, there is a need for effective oil remediation technologies. This paper provides a review on the remediation technologies for soil contaminated with various types of oil, including diesel, crude oil, petroleum, lubricating oil, bitumen and bunker oil. The methods discussed include solvent extraction, bioremediation, phytoremediation, chemical oxidation, electrokinetic remediation, thermal technologies, ultrasonication, flotation and integrated remediation technologies. Each of these technologies was discussed, and associated with their advantages, disadvantages, advancements and future work in detail. Nonetheless, it is important to note that no single remediation technology is considered the best solution for the remediation of oil contaminated soil. This review provides a comprehensive literature on the various remediation technologies studied in the removal of different oil types from soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Chitin-binding Protein Purified from Moringa oleifera Seeds Presents Anticandidal Activity by Increasing Cell Membrane Permeability and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João X.S. Neto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida species are opportunistic pathogens that infect immunocompromised and/or immunosuppressed patients, particularly in hospital facilities, that besides representing a significant threat to health increase the risk of mortality. Apart from echinocandins and triazoles, which are well tolerated, most of the antifungal drugs used for candidiasis treatment can cause side effects and lead to the development of resistant strains. A promising alternative to the conventional treatments is the use of plant proteins. M. oleifera Lam. is a plant with valuable medicinal properties, including antimicrobial activity. This work aimed to purify a chitin-binding protein from M. oleifera seeds and to evaluate its antifungal properties against Candida species. The purified protein, named Mo-CBP2, represented about 0.2% of the total seed protein and appeared as a single band on native PAGE. By mass spectrometry, Mo-CBP2 presented 13,309 Da. However, by SDS-PAGE, Mo-CBP2 migrated as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 23,400 Da. Tricine-SDS-PAGE of Mo-CBP2 under reduced conditions revealed two protein bands with apparent molecular masses of 7,900 and 4,600 Da. Altogether, these results suggest that Mo-CBP2 exists in different oligomeric forms. Moreover, Mo-CBP2 is a basic glycoprotein (pI 10.9 with 4.1% (m/m sugar and it did not display hemagglutinating and hemolytic activities upon rabbit and human erythrocytes. A comparative analysis of the sequence of triptic peptides from Mo-CBP2 in solution, after LC-ESI-MS/MS, revealed similarity with other M. oleifera proteins, as the 2S albumin Mo-CBP3 and flocculating proteins, and 2S albumins from different species. Mo-CBP2 possesses in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis, with MIC50 and MIC90 values ranging between 9.45–37.90 and 155.84–260.29 μM, respectively. In addition, Mo-CBP2 (18.90 μM increased the cell membrane permeabilization

  1. Effects of biochar on air and water permeability and colloid and phosphorus leaching in soils from a natural calcium carbonate gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Møldrup, Per; Perez, Marcos Paradelo

    2014-01-01

    chemical properties (e.g., pH and ionic strength) which significantly affected air and water transport and colloid and phosphorous leaching. In denser soils (bulk density 1.57-1.69 g cm-3) preferential flow dominated the transport and caused an enhanced movement of air and water whereas in less dense soils......Application of biochar to agricultural fields to improve soil quality has increased in popularity in recent years, but limited attention is generally paid to existing field conditions prior to biochar application. This study examined the short-term physico-chemical effects of biochar amendment...... in an agricultural field in Denmark with a calcium carbonate (CaCO3) gradient. The field comprised four reference plots and four plots to which biochar (birch wood pyrolyzed at 500 C) was applied at a rate of 20 tons ha-1. Five undisturbed soil columns (10 cm dia., 8 cm height) were sampled from each plot seven...

  2. Plant-soil feedback: the past, the present and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van der W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; Bever, J.D.; Bezemer, T.M.; Casper, B.B.; Fukami, T.; Kardol, P.; Klironomos, J.N.; Kulmatiski, A.; Schweitzer, J.A.; Suding, K.N.; Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Wardle, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    1.Plant–soil feedbacks is becoming an important concept for explaining vegetation dynamics, the invasiveness of introduced exotic species in new habitats and how terrestrial ecosystems respond to global land use and climate change. Using a new conceptual model, we show how critical alterations in

  3. Plant-soil feedback: the past, the present and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; Bever, J.D.; Bezemer, T.M.; Casper, B.B.; Fukami, T.; Kardol, P.; Klironomos, J.N.; Kulmatiski, A.; Schweitzer, J.A.; Suding, K.N.; Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Wardle, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Plant–soil feedbacks is becoming an important concept for explaining vegetation dynamics, the invasiveness of introduced exotic species in new habitats and how terrestrial ecosystems respond to global land use and climate change. Using a new conceptual model, we show how critical alterations

  4. High natural erosion rates are the backdrop for present-day soil erosion in the agricultural Middle Hills of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. J.; Arnold, M.; AumaItre, G.; Bourles, D. L.; Keddadouche, K.; Bickle, M.; Ojha, T.

    2015-07-01

    Although agriculturally accelerated soil erosion is implicated in the unsustainable environmental degradation of mountain environments, such as in the Himalaya, the effects of land use can be challenging to quantify in many mountain settings because of the high and variable natural background rates of erosion. In this study, we present new long-term denudation rates, derived from cosmogenic 10Be analysis of quartz in river sediment from the Likhu Khola, a small agricultural river basin in the Middle Hills of central Nepal. Calculated long-term denudation rates, which reflect background natural erosion processes over 1000+ years prior to agricultural intensification, are similar to present-day sediment yields and to soil loss rates from terraces that are well maintained. Similarity in short- and long-term catchment-wide erosion rates for the Likhu is consistent with data from elsewhere in the Nepal Middle Hills but contrasts with the very large increases in short-term erosion rates seen in agricultural catchments in other steep mountain settings. Our results suggest that the large sediment fluxes exported from the Likhu and other Middle Hills rivers in the Himalaya are derived in large part from natural processes, rather than from soil erosion as a result of agricultural activity. Catchment-scale erosional fluxes may be similar over short and long timescales if both are dominated by mass wasting sources such as gullies, landslides, and debris flows (e.g., as is evident in the landslide-dominated Khudi Khola of the Nepal High Himalaya, based on compiled data). As a consequence, simple comparison of catchment-scale fluxes will not necessarily pinpoint land use effects on soils where these are only a small part of the total erosion budget, unless rates of mass wasting are also considered. Estimates of the mass wasting contribution to erosion in the Likhu imply catchment-averaged soil production rates on the order of ~ 0.25-0.35 mm yr-1, though rates of mass wasting are

  5. Modelling of water permeability in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guang, Ye; Lura, Pietro; van Breugel, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a network model to predict the permeability of cement paste from a numerical simulation of its microstructure. Based on a linked list pore network structure, the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated and the fluid flow is calculated according to the Hagen-Poiseuille law....... The pressure gradient at all nodes is calculated with the Gauss elimination method and the absolute permeability of the pore network is calculated directly from Darcy's law. Finally, the permeability model is validated by comparison with direct water permeability measurements. According to this model...

  6. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  7. Measurement of radioactive nuclides present in soil samples of district Ganderbal of Kashmir Province for radiation safety purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroz A. Mir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of radioactive elements in the residential area is very important from different points of view especially for human health. The aim of present survey was focused on determining the current radon exhalation rate and radium concentration in soil samples collected from some areas of the Ganderbal district, Jammu and Kashmir, India. “Can technique” has been employed for the measurement of radon exhalation rate and radium concentration in soil samples collected from under study areas. The Uranium concentration in these soil samples where estimated by using the fission track registration technique (using LR-115 plastic track detectors.The uranium concentration was found to varies between 2.03 and 3.52 ppm. The radon exhalation rate in these samples has been found to vary from 5.05 to 21.89 m Bq kg−1 h−1. Radium concentration in soil samples varies from 6.43 to 18.89 Bq kg−1. The calculated values of Uranium concentration in these soil/rock samples are quite lower than the risk level. Radon and radium values found in these samples are also lower than that of optimum value. Hence these areas can be considered as risk free zones from human health point of view.

  8. Cultivable fungi present in Antarctic soils: taxonomy, phylogeny, diversity, and bioprospecting of antiparasitic and herbicidal metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eldon C Q; Godinho, Valéria M; Silva, Débora A S; de Paula, Maria T R; Vitoreli, Gislaine A; Zani, Carlos L; Alves, Tânia M A; Junior, Policarpo A S; Murta, Silvane M F; Barbosa, Emerson C; Oliveira, Jaquelline G; Oliveira, Fabio S; Carvalho, Camila R; Ferreira, Mariana C; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2018-05-01

    Molecular biology techniques were used to identify 218 fungi from soil samples collected from four islands of Antarctica. These consisted of 22 taxa of 15 different genera belonging to the Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Mortierella, Antarctomyces, Pseudogymnoascus, and Penicillium were the most frequently isolated genera and Penicillium tardochrysogenum, Penicillium verrucosus, Goffeauzyma gilvescens, and Mortierella sp. 2 the most abundant taxa. All fungal isolates were cultivated using solid-state fermentation to obtain their crude extracts. Pseudogymnoascus destructans, Mortierella parvispora, and Penicillium chrysogenum displayed antiparasitic activities, whilst extracts of P. destructans, Mortierella amoeboidea, Mortierella sp. 3, and P. tardochrysogenum showed herbicidal activities. Reported as pathogenic for bats, different isolates of P. destructans exhibited trypanocidal activities and herbicidal activity, and may be a source of bioactive molecules to be considered for chemotherapy against neglected tropical diseases. The abundant presence of P. destructans in soils of the four islands gives evidence supporting that soils in the Antarctic Peninsula constitute a natural source of strains of this genus, including some P. destructans strains that are phylogenetically close to those that infect bats in North America and Europe/Palearctic Asia.

  9. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of elastic waves is the primary datum available for acquiring information about subsurface characteristics such as lithology and porosity. Cheap and quick (spatial coverage, ease of measurement) information of permeability can be achieved, if sonic velocity is used for permeability p...... significantly using the effective specific surface as the fluid-flow concept. The FZI unit is appropriate for highly permeable sedimentary rocks such as sandstones and limestones that have small surface areas....

  10. Programs for the calculi of blocks permeabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Hernandez, J.J.; Sovero Sovero, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    This report studies the stochastic analysis of radionuclide transport. The permeability values of blocks are necessary to do a numeric model for the flux and transport problems in ground soils. The determination of block value by function on grill value is the objective of this program

  11. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  12. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchsta¨dt longterm static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA......), and aggregate tensile strength. Our studies were carried out on soils on identical parent material under controlled management conditions, enabling us to study the long-term effects on soil physical properties with few explanatory variables in play. The content of WDC and the amount of WSA were measured...

  13. Accurate control testing for clay liner permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R J

    1991-08-01

    Two series of centrifuge tests were carried out to evaluate the use of centrifuge modelling as a method of accurate control testing of clay liner permeability. The first series used a large 3 m radius geotechnical centrifuge and the second series a small 0.5 m radius machine built specifically for research on clay liners. Two permeability cells were fabricated in order to provide direct data comparisons between the two methods of permeability testing. In both cases, the centrifuge method proved to be effective and efficient, and was found to be free of both the technical difficulties and leakage risks normally associated with laboratory permeability testing of fine grained soils. Two materials were tested, a consolidated kaolin clay having an average permeability coefficient of 1.2{times}10{sup -9} m/s and a compacted illite clay having a permeability coefficient of 2.0{times}10{sup -11} m/s. Four additional tests were carried out to demonstrate that the 0.5 m radius centrifuge could be used for linear performance modelling to evaluate factors such as volumetric water content, compaction method and density, leachate compatibility and other construction effects on liner leakage. The main advantages of centrifuge testing of clay liners are rapid and accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties and realistic stress modelling for performance evaluations. 8 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Permeability of porour rhyolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  15. Hydrogen permeability through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tsvetkov, I.V.; Marenkov, E.D.; Yarko, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen permeability through one-layer and multi-layer membranes are considered. The effect of surface roughness, crystal defects, cracks and pores is described. Mathematical description of the processes is given [ru

  16. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types...

  17. Intestinal Permeability: The Basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvar Bjarnason

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review some of the more fundamental principles underlying the noninvasive assessment of intestinal permeability in humans, the choice of test markers and their analyses, and the practical aspects of test dose composition and how these can be changed to allow the specific assessment of regional permeability changes and other intestinal functions. The implications of increased intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of human disease is discussed in relation to findings in patients with Crohn’s disease. A common feature of increased intestinal permeability is the development of a low grade enteropathy, and while quantitatively similar changes may be found in Crohn’s disease these seem to predict relapse of disease. Moreover, factors associated with relapse of Crohn’s disease have in common an action to increase intestinal permeability. While increased intestinal permeability does not seem to be important in the etiology of Crohn’s disease it may be a central mechanism in the clinical relapse of disease.

  18. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has been developed in this study. The developed model can continuously simulate infiltration through the permeable pavement surface, exfiltration from the storage to the surrounding in situ soils, and clogging impacts on infiltration/exfiltration capacity at the pavement surface and the bottom of the subsurface storage unit. The exfiltration modeling component simulates vertical and horizontal exfiltration independently based on Darcy’s formula with the Green-Ampt approximation. The developed model can be arranged with physically-based modeling parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, Manning’s friction flow parameters, saturated and field capacity volumetric water contents, porosity, density, etc. The developed model was calibrated using high-frequency observed data. The modeled water depths are well matched with the observed values (R2 = 0.90). The modeling results show that horizontal exfiltration through the side walls of the subsurface storage unit is a prevailing factor in determining the hydrologic performance of the system, especially where the storage unit is developed in a long, narrow shape; or with a high risk of bottom compaction and clogging. This paper presents unit

  19. Permeability response of oil-contaminated compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, V.; Mikhail, N.; Soulie, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation on the behavior of motor oil-contaminated, partially saturated compacted clays. For the study, both a natural clay and an artificially purified kaolinite, contaminated with 0 to 8% of motor oil, were firstly compacted following the ASTM standard procedure. Secondly, permeability tests were carried out in a triaxial cell on 10 cm-diameter compacted clay specimens. The results of the investigation indicate that increasing percentages of motor oil decrease both the optimum water content and the optimum dry density of the two clays. However, whereas the optimum water content on the average decreases by about 6% when the percentage contamination increases from 0 to 8%, the corresponding decrease in the optimum dry density is less than 3%. Even though the optimum dry density decreases as the percentage of oil increases from 0 to 8%, there is, however, a range in oil content varying between 2 and 4% for which the optimum dry density is slightly greater than that of the untreated soils. As far as the permeability tests are concerned, the results indicate that as the percentage of oil increases, the coefficient of permeability decreases substantially, especially for clay specimens which were initially compacted on the dry side of optimum

  20. Pysical Properties of Soil with Addition of Sewage Dried with Heated Edible Oil

    OpenAIRE

    大坪, 政美; 中司, 敬; 中園, 修三; 中園, 英司; 徳留, 斉将

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigates the water holding capacity, density, permeability, and swelling properties of the soil samples mixed with the sewage that was dried with heated edible oil. For comparison similar experiments were conducted for the soil samples mixed with sun-dried sewage and sewage compost. The water holding capacity was higher for the soil samples with oil-dried and sun-dried sewage addition than for those with sewage-compost addition. For statically compacted soil samples, wit...

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Alfalfa-Nodulating Rhizobia Present in Acidic Soils of Central Argentina and Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Papa, María F.; Balagué, Laura J.; Sowinski, Susana Castro; Wegener, Caren; Segundo, Eduardo; Abarca, Francisco Martínez; Toro, Nicolás; Niehaus, Karsten; Pühler, Alfred; Aguilar, O. Mario; Martínez-Drets, Gloria; Lagares, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of alfalfa-nodulating rhizobia from acid soils of different locations in Central Argentina and Uruguay. A collection of 465 isolates was assembled, and the rhizobia were characterized for acid tolerance. Growth tests revealed the existence of 15 acid-tolerant (AT) isolates which were able to grow at pH 5.0 and formed nodules in alfalfa with a low rate of nitrogen fixation. Analysis of those isolates, including partial sequencing of the genes encoding 16S rRNA and genomic PCR-fingerprinting with MBOREP1 and BOXC1 primers, demonstrated that the new isolates share a genetic background closely related to that of the previously reported Rhizobium sp. Or191 recovered from an acid soil in Oregon (B. D. Eardly, J. P. Young, and R. K. Selander, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:1809–1815, 1992). Growth curves, melanin production, temperature tolerance, and megaplasmid profiles of the AT isolates were all coincident with these characteristics in strain Or191. In addition to the ability of all of these strains to nodulate alfalfa (Medicago sativa) inefficiently, the AT isolates also nodulated the common bean and Leucaena leucocephala, showing an extended host range for nodulation of legumes. In alfalfa, the time course of nodule formation by the AT isolate LPU 83 showed a continued nodulation restricted to the emerging secondary roots, which was probably related to the low rate of nitrogen fixation by the largely ineffective nodules. Results demonstrate the complexity of the rhizobial populations present in the acidic soils represented by a main group of N2-fixing rhizobia and a second group of ineffective and less-predominant isolates related to the AT strain Or191. PMID:10103231

  2. Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental soil surveys in each province of Austria have been performed, soils of about 5,000 sites were described and analyzed for nutrients and pollutants, the majority of these data are recorded in the soil information system of Austria (BORIS) soil database, http://www.ubavie.gv.at/umweltsituation/boden/boris), which also contains a soil map of Austria, data from 30 specific investigations mainly in areas with industry and results from the Austria - wide cesium investigation. With respect to the environmental state of soils a short discussion is given, including two geographical charts, one showing which sites have soil data (2001) and the other the cadmium distribution in top soils according land use (forest, grassland, arable land, others). Information related to the soil erosion, Corine land cover (Europe-wide land cover database), evaluation of pollutants in soils (reference values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Pb, Tl, Va, Zn, AOX, PAH, PCB, PCDD/pcdf, dioxin), and relevant Austrian and European standards and regulations is provided. Figs. 2, Tables 4. (nevyjel)

  3. Bentonite-amended soil special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This special study was conducted to assess the viability of soil with a high percentage of bentonite added as an infiltration barrier in the cover of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. To achieve maximum concentration limits (MCLs) at several UMTRA Project sites, covers with a very low permeability are needed. If alternate concentration limits (ACLs) are the appropriate site groundwater compliance strategy, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to demonstrate, among other things, that the infiltration to the disposal cell is as low as reasonably achievable, and hence that the cover has a very low permeability. When the study discussed here was begun, the lowest permeability element available was CLAYMAX R , a manufactured liner material constructed of natural material (bentonite clay) between two geosynthetics.The strength of soil-bentonite mixes was measured to see if they could be placed on sideslopes and not pose stability problems. Also evaluated were the hydraulic conductivities of soil-bentonite mixes. If the strengths and permeabilities of soils with a high percentage of bentonite are favorable, the soils may be used as infiltration barriers in current cover designs without changing pile geometries. The scope of work for this study called for a literature review and a two-phased laboratory testing program. This report presents the results of the literature review and the first phase of the testing program

  4. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  5. Evolution of permeability in diatomaceous rocks mediated by pressure solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented to follow the evolution of permeability in diatomaceous rocks mediated by pressure solution. The progress of compaction and the evolution of permeability may be followed with time. Specifically, the main minerals of diatomaceous rocks that are quartz, cristobalite, and amorphous silica, are focused to examine differences of the permeability evolutions among them at effective stresses of 5, and 10 MPa, and temperatures of 20 and 90degC. The rates and magnitudes of permeability reduction increase with increase of the dissolution rate constants. Ultimate permeabilities reduce to the order of 90% at the completion of dissolution-mediated compaction. (author)

  6. Present changes in water soil erosion hazard and the response to suspended sediment load in the Czech landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliment, Zdenek; Langhammer, Jakub; Kadlec, Jiří; Vyslouzilová, Barbora

    2014-05-01

    A noticeable change in water soil erosion hazard and an increase of extreme meteorological effects at the same time have marked the Czech landscape in the last twenty years. Formerly cultivated areas have been grassed or forested in mountain and sub mountain regions. Crop management has also been substantially changed. Longer and more frequently dry periods, more intensive local rainfalls and more gentle winter periods we can observe in the present climate development. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the importance and spatial relationship between changes in water soil erosion hazard by way of example of model river basins in different areas of the Czech Republic. The field research, remote sensing data, GIS and model approaches (MEFEM- multicriteria erosion factors evaluation model, USLE, RUSLE, WaTEM/SEDEM, AnnAGNPS and SWAT) were used for erosion hazard assessment. The findings were comparing with the balance, regime and trends of suspended load. Research in the model Blšanka River basin, based on our fifteen-year monitoring of suspended load, can be considered as basic (Kliment et al. 2008, Langhammer et al. 2013). KLIMENT, Z., KADLEC, J., LANGHAMMER, J., 2008. Evaluation of suspended load changes using AnnAGNPS and SWAT semi-empirical models. Catena, 73(3): 286-299. LANGHAMMER, J., MATOUŠKOVÁ, M., KLIMENT, Z., 2013. Assessment of spatial and temporal changes of ecological status of streams in Czechia: a geographical approach. Geografie, 118(4): 309-333

  7. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  8. Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2001-01-01

    For Austria there exists a comprehensive soil data collection, integrated in a GIS (geographical information system). The content values of pollutants (cadmium, mercury, lead, copper, mercury, radio-cesium) are given in geographical charts and in tables by regions and by type of soil (forests, agriculture, greenland, others) for the whole area of Austria. Erosion effects are studied for the Austrian region. Legal regulations and measures for an effective soil protection, reduction of soil degradation and sustainable development in Austria and the European Union are discussed. (a.n.)

  9. Change of PAHs with evolution of paddy soils from prehistoric to present over the last six millennia in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 88 North Huancheng Rd. of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Cornelia, Mueller-Niggemann [Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Wang, Minyan, E-mail: jz.zafu@gmail.com [Tianmu College of Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 252 Yijin Str.of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Cao, Zhihong [Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 East Beijing Rd., Nanjing 210008 (China); Luo, Xiping, E-mail: luoxpzj@yahoo.com.cn [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 88 North Huancheng Rd. of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Wong, Minghung [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 88 North Huancheng Rd. of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Rd., Kln., Hong Kong (China); Chen, Wei [Department of Ecology and Evolution, Frankfurt University, Max-Von-Laue Str. 13, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of hydroponics management on soil organic components with evolution of paddy soil over the last six millennia, PAHs, as a biomarker, as well as total organic carbon content were used to explore changes of paddy soil organic carbon in two entirely buried ancient paddy soil profiles. The results showed that hydroponics management can cause organic carbon deposition in rice paddy. The changing of total PAH concentrations was not always in accordance with the changing of total organic carbon contents in layers of the buried ancient paddy soils. The PAHs in 6280 BP prehistoric paddy soil layer was 3-ring > 5-ring > 4-ring > 6-ring, while in layers of the present paddy soil and the prehistoric upland were 3-ring > 4-ring > 5-ring > 6-ring. The contribution of phenanthrene to total PAHs in two profiles and the increasing ratio of phenanthrene to alkylated PAHs from parent material/6280 BP prehistoric upland to 6280 BP paddy suggested substantial increase of the anthropogenic influence of hydroponics management on rice paddy soil. And in view of the {sup 14}C age and bioremains in the two profiles, it was only possible for PAHs to be derived from hydroponics management with evolution of the paddy soils form the Neolithic age. Cadalene could be used as an indicator for biological sources of PAHs released by rice plant residues, and benzo[g,h,i]fluoranthene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene for pyrogenic sources released by field vegetation fires. - Highlights: ► Soil hydroponics management can cause SOC deposition in rice paddy. ► PAHs in buried ancient paddy soil profiles were mainly derived from anthropogenic hydroponics management. ► PAH, as a biomarker, was not suitable for tracing SOC change with evolution of paddy soil from the Neolithic age.

  10. Change of PAHs with evolution of paddy soils from prehistoric to present over the last six millennia in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin; Cornelia, Mueller-Niggemann; Wang, Minyan; Cao, Zhihong; Luo, Xiping; Wong, Minghung; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of hydroponics management on soil organic components with evolution of paddy soil over the last six millennia, PAHs, as a biomarker, as well as total organic carbon content were used to explore changes of paddy soil organic carbon in two entirely buried ancient paddy soil profiles. The results showed that hydroponics management can cause organic carbon deposition in rice paddy. The changing of total PAH concentrations was not always in accordance with the changing of total organic carbon contents in layers of the buried ancient paddy soils. The PAHs in 6280 BP prehistoric paddy soil layer was 3-ring > 5-ring > 4-ring > 6-ring, while in layers of the present paddy soil and the prehistoric upland were 3-ring > 4-ring > 5-ring > 6-ring. The contribution of phenanthrene to total PAHs in two profiles and the increasing ratio of phenanthrene to alkylated PAHs from parent material/6280 BP prehistoric upland to 6280 BP paddy suggested substantial increase of the anthropogenic influence of hydroponics management on rice paddy soil. And in view of the 14 C age and bioremains in the two profiles, it was only possible for PAHs to be derived from hydroponics management with evolution of the paddy soils form the Neolithic age. Cadalene could be used as an indicator for biological sources of PAHs released by rice plant residues, and benzo[g,h,i]fluoranthene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene for pyrogenic sources released by field vegetation fires. - Highlights: ► Soil hydroponics management can cause SOC deposition in rice paddy. ► PAHs in buried ancient paddy soil profiles were mainly derived from anthropogenic hydroponics management. ► PAH, as a biomarker, was not suitable for tracing SOC change with evolution of paddy soil from the Neolithic age

  11. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  12. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Shahid, E-mail: shussain2@qinetiq.com

    2017-04-15

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies. - Highlights: • Negative permeability from random particle composites is

  13. 222Rn flux and soil air concentration profiles in West-Germany. Soil 222Rn as tracer for gas transport in the unsaturated soil zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, H.; Muennich, K.O.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the 222 Rn activity concentration profile in the soil and the 222 Rn flux in West-Germany are presented. The spatial pattern of the 222 Rn flux depends more on soil type than on the 226 Ra activity of the soil material. The average 222 Rn flux from sandy soils is 1000-2000 dpm m -2 h -1 and 4000-6000 dpm m -2 h -1 froam loamy and clayey soils. Weekly 222 Rn flux measurements during a period of 1 year at a sandy site show no significant temporal variations. At a clayey site, the 222 Rn flux tends to be higher in summer than in winter. The permeability coefficient P Rn , obtained from simultaneous 222 Rn flux and concentration profile measurements in various soils, can be expressed as a function of the soil parameters total porosity ε 0 , soil moisture F, tortuosity k and the molecular diffusion coefficient D 0 of 222 Rn in air: P = D 0 ((ε 0 -F)/k-const.). The flux of any other gas into or out of the soil can thus be calculated from its measured concentration profile in the soil and from the 222 Rn permeability coefficient, replacing the molecular diffusion coefficient of 222 Rn by that of the specific gas under consideration. As an example, this method of flux determination is demonstrated for the soil CO 2 flux to the atmosphere and for the flux of atmospheric CH 4 into the soil. (author) 14 refs

  14. Factors mediating the restoration of structurally degraded soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    with the ability of soils to perform these functions. The present study examines the roles of clay mineralogy, native organic matter, and exogenous organic material on the restoration of structurally degraded soils. Totally seven soils from Denmark and Ghana - five soils dominated by illites, one kaolinitic soil...... the incubation period, structural stability estimated as the amount of water-dispersible clay decreased with prevailing moisture content, and native organic matter. Also, microbial activity significantly increased with addition of exogenous organic matter. At the end of incubation, there was significant...... macroaggregation, decreased bulk density, and increased equivalent pore diameter and tortuosity (derived from measurements of soil-gas diffusivity and soil-air permeability) for all soils. Although aggregate friability was not affected by clay type, aggregate workability was highest for the kaolinitic soil...

  15. Enumeration and identification of gram negative bacteria present in soil underlying urban waste-sites in southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achudume, A C; Olawale, J T

    2010-09-01

    Samples of soils underlying wastes were collected from four sites representing four demographic regions of a medium sized town in southwestern Nigeria. Standard methods and reference strains of isolated bacteria were employed for identification. Evaluation of the enzymatic and biochemical reactions showed that all isolated and identified microbes were non-fermenting heterotrophic (HTB). For example, Klebsiella pnemuniae may be involved in wound infections, particularly following bowel surgery. Similarly Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce serious nosocomial infections if it gains access to the body through wounds or intravenous lines. From the 15 culure plates, 88 colonies with various characteristics were enumerated. They differed in aspect of viscosity and color. The bacterial species were identified by percent positive reactions while oxidative and sugar fermentation tests revealed various characteristics among the isolated strains. All of the isolates were negative for citrate utilization, gelatin liquefaction, nitrate reduction, methyl red and Voges Proskaur, motility and hydrogen sulphate production. The quantity of HTB present in an area serves as an index of the general sanitary conditions of that area. The presence of a large number of HTB, in an ecological area may be considered a liability as it can enhance the spread of diseases and on a larger scale may enable epidemics to arise. Therefore, there is need for control of waste sites by recovery and regular germicidal sanitation.

  16. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  17. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Aaran, E-mail: aaran.sumner@nottingham.ac.uk [University of Nottingham, Nottingham University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Gerada, Chris, E-mail: chris.gerada@nottingham.ac.uk [Electrical Machines, University of Nottingham, Tower Building, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil, E-mail: neil.brown@cummins.com [Advanced Electrical Machines Research and Technology at Cummins Power Generation, Peterborough PE2 6FZ, England (United Kingdom); Clare, Adam, E-mail: adam.clare@nottingham.ac.uk [Advanced Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  18. Permeability-Porosity Relationships of Subduction Zone Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2008-12-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from Northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on their sediment type and grain size distribution. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity for siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalk than for nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by clay content yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggest decreasing permeability for a given porosity as clay content increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content generally improves the quality of permeability-porosity relationships. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes may be controlled by the amount of clay present in the ooze, causing diatom oozes to behave similarly to siliciclastic sediments. For a given porosity the nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than the siliciclastic sediments. However, the use of a permeability-porosity relation may not be appropriate for unconsolidated carbonates such as nannofossil oozes. This study provided insight to the effects of porosity correction for smectite, variations in lithology and grain size in permeability-porosity relationships. However, further progress in delineating controls on permeability will require more careful and better documented permeability tests on characterized samples.

  19. Development of a New Apparatus for Investigating Acoustic Effects on Hydraulic Properties of Low-Permeability Geo-Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H.; Sawada, A.; Sugita, H.; Takeda, M.; Komai, T.; Zhang, M.

    2006-12-01

    feasibility of the EASD method and to obtain the fundamental but important knowledge for the design of this method, it is first necessary to understand the effects of acoustic wave application on pore water flow behavior. A new apparatus is developed to investigate the effects of acoustic wave on hydraulic properties of soil sample. This test apparatus enables to confine a cylindrical specimen under hydrostatic pressure conditions and to apply acoustic wave simultaneously. Preliminary results associated with the effects of acoustic wave frequency on changes of permeability of kaolin clay samples are illustrated in this report. A program investigating the effects of electricity and pore water chemistry on efficiency of decontamination using the same samples is also ongoing and briefly presented. The two strategies for enhancing the efficiency of remediation for low permeable soils will be combined in the near future

  20. Neutron activation analysis. A review of the method and its present and potential uses in agriculture and soil science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Bewick, M.W.M.

    1978-01-01

    Basic principles, neutron sources, detection and analysis of gamma radiation and use for plants, animals, man, soil and microbiology are reviewed. Addresses of 4 commercial services in the U.K. are given (144 references). (U.K.)

  1. A multiscale model of distributed fracture and permeability in solids in all-round compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Maria Laura; Della Vecchia, Gabriele; Ortiz, Michael; Pandolfi, Anna

    2017-07-01

    We present a microstructural model of permeability in fractured solids, where the fractures are described in terms of recursive families of parallel, equidistant cohesive faults. Faults originate upon the attainment of tensile or shear strength in the undamaged material. Secondary faults may form in a hierarchical organization, creating a complex network of connected fractures that modify the permeability of the solid. The undamaged solid may possess initial porosity and permeability. The particular geometry of the superposed micro-faults lends itself to an explicit analytical quantification of the porosity and permeability of the damaged material. The model is the finite kinematics version of a recently proposed porous material model, applied with success to the simulation of laboratory tests and excavation problems [De Bellis, M. L., Della Vecchia, G., Ortiz, M., Pandolfi, A., 2016. A linearized porous brittle damage material model with distributed frictional-cohesive faults. Engineering Geology 215, 10-24. Cited By 0. 10.1016/j.enggeo.2016.10.010]. The extension adds over and above the linearized kinematics version for problems characterized by large deformations localized in narrow zones, while the remainder of the solid undergoes small deformations, as typically observed in soil and rock mechanics problems. The approach is particularly appealing as a means of modeling a wide scope of engineering problems, ranging from the prevention of water or gas outburst into underground mines, to the prediction of the integrity of reservoirs for CO2 sequestration or hazardous waste storage, to hydraulic fracturing processes.

  2. Use of Interface Treatment to Reduce Emissions from Residuals in Lower Permeability Zones to Groundwater flowing Through More Permeable Zones (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.; Cavanagh, B.; Clifton, L.; Daniels, E.; Dahlen, P.

    2013-12-01

    Many soil and groundwater remediation technologies rely on fluid flow for contaminant extraction or reactant delivery (e.g., soil vapor extraction, pump and treat, in situ chemical oxidation, air sparging, enhanced bioremediation). Given that most unconsolidated and consolidated settings have permeability contrasts, the outcome is often preferential treatment of more permeable zones and ineffective treatment of the lower permeability zones. When this happens, post-treatment contaminant emissions from low permeability zone residuals can cause unacceptable long-term impacts to groundwater in the transmissive zones. As complete remediation of the impacted lower permeability zones may not be practicable with conventional technologies, one might explore options that lead to reduction of the contaminant emissions to acceptable levels, rather than full remediation of the lower permeability layers. This could be accomplished either by creating a sustained emission reaction/attenuation zone at the high-low permeability interface, or by creating a clean soil zone extending sufficiently far into the lower permeability layer to cause the necessary reduction in contaminant concentration gradient and diffusive emission. These options are explored in proof-of-concept laboratory-scale physical model experiments. The physical models are prepared with two layers of contrasting permeability and either dissolved matrix storage or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the lower permeability layer. A dissolved oxidant is then delivered to the interface via flow across the higher permeability layer and changes in contaminant emissions from the low permeability zone are monitored before, during, and after oxidant delivery. The use of three oxidants (dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and sodium persulfate) for treatment of emissions from petroleum hydrocarbon residuals is examined.

  3. Geo-environmental applications for permeable sand-shredded tyre mixtures; Applications geoenvironnementales de melanges sable-pneu permeables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabbaa, A.A. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering; Cogswell, C.A. [Formely Cambridge University Engineering Dept., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Al-Tabbaa, A.M.B. [Kings College London (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents details and results of recent work conducted on the geo-environmental applications of permeable sand-tyre mixtures. This work is part of an extensive research programme initiated by the first author on the use of waste tyre in various geotechnical and geo-environmental applications. The paper considers sand-tyre in mixed and layered sample configurations as part of active containment or landfill leachate collection system. The paper first investigates the level of leached copper and zinc from the tyre and its capacity to absorb paraffin. It then looks at the in-situ mixing of tyre with soil using a laboratory-scale auger. The work produced encouraging results and showed that tyre is a suitable waste material for use in the above applications. (authors)

  4. Permeability measuremens of brazilian Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rogério da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of Brazilian Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora wood was measured in a custom build gas analysis chamber in order to determine which species could be successfully treated with preservatives. Liquid permeability was tested using an emulsion of Neen oil and a control of distillated water. Air was used to test the gas phase permeability. For both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora, the longitudinal permeability of gas was shown to be about twice as great as the liquid phase permeability. No radial permeability was observed for either wood. The permeability of air and water through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was greater than that through the sapwood of Eucalyptus citriodora. The permeability of neen oil preservative through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was also greater than through the sapwood of E. Citradora, but the difference was not statistically significant. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed that the distribution and obstruction in the vessels could be correlated with observed permeability properties. Irrespective of the causes of differences in permeability between the species, the fluid phase flux through the sapwood of both species was significant, indicating that both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora could be successfully treated with wood preservative.

  5. Salinity management using an anionic polymer in a pecan field with calcareous-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjegunte, Girisha K; Sheng, Zhuping; Braun, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Soil salinity and sodicity have long been recognized as the major concerns for irrigated agriculture in the Trans-Pecos Basin, where fields are being flood irrigated with Rio Grande River water that has elevated salinity. Reclamation of these salt-affected lands is difficult due to fine-texture, high shrink-swell soils with low permeability. Conventional practice of subsoiling to improve soil permeability is expensive and has had limited success on the irrigated soils that have appreciable amounts of readily weatherable Ca minerals. If these native Ca sources can be effectively used to counter sodicity, it can improve soil permeability and reduce amelioration costs. This study evaluated the effects of 3 yr of polyacrylamide (PAM) application at 10 mg L concentration during the first irrigation of the season to evaluate soil permeability, in situ Ca mineral dissolution, and leaching of salts from the effective root zone in a pecan field of El Paso County, TX. Results indicated that PAM application improved water movement throughout the effective root zone that resulted in Na leaching. Polymer application significantly decreased CaCO (estimated based on inorganic C analysis) concentrations in the top 45 cm compared with baseline levels, indicating solubilization and redistribution of calcite. The PAM application also reduced soil electrical conductivity (EC) in the top 60 cm (4.64-2.76 dS m) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) from 13.1 to 5.7 mmol L in the top 75-cm depths. As evidence of improved soil conditions, pecan nut yields increased by 34% in PAM-treated fields over the control. Results suggested that PAM application helped in effective use of native Ca sources present in soils of the study site and reduced Na by improving soil permeability. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  7. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 μdarcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section

  8. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  9. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  10. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  11. Effect of permeability enhancers on paracellular permeability of acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Muge; Kaynak, Mustafa Sinan; Sahin, Selma

    2016-06-01

    According to Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), acyclovir is a class III (high solubility, low permeability) compound, and it is transported through paracellular route by passive diffusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various pharmaceutical excipients on the intestinal permeability of acyclovir. The single-pass in-situ intestinal perfusion (SPIP) method was used to estimate the permeability values of acyclovir and metoprolol across different intestinal segments (jejunum, ileum and colon). Permeability coefficient (Peff ) of acyclovir was determined in the absence and presence of a permeation enhancer such as dimethyl β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD), sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), sodium caprate (Cap-Na) and chitosan chloride. All enhancers increased the permeability of paracellularly transported acyclovir. Although Cap-Na has the highest permeability-enhancing effect in all segments, permeation-enhancing effect of chitosan and SLS was only significant in ileum. On the other hand, DM-β-CD slightly decreased the permeability in all intestinal segments. These findings have potential implication concerning the enhancement of absorption of paracellularly transported compounds with limited oral bioavailability. In the case of acyclovir, Cap-Na either alone or in combination with SLS or chitosan has the potential to improve its absorption and bioavailability and has yet to be explored. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. A State-of-the-Art Review on Soil Reinforcement Technology Using Natural Plant Fiber Materials: Past Findings, Present Trends and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Gowthaman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating sustainable materials into geotechnical applications increases day by day due to the consideration of impacts on healthy geo-environment and future generations. The environmental issues associated with conventional synthetic materials such as cement, plastic-composites, steel and ashes necessitate alternative approaches in geotechnical engineering. Recently, natural fiber materials in place of synthetic material have gained momentum as an emulating soil-reinforcement technique in sustainable geotechnics. However, the natural fibers are innately different from such synthetic material whereas behavior of fiber-reinforced soil is influenced not only by physical-mechanical properties but also by biochemical properties. In the present review, the applicability of natural plant fibers as oriented distributed fiber-reinforced soil (ODFS and randomly distributed fiber-reinforced soil (RDFS are extensively discussed and emphasized the inspiration of RDFS based on the emerging trend. Review also attempts to explore the importance of biochemical composition of natural-fibers on the performance in subsoil reinforced conditions. The treatment methods which enhances the behavior and lifetime of fibers, are also presented. While outlining the current potential of fiber reinforcement technology, some key research gaps have been highlighted at their importance. Finally, the review briefly documents the future direction of the fiber reinforcement technology by associating bio-mediated technological line.

