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Sample records for permanent urethral stents

  1. Impacted calculus within a urethral stent: A rare cause of urinary retention

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    Shanmugasundaram Rajaian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An elderly male presented to the emergency department with acute urinary retention. He had poor flow of urine associated with serosanguinous discharge per urethra for 3 days duration. Earlier he underwent permanent metallic urethral stenting for post TURP bulbar urethral stricture. Plain X-ray of Pelvis showed an impacted calculus within the urethral stent in bulbar urethra. Urethrolitholapaxy was done with semirigid ureteroscope. Urethral stent was patent and well covered. Subsequently he had an uneventful recovery. We describe a unique case of acute urinary retention due to calculus impaction within a urethral stent.

  2. Urethral alarm probe for permanent prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutajar, D.; Lerch, M.; Takacs, G.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a urethral dosimetry system for real time dose verification along the urethra during permanent implant prostate brachytherapy. The urethral alarm uses 'spectroscopic dosimetry' to calculate the dose rate along the urethra in real time. The application of spectroscopic dosimetry for the urethral alarm probe was verified using Monte Carlo calculations. In phantom depth dose measurements as well as isotropy measurements were performed to verify the usefulness of the urethra alarm probe as an in vivo real time dosimeter. (author)

  3. Biodegradable urethral stent in the treatment of post-traumatic urethral strictures in a war wound rabbit urethral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Weijun; Zhang Binghong; Gao Jiangping; Hong Baofa; Zhang Lei; Yang Yong; Meng Bo; Zhu Ning; Cui Fuzhai

    2007-01-01

    To prevent terrorism during anti-terror war, we developed a reproducible animal model for the induction of a urethral stricture in a war wound rabbit, and to evaluate the feasibility and effect of using a biodegradable urethral stent in the prophylaxis and treatment of urethral strictures in a war wound (or traumatic) rabbit urethral model. The urethral stricture rabbit model was successfully performed by a self-control explosion destructor. New biodegradable urethral stents were placed in the urethras of 20 war wound (traumatic) rabbits, but no stent was used in the 8 rabbits which formed the control group. Follow-up investigation included assessment of procedure success, stent changes, urethrascopy and retrograde urethrography, and histological findings were obtained after sacrifice at 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after stent placement. The urethral stricture model owing to a war wound (trauma) was tested by tissue reactions and urethroscopy. The length of the urethral strictures was 5-10 mm; the coarctatetion of the urethral lumen was more than 50%. Biodegradable stent placement was technically successful in 20 rabbits. Urethral specimens obtained from the 4 week stent placement group showed diminished inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased thickness of the papillary projections of the epithelium. There was a strong tendency towards regression of the papillary projections and regeneration of urethral mucosa epithelium in the 8 week group. In particular, the injured urethra has recovered completely in the biodegradable stent groups compared with the control group at 12 weeks. The biodegradable urethral stent seems feasible for treating and preventing urethral strictures owing to a war wound (or traumatic) urethra. There are distinct advantages in terms of safe, effective and less-invasive treatment for the reconstruction of post-traumatic urethral strictures

  4. Biodegradable urethral stent in the treatment of post-traumatic urethral strictures in a war wound rabbit urethral model

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    Fu Weijun [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhang Binghong [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Gao Jiangping [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Hong Baofa [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhang Lei [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Yang Yong [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Meng Bo [Biomaterials Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zhu Ning [Biomaterials Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2007-12-15

    To prevent terrorism during anti-terror war, we developed a reproducible animal model for the induction of a urethral stricture in a war wound rabbit, and to evaluate the feasibility and effect of using a biodegradable urethral stent in the prophylaxis and treatment of urethral strictures in a war wound (or traumatic) rabbit urethral model. The urethral stricture rabbit model was successfully performed by a self-control explosion destructor. New biodegradable urethral stents were placed in the urethras of 20 war wound (traumatic) rabbits, but no stent was used in the 8 rabbits which formed the control group. Follow-up investigation included assessment of procedure success, stent changes, urethrascopy and retrograde urethrography, and histological findings were obtained after sacrifice at 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after stent placement. The urethral stricture model owing to a war wound (trauma) was tested by tissue reactions and urethroscopy. The length of the urethral strictures was 5-10 mm; the coarctatetion of the urethral lumen was more than 50%. Biodegradable stent placement was technically successful in 20 rabbits. Urethral specimens obtained from the 4 week stent placement group showed diminished inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased thickness of the papillary projections of the epithelium. There was a strong tendency towards regression of the papillary projections and regeneration of urethral mucosa epithelium in the 8 week group. In particular, the injured urethra has recovered completely in the biodegradable stent groups compared with the control group at 12 weeks. The biodegradable urethral stent seems feasible for treating and preventing urethral strictures owing to a war wound (or traumatic) urethra. There are distinct advantages in terms of safe, effective and less-invasive treatment for the reconstruction of post-traumatic urethral strictures.

  5. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

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    Francisco Botelho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction.

  6. Use of an Absorbable Urethral Stent for the Management of a Urethral Stricture in a Stallion.

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    Trela, Jan M; Dechant, Julie E; Culp, William T; Whitcomb, Mary B; Palm, Carrie A; Nieto, Jorge E

    2016-11-01

    To describe the successful management of a urethral stricture with an absorbable stent in a stallion. Clinical report. Stallion with a urethral stricture. A 12-year-old Thoroughbred breeding stallion was evaluated for acute onset of colic. Uroperitoneum because of presumptive urinary bladder rupture, with urethral obstruction by a urethrolith, was diagnosed. The uroperitoneum was treated conservatively. The urethrolith was removed through a perineal urethrotomy. Approximately 15 weeks after urethrolith removal, the stallion presented with a urethral stricture. The stricture was unsuccessfully treated with an indwelling urinary catheter and 4 attempts at balloon dilation. Eight weeks after diagnosis of stricture, an absorbable polydioxanone (20 mm × 80 mm) urethral stent was implanted under percutaneous, ultrasound guidance. Urethroscopy was performed at 70, 155, and 230 days after stent placement and the endoscope passed through the affected site without complication. Urethroscopy at 155 days showed the stent had been reabsorbed. Follow-up 20 months after stent placement reports the stallion was able to void a normal urine stream. Absorbable urethral stent placement was a feasible treatment for urethral stricture in this stallion. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Temporary urethral covered stent - third year of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovis, V.; Maksimovis, H.; Markovis, B.; Markovis, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In October 2003, a new generation of urethral stents ALLIUM, produced in Israel, were used at the Department of Interventional Radiology, CCS, in 18 patients with chronic stricture of bulbar urethra. The indications for insertion were determined according to well-known and recognized therapeutical protocols. The stent is made of nitinol wire with polyurethane cover. It is inserted under local anesthesia by a special self-expandable system that may be fixed or flexible. The stents we used were 3-6 cm long and 28 Fr wide. Radioscopic-assisted insertion was performed over formerly placed metal guide. Prior to insertion, balloon-catheter dilatation of stricture matching the stent width was carried out. Pre-insertion urethrotomy was performed in one case. The insertion technique is simple, presupposing the knowledge of older generations of techniques of urethral dilatation and insertion of self-expandable stents. The follow-up of results was done according to a priori established protocol including the following: UCG, uroflowmetry and interview with patients. Due to stent migration, the 'stent over stent' technique was applied in one case, while reposition by balloon-catheter outward traction was performed in two cases of caudal migration. No irritative discomforts were reported in the first 4 months after stent dwelling. Uroflowmetric controls verified at least four times better results than before the insertion. Given it is the question of covered stent, there is no possibility of proliferative secondary lumen obstruction. On account of soft structure and conic shape of posterior part of stent, no lesions of the external urethral sphincter were manifested. The stent is simply withdrawn after 6 months by outward traction using the forceps at the time when the stent construction turns into soft and straight wire. The first clinical experiences are very favorable and ALLIUM stent may be expected to be the stent of choice for chronic bulbar strictures

  8. Urethroplasty after Urethral Urolume Stent: an International Multicenter Experience.

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    Angulo, Javier C; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Pankaj, Joshi; Nikolavsky, Dmitriy; Suarez, Pedro; Belinky, Javier; Virasoro, Ramón; DeLong, Jessica; Martins, Francisco E; Lumen, Nicolaas; Giudice, Carlos; Suárez, Oscar A; Menéndez, Nicolás; Capiel, Leandro; López-Alvarado, Damian; Ramirez, Erick A; Venkatesan, Krishnan; Husainat, Maha M; Esquinas, Cristina; Arance, Ignacio; Gómez, Reynaldo; Santucci, Richard

    2018-05-08

    To evaluate the outcomes and factors affecting success of urethroplasty in patients with stricture recurrence after Urolume® urethral stent. Retrospective international multicenter study on patients treated with urethral reconstruction after Urolume® stent. Stricture and stent length, time between urethral stent insertion and urethroplasty, age, mode of stent retrieval, type of urethroplasty, complications and baseline and post-urethroplasty voiding parameters were analyzed. Successful outcome was defined as standard voiding, without need of any postoperative adjunctive procedure. Sixty-three patients were included. Stent was removed at urethroplasty in 61 patients. Reconstruction technique was excision and primary anastomosis in 14(22.2%), dorsal onlay buccal mucosa graft (BMG) 9(14.3%), ventral onlay BMG 6(9.5%), dorso-lateral onlay BMG 9(14.3%), ventral onlay plus dorsal inlay BMG 3(4.8%), augmented anastomosis 5(7.9%), pedicled flap urethroplasty 6(9.5%), 2-stage procedure 4(6.4%) and perineal urethrostomy 7(11.1%). Success rate was 81% at a mean 59.7+63.4months. Dilatation and/or internal urethrotomy was performed in 10(15.9%), redo-urethroplasty in 5(7.9%). Total IPSS, QoL, Qmax and PVR significantly improved (pUrethroplasty in patients with Urolume® urethral stents is a viable option of reconstruction with a high success rate and very acceptable complication rate. Numerous techniques are viable, however, urethral preservation, tine-by-tine stent extraction and use of BMG augmentation produced significantly better outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of retrievable self-expandable urethral stents: experience in 58 stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Jae; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Park, Hyungkeun

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of removing retrievable self-expandable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the removal of 58 polyurethane or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)-covered stents was attempted in 33 patients using a retrieval hook wire. Indications for removal were elective removal (n=21), stent migration (n=19), formation of tissue hyperplasia around or inside of the stent (n=14), stent deformity (n=3), and severe pain (n=1). The mean time the stents remained in place was 64.8±42.9 days (range, 1-177 days). Fifty-six (97%) of the 58 stents were successfully removed using the retrieval hook wire despite the following difficulties; hook wire disconnection (n=2), untied drawstrings (n=3), and polyurethane membrane disruption/separation (n=4). The removal procedure using a retrieval hook wire failed in two stents (3%) which had migrated into the urinary bladder. One of the two stents with migration into the urinary bladder was removed using a snare through the cystostomy route. The overall complication rate was 14% (seven hematuria cases and one urethral tear case), and all were minor and spontaneously resolved without further treatment. In conclusion, removal of retrievable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire was safe and effective despite some technical difficulties. It is a useful method for allowing temporary stent placement and solving various complications of stent use. (orig.)

  10. Removal of retrievable self-expandable urethral stents: experience in 58 stents

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    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Jae; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Park, Hyungkeun [Asan Medical Center, Department of Urology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of removing retrievable self-expandable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the removal of 58 polyurethane or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)-covered stents was attempted in 33 patients using a retrieval hook wire. Indications for removal were elective removal (n=21), stent migration (n=19), formation of tissue hyperplasia around or inside of the stent (n=14), stent deformity (n=3), and severe pain (n=1). The mean time the stents remained in place was 64.8{+-}42.9 days (range, 1-177 days). Fifty-six (97%) of the 58 stents were successfully removed using the retrieval hook wire despite the following difficulties; hook wire disconnection (n=2), untied drawstrings (n=3), and polyurethane membrane disruption/separation (n=4). The removal procedure using a retrieval hook wire failed in two stents (3%) which had migrated into the urinary bladder. One of the two stents with migration into the urinary bladder was removed using a snare through the cystostomy route. The overall complication rate was 14% (seven hematuria cases and one urethral tear case), and all were minor and spontaneously resolved without further treatment. In conclusion, removal of retrievable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire was safe and effective despite some technical difficulties. It is a useful method for allowing temporary stent placement and solving various complications of stent use. (orig.)

  11. [Urethral stent to treat a refractory traumatic urethra stricture in a male hunting dog].

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    Vogt, S; Schneider, M; Peppler, C; Günther, C; Kramer, M

    2014-01-01

    In a 1.5-year-old male hunting dog, a urethral defect distal to the pelvic flexure and the resulting urethral fistula were treated with a mucosal graft and a transurethral catheter. Six months postoperatively a stricture of the urethra occurred. Following balloon dilatation, urination was normal. One month after dilatation, urethral narrowing relapsed and was treated using a combination of balloon dilatation and urethral stent implantation. Ten months following stent implantation the dog continued to show normal urination, although a deformation of the proximal part of the stent was diagnosed radiographically. During the 1-year follow-up no additional complications were observed. In the future, urethral stents may replace surgical resection of the narrowed urethral region and re-anastomosis of the urethra.

  12. Transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue combined with temporary urethral stent placement for patients with in anterior urethral stricture

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    Cheol Yong Yoon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fibrotic scar formation is a main cause of recurrent urethral stricture after initial management with direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU. In the present study, we devised a new technique of combined the transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue and temporary urethral stenting, using a thermo-expandable urethral stent (MemokathTM 044TW in patients with anterior urethral stricture. Materials and Methods As a first step, multiple incisions were made around stricture site with cold-cutting knife and Collins knife electrode to release a stricture band. Fibrotic tissue was then resected with a 13Fr pediatric resectoscope before deployment of a MemokathTM 044TW stent (40 – 60mm on a pre-mounted sheath using 0° cystoscopy. Stents were removed within 12 months after initial placement. Results We performed this technique on 11 consecutive patients with initial (n = 4 and recurrent (n = 7 anterior urethral stricture (April 2009 – February 2013. At 18.9 months of mean follow-up (12-34 months, mean Qmax (7.8±3.9ml/sec vs 16.8 ± 4.8ml/sec, p < 0.001, IPSS (20.7 vs 12.5, p = 0.001 , and QoL score (4.7 vs 2.2, p < 0.001 were significantly improved. There were no significant procedure-related complications except two cases of tissue ingrowth at the edge of stent, which were amenable by transurethral resection. In 7 patients, an average 1.4 times (1-5 times of palliative urethral dilatation was carried out and no patients underwent open surgical urethroplasty during the follow-up period. Conclusion Combined transurethral resection and temporary urethral stenting is a effective therapeutic option for anterior urethral stricture. Further investigations to determine the long-term effects, and safety profile of this new technique are warranted.

  13. Comparison of urethral diameters for calculating the urethral dose after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakano, Masahiro; Kubota, Yasuaki; Maeda, Sunaho; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    No studies have yet evaluated the effects of a dosimetric analysis for different urethral volumes. We therefore evaluated the effects of a dosimetric analysis to determine the different urethral volumes. This study was based on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) combined findings in 30 patients who had undergone prostate brachytherapy. Postimplant CT/MRI scans were performed 30 days after the implant. The urethra was contoured based on its diameter (8, 6, 4, 2, and 0 mm). The total urethral volume-in cubic centimeters [UrV150/200 (cc)] and percent (UrV150%/200%), of the urethra receiving 150% or 200% of the prescribed dose-and the doses (UrD90/30/5) in Grays to 90%, 30%, and 5% of the urethral volume were measured based on the urethral diameters. The UrV150 (cc) and UrD30 were statistically different between the of 8-, 6-, 4-, 2-, and 0-mm diameters, whereas the UrD5 was statistically different only between the 8-, 6-, and 4-mm diameters. Especially for UrD5, there was an approximately 40-Gy difference between the mean values for the 8- and 0-mm diameters. We recommend that the urethra should be contoured as a 4- to 6-mm diameter circle or one side of a triangle of 5-7 mm. By standardizing the urethral diameter, the urethral dose will be less affected by the total urethral volume. (author)

  14. Preventing intra-urethral migration of a guidewire during antegrade placement of a JJ stent: a technical modification.

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    Bansal, Ankur; Gupta, Piyush; Dalela, Disha; Dalela, Diwakar

    2016-03-07

    A JJ stent is usually inserted in antegrade fashion after percutaneous renal surgery. We describe a new technical modification for antegrade stent insertion that prevents intraoperative intra-urethral migration of the guidewire and saves operative time and cost. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. An Indwelling Urethral Catheter Knotted Around a Double-J Ureteral Stent: An Unusual Complication after Kidney Transplantation

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    E. G. Warmerdam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral catheterization is a common procedure with a relatively low complication rate. Knotting of an indwelling urethral catheter is a very rare complication, and there are only a few case reports on knotted catheters, most of them concerning children. We report an especially rare case where a urethral catheter formed a knot around a double-J ureteral stent after a kidney transplantation. We will discuss the various risk factors for knotting of a catheter and the methods to untangle a knot.

  16. Urethritis

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    ... urethritis. Organisms—such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae , which causes gonorrhea —can spread to the urethra during sexual intercourse ... Sometimes people have no symptoms. In men, when gonorrhea or chlamydia is the cause, there is usually ...

  17. Dose perturbation due to the presence of a prostatic urethral stent in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy: an in vitro study.

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    Gez, E; Cederbaum, M; Yachia, D; Bar-Deroma, R; Kuten, A

    1997-01-01

    Temporary metallic intraprostatic stent is a new alternative treatment for patients with urinary obstructive syndrome caused by prostate cancer. Definitive radiotherapy is a treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer. This study evaluates in vitro the effect of a urethral intraprostatic metallic stent on the dose absorbed by the surrounding tissue. The study was designed to mimic the conditions under which the prostatic stent is placed in the body during pelvic irradiation. A urethral stent composed of a 50% nickel-50% titanium alloy (Uracoil-InStent) was imbedded in material mimicking normal tissue (bolus) at a simulated body depth of 10 cm. The distribution of the absorbed dose of irradiation was determined by film dosimetry using Kodak X-Omat V film. Irradiation was done in a single field at the isocenter of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a field size of 7 x 7 cm. The degree of film blackening was in direct proportion to the absorbed dose. The measurements showed an increase in dose of up to 20% immediately before the stent and a decrease of up to 18% immediately after the stent. These changes occurred within a range of 1-3 mm from both sides of the stent. In practice, irradiation in prostate cancer is given by two pairs of opposed co-axial fields; a total of four fields (Box Technique). The dose perturbations are partly cancelled in a pair of opposed beams resulting in a net variation of +/- 4%; therefore, the presence of the intraprostatic stent should not influence radiotherapy planning for prostate cancer.

  18. Comparison of retrievable stents and permanent stents for Budd-Chiari syndrome due to obstructive inferior vena cava.

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    Bi, Yonghua; Chen, Hongmei; Ding, Penxu; Ren, Jianzhuang; Han, Xinwei

    2018-05-30

    To compare long-term outcomes of retrievable stents and permanent stents for BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC. Between July 2000 and August 2016, 42 patients with BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC were treated with retrievable stents (RS) and 41 patients were treated with permanent stents (PS). The retrievable stents was removed eventually after thrombus disappeared. Patients were subsequently followed-up by color Doppler sonography or CT scanning. All retrievable stent placements were successfully, and 37 retrievable stents were retrieved 8 to 29 days later. Forty-two stents were implanted in PS Group. One failure retrieval of retrievable stents occurred, and two failures of cannulations were found in PS Group. Two deaths may procedure-related and died from acute pulmonary thromboembolism perioperatively. One patient developed acute cerebral infarction and recovered after treatment. In PS Group, minor complications were found in 3 patients. The length of IVC lesion segment, length and thickness of IVC thrombus decreased significantly, and diameter of retrocaval IVC and diaphragm IVC increased significantly in both groups. During follow up, 3 patients died from liver failure in RS Group and 2 patients died in PS Group. RS Group showed a significantly higher primary patency rate than PS Group. Cumulative 1-, 3-, and 5-year secondary patency rates were 95.2%, 89.6%, 89.6% in RS Group, and 100%, 96.6%, 96.6% in PS Group (p= 0.7109). Retrievable stents is effective for BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC, with a higher primary patency rate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. EW-7197 eluting nano-fiber covered self-expandable metallic stent to prevent granulation tissue formation in a canine urethral model.

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    Kichang Han

    Full Text Available To evaluate an EW-7197-eluting nanofiber-covered stent (NFCS for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model.All experiments were approved by the committee of animal research. A total of 12 NFCSs were placed in the proximal and distal urethras of six dogs. Dogs were divided into two groups with 3 dogs each. The control stent (CS group received NFCSs and the drug stent (DS group received EW-7197 (1000 μg-eluting NFCSs. All dogs were sacrificed 8 weeks after stent placement Histologic findings of the stented urethra were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test.Stent placement was technically successful in all dogs without procedure-related complications. On urethrographic analysis, the mean luminal diameter was significantly larger in the DS group than in the CS group at 4 and 8 weeks after stent placement (all p 0.05.The EW-7197-eluting NFCS is effective and safe for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model.

  20. Segmental Urethral Dosimetry and Urinary Toxicity in Patients With No Urinary Symptoms Before Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Carys; Keyes, Mira; Liu, Mitchell; Moravan, Veronika

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether segmental urethral dosimetry is predictive for the degree of urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy in patients with no urinary symptoms before prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2005, 1,107 patients underwent iodine-125 monotherapy with urethral sparing techniques. A total of 166 patients fulfilled the selection criteria: baseline (International Prostate Symptom Score) IPSS ≤5, no androgen deprivation therapy, and prostate ultrasound planning volumes (PUTV) <45 mL. The median follow-up was 44 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by maximum increase in IPSS, time to IPSS resolution, maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, time to RTOG resolution, and urinary retention. Surrogate deviated urethra was contoured and doses calculated at the base, mid-prostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to evaluate urethral and prostate dosimetry, age, PUTV, and number of needles for their association with urinary morbidity. Results: Urethral dose was fairly constant in all urethra segments except prostate base, where the variation in does was large. On multivariate analysis, higher urethral base D50, V100, and larger PUTV were predictive for higher maximum increase in IPSS. Higher urethral base V100 and larger PUTV predicted for prolonged IPSS resolution. Higher urethral base D50 and larger needle number predicted for longer RTOG resolution. Higher urethral base V100 predicted for RTOG ≥2 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation dose to the urethral base, larger PUTV, and needle number, predicted for increased urinary toxicity after prostate brachytherapy. Correlation between urinary morbidity and urethral base dosimetry may reflect a large variation in urethral dose observed at the prostate base

  1. Permanent Pacemaker-Induced Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: Successful Treatment by Endovascular Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanciego, Carlos; Rodriguez, Mario; Rodriguez, Adela; Carbonell, Miguel A.; Garcia, Lorenzo Garcia

    2003-01-01

    The use of metallic stents in the management of benign and malignant superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is well documented. Symptomatic stenosis or occlusion of the SVC is a rare complication of a transvenous permanent pacemaker implant. Suggested treatments have included anticoagulation therapy, thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty and surgery. More recently, endovascular stenting has evolved as an attractive alternative but the data available in the literature are limited. We describe a case in which venous stenting with a Wallstent endoprosthesis was used successfully. The patient remains symptom free and with normal pacemaker function 36 months later

  2. Urethral dose and increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) in transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, N.; Itami, J.; Okuma, K.; Marino, H.; Ban, T.; Nakazato, M.; Kanai, K.; Naoi, K.; Fuse, M.; Nakagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to find the factors which influence the acute increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) after transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) using 125 I seeds. Patients and methods: from April 2004 through September 2006, 104 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer underwent TPI without external-beam irradiation. Median patient age was 70 years with a median follow-up of 13.0 months. 73 patients (70%) received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. The increment of IPSS was defined as the difference between pre- and postimplant maximal IPSS. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included age, initial prostate-specific antigen, Gleason Score, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, initial IPSS, post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, prostate V 100 , V 150 , D 90 , urethral D max , and urethral D 90 . In order to further evaluate detailed urethral doses, the base and apical urethra were defined and the dosimetric parameters were calculated. Results: the IPSS peaked 3 months after TPI and returned to baseline at 12-15 months. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, and the dosimetric parameters of the base urethra with IPSS increment. Conclusion: the base urethra appears to be susceptible to radiation and the increased dose to this region deteriorates IPSS. It remains unclear whether the base urethral dose relates to the incidence of late urinary morbidities. (orig.)

  3. Surgical management of Stenson’s duct injury by using double J stent urethral catheter

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    Suha N. Aloosi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Herein, we described an easy yet efficient technique in management of parotid duct injury using a JJ stent which is often used for urethra. We think that use of JJ stent is a valuable technique to be used in the diagnosis and surgical repair of the parotid duct during traumatic facial and/or parotid injuries.