  13. A State-of-the-Art Review on Soil Reinforcement Technology Using Natural Plant Fiber Materials: Past Findings, Present Trends and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowthaman, Sivakumar; Nakashima, Kazunori; Kawasaki, Satoru

    2018-04-04

    Incorporating sustainable materials into geotechnical applications increases day by day due to the consideration of impacts on healthy geo-environment and future generations. The environmental issues associated with conventional synthetic materials such as cement, plastic-composites, steel and ashes necessitate alternative approaches in geotechnical engineering. Recently, natural fiber materials in place of synthetic material have gained momentum as an emulating soil-reinforcement technique in sustainable geotechnics. However, the natural fibers are innately different from such synthetic material whereas behavior of fiber-reinforced soil is influenced not only by physical-mechanical properties but also by biochemical properties. In the present review, the applicability of natural plant fibers as oriented distributed fiber-reinforced soil (ODFS) and randomly distributed fiber-reinforced soil (RDFS) are extensively discussed and emphasized the inspiration of RDFS based on the emerging trend. Review also attempts to explore the importance of biochemical composition of natural-fibers on the performance in subsoil reinforced conditions. The treatment methods which enhances the behavior and lifetime of fibers, are also presented. While outlining the current potential of fiber reinforcement technology, some key research gaps have been highlighted at their importance. Finally, the review briefly documents the future direction of the fiber reinforcement technology by associating bio-mediated technological line.

  14. Hybrid green permeable pave with hexagonal modular pavement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M A; Abustan, I; Hamzah, M O

    2013-01-01

    Modular permeable pavements are alternatives to the traditional impervious asphalt and concrete pavements. Pervious pore spaces in the surface allow for water to infiltrate into the pavement during rainfall events. As of their ability to allow water to quickly infiltrate through the surface, modular permeable pavements allow for reductions in runoff quantity and peak runoff rates. Even in areas where the underlying soil is not ideal for modular permeable pavements, the installation of under drains has still been shown to reflect these reductions. Modular permeable pavements have been regarded as an effective tool in helping with stormwater control. It also affects the water quality of stormwater runoff. Places using modular permeable pavement has been shown to cause a significant decrease in several heavy metal concentrations as well as suspended solids. Removal rates are dependent upon the material used for the pavers and sub-base material, as well as the surface void space. Most heavy metals are captured in the top layers of the void space fill media. Permeable pavements are now considered an effective BMP for reducing stormwater runoff volume and peak flow. This study examines the extent to which such combined pavement systems are capable of handling load from the vehicles. Experimental investigation were undertaken to quantify the compressive characteristics of the modular. Results shows impressive results of achieving high safety factor for daily life vehicles.

  15. A Reconciliation of Packed Column Permeability Data: Column Permeability as a Function of Particle Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert M. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In his textbook teaching of packed bed permeability, Georges Guiochon uses mobile phase velocity as the fluid velocity term in his elaboration of the Darcy permeability equation. Although this velocity frame makes a lot of sense from a thermodynamic point of view, it is valid only with respect to permeability at a single theoretical boundary condition. In his more recent writings, however, Guiochon has departed from his long-standing mode of discussing permeability in terms of the Darcy equation and has embraced the well-known Kozeny-Blake equation. In this paper, his teaching pertaining to the constant in the Kozeny-Blake equation is examined and, as a result, a new correlation coefficient is identified and defined herein based on the velocity frame used in his teaching. This coefficient correlates pressure drop and fluid velocity as a function of particle porosity. We show that in their experimental protocols, Guiochon et al. have not adhered to a strict material balance of permeability which creates a mismatch of particle porosity and leads to erroneous conclusions regarding the value of the permeability coefficient in the Kozeny-Blake equation. By correcting the experimental data to properly reflect particle porosity we reconcile the experimental results of Guiochon and Giddings, resulting in a permeability reference chart which is presented here for the first time. This reference chart demonstrates that Guiochon’s experimental data, when properly normalized for particle porosity and other related discrepancies, corroborates the value of 267 for the constant in the Kozeny-Blake equation which was derived by Giddings in 1965.

  16. Foam film permeability: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Krastev, R; Zitha, Pacelli L J

    2008-02-28

    The mass transfer of gas through foam films is a prototype of various industrial and biological processes. The aim of this paper is to give a perspective and critical overview of studies carried out to date on the mass transfer of gas through foam films. Contemporary experimental data are summarized, and a comprehensive overview of the theoretical models used to explain the observed effects is given. A detailed description of the processes that occur when a gas molecule passes through each layer that forms a foam film is shown. The permeability of the film-building surfactant monolayers plays an important role for the whole permeability process. It can be successfully described by the models used to explain the permeability of surfactant monolayers on aqueous sub-phase. For this reason, the present paper briefly discusses the surfactant-induced resistance to mass transfer of gases through gas-liquid interface. One part of the paper discusses the experimental and theoretical aspects of the foam film permeability in a train of foam films in a matrix or a cylinder. This special case is important to explain the gas transfer in porous media or in foams. Finally, this paper will highlight the gaps and challenges and sketch possible directions for future research.

  17. effective hydraulic conductivity for a soil of variable pore size

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: hydraulic conductivity, soil, infiltration, permeability, water. 1. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. Accurate determination of hydraulic conductivity is very crucial for infiltration and runoff estimation. Factors which affect water infiltration in the soil include hydraulic conductivity, wetting front and soil.

  18. A theoretical model for gas permeability in a composite membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, D. A

    2009-01-01

    We present in this work an analytical expression for permeability in a two-layer composite membrane, which was derived assuming the same hypothesis as those of Adzumi model for permeability in a homogeneous membrane. Whereas in Adzumi model permeability shows a linear dependence on the mean pressure, our model for a composite membrane related permeability to pressure through a rather complex expression, which covers the whole range of flow, from molecular-Knudsen to viscous-Poiseuille regimes. The expression obtained for permeability contained information of membrane structural properties as pore size, porosity and thickness of each layer, as well as gas nature and operational conditions. Our two-layer-model expression turns into Adzumi formula when the structure of the layers approach to each other. [es

  19. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  20. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  1. Principal permeability determination from multiple horizontal well tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economides, M. [Texas A and M Univ., TX (United States); Munoz, A.; Ehlig-Economides, C.

    1998-12-31

    A method for obtaining principal permeability magnitudes and direction that requires only the linear flow regime from transient tests in three horizontal wells oriented in three distinct and arbitrary directions, is described. Well design optimization strategies require knowledge of both the principal permeability orientation as well as the horizontal permeability magnitudes. When the degree of horizontal permeability anisotropy (i.e. permeability in the bedding plane with respect to direction) is significant, the productivity of a long horizontal well will depend greatly on its direction, especially when the well is first brought into production. Productivities have been found to deviate substantially among wells in the same reservoir and this deviation has been attributed to differences in well orientation. In view of this fact, measuring permeability anisotropy becomes a compelling necessity. The success of the proposed method is illustrated by a case study in which the principal permeability magnitudes and direction from three wells were used to predict the productivity of a fourth well within 10 per cent. Use of the computed principal permeabilities from the case study, it was possible to forecast the cumulative production to show the significance of well trajectory optimization on the discounted cash flow and the net present value. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  3. Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Soil Stabilization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil stabilization involves methods used to turn unconsolidated and unstable soil into a stiffer, consolidated medium that could support engineered structures, alter permeability, change subsurface flow, or immobilize contamination through mineral precipitation. Among the variety...

  4. Studies on radiation dose due to radioactive elements present in ground water and soil samples around Mysore city, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekara, M S; Veda, S M; Paramesh, L

    2012-04-01

    A systematic study of the ground water and soil samples collected from different locations around Mysore city (12(°)N and 76(°)E) has been carried out. (226)Ra activity concentration in water samples varies from 0.28 to 189 mBq l(-1) with a geometric mean (GM) of 4.75 mBq l(-1) and (222)Rn concentration in ground water varies from 4.25 to 435 Bq l(-1) with a GM of 25.9 Bq l(-1). The GM of inhalation and ingestion doses due to (222)Rn in water is 65.2 and 5.43, µSv y(-1), respectively. The measured GM gamma dose rate in air is 85.4 nGy h(-1) and absorbed dose rate estimated from the measured activity of radionuclides is 92.6 nGy h(-1).

  5. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  6. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods

  7. Permeability of cork to gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  8. Permeable reactive barriers for pollutant removal from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, F.G.; Meggyes, T.

    2001-01-01

    The removal of pollutants from the groundwater using permeable reactive barriers is a novel in-situ groundwater remediation technology. The most relevant decontamination processes used are chemical reduction, oxidation, precipitation and sorption, for which examples are given. Some common organic pollutants are halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic and nitroaromatic compounds which can be treated in reactive barriers successfully. Lead, chromium and, in particular, uranium are dealt with in great detail among inorganic pollutants because of their occurrence in many European countries. Construction methods for cut-off walls and reactive barriers exhibit similar features. Apart from conventional methods, drilling, deep soil mixing, jet technology, arrays of wells, injected systems and biobarriers are applied to construct permeable reactive barriers. Permeable reactive barriers bear great potential for the future in remediation engineering. (orig.)

  9. Implementation of a permeable reactive barrier for treatment of groundwater impacted by strontium-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przepiora, A.; Bodine, D.; Dollar, P.; Smith, P.

    2014-01-01

    A funnel and gate permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system was constructed to treat strontium-90 (Sr- 90) in groundwater migrating from a legacy waste disposal area into an adjacent wetland. The PRB system was designed to contain and direct the Sr-90 impacted groundwater into treatment 'gates' containing zeolite using a low permeability 'funnel' sections constructed with soil-bentonite slurry. The constructed PRB met all dimension and permeability specifications. Initial performance monitoring results indicate that the PRB captured the Sr-90 impacted groundwater plume and the beta radiation values in groundwater emerging from the treatment gates ranged from 35 to 86 Becquerel's per litre (Bq/L), equivalent to a reduction by 88% to 99% from the influent values. Those initial performance results were influenced by residual impacts present in the aquifer material prior to PRB installation. It is anticipated that the clean-up target of 5 Bq/L will be achieved with time as treated groundwater emerging from the PRB flushes through the downgradient aquifer zone. (author)

  10. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  11. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  12. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  13. Gas diffusion, non-Darcy air permeability, and computed tomography images of a clay subsoil affected by compaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2013-01-01

    Soil productivity and other soil functions are dependent on processes in the untilled subsoil. Undisturbed soil cores were collected at the 0.3- to 0.4-m depth from a heavy clay soil in Finland subjected to a single heavy traffic event by agricultural machinery three decades before sampling....... Untrafficked control plots were used as a reference. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was performed on soil cores at a field-sampled field capacity water content. Gas diffusion and air permeability were measured when the soil cores were drained to −1000 hPa matric potential (air permeability also at −100...... and −300 hPa). The air-filled pore space was measured with an air pycnometer and also calculated from mass balance and CT data. Gas diffusion and air permeability were also measured on a straight model tube and on autoclaved aerated concrete. The compaction treatment had not influenced soil total porosity...

  14. Treatment for cracked and permeable Houston clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Leung, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the treatability of a field clay (obtained from Houston, Texas) and a clay-sand mixture to reduce their hydraulic conductivity was evaluated. Remolded field clay and clay-sand mixture with and without methanol contamination were treated to reduce their hydraulic conductivity by permeating very dilute grout solutions. The concentration of sodium silicate in the grout solution was 8%, while the solid content in the cement grout was 0.3%. The hydraulic conductivity of permeable Houston clay (hydraulic conductivity >10 -5 cm/sec) could be reduced to less than 10 -7 cm/sec (U.S. EPA limit for soil barriers) by permeating with a selected combination of grout solutions

  15. Migration of particulates in permeable rock columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropper, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The migration of radioactive material through soil and permeable rock formations have become a major topic of concern due to the interest in the licensing of new radioactive waste disposal sites. Previously, research has been conducted in relation to deep repositories; however, similar situations arise in the vadose zone, where there is a higher probability of naturally-occurring particulates of organic nature and for the incursion of water. Test data has provided information which suggests that particulates will travel through porous media subject to various delay mechnisms and must be included in any consideration of waste migration. Data concerning particulate migration must and should be considered in the future when radioactive waste disposal sites are licensed

  16. Numerical evaluation of the permeability and the Kozeny constant for two types of porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, A.W.J.; Lowe, C.P.

    1995-01-01

    The permeabilities of a random array of spheres and a clay soil were calculated using the lattice-Boltzmann method. The structure of the clay soil was determined by computed tomography imaging. As observed experimentally, the semi-empirical Carman-Kozeny equation gave a good estimate for the

  17. Permeability of cork for water and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana Luisa; Brazinha, Carla; Pereira, Helena; Crespo, Joao G; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2013-10-09

    Transport properties of natural (noncompressed) cork were evaluated for water and ethanol in both vapor and liquid phases. The permeability for these permeants has been measured, as well as the sorption and diffusion coefficients. This paper focuses on the differences between the transport of gases' relevant vapors and their liquids (water and ethanol) through cork. A transport mechanism of vapors and liquids is proposed. Experimental evidence shows that both vapors and liquids permeate not only through the small channels across the cells (plasmodesmata), as in the permeation of gases, but also through the walls of cork cells by sorption and diffusion as in dense membranes. The present study also shows that cork permeability for gases was irreversibly and drastically decreased after cork samples were exposed to ethanol or water in liquid phase.

  18. Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BODNER, SOL R.; CHAN, KWAI S.; MUNSON, DARRELL E.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering

  19. Measurement of relative permeability of fuel cell diffusion media

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented and new correlations for in-plane relative permeability of water and air are established. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Water permeability is a measure of severity in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Nicola; Pfeifle, Viktoria A; Kym, Urs; Keck, Simone; Galati, Virginie; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Gros, Stephanie J

    2017-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common indication for pediatric abdominal emergency surgery. Determination of the severity of appendicitis on clinical grounds is challenging. Complicated appendicitis presenting with perforation, abscess or diffuse peritonitis is not uncommon. The question remains why and when acute appendicitis progresses to perforation. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of water permeability on the severity of appendicitis. We show that AQP1 expression and water permeability in appendicitis correlate with the stage of inflammation and systemic infection parameters, leading eventually to perforation of the appendix. AQP1 is also expressed within the ganglia of the enteric nervous system and ganglia count increases with inflammation. Severity of appendicitis can be correlated with water permeability measured by AQP1 protein expression and increase of ganglia count in a progressive manner. This introduces the question if regulation of water permeability can present novel curative or ameliorating therapeutic options.

  1. Plants as Indicators of Past and Present Zones of Upwelling Soil CO2 at the ZERT Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, M. E.; Sharma, B.; Zhou, X.; Shaw, J. A.; Dobeck, L.; Cunnningham, A.; Spangler, L.; ZERT Team

    2011-12-01

    By their very nature, photosynthetic plants are sensitive and responsive to CO2, which they fix during the Calvin-Benson cycle. Responses of plants to CO2 are valuable tools in the surface detection of upwelling and leaking CO2 from carbon sequestration fields. Plants exposed to upwelling CO2 rapidly exhibit signs of stress such as changes in stomatal conductance, hyperspectral signatures, pigmentation, and viability (Lakkaraju et al. 2010; Male et al. 2010). The Zero Emission Research and Technology (ZERT) site in Bozeman, MT is an experimental facility for surface detection of CO2 where 0.15 ton/day of CO2 was released (7/19- 8/15/2010, and 7/18 - 8/15/2011) from a 100m horizontal injection well, (HIW), 1.5 m underground with deliberate leaks of CO2 at intervals, and from a vertical injector, (VIW), (6/3-6/24/2010). Soil CO2 concentrations reached 16%. Plants at ZERT include Taraxacum officinale (Dandelion), Dactylis glomerata (Orchard Grass), Poa pratensis, (Kentucky Bluegrass), Phleum pratense (Timothy), Bromus japonicus (Japanese Brome), Medicago sativa (Alfalfa) and Cirsium arvense (Canadian Thistle). Dandelion leaves above the zones of upwelling CO2 at the HIW and the VIW changed color from green to reddish-purple (indicative of an increase in anthocyanins) to brown as they senesced within two weeks of CO2 injection. Their increased stomatal conductance along with their extensive surface area combined to make water loss occur quickly following injection of CO2. Xeromorphic grass leaves were not as profoundly affected, although they did exhibit changes in stomatal conductance, accelerated loss of chlorophyll beyond what would normally occur with seasonal senescence, and altered hyperspectral signatures. Within two weeks of CO2 injection at the HIW and the VIW, hot spots formed, which are circular zones of visible leaf senescence that appear at zones of upwelling CO2. The hot spots became more pronounced as the CO2 injection continued, and were detectable

  2. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  3. The permeability and consolidation of deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, P.J.; Gunn, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents permeability and consolidation data for a wide range of sediment types. Permeability is one of the two parameters which are needed to directly quantify pore water advection in deep sea sediments and which are being investigated in high-level radioactive waste study areas. While it is desirable that these parameters should be measured in situ it is argued that values of permeability can be measured sufficiently accurately in the laboratory from core samples. Consequently, an apparatus has been developed which enables sediment permeability to be measured at decreasing void ratios during a back-pressured consolidation test. Data presented in this report from over 60 samples have established the major differences in permeability between various sediment types and how permeability changes as a function of burial depth and void ratio. Samples from two study areas in the North Atlantic Ocean, King's Trough Flank (KTF) and Great Meteor East (GME), have been compared with samples of Red Clay (RC) obtained from the NW Pacific Ocean. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  4. Permeable treatment wall design and cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manz, C.; Quinn, K.

    1997-01-01

    A permeable treatment wall utilizing the funnel and gate technology has been chosen as the final remedial solution for one industrial site, and is being considered at other contaminated sites, such as a closed municipal landfill. Reactive iron gates will be utilized for treatment of chlorinated VOCs identified in the groundwater. Alternatives for the final remedial solution at each site were evaluated to achieve site closure in the most cost effective manner. This paper presents the remedial alternatives and cost analyses for each site. Several options are available at most sites for the design of a permeable treatment wall. Our analysis demonstrates that the major cost factor's for this technology are the design concept, length, thickness, location and construction methods for the reactive wall. Minimizing the amount of iron by placement in the most effective area and construction by the lowest cost method is critical to achieving a low cost alternative. These costs dictate the design of a permeable treatment wall, including selection of a variety of alternatives (e.g., a continuous wall versus a funnel and gate system, fully penetrating gates versus partially penetrating gates, etc.). Selection of the appropriate construction methods and materials for the site can reduce the overall cost of the wall

  5. Permeability of different size waste particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Gavelytė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The world and life style is changing, but the most popular disposal route for waste is landfill globally until now. We have to think about waste prevention and preparing for re-use or recycling firstly, according to the waste disposal hierarchy. Disposed waste to the landfill must be the last opportunity. In a landfill, during waste degradation processes leachate is formed that can potentially cause clogging of bottom drainage layers. To ensure stability of a landfill construction, the physical properties of its components have to be controlled. The hydrology of precipitation, evaporation, runoff and the hydraulic performance of the capping and liner materials are important controls of the moisture content. The water balance depends also on the waste characteristics and waste particle size distribution. The aim of this paper is to determine the hydraulic permeability in a landfill depending on the particle size distribution of municipal solid waste disposed. The lab experiment results were compared with the results calculated with DEGAS model. Samples were taken from a landfill operated for five years. The samples particle sizes are: >100 mm, 80 mm, 60 mm, 40 mm, 20 mm, 0.01 mm and <0.01 mm. The permeability test was conducted using the column test. The paper presents the results of experiment and DEGAS model water permeability with waste particle size.

  6. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  7. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  8. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-01-01

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC's and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow

  9. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  10. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  11. Influence of oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids with MCPA and Dicamba anions on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ławniczak, Ł., E-mail: lukasz.k.lawniczak@wp.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Syguda, A., E-mail: Anna.Syguda@put.poznan.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Borkowski, A., E-mail: a.borkowski@uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Geology, University of Warsaw, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Cyplik, P., E-mail: pcyplik@wp.pl [Department of Biotechnology and Food Microbiology, University of Life Sciences in Poznan, 60-627 Poznan (Poland); Marcinkowska, K., E-mail: k.marcinkowska@iorpib.poznan.pl [Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznan 60-318 (Poland); Wolko, Ł., E-mail: wolko@o2.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Poznań University of Life Sciences in Poznan, 60-632 Poznan (Poland); Praczyk, T., E-mail: t.praczyk@iorpib.poznan.pl [Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznan 60-318 (Poland); Chrzanowski, Ł., E-mail: Lukasz.Chrzanowski@put.poznan.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Pernak, J., E-mail: Juliusz.Pernak@put.poznan.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs), which exhibit high efficacy in terms of weed control and low toxicity, but may be persistent due to limited biodegradability, on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil. Four different oligomeric HILs (with two types of cations and different ratio of herbicidal anions) were synthesized and characterized by employing {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. The results of biodegradation assay indicated that none of the tested HILs could be classified as readily biodegradable (biodegradation rate ranged from 0 to 7%). The conducted field studies confirmed that the herbicidal efficacy of the HILs was higher compared to the reference herbicide mixture by 10 to 30%, depending on the dose and weed species. After termination of field studies, the soil treated with the tested HILs was subjected to next generation sequencing in order to investigate the potential changes in the bacterial community structure. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all studied samples. Treatment with the studied HILs resulted in an increase of Actinobacteria compared to the reference herbicidal mixture. Differenced among the studied HILs were generally associated with a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroidetes in case of 1-HIL-Dicamba 1/3 and Firmicutes in case of 2-HIL-Dicamba 1/3. - Highlights: • Impact of herbicidal ionic liquids on bacterial community structure was studied. • Oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids were effective but not readily biodegradable. • Next generation sequencing was used to evaluate shifts in bacterial abundance. • Treatment during field trials resulted in changes at class and species level. • Use of herbicidal ionic liquids affects the structure of autochthonic soil bacteria.

  12. Influence of oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids with MCPA and Dicamba anions on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ławniczak, Ł.; Syguda, A.; Borkowski, A.; Cyplik, P.; Marcinkowska, K.; Wolko, Ł.; Praczyk, T.; Chrzanowski, Ł.; Pernak, J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs), which exhibit high efficacy in terms of weed control and low toxicity, but may be persistent due to limited biodegradability, on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil. Four different oligomeric HILs (with two types of cations and different ratio of herbicidal anions) were synthesized and characterized by employing "1H and "1"3C NMR. The results of biodegradation assay indicated that none of the tested HILs could be classified as readily biodegradable (biodegradation rate ranged from 0 to 7%). The conducted field studies confirmed that the herbicidal efficacy of the HILs was higher compared to the reference herbicide mixture by 10 to 30%, depending on the dose and weed species. After termination of field studies, the soil treated with the tested HILs was subjected to next generation sequencing in order to investigate the potential changes in the bacterial community structure. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all studied samples. Treatment with the studied HILs resulted in an increase of Actinobacteria compared to the reference herbicidal mixture. Differenced among the studied HILs were generally associated with a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroidetes in case of 1-HIL-Dicamba 1/3 and Firmicutes in case of 2-HIL-Dicamba 1/3. - Highlights: • Impact of herbicidal ionic liquids on bacterial community structure was studied. • Oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids were effective but not readily biodegradable. • Next generation sequencing was used to evaluate shifts in bacterial abundance. • Treatment during field trials resulted in changes at class and species level. • Use of herbicidal ionic liquids affects the structure of autochthonic soil bacteria.

  13. The present use of soil and water in the basin of the creek Piçarrão-Araguari-MG-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Oliveira Melo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural expansion in the basin of the creek Piçarrão during the period from 1970 to 2005 produced changes in the use of soil and water that heretofore had not been documented. A diagnosis of the present situation was carried out to evaluate the prospect of agricultural activity in the basin. The literature was reviewed, 16 rural producers were interviewed, and the creek and its tributaries were inspected. The results of the study are presented in form of maps and tables. The total area drained by the creek is 388 km2, nine pivots do the agricultural irrigation, and the creek’s flow rate varies between 1.5 and 80.0 m3 per second with an annual average of 8.0 m3 per second. The study identified water availability as main limiting factor of agricultural development in the basin.

  14. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  15. Determination of the permeability of tank basins with Zangar permeameter; Determinacao de permeabilidade em bacias de tanques com permeametro de Zangar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Carlos Alberto Rodrigues; Vicente, Ana Paula Camargo de; Lopes, Jorge Antonio; Silveira Filho, Celso Rodrigues da [Petrobras Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This article addresses a subject that has been target of requirements from environmental agencies for renewal of licenses, expansions, or implementation of new enterprises. That subject refers to the checking of the permeability of tank basins and verifying its adequacy against certain criteria. The Brazilian standard that regulates those criteria is ABNT NBR 17505-2 - Flammable and Combustible Liquid Storage. In order to check compliance with the established criteria, it is best to perform geotechnical tests to check the permeability and main characteristics of the soil. Some difficulties may arise in the execution of those services, as for example, the scarce existence of qualified firms, relative complexity, high cost and considerable time for the execution. In that regard, this article is intended to present a differentiated methodology proposed by Zangar (1953) for the checking of the permeability of the basins and also a practical case applied to a petroleum by-product storage terminal. The methodology is complemented with the presentation of the results obtained in a plant containing iso-value curves, thereby getting a geographic representation of the permeability indexes of the basins. In the case study, 21 tests have been performed encompassing 7 tank basins. As a result therefrom, it was verified that 98.3% of the studied area met the criteria, with an average permeability of 6.84 x 10{sup -5} cm/s. With this paper, one may conclude that the proposed methodology is reliable, quick, low-cost and easily applicable, and may be used for checking the compliance of the tank basin permeability with the criterion of ABNT NBR 17505-2 standard. (author)

  16. Permeability model of sintered porous media: analysis and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez Mera, Juan Pablo; Chiamulera, Maria E.; Mantelli, Marcia B. H.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the permeability of porous media fabricated from copper powder sintering process was modeled and measured, aiming the use of the porosity as input parameter for the prediction of the permeability of sintering porous media. An expression relating the powder particle mean diameter with the permeability was obtained, based on an elementary porous media cell, which is physically represented by a duct formed by the arrangement of spherical particles forming a simple or orthorhombic packing. A circular duct with variable section was used to model the fluid flow within the porous media, where the concept of the hydraulic diameter was applied. Thus, the porous is modeled as a converging-diverging duct. The electrical circuit analogy was employed to determine two hydraulic resistances of the cell: based on the Navier-Stokes equation and on the Darcýs law. The hydraulic resistances are compared between themselves and an expression to determine the permeability as function of average particle diameter is obtained. The atomized copper powder was sifted to reduce the size dispersion of the particles. The porosities and permeabilities of sintered media fabricated from powders with particle mean diameters ranging from 20 to 200 microns were measured, by means of the image analysis method and using an experimental apparatus. The permeability data of a porous media, made of copper powder and saturated with distilled water, was used to compare with the permeability model. Permeability literature models, which considers that powder particles have the same diameter and include porosity data as input parameter, were compared with the present model and experimental data. This comparison showed to be quite good.

  17. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  18. Modeling multidomain hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ryan D.; Abou Najm, Majdi R.; Rupp, David E.; Selker, John S.

    2016-10-01

    Shrink-swell soils crack and become compacted as they dry, changing properties such as bulk density and hydraulic conductivity. Multidomain models divide soil into independent realms that allow soil cracks to be incorporated into classical flow and transport models. Incongruously, most applications of multidomain models assume that the porosity distributions, bulk density, and effective saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil are constant. This study builds on a recently derived soil shrinkage model to develop a new multidomain, dual-permeability model that can accurately predict variations in soil hydraulic properties due to dynamic changes in crack size and connectivity. The model only requires estimates of soil gravimetric water content and a minimal set of parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory and/or field measurements. We apply the model to eight clayey soils, and demonstrate its ability to quantify variations in volumetric water content (as can be determined during measurement of a soil water characteristic curve) and transient saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks (as can be measured using infiltration tests). The proposed model is able to capture observed variations in Ks of one to more than two orders of magnitude. In contrast, other dual-permeability models assume that Ks is constant, resulting in the potential for large error when predicting water movement through shrink-swell soils. Overall, the multidomain model presented here successfully quantifies fluctuations in the hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soil matrices, and are suitable for use in physical flow and transport models based on Darcy's Law, the Richards Equation, and the advection-dispersion equation.

  19. Aggregate stability and soil degradation in the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Aggregate stability is a measure of the structural stability of soils. Factors that influence aggregate stability are important in evaluating the ease with which soils erode by water and/or wind, the potential of soils to crust and/or seal, soil permeability, quasi-steady state infiltration rates and seedling emergence and in predicting the capacity of soils to sustain long-term crop production. Aggregate stability of soils can be measured by the wet-sieving or raindrop techniques. A reduction in soil aggregate stability implies an increase in soil degradation. Hence aggregate stability and soil degradation are interwoven. The measures used can either be preventive or remedial. Preventive practices minimize the chances of soil degradation occurring or the magnitude or severity of the damage when the degradation manifests. These include in Nigeria, (i) manuring and mulching, (ii) planted fallows and cover crops, (iii) sustainable farming systems, (iv) adequate rotations, (v) home gardens or compound farms, (vi) alley cropping and related agro forestry systems, and (vii) chemical fertilizers which are mainly remedial measures. Because of alterations in soil properties that affect particular land uses, soils may degrade for one crop (maize rather sorghum). As long as some land use is possible soil degradation is not always an absolute concept. Decline in agricultural productivity should be evaluated in terms of inputs such as fertilizer use, water management and tillage methods. We can alleviate some types of soil degradation by use of micronutrients, inorganic fertilizers and organic residues. Soil that responds to management practices cannot be said to be degraded. Since crop growth depends on weather, degraded soils may be more sensitive to harsh weather (e.g. drought, temperature) than undegraded soils. A soil is degraded if its productivity falls below the economic threshold even under favourable weather conditions or with judicious inputs. All human

  20. Effect of Particle Size and Soil Compaction on Gas Transport Parameters in Variably Saturated, Sandy Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The soil gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and air permeability (ka) and their dependency on soil air content ( ) control gas diffusion and advection in soils. This study investigated the effects of average particle size (D50) and dry bulk density ( b) on Dp and ka for six sandy soils under variably...

  1. Trench infiltration for managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, V.M.; Watt, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock is increasingly being utilized to enhance resources and maintain sustainable groundwater development practices. One such target is the Navajo Sandstone, an extensive regional aquifer located throughout the Colorado Plateau of the western United States. Spreading-basin and bank-filtration projects along the sandstone outcrop's western edge in southwestern Utah have recently been implemented to meet growth-related water demands. This paper reports on a new cost-effective surface-infiltration technique utilizing trenches for enhancing managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. A 48-day infiltration trench experiment on outcropping Navajo Sandstone was conducted to evaluate this alternative surface-spreading artificial recharge method. Final infiltration rates through the bottom of the trench were about 0.5 m/day. These infiltration rates were an order of magnitude higher than rates from a previous surface-spreading experiment at the same site. The higher rates were likely caused by a combination of factors including the removal of lower permeability soil and surficial caliche deposits, access to open vertical sandstone fractures, a reduction in physical clogging associated with silt and biofilm layers, minimizing viscosity effects by maintaining isothermal conditions, minimizing chemical clogging caused by carbonate mineral precipitation associated with algal photosynthesis, and diminished gas clogging associated with trapped air and biogenic gases. This pilot study illustrates the viability of trench infiltration for enhancing surface spreading of managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. ?? 2010.

  2. Quantifying porosity, compressibility and permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Frykman, Peter

    strain data. We found that Kozeny's modelled permeability fall in the same order of magnitude with measured permeability for shale rich in kaolinite but overestimates permeability by two to three orders of magnitudes for shale with high content of smectite. The empirical Yang and Aplin model gives good...... permeability estimate comparable to the measured one for shale rich in smectite. This is probably because Yang and Aplin model was calibrated in London clay which is rich in smectite....

  3. Viscous fingering with permeability heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, C.; Homsy, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Viscous fingering in miscible displacements in the presence of permeability heterogeneities is studied using two-dimensional simulations. The heterogeneities are modeled as stationary random functions of space with finite correlation scale. Both the variance and scale of the heterogeneities are varied over modest ranges. It is found that the fingered zone grows linearly in time in a fashion analogous to that found in homogeneous media by Tan and Homsy [Phys. Fluids 31, 1330 (1988)], indicating a close coupling between viscous fingering on the one hand and flow through preferentially more permeable paths on the other. The growth rate of the mixing zone increases monotonically with the variance of the heterogeneity, as expected, but shows a maximum as the correlation scale is varied. The latter is explained as a ''resonance'' between the natural scale of fingers in homogeneous media and the correlation scale

  4. utilisation of rice husk ash for improvement of deficient soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1, 2 DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING,FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY,MINNA,NIGER STATE.NIGERIA ... industrial wastes in soil improvement is rapidly increasing ..... barriers, permeability characteristics of the treated soil,.

  5. Effect of aggregate grain size distribution on properties of permeable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) ratio on the mechanical properties of permeable concrete is investigated. The aim of this study is to prepare permeable concrete mixture with optimum properties in terms of strength and permeability. For this purpose, five different permeable ...

  6. Effect of temperature on the permeability of gas adsorbed coal under triaxial stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangchen; Yan, Xiaopeng; Kang, Yili

    2018-04-01

    The combined effects of gas sorption, stress and temperature play a significant role in the changing behavior of gas permeability in coal seams. The effect of temperature on nitrogen and methane permeability of naturally fractured coal is investigated. Coal permeability, P-wave velocity and axial strain were simultaneously measured under two effective stresses and six different temperatures. The results showed that the behavior of nitrogen and methane permeability presented nonmonotonic changes with increasing temperature. The variation in the P-wave velocity and axial strain showed a good correspondence with coal permeability. A higher effective stress limited the bigger deformation and caused the small change in permeability. Methane adsorption and desorption significantly influence the mechanical properties of coal and play an important role in the variations in coal permeability. The result of coal permeability during a complete stress-strain process showed that the variation in permeability is determined by the evolution of the internal structure. The increase in the temperature of the gas saturated coal causes the complex interaction between matrix swelling, matrix shrinkage and micro-fracture generation, which leads to the complex changes in coal structure and permeability. These results are helpful to understand the gas transport mechanism for exploiting coal methane by heat injection.

  7. Analysis of the average daily radon variations in the soil air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Matos, M.; Boehm, R.; Stanys, T.; Polaskova, A.; Hola, O.

    1998-01-01

    In this contribution the search of the relation between the daily variations of the radon concentration and the regular daily oscillations of the atmospheric pressure are presented. The deviation of the radon activity concentration in the soil air from the average daily value reaches only a few percent. For the dry summer months the average daily course of the radon activity concentration can be described by the obtained equation. The analysis of the average daily courses could give the information concerning the depth of the gas permeable soil layer. The soil parameter is determined by others method with difficulty

  8. Soil physical land degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    structure down to deeper depth and/or in combination with the deterioration of a continuous pore system an intensely degraded soil. A dominating anisotropy of pore functions causes a lateral soil and water movement. Doerner and Horn (2006), documented the increasing effect of stress and shear affected horizontal anisotropy on the hydraulic and gas permeability which coincides with a retarded gas exchange and an increased proportion of e.g. CO2 or even CH4 in soil pores and hinders the normal population growth. If the internal soil strength is exceeded the microbial composition and activity is converted to anoxia and even results in the emission of CH4 (Haas et al. 2016). Furthermore, the accessibility of nutrient adsorption places as well as connection between the pores within the compacted soils is decreased and results in a retarded ion mass flow and diffusion within the plats and /or in between the soil horizons. How to overcome these negative effects and how to deal with soils adequately according to their internal strength will be presented in the lecture - we need to improve the food production at an preserved land area for growing population. Literature Haas,C., Holthusen,D., Mordhorst,A., Lipiec,J., Horn, R. 2016. Elastic and plastic soil deformation and its influence on emission of greenhouse gases. Int. Agrophys., 30, 173-184 Krümmelbein, J., R.Horn 2013: Cycle of Soil Structure. Soil Degradation 183-198, Advances in Geoecology, 42, Catena Verlag, ISBN: 978-3-923381-59-3

  9. Permeability of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1980-12-01

    The object of the study was the water flow through the bentonite which is caused by hydraulic gradients. The study comprised laboratory tests and theoretical considerations. It was found that high bulk densities reduced the permeability to very low values. It was concluded that practically impervious conditions prevail when the gradients are low. Thus with a regional gradient of 10 -2 and a premeability of 10 -13 m/s the flow rate will not be higher than approximately 1 mm in 30 000 years. (G.B.)

  10. Transporte no solo de solutos presentes na água residuária de café conilon = Soil transportedsolutes found in conilon coffee wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, determinaramse em colunas de solos os fatores de retardamento, coeficientes dispersivodifusivos e curvas de efluente, assim como a concentração residente dos íons potássio, sódio, cálcio e magnésio presentes na água residuária da lavagem e despolpa de frutos do cafeeiro conilon. Inicialmente, as colunas foram interligadas a frascos de Mariotte contendo água destilada, durante período suficiente para passar dois volumes de poros e, em seguida, a frascos contendo a água residuária. As concentrações relativas das amostras oriundas do efluente, correspondentes aos respectivos volumes de poros, foram utilizadas a fim de obter as curvas experimentais de efluente para sódio, potássio, cálcio e magnésio. Modelos matemáticos para concentração no fluxo foram ajustados aos pontos amostrais das curvas de efluente, permitindo, assim, obter os valores dos fatores de retardamento e coeficientes dispersivodifusivospara os íons. Para o latossolo, os fatores de retardamento foram superiores àqueles encontrados para o aluvial e argissolo. Por outro lado, os coeficientes dispersivodifusivos não apresentaram tendência entre os três solos. As concentrações residentes dos solutos apresentaram a ordem de grandeza: aluvialThis study was carried out to determine the retardation factors, diffusivedispersive coefficients and effluent curves, as well as the resident concentration of potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium ions found in the wastewater from washing and pulping of the conilon coffee cherries. Initially, the columns were interlinked to Mariotte flasks containing distilled water, over period enough to pass two pore volumes of the soil, and then being linked to flasks containing this wastewater. The relative concentrations of the samples from the effluent, corresponding to the respective pore volumes, were used in order to obtain the experimental effluent curves for sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium. Mathematical

  11. Laboratory-scale measurements of effective relative permeability for layered sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butts, M.G.; Korsgaard, S.