  4. Prophylactic urethral stenting with Memokath® 028SW in prostate cancer patients undergoing prostate 125I seed implants: phase I/II study

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    Samuel T. Chao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the feasibility/toxicity of urethral stenting with the Memokath® 028SW stent in patients undergoing prostate implant (PI for prostate adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: An Investigational Device Exemption from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and institutional review board (IRB approval were obtained. Twenty patients enrolled. Baseline American Urological Association (AUA score was obtained prior to PI. Follow-up information was obtained with weekly phone calls for the first 12 weeks and biweekly calls for the next 12 weeks to assess toxicity and AUA score. Removal of the stent was planned at six months after PI, or earlier due to excessive toxicity/patient request. Results: Median age was 66.5 years. The median prostate volume was 39 cc (range: 10-90. The median baseline AUA score was 7.5 (range: 1-21. Three patients required intermittent self-catheterization (ISC within 3 days after PI. No patients required ISC beyond day 3 after PI. The median duration of ISC was 1 day (range: 1-2. AUA scores returned to baseline values 6 weeks after PI. The week 6 AUA score was 10 (range: 4-16. Seven patients (35% underwent early removal because of patient preference. The reasons were: incontinence (n = 3, discomfort (n = 2, hematuria (n = 1, and obstructive symptoms (n = 1. The median time of stent removal in these patients was 13.9 weeks (range: 0.9-21.4. Thirteen patients (65% had ISC and/or urinary catheterization post stent removal. Median time for ISC use was 10 days (range: 1-90. Conclusions: Urethral stenting with Memokath® in patients undergoing PI was feasible, but resulted in relatively high rate of urinary incontinence and discomfort. Given the adverse effects experienced by patients of this study, further studies should focus only on patients with highest risk of urinary obstruction from PI or those with obstruction needing ISC.

  5. Stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Stent URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002303.htm Stent To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A stent is a tiny tube placed into a hollow structure in your ...

  6. Expandable metal stents for tracheal obstruction: permanent or temporary? A cautionary tale.

    OpenAIRE

    Hind, C R; Donnelly, R J

    1992-01-01

    An expandable metal stent inserted via a long term tracheostomy successfully relieved life threatening respiratory obstruction due to benign tracheal stenosis. Later the patient's tracheostomy suction catheter became stuck on the stent and dislodged it. The stent was removed electively, without damaging the trachea, with a rigid biopsy forceps.

  7. A new permanent lacrimal stent: evaluation of a modification to dacryocystorhinostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikran G Hovaghimian

    2015-01-01

    Modified DCR with the new lacrimal silicone stent is technically quick and easy to perform and can be done for all age groups with a high success rate and could be considered as a good alternative to classic DCR surgery.

  8. Urethral Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bladder and the urethra ( cystoscopy ). Treatment Bladder drainage tube Sometimes surgery (to repair urethral tears) For urethral bruises that do not result in any leakage of urine, a doctor can place a catheter ... days to drain the urine while the urethra heals. For urethral ...

  9. Urethral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, B.M.; Hricak, H.; Dixon, C.; McAninch, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging in posterior urethral trauma. Fifteen patients with posttraumatic membranous urethral strictures underwent prospective MR imaging with a 1.5-T unit before open urethroplasty. All patients had transaxial T1-weighted (500/20) and T2-weighted (2,500/70) spin-echo images and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images (matrix, 192 x 256; section thickness, 4 mm with 20% gap). Conventional retrograde and cystourethrography were performed preoperatively. Compared with conventional studies, MR imaging defined the length and location of the urethral injury and provided additional information regarding the direction and degree of prostatic and urethral dislocation

  10. Innovation is the permanent motivation to make continuous development of interventional radiology: comments about esophageal internal irradiation stent for the treatment of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Gaojun

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of esophageal carcinoma is still a tough issue. Although metallic esophageal stent implantation is an important technique, as it can safety and quickly relieve the dysphagia caused by esophageal cancer, is has no effect on the malignant tumor itself. As a carrier of radioactive seeds, the novel esophageal stent plays functions of relieving dysphagia and conducting brachytherapy of the tumor, which creates a new therapy for esophageal carcinoma and expands the clinical significance of the stent implantation treatment. The history of interventional radiology indicates that it is the innovation that is the permanent motivation to make continuous development of interventional radiology. Innovations include new technology, new practical devices and new theories. Today, even if the interventional radiology has highly developed, innovation is till an 'unbreakable truth' for the development of interventional radiology and it makes the interventional radiology full of vitality. (author)

  11. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  12. Management of severe urethral complications of prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sean P; McAninch, Jack W; Chi, Thomas; Doyle, Sean M; Master, Viraj A

    2006-12-01

    We present our management of urethral stenosis and rectourinary fistula resulting from prostate cancer therapy. We concentrated on cases refractory to minimally invasive treatment, such as dilation, urethrotomy, and urinary and/or fecal diversion. In our prospectively collected urethral reconstruction database we identified patients who underwent reconstruction of urethral stenosis or rectourinary fistula who also received prior treatment for prostate cancer. We documented demographics, prostate cancer pretreatment characteristics, prostate cancer therapy type, urethral reconstruction type and success. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria, including 16 with rectourinary fistula and 32 with urethral stenosis. Urethral complications followed prior radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, cryotherapy, thermal ablation and any combination of these procedures. Stenosis repair was successful in 23 of 32 cases (73%) and it differed little between anterior and posterior urethral stenosis. Repair was accomplished by anastomotic urethroplasty in 19 cases, flap urethroplasty in 2, perineal urethrostomy in 2 and a urethral stent in 9. Prior external beam radiotherapy was a risk factor for urethral reconstruction failure. Fistula repair was successful in 14 of 15 patients (93%), excluding 1 who died postoperatively. The complexity of fistula management was dictated by fistula size and the presence or absence of coincident urethral stenosis. Urethral stenosis or rectourethral fistula following prostate cancer therapy can be managed by urethral reconstruction, such that normal voiding via the urethra is maintained, rather than abandoning the urethral outlet and performing heterotopic diversion. This can be accomplished with an acceptable rate of failure, given the complexity of the cases.

  13. current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iam

    such as calculi, urethral hair and stent encrustation which may be useful in ... and 7 o'clock to the prostatic urethra, 3 and 9 o'clock ... anterior urethra the use of stents is limited to but ... take such as radiotherapy, peripheral vascular disease.

  14. Urethral stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It can also occur after a disease or injury. Rarely, it may be caused by pressure from a growing tumor near the urethra. Other factors that increase the risk for this condition include: Sexually ... Injury to the pelvic area Repeated urethritis Strictures that ...

  15. TRICHOMONAS URETHRITIS IN MALES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Ector

    1955-01-01

    Trichomonas urethritis in the male should be suspected in all chronic cases of urethritis. The diagnosis is easily established by the hanging-drop method of examining the urethral discharge, or the first-glass urine specimen. Curative treatment is readily accomplished by the use of urethral instillations of Carbarsone suspension using 1 capsule of Carbarsone per ounce of distilled water. PMID:13270111

  16. When to remove the urethral catheter after endoscopic realignment of traumatic disruption of the posterior urethra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Darawany, H M

    2017-09-01

    To detect the optimal time for urethral stent removal after endoscopic urethral realignment and its effect on the incidence of development of urethral stricture. Eighteen patients underwent endoscopic urethral realignment after traumatic disruption of the posterior urethra. Post-operative urethroscopy was done using the flexible cystoscope to assess progress of urethral healing. The urethral Foley catheter that served as a stent and for urine drainage was removed only when complete mucosal healing was observed by flexible urethroscopy. There was a post-operative follow-up period of 12-36months. Uroflowmetry was performed at the end of the follow-up period. Endoscopy 6weeks after realignment showed 50-75% mucosal epithelialization at the site of urethral disruption in all patients. Epithelialization was complete at 9weeks in 15/18 patients (83%) and at 12weeks in the remaining 3 patients (17%). One patient (5.6%) developed a mild symptomatic stricture 5months post stent removal that was successfully treated by a single session of visual urethrotomy. All 18 patients had normal uroflowmetry readings at 12-36months after realignment. Urethral stenting should be continued till mucosal healing at the site of urethral disruption became complete. Removal of the stent at this optimal time decreases the incidence of post-operative urethral stricture. Flexible urethroscopy was a safe procedure for post-operative follow-up of endoscopic urethral realignment to assess the progress and completion of mucosal healing at the site of realignment. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty.

  18. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  19. Endoscopic urethral realignment of traumatic urethral disruption: A monocentric experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mohamed El Darawany

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Endoscopic primary realignment of posterior urethral rupture is less invasive and a safer procedure, without pelvic hemorrhage or additional injuries. It has low incidence of severe urethral stricture and avoids the need for delayed open urethral reconstruction.

  20. Biodegradable magnesium-alloy stent:current situation in research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hua; Zhao Xianxian

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, permanent metal stents are employed in the majority of interventional therapies; nevertheless, such kind of stents carries the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. Therefore, the biodegradable magnesium alloy stent has become the focus of attention. Theoretically, it has overcome the problems caused by permanent metal stents, so it is the development direction to use the biodegradable magnesium alloy in future. The authors believe that biodegradable magnesium alloy stents will be widely used in interventional procedures for many diseases. (authors)

  1. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  2. Percutaneous Ureteral stent insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    Percutaneous ureteral stent insertion is a treatment of permanent or temporary urinary diversion to maintain continuity and function of the obstructed and injured ureter. We performed 31 cases of percutaneous double pig tall ureteral stent insertion in 21 patients, included 13 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and eight patients with injured ureter as well as benign inflammatory stricture. Satisfactory resulted was obtained in all patients but one, who need percutaneous nephrostomy on week later for urinary diversion. No significant complication was encountered. The authors concluded that percutaneous ureteral stent insertion, an interventional procedure alternative to urologic retrograde method, is an effective method for urinary diversion.

  3. Biolimus-eluting biodegradable polymer-coated stent versus durable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stent in unselected patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (SORT OUT V)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Evald Høj; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per

    2013-01-01

    Third-generation biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents might reduce the risk of stent thrombosis compared with first-generation permanent polymer drug-eluting stents. We aimed to further investigate the effects of a biodegradable polymer biolimus-eluting stent compared with a durable polymer......-coated sirolimus-eluting stent in a population-based setting....

  4. Reconstruction and management of posterior urethral and straddle injuries of the urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Gerald H; Virasoro, Ramón; Eltahawy, Ehab A

    2006-02-01

    Urethral stricture disease, once associated mainly with gonococcal urethritis, is now most frequently a consequence of trauma, such as a fall-astride injury or a pelvic fracture. This article discusses issues and approaches related to the treatment of strictures associated with perineal straddle trauma and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. The authors emphasize that endoscopic procedures seldom cure these strictures and in-dwelling stents are seldom useful in treatment. Primary anastomotic techniques are associated with success rates in the high 90% range and appear to be remarkably durable in most cases. In contrast, tubed reconstruction of the urethra is inevitably associated with diminished success rates and with problems of durability.

  5. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  6. Urethral diverticulum in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-Xuan Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Urethral diverticulum is rare in pregnancy. There is no clear guideline on the management of urethral diverticulum in pregnancy, but most cases were managed conservatively. We report a case of urethral diverticulum in a primigravida woman, who presented with anterior vaginal swelling at 14 weeks of gestation. She was managed conservatively and the cyst (approximately 8 cm × 13 cm was aspirated during the early stage of labor. However her labor did not progress during the second stage, which resulted in an emergency cesarean section. She underwent diverticulectomy at 1 month postpartum because of the recurrence of the swelling and persistent discomfort. We believe that her dystocia may have been caused by factors other than the diverticulum. As previously described in literature, we concluded that, even in pregnant women with a large urethral diverticulum, vaginal delivery can still be considered with prior aspiration during the early stage of labor.

  7. The urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise

    2014-02-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) occurs when the bladder pressure exceeds the urethral pressure in connection with physical effort or exertion or when sneezing or coughing and depends both on the strength of the urethral closure function and the abdominal pressure to which it is subjected. The urethral closure function in continent women and the dysfunction causing SUI are not known in details. The currently accepted view is based on the concept of a sphincteric unit and a support system. Our incomplete knowledge relates to the complexity of the closure apparatus and to inadequate assessment methods which so far have not provided robust urodynamic diagnostic tools, severity measures, or parameters to assess outcome after intervention. Urethral Pressure Reflectometry (UPR) is a novel method that measures the urethral pressure and cross-sectional area (by use of sound waves) simultaneously. The technique involves insertion of only a small, light and flexible polyurethane bag in the urethra and therefore avoids the common artifacts encountered with conventional methods. The UPR parameters can be obtained at a specific site of the urethra, e.g. the high pressure zone, and during various circumstances, i.e. resting and squeezing. During the study period, we advanced the UPR technique to enable faster measurement (within 7 seconds by the continuous technique) which allowed assessment during increased intra-abdominal pressure induced by physical straining. We investigated the urethral closure function in continent and SUI women during resting and straining by the "fast" UPR technique. Thereby new promising urethral parameters were provided that allowed characterization of the closure function based on the permanent closure forces (primarily generated by the sphincteric unit, measured by the Po-rest) and the adjunctive closure forces (primarily generated by the support system, measured by the abdominal to urethral pressure impact ratio (APIR)). The new parameters enabled

  8. Posterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J. Hodges

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in male infants is posterior urethral valves. Although the incidence has remained stable, the neonatal mortality for this disorder has improved due to early diagnosis and intensive neonatal care, thanks in part to the widespread use of prenatal ultrasound evaluations. In fact, the most common reason for the diagnosis of posterior urethral valves presently is the evaluation of infants for prenatal hydronephrosis. Since these children are often diagnosed early, the urethral obstruction can be alleviated rapidly through catheter insertion and eventual surgery, and their metabolic derangements can be normalized without delay, avoiding preventable infant mortality. Of the children that survive, however, early diagnosis has not had much effect on their long-term prognosis, as 30% still develop renal insufficiency before adolescence. A better understanding of the exact cause of the congenital obstruction of the male posterior urethra, prevention of postnatal bladder and renal injury, and the development of safe methods to treat urethral obstruction prenatally (and thereby avoiding the bladder and renal damage due to obstructive uropathy are the goals for the care of children with posterior urethral valves[1].

  9. Urethral Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer is rare and is more common in men than in women. Urethral cancer can metastasize (spread) quickly to tissues around the urethra and has often spread to nearby lymph nodes by the time it is diagnosed. Start here to find information on urethral cancer treatment.

  10. Sacral neuromodulation effects on periurethral sensation and urethral sphincter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jonathan L; Kenton, Kimberly; Greer, W Jerod; Ramm, Olga; Szychowski, Jeff M; Wilson, Tracey; Richter, Holly E

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) on urethral neuromuscular function. Following IRB approval, women with refractory overactive bladder (OAB) underwent standardized urethral testing prior to and after Stage 1 SNM implantation. Periurethral sensation was measured using current perception thresholds (CPT). Striated urethral sphincter activity was quantified using concentric needle electromyography (CNE) and Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) analysis software. Nonparametric analyses were used to characterize pre/post changes with intervention. Baseline CPT and CNE findings were compared between SNM responders and non-responders. Twenty-seven women were enrolled in this pilot study with a mean age of 61 ± 13 years. Twenty of 26 women (76.9%) responded to SNM and went to Stage 2 permanent implantation. Four (14.8%) withdrew after Stage 1 implantation; three of the four withdrawals had not had therapeutic responses to SNM. CPT and CNE parameters did not significantly differ from baseline 2 weeks after SNM. Pre-SNM urethral sensation was not significantly different between responders and non-responders. However, responders had larger amplitude, longer duration and more turns and phases at baseline approaching significance, reflecting more successful urethral reinnervation, than non-responders. SNM does not alter urethral neuromuscular function 2 weeks post Stage 1 implantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Anaerobes in men with urethritis

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, E A; Taylor-Robinson, D; Hanna, N F; Coufalik, E D

    1982-01-01

    Sixty-four men with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), seven with gonococcal urethritis (GU), and 30 who had no symptoms or signs of urethritis were studied. Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from urethral specimens taken from 22% of the men with NGU, and 18% with GU, but not from those who did not have urethritis even though 20 (67%) of them had a history of NGU, GU, or both. The chlamydial isolation rate for men having NGU for the first time was 30%. Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated from ...

  12. Predictors of Long-Term Results After Treatment of Iliac Artery Obliteration by Transluminal Angioplasty and Stent Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funovics, M.A.; Lackner, B.; Cejna, M.; Peloschek, P.; Sailer, J.; Philipp, M.O.; Maca, T.; Ahmadi, A.; Minar, E.; Lammer, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate initial and long-term success rate after percutaneous treatment of iliac artery occlusion with angioplasty and stent deployment. To investigate the influence of vascular comorbidity, lesion length, stent placement and lesion coverage as possible predictors of outcome. Methods: Between January 1994 and December 1999, 80 iliac recanalizations were performed on 78 patients, median age 61.1 ±11.5 (SD) years. All patients were followed up by clinical examinations, duplex ultrasound and intravenous digital subtraction angiography. Mean follow-up time was 2.0 ± 1.53 (SD) years.Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine the influence of cofactors on patency. Results: One, 2 and 4 years after recanalization, primary patency was 78.1%, 74.5% and 64.0%; secondary patency was 88.8%, 88.8% and 77.9%, respectively.Patients with shorter occlusions, complete lesion coverage and patent ipsilateral femoral arteries had significantly longer patency rates.Complications included inguinal hematoma (n=1), technical failure (n=3) aortic dissection (n=1), embolic occlusions (n=7), gluteal claudication (n=1) and genital necrosis after subsequent urethral surgery in one patient with contralateral occlusion and ipsilateral overstenting of the internal iliac artery with subsequent stenosis. Complications were of permanent clinical significance in seven of 78 (9%) of the patients. In 17 (22%) cases, percutaneous reintervention was performed with angioplasty in the stent (n=16) or deployment of a new stent (n=1). Conclusion: Endoluminal stent placement has its place in an interdisciplinary therapeutic approach as a viable therapeutic alternative to major transabdominal bypass surgery and can be performed with comparable complication rates. Patients with short occlusions, patent femoral arteries, and stents covering the entire occlusion have significant longer patency

  13. An assessment on modified AZ80 alloys for prospect biodegradable CV stent applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erinc, M.; Sillekens, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    In medicine, stents are inserted into an artery to prevent local constrictions to blood flow. Commonly used stents are permanent metal stents, yet developments in this area are more and more heading towards biodegradable stents. Implants made of materials that can dissolve in the patient's body by

  14. Transrectal ultrasound in male urethritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaly, A F; Taylor, P M; Goorney, B P; Haye, K R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of prostatic abnormalities in men with gonococcal and non-gonococcal urethritis using trans-rectal ultrasonic markers. DESIGN--A case control study of patients attending a department of genitourinary medicine with symptoms of urethritis. SETTING--Department of Genitourinary Medicine and Department of Radiology in Manchester Royal Infirmary. RESULTS--A total of 42 patients were recruited to the study: 26 with urethritis and 16 controls. Of the 26 study patie...

  15. Female urethral carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Masahiko; Kondo, Atsuo; Sakakibara, Toshihumi

    1988-01-01

    Urethral carcinoma in 2 females has been treated with irradiation together with adjunct chemotherapy. In case 1, a 73-year-old female with squamous cell carcinoma was successfully treated with irradiation of 4,000 rad and peplomycin of 60 mg intravenously given. She has been free from the disease for the past 43 months. In case 2, a 61-year-old female with transitional cell carcinoma was initially treated with irradiation of 5,000 rad together with peplomycin 90 mg, which was followed by another 5,000 rad irradiation. The tumor recurred and the patient was operated on for cystourethrectomy and partial resection of the vagina. A further chemotherapy of cisplatin, peplomycin, and mitomycin C was instituted. She died of the tumor recurrence 23 months after the first visit to our clinic. Diagnosis and treatment modalities on the female urethral carcinoma are briefly discussed. (author)

  16. Anterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  17. Calculi in female urethral diverticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B J; Hørby, J; Brynitz, S

    1989-01-01

    A case of two calculi found in the same urethral diverticulum in a 41-year-old woman with recurrent urinary tract infections is reported. The diagnostic procedures are discussed.......A case of two calculi found in the same urethral diverticulum in a 41-year-old woman with recurrent urinary tract infections is reported. The diagnostic procedures are discussed....

  18. [Absorbable coronary stents. New promising technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Kordish, Igor; Churzidze, Sofia; Malyar, Nasser; Konorza, Thomas; Sack, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    Coronary stent implantation started in Germany 20 years ago. In the beginning, the progress was very slow and accelerated 10 years later. Meanwhile, coronary stent implantation is a standard procedure in interventional cardiology. From the beginning of permanent stent implantation, research started to provide temporary stenting of coronary arteries, first with catheter-based systems, later with stent-alone technology. Stents were produced from polymers or metal. The first polymer stent implantation failed except the Igaki-Tamai stent in Japan. Newly developed absorbable polymer stents seem to be very promising, as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography have demonstrated. Temporary metal stents were developed based on iron and magnesium. Currently, the iron stent is tested in peripheral arteries. The absorbable magnesium stent (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) was tested in peripheral arteries below the knee and meanwhile in the multicenter international PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) study. The first magnesium stent implantation was performed on July 30, 2004 after extended experimental testing in Essen. The magnesium stent behaved like a bare-metal stent with low recoil of 5-7%. The stent struts were absorbed when tested with IVUS. Stent struts were not visible by fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). That means, that the magnesium stent is invisible and therefore CT and MRI can be used for imaging of interventions. Only using micro-CT the stent struts were visible. The absorption process could be demonstrated in a patient 18 days after implantation due to suspected acute coronary syndrome, which was excluded. IVUS showed a nice open lumen. Stent struts were no longer visible, but replaced by tissue indicating the previous stent location. Coronary angiography after 4 months showed an ischemia-driven target lesion

  19. Research progress of biodegradable stent in the application for benign luminal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yueqi; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua

    2008-01-01

    Stent implantation plays an significant role in the interventional therapy, mainly with permanent stent, possessing many disadvantages such as restenosis and inflammatory hyperplasia and can thus hardly be used in children and nonmalignant stenosis. Biodegradable stent has theoretical capability to solve these problems and acquires a bright future. Nowadays, with the development of material industry and manufacture craft, biodegradable stent technique has turned up to be mature in last decades. Through the strict animal experiments and prophase of clinic application, satisfactory result has been acquired. We believe that bioabsorbable stent will be widely used in many benign diseases which would be a good supplement for permanent stent in the near future. (authors)

  20. Airway stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Colleen

    2018-01-01

    Stents and tubes to maintain the patency of the airways are commonly used for malignant obstruction and are occasionally employed in benign disease. Malignant airway obstruction usually results from direct involvement of bronchogenic carcinoma, or by extension of carcinomas occurring in the esophagus or the thyroid. External compression from lymph nodes or metastatic disease from other organs can also cause central airway obstruction. Most malignant airway lesions are surgically inoperable due to advanced disease stage and require multimodality palliation, including stent placement. As with any other medical device, stents have significantly evolved over the last 50 years and deserve an in-depth understanding of their true capabilities and complications. Not every silicone stent is created equal and the same holds for metallic stents. Herein, we present an overview of the topic as well as some of the more practical and controversial issues surrounding airway stents. We also try to dispel the myths surrounding stent removal and their supposed use only in central airways. At the end, we come to the long-held conclusion that stents should not be used as first line treatment of choice, but after ruling out the possibility of curative surgical resection or repair. PMID:29707506

  1. Polymeric Biodegradable Stent Insertion in the Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal stent insertion has been used as a well-accepted and effective alternative to manage and improve the quality of life for patients diagnosed with esophageal diseases and disorders. Current stents are either permanent or temporary and are fabricated from either metal or plastic. The partially covered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS has a firm anchoring effect and prevent stent migration, however, the hyperplastic tissue reaction cause stent restenosis and make it difficult to remove. A fully covered SEMS and self-expanding plastic stent (SEPS reduced reactive hyperplasia but has a high migration rate. The main advantage that polymeric biodegradable stents (BDSs have over metal or plastic stents is that removal is not require and reduce the need for repeated stent insertion. But the slightly lower radial force of BDS may be its main shortcoming and a post-implant problem. Thus, strengthening support of BDS is a content of the research in the future. BDSs are often temporarily effective in esophageal stricture to relieve dysphagia. In the future, it can be expect that biodegradable drug-eluting stents (DES will be available to treat benign esophageal stricture, perforations or leaks with additional use as palliative modalities for treating malignant esophageal stricture, as the bridge to surgery or to maintain luminal patency during neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  2. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun

    1990-01-01

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable

  3. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable.