    1996-12-31

    Predictions of the impact of remediation or the extent of contamination resulting from spills of gasoline, solvents and other petroleum products, must often be made in complex geological environments. Such problems can be treated by introducing the concept of effective parameters that incorporate the effects of soil layering or other heterogeneities into a large-scale flow description. Studies that derive effective multiphase parameters are few, and approximations are required to treat the non-linear multiphase flow equations. The purpose of this study is to measure effective relative permeabilities for well-defined multi-layered soils at the laboratory scale. Relative permeabilities were determined for homogeneous and layered, unconsolidated sands using the method of Jones and Roszelle (1978). The experimental data show that endpoint relative permeabilities are important in defining the shape of the relative permeability curves, but these cannot be predicted by estimation methods base on capillary pressure data. The most significant feature of the measured effective relative permeability curves is that the entrapped (residual) oil saturation is significantly larger than the residual saturation of the individual layers. This observation agrees with previous theoretical predictions of large-scale entrapment Butts, 1993 and (1995). Enhanced entrapment in heterogeneous soils has several important implications for spill remediation, for example, the reduced efficiency of direct recovery. (au) 17 refs.

  12. Laboratory-scale measurements of effective relative permeability for layered sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butts, M.G.; Korsgaard, S.

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of the impact of remediation or the extent of contamination resulting from spills of gasoline, solvents and other petroleum products, must often be made in complex geological environments. Such problems can be treated by introducing the concept of effective parameters that incorporate the effects of soil layering or other heterogeneities into a large-scale flow description. Studies that derive effective multiphase parameters are few, and approximations are required to treat the non-linear multiphase flow equations. The purpose of this study is to measure effective relative permeabilities for well-defined multi-layered soils at the laboratory scale. Relative permeabilities were determined for homogeneous and layered, unconsolidated sands using the method of Jones and Roszelle (1978). The experimental data show that endpoint relative permeabilities are important in defining the shape of the relative permeability curves, but these cannot be predicted by estimation methods base on capillary pressure data. The most significant feature of the measured effective relative permeability curves is that the entrapped (residual) oil saturation is significantly larger than the residual saturation of the individual layers. This observation agrees with previous theoretical predictions of large-scale entrapment Butts, 1993 and (1995). Enhanced entrapment in heterogeneous soils has several important implications for spill remediation, for example, the reduced efficiency of direct recovery. (au) 17 refs

  13. Evolution of permeability in siliceous rocks induced by mineral dissolution and precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Shinichiro; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented to follow the evolution of permeability in siliceous rocks mediated by pressure solution. Specifically, the main minerals of siliceous rocks that are quartz, cristobalite, and amorphous silica, are focused to examine differences of the permeability evolutions among them at effective pressures of 1, 5, and 10 MPa, and temperatures of 20 and 90degC. The rates and magnitudes of permeability reduction increase with increases of the pressures and temperatures applied. Ultimate permeabilities reduced by the order of 90 % at the completion of dissolution-mediated compaction at 10 MPa and 90degC. Precipitation may augment more degradation of flow transport in time. (author)

  14. Cross-property relations and permeability estimation in model porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Martys, N.; Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Torquato, S.

    1993-01-01

    Results from a numerical study examining cross-property relations linking fluid permeability to diffusive and electrical properties are presented. Numerical solutions of the Stokes equations in three-dimensional consolidated granular packings are employed to provide a basis of comparison between different permeability estimates. Estimates based on the Λ parameter (a length derived from electrical conduction) and on d c (a length derived from immiscible displacement) are found to be considerably more reliable than estimates based on rigorous permeability bounds related to pore space diffusion. We propose two hybrid relations based on diffusion which provide more accurate estimates than either of the rigorous permeability bounds

  15. Solarization soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Ghraibe, W.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energy could be used in pest control, in soil sterilization technology. The technique consists of covering humid soils by plastic films steadily fixed to the soil. Timing must be in summer during 4-8 weeks, where soil temperature increases to degrees high enough to control pests or to produce biological and chemical changes. The technique could be applied on many pests soil, mainly fungi, bacteria, nematods, weeds and pest insects. The technique could be used in greenhouses as well as in plastic film covers or in orchards where plastic films present double benefits: soil sterilization and production of black mulch. Mechanism of soil solarization is explained. Results show that soil solarization can be used in pest control after fruit crops cultivation and could be a method for an integrated pest control. 9 refs

  16. Porosity, petrophysics and permeability of the Whitby Mudstone (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, M.; Barnhoorn, A.; Hardebol, N.; Ifada, M.; Boersma, Q.; Douma, L.; Peach, C. J.; Bertotti, G.; Drury, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Typically pore diameters in shales range from the µm down to the nm scale and the effective permeability of shale reservoirs is a function of the interconnectivity between the pore space and the natural fracture network present. The length and spacing of mechanical induced and natural fractures is one of the factors controlling gas produtivity from unconventional reservoirs. Permeability of the Whitby Mudstone measured on 1 inch cores was linked to microstructure and combined with natural fracture spacing present in outcrops along the Yorkshire coast (UK) to get insight into possible fluid pathways from reservoir to well. We used a combination of different techniques to characterize the porosity (gas adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy), mineralogy (X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) and permeability (pressure step decay) of the Whitby Mudstone. In addition, we mapped the natural fracture network as present in outcrops along the Yorkshire coast (UK) at the 10-2-101m scale. Mineralogically we are dealing with a rock that is high in clay content and has an average organic matter content of about 10%. Results show a low porosity (max. 7%) as well as low permeability for the Whitby Mudstone. The permeability, measured parallel to bedding, depends on the confining pressure and is 86 nanodarcy at 10 MPa effective confining pressure and decreases to 16 nanodarcy at 40 MPa effective confining pressure. At the scale of observation the average distance to nearest natural fracture is in the order of 0.13 meter and 90 percent of all matrix elements are spaced within 0.4 meter to the nearest fracture. By assuming darcy flow, a permeability of 100 nanodarcy and 10% of overpressure we calculated that for the Whitby mudstone most of the gas resides in the matrix for less than 60 days until it reaches the fracture network.

  17. Steam-water relative permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  18. Soil Tillage Conservation and its Effect on Soil Properties Bioremediation and Sustained Production of Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Ioana Moraru, Paula; Muresan, Liliana; Andriuca, Valentina; Cojocaru, Olesea

    2017-04-01

    soil features resulted in a positive impact on the water permeability of the soil. Availability of soil moisture during the crop growth resulted in better plant water status. Subsequent release of conserved soil water regulated proper plant water status, soil structure, and lowered soil penetrometer resistance. Productions obtained at STC did not have significant differences for the wheat and maize crop but were higher for soybean. The advantages of minimum soil tillage systems for Romanian pedo-climatic conditions can be used to improve methods in low producing soils with reduced structural stability on sloped fields, as well as measures of water and soil conservation on the whole agroecosystem. Presently, it is necessary to make a change concerning the concept of conservation practices and to consider a new approach regarding the good agricultural practice. We need to focus on an upper level concerning conservation by focusing on soil quality. Carbon management is necessary for a complexity of matters including soil, water management, field productivity, biological fuel and climatic change. In conclusion a Sustainable Agriculture includes a range of complementary agricultural practices: (i) minimum soil tillage (through a system of reduced tillage or no-tillage) to preserve the structure, fauna and soil organic matter; (ii) permanent soil cover (cover crops, residues and mulches) to protect the soil and help to remove and control weeds; (iii) various combinations and rotations of the crops which stimulate the micro-organisms in the soil and controls pests, weeds and plant diseases. Acknowledgements: This paper was performed under the frame of the Partnership in priority domains - PNII, developed with the support of MEN-UEFISCDI, project no. PN-II-PT-PCCA-2013-4-0015: Expert System for Risk Monitoring in Agriculture and Adaptation of Conservative Agricultural Technologies to Climate Change, and International Cooperation Program - Sub-3.1. Bilateral AGROCEO c. no. 21BM

  19. Determination of Matric Suction and Saturation Degree for Unsaturated Soils, Comparative Study - Numerical Method versus Analytical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorean, Vasile-Florin

    2017-10-01

    Matric suction is a soil parameter which influences the behaviour of unsaturated soils in both terms of shear strength and permeability. It is a necessary aspect to know the variation of matric suction in unsaturated soil zone for solving geotechnical issues like unsaturated soil slopes stability or bearing capacity for unsaturated foundation ground. Mathematical expression of the dependency between soil moisture content and it’s matric suction (soil water characteristic curve) has a powerful character of nonlinearity. This paper presents two methods to determine the variation of matric suction along the depth included between groundwater level and soil level. First method is an analytical approach to emphasize one direction steady state unsaturated infiltration phenomenon that occurs between the groundwater level and the soil level. There were simulated three different situations in terms of border conditions: precipitations (inflow conditions on ground surface), evaporation (outflow conditions on ground surface), and perfect equilibrium (no flow on ground surface). Numerical method is finite element method used for steady state, two-dimensional, unsaturated infiltration calculus. Regarding boundary conditions there were simulated identical situations as in analytical approach. For both methods, was adopted the equation proposed by van Genuchten-Mualen (1980) for mathematical expression of soil water characteristic curve. Also for the unsaturated soil permeability prediction model was adopted the equation proposed by van Genuchten-Mualen. The fitting parameters of these models were adopted according to RETC 6.02 software in function of soil type. The analyses were performed in both methods for three major soil types: clay, silt and sand. For each soil type were concluded analyses for three situations in terms of border conditions applied on soil surface: inflow, outflow, and no flow. The obtained results are presented in order to highlight the differences

  20. Permeability of hydrogen isotopes through Pd-Ag membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    This paper represents the permeabilities, diffusion coefficients and isotope effects for hydrogen and deuterium through Pd-25 wt.% Ag alloy tubes The feed gas H 2 or D 2 flowing into the permeation cell was preheated before it reached to the outer surface of the permeation tube made of palladium-silver alloy. Permeation time lag method could be successfully carried out with the present apparatus to measure both permeability and diffusion coefficient. The square-root pressure dependence for the permeation of hydrogen isotopes was observed. The observed systematic temperature dependence indicates that the approximation of the Arrhenius' relation was effective within this experimental conditions. Some tendency of permeation fluxes in relation to the reciprocal temperature, 1/T, was seen. The permeability ratio was larger than the square root of isotopic mass ratio, and it decreased with temperature rise. On the contrary, the diffusion coefficient ratio was much smaller than the square root of isotopic mass ratio. (Kato, T.)

  1. Permeability and dispersivity of variable-aperture fracture systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    A number of recent experiments have pointed out the need of including the effects of aperture variation within each fracture in predicting flow and transport properties of fractured media. This paper introduces a new approach in which medium properties, such as the permeability to flow and dispersivity in tracer transport, are correlated to only three statistical parameters describing the fracture aperture probability distribution and the aperture spatial correlation. We demonstrate how saturated permeability and relative permeabilities for flow, as well as dispersion for solute transport in fractures may be calculated. We are in the process of examining the applicability of these concepts to field problems. Results from the evaluation and analysis of the recent Stripa-3D field data are presented. 13 refs., 10 figs

  2. Endodontic sealers: Intratubular penetration and permeability to Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolini Maria Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Evaluate in vitro the intratubular penetration and permeability of endodontic sealers in teeth contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods : Human canines were filled with AHPlus ® , Endo CPM-sealer ® or EndoRez ® sealers. To evaluate permeability, the coronary portion of each tooth was contaminated with E. faecalis, then the apical portion was immersed in brain heart infusion (BHI broth, and medium turbidity was observed for thirty days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM was used to evaluate the intratubular penetration of each sealer at the cervical, middle, and apical thirds of the tooth. Results : Only one tooth from the Endo CPM-sealer ® group presented broth contamination. EndoRez ® showed increased intratubular penetration compared to AHPlus ® and Endo CPM-sealer ® . Conclusions : Endo CPM-sealer ® showed greater permeability to E. faecalis and EndoRez ® showed increased intratubular penetration.

  3. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  4. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Different Methods of Predicting Permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Krogsbøll, Anette

    by two to five orders of magnitudes at lower vertical effective stress below 40 MPa as the content of clay minerals increases causing heterogeneity in shale material. Indirect permeability from consolidation can give maximum and minimum values of shale permeability needed in simulating fluid flow......Permeability is often very difficult to measure or predict in shale lithology. In this work we are determining shale permeability from consolidation tests data using Wissa et al., (1971) approach and comparing the results with predicted permeability from Kozeny’s model. Core and cuttings materials...... effective stress to 9 μD at high vertical effective stress of 100 MPa. The indirect permeability calculated from consolidation tests falls in the same magnitude at higher vertical effective stress, above 40 MPa, as that of the Kozeny model for shale samples with high non-clay content ≥ 70% but are higher...

  6. Analysis on the influence of forest soil characteristics on radioactive Cs infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yoshitomo; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Shimomura, Ryohei; Fukutani, Satoshi; Ikegami, Maiko

    2017-01-01

    Soil core (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm) was collected in 5 points with different vegetation in Fukushima Prefecture in order to explore the permeability, field capacity and voidage. Depth profiles of radioactive Cs, ignition loss and CEC (Cation Exchange Capacity) in the 5 forest soils were also investigated, using scraper plate (at 0.5 cm intervals for 0-5 cm and at 1.0 cm intervals for 5-10 cm). Depth profiles in soil layers were totally different between forests and did not show explicit correlation with field capacity, voidage or ignition loss. On the other hand, CEC correlated weakly and permeability did strongly with infiltration of radioactive Cs. Compartment modeling was conducted, so as to reproduce the monitored depth profile, taking ignition loss as a parameter, based on the experiment result that ignition loss had positive correlation with CEC, which might influence the adsorption process on radioactive Cs in soil layer. However, the ignition loss alone failed to fully reproduce the depth profile. Considering the present results as well as the fact that permeability might have explicit relation with infiltration of radioactive Cs, factors related with precipitation or water flow in early stage after the accident could influence the depth profile, before adsorbed with negative charge in soil particles. (author)

  7. Effective permeability in micropores from molecular simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botan, A.; Vermorel, R.; Brochard, L.; Hantal, G.; Pellenq, R.

    2012-01-01

    molecular dynamics simulations. Gas molecules (here methane) permeate through the membrane from the high to low density region. As the membrane, we used a realistic models of a grain of porous carbon, CS1000a. We calculate the flow J by measuring the number of particles N crossing the membrane with surface area of A xy for a time interval Δt: J= N / (ΔtxA xy ). The permeability P is defined as P=J/(Δp/L z ). Here Δp is the partial pressure difference and L z is the membrane length. Quantitative estimates of the flow and permeability in micropores and the factors affecting them are presented. We discuss a possible way to extend molecular modeling and bridge it with experimental results using coarse-graining techniques. (authors)

  8. Nutrient Infiltrate Concentrations from Three Permeable Pavement Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha...

  9. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation for a second Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works!" at West Windsor Public Library on Saturday, November 5th. It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center. Besides slide persentation, two demo units w...

  10. Quantifying tight-gas sandstone permeability via critical path analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock permeability has been actively investigated over the past several decades by the geosciences community. However, its accurate estimation still presents significant technical challenges, especially in spatially complex rocks. In this letter, we apply critical path analysis (CPA) to estimate perm...

  11. The effect of hot water injection on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Haugwitz, Christian; Jacobsen, Peter Sally Munch

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal energy storage can be achieved by hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers. We present an analysis of literature data in combination with new short-term flow through permeability experiments in order to address physical and physico-chemical mechanisms that can alter...

  12. Intestinal permeability - a new target for disease prevention and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, S.C.; Barbara, G.; Buurman, W.; Ockhuizen, T.; Schulzke, J.D.; Serino, M.; Tilg, H.; Watson, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are accumulating that emphasize the important role of the intestinal barrier and intestinal permeability for health and disease. However, these terms are poorly defined, their assessment is a matter of debate, and their clinical significance is not clearly established. In the present review,

  13. A topology optimization method for design of negative permeability metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, A. R.; Sigmund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    A methodology based on topology optimization for the design of metamaterials with negative permeability is presented. The formulation is based on the design of a thin layer of copper printed on a dielectric, rectangular plate of fixed dimensions. An effective media theory is used to estimate the ...

  14. MHD flow of a uniformly stretched vertical permeable membrane in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a magneto - hydrodynamic flow of a uniformly stretched vertical permeable surface undergoing Arrhenius heat reaction. The analytical solutions are obtained for concentration, temperature and velocity fields using an asymptotic approximation, similar to that of Ayeni et al 2004. It is shown that the temperature ...

  15. Evaluation of Surface and Subsurface Processes in Permeable Pavement Infiltration Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems can be affected by clogging of the pavement surface and/or clogging at the interface where the subsurface storage layer meets the underlying soil. As infiltration and exfiltration are the primary functional mechanisms for ...

  16. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  17. The effect of offset on fracture permeability of rocks from the Southern Andes Volcanic Zone, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, P.; Wang, G.; Mitchell, T. M.; Meredith, P. G.; Nara, Y.; Sarkar, V.; Cembrano, J.

    2017-11-01

    The Southern Andes Volcanic Zone (SVZ) represents one of the largest undeveloped geothermal provinces in the world. Development of the geothermal potential requires a detailed understanding of fluid transport properties of its main lithologies. The permeability of SVZ rocks is altered by the presence of fracture damage zones produced by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). We have therefore measured the permeability of four representative lithologies from the volcanic basement in this area: crystalline tuff, andesitic dike, altered andesite and granodiorite. For comparative purposes, we have also measured the permeability of samples of Seljadalur basalt, an Icelandic rock with widely studied and reported hydraulic properties. Specifically, we present the results of a systematic study of the effect of fractures and fracture offsets on permeability as a function of increasing effective pressure. Baseline measurements on intact samples of SVZ rocks show that the granodiorite has a permeability (10-18 m2), two orders of magnitude higher than that of the volcanic rocks (10-20 m2). The presence of throughgoing mated macro-fractures increases permeability by between four and six orders of magnitude, with the highest permeability recorded for the crystalline tuff. Increasing fracture offset to produce unmated fractures results in large increases in permeability up to some characteristic value of offset, beyond which permeability changes only marginally. The increase in permeability with offset appears to depend on fracture roughness and aperture, and these are different for each lithology. Overall, fractured SVZ rocks with finite offsets record permeability values consistent with those commonly found in geothermal reservoirs (>10-16 m2), which potentially allow convective/advective flow to develop. Hence, our results demonstrate that the fracture damage zones developed within the SVZ produce permeable regions, especially within the

  18. The Effect of Green Inhibitor on strength and water permeability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... present in the concrete evident from inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS) result. KOH is adequate for passivation and reduction of permeability, which serve as a chemical water barriers or hydrophobic agents. Keywords: Concrete; Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (C-S-H); Compressive strength; Permeability; ...

  19. Aqueous flow and transport in analog systems of fractures embedded in permeable matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Butts, Michael Brian; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    1999-01-01

    Two-dimensional laboratory investigations of flow and transport in a fractured permeable medium are presented. Matrix blocks of a manufactured consolidated permeable medium were arranged together to create fractures in the spaces between the blocks. Experiments examined flow and transport in four...

  20. ECONOMICS ANALYSIS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents an analysis of the cost of using permeable reactive barriers to remediate contaminated ground water. When possible, these costs are compared with the cost of pump-and-treat technology for similar situations. Permeable reactive barriers are no longer perceiv...

  1. Errors in Air Permeability Rationing as Key Sources of Construction Quality Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A. A.; Nitievski, A. A.; Ivanov, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The article deals with different approaches to the valuation parameters of air permeability n50 and q50. Examples of erroneous conclusions about the state of the building are presented as well as the ways to obtain reliable results. There are obtained comparative data of the air permeability parameters on examples of buildings with different configuration and with different values of compactness factor.

  2. Soil-bentonite design mix for slurry cutoff walls used as containment barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad, N.S.; Bachus, R.C.; Jacobson, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, soil-bentonite slurry cutoff walls have been increasingly used as containment barriers around contaminated soils to impede or, in some cases, nearly eliminate the off-site migration of contaminated ground water or other potentially hazardous liquids. The paper presents the procedures used and the results obtained during an extensive laboratory testing program performed to select varying soil-bentonite slurry mix components for a soil-bentonite slurry cutoff wall constructed around an old landfill at a former oil refinery. The landfill is underlain to varying depths by a coarse granular soils that has been exposed to oil-products. Compatibility of three commercially available bentonite products with the free oil-products and the oil-contaminated ground water found at some locations in the landfill was initially investigated. Based on the test results, one of the bentonite products was selected for use in the soil-bentonite slurry testing program. A clayey soil from a borrow source, potable water from the site, and subsurface soils from the proposed soil-bentonite slurry wall alignment were used to form different soil-bentonite slurry mixes. Slump tests were performed to evaluate the workability of the mixes. Based on the test results, a single mix was selected for further study, including permeability/compatibility testing. The results of the compatibility testing program are presented and discussed in the paper. A specific design mix methodology for evaluating the chemical compatibility of soil-bentonite slurry mixes with permeants is proposed

  3. Modeling stress/strain-dependent permeability changes for deep geoenergy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2016-04-01

    Rock permeability is a key parameter in deep geoenergy systems. Stress and strain changes induced at depth by fluid injection or extraction may substantially alter the rock permeability in an irreversible way. With regard to the geoenergies, some applications require the permeability to be enhanced to improve productivity. The rock permeability is generally enhanced by shearing process of faults and fractures (e.g. hydroshearing for Enhanced and Deep Geothermal Systems), or the creation of new fractures (e.g. hydrofracturing for shale gas). However, such processes may, at the same time, produce seismicity that can be felt by the local population. Moreover, the increased permeability due to fault reactivation may pose at risk the sealing capacity of a storage site (e.g. carbon sequestration or nuclear waste disposal), providing then a preferential pathway for the stored fluids to escape at shallow depth. In this work we present a review of some recent applications aimed at understanding the coupling between stress (or strain) and permeability. Examples of geoenergy applications include both EGS and CO2 sequestration. To investigate both "wanted" and "unwanted" effects, THM simulations have been carried out with the TOUGH-FLAC simulator. Our studies include constitutive equations relating the permeability to mean effective stress, effective normal stress, volumetric strain, as well as accounting for permeability variation as related to fault/fracture reactivation. Results show that the geomechanical effects have a large role in changing the permeability, hence affecting fluids leakage, reservoir enhancement, as well as the induced seismicity.

  4. Cross-cutting activities: Soil quality and soil metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Motavalli, Peter P.; Garrett, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reports on the work of the SANREM CRSP cross-cutting activities "Assessing and Managing Soil Quality for Sustainable Agricultural Systems" and "Soil Metagenomics to Construct Indicators of Soil Degradation." The introduction gives an overview of the extensiveness of soil degradation globally and defines soil quality. The objectives of the soil quality cross cutting activity are: CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  5. How Indigenous values shaped a successful multi-year Soil Health program in Aotearoa-New Zealand (presented from both indigenous Māori and western science perspectives)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, B.; Harmsworth, G.; Kalaugher, E.

    2017-12-01

    New Zealand is a multicultural society, founded on the Treaty of Waitangi which when enshrined into various legislation and national policy, provides incentive to incorporate indigenous Māori world views into nationally funded science and research programmes. Here we discuss how the integration of indigenous world views and western science were combined in a research proposal that resulted in successful funding for a 5 year collaborative science programme. The programme strives to develop an expanded national soil health framework for New Zealand that will be used by policy makers, local government, indigenous Māori, industry, and primary sector groups to maintain the natural capital and productivity of soils within environmental constraints. Soil health is fundamental to economic, social, and human wellbeing, and provides a myriad of ecosystem and environmental services, such as those sustaining food and fibre production. Typically soil health is defined by "dynamic" soil characteristics that are susceptible to changes in land use or land management over relatively short time frames (years to decades). Soil resilience, however, is a much longer-term concept that is not well captured in current soil health thinking. The Māori world view encapsulates such long term thinking through interconnected Māori values and inter-generational concepts (e.g., whakapapa, rangatiratanga, manawhenua, kaitiakitanga, mauri) that provide the basis for indigenous resource management in Aotearoa-New Zealand. These values and recognition of the Treaty of Waitangi provide authority and rights to manage resources according to tikanga (customs, principles). Māori environmental concepts and knowledge combined with science concepts for understanding soil health and resilience, served as a powerful central theme for the design and implementation of this science program. Māori involvement and capability development are integral to this research effort and we believe the synthesis of M

  6. Surface-subsurface turbulent interaction at the interface of a permeable bed: influence of the wall permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse-gravel river beds possess a high degree of permeability. Flow interactions between surface and subsurface flow across the bed interface is key to a number of natural processes occurring in the hyporheic zone. In fact, it is increasingly recognized that these interactions drive mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface, and consequently control biochemical processes as well as stability of sediments. The current study explores the role of the wall permeability in surface and subsurface flow interaction under controlled experimental conditions on a physical model of a gravel bed. The present wall model was constructed by five layers of cubically arranged spheres (d=25.4mm, where d is a diameter) providing 48% of porosity. Surface topography was removed by cutting half of a diameter on the top layer of spheres to render the flow surface smooth and highlight the impact of the permeability on the overlying flow. An impermeable smooth wall was also considered as a baseline of comparison for the permeable wall flow. To obtain basic flow statistics, low-frame-rate high-resolution PIV measurements were performed first in the streamwise-wall-normal (x-y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. Time-resolved PIV experiments in the same facility were followed to investigate the flow interaction across the wall interface in sptaio-temporal domain. In this paper, a detailed analysis of the first and second order velocity statistics as well as the amplitude modulation for the flow overlying the permeable smooth wall will be presented.

  7. Soil shrinkage characteristics in swelling soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to understand soil swelling and shrinkage mechanisms, and the development of desiccation cracks, to distinguish between soils having different magnitude of swelling, as well as the consequences on soil structural behaviour, to know methods to characterize soil swell/shrink potential and to construct soil shrinkage curves, and derive shrinkage indices, as well to apply them to assess soil management effects

  8. Adaptive Methods for Permeability Estimation and Smart Well Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, Martha Oekland

    2005-04-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on adaptive regularization methods. We consider two different applications, the inverse problem of absolute permeability estimation and the optimal control problem of estimating smart well management. Reliable estimates of absolute permeability are crucial in order to develop a mathematical description of an oil reservoir. Due to the nature of most oil reservoirs, mainly indirect measurements are available. In this work, dynamic production data from wells are considered. More specifically, we have investigated into the resolution power of pressure data for permeability estimation. The inversion of production data into permeability estimates constitutes a severely ill-posed problem. Hence, regularization techniques are required. In this work, deterministic regularization based on adaptive zonation is considered, i.e. a solution approach with adaptive multiscale estimation in conjunction with level set estimation is developed for coarse scale permeability estimation. A good mathematical reservoir model is a valuable tool for future production planning. Recent developments within well technology have given us smart wells, which yield increased flexibility in the reservoir management. In this work, we investigate into the problem of finding the optimal smart well management by means of hierarchical regularization techniques based on multiscale parameterization and refinement indicators. The thesis is divided into two main parts, where Part I gives a theoretical background for a collection of research papers that has been written by the candidate in collaboration with others. These constitutes the most important part of the thesis, and are presented in Part II. A brief outline of the thesis follows below. Numerical aspects concerning calculations of derivatives will also be discussed. Based on the introduction to regularization given in Chapter 2, methods for multiscale zonation, i.e. adaptive multiscale estimation and refinement

  9. Crustal permeability: Introduction to the special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gleeson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The topic of crustal permeability is of broad interest in light of the controlling effect of permeability on diverse geologic processes and also timely in light of the practical challenges associated with emerging technologies such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production (‘fracking’), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. This special issue of Geofluids is also motivated by the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic concept of permeability as a static material property that exerts control on fluid flow and the perspective of economic geologists, geophysicists, and crustal petrologists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. Issues associated with fracking, enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration have already begun to promote a constructive dialog between the static and dynamic views of permeability, and here we have made a conscious effort to include both viewpoints. This special issue also focuses on the quantification of permeability, encompassing both direct measurement of permeability in the uppermost crust and inferential permeability estimates, mainly for the deeper crust.

  10. Analytical Estimation of Water-Oil Relative Permeabilities through Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saboorian-Jooybari Hadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling multiphase flow through fractures is a key issue for understanding flow mechanism and performance prediction of fractured petroleum reservoirs, geothermal reservoirs, underground aquifers and carbon-dioxide sequestration. One of the most challenging subjects in modeling of fractured petroleum reservoirs is quantifying fluids competition for flow in fracture network (relative permeability curves. Unfortunately, there is no standard technique for experimental measurement of relative permeabilities through fractures and the existing methods are very expensive, time consuming and erroneous. Although, several formulations were presented to calculate fracture relative permeability curves in the form of linear and power functions of flowing fluids saturation, it is still unclear what form of relative permeability curves must be used for proper modeling of flow through fractures and consequently accurate reservoir simulation. Basically, the classic linear relative permeability (X-type curves are used in almost all of reservoir simulators. In this work, basic fluid flow equations are combined to develop a new simple analytical model for water-oil two phase flow in a single fracture. The model gives rise to simple analytic formulations for fracture relative permeabilities. The model explicitly proves that water-oil relative permeabilities in fracture network are functions of fluids saturation, viscosity ratio, fluids density, inclination of fracture plane from horizon, pressure gradient along fracture and rock matrix wettability, however they were considered to be only functions of saturations in the classic X-type and power (Corey [35] and Honarpour et al. [28, 29] models. Eventually, validity of the proposed formulations is checked against literature experimental data. The proposed fracture relative permeability functions have several advantages over the existing ones. Firstly, they are explicit functions of the parameters which are known for

  11. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    Hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers is considered for seasonal energy storage in Denmark. However, an increase in the aquifer temperature might reduce permeability, and thereby increase production costs. An understanding of the factors that control permeability is required in order...... and the Klinkenberg procedure showed the expected correlation between the two measures, however, differences could be around one order of magnitude. In tight gas sandstones, permeability is often sensitive to net stress, which might change due to the pore pressure change in the Klinkenberg procedure. Besides...... affecting the Klinkenberg procedure, the combined effect of slip and changes in permeability would affect production during pressure depletion in tight gas sandstone reservoirs; therefore effects of gas slip and net stress on permeability were combined in a model based on the Klinkenberg equation. A lower...

  12. Microorganism Removal in Permeable Pavement Parking Lots ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of permeable pavements (pervious concrete, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, and porous asphalt) were monitored at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, New Jersey for indicator organisms such as fecal coliform, enterococci, and E. coli. Results showed that porous asphalt had much lower concentration in monitored infiltrate compared to pervious concrete and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Concentrations of monitored organisms in infiltrate from porous asphalt were consistently below the bathing water quality standard. Fecal coliform and enterococci exceeded bathing water quality standards more than 72% and 34% of the time for permeable interlocking concrete pavers and pervious concrete, respectively. Purpose is to evaluate the performance of permeable pavement in removing indicator organisms from infiltrating stormwater runoff.

  13. Wave transmission over permeable submerged breakwaters; Transmision del oleaje en rompeolas sumergidos permeables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-y-Zurvia-Flores, Jaime Roberto; Fragoso-Sandoval, Lucio [Instituto Politecnico Nacional(Mexico)

    2008-10-15

    The permeable submerged breakwaters represent a coastal protection alternative, where some degree of wave energy transmission is acceptable. Such would be the case of tourist beach protection in Mexico. In previous researches, like those performed by D'Angremond et al. (1996), Seabrook and Hall (1998), and Briganti et al. (2003), the empirical formulas developed, give only some limited information over the spatial distribution of wave energy over the structure. Therefore, a decision was made to conduct a study on a reduced physical model of a permeable submerged breakwater based on the results presented by those researchers and with possible applications. Therefore this paper presents the development of a study of wave transmission over permeable submerged breakwaters performed in a reduced physical model of different sections of a submerged rockfill breakwater of the trapezoidal type. This was done in a narrow wave flume with a hydraulic irregular wave generator controlled by a computer that was used to generate and to reproduce different types of irregular waves to be used in the tests. It also has a wave meter with four sensors, and they are connected to a computer in order to process the wave data. The main objective of the study was to determine in an experimental way the influence of the several parameters of submerged breakwater over the wave transmission coefficient. Our experimental results were comparable to those obtained by D'Angremond et al. (1996) and Seabrook and Hall (1998). The results show that the sumerged breakwater parameters of most influence over the wave transmission coefficient were relative submergence and the relative width crest of the sumerged breakwater, and that the formula by Seabrook and Hall correlates best with our results. [Spanish] Los rompeolas sumergidos permeables representan actualmente una alternativa de proteccion de costas, donde un cierto grado de transmision de energia del oleaje es aceptable, como seria el

  14. Consolidation and permeability of salt in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, A.J.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Canonico, C.M.

    1981-07-01

    The consolidation and loss of permeability of salt crystal aggregates, important in assessing the effects of water in salt repositories, has been studied as a function of several variables. The kinetic behavior was similar to that often observed in sintering and suggested the following expression for the time dependence of the void fraction: phi(t) = phi(0) - (A/B)ln(1 + Bt/z(0) 3 ), where A and B are rate constants and z(0) is initial average particle size. With brine present, A and phi(0) varied linearly with stress. The initial void fraction was also dependent to some extent on the particle size distribution. The rate of consolidation was most rapid in brine and least rapid in the presence of only air as the fluid. A brine containing 5 m MgCl 2 showed an intermediate rate, presumably because of the greatly reduced solubility of NaCl. A substantial wall effect was indicated by an observed increase in the void fraction of consolidated columns with distance from the top where the stress was applied and by a dependence of consolidation rate on the column height and radius. The distance through which the stress fell by a factor of phi was estimated to change inversely as the fourth power of the column diameter. With increasing temperature (to 85 0 C), consolidation proceeded somewhat more rapidly and the wall effect was reduced. The permeability of the columns dropped rapidly with consolidation, decreasing with about the sixth power of the void fraction. In general, extrapolation of the results to repository conditions confirms the self-sealing properties of bedded salt as a storage medium for radioactive waste

  15. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport.

  16. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huanling, E-mail: whl_hm@163.com [Key Laboratory of Coastal Disaster and Defence, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); LML, University of Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing [Institutes of Geotechnical Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO{sub 2,} shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10{sup −19} m{sup 2}; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens’ permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  17. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  18. Permeability During Magma Expansion and Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Helge. M.; Giachetti, Thomas; Fliedner, Céline; Nguyen, Chinh T.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Crozier, Joshua A.; Carey, Rebecca J.

    2017-12-01

    Plinian lapilli from the 1060 Common Era Glass Mountain rhyolitic eruption of Medicine Lake Volcano, California, were collected and analyzed for vesicularity and permeability. A subset of the samples were deformed at a temperature of 975°, under shear and normal stress, and postdeformation porosities and permeabilities were measured. Almost all undeformed samples fall within a narrow range of vesicularity (0.7-0.9), encompassing permeabilities between approximately 10-15 m2 and 10-10 m2. A percolation threshold of approximately 0.7 is required to fit the data by a power law, whereas a percolation threshold of approximately 0.5 is estimated by fitting connected and total vesicularity using percolation modeling. The Glass Mountain samples completely overlap with a range of explosively erupted silicic samples, and it remains unclear whether the erupting magmas became permeable at porosities of approximately 0.7 or at lower values. Sample deformation resulted in compaction and vesicle connectivity either increased or decreased. At small strains permeability of some samples increased, but at higher strains permeability decreased. Samples remain permeable down to vesicularities of less than 0.2, consistent with a potential hysteresis in permeability-porosity between expansion (vesiculation) and compaction (outgassing). We attribute this to retention of vesicle interconnectivity, albeit at reduced vesicle size, as well as bubble coalescence during shear deformation. We provide an equation that approximates the change in permeability during compaction. Based on a comparison with data from effusively erupted silicic samples, we propose that this equation can be used to model the change in permeability during compaction of effusively erupting magmas.

  19. The biopharmaceutics of successful controlled release drug product: Segmental-dependent permeability of glipizide vs. metoprolol throughout the intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Moran; Cohen, Noa; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to study the challenges and prospects of regional-dependent absorption in a controlled-release scenario, through the oral biopharmaceutics of the sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug glipizide. The BCS solubility class of glipizide was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in-vitro (PAMPA and Caco-2) and in-vivo in rats. Metoprolol was used as the low/high permeability class boundary marker. Glipizide was found to be a low-solubility compound. All intestinal permeability experimental methods revealed similar trend; a mirror image small intestinal permeability with opposite regional/pH-dependency was obtained, a downward trend for glipizide, and an upward trend for metoprolol. Yet the lowest permeability of glipizide (terminal Ileum) was comparable to the lowest permeability of metoprolol (proximal jejunum). At the colon, similar permeability was evident for glipizide and metoprolol, that was higher than metoprolol's jejunal permeability. We present an analysis that identifies metoprolol's jejunal permeability as the low/high permeability class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract; we show that the permeability of both glipizide and metoprolol matches/exceeds this threshold throughout the entire intestinal tract, accounting for their success as controlled-release dosage form. This represents a key biopharmaceutical characteristic for a successful controlled-release dosage form. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancement and inhibition effects on the corneal permeability of timolol maleate: Polymers, cyclodextrins and chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2017-08-30

    This study investigates how both bioadhesive polymers (chitosan, hyaluronic acid and alginate) and permeability enhancers (ethylene glycol- bis(2-aminoethylether)- N, N, N', N'- tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin) influence the permeability of the anti-glaucoma drug timolol maleate through ex vivo bovine corneas. Our results showed that only the permeability enhancers alone were able to increase drug permeability, whereas the polymers significantly reduced drug permeation, and however, they increased the pre-corneal residence of timolol. Ternary systems (polymer-enhancer-drug) showed a reduced drug permeability compared to the polymers alone. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of the epithelium surface confirmed there was no evidence of epithelial disruption caused by these formulations, suggesting that polymer-enhancer interactions reduce drug solubilization and counteract the disruptive effect of the permeability enhancers on the surface of the cornea. Further mucoadhesive tests, revealed a stable interaction of chitosan and hyaluronic acid with the epithelium, while alginate showed poor mucoadhesive properties. The differences in mucoadhesion correlated with the permeability of timolol maleate observed, i.e. formulations containing mucoadhesive polymers showed lower drug permeabilities. The results of the present study indicate polymers acting as an additional barrier towards drug permeability which is even more evident in the presence of permeability enhancers like EGTA and hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin. Then, this study highlights the need to adequately select additives intended for ocular applications since interactions between them can have opposite results to what expected in terms of drug permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Suitability of Torrent Permeability Tester to measure air-permeability of covercrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.; Gonzales-Gasca, C. [Institute of Construction Sciences ' Eduardo Torroja' , Madrid (Spain); Torrent, R. [Portland Cement Institute, (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Suitability of the Torrent Permeability Tester (TPT) to measure the permeability of covercrete to air, both in the laboratory and the field, is investigated, and test results obtained in laboratory studies are discussed. The tests performed included the determination of air permeability (TPT method), oxygen permeability (Cembureau method) and capillary suction, rapid chloride permeability test (ASTM C 1202), as well as a one-year carbonation depth test. Concrete specimens of various compositions and curing regimes were used in the tests; the gas-permeability tests were repeated on the same specimens after 28 days, than again at 6 months and 12 months. Test results confirmed the suitability of the TPT as a useful tool in the characterization of the quality the of concrete cover. It was found to be sensitive to changes in concrete quality; repeatable for sensitive properties such as gas permeability ; also, it was found to correlate well with other durability-related properties. 10 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs.