  4. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-29

    Jun 29, 2010 ... Jolly type a) De novo urethral stones are generally composed ... Prepare the title page, covering letter, acknowledgement etc. using a word processor program. ... The main text of the article, beginning with the Abstract to ...

  5. Advances in urethral stricture management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Maxx A.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture/stenosis is a narrowing of the urethral lumen. These conditions greatly impact the health and quality of life of patients. Management of urethral strictures/stenosis is complex and requires careful evaluation. The treatment options for urethral stricture vary in their success rates. Urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy are the most commonly performed procedures but carry the lowest chance for long-term success (0–9%). Urethroplasty has a much higher chance of success (85–90%) and is considered the gold-standard treatment. The most common urethroplasty techniques are excision and primary anastomosis and graft onlay urethroplasty. Anastomotic urethroplasty and graft urethroplasty have similar long-term success rates, although long-term data have yet to confirm equal efficacy. Anastomotic urethroplasty may have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. Posterior urethral stenosis is typically caused by previous urologic surgery. It is treated endoscopically with radial incisions. The use of mitomycin C may decrease recurrence. An exciting area of research is tissue engineering and scar modulation to augment stricture treatment. These include the use of acellular matrices or tissue-engineered buccal mucosa to produce grafting material for urethroplasty. Other experimental strategies aim to prevent scar formation altogether. PMID:28105329

  6. Urethral pressure reflectometry during intra-abdominal pressure increase-an improved technique to characterize the urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-11-01

    to assess the urethral closure function by urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) during intra-abdominal pressure-increase in SUI and continent women. Twenty-five urodynamically proven SUI women and eight continent volunteer women were assessed by ICIQ-SF, pad-weighing test, incontinence diary, and UPR. UPR was conducted during resting and increased intra-abdominal pressure (P(Abd)) by straining. Related values of P(Abd) and urethral opening pressure (P(o)) were plotted into an abdomino-urethral pressuregram. Linear regression of the values was conducted, and the slope of the line ("APIR") and the intercept with the y-axis found. By the equation of the line, Po was calculated for various values of P(Abd), for example, 50 cm H2O (P(o-Abd 50)). The resting P(o) (P(o-rest)) and APIR, respectively, significantly differed in SUI and continent women but could not separate the two groups. The urethral closure equation (UCE) based on P(o-rest) and APIR provided a more detailed characterization of a woman's closure function based on the permanent closure forces (primarily generated by the urethral sphincteric unit) and the adjunctive closure forces (primarily generated by the support system). P(o-Abd 50) and UCE, respectively, which express the combined permanent and adjunctive closure forces and estimate the efficiency of the closure function, separated SUI and continent women and were highly significantly negatively correlated with ICIQ-SF, pad test, and the number of incontinence episodes. New parameters for characterization of the urethral closure function and possible dysfunctions and its efficiency were provided. P(o-Abd 50) and UCE may be used as diagnostic tests and severity measures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Urethral sensation following reconstructive pelvic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, M G; Davis, C; Lowenstein, L; Mueller, E R; Brubaker, L; Kenton, K

    2014-11-01

    Most urethral neuromuscular function data focus on efferent rather than afferent innervation. We aimed to determine if changes exist in urethral afferent nerve function before and after reconstructive pelvic surgery (RPS). Secondarily, we compared afferent urethral innervation in women with and without stress urinary incontinence undergoing RPS. Participants underwent current perception threshold (CPT) and urethral anal reflex (UAR) testing prior to surgery and again post-operatively. Wilcoxon signed ranked test and Spearman's correlations were used and all tests were two-sided. p = 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Urethral CPT thresholds increased significantly after RPS, consistent with decreased urethral afferent function. Pre-operative urethral CPT thresholds at 5 and 250 Hz were lower in SUI women (10 [IQR 5-29], 40 [32-750]) compared with continent women (63 [14-99], 73 [51-109]; p = 0.45, p = 0.020), signifying increased urethral sensation or easier activation of urethral afferents in SUI women. Reconstructive pelvic surgery is associated with a short-term deleterious impact on urethral afferent function, as demonstrated by the higher levels of stimuli required to activate urethral afferent nerves (decreased urethral sensation) immediately after RPS. Women with SUI required lower levels of stimuli to activate urethral afferent nerves prior to RPS, although UAR latencies were similar regardless of concomitant SUI.

  8. Revisiting the tethered ureteral stents in children: a novel modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Nabavizadeh, Behnam; Keihani, Sorena; Hosseini Sharifi, Seyed Hossein

    2015-06-01

    To propose a simple noninvasive method for ureteral stent retrieval using an extraction string sutured to the skin in children. A retrospective chart review was performed to gather relevant data from December 2005 to February 2013. After the surgeries, if indicated, a tethered double-J stent was placed in the ureter. A 5-0 non-absorbable Prolene stitch was used as an extraction string passing through the urethra and was sutured to subcoronal skin in boys or inner surface of labia majora in girls. For stent removal, a small amount of 2 % lidocaine jelly was pushed into the urethra 5 min before the procedure. The string was then pulled by continuous and gentle force until the entire stent was out. The suture was then cut to release the stent. No sedation or anesthesia was needed. A total of 378 double-J stents with extraction strings were inserted for a total of 325 patients (61.2 % male). Of the 53 patients with bilateral ureteral stents, one male patient (1.88 %) experienced early stent protrusion from urethral meatus. Two of 272 patients (0.73 %) with unilateral ureteral stent (one male and one female) encountered the same problem. All other stents were extracted successfully using the extraction string without any complications. No upward stent migration or suture site reaction was encountered. This method is a safe, easy-to-use, feasible and noninvasive alternative for cystoscopic stent removal with high success rate and minimal complications. This can lead to considerable saving in time and costs for patients, families and healthcare system.

  9. Forgotten Ureteral Stents: An Avoidable Morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtaza, B.; Alvi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical presentation of forgotten ureteral stents and highlight the etiological factors resulting in the retention of these stents. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology, Armed Forces Institute of Urology, Rawalpindi, from January 2010 to Jun 2011. Methodology: Thirty-eight patients, with forgotten ureteral stents, retained for more than 6 months duration, were enrolled. A detailed evaluation was performed, along with the questions regarding the patients' opinion about the ureteral stents. They were specially asked whether they knew about the stents or were they formally informed regarding the stents. Subsequently, the patients were managed according to their clinical condition. Results: The male to female ratio was 2.1:1 aged 23 - 69 years, mean being 40.24 ± 12.59 years. The time of presentation after the ureteral stenting was 7 - 180 months (mean = 28.89 ± 33.435 years). Seven patients (18.4 percentage) reported with chronic kidney disease, including ESRD in two cases. Recurrent UTI was seen in 28 cases (73.6 percentage), calculus formed over the stents in 20 cases (52.6 percentage), and stent fragmented in 5 patients (13.1 percentage). Majority of patients, (n = 23, 60.5 percentage), were not even aware of the placement of these stents while 8 (21.0 percentage) knew but were reluctant about its removal. In 3 cases (7.8 percentage), the relatives knew about the stent but never informed the patients. The stent had been removed in 2 cases (5.2 percentage), but the other broken fragment was missed. One case (2.6 percentage) each had a misconception about the permanent placement of the stents like cardiac stents and regarding degradation of the stents in situ. Conclusion: Forgotten ureteral stents produce clinical features ranging from recurrent UTI to ESRD. This preventable urological complication is primarily due to the unawareness or ignorance of the patients and their relatives

  10. Urethral Foreign Body Management: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Andy Y.; Koh, Chester J.; Stein, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The management of urethral foreign bodies may require the use of various surgical techniques in a urologist's armamentarium. We report a unique case of a urethral foreign body requiring percutaneous and endoscopic techniques for removal.

  11. Female urethral diverticulum containing large calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Kimura

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary stones in female urethral diverticulum are rarely seen. We report a 79-year-old woman who presented with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms and vaginal cystocele with incontinence. The urethral stones in the diverticulum were successfully extracted through the trans-urethral route and anterior tension-free vaginal mesh was applied one month later. The patient has been well, with no lower urinary symptoms or incontinence for 4 months. Keywords: Female, Urethral diverticulum, Incontinence, Calculus

  12. Simple urethral dilatation, endoscopic urethrotomy, and urethroplasty for urethral stricture disease in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Susan S W; Aboumarzouk, Omar M; Narahari, Radhakrishna; O'Riordan, Anna; Pickard, Robert

    2012-12-12

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and frequently recur after initial treatment. Standard treatment comprises internal widening of the strictured area by simple dilatation or by telescope-guided internal cutting (optical urethrotomy), but these interventions are associated with a high failure rate requiring repeated treatment. The alternative option of open urethroplasty whereby the urethral lumen is permanently widened by removal or grafting of the strictured segment is less likely to fail but requires greater expertise. Findings of Improved choice of graft material and shortened hospital stay suggest that urethroplasty may be under utilised. The extent and quality of evidence guiding treatment choice for this condition are uncertain.   To determine which is the best surgical treatment for male urethral stricture disease taking into account relative efficacy, adverse event rates and cost-effectiveness.   We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 21 June 2012), CENTRAL (2012, Issue 6), MEDLINE (January 1946 to week 2 June 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to week 25 2012), OpenSIGLE (searched 26 June 2012), clinical trials registries and reference lists of relevant articles. We included publications reporting data from randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of dilatation, urethrotomy and urethroplasty in the treatment of adult men with urethral stricture disease. Two authors evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and methodological quality. Data extraction was performed using predetermined criteria. Analyses were carried out using the Cochrane Review Manager software (RevMan 5). Two randomised trials were identified. One trial compared the outcomes of surgical urethral dilatation and optical urethrotomy in 210 adult men with urethral stricture disease. No significant difference was found in the proportion of men being

  13. Urethral Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer is a rare cancer. There are three types of urethral cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type. Transitional cell carcinoma of the urethra, and adenocarcinoma in the glands around the urethra are less common. Find evidence-based information on urethral cancer treatment.

  14. JJ Stent Removal under Ultrasound Guidance in Women: It is Simple and Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Bernard; Gupta, Sandeep; Kanwar, Vijayendra S; Lodh, Bijit; Khumukcham, Somarendra; Akoijam, Kaku Singh

    2014-12-01

    With the increase in number of patients treated for urological problems with endoscopic procedures, the number of patients with JJ stent is also increasing. The amount of workload thus incurred multiplies, even to the point that, sometimes we waste more time in the operating room removing JJ stents than the actual endourological procedures. Here in our institute, we have devised a very simple and effective way of removing JJ stents in women and also determined the efficacy, safety and cost of JJ stent removal under ultrasound guidance in women in comparison to cystoscopic removal. Two hundred women attending the Department of Urology from July 2012 to July 2013 at RIMS hospital were randomly divided into two arms. One hundred women had their JJ stent removed with cystoscope and another 100 women had their JJ stent removed under ultrasound guidance using simple surgical tools available at the hospital. The primary comparative points were waiting time for operating room appointment date, cost of the procedure, time taken for the procedure, discomfort or pain felt by the patient and urethral injuries. In all the parameters, stent removal under ultrasound guidance was significantly better except for urethral injuries where both the procedures had similar outcomes. We concluded that JJ stent removal under ultrasound guidance in women was simple, effective and safe.

  15. Stent placement for benign colonic stenosis: case report, review of the literature, and animal pilot data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Timothy M; Miedema, Brent W; Tsereteli, Zurab; Sporn, Emanuel; Thaler, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    Permanent metal stent placement for malignant intestinal obstruction has been proven to be efficient. Temporary stents for benign conditions of the colon and rectum are less studied. This is a case study, review of the literature, and observation from an animal model on placement of stents in the colorectum for benign disease. A 55-year-old man presented with recurrent obstructions from a benign stricture of the distal sigmoid colon. After failed balloon dilations, a polyester coated stent was placed. The purpose of the stent was to improve symptoms and avoid surgery. The stent was expelled after 5 days. We conducted a literature review of stents placed for benign colorectal strictures and an animal study to evaluate stent migration. In the literature, there were 53 reports of uncovered metal stents, four covered metal stents, and six polyester stents. Patency rates were 71%, and migration rate was 43%. Migration occurred earlier with polyester stents (mean=8 days) versus covered (32 days) or uncovered metal stents (112 days). Severe complications were seen in 23% of patients. Four 45-kg pigs underwent rectosigmoid transection with a 21-mm anastomosis and endoscopic placement of a Polyflex stent. Two stents were secured with suture. Stents without fixation were expelled within 24 h of surgery. Stents with fixation were expelled between postoperative days 2 and 14. Stents for the treatment of benign colorectal strictures are safe, with comparable patency rates between stent types. Metal stents can cause severe complications. In a pig model, covered polyester stents tend to migrate early even with fixation. Further investigation needs to focus on new stent designs and/or better fixation.

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSPU B IC URETHROPLASTY FOR RECURRENT URETHRAL STR U CTURE IN PELVIC FRACTURE URETHRAL DISTRACTION DEFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudegowdar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF THE STUDY: Effectiveness of Transpubic urethroplasty in recurrent (failed urethral strictures due to pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. INTRODUCTION: Urethral distraction injuries occur upto 10% of pelvic fracture cases. The principle indication of Transpubic urethroplasty is length >3 c ms, recur rent (failed repairs of posterior urethral stricture. Though other procedures like primary anastomotic urethroplasty, rerouting of the urethra under the corporal body, urethral substitution with tubularised flaps, two stage urethroplasty are described, Tr anspubic urethroplasty is said to produce the best results especially when repeat procedures are required. MATERIALS & METHODS: This is a prospective study from 2004 to 2014 consisting of 17 patients having recurrent stricture urethra secondary to pelvic f racture urethral distraction defects (PFUDD. All the patients were males and their age ranged from 15year to 45 years. Pre - op evaluation included X - ray KUB, Ultrasound abdomen & pelvis, retrograde urethrogram (RGU, micturating cystourethrogram (MCU, up and down Cystoscopy, urine culture and renal biochemical parameters. Urethra was approched through progressive perineal and abdominal approach with total pubectomy, followed by excising fibrosed stricture and tension free end to end anastomosis. Post opera tively pericatheteral RGU was carried out after 4 weeks and Catheter removed if there was no leak. RGU, MCU uroflowmetry and PVR were done one month after removal of catheter. Subsequently UFR, PVR and obstructive symptoms were assessed periodically. RESUL TS: All 17 Cases were followed up for a period of 3 - 11 years. Out of 17patients, 14(80% patients maintained good uroflow (UFR and insignificant PVR and procedure was considered successful. In 3 patients procedure failed, of which 2 patients had pericathe ter leak and reduced urinary flow with significant PVR and were followed up with CIC and 1 patient remained on permanent

  17. [Three theses on urethral disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesa-Ponce, N

    2012-01-01

    To inform about three doctorate theses on urethral stenosis, presented in the University of Paris and Montpellier by Spanish authors. Of the Canary Island students who studied medicine in France during the xix century and beginning of the xx century, three stand out for having chosen the same subject for presentation of their doctorate thesis. We briefly analyze their biographies, placing special emphasis on the content of their doctorate thesis. Urethral stenosis was a very mentioned disease during the period studied due to its high incidence. We distinguish the therapeutic changes contributed in the three theses studied. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Finite element analyses for design evaluation of biodegradable magnesium alloy stents in arterial vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Wei [Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Gastaldi, Dario, E-mail: dario.gastaldi@polimi.it [Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Yang Ke; Tan Lili [Division of Specialized Materials and Devices, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco [Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Biodegradable magnesium alloy stents (MAS) can provide a great benefit for diseased vessels and avoid the long-term incompatible interactions between vessels and permanent stent platforms. However, the existing MAS showed insufficient scaffolding to the target vessels due to short degradation time. In this study, a three dimensional finite element model combined with a degradable material model of AZ31 (Al 0.03, Zn 0.01, Mn 0.002 and Mg balance, mass percentage) was applied to three different MAS designs including an already implanted stent (Stent A), an optimized design (Stent B) and a patented stent design (Stent C). One ring of each design was implanted through a simulation in a vessel model then degraded with the changing interaction between outer stent surface and the vessel. Results showed that a proper stent design (Stent B) can lead to an increase of nearly 120% in half normalized recoil time of the vessel compared to the Stent A; moreover, the expectation that the MAS design, with more mass and optimized mechanical properties, can increase scaffolding time was verified numerically. The Stent C has more materials than Stent B; however, it only increased the half normalized recoil time of the vessel by nearly 50% compared to the Stent A because of much higher stress concentration than that of Stent B. The 3D model can provide a convenient design and testing tool for novel magnesium alloy stents.

  19. Finite element analyses for design evaluation of biodegradable magnesium alloy stents in arterial vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; Gastaldi, Dario; Yang Ke; Tan Lili; Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable magnesium alloy stents (MAS) can provide a great benefit for diseased vessels and avoid the long-term incompatible interactions between vessels and permanent stent platforms. However, the existing MAS showed insufficient scaffolding to the target vessels due to short degradation time. In this study, a three dimensional finite element model combined with a degradable material model of AZ31 (Al 0.03, Zn 0.01, Mn 0.002 and Mg balance, mass percentage) was applied to three different MAS designs including an already implanted stent (Stent A), an optimized design (Stent B) and a patented stent design (Stent C). One ring of each design was implanted through a simulation in a vessel model then degraded with the changing interaction between outer stent surface and the vessel. Results showed that a proper stent design (Stent B) can lead to an increase of nearly 120% in half normalized recoil time of the vessel compared to the Stent A; moreover, the expectation that the MAS design, with more mass and optimized mechanical properties, can increase scaffolding time was verified numerically. The Stent C has more materials than Stent B; however, it only increased the half normalized recoil time of the vessel by nearly 50% compared to the Stent A because of much higher stress concentration than that of Stent B. The 3D model can provide a convenient design and testing tool for novel magnesium alloy stents.

  20. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  1. A brief review on anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of urethral strictures remains a challenging field in urology even though there are a variety of procedures to treat it at present, as no one approach is superior over another. This paper reviewed the surgical options for the management of different sites and types of anterior urethral stricture, providing a brief discussion of the controversies regarding this issue and suggesting possible future advancements. Among the existing procedures, simple dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy are more commonly used for short urethral strictures ( <1 cm, soft and no previous intervention. Currently, urethroplasty using buccal mucosa or penile skin is the most widely adopted clinical techniques and have proved successful. Nonetheless, complications such as donor site morbidity remain problem. Tissue engineering techniques are considered as a promising solution for urethral reconstruction, but require further investigation, as does stem cell therapy. Keywords: Anterior urethral strictures, Urethral reconstruction, Tissue engineering, Urethral strictures

  2. The urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    , the parameters showed highly significant negative correlation with ICIQ-SF, pad test and the number of incontinence episodes per week and are therefore valid as urodynamic severity measures. UPR in SUI women before and after TVT demonstrated a more efficient urethral closure function after the operation. The Po......-rest was unchanged suggesting that the sphincteric unit was virtually unaltered and hence the permanent closure forces unchanged. However, the resting opening elastance increased by 18% indicating that at the resting state the TVT somewhat improves the closure function by providing increased resistance against...... the dilation of the urethra, which probably explains the decreased maximum urine flow rate found after TVT in this and previous studies. The APIR increased in all patients after TVT suggesting that the support system was re-established and thus the adjunctive closure forces improved, regardless of the type...

  3. Long-term urethral catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Dickens, Nicola

    This article discusses long-term urethral catheterisation, focusing on the relevant anatomy and physiology, indications for the procedure, catheter selection and catheter care. It is important that nurses have a good working knowledge of long-term catheterisation as the need for this intervention will increase with the rise in chronic health conditions and the ageing population.

  4. Anastomotic Urethroplasty for an Obstructing Calculus Within a Bulbar Urethral Diverticulum and Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Banapour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male with prior history of endoscopic urethral calculus removal presented to the emergency room with urinary retention and a palpable perineal mass. A CT showed a large calcification within the bulbar urethra. After multiple unsuccessful attempts at foley catheter insertion, the urology service was consulted. The patient was taken to the operating room where an obstructing urethral calculus with associated urethral stricture was visualized on cystoscopy. We present an exceedingly rare case of recurrent urethrolithiasis with associated urethral stricture managed with initial suprapubic tube and delayed primary end-to-end urethroplasty, excision of urethral stricture and urethral diverticulectomy.

  5. Unusual giant prostatic urethral calculus | Bello | Journal of Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and ...

  6. Management strategies for idiopathic urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, L; Farrelly, P; Dickson, A P; Goyal, A

    2016-02-01

    Williams and Mikhael (1971) described idiopathic urethritis (IU) as a self-limiting condition that affects boys aged 5-15 years, with symptoms of urethrorrhagia, dysuria and haematuria. However, a proportion of boys will remain symptomatic for several years, and may develop urethral stricture (Poch et al., 2007; Palagiri et al., 2003). There is no universally effective treatment for IU, although various strategies have been employed. To review the presentation and long-term outcomes of boys with IU, and present the efficacy of management strategies that have been utilised. A retrospective review was performed of all boys with IU. It was based on clinical and cystoscopic findings for presentation, medical history, management and clinical progress. Fifty-four boys were included, with a median age of 11 years (range 5-15 years) at presentation. The median duration of symptoms was 18 months (range 2-132 months). The median follow-up was 18.5 months (range 1-120 months). Seven (13.0%) boys had early urethral stricture at initial cystourethroscopy, and one (1.9%) developed stricture during follow-up. Thirty-six boys (66.7%) had previous circumcision and four (7.4%) had meatal stenosis. Eight (14.8%) had previous hypospadias repair. Whilst 50% of boys with IU do not require any specific treatment, those with severe/unremitting symptoms may benefit from a trial of urethral steroids or short-term urethral catheterisation. The mechanisms of benefit from these modalities are unclear and they require further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and morbidity of urethral Trichomonas vaginalis in Japanese men with or without urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seike, Kensaku; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Kubota, Yasuaki; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Deguchi, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is one of the pathogens causing sexually transmitted infections. This microorganism is a common pathogen among women, but its significance as a cause of morbidity among men remains uncertain. We sought to determine the prevalence and morbidity of T. vaginalis infection in Japanese men with and without urethritis. We examined urine specimens from 215 men with urethritis and 98 men without urethritis for the presence of urethral T. vaginalis by PCR assay. Only four patients-one with gonococcal urethritis, one with non-gonococcal chlamydial urethritis, one with non-gonococcal non-chlamydial urethritis and one without urethritis-were positive for T. vaginalis. The prevalence of T. vaginalis was 1.4% in men with urethritis and 1.0% in men without urethritis. A possible relation between the appearance of T. vaginalis and clinical symptoms was not confirmed. In the present study, the incidence of urethral T. vaginalis infection appears to be rare in Japanese men with or without urethritis, and T. vaginalis may be an uncommon pathogen in male urethritis in Japan.

  8. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  9. Redo-urethroplasty in pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect: an audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Suresh K; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Kumar, Santosh; Devasia, Antony; Kekre, Nitin S

    2011-02-01

    To predict the outcome of redo-urethroplasty after failed single or multiple open urethral procedures for pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. From January 1997 to December 2006, 43 patients underwent redo-urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. Forty-one were referred from other centers. All had undergone open surgery along with an endoscopic procedure (one or more procedures in each patient) which included endoscopic internal urethrotomy, urethral stenting or urethral dilations. There were 43 men with mean age of 29 (range 11-52). Eleven had associated injuries: intraperitoneal bladder rupture (3), bladder neck (2), rectum (3), anal sphincter (2), combined bladder, rectum and anal sphincter (1). Trocar suprapubic cystostomy was performed in 22, rail-road procedures in 10 and open suprapubic cystostomy in 11 along with the management of associated injuries as immediate treatment. Of 43 patients, 28 had progressive perineal, and 12 had transpubic repair. Three patients had total bulbar necrosis, and they underwent prepuceal tube reconstruction (1) and staged substitution with BMG and standard scrotal inlay (2). Analysis of various factors like number of attempts at previous surgery and stricture length did not affect the outcome. A successful result was achieved in 36 (83.72%), improved and stable in five and failure in two. The overall result of redo-urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect continues to be gratifying. Failures happen usually within the first 3 months. Substitution urethroplasty can be reserved for those who have long distraction defect. Long-term follow-up is essential using stringent criteria to measure success.

  10. Allium Stents: A Novel Solution for the Management of Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Bahouth

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stents are widely use in endoscopic urological procedures. One of the most important indications is the treatment of urinary tract strictures. Allium™ Medical has introduced several types of stents for the treatment of different types of urinary tract strictures, based on anatomic location. All the stents are made of nitinol and coated with a co-polymer that reduces encrustations. These stents are self-expandable and have a large caliber and a high radial force. They have different shapes, designed especially for the treatment of each type of stricture. One of the most important features of Allium-manufactured stents is the ease of removal, due to their special unraveling feature. The company has introduced the Bulbar Urethral Stent (BUS for treatment of bulbar urethral strictures; a rounded stent available in different lengths. Initial data on 64 patients with bulbar urethral stricture treated with the BUS showed a significant improvement in symptoms, with minimal complications and few adverse events. For treatment of prostate obstruction in patients unfit for surgery or unwilling to undergo a classical prostatic surgery, the Triangular Prostatic Stent (TPS was introduced, which has a triangular shape that fits in the prostatic urethra. Its body has a high radial force attached to an anchor (which prevents migration through a trans-sphincteric wire (which reduces incontinence rate. Initial data on 51 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms and in urinary peak flow rate, with a relatively small number of complications. The Round Posterior Stent (RPS was designed for treatment of post radical prostatectomy bladder neck contracture. This short, round stent has an anchor, which is placed in the bladder neck. This stent being relatively new, the clinical data are still limited. Ureteral strictures can be treated with the Ureteral Stent (URS, which is round-shaped, available in different lengths, and has an anchor option (for very

  11. SIU/ICUD Consultation on Urethral Strictures: Posterior urethral stenosis after treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschorn, Sender; Elliott, Sean; Coburn, Michael; Wessells, Hunter; Zinman, Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Posterior urethral stenosis can result from radical prostatectomy in approximately 5%-10% of patients (range 1.4%-29%). Similarly, 4%-9% of men after brachytherapy and 1%-13% after external beam radiotherapy will develop stenosis. The rate will be greater after combination therapy and can exceed 40% after salvage radical prostatectomy. Although postradical prostatectomy stenoses mostly develop within 2 years, postradiotherapy stenoses take longer to appear. Many result in storage and voiding symptoms and can be associated with incontinence. The evaluation consists of a workup similar to that for lower urinary tract symptoms, with additional testing to rule out recurrent or persistent prostate cancer. Treatment is usually initiated with an endoscopic approach commonly involving dilation, visual urethrotomy with or without laser treatment, and, possibly, UroLume stent placement. Open surgical urethroplasty has been reported, as well as urinary diversion for recalcitrant stenosis. A proposed algorithm illustrating a graded approach has been provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Urethritis Compared With Chlamydial Urethritis Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason J; Morton, Anna N; Henzell, Helen R; Berzins, Karen; Druce, Julian; Fairley, Christopher K; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Read, Tim Rh; Hocking, Jane S; Chen, Marcus Y

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical characteristics associated with herpes simplex virus (HSV) urethritis in men and to compare those with chlamydial urethritis. We compared clinical and laboratory data from men diagnosed with polymerase chain reaction confirmed HSV urethritis with those of men with chlamydial urethritis presenting to Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2000 and 2015. Eighty HSV urethritis cases were identified: 55 (68%, 95% confidence interval, 58-78) were by HSV-1 and 25 (32%, 95% confidence interval, 22-42) by HSV-2. Compared with chlamydial urethritis, men with HSV urethritis were significantly more likely to report severe dysuria (20% vs 0%, P < 0.01) or constitutional symptoms (15% vs 0%, P < 0.01). Men with HSV urethritis were significantly more likely to have meatitis (62% vs 23%, P < 0.01), genital ulceration (37% vs 0%, P < 0.01), or inguinal lymphadenopathy (30% vs 0%, P < 0.01) but less likely to have urethral discharge (32% vs 69%, P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the proportion of men who had raised (≥5) polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-powered field between the two groups (P = 0.46). The clinical presentation of HSV urethritis in men may differ from those of chlamydial urethritis and guide testing for HSV in men presenting with non-gonococcal urethritis.

  13. Urethral Leiomyoma: A Rare Clinical Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Beng Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrauterine leiomyomas are encountered occasionally, which can pose a diagnostic dilemma and challenge to the gynaecologist. We report a rare case of urethral leiomyoma. A 31-year-old woman with history of primary subfertility presented with mass at her urethral meatus and lower urinary tract symptoms. She underwent examination under anaesthesia and excision of the urethral mass. Histopathological examination confirmed leiomyoma. Diagnosis and management of this common growth situated at a rare location were reviewed and discussed.

  14. Infectious Urethritis in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meares, Edwin M.

    1975-01-01

    Acute and recurrent infectious urethritis in men and women is commonly seen by physicians. Since specific therapy varies widely with the type of urethritis present, the proper diagnosis must be clearly established if curative drug therapy is to be selected. It is valuable, therefore, to review the diagnosis and therapy of the various forms of infectious urethritis that are recognized today in both men and women. PMID:1199099

  15. Critical appraisal of the Spanner™ prostatic stent in the treatment of prostatic obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McKenzie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Patrick McKenzie1, Gopal Badlani11Department of Urology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem NC, USAAbstract: The Spanner™ stent was first used in patients to relieve bladder outlet obstruction (BOO, and has recently been used in patients following transurethral microwave thermotherapy and men unfit for surgical intervention. We review the current literature on the role of the Spanner stent in treating prostatic obstruction compared to previously reported cases involving the use of temporary stents. The Spanner stent has been found to be successful in treating patients with bladder outlet obstruction from benign prostatic hyperplasia and following high-energy transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT. Patients with the Spanner stent had an increase in peak flow rate and a decrease in post void residual and International Prostate Symptom Scores. In patients treated with TUMT, quality of life measures indicate that the Spanner stent shows increased ease of bladder drainage, decreased leakage, and no adverse effect on daily activities. In patients unfit for surgery, however, there was increased retention and pain requiring stent removal in 63% of cases. The Spanner stent offers ease of insertion with a decrease in voiding symptoms in selected patients. Based on limited data, the Spanner stent has been recommended as a treatment option for men with BOO following TUMT. However, it is not a good treatment option for men unfit for surgery based on an increased incidence of urinary retention and dysuria. The Spanner stent is the only currently approved temporary stent and, based on a literature review, it does not offer significant advantage over previously used temporary stents. It is notable that most researchers have not evaluated the role of detrusor function on the outcomes.Keywords: benign prostate hyperplasia, Spanner stent, urethral stent, minimally invasive therapy

  16. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Zachariah A.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian; Anderson, Richard L.; Murray, Brian C.; Galbreath, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha

  17. Management of bladder neck stenosis and urethral stricture and stenosis following treatment for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Helen L; Al-Hakeem, Yasser; Maldonado, Javier J; Tse, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review is to examine all urethral strictures and stenoses subsequent to treatment for prostate cancer, including radical prostatectomy (RP), radiotherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and cryotherapy. The overall majority respond to endoscopic treatment, including dilatation, direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) or bladder neck incision (BNI). There are adjunct treatments to endoscopic management, including injections of corticosteroids and mitomycin C (MMC) and urethral stents, which remain controversial and are not currently mainstay of treatment. Recalcitrant strictures are most commonly managed with urethroplasty, while recalcitrant stenosis is relatively rare yet almost always associated with bothersome urinary incontinence, requiring bladder neck reconstruction and subsequent artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, or urinary diversion for the devastated outlet.

  18. Treatment of Bulbar Urethral Strictures. A Review, with Personal Critical Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Oosterlinck

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review article on treatment of bulbar urethral strictures with personal critical remarks on newer developments. As a treatment of first intention there exists 4 options : dilatation, urethrotomy, end to end anastomosis and free graft, open urethroplasty. Success rate of dilatation and visual urethrotomy after 4 years is only 20 en 40 % respectively. Laser urethrotomy could not fulfill expectations. End to end anastomosis obtains a very high success rate but is only applicable for short strictures. Free graft urethroplasty obtains success rates of ± 80 %. There is considerable debate on the best material for grafting. Buccal mucosa graft is the new wave, but this is not based on scientific data. Whether this graft should be used dorsally or ventrally is also a point of discussion. In view of the good results published with both techniques it is probably of no importance. Intraluminal stents are not indicated for complicated cases and give only good results in those cases which can easily be treated with other techniques. Metal self-retaining urethral stent , resorbable stents and endoscopic urethroplasty is briefly discussed. Redo’s and complicated urethral strictures need often other solutions. Here skin flap from the penile skin and scrotal flap can be used. Advantages and drawbracks of both are discussed. There is still a place for two-stage procedures in complicated redo�s. The two-stage mesh-graft urethroplasty offers advantage over the use of scrotal skin. Some other rare techniques like substitution with bowel and pudendal thigh flap, to cover deep defects, are also discussed.

  19. Balloon dilatation of iatrogenic urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Acunas, G.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the urethra was performed in five patients with iatrogenic urethral strictures. The urethral strictures were successfully negotiated and dilated in all patients. Redilatation became necessary in a period ranging from 3 to 10 months. The authors believe that balloon dilatation of the urethra can be safely and successfully performed; the procedure produces minimal trauma and immediate relief of symptoms. (orig.)

  20. Hydraulic urethral dilatation after optical internal urethrotomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the rate of early recurrence of urethral stricture in the first six months in patients who perform hydraulic urethral dilatation(HUD) after optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and compare the early recurrence Fate in patients who perform HUD after OIU with the recurrence rates in patients reported in the ...

  1. [Transurethral thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Xi-Ling; Liu, Yi-Li; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of endourethrotomy with thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. We treated 36 cases of urethral stricture or atresia by endourethrotomy with thulium laser, restored the urethral continuity by vaporization excision of the scar tissue, and observed the clinical effects and complications. The mean operation time was 35 min, ranging from 10 to 90 min. Smooth urination was achieved after 2-6 weeks of catheter indwelling, with no urinary incontinence. The patients were followed up for 4-24 (mean 12) months, during which 27 did not need any reintervention, 5 developed urinary thinning but cured by urethral dilation, 3 received another laser urethrotomy for previous negligence of timely urethral dilation, and the other 1 underwent open urethroplasty. Thulium laser urethrotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for short urethral stricture, which is also suitable for severe urethral stricture and urethral atresia. Its short-term outcome is satisfactory, but its long-term effect remains to be further observed.

  2. Azithromycin Failure in Mycoplasma genitalium Urethritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jorgen S.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Read, Timothy R.H.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Hopkins, Carol A.; Moss, Lorna M.; Fairley, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    We report significant failure rates (28%, 95% confidence interval 15%–45%) after administering 1 g azithromycin to men with Mycoplasma genitalium–positive nongonococcal urethritis. In vitro evidence supported reduced susceptibility of M. genitalium to macrolides. Moxifloxacin administration resulted in rapid symptom resolution and eradication of infection in all cases. These findings have implications for management of urethritis. PMID:16836839

  3. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  4. Corynebacterium propinquum associated with acute, nongonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Roushan, Azita

    2013-10-01

    Corynebacterium propinquum is usually considered part of the normal human oropharyngeal flora and is rarely responsible for clinical infection. We report here what seems to be the first case of acute purulent urethral discharge in a young Iranian man with urethritis acquired after orogenital contact. Attention should be devoted to less common nondiphtheriae Corynebacterium species for differential diagnosis.

  5. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication: Bladder can be augmented with dorsal urethral mucosa. J.E. Mensaha,∗. , K.N. Ampadua, M.Y. Kyeia, B. Edusieb.

  6. The diastal urethral stenosis in female children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauer, W.

    1985-01-01

    The distal urethral stenosis in female children is a pathological reality. It is represented by the hymenal hood, the meatal stenosis and the distal urethral ring. Diagnosis and localisation of the stenosis is maintained by calibration with bougies a boule. Therapeutical consequences are: internal urethrotomy, bilateral meatotomy and excision of hymenal hoods. (Author)

  7. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traboulsi, S.L.; Witjes, J.A.; Kassouf, W.

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation

  8. A clinicopathological study of urethritis in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Khawer; Mumtaz, Babar; Raza, Naeem

    2009-12-01

    To determine the etiology and frequency of different types of urethritis in adult males. A case series. The Dermatology Department of PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from June 2004 to December 2007. One hundred male patients having complaints of urethral discharge and dysuria reporting in the skin OPD were included in the study. Patients who had received systemic treatment for their complaints and those who had other systemic infections were excluded. A detailed history including history of sexual contact was taken. Dermatological examination including examination of external genitalia was also performed. All these patients were subjected to complete physical examination, complete urine examination, urethral pus for gram staining and culture, endo-urethral swab with urethral loop for seeing Chlamydia antigen by fluorescent microscopy, cultures for ureaplasma and Wet mount specimen microscopy for trichomonas along with HIV (serum ELISA) test. Non-gonococcal urethritis was diagnosed on the presence of more than five polymorphonuclear leucocytes per high power field in at least five fields of Gram stained urethral smear, in the absence of Gram negative diplococci. The mean age was 29.2 + or - 5.8 years. Seventy (70%) cases were diagnosed as gonococcal urethritis and 30 (30%) cases as non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU). History of illicit sexual exposure was available in 25 (25%) patients. The interval period between initiation of symptoms and reporting of patient in gonococcal urethritis was 4 to 30 days (mean 12.8 days) and 4 days to 2 months (mean 20.7 days) in non-gonococcal urethritis. The patients with gonococcal urethritis presented with purulent discharge in 66 (84%) cases, and dysuria in 49 (70%) cases. In the NGU group, 25 (80%) cases had mucoid discharge and 18 (65%) had dysuria. in 70%, Neisseria gonorrhoeae was isolated, Chlamydia trachomatis in 16%, ureaplasma in 8%, and Trichomonas vaginalis in 4%. No organism could be detected in 2% cases. HIV test was

  9. Imaging of the female urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, P.; Long, S.S.; Long, C.M.; Genadry, R.R.; Macura, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Female urethral diverticulum is a localized out-pouching of the urethra that is becoming increasingly prevalent, but often poses a diagnostic challenge. Traditionally, conventional voiding cystourethrography has been used to make the preoperative diagnosis. With the development of higher-resolution images acquired through ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the anatomy and various abnormalities of the female urethra can be better elucidated. This article focuses on the imaging features of female urethral diverticulum, with emphasis on diagnostic pearls, particularly using MRI. Female urethral diverticulum can be best identified by their location in the posterolateral urethra and by their communication with the urethral lumen. Improved imaging techniques combined with increased physician awareness of urethral diverticulum will lead to more prompt and accurate diagnosis of this entity, leading to better treatment of affected patients

  10. URETHROPLASTY FOR COMPLICATED ANTERIOR URETHRAL STRICTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuya; Hori, Shunta; Morizawa, Yosuke; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    (Objectives) To compare efficacy and outcome of urethroplasty for complicated anterior urethral strictures. (Methods) Twelve patients, included 3 boys, with anterior urethral stricture underwent urethroplasty after the failure of either urethral dilatation or internal urethrotomy. We evaluated pre- and post-operative Q max and surgical outcome. (Results) Four patients were treated with end-to-end anastomosis, included a case of bulbar urethral elongation simultaneously, one patient was treated with augmented anastomotic urethroplasty, three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with prepucial flap, one patient was treated with tubed urethroplasty with prepucial flap (Ducket procedure) and three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft. Postoperative Qmax improved in all patients without major complications and recurrence during follow-up periods ranging from 17 to 102 months (mean 55 months). (Conclusions) Urethroplasty is an effective therapeutic procedure for complicated anterior urethral stricture.

  11. Impact of stent strut design in metallic stents and biodegradable scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foin, Nicolas; Lee, Renick D; Torii, Ryo; Guitierrez-Chico, Juan Luis; Mattesini, Alessio; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo; Davies, Justin E; Di Mario, Carlo; Joner, Michael; Virmani, Renu; Wong, Philip

    2014-12-20

    Advances in the understanding of healing mechanisms after stent implantation have led to the recognition of stent strut thickness as an essential factor affecting re-endothelialization and overall long term vessel healing response after Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCI). Emergence of Drug-eluting stents (DESs) with anti-proliferative coating has contributed to reducing the incidence of restenosis and Target Lesion Revascularization (TVR), while progress and innovations in stent materials have in the meantime facilitated the design of newer platforms with more conformability and thinner struts, producing lesser injury and improving integration into the vessel wall. Recent advances in biodegradable metal and polymer materials now also allow for the design of fully biodegradable platforms, which are aimed at scaffolding the vessel only temporarily to prevent recoil and constrictive remodeling of the vessel during the initial period required, and are then progressively resorbed thereby avoiding the drawback of leaving an unnecessary implant permanently in the vessel. The aim of this article is to review recent evolution in stent material and stent strut design while understanding their impact on PCI outcomes. The article describes the different metallic alloys and biodegradable material properties and how these have impacted the evolution of stent strut thickness and ultimately outcomes in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for ...

  13. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Areo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for the treatment of genital warts.

  14. Aetiology of Urethral Strictures at Moi Teaching and Refferal Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16.3 years. Conclusion. Urethritis, iatrogenic and accidental trauma are still the commonest causes of urethral strictures in our environment. These causes are preventable. Introduction. Urethral stricture disease is caused by any process that injures the urethral epithelium or the underlying spongiosum leading to healing by.

  15. A review on biodegradable materials for cardiovascular stent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Da; Li, Zhen; Pan, Yu; Sabir, MuhammadIqbal; Zheng, Yu-Feng; Li, Li

    2016-09-01

    A stent is a medical device designed to serve as a temporary or permanent internal scaffold to maintain or increase the lumen of a body conduit. The researchers and engineers diverted to investigate biodegradable materials due to the limitation of metallic materials in stent application such as stent restenosis which requires prolonged anti platelet therapy, often result in smaller lumen after implantation and obstruct re-stenting treatments. Biomedical implants with temporary function for the vascular intervention are extensively studied in recent years. The rationale for biodegradable stent is to provide the support for the vessel in predicted period of time and then degrading into biocompatible constituent. The degradation of stent makes the re-stenting possible after several months and also ameliorates the vessel wall quality. The present article focuses on the biodegradable materials for the cardiovascular stent. The objective of this review is to describe the possible biodegradable materials for stent and their properties such as design criteria, degradation behavior, drawbacks and advantages with their recent clinical and preclinical trials.

  16. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Nieves; Macaya, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

  17. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo, Nieves; Macaya, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Nieves Gonzalo, Carlos MacayaInterventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute. Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses imp...

  18. The urethral smear as a tool in diagnosing adenovirus-induced urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønsberg, E; Hartgill, U

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus is a recognised cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, and is not uncommonly associated with extragenital signs and symptoms. This case report describes a patient with symptoms of conjunctivitis, meatitis and urethritis. The urethral smear revealed almost exclusively monocytes microscopically, raising the suspicion of a viral aetiology. Results confirmed the presence of adenovirus in both the eyes and urethra. Despite waning reliance on the urethral smear in sexual health clinics, it can still be an important diagnostic tool in assessing the aetiology of non-specific urethritis. Finding an obvious monocytic cell response in the urethral smear can indicate a viral cause and allow the clinician to optimise management, counsel appropriately, and potentially reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. A rare case of giant urethral calculus and multiple urethral diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agarwal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stones in adults are rare and usually encountered with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We report a 54 years old gentleman who presented with urinary retention due to a large urethral calculus impacted in bulbar urethra with multiple stones in anterior and posterior urethral diverticulum. On examination a mass of size 5.5cmx4cmx3cm was palpable at anterior perineum with a fistulous tract from which pus was oozing out. On retrograde urethrogram a large urethral calculus with bulbar diverticulum and multiple radio opacity in prostatic area were revealed. Patient was managed by suprapubic cystostomy initially and later on by external urethrotomy, diverticulectomy, urethroscopic removal of multiple stones in prostatic urethral diverticulum and urethroplasty. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 46-48 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6838

  20. Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting Overview Carotid angioplasty (kuh-ROT-id AN-jee-o-plas-tee) and stenting ... to better see and examine the blood vessels. Food and medications You'll receive instructions on what ...

  1. Urethral syndrome” in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Dutkiewicz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A contemporary overview of knowledge is presented on the subject of the so-called urethral syndrome in women, the causes of which have yet to be clearly identified. For practical reasons, the following three forms of the syndrome have been distinguished: interstitial cystitis, the “infectious” form and the “clean” form. In women who do not show symptoms of inflammation of the reproductive organs, bacterial urethritis should be distinguished from the urethral syndrome by evaluating the symptoms, the bacteriological tests and the risk of infection.

  2. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khourdaji, Iyad; Parke, Jacob; Burks, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), photon beam therapy (PBT), high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, and cryotherapy 2.5%. Radiation effects on the genitourinary system can manifest early or months to years after treatment with the onus being on the clinician to investigate and rule-out stricture disease as an underlying etiology for lower urinary tract symptoms. Obliterative endarteritis resulting in ischemia and fibrosis of the irradiated tissue complicates treatment strategies, which include urethral dilation, direct-vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU), urethral stents, and urethroplasty. Failure rates for dilation and DVIU are exceedingly high with several studies indicating that urethroplasty is the most definitive and durable treatment modality for patients with radiation-induced stricture disease. However, a detailed discussion should be offered regarding development or worsening of incontinence after treatment with urethroplasty. Further studies are required to assess the nature and treatment of cryotherapy and HIFU-induced strictures. PMID:26494994

  3. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad Khourdaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT, brachytherapy (BT, photon beam therapy (PBT, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, and cryotherapy 2.5%. Radiation effects on the genitourinary system can manifest early or months to years after treatment with the onus being on the clinician to investigate and rule-out stricture disease as an underlying etiology for lower urinary tract symptoms. Obliterative endarteritis resulting in ischemia and fibrosis of the irradiated tissue complicates treatment strategies, which include urethral dilation, direct-vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU, urethral stents, and urethroplasty. Failure rates for dilation and DVIU are exceedingly high with several studies indicating that urethroplasty is the most definitive and durable treatment modality for patients with radiation-induced stricture disease. However, a detailed discussion should be offered regarding development or worsening of incontinence after treatment with urethroplasty. Further studies are required to assess the nature and treatment of cryotherapy and HIFU-induced strictures.

  4. Stent thrombosis with drug-eluting and bare-metal stents: evidence from a comprehensive network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Della Riva, Diego; Stettler, Christoph; Sangiorgi, Diego; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Kimura, Takeshi; Briguori, Carlo; Sabatè, Manel; Kim, Hyo-Soo; De Waha, Antoinette; Kedhi, Elvin; Smits, Pieter C; Kaiser, Christoph; Sardella, Gennaro; Marullo, Antonino; Kirtane, Ajay J; Leon, Martin B; Stone, Gregg W

    2012-04-14

    The relative safety of drug-eluting stents and bare-metal stents, especially with respect to stent thrombosis, continues to be debated. In view of the overall low frequency of stent thrombosis, large sample sizes are needed to accurately estimate treatment differences between stents. We compared the risk of thrombosis between bare-metal and drug-eluting stents. For this network meta-analysis, randomised controlled trials comparing different drug-eluting stents or drug-eluting with bare-metal stents currently approved in the USA were identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. Information about study design, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample characteristics, and clinical outcomes was extracted. 49 trials including 50,844 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups were analysed. 1-year definite stent thrombosis was significantly lower with cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents (CoCr-EES) than with bare-metal stents (odds ratio [OR] 0·23, 95% CI 0·13-0·41). The significant difference in stent thrombosis between CoCr-EES and bare-metal stents was evident as early as 30 days (OR 0·21, 95% CI 0·11-0·42) and was also significant between 31 days and 1 year (OR 0·27, 95% CI 0·08-0·74). CoCr-EES were also associated with significantly lower rates of 1-year definite stent thrombosis compared with paclitaxel-eluting stents (OR 0·28, 95% CI 0·16-0·48), permanent polymer-based sirolimus-eluting stents (OR 0·41, 95% CI 0·24-0·70), phosphorylcholine-based zotarolimus-eluting stents (OR 0·21, 95% CI 0·10-0·44), and Resolute zotarolimus-eluting stents (OR 0·14, 95% CI 0·03-0·47). At 2-year follow-up, CoCr-EES were still associated with significantly lower rates of definite stent thrombosis than were bare-metal (OR 0·35, 95% CI 0·17-0·69) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (OR 0·34, 95% CI 0·19-0·62). No other drug-eluting stent had lower definite thrombosis rates compared with bare

  5. Routine short-term ureteral stent in living donor renal transplantation: introduction of a simple stent removal technique without using anesthesia and cystoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J; Lu, J; Zu, Q; Yang, S; Sun, S; Cai, W; Zhang, L; Zhang, X

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated routine short-time insertion of ureteral stent in living donor renal transplant at a single center. It was easy to remove the stent without cystoscopy and anesthesia. Between October 2007 and July 2010, a single surgeon performed 76 living donor renal transplantations at one institute. All recipients underwent extravesical ureteroneocystostomy with a 2-0 silk suture passed through the venting side hole of the double-J stent into the bladder; a quadruple knot prevented the suture's slippage or distraction from the stent. After removal of the indwelling catheter at 5 days posttransplantation, the 2-0 silk passed with the urinary stream within 72 hours. The double-J stent was removed at 7 to 10 (mean 8.4) days after kidney transplantation by pulling the 2-0 silk out of the urethral orifice without anesthesia or cystoscopy. There was only one case of stenosis, which was resolved by surgery. No patient developed urinary leakage. There were three episodes of urinary tract infection in 70 patients during first 6 months' follow-up. Routine short-term stenting is a safe and effective technique in living donor renal transplantation. Removal of the stent is feasible without cystoscopy or anesthesia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Urethritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groin area Tender and swollen penis A digital rectal exam will also be performed. Women will have ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  7. Transperineal Ultrasonographic findings of female urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jin Han; Koo, Bong Sik; Nam, Ki Dong; Choi, Jong Cheol; Park, Byeong Ho; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kweon, Heon Young

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the role of sonography for women with a suspected urethral diverticulum and to evaluate the transperineal ultrasonographic findings of female urethral diverticulum. Eight women (mean age, 44 years) who presented with urethral symptoms and clinically suspected urethral diverticula underwent transperineal ultrasonography; sagittal and coronal images were obtained. Sonography was done with either a 7-5 MHz curved array transducer or 10-5 MHz linear transducer, placed on the perineum at the level of the urethra. Ultrasonograms were assessed for the presence, size, location, shape, echogenicity, and septum. Five patients underwent voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). Results of the sonograms and VCUGs were compared with each other and with surgical findings. Longitudinally, all lesions were located in a middle third of the urethra. In axial plane, 4 diverticula wrapped around 50-100% of the urethra. 3 cases located posteriorly, and 1 case laterally. Seven diverticula contained echogenic debris. Three cases have septa in the diverticulum. The outer margin of the diverticula was smooth in 2 patients and was lobulated in 6 patients. In 3 of 5 cases who underwent VCUG, diverticula were filled with contrast, and appeared to be smaller than those of ultrasonography. In addition, all were single diverticulum in VCUG. Most urethral diverticulum were located in a middle third of the urethra, wrapped around the urethra or round posteriorly. Many cases appear unilocular or multilocular with echogenic debris. Transperineal ultrasonography is easy to operate and accurate for showing urethral diverticulum, and it may be useful for diagnosing this group of women with urethral symptoms and suspected urethral diverticulum. It provides information on the extent and location of the diverticulum, which are important in surgical excision.