  2. Simultaneous inversion of airborne electromagnetic data for resistivity and magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Where the magnetic permeability of rock or soil exceeds that of free space, the effect on airborne electromagnetic systems is to produce a frequency-independent shift in the in-phase response of the system while altering the quadrature response only slightly. The magnitude of the in-phase shift increases as (1) the relative magnetic permeability is increased, (2) the amount of magnetic material is increased, and (3) the airborne sensor gets nearer the earth's surface. Over resistive, magnetic ground, the shift may be evinced by negative in-phase measurements at low frequencies; but over more conductive ground, the same shift may go unnoticed because of the large positive in-phase response. If the airborne sensor is flown at low levels, the magnitude of the shift may be large enough to affect automatic inversion routines that do not take this shift into account, producing inaccurate estimated resistivities, usually overestimates. However, layered-earth inversion algorithms that incorporate magnetic permeability as an additional inversion parameter may improve the resistivity estimates. The authors demonstrate this improvement using data collected over hazardous waste sites near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Using resistivity inversion without magnetic permeability, the waste sites are almost invisible to the sensors. When magnetic permeability is included as an inversion parameter, the sites are detected, both by improved resistivity estimates and by estimated magnetic permeability

  3. Experimental datasets on engineering properties of expansive soil treated with common salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O. Durotoye

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Construction of highway pavements or high rise structures over the expansive soils are always problematic due to failures of volume change or swelling characteristic experienced in the water permeability of the soil. The data in this article represented summary of (Durotoye et al., 2016; Durotoye, 2016 [1,2]. The data explored different percentages of sodium chloride as additive in stabilizing the engineering properties of expansive soil compared with other available stabilizer previously worked on. Experimental procedures carried out on expansive soil include: (Liquid limit, Plastic limit, Plasticity index, Shrinkage limit, Specific gravity Free swell index and Optimum water content to determine the swelling parameters and (maximum dry density, California bearing ratio and unconfined compressive strength to determine the strength parameters. The results of the experiment were presented in pie charts. Keywords: Common salt, Expansive soil, Experimental procedure, Strength parameters, Swelling parameters

  4. Low-concentration tailing and subsequent quicklime-enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by mechanical soil aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Du, Xiaoming; Shi, Yi; Xu, Zhu; Fang, Jidun; Li, Zheng; Li, Fasheng

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical soil aeration has long been regarded as an effective ex-situ remediation technique and as suitable for remediation of large-scale sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low cost. However, it has been reported that the removal efficiency of VOCs from soil is relatively low in the late stages of remediation, in association with tailing. Tailing may extend the remediation time required; moreover, it typically results in the presence of contaminants residues at levels far exceeding regulations. In this context, the present study aimed to discuss the tailing that occurs during the process of remediation of soils contaminated artificially with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) and to assess possible quicklime-enhanced removal mechanisms. The results revealed the following conclusions. First, temperature and aeration rate can be important controls on both the timing of appearance of tailing and the levels of residual contaminants. Furthermore, the addition of quicklime to soil during tailing can reduce the residual concentrations rapidly to below the remedial target values required for site remediation. Finally, mechanical soil aeration can be enhanced using quicklime, which can improve the volatilization of VCHs via increasing soil temperature, reducing soil moisture, and enhancing soil permeability. Our findings give a basic understanding to the elimination of the tailing in the application of mechanical soil aeration, particularly for VOCs-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of an interstitial cystitis risk score for bladder permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Lamb

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC is a multifactorial syndrome of severe pelvic and genitalia pain and compromised urinary function; a subset of IC patients present with Hunner's lesions or ulcers on their bladder walls (UIC. UIC is diagnosed by cystoscopy, which may be quite painful. The objective of this study was to determine if a calculated Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score (BP-RS based on non-invasive urinary cytokines could discriminate UIC patients from controls and IC patients without Hunner's ulcers.A national crowdsourcing effort targeted IC patients and age-matched controls to provide urine samples. Urinary cytokine levels for GRO, IL-6, and IL-8 were determined using a Luminex assay.We collected 448 urine samples from 46 states consisting of 153 IC patients (147 female, 6 male, of which 54 UIC patients (50 females, 4 male, 159 female controls, and 136 male controls. A defined BP-RS was calculated to classify UIC, or a bladder permeability defect etiology, with 89% validity.The BP-RS Score quantifies UIC risk, indicative of a bladder permeability defect etiology in a subset of IC patients. The Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score is the first validated urine biomarker assay for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

  6. Effects of different agricultural management on a stagnic Luvisol in Lower Saxony, Germany - Factors for sustainable soil protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Marco; Brunotte, Joachim; Ortmeier, Berthold

    2017-04-01

    Regarding increasing pressures by global societal and climate change, for example, the assessment of the impact of land use and land management practices on land productivity, land degradation and the related decrease in sustainable food production and the provision of ecosystem services gains increasing interest. Regarding international research on land use and soil threats, main problems in agricultural land use on global scale are erosion by water and wind, soil organic matter loss, salinization, depletion of nutrients, chemical and physical deterioration, including e.g. soil compaction. When coming to soil sciences, basically soil functions are affected negatively by intensive food production and field traffic. Management based negative changes in soil functions and a suboptimal soil structure have multiple negative effects on physical, biological and chemical soil functions, like a poor water balance, air and water permeability, disturbed soil fauna, impeded root penetration etc. and in consequence on the achievable yields. The presentation deals with the multiple effects of different agricultural machinery and technologies and different agricultural soil tillage (e.g. no-till, conservation tillage, ploughing), on various soil properties of a stagnic Luvisol in Lower Saxony, Germany. These are e.g. bulk density, air capacity, saturated water permeability, changes in pore size distribution and water retention curve as well as crop yields. Furthermore results of a long term study of bulk density and total pore size on more then 20 farms in Lower Saxony since the year 1952 will be presented. Finally, key factors and first recommendations for sustainable agricultural soil protection will be derived from the results.

  7. A methodology for determining the evolution law of gob permeability and its distributions in longwall coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cun; Tu, Shihao; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Qingsheng; Yuan, Yong; Wang, Fangtian

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the permeability evolution law of the gob by mining disturbances and obtain the permeability distribution of the fully compacted gob, comprehensive methods including theoretical analyses of monitoring data and numerical simulation are used to determine the permeability of gobs in the mining process. Based on current research, three zones of the vertical stress and permeability in the gob are introduced in this article, which are the caving rock mass accumulation zone, the gradually compacted zone and the fully compacted zone. A simple algorithm is written by using FISH language to be imported into the reservoir model. FISH language is an internal programming language in FLAC3D. It is possible to calculate the permeability at each zone with this algorithm in the mining process. Besides, we analyze the gas flow rates from seven gob gas ventholes (GGV) located on a longwall face operated in a mine of a Huainan coalfield in Huainan City, China. Combined with Darcy’s law, a calculation model of permeability around GGV in the gob is proposed. Using this model, the evolution law of permeability in the gob is deduced; the phases of permeability evolution are the decline stage and the stable stage. The result of the vertical stress monitoring data and good fitting effect of the permeability to the experimental data show that the permeability decline caused by the compaction of the gob is the principal reason for the decline stage. The stable stage indicates that the gob has been fully compacted, and the average period of full gob compaction is 47.75 d. The permeability in the middle of the compacted gob is much smaller than the permeability on the edge of the gob which presents an O shape trend. Besides, the little difference among the results of the numerical simulation, the permeability calculation model and other commonly used calculation models validate the correctness of the permeability calculation model and numerical simulation results

  8. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  9. Comparison of Mass Transfer Models for Determination of the Intestinal Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Zakeri-Milani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In determination of the permeability of the intestinal wall by external perfusion techniques, several models have been proposed. In the present study three models were used for experimental results that differ in their convection and diffusion assumptions. Material and Methods: Permeability coefficients for 13 compounds (metoprolol, propranolol, naproxen, ketoprofen, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, cimetidine, ranitidine, atenolol, piroxicam, antipyrine, ibuprofen and carbamazepine with known human intestinal permeability values were determined in anaesthetized rats by different mass transfer models and plotted versus the observed human intestinal permeabilities. Results: The calculated dimensionless wall permeability values were in the range of 0.37 - 4.85, 0.38-6.54 and 0.41-16.59 for complete radial mixing, mixing tank and laminar flow models respectively. The results indicated that all of the models work relatively well for our data despite fundamentally different assumptions. The wall permeabilities were in the order laminar flow > mixing tank > complete radial mixing. Conclusion: Although laminar flow model provides the most direct measure of the intrinsic wall permeability, it has limitations for highly permeable drugs such as ibuprofen. The normal physiological hydrodynamics is more complex and more investigation is required to find out the real hydrodynamics.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of the USLE Soil Erodibility Factor to Its Determining Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitova, Milena; Rousseva, Svetla

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion is recognized as one of the most serious soil threats worldwide. Soil erosion prediction is the first step in soil conservation planning. The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is one of the most widely used models for soil erosion predictions. One of the five USLE predictors is the soil erodibility factor (K-factor), which evaluates the impact of soil characteristics on soil erosion rates. Soil erodibility nomograph defines K-factor depending on soil characteristics, such as: particle size distribution (fractions finer that 0.002 mm and from 0.1 to 0.002 mm), organic matter content, soil structure and soil profile water permeability. Identifying the soil characteristics, which mostly influence the K-factor would give an opportunity to control the soil loss through erosion by controlling the parameters, which reduce the K-factor value. The aim of the report is to present the results of analysis of the relative weight of these soil characteristics in the K-factor values. The relative impact of the soil characteristics on K-factor was studied through a series of statistical analyses of data from the geographic database for soil erosion risk assessments in Bulgaria. Degree of correlation between K-factor values and the parameters that determine it was studied by correlation analysis. The sensitivity of the K-factor was determined by studying the variance of each parameter within the range between minimum and maximum possible values considering average value of the other factors. Normalizing transformation of data sets was applied because of the different dimensions and the orders of variation of the values of the various parameters. The results show that the content of particles finer than 0.002 mm has the most significant relative impact on the soil erodibility, followed by the content of particles with size from 0.1 mm to 0.002 mm, the class of the water permeability of the soil profile, the content of organic matter and the aggregation class. The

  11. An improved method for permeability estimation of the bioclastic limestone reservoir based on NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Liu, Jianyu; Zhang, Li; Han, Yujiao; Xing, Donghui

    2017-10-01

    Permeability is an important parameter in formation evaluation since it controls the fluid transportation of porous rocks. However, it is challengeable to compute the permeability of bioclastic limestone reservoirs by conventional methods linking petrophysical and geophysical data, due to the complex pore distributions. A new method is presented to estimate the permeability based on laboratory and downhole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. We divide the pore space into four intervals by the inflection points between the pore radius and the transversal relaxation time. Relationships between permeability and percentages of different pore intervals are investigated to investigate influential factors on the fluid transportation. Furthermore, an empirical model, which takes into account of the pore size distributions, is presented to compute the permeability. 212 core samples in our case show that the accuracy of permeability calculation is improved from 0.542 (SDR model), 0.507 (TIM model), 0.455 (conventional porosity-permeability regressions) to 0.803. To enhance the precision of downhole application of the new model, we developed a fluid correction algorithm to construct the water spectrum of in-situ NMR data, aiming to eliminate the influence of oil on the magnetization. The result reveals that permeability is positively correlated with percentages of mega-pores and macro-pores, but negatively correlated with the percentage of micro-pores. Poor correlation is observed between permeability and the percentage of meso-pores. NMR magnetizations and T 2 spectrums after the fluid correction agree well with laboratory results for samples saturated with water. Field application indicates that the improved method provides better performance than conventional models such as Schlumberger-Doll Research equation, Timur-Coates equation, and porosity-permeability regressions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An improved method for permeability estimation of the bioclastic limestone reservoir based on NMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Liu, Jianyu; Zhang, Li; Han, Yujiao; Xing, Donghui

    2017-10-01

    Permeability is an important parameter in formation evaluation since it controls the fluid transportation of porous rocks. However, it is challengeable to compute the permeability of bioclastic limestone reservoirs by conventional methods linking petrophysical and geophysical data, due to the complex pore distributions. A new method is presented to estimate the permeability based on laboratory and downhole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. We divide the pore space into four intervals by the inflection points between the pore radius and the transversal relaxation time. Relationships between permeability and percentages of different pore intervals are investigated to investigate influential factors on the fluid transportation. Furthermore, an empirical model, which takes into account of the pore size distributions, is presented to compute the permeability. 212 core samples in our case show that the accuracy of permeability calculation is improved from 0.542 (SDR model), 0.507 (TIM model), 0.455 (conventional porosity-permeability regressions) to 0.803. To enhance the precision of downhole application of the new model, we developed a fluid correction algorithm to construct the water spectrum of in-situ NMR data, aiming to eliminate the influence of oil on the magnetization. The result reveals that permeability is positively correlated with percentages of mega-pores and macro-pores, but negatively correlated with the percentage of micro-pores. Poor correlation is observed between permeability and the percentage of meso-pores. NMR magnetizations and T2 spectrums after the fluid correction agree well with laboratory results for samples saturated with water. Field application indicates that the improved method provides better performance than conventional models such as Schlumberger-Doll Research equation, Timur-Coates equation, and porosity-permeability regressions.

  13. Multilevel soil-vapor extraction test for heterogeneous soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdowson, M.A.; Haney, O.R.; Reeves, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    The design, performance, and analysis of a field method for quantifying contaminant mass-extraction rates and air-phase permeability at discrete vertical locations of the vadose zones are presented. The test configuration consists of a multiscreen extraction well and multilevel observation probes located in soil layers adjacent to the extraction well. For each level tested an inflatable packer system is used to pneumatically isolate a single screen in the extraction well, and a vacuum is applied to induce air flow through the screen. Test data include contaminant concentration and flow characteristics at the extraction well, and transient or steady-state pressure drawdown data at observation probes located at variable radii from the extraction well. The test method is applicable to the design of soil-vapor extraction (SVE) and bioventing remediation systems in a variety of geologic settings, particularly stratified soils. Application of the test method at a gasoline-polluted site located in the Piedmont physiographic region is described. Contaminant mass-extraction rates, expressed in terms of volatile hydrocarbons, varied from 0.16 to 14 kg/d

  14. Permeability and stress-jump effects on magnetic drug targeting in a permeable microvessel using Darcy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, S., E-mail: sachinshaw@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Private Bag 16, Palapye (Botswana); Sutradhar, A.; Murthy, PVSN [Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India)

    2017-05-01

    In the present paper, we investigated the influence of permeability of the carrier particle and stress jump condition on the porous spherical surface in magnetic drug targeting through a permeable microvessel. The nature of blood is defined by non-Newtonian Casson fluid in the core region of the microvessel and Newtonian fluid in the peripheral region which is located near the surface of the wall of the microvessel. The magnetic particles are considered as spherical and in nanosize, embedded in the carrier particle along with drug particles. A magnet is placed near the tumor position to generate a magnetic field. The relative motion of the carrier particle is the resultant of the fluidic force, magnetic force and Saffman drag force which are calculated for the spherical carrier particle. Trajectories of the carrier particle along the radial and axial direction are calculated. Effect of different parameters such as stress-jump constant, permeability of the carrier particle, pressure gradient, yield stress, Saffman force, volume fraction of the embedded magnetic nanoparticles, permeability of the microvessel wall, and the radius of the carrier particle on the trajectory of the carrier particle are discussed and displayed graphically. - Highlights: • In the present manuscript, we considered the porous carrier particle which provide a larger surface area contact with the fluid than the solid spherical carrier particle. It shows that the porous carrier particle are captured easily than the solid carrier particle. • Introduce Suffman force on the carrier particle which commences an additional resistance which acts opposite to the surface wall and helps the particles to go away from the tumor position. • Considered stress jump condition at the surface of the porous carrier particle which enhanced the tendency of the carrier particle to be capture near the tumor. • Used Darcy model to define the permeability of the wall of the microvessel.

  15. Borehole stoneley waves and permeability: Laboratory results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, K.W.; Plona, T.J.; Froelich, B.; Liu, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Recent interest in full waveform sonic logging has created the need for full waveform laboratory experiments on model boreholes. Of particular interest is the investigation of Stoneley waves and their interaction with permeable formations. The authors describe experimental results that show how Stoneley wave slowness and attenuation are affected by formation permeability. Both slowness and attenuation (1/Q) are observed to increase with formation permeability. This increase is frequency dependent, being greatest at low frequencies. The presence of simulated mudcakes on the borehole wall reduces the permeability effect on Stoneley waves, but does not eliminate it. The mudcake effect is frequency dependent, being greatest at low frequencies. In our experiments on rocks, the laboratory data is in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. In a very well characterized synthetic porous material, theory and experiment are in good quantitative agreement

  16. Octopus microvasculature: permeability to ferritin and carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J

    1979-01-01

    The permeability of Octopus microvasculature was investigated by intravascular injection of carbon and ferritin. Vessels were tight to carbon while ferritin penetrated the pericyte junction, and was found extravascularly 1-2 min after its introduction. Vesicles occurred rarely in pericytes; fenestrae were absent. The discontinuous endothelial layer did not consitute a permeability barrier. The basement membrane, although retarding the movement of ferritin, was permeable to it; carbon did not penetrate the basement membrane. Evidence indicated that ferritin, and thus similarly sized and smaller water soluble materials, traverse the pericyte junction as a result of bulk fluid flow. Comparisons are made with the convective (or junctional) and slower, diffusive (or vesicular) passage of materials known to occur across the endothelium of continuous capillaries in mammals. Previous macrophysiological determinations concerning the permeability of Octopus vessels are questioned in view of these findings. Possible reasons for some major structural differences in the microcirculatory systems of cephalopods and vertebrates are briefly discussed.

  17. Dentin Permeability of Carious Primary Teeth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    primary dental pulp make it difficult to determine which modality offers the best ... The most common pathology of the dentine is dental caries. ... to evaluate dentine permeability is to calculate its hydraulic conductance (Lp) using fluid filtration ...

  18. Permeability of gypsum samples dehydrated in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike; Blöcher, Guido

    2011-09-01

    We report on changes in rock permeability induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air (dry) for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the reaction kinetics, so induced changes in porosity, and the concurrent evolution of sample permeability were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate and complete dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity showed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% to 30%, whilst the initial bulk volume remained unchanged. Within these limits permeability significantly increased with porosity by almost three orders of magnitude from approximately 7 × 10-19 m2 to 3 × 10-16 m2. We show that - when mechanical and hydraulic feedbacks can be excluded - permeability, reaction progress, and porosity are related unequivocally.

  19. Soil quality changes in response to their pollution by heavy metals, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchavariani, Lia; Kalandadze, Besik; Lagidze, Lamzira; Gokhelashvili, Nino; Sulkhanishvili, Nino; Paichadze, Nino; Dvalashvili, Giorgi

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the composition, migration and accumulation of heavy metals in irrigated soils, plants and partially natural waters; and also, establishing the possible sources of pollution and their impact on environmental situation. The content of toxic elements in the irrigated soils adjacent to ore mining and processing enterprise were studied. Content of toxic elements in the irrigated soils adjacent to ore mining, showed that more than half of territory was seriously polluted by copper and zinc. Some part of the area were considered catastrophically polluted. Expressed technogenesis taking place influenced irrigation. Heavy metals like copper, zinc and manganese negative by effected the properties of soil, thus composition and soil-forming processes taking place in the soil. It was especially well represented in the deterioration of hydro-physical potential of the soil. Irrigation of agricultural land plots by water, polluted with heavy metals changed the pH. Balanced correlation among solid, liquid and gas phases was disrupted. In highly polluted soil, the cementing processes took place that sharply increased the bulk density of the soil, deteriorated the porosity of soil and reduced water permeability critically.

  20. Soil gas radon response to environmental and soil physics variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.M.; Chen, C.; Holford, D.

    1991-01-01

    During the last three years a field study of soil gas radon activities conducted at Poamoho, Oahu, has shown that the primary environmental variables that control radon transport in shallow tropical soils are synoptic and diurnal barometric pressure changes and soil moisture levels. Barometric pressure changes drive advective transport and mixing of soil gas with atmospheric air; soil moisture appears to control soil porosity and permeability to enhance or inhibit advective and diffusive radon transport. An advective barrier test/control experiment has shown that advective exchange of soil gas and air may account for a substantial proportion of the radon loss from shallow soils but does not significantly affect radon activities at depths greater than 2.3 m. An irrigation test/control experiment also suggests that, at soil moisture levels approaching field capacity, saturation of soil macroporosity can halt all advective transport of radon and limit diffusive mobility to that occurring in the liquid phase. The results of the authors field study have been used to further refine and extend a numerical model, RN3D, that has been developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories to simulate subsurface transport of radon. The field data have allowed them to accurately simulate the steady state soil gas radon profile at their field site and to track transient radon activities under the influence of barometric pressure changes and in response to changes in soil permeability that result from variations in soil moisture levels. Further work is continuing on the model to enable it to properly account for the relative effects of advective transport of soil gas through cracks and diffusive mobility in the bulk soils

  1. Tropical Soil Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.

    and environmental protection. Tropical Soil Chemistry by Ole K. Borggaard provides an overview of the composition, occurrence, properties, processes, formation, and environmental vulnerability of various tropical soil types (using American Soil Taxonomy for classification). The processes and the external factors...... soil chemical issues are also presented to assess when, why, and how tropical soils differ from soils in other regions. This knowledge can help agricultural specialists in the tropics establish sustainable crop production. Readers are assumed to be familiar with basic chemistry, physics...

  2. Surface sedimentation at permeable pavement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støvring, Jan; Dam, Torben; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2018-01-01

    Newly installed permeable pavement (PP) systems provide high surface infiltration capacity, but the accumulation of sediments causes a decrease in capacity over time, eventually leading to surface clogging. With the aim of investigating local sedimentation processes and the importance of restorat......Newly installed permeable pavement (PP) systems provide high surface infiltration capacity, but the accumulation of sediments causes a decrease in capacity over time, eventually leading to surface clogging. With the aim of investigating local sedimentation processes and the importance...

  3. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA and VanishTM (VAN, after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001 and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001. VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents.

  4. The solubility-permeability interplay and its implications in formulation design and development for poorly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Miller, Jonathan M

    2012-06-01

    While each of the two key parameters of oral drug absorption, the solubility and the permeability, has been comprehensively studied separately, the relationship and interplay between the two have been largely ignored. For instance, when formulating a low-solubility drug using various solubilization techniques: what are we doing to the apparent permeability when we increase the solubility? Permeability is equal to the drug's diffusion coefficient through the membrane times the membrane/aqueous partition coefficient divided by the membrane thickness. The direct correlation between the intestinal permeability and the membrane/aqueous partitioning, which in turn is dependent on the drug's apparent solubility in the GI milieu, suggests that the solubility and the permeability are closely associated, exhibiting a certain interplay between them, and the current view of treating the one irrespectively of the other may not be sufficient. In this paper, we describe the research that has been done thus far, and present new data, to shed light on this solubility-permeability interplay. It has been shown that decreased apparent permeability accompanies the solubility increase when using different solubilization methods. Overall, the weight of the evidence indicates that the solubility-permeability interplay cannot be ignored when using solubility-enabling formulations; looking solely at the solubility enhancement that the formulation enables may be misleading with regards to predicting the resulting absorption, and hence, the solubility-permeability interplay must be taken into account to strike the optimal solubility-permeability balance, in order to maximize the overall absorption.

  5. Transformable ferroelectric control of dynamic magnetic permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changjun; Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Zhou, Cai; Xue, Desheng

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic permeability, which measures the response of a material to an applied magnetic field, is crucial to the performance of magnetic devices and related technologies. Its dynamic value is usually a complex number with real and imaginary parts that describe, respectively, how much magnetic power can be stored and lost in the material. Control of permeability is therefore closely related to energy redistribution within a magnetic system or energy exchange between magnetic and other degrees of freedom via certain spin-dependent interactions. To avoid a high power consumption, direct manipulation of the permeability with an electric field through magnetoelectric coupling leads to high efficiency and simple operation, but remains a big challenge in both the fundamental physics and material science. Here we report unambiguous evidence of ferroelectric control of dynamic magnetic permeability in a Co /Pb (Mg1/3Nb2/3) 0.7Ti0.3O3 (Co/PMN-PT) heterostructure, in which the ferroelectric PMN-PT acts as an energy source for the ferromagnetic Co film via an interfacial linear magnetoelectric interaction. The electric field tuning of the magnitude and line shape of the permeability offers a highly localized means of controlling magnetization with ultralow power consumption. Additionally, the emergence of negative permeability promises a new way of realizing functional nanoscale metamaterials with adjustable refraction index.

  6. Defining clogging potential for permeable concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2018-08-15

    Permeable concrete is used to reduce urban flooding as it allows water to flow through normally impermeable infrastructure. It is prone to clogging by particulate matter and predicting the long-term performance of permeable concrete is challenging as there is currently no reliable means of characterising clogging potential. This paper reports on the performance of a range of laboratory-prepared and commercial permeable concretes, close packed glass spheres and aggregate particles of varying size, exposed to different clogging methods to understand this phenomena. New methods were developed to study clogging and define clogging potential. The tests involved applying flowing water containing sand and/or clay in cycles, and measuring the change in permeability. Substantial permeability reductions were observed in all samples, particularly when exposed to sand and clay simultaneously. Three methods were used to define clogging potential based on measuring the initial permeability decay, half-life cycle and number of cycles to full clogging. We show for the first time strong linear correlations between these parameters for a wide range of samples, indicating their use for service-life prediction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell permeability beyond the rule of 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, Pär; Doak, Bradley C; Over, Björn; Kihlberg, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Drug discovery for difficult targets that have large and flat binding sites is often better suited to compounds beyond the "rule of 5" (bRo5). However, such compounds carry higher pharmacokinetic risks, such as low solubility and permeability, and increased efflux and metabolism. Interestingly, recent drug approvals and studies suggest that cell permeable and orally bioavailable drugs can be discovered far into bRo5 space. Tactics such as reduction or shielding of polarity by N-methylation, bulky side chains and intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be used to increase cell permeability in this space, but often results in decreased solubility. Conformationally flexible compounds can, however, combine high permeability and solubility, properties that are keys for cell permeability and intestinal absorption. Recent developments in computational conformational analysis will aid design of such compounds and hence prediction of cell permeability. Transporter mediated efflux occurs for most investigated drugs in bRo5 space, however it is commonly overcome by high local intestinal concentrations on oral administration. In contrast, there is little data to support significant impact of transporter-mediated intestinal absorption in bRo5 space. Current knowledge of compound properties that govern transporter effects of bRo5 drugs is limited and requires further fundamental and comprehensive studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Feasibility of soil-EFB mixtures as a filled barrier material for waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarudin Samuding; Ismail Abustan; Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman; Mohamed Hasnain Isa

    2010-01-01

    This paper present the results of laboratory experiment that is involved the characterization and removal efficiency test of soil-EFB (Empty Fruit Bunch) of oil palm mixture. In this study, soil samples were mixed with EFB at 10 % (EFB10), 30 % (EFB30), and 50 % (EFB50). The characterization included the physical and chemical properties of the soil-EFB mixture such as compaction behaviour, cation exchange capacity, permeability and its surface physical morphology. Batch Equilibrium Test was performed in order to determine the adsorption capability of the soil-EFB mixture with the heavy metals solution. Five solutions with different concentrations (2.5 mg/l, 5.0 mg/l, 7.5 mg/l, 10.0 mg/l and 12.5 mg/l) were used in this experiment. Base on the compaction test, the value of optimum water content was influence by the EFB introduced into the soil. This is due to the presence of hydroxyl group, which was probably attributed to absorb water. The permeability of the soil-EFB mixtures ranges from 2.4 x 10 -7 to 6.5 x 10 -7 cm/s meanwhile the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) result ranges from 11.6 to 31.9 meq/ 100 g. The study has revealed that different percentages of soil-EFB mixture possess different capabilities to remove heavy metals. From the removal efficiency test, it is shown that the removal percentages of heavy metals for soil-EFB mixtures were relatively high as compared to soil alone. Based on the characterization and removal data, the soil-EFB mixture has a good potential to be used as filled barrier material. (author)

  9. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PERMEABILITY MAP OF RESIDENTIAL SETTLEMENTS IN THE TROPICS

    OpenAIRE

    I Gusti Ngurah Antaryama

    2002-01-01

    Source of information for ventilation design of residential settlement is generally derived from wind tunnel or, recently, CFD studies, which involves both modeling and simulation of wind flow pattern and speed. Yet this is not readily accessible to most architects. In order to gain similar objectives but without involving detailed studies, the present study introduces a graphical method of gathering information about permeability of residential. It describes how the way wind reaches and flow...

  11. Thermomagnetic analysis of the initial permeability in magnetite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniquez, J.; Francisco, C. de; Munoz, J.M.; Sanchez, O.

    1987-01-01

    A study on the thermomagnetic analysis of the initial permeability in magnetite samples and its dependence with the sintering conditions is presented. The measurements, for temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen to the Curie temperature, were performed with the help of a very simple system which is also described here. The experimental results allow us to consider this study as a sensitive test of the sintering conditions (author) 21 refs

  12. Soil properties from seismic intrinsic dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhubayev, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies in the past have shown the sensitivity of seismic waves to soil/rock properties, such as composition, porosity, pore fluid, and permeability. However, quantitative characterization of these properties has remained challenging. In case of unconsolidated soils, the

  13. Measurements of radon in soil gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Schelin, Hugo R.; Barbosa, Laercio; Sadula, Tatyana; Matsuzaki, Cristiana A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: After the decades of systematic and numerous studies performed at different countries of the World, it has been concluded that radon as well as its progeny is the main cause of lung cancer. It is well known that more than 50% of the effective annual radiation dose received by a human being is related to the radon and its progenies. Among the principle mechanisms that bring the radon inside the dwelling is the soil exhalation as well as exhalation and release from the water. Radon concentration in the soil and its transport (emanation, diffusion, advection and adsorption) to the surface depends on different physical, geological and ambient parameters such as the geology of the area, geochemical composition of the soil, its porosity and permeability, grain size, soil humidity, bottom sediments and inputs from streams, temperature, atmospheric pressure, etc. Since the main part of indoor radon originates in the soil, the measurements of radon concentration in soil gas have to be considered as an important tool and indicator of probable high levels of radon inside the dwellings. Present work describes the radon in soil gas measurements performed during the last two years in cooperation between the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR), the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) and the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) from the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Following previously concluded measurements of radon concentration in dwellings and the measurements of 222 Rn activity in drinking water collected at artesian bores of Curitiba urban area, present step of activities has been dedicated to measurements of radon concentration in soil gas. Experimental setup was based on the Professional Radon Monitor (ALPHA GUARD) connected to specially developed for such measurements Soil Gas Probe through the air pump and filter system. The equipment was adjusted with air flow of 0

  14. Predicting skin permeability from complex chemical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, Jim E.; Brooks, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Occupational and environmental exposure to topical chemicals is usually in the form of complex chemical mixtures, yet risk assessment is based on experimentally derived data from individual chemical exposures from a single, usually aqueous vehicle, or from computed physiochemical properties. We present an approach using hybrid quantitative structure permeation relationships (QSPeR) models where absorption through porcine skin flow-through diffusion cells is well predicted using a QSPeR model describing the individual penetrants, coupled with a mixture factor (MF) that accounts for physicochemical properties of the vehicle/mixture components. The baseline equation is log k p = c + mMF + aΣα 2 H + bΣβ 2 H + sπ 2 H + rR 2 + vV x where Σα 2 H is the hydrogen-bond donor acidity, Σβ 2 H is the hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity, π 2 H is the dipolarity/polarizability, R 2 represents the excess molar refractivity, and V x is the McGowan volume of the penetrants of interest; c, m, a, b, s, r, and v are strength coefficients coupling these descriptors to skin permeability (k p ) of 12 penetrants (atrazine, chlorpyrifos, ethylparathion, fenthion, methylparathion, nonylphenol, ρ-nitrophenol, pentachlorophenol, phenol, propazine, simazine, and triazine) in 24 mixtures. Mixtures consisted of full factorial combinations of vehicles (water, ethanol, propylene glycol) and additives (sodium lauryl sulfate, methyl nicotinate). An additional set of 4 penetrants (DEET, SDS, permethrin, ricinoleic acid) in different mixtures were included to assess applicability of this approach. This resulted in a dataset of 16 compounds administered in 344 treatment combinations. Across all exposures with no MF, R 2 for absorption was 0.62. With the MF, correlations increased up to 0.78. Parameters correlated to the MF include refractive index, polarizability and log (1/Henry's Law Constant) of the mixture components. These factors should not be considered final as the focus of these studies

  15. Road drainage system using highly compressible and long-term permeable geotextile. Evaluation of long-term permeability and application to trafficability in a tunnel; Kotaiatsu mezumari taikyugata geotextile haisuizai wo mochiita roban haisui taisaku. Mezumari taikyusei no hyoka to tunnel konai kasetsu doro no trafficability kaizen koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S.; Yamagishi, K.; Hirama, K.; Ueno, T. [Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-10

    A geotextile drainage material called ART-DRAIN has been developed. It was applied to temporary roads in a tunnel, to evaluate its permeability through a long-term permeability test using a model. The ART-DRAIN is a drainage material for protecting the roads from muddy conditions in a tunnel due to spring water. A filter for permeating fine soil particles was employed to keep the permeability. From the long-term permeability test using a model, appropriate permeability of ART-DRAIN was maintained for three years without blinding. There was only a slight inflow of fine grain soils into the ART-DRAIN. It was confirmed that the permeability was not obstructed by the fine grain soils. The ART-DRAIN was applied to tunnel construction works for the high-speed railway in Kyoto and the national road in mountains. From these applications, factors for enhancing the permeability effect were confirmed, which includes the selection of high quality muck, insurance of the road-bed strength by the initial compaction, use of road drainage materials with high compressible property and permeability of filter, and intervals of drainage. 1 ref., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Impervious Surfaces Alter Soil Bacterial Communities in Urban Areas: A Case Study in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhong Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of urbanization has caused land cover change, especially the increasing area of impervious surfaces. Such alterations have significant effects on the soil ecosystem by impeding the exchange of gasses, water, and materials between soil and the atmosphere. It is unclear whether impervious surfaces have any effects on soil bacterial diversity and community composition. In the present study, we conducted an investigation of bacterial communities across five typical land cover types, including impervious surfaces (concrete, permeable pavement (bricks with round holes, shrub coverage (Buxus megistophylla Levl., lawns (Festuca elata Keng ex E. Alexeev, and roadside trees (Sophora japonica Linn. in Beijing, to explore the response of bacteria to impervious surfaces. The soil bacterial communities were addressed by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla in urban soils. Soil from impervious surfaces presented a lower bacterial diversity, and differed greatly from other types of land cover. Soil bacterial diversity was predominantly affected by Zn, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and soil moisture content (SMC. The composition of the bacterial community was similar under shrub coverage, roadside trees, and lawns, but different from beneath impervious surfaces and permeable pavement. Variance partitioning analysis showed that edaphic properties contributed to 12% of the bacterial community variation, heavy metal pollution explained 3.6% of the variation, and interaction between the two explained 33% of the variance. Together, our data indicate that impervious surfaces induced changes in bacterial community composition and decrease of bacterial diversity. Interactions between edaphic properties and heavy metals were here found to change the composition of the bacterial community and

  17. Permeability computation on a REV with an immersed finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laure, P.; Puaux, G.; Silva, L.; Vincent, M.

    2011-01-01

    An efficient method to compute permeability of fibrous media is presented. An immersed domain approach is used to represent the porous material at its microscopic scale and the flow motion is computed with a stabilized mixed finite element method. Therefore the Stokes equation is solved on the whole domain (including solid part) using a penalty method. The accuracy is controlled by refining the mesh around the solid-fluid interface defined by a level set function. Using homogenisation techniques, the permeability of a representative elementary volume (REV) is computed. The computed permeabilities of regular fibre packings are compared to classical analytical relations found in the bibliography.

  18. Studies of cesium permeability of potassium transporter from Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Inaba, Jiro; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Hazama, Akihiro

    2007-01-01

    Cs-137 is an important radionuclide for safety assessment of nuclear facilities, and its transfer via plants is an important route from the environment to humans. Studies of Cs uptake mechanisms by plants are essential for understanding 137 Cs movement in soil-to-plant systems and in plants. Since uptake of Cs is considered to be mediated by K transport protein, we investigated Cs + permeability of two Arabidopsis K + transporters, AKT2 and AtHKT1, by using Xenopus oocytes expression systems and two-electrode voltage-clamp technique under various pH conditions. The data showed AKT2 and AtHKT1 did not transport Cs + at external pH in the 5.5-7.5 range. These results indicated that AKT2 and AtHKT1 did not contribute to Cs + influx into cells under physiological conditions in plants. (author)

  19. Investigation on the Permeability Evolution of Gypsum Interlayer Under High Temperature and Triaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meng; Yechao, You; Jie, Chen; Yaoqing, Hu

    2017-08-01

    The permeability of the surrounding rock is a critical parameter for the designing and assessment of radioactive waste disposal repositories in the rock salt. Generally, in the locations that are chosen for radioactive waste storage, the bedded rock salt is a sedimentary rock that contains NaCl and Na2SO4. Most likely, there are also layers of gypsum ( {CaSO}_{ 4} \\cdot 2 {H}_{ 2} {O)} present in the salt deposit. Radioactive wastes emit a large amount of heat and hydrogen during the process of disposal, which may result in thermal damage of the surrounding rocks and cause a great change in their permeability and tightness. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the permeability evolution of the gypsum interlayer under high temperature and high pressure in order to evaluate the tightness and security of the nuclear waste repositories in bedded rock salt. In this study, a self-designed rock triaxial testing system by which high temperature and pressure can be applied is used; the μCT225kVFCB micro-CT system is also employed to investigate the permeability and microstructure of gypsum specimens under a constant hydrostatic pressure of 25 MPa, an increasing temperature (ranging from 20 to 650 °C), and a variable inlet gas pressure (1, 2, 4, 6 MPa). The experimental results show: (a) the maximum permeability measured during the whole experiment is less than 10-17 m2, which indicates that the gypsum interlayer has low permeability under high temperature and pressure that meet the requirements for radioactive waste repository. (b) Under the same temperature, the permeability of the gypsum specimen decreases at the beginning and then increases as the pore pressure elevates. When the inlet gas pressure is between 0 and 2 MPa, the Klinkenberg effect is very pronounced. Then, as the pore pressure increases, the movement behavior of gas molecules gradually changes from free motion to forced directional motion. So the role of free movement of gas molecules gradually

  20. Analytical Expressions for Thermo-Osmotic Permeability of Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalvès, J.; Ji Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M.; Tremosa, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new formulation for the thermo-osmotic permeability of natural pore solutions containing monovalent and divalent cations is proposed. The mathematical formulation proposed here is based on the theoretical framework supporting thermo-osmosis which relies on water structure alteration in the pore space of surface-charged materials caused by solid-fluid electrochemical interactions. The ionic content balancing the surface charge of clay minerals causes a disruption in the hydrogen bond network when more structured water is present at the clay surface. Analytical expressions based on our heuristic model are proposed and compared to the available data for NaCl solutions. It is shown that the introduction of divalent cations reduces the thermo-osmotic permeability by one third compared to the monovalent case. The analytical expressions provided here can be used to advantage for safety calculations in deep underground nuclear waste repositories.