  8. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Smith

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of urethritis in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, John R

    2010-04-01

    Symptoms of urethritis in men typically include urethral discharge, penile itching or tingling, and dysuria. A diagnosis can be made if at least one of the following is present: discharge, a positive result on a leukocyte esterase test in first-void urine, or at least 10 white blood cells per high-power field in urine sediment. The primary pathogens associated with urethritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Racial disparities in the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections persist in the United States, with rates of gonorrhea 40 times higher in black adolescent males than in white adolescent males. Recent studies have focused on identifying causes of nongonococcal urethritis and developing testing for atypical organisms, such as Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma species. Less common pathogens identified in patients with urethritis include Trichomonas species, adenovirus, and herpes simplex virus. History and examination findings can help distinguish urethritis from other urogenital syndromes, such as epididymitis, orchitis, and prostatitis. The goals of treatment include alleviating symptoms; preventing complications in the patient and his sexual partners; reducing the transmission of coinfections (particularly human immunodeficiency virus); identifying and treating the patient's contacts; and encouraging behavioral changes that will reduce the risk of recurrence. The combination of azithromycin or doxycycline plus ceftriaxone or cefixime is considered first-line empiric therapy in patients with urethritis. Expedited partner treatment, which involves giving patients prescriptions for partners who have not been examined by the physician, is advocated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has been approved in many states. There is an association between urethritis and an increased human immunodeficiency virus concentration in semen.

  10. Iatrogenic Urethral Defect Repairment: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulas Fidan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Iatrogenic urethral defect is a complication that occurs after vaginal surgical procedures. Many surgical methods according to place of defect are described in case of injury of urethra. In this article, we reported the repairment of distal urethral defect with the help of greft taken from labia minor. This defect is made by the excision of the granulation tissue that occurred after chronic paraurethral  gland infection.

  11. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravej, Maryam; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals. PMID:21845076

  12. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moravej

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals.

  13. Stenting in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar A Samaniego

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40-81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES. These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion.

  14. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis in non-specific urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terho, P

    1978-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 58.5% of 159 patients with non-specific urethritis (NSU) using irradiated McCoy cell cultures. Patients with persistent Chlamydia-positive NSU remained Chlamydia-positive each time they were examined before treatment and patients with Chlamydia-negative NSU remained Chlamydia-negative during the course of the illness. Neither the duration of symptoms of urethritis nor a history of previous urethritis affected the chlamydial isolation rate significantly. Of 40 patients with severe discharge 30 (75%) harboured C. trachomatis. One-third of the Chlamydia-positive patients had a severe urethral discharge, while this was present in only 15% of Chlamydia-negative patients. Complications--such as conjunctivitis, arthritis, and epididymitis--were more severe in men with Chlamdia-positive NSU than in those with Chlamydia-negative NSU. Of 64 men matched for sexual promiscuity but without urethritis, none harboured C. trachomatis in his urethra. This differs significantly (P less than 0.001) when compared with patients with NSU. C. trachomatis was isolated from the urogenital tract in 24 (42%) out of 57 female sexual contacts of patients with NSU. The presence of C. trachomatis in the women correlated significantly (P less than 0.001) with the isolation of the agent from their male contacts. These findings give further evidence for the aetiological role of C. trachomatis in non-specific urethritis and its sexual transmission. PMID:678958

  16. Radiological findings of congenital urethral valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kook, Shin Ho

    1990-01-01

    Congenital urethral valve is the common cause of hydronephrosis in newborn infants and the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in male children. We reviewed and analysed radiological findings and associated anomalies of 16 cases of congenital urethral valve which were examined during the period from January 1985 to December 1989. The most frequent age was under one year old (56%). The main symptoms were urinary dribbing (37.5%), weak stream (25%) and urinary frequency and incontinence (25%). Anterior urethral valve (AUV) was 5 cases (31%) and posterior urethral valve (PUV) was 11 cases(69%), in which 10 cases were Type I and one case was Type III. Bladder wall thickening was seen in all cases and its severity was partly correlated with the degree of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). VUR was observed in 12 cases (75%), and relatively severe in older age group. The degree of VUR was milder in AUV than PUV. Hydronephrosis was more severe in PUV than in anterior one, and its degree was correlated with the severity of VUR. Associated anomalies were ectopic urethral opening (2 cases), PDA (1 case), congenital megacolon (1 case) and patent urachus (1 case) in PUV. So early diagnosis and treatment of congenital urethral valve is essential to the prevention of renal damage

  17. Urethral prolapse in dogs: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jennifer G; Tobias, Karen M; Smith, Laura

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the signalment, clinical signs, treatment, and outcome of dogs with urethral prolapse and identify risk factors associated with prolapse or treatment. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 48) with urethral prolapse. Medical records (May 1995-June 2010) from 2 referral centers were reviewed. Retrieved data included signalment, clinical signs, laboratory findings, treatment, complications, results of long-term follow-up. Records from Veterinary Medical Data Base (VMDB) were evaluated to determine odds ratios. Odds ratio for urethral prolapse in English bulldogs compared to all breeds was 366.99 (95% CI: 265.83, 506.65). Of 48 affected dogs, 46 had either resection and anastomosis (43 dogs) or urethropexy (3 dogs). The most common early postoperative complication was hemorrhage (39%); postoperative hemorrhage was less common when a simple continuous pattern was used for resection and anastomosis. Prolapse recurred in 57% of dogs available for long-term follow-up; recurrence was less common in dogs that were administered postoperative butorphanol or acepromazine. Gender was not associated with urethral prolapse or postoperative complications. Urethral prolapse occurs most commonly in English bulldogs. Postoperative hemorrhage and prolapse recurrence may be reduced with use of a simple continuous pattern for urethral anastomosis and by administration of postoperative sedation, respectively. Castration status did not appear to affect prolapse development or outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Composite self-expanding bioresorbable prototype stents with reinforced compression performance for congenital heart disease application: Computational and experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fan; Xue, Wen; Wang, Fujun; Liu, Laijun; Shi, Haoqin; Wang, Lu

    2018-08-01

    Stents are vital devices to treat vascular stenosis in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Bioresorbable stents (BRSs) have been applied to reduce challenging complications caused by permanent metal stents. However, it remains almost a total lack of BRSs with satisfactory compression performance specifically for children with congenital heart disease, leading to importantly suboptimal effects. In this work, composite bioresorbable prototype stents with superior compression resistance were designed by braiding and annealing technology, incorporating poly (p-dioxanone) (PPDO) monofilaments and polycaprolactone (PCL) multifilament. Stent prototype compression properties were investigated. The results revealed that novel composite prototype stents showed superior compression force compared to the control ones, as well as recovery ability. Furthermore, deformation mechanisms were analyzed by computational simulation, which revealed bonded interlacing points among yarns play an important role. This research presents important clinical implications in bioresorbable stent manufacture and provides further study with an innovative stent design. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Dianat, SeyedSaeid; Nezami, Behtash G; Mahboubi, Amir Hassan; Sina, Alireza

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome (PBS). During a 10-year period, 7 infants with PBS and urethral hypoplasia presented either with open urachus or surgically created urinary diversion referred to our hospital. Five milliliters of normal saline was pushed via a 22-gauge plastic angiocatheter into the urethra with simultaneous finger pressure on the perineum to occlude the proximal urethra that was repeated with higher volumes of the solution (up to 20 mL). The procedure was continued until a 6F or 8F feeding tube catheter confirmed the urethral patency. Hydrodistension was repeated in 3-month intervals till complete patency was confirmed by imaging. Median age of the infants was 6 (1-8) months. All urethral hydrodistension were successful after 1 to 3 sessions. Follow-up imaging studies showed significant improvement in all patients except one. Natural and surgically created urinary diversions were closed in 6 infants. The hydrodistension create an equal and constant pressure into the urethral wall without any urethral damage. This technique can be considered along with the other available methods for management of urethral hypoplasia in selected cases of PBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Circumferential Stent Fracture: Novel Detection and Treatment with the Use of StentBoost

    OpenAIRE

    Ramegowda, Raghu T.; Chikkaswamy, Srinivas B.; Bharatha, Ashalatha; Radhakrishna, Jayashree; Krishnanaik, Geetha B.; Nanjappa, Manjunath C.; Panneerselvam, Arunkumar

    2012-01-01

    Circumferential stent fracture is extremely uncommon, and in rare cases, it can cause stent thrombosis. Recognizing stent fracture can be difficult on conventional fluoroscopy because of poor stent radiopacity. We found that StentBoost image acquisition yields improved visibility of stent struts, enabling the identification of stent fracture and the precise positioning of new stents over previously stented segments.

  1. Permanent education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardien, S.; Kirsch, R.

    1998-01-01

    The permanent education of the IPN-Lyon inscribes itself completely in the priorities of the tri-annual plan of education of CNRS. These priorities contribute to evolution of research, evaluation of the professions, integration during the professional carriers of the personnel and form the frame for new management practice implementation

  2. Removal of self expandable metallic airway stent: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Chawla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Covered self expandable metallic airway stents (SEMS have been used for benign tracheal stenosis, post intubation tracheal stenosis, tracheal burn or trauma, tracheo-broncho-malacia, and extrinsic compression of trachea. Their placement is considered to be permanent, with open surgery the only way to remove the stent, though there are few cases reports of their removal with the bronchoscope, but the complications after their removal are very high. In our patient, one and a half years after placement of SEMS, she developed cough with dyspnoea, video bronchoscopy showed stenosis above the level of stent with granulation tissue inside the stent, stent fracture in lower part and stent migration to right main bronchus, thus she had all conceivable complications of stent placement. The stent was removed with the help of rigid bronchoscope under general anaesthesia. She was discharged the following day. The case is being reported because it was unique in having all the possible complications of stent placement, and rare as we could take out the stent in Toto. Thirdly, the stent could be removed without any complication.

  3. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer occurs in men and women and can spread quickly to lymph nodes near the urethra. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for urethral cancer.

  4. Management of Posterior Urethral Valves in Rural Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Posterior Urethral Valves in Rural. Kenya .... Antwi S. Audit of Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV) in Children at ... Community Paediatrics Committee, Infectious. Diseases ... Effect of Circumcision on Risk of Urinary Tract. Infection in ...

  5. Potential advantages and limitations of the Leo stent in endovascular treatment of complex cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv Xianli; Li Youxiang; Jiang Chuhan; Yang Xinjian [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan Xili, 100050 Hebei, Beijing (China); Wu Zhongxue, E-mail: ttyyzjb@sina.com [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan Xili, 100050 Hebei, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: The Leo self-expandable stent is a new retractable stent that is delivered via a conventional catheter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of this stent for endovascular treatment of complex aneurysms. Methods: Twenty-eight complex cerebral aneurysms (27 saccular and 1 fusiform) in 28 patients were treated electively. They were located at the internal carotid artery (17), basilar trunk (3), anterior cerebral artery (1), anterior communicating artery (3), vertebral artery (2) and middle cerebral artery (2). One aneurysm exhibited recanalization after primary endovascular treatment without stent. Clinical outcome was assessed with the modified Glasgow Outcome Scale. Results: Deployment of Leo stent was successful in 26 lesions, and difficulties in stent positioning due to tortuous cerebral circulation in 2 cases, which were treated with Neuroform stent. Additional coil embolization was performed in 26 lesions. No permanent neurological deficits were encountered consequent to endovascular procedure. Complete or partial occlusion immediately after stent deployment was achieved in all aneurysms. There was no immediate coil embolization was chosen in 3 cases because of subsequent reduced filling of the aneurysms with contrast agent on angiograms. There were 3 asymptomatic parent artery occlusion related to the deployment of the Leo stent, one stent migration. Follow-up revealed patent stents in the remaining cases. No angiographic recurrences arose. Conclusion: The Leo stent is very useful for endovascular treatment of complex cerebral aneurysms because it is easy to navigate and place precisely. A drawback is that in-stent thrombosis caused by stent placement and stiffer delivery catheters to place larger stents.

  6. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nieves Gonzalo, Carlos MacayaInterventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute. Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.Keywords: absorbable stent, bioresorbable stent, absorb, percutaneous coronary intervention

  7. Modified nasolacrimal duct stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Min; Jin Mei; Chen Huanjun; Li Yi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Traditional nasolacrimal duct stenting possesses some shortcoming including difficulty of pulling ball head guide wire from the nasal cavity with turbinate hypertrophy and nasal septal deviation. The new method of nose-oral tube track establishment can overcome the forementioned and increase the successful rate. Methods: 5 F catheter and arterial sheath were modified to be nasolacrimal duct stent delivery device respectively. Antegrade dacryocystography was taken firstly to display the obstructed site and followed by the modified protocol of inserting the guide wire through nasolacrimal duct and nasal cavity, and establishing the stent delivery track for retrograde stent placement. Results: 5 epiphora patients with failure implantation by traditional method were all succeeded through the modified stenting (100%). During 6-mouth follow-up, no serious complications and reocclusion occurred. Conclusion: The establishment of eye-nose-mouth-nose of external nasal guide wire track can improve the successful rate of nasolacrimal duct stenting. (authors)

  8. Auxetic coronary stent endoprosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal; Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Ansari, Umar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular heart disease is one of the leading health issues in the present era and requires considerable health care resources to prevent it. The present study was focused on the development of a new coronary stent based on novel auxetic geometry which enables the stent to exhibit...... a negative Poisson's ratio. Commercially available coronary stents have isotropic properties, whereas the vascular system of the body shows anisotropic characteristics. This results in a mismatch between anisotropic-isotropic properties of the stent and arterial wall, and this in turn is not favorable...... for mechanical adhesion of the commercially available coronary stents with the arterial wall. It is believed that an auxetic coronary stent with inherent anisotropic mechanical properties and negative Poisson's ratio will have good mechanical adhesion with the arterial wall. METHODS: The auxetic design...

  9. An NTCP Analysis of Urethral Complications from Low Doserate Mono- and Bi-Radionuclide Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Nuttens

    2011-01-01

    First, DU20, meaning that 20% of the urhral volume receive a dose of at least DU20, is converted into an I-125 LDR equivalent DU20 in order to use the urethral NTCP model. Second, the propagation of uncertainties through the steps in the NTCP calculation was assessed in order to identify the parameters responsible for large data uncertainties. Two sets of radiobiological parameters were studied. The NTCP results all fall in the 19%–23% range and are associated with large uncertainties, making the comparison difficult. Depending on the dataset chosen, the ranking of NTCP values among the six seed implants studied changes. Moreover, the large uncertainties on the fitting parameters of the urethral NTCP model result in large uncertainty on the NTCP value. In conclusion, the use of NTCP model for permanent brachytherapy is feasible but it is essential that the uncertainties on the parameters in the model be reduced.

  10. Localized urethral cancer in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.; Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Clayton, M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of treatments for localized carcinoma of the urethra were assessed in 21 consecutive women treated at our institutions over a twenty year period. Only one of the tumors was confined to the distal urethra. Eighty-six percent invaded the periurethral tissues and 24% were known to be associated with regional lymph node metastases. Fifty-seven percent were adenocarcinomas. Five patients refused active therapeutic intervention and expired within one to 30 months following diagnosis. Sixteen patients were treated with extirpative surgery, radiation therapy, or combinations of the two. Four are free of disease at one, four, eleven, and 15 years after treatment. Nine developed pelvic recurrences, two developed pelvic recurrences and distant metastases and one developed distant metastases only from six to 72 months (mean, 19 months) after initial treatment. Eight of these 12 patients died at two to 13 months (mean, 8 months) after secondary treatment, two are alive with residual pelvic tumor, and two are clinically free of disease at 7 and 48 months. Only six patients were known to have distant metastases at the time of death and five of these six had adenocarcinomas. Advanced localized urethral cancer in women is difficult to eradicate and usually fatal

  11. Minimally invasive surgical approach to treat posterior urethral diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossamah Alsowayan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral diverticulum is a localized saccular or fusiform out-pouching of the urethra. It may occur at any point along the urethra in both male and females. Male urethral diverticulum is rare, and could be either congenital or acquired, anterior or posterior. The mainstay treatment of posterior urethral diverticulum (PUD is the open surgical approach. Here we discuss our minimally invasive surgical approach (MIS in managing posterior urethral diverticulum.

  12. Male urethral strictures and their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lindsay A.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Male urethral stricture disease is prevalent and has a substantial impact on quality of life and health-care costs. Management of urethral strictures is complex and depends on the characteristics of the stricture. Data show that there is no difference between urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy in terms of long-term outcomes; success rates range widely from 8–80%, with long-term success rates of 20–30%. For both of these procedures, the risk of recurrence is greater for men with longer strictures, penile urethral strictures, multiple strictures, presence of infection, or history of prior procedures. Analysis has shown that repeated use of urethrotomy is not clinically effective or cost-effective in these patients. Long-term success rates are higher for surgical reconstruction with urethroplasty, with most studies showing success rates of 85–90%. Many techniques have been utilized for urethroplasty, depending on the location, length, and character of the stricture. Successful management of urethral strictures requires detailed knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, proper patient selection, and reconstructive techniques. PMID:24346008

  13. Management of posterior urethral disruption injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeremy B; McAninch, Jack W

    2009-03-01

    Posterior urethral disruption is a traumatic injury to the male urethra, which most often results from pelvic fracture. After trauma, the distraction defect between the two ends of the urethra often scars and becomes fibrotic, blocking the urethra and bladder emptying. Increasing evidence suggests that many posterior urethral disruptions occur at the junction between the membranous urethra and the bulbar urethra, which is distal to the rhabdosphincter. In the acute setting, when a posterior urethral disruption is suspected, retrograde urethrography should be performed. Posterior urethral disruptions can be managed acutely by realignment of the urethra over a urethral catheter or by placement of a suprapubic catheter for bladder drainage only. Once fibrosis has stabilized, the patient can undergo posterior urethroplasty. In most cases, this procedure can be performed via a perineal approach in a single-stage surgery. The results of this single-stage perineal urethroplasty are excellent, and a patent urethra can be re-established in the majority of men who undergo surgery.

  14. Long-term effect of urethral dilatation and internal urethrotomy for urethral strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Pickard, Rob S

    2012-11-01

    Urethral dilatation and direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) are widely used minimally invasive options to manage men with urethral strictures. Advances in open urethroplasty with better long-term cure rates have fuelled the continuing debate as to which treatment is best for primary and recurrent urethral strictures. We reviewed recent literature to identify contemporary practice of urethral dilatation and DVIU and the long-term outcome of these procedures. Systematic literature search for the period January 2010 to December 2011 showed that urethral dilatation and DVIU remain frequently used treatment options as confirmed by surveys of urologists in the USA and the Netherlands. Multiple reports of laser DVIU confirm the safety of this approach but long-term data were lacking. Stricture free rates from urethra dilatation and DVIU vary from 10 to 90% at 12 months, although adjunctive intermittent self-dilatation can reduce time to recurrence. Although quality-of-life benefit appears good in the short term, repeated procedures may harm sexual function in the long-term. Urethral dilatation and DVIU remain widely used in urethral stricture management but high-level comparative evidence of benefit and harms against urethroplasty in the short and long-term is still lacking.

  15. Editorial comment on “Etiology of male urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My colleagues and I are strongly convinced that urethral stricture disease presents different etiologies and pathological characteris- tics in developed compared to developing countries [1]. Recently, we reported the differences in posterior urethral stricture after pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects in developing (India) ...

  16. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal sounds...

  17. Urethral catheterization:The need for adequate undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.V. Ezenwa

    2016-12-26

    Dec 26, 2016 ... urethral catheterization procedure and precautionary methods taken while carrying out the procedure. Also assessed was the ... Conclusion: Newly recruited interns have poor practical exposure to urethral catheterization. Efforts should .... ska B. Treatment of posterior and anterior urethral trauma. BJU Int.

  18. Pediatric Bulbar and Posterior Urethral Injuries: Operative Outcomes and Long-Term Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachta, Jan; Moravek, Jiri; Kriz, Jan; Padr, Radek; Skaba, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze complications and outcomes of end-to-end urethral anastomosis performed for posttraumatic bulbar strictures or posterior urethral injuries in pediatric patients. The records of 15 boys, age 18 years and below, admitted to our tertiary trauma center with urethral injuries from 1989 to 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Out of these 15 boys, 7 were excluded (2 for iatrogenic trauma, 2 for minor straddle injuries who were not operated on, 2 for incomplete records, and 1 lost to follow-up) and 8 analyzed patients were operated for bulbar or posterior urethral injury. The mean follow-up after the operation was 4.5 years (range 0.5-10). To obtain up-to-date follow-up information, all the analyzed patients were contacted by a letter and telephone in January 2015 and asked about lower urinary tract or erectile dysfunction (ED) using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire. Mean age at the time of injury was 12.3 years (range 5-17). Four patients with pelvic fracture had complete posterior urethra disruption, three patients after straddle injury developed obliterating stricture of the bulbar urethra and one patient had torn his bulbar urethra apart by a sharp hook. Except for the immediate exploration of the open perineal wound, all patients were operated via perineal approach 1 to 6 months after initial suprapubic catheter insertion. Five patients needed a cystotomy to identify the proximal urethral stump by a probe, and two patients had partial pubectomy to gain urethral length. Postoperative complications included stricture in anastomosis in six patients (all reoperated, four more than once including attempts of endoscopic internal urethrotomy). Six days after surgery, one patient developed massive external bleeding around a permanent urinary catheter due to a posttraumatic ruptured arterial aneurysm that was later stopped by urgent angiography and coil insertion. After discharge, three patients had transient

  19. The detection of microorganisms related to urethritis from the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phuong Thi; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Kawai, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Takamasa; Uehara, Kazutaka; Murakami, Norihiko; Yoshioka, Masaru; Nakayama, Ken; Shiono, Yutaka; Muraoka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the presence of microorganisms related to urethritis in the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis and the efficacies of antimicrobials for urethritis on microorganisms in the oral cavity. Ninety-two male patients with urethritis and 17 male controls participated to this study at 12 urology clinics in Japan between March 2014 and March 2015. The first voided urine (FVU) and oral wash fluid (OWF) specimens were collected from the participants. The microorganisms in both FVU and OWF specimens were detected by nucleic acid amplification tests at the first and follow-up visit. The efficacies of antimicrobials were evaluated after 1-4 weeks treatment completion. In a total of 92 male patients with urethritis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Trichomonas vaginalis and Gardnerella vaginalis were detected from OWF specimens of 12%, 3%, 9%, 0%, 12%, 3%, 3% and 15% patients, respectively. From control males, no microorganism was detected from OWF specimens. Among 46 patients who could be evaluated for antimicrobial efficacies at the follow-up visit, 5 in FVU specimens failed by azithromycin (AZM), and 10 failed in OWF specimens (7 by AZM, 2 by tetracycline, 1 by spectinomycin; p = 0.002). Especially, a high prevalence of G. vaginalis remained positive after treatment for urethritis in the oral cavity. Microorganisms related to urethritis were detected in the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis. Antimicrobials that focused on urethritis, especially AZM regimen seem to be less effective for microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coronary Stents: The Impact of Technological Advances on Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennuni, Marco G; Pagnotta, Paolo A; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2016-02-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were proposed in the late 1970s as an alternative to surgical coronary artery bypass grafting for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Important technological progress has been made since. Balloon angioplasty was replaced by bare metal stents, which allowed to permanently scaffold the coronary vessel avoiding acute recoil and abrupt occlusion. Thereafter, the introduction of early generation drug-eluting stents (DES) has significantly improved clinical outcomes, primarily by markedly reducing the risk of restenosis. New generation DES with thinner stent struts, novel durable or biodegradable polymer coatings, and new limus antiproliferative agents, have further improved upon the safety and efficacy profile of early generation DES. The present article aims to review the impact of technological advances on clinical outcomes in the field of PCI with coronary stents, and to provide a brief overview on clinical margins of improvement and unmet needs of available DES.

  1. Isotretinoin-induced urethritis versus non-gonococcal urethritis in a man who has sex with men: an open debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballout, Rami A; Maatouk, Ismael

    2018-01-01

    This is the case of a young man presenting with urethritis despite a negative infectious work-up. Careful history taking elucidated a strong correlation between symptom onset and a recent dose escalation of isotretinoin for treatment of his refractory cystic acne. The urethral symptoms quickly resolved with dose reduction, suggesting urethritis as a rare adverse reaction of isotretinoin.

  2. Nitinol stents in the treatment of benign proximal tracheal stenosis or tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, A Y; Macandie, C; Irvine, B W

    2006-01-01

    Nitinol stents have been used in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. A retrospective review of five patients treated at Stobhill Hospital over the last six and a half years is presented. Age at presentation ranged from 17 to 76 years. The minimum follow-up period was 23 months and the maximum was 78 months. All our patients were successfully decannulated, with none requiring recannulation. Four patients developed granulation tissue related to the stent at intervals ranging from three weeks to 41 months post stenting. Topical mitomycin C application has been useful after resection of granulations using the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. Stent migration occurred in one patient three weeks after insertion. Nitinol stents are easy to insert and effective in the treatment of tracheal stenosis, but can have associated morbidity. Their use should be considered carefully, as insertion should be regarded as permanent. Publications reporting experience and outcome with the use of Nitinol stents in the trachea are reviewed.

  3. Use of flow-diverting stents as salvage treatment following failed stent-assisted embolization of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiferman, Daniel M; Billingsley, Joshua T; Kasliwal, Manish K; Johnson, Andrew K; Keigher, Kiffon M; Frudit, Michel E; Moftakhar, Roham; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2016-07-01

    Flow-diverting stents, including the Pipeline embolization device (PED) and Silk, have been beneficial in the treatment of aneurysms previously unable to be approached via endovascular techniques. Recurrent aneurysms for which stent-assisted embolization has failed are a therapeutic challenge, given the existing intraluminal construct with continued blood flow into the aneurysm. We report our experience using flow-diverting stents in the repair of 25 aneurysms for which stent-assisted embolization had failed. Nineteen (76%) of these aneurysms at the 12-month follow-up showed improved Raymond class occlusion, with 38% being completely occluded, and all aneurysms demonstrated decreased filling. One patient developed a moderate permanent neurologic deficit. Appropriate stent sizing, proximal and distal construct coverage, and preventing flow diverter deployment between the previously deployed stent struts are important considerations to ensure wall apposition and prevention of endoleak. Flow diverters are shown to be a reasonable option for treating previously stented recurrent cerebral aneurysms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of Temporary Covered Nitinol Stent Placement in the Prostatic Urethra: Short-Term Study in the Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisostomo, Veronica; Song, Ho Young; Maynar, Manuel; Sun, Fei; Soria, Federico; Lima, Juan Rafael; Yoon, Chang Jin; Uson-Gargallo, Jesus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of temporary stent placement on the canine prostatic urethra. Methods. Retrievable PTFE-covered nitinol stents were placed in the prostatic urethras of 8 beagle dogs under fluoroscopic guidance. Retrograde urethrography was obtained before and after stenting. Retrograde urethrography and endoscopy were performed 1 and 2 months after deployment. The endoscopic degree of hyperplasia was rated on a scale of 0 to 4 (0 absence, 4 = occlusion). On day 60, stents were removed and urethrography was performed immediately before euthanasia. Pathologic analysis was performed to determine the degree of glandular atrophy, periurethral fibrosis, and urethral dilation. Results. Stent deployment was technically successful in 7 animals, and failed in 1 dog due to a narrow urethral lumen. Complete migration was seen in 2 animals at 1 month, and an additional stent was deployed. On day 30, endoscopy showed slight hyperplasia (grade 1) in 3 animals. On day 60, moderate hyperplasia (grade 2) was evidenced in 4 cases. No impairment of urinary flow was seen during follow-up. Retrieval was technically easy to perform, and was successful in all dogs. The major histologic findings were chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates; prostate glandular atrophy, with a mean value of 1.86 (SD 0.90); periurethral fibrosis, with a mean ratio of 29.37 (SD 10.41); and dilatation of the prostatic urethra, with a mean ratio of 6.75 (SD 3.22). Conclusion. Temporary prostatic stent placement in dogs is safe and feasible, causing marked enlargement of the prostatic urethral lumen. Retrievable covered stents may therefore be an option for bladder outlet obstruction management in men

  5. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Samer L; Witjes, Johannes Alfred; Kassouf, Wassim

    2016-11-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation therapy in women. There are no clear-cut indications for the choice of the most appropriate treatment modality. Organ-preserving modalities have shown effective and should be used whenever they do not compromise the oncological safety to decrease the physical and psychological trauma of dismemberment or loss of sexual/urinary function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Tracheobronchial stents: a retrospective analysis of indications, results and in particular complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonn, H; Mall, W; Schneider, K-D; Schönhofer, B

    2008-10-01

    Tracheobronchial stents are inserted mainly in cases of malignant and benign airway stenosis. Further indications are esophago-tracheal fistulas, mediastinal fistulas and tracheomalacia. A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients' records, information provided by the general practitioners and relatives of the patients from July 1993 to December 2006 in the Department of Pneumology of the Heidehaus Hospital Hannover (since 6/05 Department of Pneumology and Internal Intensive Care Medicine, Oststadt-Heidehaus Hospital). During the observation period of 13 years a total of 269 stents (177 permanent, 92 temporary) were implanted in 207 patients (1.3 stents per patient). The vast majority of patients (173/207) suffered from an underlying malignancy. About half of the stents were deployed in the trachea. The median length of placement was 116 days in patients with malignancies and 313 days in patients with benign diseases. In about 40 % of the patients notable complications were observed which were directly or indirectly associated with the stents. These findings show the importance of a critical indication for stent implantation. In benign diseases a stent can remain for years inside the tracheobronchial system, if it is well tolerated in the beginning. In malignant diseases the result depends decisively on the stage of the tumour: has the stent been implanted before any other tumour therapy is started or is it an end-stage tumor with no other therapeutic option? In general, complications of stents occur quite frequently. The analysis of stent data leads to some aspects for the prevention of stent-related complications. There should be a strict indication and appropriate choice of stent material. Nevertheless, there remains an ethical dilemma in patients with end-stage disease as to whether to implant a stent or to do nothing against the tumor, because the benefit immediately after stent insertion vanishes with progression of the tumour, so causing extra

  7. Deferred endoscopic urethral realignment: Role in management of traumatic posterior urethral disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Elgammal

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: When early realignment is postponed for any reason, deferred endoscopic realignment is considered an adequate substitute because urethral continuity can be achieved in a group of patients without increase incidence of impotence and incontinence.

  8. Temporary placement of metallic stent could lead to long-term benefits for benign tracheobronchial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guo-Wu; Huang, Hai-Dong; Sun, Qin-Ying; Xiong, Ye; Li, Qiang; Dong, Yu-Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The permanent placement of metallic stent for benign tracheobronchial stenosis (BTS) was controversial. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term outcomes of temporary placement of metallic stent for BTS. The BTS patients who received temporary placement of retrievable self-expanded metallic stents were included between 2008 and 2011. Pre-stenting and follow-up respiratory status was analyzed. And symptom recurrence-free survival (SRFS) was assessed. A total of 49 stents were successfully temporarily placed in 40 consecutive BTS patients whose etiologies included endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) (n=22), post-tracheostomy stenosis (n=10), post-intubation stenosis (n=6) and post radiotherapy stricture (n=2). All stents were removed integrally after a median 18 days' stenting period, without major complications. During the median 27 months follow-up period after stent removal, a total of 22 patients were free of recurrence. And the overall 3-year SRFS rate was 52.0%. According to the etiology, the 3-year SRFS rates were 59.1% and 42.9% in the patients with EBTB and non-EBTB, respectively. Compared with pre-stenting, the follow-up internal diameter of stricture, Hugh-Jones scale, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and percentage of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) were significantly improved. Multivariate analysis suggested that granulation tissue growth and tracheobronchial malacia might be independent factors of poor prognosis. Temporary placement of retrievable metallic stent may be an alternative treatment for BTS patients.

  9. Evaluation of the Anti-migration Effect of Barbed Prostatic Stents: In Vitro Study in Urethra-mimicking Bovine Pericardium Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Han Kyu; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Nam, Deok Ho; Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the migration rates of covered stents with eight, four, and zero barbs in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium models. Three types of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered retrievable self-expandable prostatic stents, with eight, four, and zero barbs, were tested in bovine pericardium models, consisting of normal saline-filled acrylic containers with tubes at both ends and a replica of the human urethra. The barbs were 2 mm in length and projected 60° toward the urinary bladder. The anti-migration force (AMF) and resistance force against stent removal (RFSR) were measured by an automatic push–pull gauge system at a fixed rate (2 mm/s). Significant differences in AMF among the three stent types were detected (P < 0.001). Median AMF was far greater for eight-barbed than for four-barbed stents (11.96 vs. 7.55 N, P = 0.003). For stent removal, the difference between 4- and 8-barbed stents were not significant in median static (5.54 vs. 6.08 N, P = 0.15) or sliding (prostatic urethra, 5.32 vs. 5.59 N, P = 0.65; membranous urethra, 7.78 vs. 8.57 N, P = 0.364) RFSR. No perforations or scratched traces were observed during removal of these stents. The inclusion of eight barbs projecting 60° toward the urinary bladder were not only effective against stent migration in this model but suggests that these stents may be suitable for the treatment of prostatic urethral strictures without severely irritating the tissue. However, whether these results translate into living urethral tissue is unclear, necessitating further studies.

  10. Evaluation of the anti-migration effect of barbed prostatic stents: in vitro study in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Han Kyu; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Nam, Deok Ho; Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to compare the migration rates of covered stents with eight, four, and zero barbs in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium models. Three types of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered retrievable self-expandable prostatic stents, with eight, four, and zero barbs, were tested in bovine pericardium models, consisting of normal saline-filled acrylic containers with tubes at both ends and a replica of the human urethra. The barbs were 2 mm in length and projected 60° toward the urinary bladder. The anti-migration force (AMF) and resistance force against stent removal (RFSR) were measured by an automatic push-pull gauge system at a fixed rate (2 mm/s). Significant differences in AMF among the three stent types were detected (P barbed than for four-barbed stents (11.96 vs. 7.55 N, P = 0.003). For stent removal, the difference between 4- and 8-barbed stents were not significant in median static (5.54 vs. 6.08 N, P = 0.15) or sliding (prostatic urethra, 5.32 vs. 5.59 N, P = 0.65; membranous urethra, 7.78 vs. 8.57 N, P = 0.364) RFSR. No perforations or scratched traces were observed during removal of these stents. The inclusion of eight barbs projecting 60° toward the urinary bladder were not only effective against stent migration in this model but suggests that these stents may be suitable for the treatment of prostatic urethral strictures without severely irritating the tissue. However, whether these results translate into living urethral tissue is unclear, necessitating further studies.

  11. Evaluation of the Anti-migration Effect of Barbed Prostatic Stents: In Vitro Study in Urethra-mimicking Bovine Pericardium Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Han Kyu, E-mail: hankyu1324@empas.com; Song, Ho-Young, E-mail: hysong@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, Jin Hyoung, E-mail: m1fenew@hanmail.net [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Deok Ho, E-mail: namjindan@paran.com [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung-Hoon, E-mail: jhparkz@amc.seoul.kr [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, In Gab, E-mail: uroman2000@yahoo.co.kr; Kim, Choung-Soo, E-mail: cskim@amc.seoul.kr [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to compare the migration rates of covered stents with eight, four, and zero barbs in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium models. Three types of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered retrievable self-expandable prostatic stents, with eight, four, and zero barbs, were tested in bovine pericardium models, consisting of normal saline-filled acrylic containers with tubes at both ends and a replica of the human urethra. The barbs were 2 mm in length and projected 60 Degree-Sign toward the urinary bladder. The anti-migration force (AMF) and resistance force against stent removal (RFSR) were measured by an automatic push-pull gauge system at a fixed rate (2 mm/s). Significant differences in AMF among the three stent types were detected (P < 0.001). Median AMF was far greater for eight-barbed than for four-barbed stents (11.96 vs. 7.55 N, P = 0.003). For stent removal, the difference between 4- and 8-barbed stents were not significant in median static (5.54 vs. 6.08 N, P = 0.15) or sliding (prostatic urethra, 5.32 vs. 5.59 N, P = 0.65; membranous urethra, 7.78 vs. 8.57 N, P = 0.364) RFSR. No perforations or scratched traces were observed during removal of these stents. The inclusion of eight barbs projecting 60 Degree-Sign toward the urinary bladder were not only effective against stent migration in this model but suggests that these stents may be suitable for the treatment of prostatic urethral strictures without severely irritating the tissue. However, whether these results translate into living urethral tissue is unclear, necessitating further studies.

  12. Female urethral strictures: successful management with long-term clean intermittent catheterization after urethral dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ariana L; Ferlise, Victor J; Rovner, Eric S

    2006-07-01

    To report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of urethral stricture in women. A retrospective review of records and video-urodynamics identified women treated for urethral stricture between 1999 and 2004 at one institution by one surgeon. Urethral stricture was defined as a fixed anatomical narrowing between the bladder neck and distal urethra of or = 30 F. After a period of indwelling catheterization, the women were placed on clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) at least once daily, and monitored every 3-6 months. At each follow-up, the urethra was catheterized to exclude recurrence. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom scores were obtained at presentation and at the initial 3 month follow-up. Seven women met the criteria for urethral stricture, and were followed for a mean (range) of 21 (6-34) months. All were initially maintained on daily CISC, and some were gradually reduced to weekly CISC for the duration of follow-up. No patient had a recurrent stricture while on CISC, and none has had a urethral reconstruction to manage their condition. AUA symptom scores improved in all of the women by a mean of 10.7 points. No complications related to catheterization were noted. Urethral stricture is rare in women. Long-term CISC in these women is safe and effective, and can avoid the need for major reconstructive surgery.

  13. Incomplete urethral duplication in an adult male.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, N F

    2012-09-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly with less than 200 cases reported. It predominantly occurs in males and is nearly always diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. It is defined as a complete second passage from the bladder to the dorsum of the penis or as an accessory pathway that ends blindly on the dorsal or ventral surface.

  14. Early endoscopic realignment in posterior urethral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Baidya, J L

    2013-01-01

    Posterior urethral injury requires meticulous tertiary care and optimum expertise to manage successfully. The aim of our study is to describe our experiences with pelvic injuries involving posterior urethra and their outcome after early endoscopic realignment. A prospective study was carried out in 20 patients with complete posterior urethral rupture, from November 2007 till October 2010. They presented with blunt traumatic pelvic fracture and underwent primary realignment of posterior urethra in our institute. The definitive diagnosis of urethral rupture was made after retrograde urethrography and antegrade urethrography where applicable. The initial management was suprapubic catheter insertion after primary trauma management in casualty. After a week of conservative management with intravenous antibiotics and pain management, patients were subjected to the endoscopic realignment. The follow up period was at least six months. The results were analyzed with SPSS software. After endoscopic realignment, all patients were advised CISC for the initial 3 months. All patients voided well after three months of CISC. However, 12 patients were lost to follow up by the end of 6 postoperative months. Out of eight remaining patients, two had features of restricture and were managed with DVU followed by CISC again. One patient with restricture had some degree of erectile dysfunction who improved significantly after phospodiesterase inhibitors. None of the patients had features of incontinence. Early endoscopic realignment of posterior urethra is a minimally invasive modality in the management of complete posterior urethral injury with low rates of incontinence and impotency.

  15. Male Urethral Diverticulum Having Multiple Stones

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle fibers in their wall, commonly encountered in adults, and involve the posterior urethra. Differential diagnosis for UD includes syringoceles (cystic dilatation of the Cowper's gland), sequestration cysts, epidermoid and epithelial inclusion cysts. Male Urethral Diverticulum Having Multiple Stones. Mohanty D, Garg PK, ...

  16. StentBoost Visualization for the Evaluation of Coronary Stent Expansion During Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Fernando; Albertal, Mariano; Candiello, Alfonsina; Nau, Gerardo; Bonvini, Victor; Tricherri, Hernan; Padilla, Lucio T.; Belardi, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate stent implantation is associated with stent thrombosis and restenosis. StentBoost can enhance stent visualization and evaluate stent expansion. Currently, there are limited comparison studies between StentBoost and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We aimed to test the correlation and agreement between IVUS and StentBoost measurements. Methods From December 2010 to December 2011, 38 patients (54 stents) were analyzed using IVUS and StentBoost. Minimal stent diameter and...

  17. [Urethroplasty with transection of urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of urethral plate: highly applicable to the treatment of hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Min; Qiu, Wei-Feng; Qian, Chong

    2010-07-01

    To explore the feasibility of urethroplasty with transection of the urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of the urethral plate in the treatment of hypospadias. Forty-eight patients with hypospadias (18 of the coronal type, 21 the penile type, 8 the penoscrotal type and 1 the perineal type) underwent urethroplasty with transection of the urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of the urethral plate. The surgical effects were observed by following up the patients for 3-27 months. One-stage surgical success was achieved in 44 of the cases, with satisfactory functional and cosmetic results but no complications. Two cases developed urinary fistula and another 2 urethral stricture, but all cured by the second surgery. Urethroplasty with transection of the urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of the urethral plate is a simple, safe and effective surgical procedure for the treatment of hypospadias.

  18. Predictors of early stent occlusion among plastic biliary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Kim, Katherine; Hutfless, Susan; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-09-01

    A major disadvantage of plastic biliary stents is their short patency rates. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of early stent occlusion among patients receiving conventional plastic biliary stents. Early stent occlusion was defined as worsening cholestatic liver test results of a severity sufficiently significant to warrant ERCP with stent exchange prior to the planned stent exchange, or as symptoms of cholangitis. The association of cumulative stent diameter, demographics, stricture location, procedure indication, Charlson comorbidity index, history of prior early stent occlusion, presence of gallbladder, and performance of sphincteromy with the occurrence of early stent occlusion was studied using logistic regression and multivariate analysis. Our patient cohort comprised 343 patients (mean age 59.3 years) who underwent 561 ERCP procedures with the placement of one or more plastic biliary stents (mean number of stents per procedure 1.2, mean total diameter of stents per procedure 12 Fr). Early stent occlusion occurred in 73 (13 %) procedures. Female gender was protective against early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.32-0.90, p = 0.02), while hilar stricture location was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 3.41, 95 % CI 1.68-6.90, p = 0.0007). Early occlusion of conventional biliary stents occurred in 13 % of cases. While female gender decreased the risk of early stent occlusion, hilar stricture location was a significant predictor of early stent occlusion. Our results suggest that physicians should consider early elective stent exchange in patients with hilar strictures.

  19. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chi-Lun; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent-cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis.

  20. Microscopy of Stained Urethral Smear in Male Urethritis; Which Cutoff Should be Used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Harald; Hartgill, Usha; Skullerud, Kristin Helene; Reponen, Elina J; Syvertsen, Line; Moghaddam, Amir

    2017-03-01

    The microscopical diagnosis of male urethritis was recently questioned by Rietmeijer and Mettenbrink, lowering the diagnostic criteria of the diagnosis to ≥2 polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) per high power field (HPF), and adopted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in their 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines. The European Non-Gonococcal Urethritis Guideline advocates a limit of ≥5 PMNL/HPF. To determine if syndromic treatment of urethritis should be considered with a cutoff value of ≥2 PMNL/HPF in urethral smear. The design was a cross-sectional study investigating the presence and degree of urethritis relative to specific infections in men attending an STI clinic as drop-in patients. The material included 2 cohorts: a retrospective study of 13,295 men and a prospective controlled study including 356 men. We observed a mean chlamydia prevalence of 2.3% in the 0-9 stratum, and a 12-fold higher prevalence (27.3%) in the strata above 9. Of the chlamydia cases, 89.8% were diagnosed in strata above 9. For Mycoplasma genitalium, the prevalence was 1.4% in the 0-9 stratum and 11.2% in the stratum ≥10, and 83.6% were diagnosed in strata above 9. For gonorrhea, a significant increase in the prevalence occurred between the 0-30 strata and >30 strata from 0.2% to 20.7%. The results of the prospective study were similar. Our data do not support lowering the cutoff to ≥2 PMNL/HPF. However, a standardization of urethral smear microscopy seems to be impossible. The cutoff value should discriminate between low and high prevalence of chlamydia, mycoplasma, and gonorrhea to include as many as possible with a specific infection in syndromic treatment, without overtreating those with few PMNL/HPF and high possibility of having nonspecific or no urethritis.

  1. Impact of prior urethral manipulation on outcome of anastomotic urethroplasty for post-traumatic urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra P; Andankar, Mukund G; Swain, Sanjaya K; Das, Krishanu; Dassi, Vimal; Kaswan, Harish K; Agrawal, Vipul; Pathak, Hemant R

    2010-01-01

    To determine the impact of earlier urethral interventions on the outcomes of anastomotic urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture urethra. From October 1995 to March 2008, a total of 58 patients with post-traumatic posterior urethral stricture underwent anastomotic urethroplasty. Eighteen patients had earlier undergone urethral intervention in the form of urethrotomy (3), endoscopic realignment (7), or open urethroplasty (8). Success was defined as no obstructive urinary symptoms, maximum urine flow rate > or = 15 mL/s, normal urethral imaging and/or urethroscopy, and no need of any intervention in the follow-up period. Patients who met the above objective criteria after needing 1 urethrotomy following urethroplasty were defined to have satisfactory outcome and were included in satisfactory result rate along with patients who had a successful outcome. Results were analyzed using unpaired t test, chi-square test, binary logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier curves, and log rank test. Previous interventions in the form of endoscopic realignment or urethroplasty have significant adverse effect on the success rate of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty for post-traumatic posterior urethral strictures (P urethrotomies (up to 2 times) did not affect the outcome of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty. Length of stricture and age of patient did not predict the outcome in traumatic posterior urethral strictures in logistic regression analysis. Previous failed railroading or urethroplasty significantly decrease the success of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty. Hence, a primary realignment or urethroplasty should be avoided in suboptimal conditions and the cases of post-traumatic urethral stricture should be referred to centers with such expertise. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors for success of internal urethrotomy in patients with urethral contracture following perineal repair of pelvic fracture urethral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young-Kwon; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, Seung-Ryeol

    2017-05-01

    Internal urethrotomy (IU) in patients with urethral contracture following perineal repair of pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PRPFUI) is troublesome. We evaluated the clinical factors affecting the surgical outcome of IU for urethral contracture after PRPFUI. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 35 patients who underwent IU for urethral contracture after PRPFUI between March 2004 and June 2013. Ages of patients ranged from 18 to 50, and their follow-up duration was more than 1year after IU. The urethral contracture was confirmed by retrograde urethrogram or cysto-urethroscopy. Success was defined as greater than 15mL/s of peak urinary flow rate at 1year after IU without any clinical evidence of urethral contracture. Success rates were investigated according to the number of IU. Age, body mass index, urethral defect length before PRPFUI, time interval between the original urethral injury and the PRPFUI or between a previous operation and the PRPFUI, time interval between the PRPFUI and the urethral contracture, number of PRPFUI performed, and the type of urethral lengthening procedure were compared between patients with and without success according to the number of IU. Among the 35 patients, the overall success rate of IU was 37% (13/35) during the mean follow-up period of 53 months (range: 17-148 months). There were 8 and 5 patients with success in first and second IU, respectively. However, there was no success after third IU. Urethral defect length before PRPFUI was significantly shorter in patients with success who underwent first and second IU (p<0.05). There were significant differences of success between patients with and without previous repeated failures of PRPFUI in first and second IU (p<0.05). Short urethral defect length and no previous surgical failures before PRPFUI are good prognostic factors for IU following PRPFUI. Only one or two IUs will be helpful in patients with urethral contracture following PRPFUI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Management of non-gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Harald; Blee, Karla; Horner, Patrick J

    2015-07-29

    Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), or inflammation of the urethra, is the most common treatable sexually transmitted syndrome in men, with approximately 20-50 % of cases being due to infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and 10-30 % Mycoplasma genitalium. Other causes are Ureaplasma urealyticum, Trichomonas vaginalis, anaerobes, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and adenovirus. Up to half of the cases are non-specific. Urethritis is characterized by discharge, dysuria and/or urethral discomfort but may be asymptomatic. The diagnosis of urethritis is confirmed by demonstrating an excess of polymorpho-nuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) in a stained smear. An excess of mononuclear leucocytes in the smear indicates a viral etiology. In patients presenting with symptoms of urethritis, the diagnosis should be confirmed by microscopy of a stained smear, ruling out gonorrhea. Nucleid acid amplifications tests (NAAT) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis and for M. genitalium. If viral or protozoan aetiology is suspected, NAAT for HSV, adenovirus and T. vaginalis, if available. If marked symptoms and urethritis is confirmed, syndromic treatment should be given at the first appointment without waiting for the laboratory results. Treatment options are doxycycline 100 mg x 2 for one week or azithromycin 1 gram single dose or 1,5 gram distributed in five days. However, azithromycin as first line treatment without test of cure for M. genitalium and subsequent Moxifloxacin treatment of macrolide resistant strains will select and increase the macrolide resistant strains in the population. If positive for M. genitalium, test of cure samples should be collected no earlier than three weeks after start of treatment. If positive in test of cure, moxifloxacin 400 mg 7-14 days is indicated. Current partner(s) should be tested and treated with the same regimen. They should abstain from intercourse until both have completed treatment. Persistent or recurrent NGU must be confirmed with microscopy

  4. Intravascular ultrasound assessed incomplete stent apposition and stent fracture in stent thrombosis after bare metal versus drug-eluting stent treatment the Nordic Intravascular Ultrasound Study (NIVUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Petteri; Vikman, Saila; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2012-01-01

    This prospective multicenter registry used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with definite stent thrombosis (ST) to compare rates of incomplete stent apposition (ISA), stent fracture and stent expansion in patients treated with drug-eluting (DES) versus bare metal (BMS) stents. ST...... is a rare, but potential life threatening event after coronary stent implantation. The etiology seems to be multifactorial....