  1. The system of thermoelectric air conditioning based on permeable thermoelements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkez R. G.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available There is thermoelectric air conditioner unit on the basis of permeable cooling thermoelements presented. In thermoelectric air conditioner unit the thermoelectric effects and the Joule–Thomson effect have been used for the air stream cooling. There have been described the method of temperature distribution analysis, the determinations of energy conversion power characteristics and design style of permeable thermoelement with maximum coefficient of performance described. The results of computer analysis concerning the application of the thermoelement legs material on the basis of Bi2Te3 have shown the possibility of coefficient of performance increase by a factor of 1,6—1,7 as compared with conventional thermoelectric systems.

  2. Experimental study of very low permeability rocks using a high accuracy permeameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larive, Elodie

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of fluid flow through 'tight' rocks is important to provide a better understanding of physical processes involved in several industrial and natural problems. These include deep nuclear waste repositories, management of aquifers, gas, petroleum or geothermal reservoirs, or earthquakes prevention. The major part of this work consisted of the design, construction and use of an elaborate experimental apparatus allowing laboratory permeability measurements (fluid flow) of very low permeability rocks, on samples at a centimetric scale, to constrain their hydraulic behaviour at realistic in-situ conditions. The accuracy permeameter allows the use of several measurement methods, the steady-state flow method, the transient pulse method, and the sinusoidal pore pressure oscillation method. Measurements were made with the pore pressure oscillation method, using different waveform periods, at several pore and confining pressure conditions, on different materials. The permeability of one natural standard, Westerly granite, and an artificial one, a micro-porous cement, were measured, and results obtained agreed with previous measurements made on these materials showing the reliability of the permeameter. A study of a Yorkshire sandstone shows a relationship between rock microstructure, permeability anisotropy and thermal cracking. Microstructure, porosity and permeability concepts, and laboratory permeability measurements specifications are presented, the permeameter is described, and then permeability results obtained on the investigated materials are reported [fr

  3. Experimental study of very-low permeability rocks by the implementation of a precision permeameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larive, E.

    2002-12-01

    The measurement of fluid flow through 'tight' rocks is important to provide a better understanding of physical processes involved in several industrial and natural problems. These include deep nuclear waste repositories, management of aquifers, gas, petroleum or geothermal reservoirs, or earthquakes prevention. The major part of this work consisted of the design, construction and use of an elaborate experimental apparatus allowing laboratory permeability measurements (fluid flow) of very low permeability rocks, on samples at a centimetric scale, to constrain their hydraulic behaviour at realistic in-situ conditions.The accuracy permeameter allows the use of several measurement methods, the steady-state flow method, the transient pulse method and the sinusoidal pore pressure oscillation method. Measurements were made with the pore pressure oscillation method, using different waveform periods, at several pore and confining pressure conditions on different materials. The permeability of one natural standard, Westerly granite, and an artificial one, a micro-porous cement, were measured and results obtained agreed with previous measurements made on these materials showing the reliability of the permeameter. A study of a Yorkshire sandstone shows a relationship between rock microstructure, permeability anisotropy and thermal cracking. Microstructure, porosity and permeability concepts, and laboratory permeability measurements specifications are presented, the permeameter is described, and then permeability results obtained on the investigated materials are reported. (author)

  4. Cocrystals of Hydrochlorothiazide: Solubility and Diffusion/Permeability Enhancements through Drug-Coformer Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanphui, Palash; Devi, V Kusum; Clara, Deepa; Malviya, Nidhi; Ganguly, Somnath; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-05-04

    Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) is a diuretic and a BCS class IV drug with low solubility and low permeability, exhibiting poor oral absorption. The present study attempts to improve the physicochemical properties of the drug using a crystal engineering approach with cocrystals. Such multicomponent crystals of HCT with nicotinic acid (NIC), nicotinamide (NCT), 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), succinamide (SAM), and resorcinol (RES) were prepared using liquid-assisted grinding, and their solubilities in pH 7.4 buffer were evaluated. Diffusion and membrane permeability were studied using a Franz diffusion cell. Except for the SAM and NIC cocrystals, all other binary systems exhibited improved solubility. All of the cocrystals showed improved diffusion/membrane permeability compared to that of HCT with the exception of the SAM cocrystal. When the solubility was high, as in the case of PABA, NCT, and RES cocrystals, the flux/permeability dropped slightly. This is in agreement with the expected interplay between solubility and permeability. Improved solubility/permeability is attributed to new drug-coformer interactions. Cocrystals of SAM, however, showed poor solubility and flux. This cocrystal contains a primary sulfonamide dimer synthon similar to that of HCT polymorphs, which may be a reason for its unusual behavior. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out in all cases to determine whether a correlation exists between cocrystal permeability and drug-coformer interactions.

  5. Effect of desensitizing agents on dentin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihata, Hiroshi; Kanehira, Masafumi; Nagai, Tomoko; Finger, Werner J; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the in vitro efficacy of two dentin desensitizing products at reducing liquid permeability through human dentin discs. The tested hypothesis was that the products, in spite of different chemical mechanisms were not different at reducing or eliminating flow through dentin discs. Dentin slices (1 mm thick) were prepared from 16 extracted human third molars and their permeability was indirectly recorded in a split chamber model, using a chemiluminescence technique, after EDTA treatment (control), after soaking with albumin, and after desensitizer application. Two products were studied: MS Coat, a self-curing resin-containing oxalate product, and Gluma Desensitizer, a glutaraldehyde/HEMA-based agent without initiator. The dentin slices were mounted between an upper chamber, filled with an aqueous solution of 1% potassium ferricyanide and 0.3% hydrogen peroxide, and a lower chamber filled with 1% sodium hydroxide solution and 0.02% luminol. The upper solution was pressurized, and upon contact with the luminol solution a photochemical signal was generated and recorded as a measure of permeability throughout two consecutive pressurizing cycles at 2.5 and 13 kPa (26 and 133 cm H2O), respectively. The permeability of the control and albumin-soaked samples was similarly high. After application of the desensitizing agents, dentin permeability was reduced to virtually zero at both pressure levels (P < 0.001).

  6. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the in vivo buccal pH-dependent permeability of nicotine in humans and furthermore compare the in vivo permeability of nicotine to previous in vitro permeability data. The buccal permeability of nicotine was examined in a three-way cross-over study in eight healthy non......-smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine....... The disappearance rate of nicotine increased significantly as the pH increased, which resulted in P(app) values of 0.57+/-0.55 x 10(-4), 2.10+/-0.23 x 10(-4), and 3.96+/-0.54 x 10(-4)cms(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) at pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.993) was obtained between the P...

  7. Technology selection for remediation of lead and hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.E.; Sparks, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for selection of a technology for remediation of 70,000 tons of lead and hydrocarbon impacted soil resulting from an excavation at the Mobil Torrance Refinery. This methodology resulted from over two years of extensive research and technology evaluation. Twelve technologies and combination of technologies were evaluated, which often included bench scale testing, to determine the most cost effective and technically feasible remediation option. The results of the studies for each technology are discussed and presented in tabular form. The technologies investigated include: fixation/stabilization, soil washing, solvent washing, heap leach extraction, froth flotation, bioremediation, thermal desorption, electrokinetic extraction, asphalt incorporation, vitrification, off-site treatment, and off-site disposal. The associated costs and technical feasibility of each of the remediation options evaluated are presented. Laboratory analyses of the excavated soil indicate hydrocarbons range from non-detect to 11,000 ppm with an average of 2,600 ppm, soluble lead (CA test-not TCLP) range from 1.4 ppm to 100 ppm with an average of 29 ppm, and low levels of organic lead are present. Average grain size of the soil ranges from number-sign 200 to number-sign 120 mesh, and permeability averages 10--4 cm/sec. Significant odors, likely caused by hydrogen sulfide and thiophenes, were detected when the soil was excavated and control of odors during the remediation phase is a critical concern

  8. In situ permeable flow sensor - OST reference No. 99. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This summary reports describes the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) developed to directly measure the direction and velocity of groundwater flow at a point in saturated soil sediments. The ISPFS provides information for locating, designing, and monitoring waste disposal sites, and for monitoring remediated waste sites. The design and performance are described and compared to alternative methods. Economic, regulatory, and policy issues are discussed. Applicability of the ISPFS to specific situations is also summarized. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Evaluation of permeable and non-permeable tritium in normal condition in a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, V; Manuel, P J [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM)/ETSII, Universidad Politecnica Madrid (UPM) (Spain); Sedano Luis, A [Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia, Ciemat (Spain)], E-mail: marta@denim.upm.es

    2008-05-15

    The tritium cycle, technologies of process and control of the tritium in the plant will constitute a fraction of the environmental impact of the first generation of DT fusion reactors. The efforts of conceptual development of the tritium cycle are centered in the Internal Regenerator Cycle. The tritium could be recovered from a flow of He gas, or directly from solid breeder. The limits of transfers to the atmosphere are assumed {approx} 1 gr-T/a ({approx}20 Ci/a) (without species distinction). In the case of ITER, for example, we have global demands of control of 5 orders of magnitude have been demonstrated at experimental level. The transfer limits determine the key parameters in tritium Cycle (HT, HTO, as dominant, and T2, T2O as marginal). Presently, the transfer from the cycle to the environment is assumed through the exchange system of the power plant (primary to secondary). That transport is due to the permeation through HT, T2, or leakage to the coolant in the primary system. It is key the chemical optimization in the primary system, that needs to be reanalyzed in terms of radiological impact both for permeable, HT, T2, and non-permeable HTO, T2O. It is necessary considered the pathway of tritium from the reactor to the atmosphere, these processes are modelled adequately. Results of the assessments were early and chronic doses which have been evaluated for the Most Exposed Individual at particular distance bands from the release point. The impact evaluations will be performed with the computational tools (NORMTRI), besides national regulatory models, internationally accepted computer these code for dosimetric evaluations of tritiated effluents in operational conditions.

  10. Application of carbon nanotubes to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Martim P. S. R.; Correia, António Alberto S.; Rasteiro, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    The contamination of soils with heavy metals is a growing concern in modern societies. To avoid the spread of contamination, soil stabilization techniques can be applied mixing materials with the soil in order to partially immobilize heavy metals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials known for its exceptional properties, like high surface area and adsorption capacity. Due to these unique properties, the potential use of CNTs in heavy metal contaminated water has been studied, with very satisfactory results; however, their application in contaminated soils is practically unexplored. This experimental work is focused on studying the potential of using CNTs in soil remediation, especially to immobilize the heavy metals ions: lead (Pb"2"+), copper (Cu"2"+), nickel (Ni"2"+), and zinc (Zn"2"+), commonly present in contaminated soils. In order to avoid CNT agglomeration, which originates the loss of their beneficial properties, an aqueous suspension of CNTs was prepared using a non-ionic surfactant combined with ultrasonic energy to promote CNTs dispersion. Then, the soil, with and without the addition of CNTs, was subjected to adsorption tests to evaluate the CNT capacity to improve heavy metal immobilization. To validate the adsorption test results, permeability tests were executed, simulating the conditions of a real-case scenario. The results obtained led to the conclusion that the addition of a small amount of dispersed CNTs can successfully increase the adsorption capacity of the soil and consequently improve the immobilization of heavy metals in the soil matrix. The immobilization percentage varies with the different heavy metals under study.

  11. Application of carbon nanotubes to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Martim P. S. R.; Correia, António Alberto S.; Rasteiro, Maria G.

    2017-04-01

    The contamination of soils with heavy metals is a growing concern in modern societies. To avoid the spread of contamination, soil stabilization techniques can be applied mixing materials with the soil in order to partially immobilize heavy metals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials known for its exceptional properties, like high surface area and adsorption capacity. Due to these unique properties, the potential use of CNTs in heavy metal contaminated water has been studied, with very satisfactory results; however, their application in contaminated soils is practically unexplored. This experimental work is focused on studying the potential of using CNTs in soil remediation, especially to immobilize the heavy metals ions: lead (Pb2+), copper (Cu2+), nickel (Ni2+), and zinc (Zn2+), commonly present in contaminated soils. In order to avoid CNT agglomeration, which originates the loss of their beneficial properties, an aqueous suspension of CNTs was prepared using a non-ionic surfactant combined with ultrasonic energy to promote CNTs dispersion. Then, the soil, with and without the addition of CNTs, was subjected to adsorption tests to evaluate the CNT capacity to improve heavy metal immobilization. To validate the adsorption test results, permeability tests were executed, simulating the conditions of a real-case scenario. The results obtained led to the conclusion that the addition of a small amount of dispersed CNTs can successfully increase the adsorption capacity of the soil and consequently improve the immobilization of heavy metals in the soil matrix. The immobilization percentage varies with the different heavy metals under study.

  12. Experimental datasets on engineering properties of expansive soil treated with common salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durotoye, Taiwo O; Akinmusuru, Joseph O; Ogundipe, Kunle E

    2018-06-01

    Construction of highway pavements or high rise structures over the expansive soils are always problematic due to failures of volume change or swelling characteristic experienced in the water permeability of the soil. The data in this article represented summary of (Durotoye et al., 2016; Durotoye, 2016) [1], [2]. The data explored different percentages of sodium chloride as additive in stabilizing the engineering properties of expansive soil compared with other available stabilizer previously worked on. Experimental procedures carried out on expansive soil include: (Liquid limit, Plastic limit, Plasticity index, Shrinkage limit, Specific gravity Free swell index and Optimum water content) to determine the swelling parameters and (maximum dry density, California bearing ratio and unconfined compressive strength) to determine the strength parameters. The results of the experiment were presented in pie charts.

  13. Development of a low-permeability glass--ceramic to seal to molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.J.

    1975-03-01

    This report describes the development of low-permeability glass-ceramics which can be sealed directly to molybdenum for the purpose of producing long-life vacuum tubes. Low permeability to helium and thermal expansion match to molybdenum are the bases upon which particular glass-ceramic compositions were selected and developed. The fabrication of tube envelopes using glass-ceramics is simplified when compared to conventional ceramic/metal tubes and these melting and sealing techniques are presented

  14. Statistical Inversion of Absolute Permeability in Single-phase Darcy Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Strauss, Thilo

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we formulate the permeability inverse problem in the Bayesian framework using total variation (TV) and fp (0 < p δ 2) regularization prior. We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for sampling the posterior distribution to solve the ill-posed inverse problem. We present simulations to estimate the distribution for each pixel for the image reconstruction of the absolute permeability.

  15. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs

  16. Statistical Inversion of Absolute Permeability in Single-phase Darcy Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Strauss, Thilo; Fan, Xiaolin; Sun, Shuyu; Khan, Taufiquar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the permeability inverse problem in the Bayesian framework using total variation (TV) and fp (0 < p δ 2) regularization prior. We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for sampling the posterior distribution to solve the ill-posed inverse problem. We present simulations to estimate the distribution for each pixel for the image reconstruction of the absolute permeability.

  17. Flow of a Newtonian fluid in a non-uniform wavy and permeable tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfahun Berhane

    2017-10-01

    equations of motion are linearized by perturbation method by assuming ? (ratio of inlet width to wavelength as a small parameter and the resulting equations are solved by numerical methods. The effects of permeability parameter (?, slope parameter (k, slip coefficient (? and Reynolds number (Re on the velocity profiles, pressure and ?ow rate are presented graphically. Results concerning the velocity, pressure and flow rate, indicate that the slip and permeability parameters influence the flow field significantly. Discussions are made from physiological point of view.

  18. Sustainable management of coastal saline soils in the Saloum river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conductivity, pH, water soluble cations and anions) were analysed to estimate the salinity level at each .... (floodplain, low terrace), saline soils are now .... Apart from having a high salt content, ..... permeability and thereby promotes continuous.

  19. Experimental Studies on Permeability of Intact and Singly Jointed Meta-Sedimentary Rocks Under Confining Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Li, Diyuan; Liu, Gang

    2013-01-01

    spanning from 1.25 to 5.0 MPa, which represent the typical ground stress conditions in the cavern. The in situ hydraulic conductivity measurements conducted in six boreholes by the injection test showed that the in situ permeability of rock mass varies between 10-18 and 10-11 m2. The lower bound of the in situ permeability is larger than that of the present laboratory-tested intact rock specimens, while the upper bound of the in situ permeability is less than that of the present laboratory-tested jointed rock specimens. The in situ permeability test results were thus compatible with our present laboratory permeability results of both intact and jointed rock specimens.

  20. Permeability and compression characteristics of municipal solid waste samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmusoglu, Ertan; Sanchez, Itza M.; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    2006-08-01

    Four series of laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the permeability and compression characteristics of municipal solid waste (MSW) samples. While the two series of tests were conducted using a conventional small-scale consolidometer, the two others were conducted in a large-scale consolidometer specially constructed for this study. In each consolidometer, the MSW samples were tested at two different moisture contents, i.e., original moisture content and field capacity. A scale effect between the two consolidometers with different sizes was investigated. The tests were carried out on samples reconsolidated to pressures of 123, 246, and 369 kPa. Time settlement data gathered from each load increment were employed to plot strain versus log-time graphs. The data acquired from the compression tests were used to back calculate primary and secondary compression indices. The consolidometers were later adapted for permeability experiments. The values of indices and the coefficient of compressibility for the MSW samples tested were within a relatively narrow range despite the size of the consolidometer and the different moisture contents of the specimens tested. The values of the coefficient of permeability were within a band of two orders of magnitude (10-6-10-4 m/s). The data presented in this paper agreed very well with the data reported by previous researchers. It was concluded that the scale effect in the compression behavior was significant. However, there was usually no linear relationship between the results obtained in the tests.

  1. Permeability of volcanic rocks to gas and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, M. J.; Reuschlé, T.; Farquharson, J. I.; Baud, P.

    2018-04-01

    The phase (gas or liquid) of the fluids within a porous volcanic system varies in both time and space. Laboratory experiments have shown that gas and water permeabilities can differ for the same rock sample, but experiments are biased towards rocks that contain minerals that are expected react with the pore fluid (such as the reaction between liquid water and clay). We present here the first study that systematically compares the gas and water permeability of volcanic rocks. Our data show that permeabilities to argon gas and deionised water can differ by a factor between two and five in two volcanic rocks (basalt and andesite) over a confining pressure range from 2 to 50 MPa. We suggest here that the microstructural elements that offer the shortest route through the sample-estimated to have an average radius 0.1-0.5 μm using the Klinkenberg slip factor-are accessible to gas, but restricted or inaccessible to water. We speculate that water adsorption on the surface of these thin microstructural elements, assumed here to be tortuous/rough microcracks, reduces their effective radius and/or prevents access. These data have important implications for fluid flow and therefore the distribution and build-up of pore pressure within volcanic systems.

  2. Biofilm Effect on Flow Structure over a Permeable Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Aybar, M.; Perez-Calleja, P.; Nerenberg, R.; Sinha, S.; Hardy, R. J.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms constitute an important form of bacterial life in aquatic environments and are present at the fluid-solid interfaces in natural and industrial settings, such as water distribution systems and riverbeds among others. The permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structure of biofilms can influence mass and momentum transport between the subsurface and freestream. However, this interaction is not fully understood, in part due to technical obstacles impeding quantitative experimental investigations. In this work, the effect of biofilm on flow structure over a permeable bed is studied. Experiments are conducted in a closed water channel equipped with an idealized two-dimensional permeable bed. Prior to conducting flow experiments, the models are placed within an independent recirculating reactor for biofilm growth. Once a targeted biofilm growth stage is achieved, the models are transferred to the water channel and subjected to transitional and turbulent flows. Long-distance microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements are performed to quantify the effect of biofilm on the turbulence structure of the free flow as well as the freestream-subsurface flow interaction.

  3. The Biot coefficient for a low permeability heterogeneous limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental and theoretical developments used to estimate the Biot coefficient for the heterogeneous Cobourg Limestone, which is characterized by its very low permeability. The coefficient forms an important component of the Biot poroelastic model that is used to examine coupled hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the fluid-saturated Cobourg Limestone. The constraints imposed by both the heterogeneous fabric and its extremely low intact permeability [K \\in (10^{-23},10^{-20}) m2 ] require the development of alternative approaches to estimate the Biot coefficient. Large specimen bench-scale triaxial tests (150 mm diameter and 300 mm long) that account for the scale of the heterogeneous fabric are complemented by results for the volume fraction-based mineralogical composition derived from XRD measurements. The compressibility of the solid phase is based on theoretical developments proposed in the mechanics of multi-phasic elastic materials. An appeal to the theory of multi-phasic elastic solids is the only feasible approach for examining the compressibility of the solid phase. The presence of a number of mineral species necessitates the use of the theories of Voigt, Reuss and Hill along with the theories proposed by Hashin and Shtrikman for developing bounds for the compressibility of the multi-phasic geologic material composing the skeletal fabric. The analytical estimates for the Biot coefficient for the Cobourg Limestone are compared with results for similar low permeability rocks reported in the literature.

  4. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    significant at alkaline pH. It is debated whether the H(+) ion passes via the aquaporin or by some external route; the investigation of this problem requires the aquaporin-expressing cell to be voltage-clamped. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins differ from other aquaporins by having a less restrictive aromatic...... groups differ in the amino acid composition of their aromatic/arginine regions. The location of the ammonia-permeable aquaporins in the body parallels that of the Rh proteins. This applies to erythrocytes and to cells associated with nitrogen homeostasis and high rates of anabolism. In the liver, AQPs 8...

  5. Permeability and elastic properties of cracked glass under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougier-Simonin, A.; GuéGuen, Y.; Fortin, J.; Schubnel, A.; Bouyer, F.

    2011-07-01

    Fluid flow in rocks is allowed through networks of cracks and fractures at all scales. In fact, cracks are of high importance in various applications ranging from rock elastic and transport properties to nuclear waste disposal. The present work aims at investigating thermomechanical cracking effects on elastic wave velocities, mechanical strength, and permeability of cracked glass under pressure. We performed the experiments on a triaxial cell at room temperature which allows for independent controls of the confining pressure, the axial stress, and pore pressure. We produced cracks in original borosilicate glass samples with a reproducible method (thermal treatment with a thermal shock of 300°C). The evolution of the elastic and transport properties have been monitored using elastic wave velocity sensors, strain gage, and flow measurements. The results obtained evidence for (1) a crack family with identified average aspect ratio and crack aperture, (2) a very small permeability which decreases as a power (exponential) function of pressure, and depends on (3) the crack aperture cube. We also show that permeability behavior of a cracked elastic brittle solid is reversible and independent of the fluid nature. Two independent methods (permeability and elastic wave velocity measurements) give these consistent results. This study provides data on the mechanical and transport properties of an almost ideal elastic brittle solid in which a crack population has been introduced. Comparisons with similar data on rocks allow for drawing interesting conclusions. Over the timescale of our experiments, our results do not provide any data on stress corrosion, which should be considered in further study.

  6. Geophysical methods for monitoring soil stabilization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneiyan, Sina; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, D. Dale; Ustra, Andréa

    2018-01-01

    Soil stabilization involves methods used to turn unconsolidated and unstable soil into a stiffer, consolidated medium that could support engineered structures, alter permeability, change subsurface flow, or immobilize contamination through mineral precipitation. Among the variety of available methods carbonate precipitation is a very promising one, especially when it is being induced through common soil borne microbes (MICP - microbial induced carbonate precipitation). Such microbial mediated precipitation has the added benefit of not harming the environment as other methods can be environmentally detrimental. Carbonate precipitation, typically in the form of calcite, is a naturally occurring process that can be manipulated to deliver the expected soil strengthening results or permeability changes. This study investigates the ability of spectral induced polarization and shear-wave velocity for monitoring calcite driven soil strengthening processes. The results support the use of these geophysical methods as soil strengthening characterization and long term monitoring tools, which is a requirement for viable soil stabilization projects. Both tested methods are sensitive to calcite precipitation, with SIP offering additional information related to long term stability of precipitated carbonate. Carbonate precipitation has been confirmed with direct methods, such as direct sampling and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study advances our understanding of soil strengthening processes and permeability alterations, and is a crucial step for the use of geophysical methods as monitoring tools in microbial induced soil alterations through carbonate precipitation.

  7. The low/high BCS permeability class boundary: physicochemical comparison of metoprolol and labetalol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Moran; Gasparini, Marisa; Wolk, Omri; Amidon, Gordon L; Dahan, Arik

    2014-05-05

    Although recognized as overly conservative, metoprolol is currently the common low/high BCS permeability class boundary reference compound, while labetalol was suggested as a potential alternative. The purpose of this study was to identify the various characteristics that the optimal marker should exhibit, and to investigate the suitability of labetalol as the permeability class reference drug. Labetalol's BCS solubility class was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats, considering the complexity of the whole of the small intestine. Labetalol was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. In the pH range throughout the small intestine (6.5-7.5), labetalol exhibited pH-dependent permeability, with higher permeability at higher pH values. While in vitro octanol-buffer partitioning (Log D) values of labetalol were significantly higher than those of metoprolol, the opposite was evident in the in vitro PAMPA permeability assay. The results of the in vivo perfusion studies in rats lay between the two contradictory in vitro studies; metoprolol was shown to have moderately higher rat intestinal permeability than labetalol. Theoretical distribution of the ionic species of the drugs was in corroboration with the experimental in vitro and the in vivo data. We propose three characteristics that the optimal permeability class reference drug should exhibit: (1) fraction dose absorbed in the range of 90%; (2) the optimal marker drug should be absorbed largely via passive transcellular permeability, with no/negligible carrier-mediated active intestinal transport (influx or efflux); and (3) the optimal marker drug should preferably be nonionizable. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that neither metoprolol nor labetalol can be regarded as optimal low/high-permeability class boundary standard. While metoprolol is too conservative due to its complete absorption

  8. Physico-Chemical Properties of Three Salt-Affected Soils in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    but the B-horizon is between low to high. ... Excess sodium on the soil exchange complex and/or soluble salts in the soil profile has rendered an estimated ...... dispersion causes soil pore blockage resulting in the reduction of soil permeability.

  9. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    2015-01-01

    in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison...... with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood-brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood-brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging...... fluid as well as levels of CXCL10 and MMP9 in the cerebrospinal fluid. These findings suggest that blood-brain barrier permeability, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging, may provide novel pathological information as a marker of neuroinflammation related to multiple sclerosis, to some extent...

  10. Permeability Testing of Impacted Composite Laminates for Use on Reusable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite, and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented, and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a nonlinear fashion for almost all the specimens tested.

  11. Application of persulfate-oxidation foam spraying as a bioremediation pretreatment for diesel oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajagain, Rishikesh; Lee, Sojin; Jeong, Seung-Woo

    2018-05-15

    This study investigated a persulfate-bioaugmentation serial foam spraying technique to remove total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) present in diesel-contaminated unsaturated soil. Feeding of remedial agents by foam spraying increased the infiltration/unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of reagents into the unsaturated soil. Persulfate mixed with a surfactant solution infiltrated the soil faster than peroxide, resulting in relatively even soil moisture content. Persulfate had a higher soil infiltration tendency, which would facilitate its distribution over a wide soil area, thereby enhancing subsequent biodegradation efficiency. Nearly 80% of soil-TPHs were degraded by combined persulfate-bioaugmentation foam spraying, while bioaugmentation foam spraying alone removed 52%. TPH fraction analysis revealed that the removal rate for the biodegradation recalcitrant fraction (C 18 to C 22 ) in deeper soil regions was higher for persulfate-bioaugmentation serial foam application than for peroxide-bioaugmentation foam application. Persulfate-foam spraying may be superior to peroxide for TPH removal even at a low concentration (50 mN) because persulfate-foam is more permeable, persistent, and does not change soil pH in the subsurface. Although the number of soil microbes declines by oxidation pretreatment, bioaugmentation-foam alters the microbial population exponentially. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mobility and Distribution of 14C-Endosulfan in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anurakponsatorn, P.; Pakkong, P.; Parkpian, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chromatographic packed-soil Column was used to study the relative mobility and distribution of endosulfan in soil. With water saturated flow and gravity, Phrabat soil (PakChong Series) showed much more relative mobility and distribution than Rangsit soil (Rangsit Series). This was agreed with soil permeability of the two soils with were 0.34 and 9.16 mm/hr for Rangsit soil and Phrabat soil, respectively. This result was in agreeable with the adsorption coefficient (k d ) of the two soils which was higher in Rangsit soil compared to Phrabat soil. The distribution of endosulfan was found mostly in the top 10 cm of soil. As expected distribution to deeper extend was observed in Phrabat soil

  13. High-permeability criterion for BCS classification: segmental/pH dependent permeability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Miller, Jonathan M; Hilfinger, John M; Yamashita, Shinji; Yu, Lawrence X; Lennernäs, Hans; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-10-04

    The FDA classifies a drug substance as high-permeability when the fraction of dose absorbed (F(abs)) in humans is 90% or higher. This direct correlation between human permeability and F(abs) has been recently controversial, since the β-blocker sotalol showed high F(abs) (90%) and low Caco-2 permeability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the scientific basis for this disparity between permeability and F(abs). The effective permeabilities (P(eff)) of sotalol and metoprolol, a FDA standard for the low/high P(eff) class boundary, were investigated in the rat perfusion model, in three different intestinal segments with pHs corresponding to the physiological pH in each region: (1) proximal jejunum, pH 6.5; (2) mid small intestine, pH 7.0; and (3) distal ileum, pH 7.5. Both metoprolol and sotalol showed pH-dependent permeability, with higher P(eff) at higher pH. At any given pH, sotalol showed lower permeability than metoprolol; however, the permeability of sotalol determined at pH 7.5 exceeded/matched metoprolol's at pH 6.5 and 7.0, respectively. Physicochemical analysis based on ionization, pK(a) and partitioning of these drugs predicted the same trend and clarified the mechanism behind these observed results. Experimental octanol-buffer partitioning experiments confirmed the theoretical curves. An oral dose of metoprolol has been reported to be completely absorbed in the upper small intestine; it follows, hence, that metoprolol's P(eff) value at pH 7.5 is not likely physiologically relevant for an immediate release dosage form, and the permeability at pH 6.5 represents the actual relevant value for the low/high permeability class boundary. Although sotalol's permeability is low at pH 6.5 and 7.0, at pH 7.5 it exceeds/matches the threshold of metoprolol at pH 6.5 and 7.0, most likely responsible for its high F(abs). In conclusion, we have shown that, in fact, there is no discrepancy between P(eff) and F(abs) in sotalol's absorption; the data emphasize that

  14. Soil organic matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A total of 77 papers were presented and discussed during this symposium, 37 are included in this Volume II. The topics covered in this volume include: biochemical transformation of organic matter in soils; bitumens in soil organic matter; characterization of humic acids; carbon dating of organic matter in soils; use of modern techniques in soil organic matter research; use of municipal sludge with special reference to heavy metals constituents, soil nitrogen, and physical and chemical properties of soils; relationship of soil organic matter and plant metabolism; interaction between agrochemicals and organic matter; and peat. Separate entries have been prepared for those 20 papers which discuss the use of nuclear techniques in these studies

  15. The complex initial reluctivity, permeability and susceptibility spectra of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N. C.

    2015-03-01

    The HF complex permeability spectrum of a magnetic material is deduced from the measured impedance spectrum, which is then normalized to a series permeability spectrum. However, this series permeability spectrum has previously been shown to correspond to a parallel magnetic circuit, which is not appropriate. Some of the implications of this truth are examined. This electric/magnetic duality has frustrated efforts to interpret the shape of the complex magnetic permeability spectra of materials, and has hindered the application of impedance spectroscopy to magnetic materials. In the presence of magnetic loss, the relationship between the relative magnetic permeability and the magnetic susceptibility is called into question. The use of reluctivity spectra for expressing magnetic material properties is advocated. The relative loss factor, tanδm/μi is shown to be an approximation for the imaginary part of the reluctivity. A single relaxation model for the initial reluctivity spectra of magnetic materials is presented, and its principles are applied to measurements of a high permeability ferrite. The results are presented as contour plots of the spectra as a function of temperature.

  16. Effect of Biochar on Soil Physical Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    Biochar addition to agricultural soil has been reported to reduce climate gas emission, as well as improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little, however, is known about biochar effects on soil structural characteristics. This study investigates if biochar-application changes soil structural...... characteristics, as indicated from water retention and gas transport measurements on intact soil samples. Soil was sampled from a field experiment on a sandy loam with four control plots (C) without biochar and four plots (B) with incorporated biochar at a rate of 20 tons per hectare (plot size, 6 x 8 m). The C...... and B plots were placed in a mixed sequence (C-B-C-B-C-B-C-B) and at the same time the eight plots formed a natural pH gradient ranging from pH 7.7 to 6.3. We determined bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-sat), soil water retention characteristics, soil-air permeability, and soil...

  17. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  18. Water permeability of pigmented waterborne coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, P.A.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Erich, S.J.F.; Reuvers, N.J.W.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Coatings are used in a variety of applications. Last decades more and more coating systems are transforming from solvent to waterborne coating systems. In this study the influence of pigments on the water permeability of a waterborne coating system is studied, with special interest in the possible

  19. Water permeability in human airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Steen; Procida, Kristina; Larsen, Per Leganger

    2005-01-01

    Osmotic water permeability (P(f)) was studied in spheroid-shaped human airway epithelia explants derived from nasal polyps by the use of a new improved tissue collection and isolation procedure. The fluid-filled spheroids were lined with a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane ...

  20. Color-magnetic permeability of QCD vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Shigemoto, K

    1980-03-01

    In the very strong background gauge field the QCD true vacuum has been shown to have lower energy than the ''perturbative vacuum.'' The color-magnetic permeability of the QCD true vacuum is then calculated to be 1/2 within the quark-one-loop approximation.

  1. The Permeability of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, A.F.; Burcharth, H. F.; Adel, H. den

    1992-01-01

    . A new series of tests designed to test for deviations from the Forchheimer equation and investigate the effects of material shape are described. While no evidence can be found to indicate a deviation from the Forchheimer equation a dependency of permeability and the surface roughness the material...

  2. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ...

  3. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  4. Radon levels and transport parameters in Atlantic Forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, E.E.G. de; Silva Neto, P.C. da; Souza, E.M. de; De Franca, E.J.; Hazin, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    In natural forest soils, the radon transport processes can be significantly intensified due to the contribution of living organism activities to soil porosity. In this paper, the first results of the radon concentrations were obtained for soil gas from the Atlantic Forest, particularly in the Refugio Ecologico Charles Darwin, Brazil. The estimation of permeability and radon exhalation rate were carried out in this conservation unit. For forested soils, radon concentrations as high as 40 kBq m -3 were found. Based on the radon concentrations and on the permeability parameter, the results indicated considerable radon hazard for human occupation in the neighborhood. (author)

  5. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the [3H]DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells

  6. Influence of Height Waterlogging on Soil Physical Properties of Potential and Actual Acid Sulphate Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifin Fahmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water management is main factor that determines the successful of rice cultivation in acid sulphate soil. Soil waterlogging determines the direction and rate of chemical, geochemical and biological reaction in the soil, indirectly these reactions may influence to the changes of soil psycal properties during soil waterlogging process. The experiment was aimed to study the changes of two type of acid sulphate soils physical properties during rice straw decomposition processes. The research was conducted in the greenhouse consisting of the three treatment factors using the completely randomized design with three replications. The first factor was soil type: potential acid sulphate soil (PASS and actual acid sulphate soil (AASS. The second factor was height of water waterlogging: 0.5-1.0 cm (muddy water–level condition and 4.0 cm from above the soil surface (waterlogged. The third factor was organic matter type: rice straw (RS, purun tikus (Eleocharis dulcis (PT and mixed of RS and PT (MX. Soil physical properties such as aggregate stability, total soil porosity, soil permeability, soil particle density and bulk density were observed at the end of experiment (vegetative maximum stage. The results showed that acid sulphate soil type had large effect on soil physicl properties, soil waterlogging decreased aggregate stability, soil particle density and bulk density both of soil type.

  7. Sub-core permeability and relative permeability characterization with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahasky, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    This study utilizes preclinical micro-Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image and quantify the transport behavior of pulses of a conservative aqueous radiotracer injected during single and multiphase flow experiments in a Berea sandstone core with axial parallel bedding heterogeneity. The core is discretized into streamtubes, and using the micro-PET data, expressions are derived from spatial moment analysis for calculating sub-core scale tracer flux and pore water velocity. Using the flux and velocity data, it is then possible to calculate porosity and saturation from volumetric flux balance, and calculate permeability and water relative permeability from Darcy's law. Full 3D simulations are then constructed based on this core characterization. Simulation results are compared with experimental results in order to test the assumptions of the simple streamtube model. Errors and limitations of this analysis will be discussed. These new methods of imaging and sub-core permeability and relative permeability measurements enable experimental quantification of transport behavior across scales.

  8. Contamination valuation of soil and groundwater source at anaerobic municipal solid waste landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Shuokr Qarani; Maulood, Yousif Ismael

    2015-12-01

    The present work aimed to determine the risks that formed landfill leachate from anaerobic Erbil Landfill Site (ELS) poses on groundwater source and to observe the effects of disposed municipal solid waste (MSW) on soil properties. The study further aims to fill the gap in studies on the effects of disposed MSW and produced leachate on the groundwater characteristics and soil quality at ELS, Iraq. Soil, leachate, and groundwater samples were collected from ELS for use as samples in this study. Unpolluted groundwater samples were collected from an area outside of the landfill. Field and laboratory experiments for the soil samples were conducted. Chemical analyses for the soil samples such as organic matter, total salts, and SO4 (=) were also performed. Raw leachate and groundwater samples were analyzed using physical and chemical experiments. The yields for sorptivity, steady-state infiltration rate, and hydraulic conductivity of the soil samples were 0.0006 m/√s, 0.00004 m/s, and 2.17 × 10(-5) m/s, respectively. The soil at ELS was found to be light brown clayey gravel with sand and light brown gravely lean clay layers with low permeability. Unprocessed leachate analysis identified the leachate as stabilized. Findings showed that the soil and groundwater at the anaerobic ELS were contaminated.

  9. Reduction in ionic permeability of a silicone hydrogel contact lenses after one month of daily wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira da Silva, Ana Rita; González-Méijome, José M; Compañ, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the ionic permeability using the ionoflux method of new and worn samples of a silicone hydrogel contact lens material. Methods. An ionoflux experimental setup was established to measure the ionic permeability (NaCl) of soft contact lenses. Samples of a silicone hydrogel lens (Comfilcon A, Coopervision, Pleasanton, CA) with optical powers of −1.00, −1.50 and −4.75 diopters (D) were used in this study. Three samples of each power were measured after being worn for one month on a daily wear basis. Lenses were cleaned and disinfected every night using multipurpose disinfecting solutions. Three samples of new lenses from the same batch and the same optical power were also measured to evaluate the effect of lens wear on the ionic permeability of the lens material. Before measurement, the lenses were equilibrated with a 1 M NaCl solution during one week before of each measurement. Results. Lens power had minimal effect on the ionic permeability of a modern silicone hydrogel contact lens with the −1.00 lens having a 15% lower permeability compared to the other two lenses. After one month of lens wear the apparent ionic permeability for lenses with −1.50 D decreased by 15%. In the case of −1.00 and −4.75 D lenses there was a decrease of 26%. Conclusions. The ionic permeability of silicone hydrogel lenses of different optical powers was not significantly different. Worn lenses present a significant reduction of the ionic permeability after a month of wear. The potential effect this reduction on lens movement and discomfort associated to lens wear should be further evaluated. (paper)

  10. The hydraulic permeability of blood clots as a function of fibrin and platelet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wufsus, A R; Macera, N E; Neeves, K B

    2013-04-16

    Interstitial fluid flow within blood clots is a biophysical mechanism that regulates clot growth and dissolution. Assuming that a clot can be modeled as a porous medium, the physical property that dictates interstitial fluid flow is the hydraulic permeability. The objective of this study was to bound the possible values of the hydraulic permeability in clots formed in vivo and present relationships that can be used to estimate clot permeability as a function of composition. A series of clots with known densities of fibrin and platelets, the two major components of a clot, were formed under static conditions. The permeability was calculated by measuring the interstitial fluid velocity through the clots at a constant pressure gradient. Fibrin gels formed with a fiber volume fraction of 0.02-0.54 had permeabilities of 1.2 × 10(-1)-1.5 × 10(-4)μm(2). Platelet-rich clots with a platelet volume fraction of 0.01-0.61 and a fibrin volume fraction of 0.03 had permeabilities over a range of 1.1 × 10(-2)-1.5 × 10(-5)μm(2). The permeability of fibrin gels and of clots with platelet volume fraction of platelet volume fraction of >0.2 were modeled as a Brinkman medium of coarse solids (platelets) embedded in a mesh of fine fibers (fibrin). Our data suggest that the permeability of clots formed in vivo can vary by up to five orders of magnitude, with pore sizes that range from 4 to 350 nm. These findings have important implications for the transport of coagulation zymogens/enzymes in the interstitial spaces during clot formation, as well as the design of fibrinolytic drug delivery strategies. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intestinal Permeability of β-Lapachone and Its Cyclodextrin Complexes and Physical Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas-Sanjuan, Victor; Gutiérrez-Nieto, Jorge; Echezarreta-López, Magdalena; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Casabó, Vicente-Germán; Bermejo, Marival; Landin, Mariana

    2016-12-01

    β-Lapachone (βLAP) is a promising, poorly soluble, antitumoral drug. βLAP combination with cyclodextrins (CDs) improves its solubility and dissolution but there is not enough information about the impact of cyclodextrins on βLAP intestinal permeability. The objectives of this work were to characterize βLAP intestinal permeability and to elucidate cyclodextrins effect on the dissolution properties and on the intestinal permeability. The final goal was to evaluate CDs influence on the oral absorption of βLAP. Binary systems (physical mixtures and inclusion complexes) including βLAP and CDs (β-cyclodextrin: βCD, random-methyl-β-cyclodextrin: RMβCD and sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin: SBEβCD) have been prepared and analysed by differential scanning calorimetry. βLAP (and its combinations with CDs) absorption rate coefficients and effective permeability values have been determined in vitro in MDCK or MDCK-Mdr1 monolayers and in situ in rat by a closed loop perfusion technique. DSC results confirmed the formation of the inclusion complexes. βLAP-CDs inclusion complexes improve drug solubility and dissolution rate in comparison with physical mixtures. βLAP presented a high permeability value which can provide complete oral absorption. Its oral absorption is limited by its low solubility and dissolution rate. Cyclodextrin (both as physical mixtures and inclusion complexes) showed a positive effect on the intestinal permeability of βLAP. Complexation with CDs does not reduce βLAP intestinal permeability in spite of the potential negative effect of the reduction in free fraction of the drug. The use of RMβCD or SBEβCD inclusion complexes could benefit βLAP oral absorption by enhancing its solubility, dissolution rate and permeability.

  12. Radioisotope albumin flux measurement of microvascular lung permeability: an independent parameter in acute respiratory failure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegerle, S.; Nitzsche, E.U.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Moser, E.; Benzing, A.; Geiger, K.; Schulte Moenting, J.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the extent to which single measurements of microvascular lung permeability may be relevant as an additional parameter in a heterogenous clinical patient collective with Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Methods: In 36 patients with pneumonia (13), non pneumogenic sepsis (9) or trauma (14) meeting the consensus conference criteria of ALI or ARDS double-isotope protein flux measurements ( 51 Cr erythrocytes as intravascular tracer, Tc-99m human albumin as diffusible tracer) of microvascular lung permeability were performed using the Normalized Slope Index (NSI). The examination was to determine whether there is a relationship between the clinical diagnosis of ALI/ARDS, impaired permeability and clinical parameters, that is the underlying disease, oxygenation, duration of mechanical ventilation and mean pulmonary-artery pressure (PAP). Results: At the time of study, 25 patients presented with increased permeability (NSI > 1 x 10 -3 min -1 ) indicating an exudative stage of disease, and 11 patients with normal permeability. The permeability impairment correlated with the underlying disease (p > 0.05). With respect to survival, there was a negative correlation to PAP (p [de

  13. New well pattern optimization methodology in mature low-permeability anisotropic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiazheng; Liu, Yuetian; Feng, Yueli; Ding, Yao; Liu, Liu; He, Youwei

    2018-02-01

    In China, lots of well patterns were designed before people knew the principal permeability direction in low-permeability anisotropic reservoirs. After several years’ production, it turns out that well line direction is unparallel with principal permeability direction. However, traditional well location optimization methods (in terms of the objective function such as net present value and/or ultimate recovery) are inapplicable, since wells are not free to move around in a mature oilfield. Thus, the well pattern optimization (WPO) of mature low-permeability anisotropic reservoirs is a significant but challenging task, since the original well pattern (WP) will be distorted and reconstructed due to permeability anisotropy. In this paper, we investigate the destruction and reconstruction of WP when the principal permeability direction and well line direction are unparallel. A new methodology was developed to quantitatively optimize the well locations of mature large-scale WP through a WPO algorithm on the basis of coordinate transformation (i.e. rotating and stretching). For a mature oilfield, large-scale WP has settled, so it is not economically viable to carry out further infill drilling. This paper circumvents this difficulty by combining the WPO algorithm with the well status (open or shut-in) and schedule adjustment. Finally, this methodology is applied to an example. Cumulative oil production rates of the optimized WP are higher, and water-cut is lower, which highlights the potential of the WPO methodology application in mature large-scale field development projects.

  14. Solubility and Permeability Studies of Aceclofenac in Different Oils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The solubility and permeability of aceclofenac were compared with the hydroalcoholic solution of ... the use of lipid based systems such as micro- or .... carriers/vehicles for enhanced solubility and permeability ... modifications: A recent review.

  15. Investigation clogging dynamic of permeable pavement systems using embedded sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeable pavement is a stormwater control measure commonly selected in both new and retrofit applications. However, there is limited information about the clogging mechanism of these systems that effects the infiltration. A permeable pavement site located at the Seitz Elementary...

  16. Intestinal permeability study of minoxidil: assessment of minoxidil as a high permeability reference drug for biopharmaceutics classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Zur, Moran; Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-01-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate minoxidil as a high permeability reference drug for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). The permeability of minoxidil was determined in in situ intestinal perfusion studies in rodents and permeability studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The permeability of minoxidil was compared with that of metoprolol, an FDA reference drug for BCS classification. In rat perfusion studies, the permeability of minoxidil was somewhat higher than that of metoprolol in the jejunum, while minoxidil showed lower permeability than metoprolol in the ileum. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of intestinal segment, while the permeability of metoprolol was region-dependent. Similarly, in mouse perfusion study, the jejunal permeability of minoxidil was 2.5-fold higher than that of metoprolol. Minoxidil and metoprolol showed similar permeability in Caco-2 study at apical pH of 6.5 and basolateral pH of 7.4. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of pH, while metoprolol showed pH-dependent transport in Caco-2 study. Minoxidil exhibited similar permeability in the absorptive direction (AP-BL) in comparison with secretory direction (BL-AP), while metoprolol had higher efflux ratio (ER > 2) at apical pH of 6.5 and basolateral pH of 7.4. No concentration-dependent transport was observed for either minoxidil or metoprolol transport in Caco-2 study. Verapamil did not alter the transport of either compounds across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of both pH and intestinal segment in intestinal perfusion studies and Caco-2 studies. Caco-2 studies also showed no involvement of carrier mediated transport in the absorption process of minoxidil. These results suggest that minoxidil may be an acceptable reference drug for BCS high permeability classification. However, minoxidil exhibited higher jejunal permeability than metoprolol and thus to use minoxidil as a reference drug would raise the

  17. Determination of the permeability of α-, β- and γ-radiation in textile fabrics by Gamma-Scout device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gintibidze, N.; Mardaleishvili, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present was the measurement of radiation permeability in textile fabrics by Gamma-Scout device and the comparison of the obtained results with the radiation background of the ambient air. The authors of this article have produced new fiber Fibron-3, which, according to theoretical calculations, reduces permeability of solar radiation. With this in mind, an experiment was performed. Three samples of the knitted cloth from Fibron-3 were taken, and the permeability of solar radiation in them was determined. The measurements were performed on Gamma-Scout device. The comparative analysis of the permeability of solar radiation in fabrics of different fibrous structure was performed. It was inferred that the degree of radiation permeability in fabrics depended on the thread thickness and the fiber structure. (author)

  18. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain

  19. Long-term Metal Performance of Three Permeable Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA constructed a 4,000-m2 parking lot surfaced with three permeable pavements (permeable interlocking concrete pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt) on the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ in 2009. Samples from each permeable pavement infiltrate were collected...

  20. Revamping of entisol soil physical characteristics with compost treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumono; Loka, S. P.; Nasution, D. L. S.

    2018-02-01

    Physical characteristic of Entisol soil is an important factor for the growth of plant. The aim of this research was to know the effect of compost application on physical characteristics of Entisol soil. The research method used was experimental method with 6 (six) treatments and 3 replications of which K1 = 10 kg Entisol soil without compost, K2 = 9 Kg Entisol soil with 1 kg compost, K3 = 8 kg Entisol soil with 2 kg compost, K4 = 7 kg Entisol soilwith3 kg compost, K5 = 6 kg Entisol soil with 4 kg compost and K6 = 5 kg Entisol soil with 5 kg compost. The observed parameters were soil texture, soil organic matter, soil thickness, porosity, soil pore size, soil permeability and water availability. The results showed that the Entisol soil texture was loamy sand texture, the value of soil organic matter ranged from 0.74% to 4.69%, soil thickness ranged from 13.83 to 20.16 cm, porosity ranged from16% to 37%, soil pore size ranged from 2.859 to 5.493 µm, permeability ranged from 1.24 to 5.64 cm/hour and water availability ranged from 6.67% to 9.12% by each treatment.

  1. Physically based model for extracting dual permeability parameters using non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Najm, M. R.; Basset, C.; Stewart, R. D.; Hauswirth, S.

    2017-12-01

    Dual permeability models are effective for the assessment of flow and transport in structured soils with two dominant structures. The major challenge to those models remains in the ability to determine appropriate and unique parameters through affordable, simple, and non-destructive methods. This study investigates the use of water and a non-Newtonian fluid in saturated flow experiments to derive physically-based parameters required for improved flow predictions using dual permeability models. We assess the ability of these two fluids to accurately estimate the representative pore sizes in dual-domain soils, by determining the effective pore sizes of macropores and micropores. We developed two sub-models that solve for the effective macropore size assuming either cylindrical (e.g., biological pores) or planar (e.g., shrinkage cracks and fissures) pore geometries, with the micropores assumed to be represented by a single effective radius. Furthermore, the model solves for the percent contribution to flow (wi) corresponding to the representative macro and micro pores. A user-friendly solver was developed to numerically solve the system of equations, given that relevant non-Newtonian viscosity models lack forms conducive to analytical integration. The proposed dual-permeability model is a unique attempt to derive physically based parameters capable of measuring dual hydraulic conductivities, and therefore may be useful in reducing parameter uncertainty and improving hydrologic model predictions.

  2. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments...... on sediments taken from six shallow coastal sites in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. The results showed that denitrification commenced rapidly (within 30 min) after the onset of anoxia and the kinetics could be well described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with half saturation constants (apparent K...... in cohesive sediments despite organic carbon contents one order of magnitude lower for the sediments studied here. The ratio of sediment O-2 consumption to V-max was in the range of 0.02-0.09, and was on average much lower than the theoretical ratio of 0.8. As a consequence, models implemented...

  3. Nonequilibrium gas absorption in rotating permeable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, V. K.; Bazhaikin, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    The absorption of ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide by water and aqueous solutions in rotating permeable media, a cellular porous disk, and a set of spaced-apart thin disks has been considered. The efficiency of cleaning air to remove these impurities is determined, and their anomalously high solubility (higher than equilibrium value) has been discovered. The results demonstrate the feasibility of designing cheap efficient rotor-type absorbers to clean gases of harmful impurities.

  4. Permeable pavement and stormwater management systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, H M; Akib, Shatirah; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled stormwater runoff not only creates drainage problems and flash floods but also presents a considerable threat to water quality and the environment. These problems can, to a large extent, be reduced by a type of stormwater management approach employing permeable pavement systems (PPS) in urban, industrial and commercial areas, where frequent problems are caused by intense undrained stormwater. PPS could be an efficient solution for sustainable drainage systems, and control water security as well as renewable energy in certain cases. Considerable research has been conducted on the function of PPS and their improvement to ensure sustainable drainage systems and water quality. This paper presents a review of the use of permeable pavement for different purposes. The paper focuses on drainage systems and stormwater runoff quality from roads, driveways, rooftops and parking lots. PPS are very effective for stormwater management and water reuse. Moreover, geotextiles provide additional facilities to reduce the pollutants from infiltrate runoff into the ground, creating a suitable environment for the biodegradation process. Furthermore, recently, ground source heat pumps and PPS have been found to be an excellent combination for sustainable renewable energy. In addition, this study has identified several gaps in the present state of knowledge on PPS and indicates some research needs for future consideration.

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B.

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness

  6. Ammonia gas permeability of meat packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Faris; Hijaz, Faraj; Kastner, Curtis L; Smith, J Scott

    2011-03-01

    Meat products are packaged in polymer films designed to protect the product from exterior contaminants such as light, humidity, and harmful chemicals. Unfortunately, there is almost no data on ammonia permeability of packaging films. We investigated ammonia permeability of common meat packaging films: low-density polyethylene (LDPE; 2.2 mil), multilayer polyolefin (MLP; 3 mil), and vacuum (V-PA/PE; 3 mil, 0.6 mil polyamide/2.4 mil polyethylene). The films were fabricated into 10 × 5 cm pouches and filled with 50 mL deionized water. Pouches were placed in a plexiglass enclosure in a freezer and exposed to 50, 100, 250, or 500 ppm ammonia gas for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h at -17 ± 3 °C and 21 ± 3 °C. At freezing temperatures, no ammonia residues were detected and no differences in pH were found in the water. At room temperature, ammonia levels and pH of the water increased significantly (P packaging materials have low ammonia permeability and protect meat products exposed to ammonia leaks during frozen storage.

  7. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water ( 3 HHO) and 14 C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for 3 HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D 2 ), and the extracellular material (D 1 ) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10 -5 cm 2 s -1 and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10 -5 cm 2 s -1 respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for 3 HHO was higher than that for AP and for both 3 HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes

  8. Cost studies of thermally enhanced in situ soil remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremser, J.; Booth, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes five thermally enhanced technologies that may be used to remediate contaminated soil and water resources. The standard methods of treating these contaminated areas are Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Excavate ampersand Treat (E ampersand T), and Pump ampersand Treat (P ampersand T). Depending on the conditions at a given site, one or more of these conventional alternatives may be employed; however, several new thermally enhanced technologies for soil decontamination are emerging. These technologies are still in demonstration programs which generally are showing great success at achieving the expected remediation results. The cost savings reported in this work assume that the technologies will ultimately perform as anticipated by their developers in a normal environmental restoration work environment. The five technologies analyzed in this report are Low Frequency Heating (LF or Ohmic, both 3 and 6 phase AC), Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS), Radio Frequency Heating (RF), Radio Frequency Heating using Dipole Antennae (RFD), and Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES). In all of these technologies the introduction of heat to the formation raises vapor pressures accelerating contaminant evaporation rates and increases soil permeability raising diffusion rates of contaminants. The physical process enhancements resulting from temperature elevations permit a greater percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) or semi- volatile organic compound (SVOC) contaminants to be driven out of the soils for treatment or capture in a much shorter time period. This report presents the results of cost-comparative studies between these new thermally enhanced technologies and the conventional technologies, as applied to five specific scenarios

  9. Quicklime-induced changes of soil properties: Implications for enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated soils via mechanical soil aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Dong, Binbin; He, Xiaosong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Mingyue; He, Xuwen; Du, Xiaoming; Li, Fasheng

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is used for soil remediation at sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds. However, the effectiveness of the method is limited by low soil temperature, high soil moisture, and high soil viscosity. Combined with mechanical soil aeration, quicklime has a practical application value related to reinforcement remediation and to its action in the remediation of soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds. In this study, the target pollutant was trichloroethylene, which is a volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutant commonly found in contaminated soils. A restoration experiment was carried out, using a set of mechanical soil-aeration simulation tests, by adding quicklime (mass ratios of 3, 10, and 20%) to the contaminated soil. The results clearly indicate that quicklime changed the physical properties of the soil, which affected the environmental behaviour of trichloroethylene in the soil. The addition of CaO increased soil temperature and reduced soil moisture to improve the mass transfer of trichloroethylene. In addition, it improved the macroporous cumulative pore volume and average pore size, which increased soil permeability. As soil pH increased, the clay mineral content in the soils decreased, the cation exchange capacity and the redox potential decreased, and the removal of trichloroethylene from the soil was enhanced to a certain extent. After the addition of quicklime, the functional group COO of soil organic matter could interact with calcium ions, which increased soil polarity and promoted the removal of trichloroethylene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral peritumoral oedema study: Does a single dynamic MR sequence assessing perfusion and permeability can help to differentiate glioblastoma from metastasis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Pierre; Saliou, Guillaume; Marco, Giovanni de; Monet, Pauline; Souraya, Stoquart-Elsankari; Bruniau, Alexis; Vallée, Jean Noel; Ducreux, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to differentiate glioblastoma from metastasis using a single dynamic MR sequence to assess perfusion and permeability parameters. 24 patients with glioblastoma or cerebral metastasis with peritumoral oedema were recruited and explored with a 3 T MR unit. Post processing used DPTools software. Regions of interest were drawn around contrast enhancement to assess relative cerebral blood volume and permeability parameters. Around the contrast enhancement Glioblastoma present high rCBV with modification of the permeability, metastasis present slight modified rCBV without modification of permeability. In conclusion, peritumoral T2 hypersignal exploration associating morphological MR and functional MR parameters can help to differentiate cerebral metastasis from glioblastoma.

  11. EDZ and permeability in clayey rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levasseur, Severine; Collin, Frederic; Charlier, Robert; Besuelle, Pierre; Chambon, Rene; Viggiani, Cino

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep geological layers are being considered as potential host rocks for the high level radioactivity waste disposals. During drilling in host rocks, an excavated damaged zone - EDZ is created. The fluid transmissivity may be modified in this damaged zone. This paper deals with the permeability evolution in relation with diffuse and/or localized crack propagation in the material. We mainly focus on argillaceous rocks and on some underground laboratories: Mol URL in Boom clay, Bure URL in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and Mont-Terri URL in Opalinus clay. First, observations of damage around galleries are summarized. Structure of damage in localized zone or in fracture has been observed at underground gallery scale within the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The first challenge for a correct understanding of all the processes occurring within the EDZ is the characterization at the laboratory scale of the damage and localization processes. The observation of the initiation and propagation of the localized zones needs for advanced techniques. X-ray tomography is a non-destructive imaging technique that allows quantification of internal features of an object in 3D. If mechanical loading of a specimen is applied inside a X-ray CT apparatus, successive 3D images at different loading steps show the evolution of the specimen. However, in general volumetric strain in a shear band is small compared to the shear strain and, unfortunately, in tomographic images grey level is mainly sensitive to the local mass density field. Such a limitation has been recently overcome by complementing X-ray tomography with 3D Volumetric Digital Image Correlation (V-DIC) which allows the determination of the full strain tensor field. Then it is possible to further explore the progression of localized deformation in the specimen. The second challenge is the robust modelling of the strain localized process. In fact, modelling the damage process with finite

  12. Soil tillage conservation and its effect on erosion control, water management and carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Dr.; Gus, Dr.; Bogdan, Dr.; Moraru, Dr.; Pop, Dr.; Clapa, Dr.; Pop, Drd.

    2009-04-01

    The energetic function of the soil expressed through the potential energy accumulated through humus, the biogeochemical function (the circuit of the nutrient elements) are significantly influenced by its hydrophysical function and especially by the state of the bedding- consolidation, soil capacity of retaining an optimal quantity of water, and then its gradual disponibility for plant consumption. The understanding of soil functions and management including nutrient production, stocking, filtering and transforming minerals, water , organic matter , gas circuit and furnishing breeding material, all make the basis of human activity, Earth's past, present and especially future. The minimum tillage soil systems - paraplow, chisel or rotary grape - are polyvalent alternatives for basic preparation, germination bed preparation and sowing, for fields and crops with moderate loose requirements being optimized technologies for: soil natural fertility activation and rationalization, reduction of erosion, increasing the accumulation capacity for water and realization of sowing in the optimal period. By continuously applying for 10 years the minimum tillage system in a crop rotation: corn - soy-bean - wheat - potato / rape, an improvement in physical, hydro-physical and biological properties of soil was observed, together with the rebuilt of structure and increase of water permeability of soil. The minimum tillage systems ensure an adequate aerial-hydrical regime for the biological activity intensity and for the nutrients solubility equilibrium. The vegetal material remaining at the soil surface or superficially incorporated has its contribution to intensifying the biological activity, being an important resource of organic matter. The minimum tillage systems rebuild the soil structure, improving the global drainage of soil which allows a rapid infiltration of water in soil. The result is a more productive soil, better protected against wind and water erosion and needing less

  13. Influence of Amang (Tin Tailing) on Geotechnical Properties of Clay Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulfahmi, A.R.; Zuhairi, W.Y.W.; Raihan, M.T.; Sahibin, A.R.; Razi, I.W.M.; Tukimat, L.; Syakireen, Z.S.N.; Noorulakma, A.

    2012-01-01

    Amang or tin tailing is commonly found in the vicinity of disused mining area and responsible in downgrading the water quality, landscape and mechanical behaviour of soils. It was generated from extraction process of separating valuable metal from particular ore. This paper presents the geotechnical characteristics of amang-contaminated clay soil. The geotechnical properties of uncontaminated soils were studied in order to compare to that of amang contaminated soils. The base soil used in this study represents completely weathered horizon of meta sedimentary rock. Meanwhile, tin tailing sample was taken from the disused mine at Sungai Lembing, Pahang. The geotechnical characterisations of base soil and contaminated soils were determined based on consistency index, compaction behaviour, hydraulic conductivity and undrained shear strength (UU tests). Contaminated soil samples were prepared by adding 5, 10 and 20 % of tailing, based on dry weigh of the studied base soil. The results from the particle size distribution analysis showed that residual soil from meta sedimentary rock comprised 42.6 % clay, 32.2 % silt and 25.2 % sand whilst tailing was dominated by 98 % of sand fraction. XRD analysis indicated the presence of quartz, kaolinite and muscovite minerals in the studied soil. The specific gravity of soil used is 2.67 and the pH is 3.88. Tailing found to have higher specific gravity of 3.37. The consistency index of contaminated soils showed that liquid limit, wL and plastic limit, wP decreased with the increase in the percentage of tailing added to the soil samples. The value of maximum dry density, ρ dry max increased while optimum moisture content decreased due to the increase in tailing content in soil sample. The permeability of contaminated soil also increased with the increase in tailing contents ranged from 19.8 cm/ hr to 23.8 cm/ hr. The undrained shear strength, Cu, of contaminated soil decreased from 646 kPa (5 % of tailing) to 312 kPa (20 % of

  14. Soil structural behaviour of flooded soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to: identify factors determining of the structural behaviour of flooded soils, as compared to those acting in upland soils; analyse the influence of reductive processes on aggregate stabilising agents; discuss mechanisms of structural deterioration and recovery during the flooding-drying cycle, on the basis of a case study: cattle trampling effects in the flooding Pampa of Argentina. Flooded soils, now known as Hydric soils, are characteristic of wetlands and irrigated fields cropped to rice (paddy soils). In them, water covers the soil, or is present either at or near the surface of the soil all year or for varying periods of time during the year. Hydric soils belong to different taxa of the FAO-UNESCO Soil Map (2000). Fluvisols, Planosols and Gleysols are widespread distributed in the globe. The generation of redoximorphic features is due to different causes in each of them. Fluvisols are covered part of the year by surface water from river overflows; Planosols are soils having an impervious Bt horizon, supporting perched water during short periods; and Gleysols are soils affected by stagnant water tables during long periods

  15. Upscaling of permeability field of fractured rock system: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, K.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2012-01-01

    When the permeability field of a given porous medium domain is heterogeneous by the existence of randomly distributed fractures such that numerical investigation becomes cumbersome, another level of upscaling may be required. That is such complex permeability field could be relaxed (i.e., smoothed) by constructing an effective permeability field. The effective permeability field is an approximation to the real permeability field that preserves certain quantities and provides an overall acceptable description of the flow field. In this work, the effective permeability for a fractured rock system is obtained for different coarsening scenarios starting from very coarse mesh all the way towards the fine mesh simulation. In all these scenarios, the effective permeability as well as the pressure at each cell is obtained. The total flux at the exit boundary is calculated in all these cases, and very good agreement is obtained.

  16. A study and development of a system for the determination of porus plates permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao Junior, C.B.; Zorzetto, L.F.

    1989-07-01

    A device employed for the study of flux in porous media and another one employed for the determination of permeability of porous plate are presented in this work. Experimental data and calculation obtained from the above cited systems are also presented. (author) [pt

  17. Study of the behavior of aggregate of calcined clay for use in permeable pavements for the city of Manaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Vilela, P.A.T.; Araujo, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the production of ceramic aggregates and their use in paving in the country began in the 80’s in the search for an alternative material that could replace the pebble or crushed stone, studied the clay, considered an abundant mineral resource by virtue of being the predominant soil in this region and which were made synthetic calcinated clay aggregates (ASAC), for their application in permeable paving concrete motivated by the lack of permeable areas. The study consists of the characterization of materials for manufacture of concrete slabs permeable and the assessment of the effects of synthetic aggregate on its properties in fresh and hardened state. The ceramic bodies were subjected to tests of X-ray diffraction, determination of chemical composition and plasticity. The results indicate that the use of synthetic clusters is a viable alternative for the production of porous concrete. (author)

  18. Agriculture Oral Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains 23 papers related to the use of nuclear techniques in plant breeding in Turkey, effect of gamma irradiations on growing various plants, mutations and soil chemistry, etc., presented at 4. International Congress of Nuclear Agriculture and Animal Science in Bursa, Turkey, 25-27 Sep 1996. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  19. Restoration of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda J, Jose Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    A great variety of techniques are used for the restoration of contaminated soils. The contamination is present by both organic and inorganic pollutants. Environmental conditions and soil characteristics should take into account in order to implement a remedial technique. The bioremediation technologies are showed as help to remove a variety of soil contaminants. (author) [es

  20. Permeability and Microstructure of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Electrolytes for SOFCs on Various Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Michael; Kesler, Olivera

    2012-12-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte coatings for solid oxide fuel cells were deposited by suspension plasma spraying using a range of spray conditions and a variety of substrates, including finely structured porous stainless steel disks and cathode layers on stainless steel supports. Electrolyte permeability values and trends were found to be highly dependent on which substrate was used. The most gas-tight electrolyte coatings were those deposited directly on the porous metal disks. With this substrate, permeability was reduced by increasing the torch power and reducing the stand-off distance to produce dense coating microstructures. On the substrates with cathodes, electrolyte permeability was reduced by increasing the stand-off distance, which reduced the formation of segmentation cracks and regions of aligned and concentrated porosity. The formation mechanisms of the various permeability-related coating features are discussed and strategies for reducing permeability are presented. The dependences of electrolyte deposition efficiency and surface roughness on process conditions and substrate properties are also presented.

  1. TDR measurements looking for complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability in lossy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    TDR probes can be exploited for the measure of the electromagnetic characteristics of the soil, or of any penetrable material. They are commonly exploited as instruments for the measure of the propagation velocity of the electromagnetic waves in the probed medium [1], in its turn useful for the proper focusing of GPR data [2-5]. However, a more refined hardware and processing can allow to extrapolate from these probes also the discrimination between dielectric and magnetic characteristics of the material under test, which can be relevant for a better interpretation of the buried scenario or in order to infer physical-chemical characteristics of the material at hand. This requires a TDR probe that can work in frequency domain, and in particular that allows to retrieve the reflection coefficient at the air soil interface. It has been already shown [6] that in lossless cases this can be promising. In the present contribution, it will be shown at the EGU conference that it is possible to look for both the relative complex permittivity and the relative magnetic permeability of the probed material, on condition that the datum has an acceptable SNR and that some diversity of information is guaranteed, either by multifrequency data or by a TDR that can prolong its arms in the soil. References [1] F. Soldovieri, G. Prisco, R. Persico, Application of Microwave Tomography in Hydrogeophysics: some examples, Vadose Zone Journal, vol. 7, n. 1 pp. 160-170, Feb. 2008. [2] I. Catapano, L. Crocco, R. Persico, M. Pieraccini, F. Soldovieri, "Linear and Nonlinear Microwave Tomography Approaches for Subsurface Prospecting: Validation on Real Data", IEEE Trans. on Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, vol. 5, pp. 49-53, 2006. [3] G. Leucci, N. Masini, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri." GPR and sonic tomography for structural restoration : the case of the Cathedral of Tricarico", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol. 8, pp. S76-S92, Aug. 2011. [4] S. Piscitelli, E. Rizzo, F. Cristallo

  2. Experimental Measurement of Relative Permeability Functions for Fuel Cell GDL Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, Irfan; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2009-01-01

    Gas diffusion layer in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex-situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented. Significant departure from the generally assumed cubic function of saturation is observed. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  3. Visual soil evaluation and soil compaction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M.L. Guimarães, Rachel; Keller, Thomas; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Following on from discussions that took place during the 19th International Conference of the International Soil Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO) in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 2012, the ISTRO working groups “Visual Soil Examination and Evaluation” (VSEE) and “Subsoil Compaction” decided...... to organize a joint workshop. The present special issue is an outcome from the workshop on “Soil structural quality of tropical soils: Visual evaluation methods and soil compaction prevention strategies” that was held 26–29 May 2014 in Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. There has been a long-lasting interest in Visual...... Soil Evaluation (VSE). An ISTRO working group was established more than 30 years ago with the objectives to exchange knowledge and experiences on field methods of visual-tactile soil assessment and to foster international cooperation on new or refined methods. The three previous meeting of the group...

  4. Predicting permeability of regular tissue engineering scaffolds: scaling analysis of pore architecture, scaffold length, and fluid flow rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, A; Montazerian, H; Davoodi, E; Homayoonfar, S

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this research is to numerically obtain the permeability coefficient in the cylindrical scaffolds. For this purpose, a mathematical analysis was performed to derive an equation for desired porosity in terms of morphological parameters. Then, the considered cylindrical geometries were modeled and the permeability coefficient was calculated according to the velocity and pressure drop values based on the Darcy's law. In order to validate the accuracy of the present numerical solution, the obtained permeability coefficient was compared with the published experimental data. It was observed that this model can predict permeability with the utmost accuracy. Then, the effect of geometrical parameters including porosity, scaffold pore structure, unit cell size, and length of the scaffolds as well as entrance mass flow rate on the permeability of porous structures was studied. Furthermore, a parametric study with scaling laws analysis of sample length and mass flow rate effects on the permeability showed good fit to the obtained data. It can be concluded that the sensitivity of permeability is more noticeable at higher porosities. The present approach can be used to characterize and optimize the scaffold microstructure due to the necessity of cell growth and transferring considerations.

  5. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abazari

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre. Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies.

  6. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  7. Permeability log using new lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, D.J.; Boyd, J.F.; Fuchs, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Comparative measurements of thermal neutron decay time are obtained for a formation after irradiation with a pulsed neutron source. Chloride ions in formation fluids are concentrated by the electrosmosis effect using charged poles on a well logging sonde. The formation is irradiated with fast neutrons and a first comparative measure of the thermal neutron decay time or neutron lifetime is taken. The chloride ions are then dispersed by acoustic pumping with a magnetostrictive transducer. The formation is then again irradiated with fast neutrons and a comparative measure of neutron lifetime is taken. The comparison is a function of the variation in chloride concentration between the two measurements which is related to formation permeability

  8. Permeability Evolution and Rock Brittle Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Qiang; Xue Lei; Zhu Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study of the evolution of permeability during rock brittle failure and a theoretical analysis of rock critical stress level. It is assumed that the rock is a strain-softening medium whose strength can be described by Weibull’s distribution. Based on the two-dimensional renormalization group theory, it is found that the stress level λ c (the ratio of the stress at the critical point to the peak stress) depends mainly on the homogeneity index or shape paramete...

  9. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed......-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) (1) confirmed denitrification as the main NO consumption pathway, with N2O as its major product, (2) showed that denitrification combines one free NO molecule with one NO molecule formed from nitrite to produce N2O, and (3) suggested that NO inhibits N2O reduction....

  10. Gyroid Nanoporous Membranes with Tunable Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Schulte, Lars; Clausen, Lydia D.

    2011-01-01

    -linked 1,2-polybutadiene (1,2-PB) membranes with uniform pores that, if needed, can be rendered hydrophilic. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure prealignment. Closed (skin) or opened (nonskin) outer surface can be simply realized by altering...... the effective diffusion coefficients of a series of antibiotics, proteins, and other biomolecules; solute permeation is discussed in terms of hindered diffusion. The combination of uniform bulk morphology, isotropically percolating porosity, controlled surface chemistry, and tunable permeability is distinctive...

  11. Meshfree Modeling of Munitions Penetration in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    triaxial extension (Alejano, 2012) and being unable to model soil compaction at high mean stresses. The original and modified Cam- Clay models (Roscoe...g∇ , (23) where is the intrinsic permeability, is the fluid dynamic viscosity , is the fluid density, and g is the gravity...incorporate nonlinear elasticity into the constitutive model. Especially clay soils exhibit a nonlinear elastic response. While the effects of nonlinear

  12. Model analysis of mechanisms controlling pneumatic soil vapor extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Camilla Kruse; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2009-01-01

    of heterogeneous soils by enforcing large fluctuating pressure fronts through the contaminated area. Laboratory experiments have suggested that pneumatic SVE considerably improves the recovery rate from low-permeable units. We have analyzed the experimental results using a numerical code and quantified......The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency...... level the pneumatic venting technology is superior to the traditional technique, and that the method is particularly efficient in cases where large permeability contrasts exist between soil units in the subsurface....

  13. Optimum permeability for a cement based backfill material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, F.; Wittmann, F.H.; Iriya, K.

    1989-01-01

    In Switzerland it is planned to dispose low- and intermediate radioactive waste (LLW/ILW) in an underground repository. Between the materials present in a repository different chemical reactions may occur. Due to radiolytic decomposition, microbiological degradation and corrosion gas (mainly hydrogen) may be produced. The release of gas can cause the build-up of pressure in the cavern and finally lead to the formation of cracks and/or serious damage in the concrete structure or host rock. Through cracks a contamination of the groundwater and the biosphere could be possible. This investigation develops a suitable cement based material which can be used as backfill for the repository. Besides other aspects mentioned later a suitable backfill material has to be characterized by a certain minimum gas permeability and a as low as possible hydraulic conductivity. On the one hand gas permeability is necessary to release gas overpressure and on the other hand a low hydraulic conductivity should prevent leaching of backfill materials and contamination of the environment

  14. Decomposing the permeability spectra of nanocrystalline finemet core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos K. Varga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a theoretical and experimental investigation on the magnetization contributions to permeability spectra of normal annealed Finemet core with round type hysteresis curve. Real and imaginary parts of the permeability were determined as a function of exciting magnetic field (HAC between 40 Hz -110 MHz using an Agilent 4294A type Precision Impedance Analyzer. The amplitude of the exciting field was below and around the coercive field of the sample. The spectra were decomposed using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm running under Origin 9 software in four contributions: i eddy current; ii Debye relaxation of magnetization rotation, iii Debye relaxation of damped domain wall motion and iv resonant type DW motion. For small exciting amplitudes the first two components dominate. The last two contributions connected to the DW appear for relative large HAC only, around the coercive force. All the contributions will be discussed in detail accentuating the role of eddy current that is not negligible even for the smallest applied exciting field.

  15. PERMEABILITY MAP OF RESIDENTIAL SETTLEMENTS IN THE TROPICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ngurah Antaryama

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Source of information for ventilation design of residential settlement is generally derived from wind tunnel or, recently, CFD studies, which involves both modeling and simulation of wind flow pattern and speed. Yet this is not readily accessible to most architects. In order to gain similar objectives but without involving detailed studies, the present study introduces a graphical method of gathering information about permeability of residential. It describes how the way wind reaches and flows through built spaces and forms (streets, park/garden, buildings, and makes use of access graphs and numerical measures to indicate permeability of a given residential settlement. Since the method is still in the initial development, further study will be required for refinement and validation. Nevertheless, the method can be employed to provide information for ventilation design of low-rise residential settlements, particularly at the schematic level. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Informasi untuk perancangan ventilasi alam pada permukiman selama ini sangat bergantung dari hasil-hasil yang diperoleh dari studi terowongan angin ataupun studi simulasi komputer dengan menggunakan CFD. Namun demikian ketersediaan informasi tersebut sangatlah terbatas bagi arsitek. Studi yang dilakukan penulis berusaha untuk mengisi kesenjangan yang ada dengan menyediakan tampilan grafis untuk menunjukkan permiabilitas sebuah permukiman. Perilaku angin di dalam dan permiablitas permukiman dijabarkan dengan menggunakan grafik akses dan pengukuran-pengukuran numerik. Oleh karena pengembangan metoda ini berada pada tahap awal, beberapa studi lanjutan sangatlah diperlukan. Kata kunci: morfologi permukiman, sains arsitektur, ventilasi alam, iklim tropis.