  5. Evaluating the urethral closure mechanism after pelvic organ prolapse surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine

    2017-01-01

    . By measuring urethral opening pressure at an abdominal pressure of 50 mmH2O (PO-Abd 50), it is the only method that has succeeded in distinguishing between women with and without SUI. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate the urethral closure mechanism before and after anterior and posterior......, the woman has occult SUI. However, only half of all women with occult SUI actually develop de novo SUI postoperatively and therefore, the usefulness of the test has been questioned. Studies investigating how POP reduction and POP surgery affect the urethral closure mechanism have used conventional urethral...... pressure profilometry, a method that has shown wide overlaps in the results of women with and without SUI. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR), a method that assesses the urethral closure mechanism by means of acoustic reflectometry, has proven highly reproducible in women with and without SUI...

  6. Urethral pressure reflectometry during intra-abdominal pressure increase—an improved technique to characterize the urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    to assess the urethral closure function by urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) during intra-abdominal pressure-increase in SUI and continent women.......to assess the urethral closure function by urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) during intra-abdominal pressure-increase in SUI and continent women....

  7. Percutaneous placement of ureteral stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Antegrade placement of ureteral stents has successfully achieved in 41 of 46 ureters. When it was difficult to advance ureteral stents through the lesion, it was facilitated by retrograde guide-wire snare technique through urethra. Complications associated with the procedure were non-function of ureteral stent by occlusion, upward migration,and spontaneous fracture of ureteral stent. These complications were managed by percutaneous nephrostomy and removal of ureteral stents by guide-wire snare technique and insertion of a new ureteral stent. While blood cell in urine was markedly increased in about 50% of patients following the procedure.

  8. Recognition and Treatment of Nongonococcal Urethritis in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiadinso, O. O. A.

    1980-01-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis is a relatively common disorder in sexually active individuals. The incidence is almost as high, if not higher, than gonorrhea. This syndrome may present with signs and symptoms indistinguishable from acute gonococcal urethritis. It is essential to differentiate the two diseases, as treatment protocols are different. Early recognition of nongonococcal urethritis and proper therapy will often lead to complete resolution and prevention of annoying complications. PMID:6999164

  9. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-01-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi.

  10. Adenocarcinoma arising in female urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patanaphan, V.; Prempree, T.; Sewchand, W.; Hafiz, M.A.; Jaiwatana, J.

    1983-01-01

    Cancer arising from a female urethral diverticulum is rare, and because of its rarity, a review of the medical literature reveals significant nonuniformity in its management. We report an additional 2 cases of this disease, one of which has an even rarer feature of being mucin-producing. The management of our 2 cases is presented in detail and in line with the management of female urethral cancer. From our extensive literature search, diverticulectomy alone showed poor results with the highest rate of recurrence (67%). Extensive surgery, either in the form of cystourethrectomy or anterior exenteration, offered results comparable with those of combined therapy (diverticulectomy and full course of irradiation for early cases; preoperative irradiation followed by cystourethrectomy for late cases). Individualization of radiation treatment and cooperative effort between urologist and radiation oncologist are essential if best results are to be achieved

  11. Late presentation of posterior urethral valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, Imran Khan; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin

    2014-05-01

    Presence of posterior urethral valves (PUV) is the most common cause of urinary tract obstruction in the male neonate. Late presentation occurs in 10% of cases. We present a case of PUVs in an adult male who presented with history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and hematuria. On evaluation, he was found to have raised serum creatinine level. A voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) could not be completely performed because of narrowing in the posterior urethra. A rigid urethrocystoscopy was performed at which he was found to have type-I posterior urethral valve which were fulgurated. A repeat uroflowmetry revealed maximum flow rate of 12 ml/second. This case highlights that PUVs is not solely a disease of infancy but may also present late. VCUG is the radiological investigation of choice but the diagnosis may be missed. A urethrocystoscopy is advised if there is a high index of suspicion.

  12. Urethral anatomy and semen flow during ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diane

    2016-11-01

    Ejaculation is critical for reproductive success in many animals, but little is known about its hydrodynamics. In mammals, ejaculation pushes semen along the length of the penis through the urethra. Although the urethra also carries urine during micturition, the flow dynamics of micturition and ejaculation differ: semen is more viscous than urine, and the pressure that drives its flow is derived primarily from the rhythmic contractions of muscles at the base of the penis, which produce pulsatile rather than steady flow. In contrast, Johnston et al. (2014) describe a steady flow of semen through the crocodilian urethral groove during ejaculation. Anatomical differences of tissues associated with mammalian and crocodilian urethral structures may underlie these differences in flow behavior.

  13. Asymptomatic urethral lymphogranuloma venereum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Louise; Fafard, Judith; Greenwald, Zoë R

    2018-07-01

    Since 2003, there has been a resurgence of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), a variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), among men who have sex with men (MSM) in several urban areas of Europe and North America. LGV infection occurs most often at anal sites causing proctitis. Urethral and oropharyngeal infections are rare. In Quebec, LGV incidence has been increasing exponentially in recent years and the current guidelines support systematic LGV genotype testing among anorectal CT-positive samples only. This case report describes a patient with a urethral LGV infection, remarkable due to its prolonged asymptomatic development prior to the manifestation of an inguinal bubo. Physicians should be vigilant of potential cases of LGV and forward CT-positive samples occurring among individuals with LGV risk factors for genotype testing.

  14. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described.

  15. Posterior urethral polyps and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Jain

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral polyp is a rare finding in young children. Fibroepithelial polyps of the urethra are usually diagnosed during the first decade of life. They present with obstruction, voiding dysfunction and hematuria. They can be associated with other congenital urinary tract anomalies. They are usually benign fibroepithelial lesions with no tendency to recur and are treated by surgical ablation, fulguration or laser therapy.

  16. Calculi in a Female Urethral Diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sung Shim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary stones are rarely seen in the urethra and are usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. The case of a 52-year-old woman presented, who consulted for weak stream associated with repeated urinary infections. The diverticulum was approached via vaginal route and the extraction was successful. The patient has been well, with no dysuria, dyspareunia, incontinence for 3-month follow-ups.

  17. Polypoidal Intestinal Metaplasia and Dysplasia of the External Urethral Meatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral mucosa with intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia is a rare occurrence. To date only a single case has been reported in a male with long-standing urethral stricture. We present a 33-year-old female with polypoid intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the external urethral meatus in the absence of an inciting factor. Intestinal metaplasia of the urethral mucosa may undergo dysplasia, emphasizing the necessity of a high degree of clinical suspicion and vigilant pathological examination of these lesions.

  18. Drug eluting stents and modern stent technologies for in-stent restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The implantation of metallic stents has become a standard procedure to improve the outcome after angioplasty of peripheral vessels. However, the occurrence of in-stent restenosis is hampering the long-term efficacy of these procedures and is associated with re-occurrence of symptoms. The optimal treatment modality for in-stent-restenosis in the peripheral vasculature is not well examined. This review discusses the existing evidence for the treatment of in-stent restenosis with drug eluting stents and modern stent technologies.

  19. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, L.; Cavallo, A.; Perin, B.; Bighi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  20. Urethral Foreign Body: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Enginyurt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Urethral insertion of foreign bodies is not very common. It is often associated with psychological problems and sexual alerts. In men due to the longer urethra this situation remains generally limited to the urethra, in women due to the short urethra foreign body can pass to the bladder. 40 years old, mentally retarded male patient was admitted to the emergency department with a complaint of urethrorrhagia. Physical examination revealed needle like structure in the urethra. The patient was taken into the operating room and under general anestesia by using cysto panendoscopy the foreign body has been identified as an old syringe needle, foreign body was removed with the help of forceps. Endoscopic methods should be utilized for the realization of the diagnosis and treatment of urethral foreign bodies. Foreign body in the urethra is usually encountered in patients with psychiatric disorders. For this reason, a detailed psychiatric evaluation is important in patients with urethral foreign bodies. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 62-65

  1. Concomitant urethral triplication, bladder, and colon duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourchi, Ali; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Khakpour, Mahshid; Mohammadi Nejad, Payam; Mousavian, Amir-Abbas; Kalantary, Mahdi

    2012-02-01

    The concomitant presence of urethral triplication and caudal duplication is extremely rare with no previous reported cases. We report a case of urethral triplication associated with bladder, sigmoid, and rectum duplication. The patient was initially referred with a history of fecaluria and recurrent urinary tract infection. Physical examination revealed 2 meatal opening on the glans penis. Further investigation revealed three distinct urinary streams, two terminating on the glans penis, and one in the rectum in voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography. Computed tomography demonstrated the bladder divided into two compartments by a complete sagittal septum. The patient was managed by the excision of the rectal ending urethra and removal of the bladder sagittal septum during which, two sigmoidal and rectal segments (the right one filled with fecal) were revealed. The right sigmoid and rectum was resected. The two ventral urethras were kept intact. The postoperative course was uneventful. At his 4 month readmission for colostomy closure, the patient reported good urethral voiding with no complication and recurrence of urinary tract infection and the colostomy was closed with no major complication.

  2. Removal of self expandable metallic airway stent: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Rakesh K.; Madan, Arun; Singh, Ishwar; Mudoiya, Rahul; Chawla, Aditya; Gupta, Radha; Chawla, Kiran; Chhabra, Roopam

    2013-01-01

    Covered self expandable metallic airway stents (SEMS) have been used for benign tracheal stenosis, post intubation tracheal stenosis, tracheal burn or trauma, tracheo-broncho-malacia, and extrinsic compression of trachea. Their placement is considered to be permanent, with open surgery the only way to remove the stent, though there are few cases reports of their removal with the bronchoscope, but the complications after their removal are very high. In our patient, one and a half years after p...

  3. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Kaneko, Yoshiteru; Samma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-01-01

    A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed...

  4. The risk and prognostic impact of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Data are limited on the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with coronary stents. We examined the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results......: All patients who underwent stent implantation from 2002 to 2005 were identified in the Western Denmark Heart Registry. The hazard ratio (HR) for death associated with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis was estimated with a Cox regression analysis with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis...... as time-dependent variables. A total of 12,277 patients were treated with stent implantation. Stent thrombosis was observed in 111 (0.9%) patients and in-stent restenosis in 503 (4.1%) patients within 12 months after the index PCI. Occurrence of stent thrombosis was associated with an increased risk...

  5. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Print Essure is a a permanently implanted birth control device for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  6. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  7. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Kaneko, Yoshiteru; Samma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-05-01

    A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed when he was 5 years. After excision of the scarred portions of the urethra, the defect of the urethra was 20 mm. Transperineal bulbar urethral mobilization was performed, and a single-stage end-to-end anterior urethroplasty without tension could be performed simultaneously.

  8. Renal PTA stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a common condition that may lead to hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction and cardiovascular morbidity. Catheter-based therapy for symptomatic, haemodynamically significant, RAS has become the preferred method of revascularization. Balloon angioplasty has been the traditional treatment of choice for fibromuscular dysplasia, however stents are increasingly used for the treatment of atheromatous lesions; in many cases-such as in ostial lesions-, direct stenting is strongly indicated. Despite the increased use of endovascular therapy for renal artery stenosis, there is still controversy regarding the optimal management and the net benefit of this treatment. Several randomized trials of balloon angioplasty or stenting for renal artery stenosis compared with medical therapy alone have been conducted, however these could not show definite advantage of endovascular therapy. Problems encountered with those trials include enrollment of small number of patients, frequent crossover from medical to interventional therapy compromising the intention-to-treat results, or selection of patients that are not expected to show clear benefit. The Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) is the most important of these trials; however, it,s study design was faulty and therefore did not provide conclusive evidence to answer the question of whether angioplasty and stenting or medical therapy is the best treatment for haemodynamically significant RAS. All expectations are now focused on the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial which was designed to answer the same question, and its methodologies took into consideration the weaknesses of the ASTRAL trial. Regarding stent device itself, it seems that the optimal design is probably a stainless steel, laser cut, open-cells stent mounted on a rapid exchange delivery balloon catheter compatible with 0.014-in and 0.018-in guidewire. As a future

  9. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair CD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Clark D Hair,1 Divyesh V Sejpal21Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USAAbstract: Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting.Keywords: plastic stents, self-expandable metal stents, drug eluting stents, bioabsorbable stents, malignant biliary strictures, benign biliary strictures

  10. Heterogeneous Intravascular Ultrasound Findings of Stent Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Morofuji, Toru; Inaba, Shinji; Aisu, Hiroe; Takahashi, Kayo; Saito, Makoto; Higashi, Haruhiko; Yoshii, Toyofumi; Sumimoto, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The underlying mechanisms of stent thrombosis are not completely understood. Methods We experienced 12 definite stent thrombosis cases (1 early, 1 late, and 10 very late) at our hospital from July 2011 to April 2016 and evaluated the possible causes of stent thrombosis by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Results Five different potential morphological causes of stent thrombosis (neoatherosclerosis, stent malapposition, stent fracture, edge dissection, and stent underexpansion) were d...

  11. Clinical presentation and treatment of urethral stricture: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.N. Ekeke

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... demography, aetiology, site, treatment and outcome of treatment of USD were collated and analyzed using. SPSS 20.0. Results: ... Eighty two patients (42.27%) had anterior urethral stricture; while 78 (40.20%) had posterior urethral strictures. ..... to leave a catheter and, if so, for what duration [34,4,35–37] in.

  12. Visual Internal Urethrotomy in the Management of Anterior Urethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Urethral stricture disease is common in our environment. The aim of this study is to report our experience with visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) in the management of this disease. Patients and Methods: Seventy male patients with a mean age of 30.6 years were treated for anterior urethral stricture by VIU at the Jos ...

  13. A descriptive study of urethral discharge among men in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunavinaka, Lavenia; Balak, Dashika; Varman, Sumanthla; Ram, Sharan; Graham, Stephen M

    2014-10-17

    Urethral discharge is a common presentation of sexually transmitted infection (STI) in men and known pathogens include Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. There are no published data of the burden of urethral discharge among men in Fiji. To evaluate urethral discharge among men to determine the incidence, the frequency of recurrence and reported at-risk behaviour. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of clinical records of all men presenting with urethral discharge to two major reproductive health clinics. Data collected included self-reported at-risk behaviours, results of abnormal syphilis serology and antibiotics prescribed. The frequency of recurrence in the following 1-2 years of initial presentation was determined along with microbiological findings from urethral swab in this group. A total of 748 males presented with urethral discharge to the clinic in one year. This represents an incidence rate of at least 295 per 100,000 adult males per year in the study population. Within the next 1-2 years of the initial presentation, 102 (14%) of these re-presented out of which 42 had urethral swab taken for etiological diagnosis. The commonest isolate was Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Results of syphilis tests were available for 560 (75%) of patients and 29 (5%) were positive. Recurrence was not associated with self-reported at-risk behaviours. The incidence of urethral discharge among males in Fiji is very high and prevention strategies are urgently needed.

  14. Fiber types in the striated urethral and anal sphincters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1983-01-01

    Seven normal human striated urethral and anal sphincters obtained by autopsy were examined using histochemical techniques. In both the urethral sphincter and the subcutaneous (s.c.) and superficial part of the anal sphincter a characteristic pattern with two populations of muscle fibers, abundant...

  15. Female Urethral Anomalies in Pediatric Age Group: Uncovered

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urogenital sinus in females (ectopia of the external urethral opening in the urogenital sinus). All the variants of female hypospadias must be surgically corrected as transposition of the external opening of the urethra from the vagina on the perineum under the clitoris in chronic urethritis. The second case mentioned above.

  16. Urethritis due to corynebacterium striatum: An emerging germ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikh, Mohammed; El Yaagoubi, Imad; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Corynedbacterium striatum (CS) is a Gram-positive coryneform bacillus that is part of mucous and skin flora. It has been considered as a causative agent of many infections in intensive care, neurology, traumatology and urology, but was never implicated in non-gonococcal urethritis. We report the case of a nosocomial urethritis due to Corynebacterium striatum following resection of an intrameatus condyloma.

  17. Transurethral incision of urethral diverticulum in the female

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, J; Honnens de Lichtenberg, M

    1989-01-01

    A new technique of transurethral incision of urethral diverticulum was successfully used in two women. The method described is safe, simple and shortens operating time.......A new technique of transurethral incision of urethral diverticulum was successfully used in two women. The method described is safe, simple and shortens operating time....

  18. Gonococcal Conjunctivitis Despite Successful Treatment of Male Urethritis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Remco P H; Verweij, Stephan P; McIntyre, James A; Schaftenaar, Erik

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of progressive, cephalosporin-susceptible, Neisseria gonorrhoeae conjunctivitis despite successful treatment of male urethritis syndrome. We hypothesize that conjunctival infection progressed due to insufficient penetration of cefixime and azithromycin and point out that extragenital infection and male urethritis may not be cured simultaneously in settings where the syndromic approach is used.

  19. Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Gonococcal Urethritis in Males by Rosoxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Tiwari

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty eight male patients with acute gonococcal, urethritis were treated, with rosoxacin 300 mg capsule, (Eradacil as a single- dose oral therapy. Twenty six patients were cured, while two patients did not improve. Four patients developed post-gonococcal urethritis (PGU.

  20. Congenital urethral polyps: a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, D.; Vivas, I.; Torres, E.; Garcia, L.; Fernandez-Villa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Congenital urethral polyps are uncommon lesions, very few cases of which have been previously reported in the literature. We present two cases of congenital urethral polyps in children, describing the clinical and radiological features and the diagnostic method employed, as well as reviewing the literature. (Author) 6 refs

  1. Original article Urethral Stricture and HIV: Unusual Presentations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    cause of urethral stricture in this series was traumatic injury The other important cause was post-inflammatory (after gonococcal urethritis) with HIV co-infection. These patients posed a challenge due to our lack of experience and the absence of literature guidelines on the optimal management. The first unusual feature in the ...

  2. Epidemiology of urethral stricture at Tygerberg Hospital | Steenkamp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over a 12-month period, 120 consecutive male patients with confirmed urethral stricture were prospectively studied with regard to the epidemiology of the disease. Specific urethritis is the main aetiological factor (45%) and internal and external trauma account for an alarming 38,3% of cases. The prevalence is highest ...

  3. Results of surgical excision of urethral prolapse in symptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mary E; Oyesanya, Tola; Cameron, Anne P

    2017-11-01

    Here, we present the clinical presentation and surgical outcomes of women with symptomatic urethral prolapse presenting to our institution over 20 years, and seek to provide treatment recommendations for management of symptomatic urethral prolapse and caruncle. A retrospective review of medical records from female patients who underwent surgery for symptomatic urethral prolapse from June 1995 to August 2015 was performed. Surgical technique consisted of a four-quadrant excisional approach for repair of urethral prolapse. A total of 26 patients were identified with a mean age of 38.8 years (range 3-81). The most common presentations were vaginal bleeding, hematuria, pain, and dysuria. All patients underwent surgical excision of urethral prolapse via a standard approach. Follow-up data was available in 24 patients. Six patients experienced temporary postoperative bleeding, and one patient required placement of a Foley catheter for tamponade. One patient experienced temporary postoperative urinary retention requiring Foley catheter placement. Three patients had visible recurrence of urethral prolapse, for which one later underwent re-excision. Surgical excision of urethral prolapse is a reasonable treatment option in patients who have tried conservative management without relief, as well as in those who present with severe symptoms. Possible complications following excision include postoperative bleeding and recurrence, and patients must be counseled accordingly. In this work, we propose a treatment algorithm for symptomatic urethral prolapse. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever in 31 patients, urethral bleeding in 14 and epididymitis in 17 patients.

  5. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Direct vision, internal, urethrotomy, urethral and stricture.;. Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever.

  6. A rare case of congenital Y-type urethral duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Tiwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of Y-type of urethral duplication with the accessory urethra arising from posterior urethra and opening in the perineum. The orthotopic urethra was normal. The accessory urethral tract was cored, transfixed and divided. At 1 year of follow-up, the patient has no urinary complaints

  7. Posterior urethral valves: search for a diagnostic reference standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Dik, Pieter; Chrzan, Rafal; Klijn, Aart J.; de Kort, Laetitia

    2008-01-01

    To test the agreement among pediatric urologists regarding endoscopic findings concerning posterior urethral valves. A total of 25 experienced pediatric urologic surgeons observed 11 video fragments of cystourethroscopy in boys. For most of these boys, a strong suspicion of urethral obstruction had

  8. Delayed primary realignment of posterior urethral rupture | Shittu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of acute posterior urethral rupture is controversial. Twelve patients who presented with acute posterior urethral rupture over a five--year period were treated by delayed primary realignment of the injury. The technique of this procedure and the outcome are the subject of this presentation. Eight patients had ...

  9. Urethral Stricture as seen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    urethritis have increasingly been incriminated as a major etiological factor of inflammatory urethral stricture especially in the developed world. Organisms which fall in this group include. Ureaplasma (T-strain), Mycoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Haemophilus vaginalis, Herpes simplex virus type II, ...