  16. Induced convection cylindrical probe conductivity measurements on permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodemesi, S.P.; Beck, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter presents results from a program of investigation using the transient needle probe thermal conductivity technique on fluid saturated permeable media with a glass bead matrix. Uses eight additional radially located sensors in order to correlate the convection effects on the temperature sensor in the heater probe with convection behavior in the medium; all were scanned frequently with a data acquisition system, from the start of the experiment through a few hours of experimental time. Points out that with typical conditions encountered in oceanic heat flow work, induced convection may commence as early as 60 s from the start of the experiment. Finds that the convection effects are worse when the needle probe is oriented horizontally than when it is oriented vertically (gradients orthogonal to the gravitational field), and a correlation is made between permeability and the time of onset and the extent of convective effects. Indicates errors in conductivity as large as 40%. Suggests empirical techniques for detecting and correcting for thermal convection using probe sensor data alone

  17. The secondary permeability of Italian clays. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gera, F.

    1998-01-01

    Over the years several studies have been performed in Italy on the permeability of various argillaceous formations for the purpose of assessing their potential utilization for the isolation of long-lived radioactive waste. An extensive survey was made of tunnels intersecting clay formations for the purpose of identifying water inflows and of interpreting them in relation to the nature of the water-bearing features present outside the lining. The main objective of the 'Faults in Clays' project was to improve the sensitivity and resolution of geophysical techniques for identifying and characterizing faults intersecting clay strata. The first obvious conclusion is that generalizations are not possible: argillaceous formations are characterized by extreme variability in respect to intrinsic properties, sedimentological and structural set-up, consolidation history and regional stress conditions. As a result of this complexity widely different permeability, for both gas and water, has been observed even in apparently similar materials. In addition, gas data indicate that flow, at a particular location, can vary also as a function of time. (R.P.)

  18. Decomposing the permeability spectra of nanocrystalline finemet core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Lajos K.; Kovac, Jozef

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical and experimental investigation on the magnetization contributions to permeability spectra of normal annealed Finemet core with round type hysteresis curve. Real and imaginary parts of the permeability were determined as a function of exciting magnetic field (HAC) between 40 Hz -110 MHz using an Agilent 4294A type Precision Impedance Analyzer. The amplitude of the exciting field was below and around the coercive field of the sample. The spectra were decomposed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm running under Origin 9 software in four contributions: i) eddy current; ii) Debye relaxation of magnetization rotation, iii) Debye relaxation of damped domain wall motion and iv) resonant type DW motion. For small exciting amplitudes the first two components dominate. The last two contributions connected to the DW appear for relative large HAC only, around the coercive force. All the contributions will be discussed in detail accentuating the role of eddy current that is not negligible even for the smallest applied exciting field.

  19. In-situ permeability measurements with direct push techniques: Phase II topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, W.; Mason, N.; Chipman, V.; Kisiel, K.; Stockton, J.

    1999-01-01

    This effort designed, fabricated, and field tested the engineering prototype of the Cone Permeametertrademark system. The integrated system includes the instrumented penetrometer probe, air and water pumps, flowrate controls, flow sensors, and a laptop-controlled data system. All of the equipment is portable and can be transported as luggage on airlines. The data system acquired and displays the process measurements (pressures, flows, and downhole temperature) in real time and calculates the resulting permeability. The measurement probe is a 2 inch diameter CPT rod section, incorporating a screened injection zone near the lower end of the rod and multiple sensitive absolute pressure sensors embedded in the probe at varying distances from the injection zone. Laboratory tests in a large test cell demonstrated the system's ability to measure nominally 1 Darcy permeability soil (30 to 40 Darcy material had been successfully measured in the Phase 1 effort). These tests also provided a shakedown of the system and identified minor instrument problems, which were resolved. Supplemental numerical modeling was conducted to evaluate the effects of layered permeability (heterogeneity) and anisotropy on the measurement system's performance. The general results of the analysis were that the Cone Permeameter could measure accurately, in heterogeneous media, the volume represented by the sample port radii if the outer pressure ports were used. Anisotropic permeability, while readily analyzed numerically, is more complicated to resolve with the simple analytical approach of the 1-D model, and will need further work to quantify. This phase culminated in field demonstrations at the DOE Savannah River Site. Saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements were completed at the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin, and air permeability measurements were conducted at the M Area Integrated Demonstration Site and the 321 M area. The saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements were the most

  20. Soil infiltration based on bp neural network and grey relational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan,Wang; Pute,Wu; Xining,Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Soil infiltration is a key link of the natural water cycle process. Studies on soil permeability are conducive for water resources assessment and estimation, runoff regulation and management, soil erosion modeling, nonpoint and point source pollution of farmland, among other aspects. The unequal influence of rainfall duration, rainfall intensity, antecedent soil moisture, vegetation cover, vegetation type, and slope gradient on soil cumulative infiltration was studied under simulated rainfall...

  1. Effect of Vetiver Grass on Reduction of Soil Salinity and Some Minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Noshadi; Hosein Valizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Soil salinity is one of the major limitations of agriculture in the warm and dry regions. Soil sodification also damages soil structure and reduce soil permeability. Therefore, control of soil salinity and sodium is very important. Vetiver grass has unique characteristics that can be useful in phytoremediation. Materials and Methods: This research was conducted to investigate the effects of irrigation with different salinities on vetiver grass and the effects of this plant o...

  2. Quantification of silver nanoparticle toxicity to algae in soil via photosynthetic and flow-cytometric analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; Il Kwak, Jin; An, Youn-Joo

    2018-01-01

    Soil algae, which have received attention for their use in a novel bioassay to evaluate soil toxicity, expand the range of terrestrial test species. However, there is no information regarding the toxicity of nanomaterials to soil algae. Thus, we evaluated the effects of silver nanoparticles (0–50 mg AgNPs/kg dry weight soil) on the soil alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after six days, and assessed changes in biomass, photosynthetic activity, cellular morphology, membrane permeability, esterase ...

  3. Establishment of a permeability/porosity equation for salt grit and damming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, E.; Mueller-Lyda, I.; Storck, R.

    1996-09-01

    The flow resistance of stowing and sealing materials hinder the transport of brines in an ultimate storage site in salt rock strata. This effect can be seen when brines flow into the storage areas and when contaminated brines are pressed out of the underground structure. The main variable determining flow resistance is permeability. The convergence process induced by rock pressure reduces the size of the available residual cavern and also the permeability of the stowing and sealing materials. In the long-term safety analyses carried out so far, the interdependence between porosity and permeability in the case of salt grit was commonly described by a power function. The present investigation uses the data available until the end of 1994 to derive an improved relation between permeability and porosity for salt grit stowing material. The results obtained show that the power function used until now is still applicable with only a slight modification of parameters. In addition, the statistical distribution functions of the correlated parameters of the permeability/porosity relation were determined for the first time for a probabilistic safety analysis. (orig./DG) [de

  4. Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, N.S.

    1994-03-01

    Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25 degrees C

  5. The influence of naphthenic acids and their fractions onto cell membrane permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of naphthenic acids (NAs mixture and their narrow fractions (called NA pH 4, pH 8 and pH 10 onto permeability of beetroot cell membrane is examined. The results showed that the effect depends on treatment duration, concentration and NAs structure. Longer treatment of plant cell membranes with sodium naphthenate (Na-naph resulted in the increase of membrane permeability (e.g. 4-hour treatment with Na-naph (C=100 μmol L-1 increased membrane permeability about 3 times, while prolongation of treatment to 24 hour resulted in the 18 times increasing of the effect. NAs in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 μmol L-1 does not change membrane permeability, while membrane permeability is increasing linearly with concentration increasing from 10-100 μmol L-1. The strongest effect expressed fraction pH 8, where bi- and tricyclic carboxylic acids are the most abundant. These structures are predominant in the total NAs mixture as well. Thereby could be explained their closest, but a little bit weaker effect, comparing to NAs present in fraction pH 8. The effect of NAs onto beetroot cell membrane is between the effects of anionic (SDS and LS and non-ionic surfactants (Triton X-100. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172006. i br. TR31036

  6. Durable Suit Bladder with Improved Water Permeability for Pressure and Environment Suits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Kuznetz, Larry; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry; Aitchison, Lindsay; Ross, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor permeability is shown to be useful in rejecting heat and managing moisture accumulation in launch-and-entry pressure suits. Currently this is accomplished through a porous Gortex layer in the Advanced Crew and Escape Suit (ACES) and in the baseline design of the Constellation Suit System Element (CSSE) Suit 1. Non-porous dense monolithic membranes (DMM) that are available offer potential improvements for water vapor permeability with reduced gas leak. Accordingly, three different pressure bladder materials were investigated for water vapor permeability and oxygen leak: ElasthaneTM 80A (thermoplastic polyether urethane) provided from stock polymer material and two custom thermoplastic polyether urethanes. Water vapor, carbon dioxide and oxygen permeability of the DMM's was measured in a 0.13 mm thick stand-alone layer, a 0.08 mm and 0.05 mm thick layer each bonded to two different nylon and polyester woven reinforcing materials. Additional water vapor permeability and mechanical compression measurements were made with the reinforced 0.05 mm thick layers, further bonded with a polyester wicking and overlaid with moistened polyester fleece thermal underwear .This simulated the pressure from a supine crew person. The 0.05 mm thick nylon reinforced sample with polyester wicking layer was further mechanically tested for wear and abrasion. Concepts for incorporating these materials in launch/entry and Extravehicular Activity pressure suits are presented.

  7. Cement technology for borehole plugging: an interim report on permeability measurements of cementitious solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The permeability of borehole plug solids and plug-wall rock junctions is a property of major interest in the Borehole Plugging Program. This report describes the equipment and techniques used to determine the permeabilities of possible borehole plugging materials and presents results from tests on various cementitious solids and plug-rock combinations. The cementitious solids were made from mixtures of cement, sand, salt, fly ash, and water. Three different types of cement and four different fly ashes were used. Permeabilities ranged from a high value of 3 x 10 -4 darcy for a neat cement paste to a low of 5 x 10 -8 darcy for a saltcrete containing 30 wt % sodium chloride. Miniature boreholes were made in the following four different types of rock: Westerly granite, Dresser basalt, Sioux quartzite, and St. Cloud granodiorite. These small holes were plugged with a mix consisting of 23 wt % Type I Portland cement, 20 wt % bituminous fy ash, 43.2 wt % sand, and 13.8 wt % water. After curing for 91 days at ambient temperature, the permeability of the plug-wall rock junctions ranged from 3 x 10 -5 to -8 darcy. Three of the four miniature plugged boreholes exhibited permeabilities of < 10 microdarcys

  8. Lasagna trademark soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna trademark is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed which remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna trademark is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured and decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration. Major features of the technology are electrodes energized by direct current, which causes water and soluble contaminants to move into or through the treatment layers and also heats the soil; treatment zones containing reagents that decompose the soluble organic contaminants or adsorb contaminants for immobilization or subsequent removal and disposal; and a water management system that recycles the water that accumulates at the cathode (high pH) back to the anode (low pH) for acid-base neutralization. Alternatively, electrode polarity can be reversed periodically to reverse electroosmotic flow and neutralize pH

  9. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - delivery presentation; Labor - delivery presentation; Occiput posterior; Occiput anterior; Brow presentation ... The mother can walk, rock, and try different delivery positions during labor to help encourage the baby ...

  10. Estimation of permeability and permeability anisotropy in horizontal wells through numerical simulation of mud filtrate invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Nelson [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao; Altman, Raphael; Rasmus, John; Oliveira, Jansen [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes how permeability and permeability anisotropy is estimated in horizontal wells using LWD (logging-while-drilling) laterolog resistivity data. Laterolog-while-drilling resistivity passes of while-drilling and timelapse (while reaming) were used to capture the invasion process. Radial positions of water based mud invasion fronts were calculated from while-drilling and reaming resistivity data. The invasion process was then recreated by constructing forward models with a fully implicit, near-wellbore numerical simulation such that the invasion front at a given time was consistent with the position of the front predicted by resistivity inversions. The radial position of the invasion front was shown to be sensitive to formation permeability. The while-drilling environment provides a fertile scenario to investigate reservoir dynamic properties because mud cake integrity and growth is not fully developed which means that the position of the invasion front at a particular point in time is more sensitive to formation permeability. The estimation of dynamic formation properties in horizontal wells is of particular value in marginal fields and deep-water offshore developments where running wireline and obtaining core is not always feasible, and where the accuracy of reservoir models can reduce the risk in field development decisions. (author)

  11. Forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Michael C. Amacher

    2009-01-01

    Productive soils are the foundation of sustainable forests throughout the United States. Forest soils are generally subjected to fewer disturbances than agricultural soils, particularly those that are tilled, so forest soils tend to have better preserved A-horizons than agricultural soils. Another major contrast between forest and agricultural soils is the addition of...

  12. GAS PERMEABILITY OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Vučenović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geosynthetic clay liners (GCL are manufactured hydraulic barriers consisting of mineral and geosynthetic components. They belong to a group of geosynthetic products whose primary purpose is to seal and they have been used in many geotechnical and hydrotechnical applications, landfi lls and liquid waste lagoons for quite a while. They are used in landfill final cover systems to prevent the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body and the penetration of gases and liquids from the landfill into the atmosphere and environment. Laboratory and fi eld research and observations on regulated landfi lls have proven the eff ectiveness of GCL as a barrier for the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body as well as the drainage of fl uid beneath the landfill. Due to the presence of high concentrations of gases in the landfill body, there is a growing interest in determining the efficiency of GCL as a gas barrier. It was not until the last twenty years that the importance of this topic was recognized. In this article, current GCL gas permeability studies, the testing methods and test results of gas permeability in laboratory conditions are described.

  13. Haemophilia, AIDS and lung epithelial permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Doherty, M.J.; Page, C.J.; Harrington, C.; Nunan, T.; Savidge, G. (Haemophilia Centre and Coagulation Research Unit, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1990-01-01

    Lung {sup 99m}Tc DTPA transfer was measured in HIV antibodypositive haemophiliacs (11 smokers, 26 nonsmokers, 5 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP)). Lung {sup 99m}Tc DTPA transfer as a marker of lung epithelial permeability was measured as the half time of transfer (from airspace into blood). This half time was faster in smokers compred to nonsmokers and the transfer curve was monoexponential. In nonsmokers no difference was observed between asymptomatic HIV-positive haemophiliacs and normal subjects, with the exception of the lung bases. At the lung basis in HIV-positive haemophiliac nonsmokers the transfer was faster than in normal individuals, implying increased alveolar permeability. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia resulted in a rapid transfer of {sup 99m}Tc DTPA (mean T50 of 2 minutes) and the transfer curve was biphasic, confirming previous observations in homosexual HIV antibody-positive patients with PCP. These changes returned to a monoexponential profile by 6 weeks following successful treatment. The DTPA lung transfer study may enable clinicians to instigate therapy for PCP without the need for initial bronchoscopy and provide a noninvasive method for the reassessment of patients should further respiratory signs or symptoms develop. This method is considered to be highly cost-effective in that it obviates the use of factor VIII concentrates required to cover bronchoscopic procedures and, with its early application and ease of use as a follow-up investigation, permits the evaluation of patients on an outpatient basis, thus reducing hospital costs. (au).

  14. Haemophilia, AIDS and lung epithelial permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Doherty, M.J.; Page, C.J.; Harrington, C.; Nunan, T.; Savidge, G.

    1990-01-01

    Lung 99m Tc DTPA transfer was measured in HIV antibodypositive haemophiliacs (11 smokers, 26 nonsmokers, 5 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP)). Lung 99m Tc DTPA transfer as a marker of lung epithelial permeability was measured as the half time of transfer (from airspace into blood). This half time was faster in smokers compred to nonsmokers and the transfer curve was monoexponential. In nonsmokers no difference was observed between asymptomatic HIV-positive haemophiliacs and normal subjects, with the exception of the lung bases. At the lung basis in HIV-positive haemophiliac nonsmokers the transfer was faster than in normal individuals, implying increased alveolar permeability. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia resulted in a rapid transfer of 99m Tc DTPA (mean T50 of 2 minutes) and the transfer curve was biphasic, confirming previous observations in homosexual HIV antibody-positive patients with PCP. These changes returned to a monoexponential profile by 6 weeks following successful treatment. The DTPA lung transfer study may enable clinicians to instigate therapy for PCP without the need for initial bronchoscopy and provide a noninvasive method for the reassessment of patients should further respiratory signs or symptoms develop. This method is considered to be highly cost-effective in that it obviates the use of factor VIII concentrates required to cover bronchoscopic procedures and, with its early application and ease of use as a follow-up investigation, permits the evaluation of patients on an outpatient basis, thus reducing hospital costs. (au)

  15. Permeability of protective coatings to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The permeability of four protective coatings to tritium gas and tritiated water was investigated. The coatings, including two epoxies, one vinyl and one urethane, were selected for their suitability in CANDU plant service in Ontario Hydro. Sorption rates of tritium gas into the coatings were considerably larger than for tritiated water, by as much as three to four orders of magnitude. However, as a result of the very large solubility of tritiated water in the coatings, the overall permeability to tritium gas and tritiated water are comparable, being somewhat larger for HTO. Marked differences were also evident among the four coatings, the vinyl proving to be unique in behaviour and morphology. Because of a highly porous surface structure water condensation takes place at high relative humidities, leading to an abnormally high retention of free water. Desorption rates from the four coatings were otherwise quite similar. Of practical importance was the observation that more effective desorption of tritiated water could be carried out at relatively high humidities, in this case 60%. It was believed that isotopic exchange was responsible for this phenomenon. It appears that epoxy coatings having a high pigment-to-binder ratio are most suited for coating concrete in tritium handling facilities

  16. Salt-saturated concrete strength and permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Hansen, F.D.; Knowles, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments applicable to the use of salt-saturated concrete as a seal material for a transuranic waste repository have been completed. Nitrogen gas permeability measurements were made using a flexible-wall permeameter, a confining pressure of 1 MPa, and gas pressure gradients ranging from 0.3 MPa to 0.75 MPa. Results show that salt-saturated concrete has very low intrinsic permeability with values ranging from 9.4 x 10 -22 m 2 to 9.7 x 10 -17 m 2 . Strength and deformation characteristics were investigated under conditions of triaxial compression with confining pressures ranging from 0 to 15 MPa using either axial strain-rate or axial stress-rate control and show that the failure strength of concrete increases with confining pressure which can be adequately described through pressure-sensitive failure criteria. Axial, radial, and volumetric strains were also measured during each test and these data were used to determine elastic properties. Experimental results are applicable in the design and analysis of scale-related functions and apply to other concrete structures subjected to compressive loadings such as dams and prestressed structural members

  17. Evolution of mechanical characteristics and permeability of clayey materials under the influence of thermal loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucly-Norotte, V.

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the effects on a long term of temperature variations on the volume and texture of clayey soils, notably with respect to their initial petro-physical and petro-graphical characteristics, and to their consolidation state. From an experimental point of view, this research is based on the monitoring of the volume strain and of the permeability of samples placed in an oedometric cell and submitted to thermal loadings within the 20 C - 110 C range. A thorough texture investigation (mercury-based porosimetry, observation by scanning electronic microscopy, and so on) before and after testing allows the evolution of material texture to be assessed [fr

  18. Initial conditions of urban permeable surfaces in rainfall-runoff models using Horton’s infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Steffen; Löwe, Roland; Høegh Ravn, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    Infiltration is a key process controlling runoff, but varies depending on antecedent conditions. This study provides estimates on initial conditions for urban permeable surfaces via continuous simulation of the infiltration capacity using historical rain data. An analysis of historical rainfall...... records show that accumulated rainfall prior to large rain events does not depend on the return period of the event. Using an infiltration-runoff model we found that for a typical large rain storm, antecedent conditions in general lead to reduced infiltration capacity both for sandy and clayey soils...... and that there is substantial runoff for return periods above 1–10 years....

  19. Soil and Soil Water Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Easton, Zachary M.; Bock, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Discusses the relationships between soil, water and plants. Discusses different types of soil, and how these soils hold water. Provides information about differences in soil drainage. Discusses the concept of water balance.

  20. Possible links between intestinal permeablity and food processing: a potential therapeutic niche for glutamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Robert Rapin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes.

  1. Possible Links between Intestinal Permeablity and Food Processing: A Potential Therapeutic Niche for Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, Jean Robert; Wiernsperger, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes. PMID:20613941

  2. In situ permeability modification using gelled polymer systems. Topical report, June 10, 1996--April 10, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; McCool, C.S.; Heppert, J.A.; Vossoughi, S.

    1997-10-01

    Results from a research program on the application of gelled polymer technology for in situ permeability modification are presented in this report. The objective of this technology when used with displacement processes such as waterflooding is to reduce the permeability in fractures and/or high permeability matrix zones to improve volumetric sweep efficiency of the displacement process. In production wells, the objective is to reduce water influx. The research program is focused on five areas: gel treatment in fractured systems; gel treatment in carbonate rocks; in-depth placement of gels; gel systems for application in carbon dioxide flooding; and gel treatment in production wells. The research program is primarily an experimental program directed at improving the understanding of gelled polymer systems and how these systems can be used to increase oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. A summary of progress for research conducted in the first 10 months of a 28 month program is described in the following sections.

  3. In situ permeability modification using gelled polymer systems. Annual report, April 11, 1997--April 10, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; McCool, C.S.; Heppert, J.A.; Vossoughi, S.; Michnick, M.J.

    1998-09-01

    Results from a research program on the application of gelled polymer technology for in situ permeability modification are presented in this report. The objective of this technology when used with displacement processes such as waterflooding is to reduce the permeability in fractures and/or high permeability matrix zones to improve volumetric sweep efficiency of the displacement process. In production wells, the objective is to reduce water influx. The research program focused on five areas: Gel treatment in fractured systems; Gel treatment in carbonate rocks; In-depth placement of gels; Gel systems for application in carbon dioxide flooding; and Gel treatment in production wells. The research program is primarily an experimental program directed toward improving the understanding of gelled polymer systems and how these systems can be used to increase oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. A summary of progress for research conducted in the second 12 month period of a 28 month program is described.

  4. Analysis for preliminary evaluation of discrete fracture flow and large-scale permeability in sedimentary rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanehiro, B.Y.; Lai, C.H.; Stow, S.H.

    1987-05-01

    Conceptual models for sedimentary rock settings that could be used in future evaluation and suitability studies are being examined through the DOE Repository Technology Program. One area of concern for the hydrologic aspects of these models is discrete fracture flow analysis as related to the estimation of the size of the representative elementary volume, evaluation of the appropriateness of continuum assumptions and estimation of the large-scale permeabilities of sedimentary rocks. A basis for preliminary analysis of flow in fracture systems of the types that might be expected to occur in low permeability sedimentary rocks is presented. The approach used involves numerical modeling of discrete fracture flow for the configuration of a large-scale hydrologic field test directed at estimation of the size of the representative elementary volume and large-scale permeability. Analysis of fracture data on the basis of this configuration is expected to provide a preliminary indication of the scale at which continuum assumptions can be made

  5. Modelling of fast hydrogen permeability of alloys for membrane gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Yu. V.; Rodchenkova, N. I.

    2017-05-01

    The method of measuring the specific hydrogen permeability is used to study various alloys that are promising for gas separation installations. The nonlinear boundary value problem of hydrogen permeability complying with the specific features of the experiment and its modifications taking into account the high transfer rate is presented. Substantial difference from the quasi-equilibrium model (Richardson approximation in the assumption of the equilibrium Sieverts' law near the surface) has been discussed. The model is tested on published experimental data on Ta77Nb23 alloy.

  6. The Effect of External Magnetic Field on Dielectric Permeability of Multiphase Ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsenko, O. A.; Pavlova, A. A.; Dotsenko, V. S.

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, ferrofluids are applied in various fields of science and technology, namely space, medicine, geology, biology, automobile production, etc. In order to investigate the feasibility of applying ferrofluids in magnetic field sensors, the paper presents research into the influence of the external magnetic field on dielectric permeability of ferrofluids comprising magnetite nanopowder, multiwall carbon nanotubes, propanetriol and deionized water. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permeability change respectively by 3.7 and 0.5% when applying the magnetic field parallel to the electric. The findings suggest that the considered ferrofluid can be used as a magnetic level gauge or in design of variable capacitors.

  7. Water and vapor permeability at different temperatures of poly (3-Hydroxybutyrate dense membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz H. Poley

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are polymers produced from renewable resources with biodegradability and biocompatibility, being therefore attractive for medical and pharmaceutical purposes. Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB is the most important polymer of this family by considering the biotechnology process of its synthesis. In the present study, dense films of PHB were prepared by casting from chloroform solutions (1% m/m. Permeability studies with water, methanol, ethanol and n-propanol were performed using the gravimetric method at different temperatures (from 50 ºC to 65 ºC. Results provide new data on permeability coefficients of PHB membranes.

  8. Laboratory measurement of permeability upscaling: Results for the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Parameterization of predictive models is often complicated by the inability to make measurements at the same scale at which one wishes to perform the analysis. This disparity in scales necessitates the use of some averaging or upscaling model to compute the desired effective media properties. In efforts to better model permeability upscaling, laboratory experiments have been conducted on a series of rock samples with different genetic origins. These experiments involve the collection of exhaustive permeability data sets at different sample supports (i.e., sample volumes) using a specially designed minipermeameter test system. Here the authors present a synopsis of such a data set collected from a block of volcanic tuff

  9. The measurement of water vapor permeability of glove materials using dilute tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doughty, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    As fusion technology progresses, there will be an increasing need to handle tritium and tritiated compounds. Protective clothing, especially drybox gloves, must be an effective barrier to minimize worker exposure. The water vapor permeability of glove materials and finished glove constructions is a crucial property of drybox gloves and is not sufficiently well characterized. We have built an apparatus that measures water vapor permeability of elastomers using dilute tritiated water. The technique is more sensitive than other methods currently available and allows us to make measurements on materials and under conditions previously inaccessible. In particular, we present results on laminated drybox gloves for which data is not currently available. (orig.)

  10. Determination of lamivudine and zidovudine permeability using a different ex vivo method in Franz cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezani, André Bersani; Pereira, Thaisa Marinho; Caffaro, Arthur Massabki; Reis, Juliana Mazza; Serra, Cristina Helena Dos Reis

    2013-01-01

    The major processes that control the absorption of orally administered drugs are dissolution and gastrointestinal permeation. These processes depend on two main properties: solubility and permeability. Based on these characteristics, the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) was proposed as a tool to assist in biowaiver and bioavailability prediction of drugs. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the permeability of lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (AZT) using a different ex vivo method in Franz cells. A segment of jejunum was inserted in a Franz cells apparatus, in order to assess drug permeability in the apical-basolateral (A-B) and basolateral-apical (B-A) directions. Each drug was added to the donor chamber, collected from the acceptor chamber and analyzed by HPLC. Fluorescein (FLU) and metoprolol (METO) were used as low and high permeability markers, respectively. The apparent permeability (Papp) results for the A-B direction were: Papp FLU A-B=0.54×10(-4)cm·s(-1), Papp METO A-B=7.99×10(-4)cm·s(-1), Papp 3TC A-B=4.58×10(-4)cm·s(-1) and Papp AZT A-B=5.34×10(-4)cm·s(-1). For the B-A direction, the Papp results were: Papp FLU B-A=0.56×10(-4)cm·s(-1), Papp METO B-A=0.25×10(-4)cm·s(-1), Papp 3TC B-A=0.24×10(-4)cm·s(-1) and Papp AZT B-A=0.19×10(-4)cm·s(-1). For the A-B direction, the Papp results of fluorescein and metoprolol show low and high permeability, respectively, indicating that the membranes were appropriate for permeability studies. For the A-B direction, the Papp results of 3TC and AZT suggest that these antiretroviral drugs have permeability values close to metoprolol. Nevertheless, for the B-A direction the Papp results do not suggest efflux mechanism for any of the drugs. Thereby, the different ex vivo methods using Franz cells can be successfully applied in drug permeability studies, in particular for drug biopharmaceutical classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  12. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  13. Soil variability in mountain areas

    OpenAIRE

    Zanini, E.; Freppaz, M.; Stanchi, S.; Bonifacio, E.; Egli, M.

    2015-01-01

    The high spatial variability of soils is a relevant issue at local and global scales, and determines the complexity of soil ecosystem functions and services. This variability derives from strong dependencies of soil ecosystems on parent materials, climate, relief and biosphere, including human impact. Although present in all environments, the interactions of soils with these forming factors are particularly striking in mountain areas.

  14. A new water permeability measurement method for unsaturated tight materials using saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinsky, Laurent; Talandier, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Relative water permeability of material in a radioactive waste disposal is a key parameter to simulate and predict saturation state evolution. In this paper we present a new measurement method and the results obtained for Callovo-Oxfordian (Cox) clay-stone, host rock of the underground Andra laboratory at Bure (Meuse/Haute-Marne). Relative water permeability of such a low permeability rock as Cox clay-stone has been measured up to now by an indirect method. It consists in submitting a rock sample to successive relative humidity steps imposed by saline solutions. The transient mass variation during each step and the mass at hydric equilibrium are interpreted generally by using an inverse analysis method. The water relative permeability function of water saturation is derived from water diffusion coefficient evolution and water retention curve. The proposed new method consists in directly measuring the water flux across a flat cylindrical submitted to a relative humidity gradient. Two special cells have been developed. The tightness of the lateral sample surface is insured by crushing a polyurethane ring surrounding the sample set in an aluminium device placed over a Plexiglas vessel filled with a saline solution. One of the cells is designed to allow humidity measurement in the cell. These cells can also be used to measure the relative humidity produced by a saline solution or by an unsaturated material. During a permeability measurement, the cell with the sample to be tested is continuously weighted in a Plexiglas box in which a saline solution imposes a different relative humidity at the upper sample face. The experimental set-up is shown on Figure 1. The mean permeability of the sample is proportional to the rate of mass variation when steady state is reached. The result of one test is shown on Figure 2(a). Twenty four permeability measurements have been performed on four argillite samples of 15 mm in height and

  15. A laboratory feasibility study on a new electrokinetic nutrient injection pattern and bioremediation of phenanthrene in a clayey soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Wang Cuiping; Liu Haibin; Zhang Zhiyuan; Sun Hongwen

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) injection has recently been proposed to supply nutrients and electron acceptors in bioremediation of low permeable soils. However, effective pH control and uniform injection of inorganic ions have yet to be developed. The present study investigated a new EK injection pattern, which combined electrolyte circulation and electrode polarity reversal on a clayey soil. Soil pH could be controlled ranging from 7.0 to 7.6 by circulating the mixed electrolyte at a suitable rate (800 mL/h in this study) without any buffer. Ammonium and nitrate ions were distributed more uniformly in soil by electrode polarity reversal. The developed electrokinetic injection technology was applied primarily in bioremediation of phenanthrene contaminated soil. Over 80% of the initial 200 mg/kg phenanthrene in soil could be removed in 20 d, and greater phenanthrene removal was achieved using electrode polarity reversal. Hence, the present study provides a promising electrokinetic injection technology for bioremediation of contaminated soils.

  16. Toxic Elements in Soil and Groundwater: Short-Time Study on Electrokinetic Removal of Arsenic in the Presence of other Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Ahmad

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The electrokinetic technique is an emerging technology presently tested in situ to remove dissolved heavy metals from contaminated groundwater. There is a growing interest for using this system to cleanse clayey soil contaminated by toxic metallic ions. Currently, there are very few available non-destructive treatment methods that could be successfully applied in situ on low permeable type of soil matrix. The main objective of presented study was to validate and possibly enhance the overall efficiency of decontamination by the electrokinetic technique of the low permeable soil polluted by the arsenic in combination with chromium and copper ions. The chosen mixture of ions was imitating leak of pesticide well known as chromate copper arsenate (CCA. The chosen technique is showing a big promise to be used in the future as a portable, easy to install and run on sites with spills or leaks hard to reach otherwise; such as in the dense populated and urbanized areas. Laboratory electrokinetic experiments were designed to understand and possibly manipulate main mechanisms involved during forced migration of ions. All tests were conducted on artificially contaminated kaolinite (low permeable clay soil. Electrokinetic migration was inducted by the low voltage dc current applied through soil column. Series of experiments were designed to assess the efficiency of arsenic-chromium-copper remediation by applying (1 only dc current; and (2 by altering the soil environment. Obtained results showed that arsenic could be successfully removed from the soil in one day (25 hours span. It was significant time reduction, very important during emergency response. Mass recovered at the end of each test depended on initial condition of soil and type of flushing solution. The best results were obtained, when soil was flushed with either NaOH or NaOCl (total removal efficiency 74.4% and 78.1%, respectively. Direct analysis of remained arsenic in soil after these tests

  17. Active intestinal drug absorption and the solubility-permeability interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Daniel; Dahan, Arik

    2018-02-15

    The solubility-permeability interplay deals with the question: what is the concomitant effect on the drug's apparent permeability when increasing the apparent solubility with a solubility-enabling formulation? The solubility and the permeability are closely related, exhibit certain interplay between them, and ongoing research throughout the past decade shows that treating the one irrespectively of the other may be insufficient. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on the solubility-permeability interplay when using solubility-enabling formulations for oral lipophilic drugs, highlighting active permeability aspects. A solubility-enabling formulation may affect the permeability in opposite directions; the passive permeability may decrease as a result of the apparent solubility increase, according to the solubility-permeability tradeoff, but at the same time, certain components of the formulation may inhibit/saturate efflux transporters (when relevant), resulting in significant apparent permeability increase. In these cases, excipients with both solubilizing and e.g. P-gp inhibitory properties may lead to concomitant increase of both the solubility and the permeability. Intelligent development of such formulation will account for the simultaneous effects of the excipients' nature/concentrations on the two arms composing the overall permeability: the passive and the active arms. Overall, thorough mechanistic understanding of the various factors involved in the solubility-permeability interplay may allow developing better solubility-enabling formulations, thereby exploiting the advantages analyzed in this article, offering oral delivery solution even for BCS class IV drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Study on Surface Permeability of Concrete under Immersion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jun; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin; Ma, Hongyan; Pan, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, concrete specimens are immersed in ultrapure water, to study the evolutions of surface permeability, pore structure and paste microstructure following the prolonging of immersion period. According to the results, after 30-day immersion, the surface permeability of concrete becomes higher as compared with the value before immersion. However, further immersion makes the surface permeability decrease, so that the value measured after 150-day immersion is only half that measured af...

  19. iSOIL: Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike; Sauer, Uta

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution soil property maps are one major prerequisite for the specific protection of soil functions and restoration of degraded soils as well as sustainable land use, water and environmental management. To generate such maps the combination of digital soil mapping approaches and remote as well as proximal soil sensing techniques is most promising. However, a feasible and reliable combination of these technologies for the investigation of large areas (e.g. catchments and landscapes) and the assessment of soil degradation threats is missing. Furthermore, there is insufficient dissemination of knowledge on digital soil mapping and proximal soil sensing in the scientific community, to relevant authorities as well as prospective users. As one consequence there is inadequate standardization of techniques. At the poster we present the EU collaborative project iSOIL within the 7th framework program of the European Commission. iSOIL focuses on improving fast and reliable mapping methods of soil properties, soil functions and soil degradation risks. This requires the improvement and integration of advanced soil sampling approaches, geophysical and spectroscopic measuring techniques, as well as pedometric and pedophysical approaches. The focus of the iSOIL project is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high resolution soil property maps. At the same time the developments will reduce costs compared to traditional soil mapping. ISOIL tackles the challenges by the integration of three major components: (i)high resolution, non-destructive geophysical (e.g. Electromagnetic Induction EMI; Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR; magnetics, seismics) and spectroscopic (e.g., Near Surface Infrared, NIR) methods, (ii)Concepts of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) and pedometrics as well as (iii)optimized soil sampling with respect to profound soil scientific and (geo)statistical strategies. A special focus of iSOIL lies on the

  20. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  1. Formulation of humic-based soil conditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanova, M. A.; Mamytova, G. A.; Mamytova, B. A.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    The goal of the study is to prepare soil conditioners (SC) able to carry out the following functions: (i) the chemical conditioning of soil mainly comprising the adjustment of pH, (ii) the balancing of inorganic nutrients, (iii) the physical conditioning of soil mainly comprising the improvement of water permeability, air permeability and water retention properties, and (iv) improvement of the ecological system concerning of useful microorganisms activity in the soil. The SC was made of a mixture of inorganic ingredients, a chemical composition and physical and chemical properties of which promoted improvement of physical characteristic of soil and enrichment by its mineral nutritious elements. In addition to aforesaid ingredients, this soil conditioner contains agronomical-valued groups of microorganisms having the function promoting the growth of the crop. As organic component of SC humic acids (HA) was used. HA serve many major functions that result in better soil and plant health. In soil, HA can increase microbial and mycorrhizal activity while enhancing nutrient uptake by plant roots. HA work as a catalyst by stimulating root and plant growth, it may enhance enzymatic activity that in turn accelerates cell division which can lead to increased yields. HA can help to increase crop yields, seed germination, and much more. In short, humic acids helps keep healthy plants health. The first stage goal was to evaluate mineral and organic ingredients for formulation of SC. Soil conditioners assessed included ash and slag. The use of slags has been largelly used in agriculture as a source of lime and phosphoric acid. The silicic acid of slags reduces Al-acitivity thus, promoting a better assimilation of P-fertilizer by plants. Additionally, silicic acid is also known to improve soil moisture capacity, thus enhancing soil water availability to plants. Physico-chemical characteristics of ash and slag were determined, as a total - about 20 samples. Results include

  2. International study on the long-term efficiency of stormwater infiltration by permeable pavements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, Floris; Lucke, T.; Dierkes, Carsten; Wentink, Ronald; Akkerman, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Although permeable pavements have been used all over the world in recent years to infiltrate and treat stormwater, only limited research has been undertaken to investigate and compare the long-term performance of these sustainable urban drainage system devices. This paper presents the results of an

  3. Subchronic mild noise stress increases HRP permeability in rat small intestine in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, P. B.; van Raaij, M. T.; Dobbe, C. J.; Timmerman, A.; Kiliaan, A. J.; Taminiau, J. A.; Groot, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently we reported an increased trans- and paracellular protein permeability in rat small intestine after acute cold restraint stress. In the present study, we applied randomized 95- or 105-dB white noise pulses during 45 min/h, 12 h/day, duration 8 days, as a milder, but more chronic stressor to

  4. Three-Dimensional poroelastic effects during hydraulic fracturing in permeable rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Zimmerman, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional finite-element model for hydraulic fractures in permeable rocks is presented, and used to investigate the ranges of applicability of the classical analytical solutions that are known to be valid in limiting cases. This model simultaneously accounts for fluid flow...

  5. A Direct inverse model to determine permeability fields from pressure and flow rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.K.; Fokker, P.A.; Wilschut, F.; Zijl, W.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the permeability field from pressure and flow rate measurements in wells is a key problem in reservoir engineering. This paper presents a Double Constraint method for inverse modeling that is an example of direct inverse modeling. The method is used with a standard

  6. Remote assessment of permeability/thermal diffusivity of consolidated clay sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, M.A.; Ogden, P.

    1984-02-01

    The aim of this project was to examine the feasibility of predicting marine sediment permeability and thermal diffusivity by remote geophysical observations. For this purpose a modified consolidation cell was developed and constructed and tests on deep sea sediment samples carried out. Results and conclusions of a nineteen month programme are presented. (U.K.)

  7. Definition of aquitard permeability factor of 'Kyiv an marl' in 'Ukryttia' object area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alferov, A.M.; Gula, V.A.; Oruzhij, A.P.; Panasyuk, N.I.

    2002-01-01

    Marl clay aquitard layer, the first from day surface, in area of the 'Ukryttia' object dividing two aquifers with piezometric and phreatic surface, is the main factor influencing to vertical processes of radionuclide migration. The calculation of definition of the main characteristic of this layer - permeability factor according to regimen survey data is presented

  8. Soil physical properties on Venezuelan steeplands: Applications to soil conservation planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a framework to support decision making for soil conservation on Venezuelan steeplands. The general approach is based on the evaluation of two important land qualities: soil productivity and soil erosion risk, both closely related to soil physical properties. Soil productivity can be estimated from soil characteristics such as soil air-water relationships, soil impedances and soil fertility. On the other hand, soil erosion risk depends basically on soil hydrologic properties, rainfall aggressiveness and terrain slope. Two indexes are obtained from soil and land characteristics: soil productivity index (PI) and erosion risk index (ERI), each one evaluates the respective land quality. Subsequently, a matrix with these two qualities shows different land classes as well as soil conservation priorities, conservation requirements and proposed land uses. The paper shows also some applications of the soil productivity index as an approach to evaluate soil loss tolerance for soil conservation programs on tropical steeplands. (author)

  9. Study on road surface source pollution controlled by permeable pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2018-06-01

    The increase of impermeable pavement in urban construction not only increases the runoff of the pavement, but also produces a large number of Non-Point Source Pollution. In the process of controlling road surface runoff by permeable pavement, a large number of particulate matter will be withheld when rainwater is being infiltrated, so as to control the source pollution at the source. In this experiment, we determined the effect of permeable road surface to remove heavy pollutants in the laboratory and discussed the related factors that affect the non-point pollution of permeable pavement, so as to provide a theoretical basis for the application of permeable pavement.

  10. Calculation of Permeability inside the Basket including one Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Hwan; Bang, Kyung Sik; Lee, Ju an; Choi, Woo Seok [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In general, the porous media model and the effective thermal conductivity were used to simply the fuel assembly. The methods of calculating permeability were compared considering the flow inside a basket which includes a nuclear fuel. Detailed fuel assembly was a computational modeling and the flow characteristics were investigated. The flow inside the basket which included a fuel assembly is analyzed by CFD. As the height of the fuel assembly increases, the pressure drop linearly increased. The inertia resistance could be neglected. Three methods to calculate the permeability were compared. The permeability by the friction factor is 50% less than the permeability by wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  11. Fast Laplace solver approach to pore-scale permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arns, C. H.; Adler, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a powerful and easily implemented method to calculate the permeability of porous media at the pore scale using an approximation based on the Poiseulle equation to calculate permeability to fluid flow with a Laplace solver. The method consists of calculating the Euclidean distance map of the fluid phase to assign local conductivities and lends itself naturally to the treatment of multiscale problems. We compare with analytical solutions as well as experimental measurements and lattice Boltzmann calculations of permeability for Fontainebleau sandstone. The solver is significantly more stable than the lattice Boltzmann approach, uses less memory, and is significantly faster. Permeabilities are in excellent agreement over a wide range of porosities.

  12. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Elsworth, Derek; Wang, Chaoyi; Ishibashi, Takuya; Fitts, Jeffrey P.

    2017-03-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  13. Geotechnical Evaluation of a Ghanaian Black Cotton Soil for use as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    quate attenuation/retardation capacity of the material are also very ... The chemical composition of the soil was determined using X-ray ... The coefficient of permeability was calculated from ..... Co. and Irish Geotechnical Services Ltd. Insti-.

  14. Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc

  15. The Location and Extent of Systematic Drainage in Relation to Land Use in the Past and at Present and in Relation to Soil Vulnerability to Accelerater Infiltration in the Protected Landscape Area Železné Hory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Karásek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study searched for associations between the extent of hydromelioration systems and the land use (in the past and at present, degree of nature conservation, and infiltration of water through soil profile in the Protected Landscape Area (PLA Železné hory. According to the available evidence, 34.6% of arable land and 32.1% of permanent grasslands in this area are drained by the drainage systems. Analysis of the original design documentations of drainage structures indicate, that the extent of drained areas can actually be even higher. The hydromelioration systems were built namely in the second half of the 20th century. The drainage also affected alluvial meadows, wetlands, and ecologically valuable stations. After establishment of PLA Železné hory in 1991, the protected area was divided into four zones according to their significance and protection regime. This study has revealed the presence of areas drained by systematic drainage systems (101 ha of grasslands even in the zones of highest landscape protection degree (1st and 2nd protection zones. The inadequately executed drainage systems should be eliminated and the character of the land should be brought closer to its natural conditions. On the model part of the PLA we also performed a study of historical changes in the landscape in three time horizons (1839, 1950, 2014 to show differences in land use before building of drainage, at the time of building, and at present.

  16. Soils and hydrology of Ranger Uranium Mine sites in relation to application of retention pond water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charters, C.J.; Walker, P.H.; Willett, I.R.; East, T.J.; Cull, R.F.; Talsma, T.; Bond, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The data presented were obtained as part of a continuing research project carried out by the Division of Soils, CSIRO in collaboration with the Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute of the Office of the Supervising Scientist, Jabiru, Northern Territory. The primary focus of this study is the characterisation of the soils and hydrology of the site to determine processes controlling adsorption and retention of the applied solutes in the soils. Biological sinks are not being considered as they only temporarily store ionic water constituents. Using conservative estimates of soil cation exchange capacity and total cation concentration of RP2 water, the time until the cation exchange complex of the upper 50 cm of soil comes into equilibrium with the irrigation water is calculated to be approximately 5 years. After this time the exchange-complex will be 100% saturated and any additional load of cations will pass through the soil profile (0-50 cm). The soils are also characterised by low soluble salt contents, acidic pH and low concentrations of secondary iron and manganese oxides. Field measurements of hydraulic conductivity indicate that the soils are highly permeable and that lateral flow of groundwater from the irrigation area to Magela Creek could take as little as 9 months. The capacity of these soils to assimilate the cations tested doses not necessarily apply to other cations such as uranium and radium, present in minor or trace concentrations. In their cases, more specific adsorption reactions are likely, some of which may be effectively non-reversible. There is insufficient information available to enable any quantitative assessment of the likely significance of these mechanisms; however, the ferruginous gravels may play some part in specific adsorption reactions. 23 refs., 7 tabs., 11 figs

  17. Soil hydraulic properties of Cuban soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, M.E.; Medina, H.

    2004-01-01

    Because soil hydraulic properties are indispensable for determining soil water retention and soil water movement, their input for deterministic crop simulation models is essential. From these models is possible to access the effect of the weather changes, soil type or different irrigation schedules on crop yields. With these models, possibilities are provided to answer questions regarding virtual 'what happen if' experiments with a minimum of fieldwork. Nevertheless, determining soil hydraulic properties can be very difficult owing to unavailability of necessary equipment or the lack of personal with the proper knowledge for those tasks. These deficiencies are a real problem in developing countries, and even more so when there is not enough financial possibilities for research work. This paper briefly presents the way these properties have been accessed for Cuban soils, which methods have been used and the work now in progress. (author)

  18. Acoustic--nuclear permeability logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, D.J.; Arnold, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    A down hole logging tool featuring a neutron generator, an acoustic disturbance generator, and a radiation detection system is described. An array of acoustic magnetostriction transducers is arranged about the target of a neutron accelerator. Two gamma ray sensors are separated from the accelerator target by shielding. According to the method of the invention, the underground fluid at the level of a formation is bombarded by neutrons which react with oxygen in the fluid to produce unstable nitrogen 16 particles according to the reaction 16 O(n,p) 16 N. Acoustic pulses are communicated to the fluid, and are incident on the boundary of the borehole at the formation. The resulting net flow of fluid across the boundary is determined from radiation detection measurements of the decaying 16 N particles in the fluid. A measure of the permeability of the formation is obtained from the determination of net fluid flow across the boundary

  19. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fediuk, R; Yushin, A

    2016-01-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m 2 , it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa). (paper)

  20. Treatment of radioactive liquid wastes on semi-permeable membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonescu, M.; Deleanu, N.; Nechifor, G.

    1997-01-01

    At present, among the currently world-wide applied separation processes, those using membranes are thought to be most advanced due to their advantages: high efficiency, cost-effectiveness in application, universality of the utilized equipment, operation in non-destructive and non-polluting conditions. The most significant results of the treatment experiments are: - a reduction of more than 70% in the chemical oxygen consumption for the solution simulating the POD waste; - the solution simulating the secondary waste from decontamination by POD procedure, appear to be the best (with retentions of 88.5%, 76.5% and 65.7% for strontium, cobalt and manganese, respectively). Important reduction of costs and efficient technological schemes can be obtained by combining the semi-permeable membrane separation techniques with other efficient currently used procedures of separation, concentration and purification, adequate for given situations

  1. Report on Hydrologic Flow in Low-Permeability Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2013-11-13

    We demonstrate that under normal conditions (under which there are no intersections between tunnels/drifts and conductive geological structures, such as faults), the water flow velocity in the damage zone, as a result of non-Darcian flow behavior, is extremely small such that solute transport is dominated by diffusion, rather than advection. We show that unless non-Darcian flow behavior is considered, significant errors can occur in the “measured” relative-permeability values. We propose a hypothesis to consider the temperature impact based on limited test results from the petroleum literature. To consider the bedding effects, we present an empirical relationship between water flux and hydraulic gradient for non-Darcian water flow in anisotropic cases.

  2. The Inverse Problem of Identification of Hydrogen Permeability Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury V. Zaika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the technological challenges for hydrogen materials science is the currently active search for structural materials with important applications (including the ITER project and gas-separation plants. One had to estimate the parameters of diffusion and sorption to numerically model the different scenarios and experimental conditions of the material usage (including extreme ones. The article presents boundary value problems of hydrogen permeability and thermal desorption with dynamical boundary conditions. A numerical method is developed for TDS spectrum simulation, where only integration of a nonlinear system of low order ordinary differential equations is required. The main final output of the article is a noise-resistant algorithm for solving the inverse problem of parametric identification for the aggregated experiment where desorption and diffusion are dynamically interrelated (without the artificial division of studies into the diffusion limited regime (DLR and the surface limited regime (SLR.

  3. Soil Microbes and soil microbial proteins: interactions with clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, A.; Kelleher, B. P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial enumeration in soil environments estimates that the population may reach approximately 10 1 0 g - 1 of soil and comprise up to 90% of the total soil microbial biomass. Bacteria are present in soils as single cells or multicell colonies and often strongly adsorb onto mineral surfaces such as sand and clay. The interactions of microbes and microbial biomolecules with these minerals have profound impacts on the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. (Author)

  4. Lattice gas methods for predicting intrinsic permeability of porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, L.O.E.; Philippi, P.C. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Propriedades Termofisicas e Meios Porosos)]. E-mail: emerich@lmpt.ufsc.br; philippi@lmpt.ufsc.br; Damiani, M.C. [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Parque Tecnologico]. E-mail: damiani@lmpt.ufsc.br

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting intrinsic permeability of porous media based on Lattice Gas Cellular Automata methods. Two methods are presented. The first is based on a Boolean model (LGA). The second is Boltzmann method (LB) based on Boltzmann relaxation equation. LGA is a relatively recent method developed to perform hydrodynamic calculations. The method, in its simplest form, consists of a regular lattice populated with particles that hop from site to site in discrete time steps in a process, called propagation. After propagation, the particles in each site interact with each other in a process called collision, in which the number of particles and momentum are conserved. An exclusion principle is imposed in order to achieve better computational efficiency. In despite of its simplicity, this model evolves in agreement with Navier-Stokes equation for low Mach numbers. LB methods were recently developed for the numerical integration of the Navier-Stokes equation based on discrete Boltzmann transport equation. Derived from LGA, LB is a powerful alternative to the standard methods in computational fluid dynamics. In recent years, it has received much attention and has been used in several applications like simulations of flows through porous media, turbulent flows and multiphase flows. It is important to emphasize some aspects that make Lattice Gas Cellular Automata methods very attractive for simulating flows through porous media. In fact, boundary conditions in flows through complex geometry structures are very easy to describe in simulations using these methods. In LGA methods simulations are performed with integers needing less resident memory capability and boolean arithmetic reduces running time. The two methods are used to simulate flows through several Brazilian reservoir petroleum rocks leading to intrinsic permeability prediction. Simulation is compared with experimental results. (author)

  5. Microwave permeability of stripe patterned FeCoN thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuping [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Yang, Yong, E-mail: tslyayo@nus.edu.sg [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Ma, Fusheng; Zong, Baoyu; Yang, Zhihong [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Ding, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)

    2017-03-15

    Magnetic stripe patterns are of great importance for microwave applications owing to their highly tunable microwave permeability by adjusting the geometrical dimensions. In this work, stripe patterned FeCoN films with 160 nm thickness are fabricated by using standard UV photolithography. Their microwave permeability are investigated systematically via both experiment and micromagnetic simulation. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results suggests that stripe width is crucial for the microwave magnetic properties of the stripe pattern. It is demonstrated by simulation that with increasing stripe width from 1 to 80 µm the initial permeability shows a continuous growth from about 8–322, whiles the resonance frequency drops dramatically from 18.7 to 3.1 GHz at 4 µm gap size. Smaller gap size would result in slightly increased initial permeability due to larger magnetic volume ratio, accompanied by decreased resonance frequency because of stronger magnetostatic interaction. Moreover, the experimental investigation on stripe length effect indicates that the stripe length should be kept as long as possible to achieve uniform bulk resonance mode and high permeability value. Insufficient stripe length would result in low frequency edge mode and decayed bulk mode. This study could provide valuable guidelines on the selection of proper geometry dimensions of FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications. - Highlights: • This work presents a systematic study on permeability of FeCoN stripe pattern. • Geometrical parameters of the stripe pattern are systematically optimized. • Several important conclusions has been obtained. • The results offer guideline on FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications.

  6. Error Analysis of High Frequency Core Loss Measurement for Low-Permeability Low-Loss Magnetic Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niroumand, Farideh Javidi; Nymand, Morten

    2016-01-01

    in magnetic cores is B-H loop measurement where two windings are placed on the core under test. However, this method is highly vulnerable to phase shift error, especially for low-permeability, low-loss cores. Due to soft saturation and very low core loss, low-permeability low-loss magnetic cores are favorable...... in many of the high-efficiency high power-density power converters. Magnetic powder cores, among the low-permeability low-loss cores, are very attractive since they possess lower magnetic losses in compared to gapped ferrites. This paper presents an analytical study of the phase shift error in the core...... loss measuring of low-permeability, low-loss magnetic cores. Furthermore, the susceptibility of this measurement approach has been analytically investigated under different excitations. It has been shown that this method, under square-wave excitation, is more accurate compared to sinusoidal excitation...

  7. A new non-destructive method for estimating the remanent life of a turbine rotor steel by reversible magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, K.S.; Nahm, S.H.; Park, J.S.; Yu, K.M.; Kim, Y.B.; Son, D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new magnetic and non-destructive procedure to evaluate the remanent life of 1Cr-1Mo-0.25V steel using the value of reversible magnetic permeability. The method is based on the existence of reversible magnetic permeability in the differential magnetization around the coercive force. The measurement principle is based on the foundation harmonics voltage induced in a coil using a lock-in amplifier tuned to a frequency of the exciting one. Results obtained for reversible magnetic permeability and Vickers hardness on the aged sample show that the peak interval of reversible magnetic permeability (PIRMP) and Vickers hardness decreases as aging time increases. A softening curve is obtained from the correlation between Vickers hardness and the PIRMP. This curve can be used as a non-destructive method to evaluate the remanent life of 1Cr-1Mo-0.25V steel

  8. Towards the Wetness Characterization of Soil Subsurface Using Fibre Optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, F.; Bodet, L.; Simon, N.; Karaulanov, R.; Clarke, A.; Abesser, C.; Krause, S.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2017-12-01

    Active seismic methods combined with detectors deployed at the soil surface, such as vertical collinear geophones, have revealed great potential for hydrogeophysical characterization of the soil vadose zone. In particular, recent findings have highlighted a clear dependence of both P-waves arrival times and surface-wave dispersion on the local degree of soil saturation, visible at laboratory as well as at field scale. In this study, we investigate the sensitivity of a fibre optic Distributed Acoustic Sensor (DAS) to different soil saturation. In vertical seismic applications, DAS have proven to offer equal and often better performance compared to the geophones, with the advantage that a fibre optic cable, whose length can reach 40 km, replaces the array of geophones as sensing element. We present the response to active seismic tests of 20 m of fibre optic cable buried in a poorly permeable bare soil. Tests were conducted in different moments of the year, with saturation monitored by means of independent dielectric probes. Body-wave travel times as well as surface-wave dispersion are compared. Finally, we discuss the possibility to determine a site-specific relation between the Poisson ratio and the soil saturation. This research has been performed in the framework of the British National Environmental Research Council (NERC) funded Distributed intelligent Heat Pulse System (DiHPS) project and of the Marie Curie H2020 Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE) consortium Hi-Freq.

  9. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Collisions in the LHC workshop held in Cracow from 18 to 18 May 2007. The main subject of the workshop was to present the newest results of research provided at CERN LHC collider. Additionally some theoretical models and methods used for presented data analysis were discussed

  10. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  11. Permeability, porosity and compressive strength of self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcuende, M.O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Most deterioration affecting the durability of self-compacting concrete structures is mediated by water penetration in the concrete, a condition related to its porous structure. The present study analyzes these two factors. To this end, two types of concrete were prepared, a self-compacting and a traditional vibrated concrete, with different W/C ratios and different types of cement. The results of low-pressure water testing to evaluate permeability and analyses to determine compressive strength and pore size distribution showed that self-compacting concrete has lower capillary porosity than traditional concrete, which would explain its greater resistance to water penetration. Such concrete likewise reached higher strength values, except where large proportions of lime powder with low sand equivalents were used in its manufacture, when lower strength was recorded. Lastly, the depth of water penetration and compressive strength were found to be linearly correlated. That correlation was seen to depend, in turn, on the type of concrete, since for any given strength level, self-compacting concrete was less permeable than the traditional material.

    En este trabajo experimental se estudia la penetración de agua en hormigones autocompactables, analizando al mismo tiempo su estructura porosa, pues gran parte de los procesos de deterioro que afectan a la durabilidad de las estructuras están condicionados por estos dos aspectos. Para ello se han fabricado dos tipos de hormigones, uno autocompactable y otro tradicional vibrado, con diferentes relaciones A/C y distintos tipos de cemento. Tras determinar la permeabilidad al agua bajo presión, la resistencia a compresión y las distribuciones de tamaño de poro, los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto que los hormigones autocompactables presentan menor porosidad capilar que los tradicionales, lo que les confiere mejores prestaciones frente a la penetración de agua. Asimismo, dichos hormigones

  12. Permeability changes induced by microfissure closure and opening in tectonized materials. Effect on slope pore pressure regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Maria; Vaunat, Jean; Pedone, Giuseppe; Cotecchia, Federica; Sollecito, Francesca; Casini, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Tectonized clays are complex materials characterized by several levels of structures that may evolve during load and wetting/drying processes. Some microstructural patterns, as microfissures, have a particular influence on the value of permeability which is one of the main factors controlling pore pressure regime in slopes. In this work, the pore pressure regime measured in a real slope of tectonized clay in Southern Italy is analyzed by a numerical model that considers changes in permeability induced by microfissure closure and opening during the wetting and drying processes resulting from climatic actions. Permeability model accounts for the changes in Pore Size Distribution observed by Microscopy Intrusion Porosimetry. MIP tests are performed on representative samples of ground in initial conditions ("in situ" conditions) and final conditions (deformed sample after applying a wetting path that aims to reproduce the saturation of the soil under heavy rains). The resulting measurements allow for the characterization at microstructural level of the soil, identifying the distribution of dominant families pores in the sample and its evolution under external actions. Moreover, comparison of pore size density functions allows defining a microstructural parameter that depends on void ratio and degree of saturation and controls the variation of permeability. Model has been implemented in a thermo-hydro-mechanical code provided with a special boundary condition for climatic actions. Tool is used to analyze pore pressure measurements obtained in the tectonized clay slope. Results are analyzed at the light of the effect that permeability changes during wetting and drying have on the pore pressure regime.

  13. Can Physiological Endpoints Improve the Sensitivity of Assays with Plants in the Risk Assessment of Contaminated Soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavina, Ana; Antunes, Sara C.; Pinto, Glória; Claro, Maria Teresa; Santos, Conceição; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific risk assessment of contaminated areas indicates prior areas for intervention, and provides helpful information for risk managers. This study was conducted in the Ervedosa mine area (Bragança, Portugal), where both underground and open pit exploration of tin and arsenic minerals were performed for about one century (1857 – 1969). We aimed at obtaining ecotoxicological information with terrestrial and aquatic plant species to integrate in the risk assessment of this mine area. Further we also intended to evaluate if the assessment of other parameters, in standard assays with terrestrial plants, can improve the identification of phytotoxic soils. For this purpose, soil samples were collected on 16 sampling sites distributed along four transects, defined within the mine area, and in one reference site. General soil physical and chemical parameters, total and extractable metal contents were analyzed. Assays were performed for soil elutriates and for the whole soil matrix following standard guidelines for growth inhibition assay with Lemna minor and emergence and seedling growth assay with Zea mays. At the end of the Z. mays assay, relative water content, membrane permeability, leaf area, content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), malondialdehyde levels, proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII) parameters were evaluated. In general, the soils near the exploration area revealed high levels of Al, Mn, Fe and Cu. Almost all the soils from transepts C, D and F presented total concentrations of arsenic well above soils screening benchmark values available. Elutriates of several soils from sampling sites near the exploration and ore treatment areas were toxic to L. minor, suggesting that the retention function of these soils was seriously compromised. In Z. mays assay, plant performance parameters (other than those recommended by standard protocols), allowed the identification of more phytotoxic soils. The

  14. Can physiological endpoints improve the sensitivity of assays with plants in the risk assessment of contaminated soils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gavina

    Full Text Available Site-specific risk assessment of contaminated areas indicates prior areas for intervention, and provides helpful information for risk managers. This study was conducted in the Ervedosa mine area (Bragança, Portugal, where both underground and open pit exploration of tin and arsenic minerals were performed for about one century (1857-1969. We aimed at obtaining ecotoxicological information with terrestrial and aquatic plant species to integrate in the risk assessment of this mine area. Further we also intended to evaluate if the assessment of other parameters, in standard assays with terrestrial plants, can improve the identification of phytotoxic soils. For this purpose, soil samples were collected on 16 sampling sites distributed along four transects, defined within the mine area, and in one reference site. General soil physical and chemical parameters, total and extractable metal contents were analyzed. Assays were performed for soil elutriates and for the whole soil matrix following standard guidelines for growth inhibition assay with Lemna minor and emergence and seedling growth assay with Zea mays. At the end of the Z. mays assay, relative water content, membrane permeability, leaf area, content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids, malondialdehyde levels, proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII parameters were evaluated. In general, the soils near the exploration area revealed high levels of Al, Mn, Fe and Cu. Almost all the soils from transepts C, D and F presented total concentrations of arsenic well above soils screening benchmark values available. Elutriates of several soils from sampling sites near the exploration and ore treatment areas were toxic to L. minor, suggesting that the retention function of these soils was seriously compromised. In Z. mays assay, plant performance parameters (other than those recommended by standard protocols, allowed the identification of more phytotoxic soils

  15. Soil heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherameti, Irena [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Pflanzenphysiologie; Varma, Ajit (eds.) [Amity Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India). Amity Inst. of Microbial Technology; Amity Science, Technology and Innovation Foundation, Noida, UP (India)

    2010-07-01

    Human activities have dramatically changed the composition and organisation of soils. Industrial and urban wastes, agricultural application and also mining activities resulted in an increased concentration of heavy metals in soils. How plants and soil microorganisms cope with this situation and the sophisticated techniques developed for survival in contaminated soils is discussed in this volume. The topics presented include: the general role of heavy metals in biological soil systems; the relation of inorganic and organic pollutions; heavy metal, salt tolerance and combined effects with salinity; effects on abuscular mycorrhizal and on saprophytic soil fungi; heavy metal resistance by streptomycetes; trace element determination of environmental samples; the use of microbiological communities as indicators; phytostabilization of lead polluted sites by native plants; effects of soil earthworms on removal of heavy metals and the remediation of heavy metal contaminated tropical land. (orig.)

  16. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  17. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has be...

  18. Performances of Metal Concentrations from Three Permeable Pavement Infiltrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designed and constructed a 4000-m2 parking lot in Edison, New Jersey in 2009. The parking lot is surfaced with three permeable pavements: permeable interlocking concrete pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. Water sampling was con...

  19. Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used permeable pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of permeable pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) across a range of climatic events, daily usage conditio...

  20. Nitrogen Transformations in Three Types of Permeable Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009, USEPA constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types - permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). The driving lanes...

  1. Permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficient in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, L.D.; Sprik, R.

    2015-01-01

    In theory, the streaming potential coefficient depends not only on the zeta potential but also on the permeability of the rocks that partially determines the surface conductivity of the rocks. However, in practice, it is hard to show the permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficients

  2. A drainage data-based calculation method for coalbed permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Feng-peng; Li, Zhi-ping; Fu, Ying-kun; Yang, Zhi-hao

    2013-01-01

    This paper establishes a drainage data-based calculation method for coalbed permeability. The method combines material balance and production equations. We use a material balance equation to derive the average pressure of the coalbed in the production process. The dimensionless water production index is introduced into the production equation for the water production stage. In the subsequent stage, which uses both gas and water, the gas and water production ratio is introduced to eliminate the effect of flush-flow radius, skin factor, and other uncertain factors in the calculation of coalbed methane permeability. The relationship between permeability and surface cumulative liquid production can be described as a single-variable cubic equation by derivation. The trend shows that the permeability initially declines and then increases after ten wells in the southern Qinshui coalbed methane field. The results show an exponential relationship between permeability and cumulative water production. The relationship between permeability and cumulative gas production is represented by a linear curve and that between permeability and surface cumulative liquid production is represented by a cubic polynomial curve. The regression result of the permeability and surface cumulative liquid production agrees with the theoretical mathematical relationship. (paper)

  3. Permeability of crust is key to crispness retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirte, A.; Hamer, R.J.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Primo-Martin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Bread loses crispness rapidly after baking because water originating from the wet crumb accumulates in the dry crust. This water accumulation might be increased by the dense and low permeable character of the bread crust. Our objective was to investigate the influence of permeability of the crust on

  4. Determination of hydrogen permeability in uncoated and coated superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Vesely, E. J., Jr.; Hill, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen permeability, diffusivity, and solubility data were obtained for eight wrought and cast high temperature alloys over the range 650 to 815 C. Data were obtained for both uncoated alloys and wrought alloys coated with four commercially available coatings. Activation energies for permeability, diffusivity and solubility were calculated.

  5. Unsaturated and Saturated Permeabilities of Fiber Reinforcement: Critics and Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Hae ePARK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In general, permeability measurement results show a strong scattering according to the measurement method, the type of test fluid and the fluid injection condition, even though permeability is regarded as a unique property of porous medium. In particular, the discrepancy between the unsaturated and saturated permeabilities for the same fabric has been widely reported. In the literature, relative permeability has been adopted to model the unsaturated flow. This approach has some limits in the modeling of double-scale porosity medium. We address this issue of permeability measurement by rigorously examining the mass conservation condition. Finally, we identify that the pressure gradient is non-linear with positive curvature in the unsaturated flow and a misinterpretation of pressure gradient is the main reason for the difference between the saturated and unsaturated permeabilities of the same fiber reinforcement. We propose to use a fixed value of permeability and to modify the mass conservation equation if there are air voids which are entrapped inside the fiber tow. Finally, we also suggest some guidelines and future perspectives to obtain more consistent permeability measurement results.

  6. Increasing the permeability of Escherichia coli using MAC13243

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muheim, Claudio; Götzke, Hansjörg; Eriksson, Anna U.

    2017-01-01

    molecules that make the outer membrane of Escherichia coli more permeable. We identified MAC13243, an inhibitor of the periplasmic chaperone LolA that traffics lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. We observed that cells were (1) more permeable to the fluorescent probe 1-N...

  7. Impact of land use change on soil erodibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Taleshian Jeloudar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulnerability of soil separates to detachment by water is described as soil erodibility by Universal Soil Loss Equation which can be affected by land use change. In this study it was attempted to quantify the changes of Universal Soil Loss Equation K-factor and its soil driving factors in three land uses including rangeland, rainfed farming, and orchards in Babolrood watershed, northern Iran. Soil composite samples were obtained from two layers in three land uses, and the related soil physico-chemical properties were measured. The rainfed farming land use showed the highest clay contents, but the highest amounts of soil organic matter and sand particles were found in orchard land use. The high intensity of tillage led to the significant decrease of soil aggregate stability and permeability in the rainfed farming land use. The Universal Soil Loss Equation K-factor was negatively correlated with soil permeability (r=-0.77**. In rangeland, the K-factor (0.045 Mg h/MJ/mm was significantly higher and the particle size distribution had a great impact on the K-factor. The orchard land use, converted from the rangeland, did not show any increase of soils erodibility and can potentially be introduced as a good alternative land use in sloping areas. However, more detailed studies on environmental, social and economic aspects of this land use are needed.

  8. CERN presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Presentation by CERN (10 minutes each) Rolf Landua - Education and Outreach Salvatore Mele - Open Access Jean-Yves Le Meur - Digital Library in Africa Francois Fluckiger - Open Source/Standards (tbc) Tim Smith - Open Data for Science Tullio Basiglia - tbc

  9. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has entered the pelvis. If the presenting part lies above the ischial spines, the station is reported ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  11. Prediction of permeability changes in an excavation response zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Naoto; Ishii, Takashi; Kuroda, Hidetaka; Tada, Hiroyuki

    1992-01-01

    In geologic disposal of radioactive wastes, stress changes due to cavern excavation may expand the existing fractures and create possible bypasses for groundwater. This paper proposes a simple method for predicting permeability changes in the excavation response zones. Numerical analyses using this method predict that the response zones created by cavern excavation would differ greatly in thickness and permeability depending on the depth of the cavern site and the initial in-situ stress, that when the cavern site is deeper, response zones would expand more and permeability would increases more, and that if the ratio of horizontal to vertical in-situ stress is small, extensive permeable zones at the crown and the bottom would occur, whereas if the ratio is large, extensive permeable zones would occur in the side walls. (orig.)

  12. Effect Of Hot Water Injection On Sandstone Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    of published results regarding the effect of temperature on sandstone permeability. These tests are performed with mineral oil, nitrogen gas, distilled water and solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 as well as brines that contain a mixture of salts. Thirteen sandstone formations, ranging from quartz arenites...... to formations with a significant fraction of fine particles including clay minerals are investigated. The porosities range from 0.10 to 0.30 and permeabilities span the range from 1 to 1000 md. To compare different rock types, specific surface is determined from permeability and porosity using Kozeny’s equation...... not account for all the permeability reductions observed. Permeablity reduction occurs both when distilled water is the saturating fluid as well as in tests with NaCl, KCl or CaCl2 solutions, however, this is not the case in tests with mineral oil or nitrogen gas. The formation of a filter cake or influx...

  13. Steady flow in voids and closed cracks in permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper considers what happens when a steady flow in a permeable medium meets two concentric spheres which have different permeabilities. This can form a first stage model for water flow near an engineered cavity in rock or a concreted waste package placed in filler material as in a nuclear waste repository. Results are obtained in terms of the simplest spherical harmonics, which lets them be used easily. Included are the well-known result that a highly permeable sphere will see only a few times the flux which would occur if it had the permeability of its surroundings, and the less well-known result, though unsurprising, that a spherical region surrounded by a highly permeable shell will see almost no flow, as it will almost all by-pass. A companion paper will include more geometrical effects by replacing the spheres by ellipsoids. (author)

  14. [Microscopic soil fungi - bioindicators organisms contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donerian, L G; Vodianova, M A; Tarasova, Zh E

    In the paper there are considered methodological issues for the evaluation of soil biota in terms of oil pollution. Experimental studies have shown that under the exposure of a various levels of oil pollution meeting certain gradations of the state and optimal alteration in microbocenosis in sod-podzolic soils, there is occurred a transformation of structure of the complex of micromycetes and the accumulation of toxic species, hardly typical for podzolic soils - primarily represantatives of the genus Aspergillus (A.niger and A. versicolor), Paecilomyces (P.variotii Bainer), Trichoderma (T.hamatum), the genus of phytopathogens Fusarium (F.oxysporum), dermatophytes of genus Sporothrix (S. schenckii) and dark-colored melanin containing fungi of Dematiaceae family. Besides that there are presented data on the study of microbiocenosis of the urban soil, the urban soil differed from the zone soil, but shaped in similar landscape and climatic conditions, and therefore having a tendency to a similar response from the side of microorganisms inhabiting the soil. Isolated complex of soil microscopic fungi is described by many authors as a complex, characteristic for soils of megalopolises. This allowed authors of this work to suggest that in urban soils the gain in the occurrence of pathogenic species micromycetes also increases against a background of chronic, continuously renewed inflow of petroleum hydrocarbons from various sources of pollution. Because changes in the species composition of micromycetes occurred in accordance with the increasing load of oil, so far as microscopic soil fungi can be recommended as a bioindicator organisms for oil. In the article there is also provided information about the distinctive features of modern DNA identification method of soil microscopic fungi and accepted in our country methodology of isolation of micromycetes with the use of a nutrient Czapek medium.

  15. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macro-porosity by combining laboratory measurements and X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    -porosity (R2 = 0.80 for air permeability: R2= 0.61 for 5% arrival time) and macro-porosity of the restricting layer (R2=0.83 for air permeability: R2= 0.71 for 5% arrival time) over air-filled porosity and all the correlations were positive. The high positive correlation these air and water transport...... functions with macro-porosity stressed the importance of continuity and tortuosity of pores in air, water and solute flow and transport through the soils. Negative correlations of air permeability, 5% arrival time of tracer and macro-porosity were obtained with bulk density whereas with other soil physical......With an objective to link the hydraulic properties of soil with the soil structural properties, air permeability and 5% arrival time of a conservative tracer was measured for large undisturbed soil columns from the same agricultural field. The same soil columns were scanned with a medical scanner...

  16. Soil salinity study in Northern Great Plains sodium affected soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharel, Tulsi P.

    Climate and land-use changes when combined with the marine sediments that underlay portions of the Northern Great Plains have increased the salinization and sodification risks. The objectives of this dissertation were to compare three chemical amendments (calcium chloride, sulfuric acid and gypsum) remediation strategies on water permeability and sodium (Na) transport in undisturbed soil columns and to develop a remote sensing technique to characterize salinization in South Dakota soils. Forty-eight undisturbed soil columns (30 cm x 15 cm) collected from White Lake, Redfield, and Pierpont were used to assess the chemical remediation strategies. In this study the experimental design was a completely randomized design and each treatment was replicated four times. Following the application of chemical remediation strategies, 45.2 cm of water was leached through these columns. The leachate was separated into 120- ml increments and analyzed for Na and electrical conductivity (EC). Sulfuric acid increased Na leaching, whereas gypsum and CaCl2 increased water permeability. Our results further indicate that to maintain effective water permeability, ratio between soil EC and sodium absorption ratio (SAR) should be considered. In the second study, soil samples from 0-15 cm depth in 62 x 62 m grid spacing were taken from the South Dakota Pierpont (65 ha) and Redfield (17 ha) sites. Saturated paste EC was measured on each soil sample. At each sampling points reflectance and derived indices (Landsat 5, 7, 8 images), elevation, slope and aspect (LiDAR) were extracted. Regression models based on multiple linear regression, classification and regression tree, cubist, and random forest techniques were developed and their ability to predict soil EC were compared. Results showed that: 1) Random forest method was found to be the most effective method because of its ability to capture spatially correlated variation, 2) the short wave infrared (1.5 -2.29 mum) and near infrared (0

  17. Effects of different desensitizing treatments on root dentin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raydsa Raíssa Moura ROSA

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of diode laser and a desensitizing dentifrice on dentin permeability. Fifty-two root dentin fragments were obtained (5 × 5mm and treated with 24% EDTA gel. The samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 13: G1, control (no treatment; G2, diode laser (λ = 908 nm, 1.5 W, continuous mode, 20s; G3, application of abrasive dentifrice for 1 minute (Elmex Sensitive Professional (International Gaba; and G4, application of abrasive dentifrice for 1 minute followed by irradiation with diode laser. Ten samples per group were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 4h. The specimens were washed, longitudinally sectioned, observed under optical microscopy, photographed and assessed based on the degree of dye leakage. The remaining samples were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The leakage data were subjected to ANOVA test, followed by Tukey’s t-test (α = 5%. Groups 2, 3 and 4 showed less dye penetration than the control group (p < 0.05, but were similar among each other. SEM images showed that dentinal tubules were open in G1, and fused and occluded in G2. Group 3 showed dentinal tubules that were occluded by the metal ions from the toothpaste. G4 presented similar characteristics to G3, and the presence of fused dentin. The diode laser and the dentifrice were effective in reducing dentinal permeability, and the combination of the two treatments did not show better results than either one used alone.

  18. Application of carbon nanotubes to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Martim P. S. R.; Correia, António Alberto S., E-mail: aalberto@dec.uc.pt [University of Coimbra, Department of Civil Engineering, CIEPQPF—Chemical Process Engineering and Forest Products Research Centre (Portugal); Rasteiro, Maria G. [University of Coimbra, Department of Chemical Engineering, CIEPQPF (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The contamination of soils with heavy metals is a growing concern in modern societies. To avoid the spread of contamination, soil stabilization techniques can be applied mixing materials with the soil in order to partially immobilize heavy metals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials known for its exceptional properties, like high surface area and adsorption capacity. Due to these unique properties, the potential use of CNTs in heavy metal contaminated water has been studied, with very satisfactory results; however, their application in contaminated soils is practically unexplored. This experimental work is focused on studying the potential of using CNTs in soil remediation, especially to immobilize the heavy metals ions: lead (Pb{sup 2+}), copper (Cu{sup 2+}), nickel (Ni{sup 2+}), and zinc (Zn{sup 2+}), commonly present in contaminated soils. In order to avoid CNT agglomeration, which originates the loss of their beneficial properties, an aqueous suspension of CNTs was prepared using a non-ionic surfactant combined with ultrasonic energy to promote CNTs dispersion. Then, the soil, with and without the addition of CNTs, was subjected to adsorption tests to evaluate the CNT capacity to improve heavy metal immobilization. To validate the adsorption test results, permeability tests were executed, simulating the conditions of a real-case scenario. The results obtained led to the conclusion that the addition of a small amount of dispersed CNTs can successfully increase the adsorption capacity of the soil and consequently improve the immobilization of heavy metals in the soil matrix. The immobilization percentage varies with the different heavy metals under study.

  19. On the seepage voids in the compacted soil observed by the x-ray imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Koichi; Koga, Kiyoshi

    1991-01-01

    The structure of large voids in the soil layer by banking and rolling compaction and the form of the water channel structure seeping through soil layers have important significance in geotechnical engineering, and it was decided to examine them by the heavy liquid infiltration method developed recently by one of the authors. It has been known that the water permeability of soil due to compaction varies remarkably according to the water content in the soil at the time of compaction. However, the factor which determines the water permeability is related to the voids in soil, particularly the form of large voids which become water channel. As for the heavy liquid infiltration method, the sample soil is set similarly to the permeability test of compacted soil, and liquid contrast medium is infiltrated. The stereoscopic photographing is carried out as it is, and the path of the contrast medium infiltrating into soil, namely the form of the voids corresponding to water channel can be observed. Sample soil, the experimental method and the results are reported. The compaction permeability curves have the same tendency in volcanic ash soil and red clay. (K.I.)