  10. Clinical and angiographic outcomes after stent-assisted coiling of cerebral aneurysms with Enterprise and Neuroform stents: a comparative analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brent; Vaziri, Sasha; Singla, Amit; Fargen, Kyle M; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    The most widely used intracranial stents for stent-assisted coiling are Neuroform (NEU) and Enterprise stents (ENT). This study compares published outcomes between the ENT and NEU coil-assist systems and comments on the published safety and efficacy of stent-assisted coiling in general. A literature search was performed through PubMed for all published series of ENT or NEU stent-assisted coiling of cerebral aneurysms from 2004 to 2014. All studies including 10 or more published cases of stent-assisted coiling with ENT or NEU were included. 47 studies met the inclusion criteria, containing 4238 aneurysms in 4039 patients. 2111 aneurysms were treated with NEU and 2127 were treated with ENT. Mean follow-up was 14.1 months. Overall, thromboembolic events occurred in 6.4% of aneurysms, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 2.6%, permanent morbidity in 3.9%, and mortality in 2.3%. Initial and final 100% angiographic occlusion was seen in 53% and 69% of patients, respectively. Deployment failures (pstent-assisted coiling devices to date, containing over 4200 aneurysms in more than 4000 patients. Comparative analyses demonstrate that both devices are reported to be safe and effective with comparable permanent morbidity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Dorsolateral onlay urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures by a unilateral urethral mobilization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra P; Pathak, Hemant R; Andankar, Mukund G

    2009-04-01

    For management of long segment anterior urethral stricture, dorsal onlay urethroplasty is currently the most favored single-stage procedure. Conventional dorsal onlay urethroplasty requires circumferential mobilization of the urethra, which might cause ischemia of the urethra in addition to chordee. To determine the feasibility and short-term outcomes of applying a dorsolateral free graft to treat anterior urethral stricture by unilateral urethral mobilization through a perineal approach. A prospective study from September 2005 to March 2008 in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Seventeen patients with long or multiple strictures of the anterior urethra were treated by a dorsolateral free buccal mucosa graft. The pendulous urethra was accessed by penile eversion through the perineal wound. The urethra was not separated from the corporal bodies on one side and was only mobilized from the midline on the ventral aspect to beyond the midline on the dorsal aspect. The urethra was opened in the dorsal midline over the stricture. The buccal mucosa graft was secured on the ventral tunica of the corporal bodies. Mean and median. After a follow-up of 12-30 months, one recurrence developed and 1 patient needed an internal urethrotomy. A unilateral urethral mobilization approach for dorsolateral free graft urethroplasty is feasible for panurethral strictures of any length with good short-term success.

  12. The effect of penile urethral fat graft application on urethral angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, M; Yazıcı, I; Boybeyi, O; Ayva, S; Aslan, M K; Senyucel, M F; Soyer, T

    2015-10-01

    Autologous fat grafts are rich in adipose-derived stem cells, providing optimal soft-tissue replacement and significant quantities of angiogenic growth factor. Although fat grafts (FG) are used in several clinical conditions, the use of FG in urethral repairs and the effects of FG to urethral repairs have not yet been reported. An experimental study was performed to evaluate the effect of FG on urethral angiogenesis and tissue growth factor (GF) levels. Sixteen Wistar albino, adult, male rats were allocated into two groups: the control group (CG) (n = 8) and the experiment group (EG) (n = 8). After anesthetization of all rats, 3-mm vertical incisions were made on the urethras, and then sutured with interrupted 5/0 vicryl sutures. The operations were performed under a stereo dissecting microscope under magnification (×20). In the CG, no additional procedure was performed. In the EG after the same surgical procedure, 1 mm(3) FG was removed from the inguinal region by sharp dissection with a knife. The grafts were trimmed to 1 × 1 mm dimensions on millimeter paper. The FGs were placed on the repaired urethras. The skin was then closed. Samples from urethral and penile skin were taken 21 days after surgery in both groups. Density and intensity of staining with vascular-endothelial GF (VEGF), VEGF-receptor, and endothelial-GF receptor (EGFR) in the endothelial and mesenchymal cells of the penile urethral vessels were immunohistochemically evaluated. Data obtained from immunohistochemical evaluations were analyzed with SPSS 15.0. The P-values lower than 0.05 were considered as significant. Density of VEGF staining was significantly decreased in the vascular endothelium of the EG compared to the CG (P factor levels, which is contrary to the literature data. Fat grafting has an immunohistochemical effect on the growth factor levels that are related to angiogenesis after urethral repair. It is difficult to make a firm conclusion about the role of fat grafting on urethral

  13. Venous sinus stenting for pseudotumour cerebri with venous sinus stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huairui; Bai Rulin; Wu Xiaojun; Qi Xiangqian; Mei Qiyong; Lu Yicheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relation between venous sinus stenosis and pseduotumour cerebri and to discuss the efficacy and strategy of venous sinus stenting for its treatment. Methods: Venous sinus stenting was performed in a total of 9 patients with pseudotumour cerebri accompanied by dural sinus stenosis. The clinical data, including the clinical presentations, intracranial pressure, angiographic findings, pressure of dural sinus,methods of treatment and the therapeutic results, were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Bilateral disc edema was seen in all patients. The pressure gradient in the lateral sinuses was obviously high before stenting (22.67±7.25)mmHg in all patients and a reduction in intra-sinus pressure and pressure gradient was also found (5.78±3.77)mmHg. The symptoms associated with intracranial hypertension were gradually improved or disappeared in two weeks after the placement of the stent in all cases, and the intracranial pressure dropped evidently (12.78±5.97)cm H 2 O. Vision was improved in 7 cases at three months, whereas it remained poor in 2 cases despite normalized intracranial pressure. There was no other permanent procedure-related morbidity. The patients were followed up for 3 months to 5 years, and no recurrence developed. Conclusion: Lateral sinus stenting is an effective method for the treatment of pseudotumour cerebri with dural sinus stenosis. (authors)

  14. In vivo measurement of urethral dose profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toye, W.C.; Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology,; Duchesne, G.M.; Das, K.R.; Cee, A.; Mameghan, H.; Johnston, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Quality assurance becomes a critical requirement when radiographs are routinely used in planning of treatments. In HDR prostate brachytherapy, the surrounding organs at risk of complications are the bladder and the rectum. However, of particular concern is the urethra that runs centrally through the prostate gland, as an unavoidably high dose can occur in the central region in order to achieve a minimum peripheral dose to a small target volume. Although high urethral doses have previously been related to increased urinary symptoms, some recent studies have not found such a correlation. The aim of this study was firstly, to identify dosimetric indicators of urethral morbidity following HDR prostate brachytherapy (4F x of 5.0 Gy), and secondly, to test the validity of calculated dose values. The in vivo measurements utilised a TLD (LiF:Mg,Ti) train formed by loading eight TLD rods alternating with 1,0 cm brass spacers into a fine plastic flexible tube. The length and diameter of plastic tubing was approximately 45cm and 0.15cm respectively, while the train length was 11.8 cm from the tip of the tube. The TLD train was placed into the central lumen of an 18 F three-way urethral catheter prior to its insertion. Significant urinary morbidity was defined prospectively as a score of a total of 3 or more points for severity from 5 symptoms categories. The five symptoms evaluated were hesitancy, frequency/nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. The introduction of in vivo measurements to enhance the existing dosimetric analysis may be required to fully test the quantitative relationships (e.g. dose-volume ratios). Placement of TLDs within the urethra results in measurements whose accuracy is unaffected by internal organ motion as the hollow urethra must move with the prostate. The dose recorded by the TLDs is determined independently of the predictive algorithm used by the treatment planning system, and prostate location errors (e.g. due to image

  15. Computational Bench Testing to Evaluate the Short-Term Mechanical Performance of a Polymeric Stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobel, A C; Petisco, S; Sarasua, J R; Wang, W; McHugh, P E

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant volume of research focussed on the utilization of biodegradable polymers such as poly-L-lactide-acid (PLLA) for applications associated with cardiovascular disease. More specifically, there has been an emphasis on upgrading current clinical shortfalls experienced with conventional bare metal stents and drug eluting stents. One such approach, the adaption of fully formed polymeric stents has led to a small number of products being commercialized. Unfortunately, these products are still in their market infancy, meaning there is a clear non-occurrence of long term data which can support their mechanical performance in vivo. Moreover, the load carry capacity and other mechanical properties essential to a fully optimized polymeric stent are difficult, timely and costly to establish. With the aim of compiling rapid and representative performance data for specific stent geometries, materials and designs, in addition to reducing experimental timeframes, Computational bench testing via finite element analysis (FEA) offers itself as a very powerful tool. On this basis, the research presented in this paper is concentrated on the finite element simulation of the mechanical performance of PLLA, which is a fully biodegradable polymer, in the stent application, using a non-linear viscous material model. Three physical stent geometries, typically used for fully polymeric stents, are selected, and a comparative study is performed in relation to their short-term mechanical performance, with the aid of experimental data. From the simulated output results, an informed understanding can be established in relation to radial strength, flexibility and longitudinal resistance, that can be compared with conventional permanent metal stent functionality, and the results show that it is indeed possible to generate a PLLA stent with comparable and sufficient mechanical performance. The paper also demonstrates the attractiveness of FEA as a tool

  16. Large Cluster of Neisseria meningitidis Urethritis in Columbus, Ohio, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Jose A; Turner, Abigail Norris; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Retchless, Adam C; Kretz, Cecilia B; Briere, Elizabeth; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Stephens, David S; Maierhofer, Courtney; Del Rio, Carlos; Abrams, A Jeanine; Trees, David L; Ervin, Melissa; Licon, Denisse B; Fields, Karen S; Roberts, Mysheika Williams; Dennison, Amanda; Wang, Xin

    2017-07-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is a Gram-negative diplococcus that normally colonizes the nasopharynx and rarely infects the urogenital tract. On Gram stain of urethral exudates, Nm can be misidentified as the more common sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In response to a large increase in cases of Nm urethritis identified among men presenting for screening at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Columbus, Ohio, we investigated the epidemiologic characteristics of men with Nm urethritis and the molecular and phylogenetic characteristics of their Nm isolates. The study was conducted between 1 January and 18 November 2015. Seventy-five Nm urethritis cases were confirmed by biochemical and polymerase chain reaction testing. Men with Nm urethritis were a median age of 31 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 24-38) and had a median of 2 sex partners in the last 3 months (IQR = 1-3). Nm cases were predominantly black (81%) and heterosexual (99%). Most had urethral discharge (91%), reported oral sex with a female in the last 12 months (96%), and were treated with a ceftriaxone-based regimen (95%). A minority (15%) also had urethral chlamydia coinfection. All urethral Nm isolates were nongroupable, ST-11 clonal complex (cc11), ET-15, and clustered together phylogenetically. Urethral Nm isolates were similar by fine typing (PorA P1.5-1,10-8, PorB 2-2, FetA F3-6), except 2, which had different PorB types (2-78 and 2-52). Between January and November 2015, 75 urethritis cases due to a distinct Nm clade occurred among primarily black, heterosexual men in Columbus, Ohio. Future urogenital Nm infection studies should focus on pathogenesis and modes of sexual transmission. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Haemophilus parainfluenzae urethritis among homosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Wu, Mei-Yu; Lin, Tsui-Hsien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-08-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a common inhabitant of the human upper respiratory tract of the normal oral microflora. We report three men who had been having unprotected sex with men (MSM) and subsequently acquired H. parainfluenzae urethritis, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Two men were treated with ceftriaxone and doxycycline, and the third man was treated with clarithromycin. All three patients responded to treatment. This case series highlights the potential role of H. parainfluenzae as a sexually transmitted genitourinary pathogen. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Mycoplasmas and Non-gonococcal Urethritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 692 heterosexual males which included 130 men with non-gonoccal urethritis (NGU and 562 age-matched controls, were studied. Mycoplasmas were cultivated in liquid PPLO medium tubes containing arionine and urea. Mycoplasmas were isolated in 24 (18.59o of the 130 patients and 76 (13.60/o of the 562 controls. Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated in 18 (13.9% gatients with NGU and in 21 (3.8% controls. Mycoplasma hominiq was isolated in 6 (4.6% patientuft NGU and in 55 (9.8% controls. Ureaplasma urealyticurm has a definite in NGU.

  19. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-van Marle M Elske

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13 and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13, decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96, but increased significantly in intensive care (IC and coronary care (CC units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17. The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16 and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18 and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96 and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90. The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an existing guideline can lead to better adherence and cost savings. Especially, hospitals which use a lot of urethral catheters or

  20. Aetiology of male urethritis in patients recruited from a population with a high HIV prevalence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, P.D.J.; Moodley, P.; Khan, N.; Ebrahim, S.; Govender, K.; Connolly, C.E.; Sturm, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The aetiology of urethritis, the significance of potential pathogens and the relation of urethritis to HIV infection were determined in 335 men (cases) with and 100 men (controls) without urethral symptoms. Urethral swab specimens were tested for different organisms by PCR or by culture for

  1. In-situ investigation of stress conditions during expansion of bare metal stents and PLLA-coated stents using the XRD sin(2)ψ-technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Wolfgang; Dammer, Markus; Bakczewitz, Frank; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Grabow, Niels; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Drug eluting stents (DES) consist of platform, coating and drug. The platform often is a balloon-expandable bare metal stent made of the CoCr alloy L-605 or stainless steel 316 L. The function of the coating, typically a permanent polymer, is to hold and release the drug, which should improve therapeutic outcome. Before implantation, DES are compressed (crimped) to allow implantation in the human body. During implantation, DES are expanded by balloon inflation. Crimping, as well as expansion, causes high stresses and high strains locally in the DES struts, as well as in the polymer coating. These stresses and strains are important design criteria of DES. Usually, they are calculated numerically by finite element analysis (FEA), but experimental results for validation are hardly available. In this work, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) sin(2)ψ-technique is applied to in-situ determination of stress conditions of bare metal L-605 stents, and Poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) coated stents. This provides a realistic characterization of the near-surface stress state and a validation option of the numerical FEA. XRD-results from terminal stent struts of the bare metal stent show an increasing compressive load stress in tangential direction with increasing stent expansion. These findings correlate with numerical FEA results. The PLLA-coating also bears increasing compressive load stress during expansion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term outcome of primary endoscopic realignment for bulbous urethral injuries: risk factors of urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ill Young; Lee, Jea Whan; Park, Seung Chol; Rim, Joung Sik

    2012-12-01

    Although endoscopic realignment has been accepted as a standard treatment for urethral injuries, the long-term follow-up data on this procedure are not sufficient. We report the long-term outcome of primary endoscopic realignment in bulbous urethral injuries. Patients with bulbous urethral injuries were treated by primary endoscopic realignment between 1991 and 2005. The operative procedure included suprapubic cystostomy and transurethral catheterization using a guide wire, within 72 hours of injury. The study population included 51 patients with a minimum follow-up duration of 5 years. The most common causes of the injuries were straddle injury from falling down (74.5%), and pelvic bone fracture (7.8%). Gross hematuria was the most common complaint (92.2%). Twenty-three patients (45.1%) had complete urethral injuries. The mean time to operation after the injury was 38.8±43.2 hours. The mean operation time and mean indwelling time of a urethral Foley catheter were 55.5±37.6 minutes and 22.0±11.9 days, respectively. Twenty out of 51 patients (39.2%) were diagnosed with urethral stricture in 89.1±36.6 months after surgery. A multivariate analysis revealed that young age and operation time were independent risk factors for strictures as a complication of urethral realignment (hazard ratio [HR], 6.554, P=0.032; HR, 6.206, P=0.035). Urethral stricture commonly developed as a postoperative complication of primary endoscopic urethral realignment for bulbous urethral injury, especially in young age and long operation time.

  3. 'Stent in a stent'--an alternative technique for removing partially covered stents following sleeve gastrectomy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilikostas, Georgios; Sanmugalingam, Nimalan; Khan, Omar; Reddy, Marcus; Groves, Chris; Wan, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic stenting is a relatively new technique for the treatment of post sleeve gastrectomy complications. Partially covered stents are used in this method to minimise the risk of migration but they are associated with difficulties with removal. Patients requiring emergency stenting following sleeve gastrectomy underwent insertion of a partially covered metallic stent. One month later, if the stent was not easily removable, a fully covered overlapping stent was inserted and the patient was readmitted 2 weeks later for removal of both stents. Four patients required stenting following sleeve gastrectomy leaks, and one patient required stenting for a stricture. In these cases, a 'stent in a stent' technique was used for removal. This technique allows the safe removal of partially covered stents inserted following sleeve gastrectomy complications.

  4. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Mehmet; Sertkaya, Zulfu; Koca, Orhan; Calıskan, Selahattin; Kutluhan, Musab Ali; Karaman, Muhammet Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US) were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors. PMID:27256189

  5. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akyuz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors.

  6. [Neisseria meningitidis urethritis: Two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, C; Liegeon, A-L; Fabbro, C; Truchetet, F

    2017-10-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (NM) is a commensal bacteria present in the oropharyngeal flora that causes invasive infections. There have been rarer reports of presence in the genital region. Herein, we present two cases of acute NM urethritis. Two men aged 30 and 31years, one of whom is homosexual and seropositive for HIV infection, presented urethral discharge which was diagnosed as acute urethritis. The unit through samples indicated the presence of NM of serogroups B and C. One of the antibiotic sensitivity tests revealed intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and to amoxicillin. The clinical presentation of acute NM urethritis is non-specific, because of which urethral samples should be taken wherever acute urethritis is suspected. NM urethritis is infrequent and primarily affects men who have sex with men (MSM). Its current increase is due to unprotected oral-genital sexual practices. Due to the emergence of resistance to NM, antibiotic susceptibility testing should be carried out routinely to ensure appropriate therapy and prophylaxis. Cases of invasive serogroup C meningococcal infections have been recorded within the MSM population with hypothetical sexual port of entry. Thus, the French High Public Health Authority recommends vaccination against meningitis C in this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Advances in the Understanding and Treatment of Male Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Laura H; Manhart, Lisa E; Martin, David H; Seña, Arlene C; Dimitrakoff, Jordan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2015-12-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis are well-documented urethral pathogens, and the literature supporting Mycoplasma genitalium as an etiology of urethritis is growing. Trichomonas vaginalis and viral pathogens (herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and adenovirus) can cause urethritis, particularly in specific subpopulations. New data are emerging regarding the potential role of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria in urethritis, although results are inconsistent regarding the pathogenic role of Ureaplasma urealyticum in men. Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma parvum do not appear to be pathogens. Men with suspected urethritis should undergo evaluation to confirm urethral inflammation and etiologic cause. Although nucleic acid amplification testing would detect N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis (or T. vaginalis if utilized), there is no US Food and Drug Administration-approved clinical test for M. genitalium available in the United States at this time. The varied etiologies of urethritis and lack of diagnostic options for some organisms present treatment challenges in the clinical setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesić, Sonja; Vukićević, Jelica; Gvozdenović, Eleonora; Skiljević, Dusan; Janosević, Slobodanka; Medenica, Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis is the most common sexually transmitted infection in men, with vast majority of the etiological agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis, followed by urogenital mycoplasmas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in nongonococcal urethritis in men, and to examine infections associated with these agents. Material and methods 299 sexually active, heterosexual men with nongonococcal urethritis were included into the study. Urethral samples were taken with a dacron swab placed into the urethra up to 2-3 cm. The Direct immunofluorescence technique was performed for identification of Chlamydia trachomatis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis were detected with Mycoplasma IST assay. Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 22.75%, Uraeplasma urealyticum in 21.08% and Mycoplasma hominis in 8.02% cases. We found no significant differences in prevalence between Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticym (p > 0.05). Monoinfections were found in 51.85% with significantly higher rate (p urethritis with prevalence of 51.85% in monoinfections and 11.70% in associated infections. In 36.45% of cases the etiology of urethritis was not elucidated. These results suggest that more sensitive diagnostic tool should be applied when searching for the derailed etiology of nongonococcal urethritis.

  9. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002953.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery To use the sharing features ... to remove plaque buildup ( endarterectomy ) Carotid angioplasty with stent placement Description Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is ...

  10. [Efficacy and safety of levofloxacin to non-gonorrheal urethritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Shoichi; Onoe, Yasuhiko; Hosobe, Takahide; Kato, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Masaki

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of levofloxacin (LVFX) 500mg once a day in patients with non-gonorrheal urethritis. Men, aged 20 years or older, with urethritis symptoms, and detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) or Mycoplasma genitalium (M. genitalium) by a microbiological examination were eligible for this study. Patients were administered LVFX 500mg, orally, once a day and the dosage period was seven days. We assumed 22 patients for a safety and efficacy analysis. In 22 patients, 17 patients had urethritis with C. trachomatis, 4 patients urethritis with M. genitalium, and one patient mixed infection of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium. In the clinial study, the primary endpoint was set as the bacteriological eradication rate at two to four weeks after completion of treatment. The bacterial eradication rate in the urethritis was 86.4% (19/22). The bacterial eradication rate in the urethritis with C. trachomatis, M. genitalium, and mixed infection of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium were 94.1% (16/17), 50.0% (2/4), 100% (1/1), respectively. A significant difference was not recognized among the three groups. The clinical efficacy at two to four weeks after completion of treatment was 90.9% (20/22). The clinical efficacy rates in the urethritis with C. trachomatis, M. genitalium, and mixed infection of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium were 100% (17/17), 50.0% (2/4), 100% (1/1), respectively. The efficacy rate of urethritis with M. genitalium was significantly low. No adverse drug reactions were observed. These results suggest that once-a-day levofloxacin (500mg) is effective and safe treatment for non-gonorrheal urethritis.

  11. The Effect of Stent Cell Geometry on Carotid Stenting Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alparslan, Burcu, E-mail: burcu.alparslan@gmail.com [Yozgat State Hospital, Radiology Clinic (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Eritmen, Ulku Turpcu, E-mail: drulkutur@hotmail.com.tr [Special Eregli Anatolia Hospital, Radiology Clinic (Turkey); Duran, Selcen, E-mail: selcenduran16@hotmail.com [Yerkoy State Hospital, Neurology Clinic (Turkey); Ozkaya, Guven, E-mail: ozkaya@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics (Turkey); Hakyemez, Bahattin, E-mail: bhakyemez@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of stent cell geometry on midterm results of carotid artery stenting (CAS).Materials and MethodOne hundred fifty-five patients underwent CAS between February 2010 and December 2012. Ninety-one open- and 84 closed-cell stents were used in this non-randomized, retrospective study. Periprocedural complications were defined as the ones happened during the procedure or within 30 days afterwards. Starting from the 6th month after the procedure, in-stent restenosis was detected with multidetector computed tomography angiography and classified into four groups from focal restenosis to occlusion.ResultsEleven complications were encountered in the periprocedural period (four on the open- and seven on the closed-cell group). Total complication rate was 6.3 % (11/175). No significant difference was detected in terms of periprocedural complications between two groups (p = 0.643). There was statistically significant difference between stent design groups in regard to radiological findings (p = 0.002). Sixteen of open-cell stents and three of closed-cell stents had focal restenosis. One closed-cell stent had diffuse proliferative restenosis and one open-cell stent had total occlusion.ConclusionIn-stent restenosis was more common in open-cell stent group, which have larger free cell area than closed-cell stents. Although our radiologic findings promote us to use closed-cell design if ‘possible’, no difference was detected in terms of clinical outcomes.

  12. Self-expandable metalic endotracheal stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Young Soo; Cho, Dae Soon; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Young Soo; Lee, Mi Jae

    1993-01-01

    Six bare stents and six covered stents were inserted in the trachea of 12 dogs under general anesthesia. After 1-10 weeks of observation, the dogs were killed, and the trachea and lung were examined grossly and histologically. Pneumonia and stent migration were observed more frequently at covered stent group. Inflammatory change of the trachea was more severe at covered stent group. In conclusion, we believe that it is inadequate to insert silicone covered stent in the tracheobronchial tree. (Author)

  13. Self-expandable metalic endotracheal stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Young Soo; Cho, Dae Soon; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Young Soo; Lee, Mi Jae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    Six bare stents and six covered stents were inserted in the trachea of 12 dogs under general anesthesia. After 1-10 weeks of observation, the dogs were killed, and the trachea and lung were examined grossly and histologically. Pneumonia and stent migration were observed more frequently at covered stent group. Inflammatory change of the trachea was more severe at covered stent group. In conclusion, we believe that it is inadequate to insert silicone covered stent in the tracheobronchial tree. (Author).

  14. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of urethral pressure profilometry and contrast radiography in the diagnosis of incompetence of the urethral sphincter mechanism in bitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, S.P.; Cripps, P.J.; Holt, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Three diagnostic indicators of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence were compared in 25 continent and 25 incontinent anaesthetised bitches: the resting urethral pressure profile, the stressed urethral pressure profile and the radiographic position of the bladder neck. Logistic regression indicated that the best predictor of continence status was the stressed urethral pressure profile as assessed by the percentage of negative peaks extending below the resting intravesical pressure; it classified 43 of the 50 dogs correctly. The radiographic position of the bladder neck was a better predictor of continence than either the measurement of functional profile length or the maximum urethral closure pressure from the resting urethral pressure profile, whether alone or in combination. By combining the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed profile with the position of the bladder neck, 46 of the 50 dogs were classified correctly. Cut-off values for the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed urethral pressure profile, and for the radiographic position of the bladder neck are suggested for use in evaluating incontinent bitches in clinical practice

  16. A new intratracheal stent made from nitinol, an alloy with "shape memory effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinograd, I; Klin, B; Brosh, T; Weinberg, M; Flomenblit, Y; Nevo, Z

    1994-05-01

    Temporary or permanent tracheal splinting in pediatric patients may be indicated in tracheomalacia or bronchomalacia, repair of congenital tracheal stenosis, and after tracheal resection. This study presents the results of the development of a new intraluminal airway stent made from titanium alloy, a metal with "shape memory effect". At low temperatures (martensitic state) the titanium alloy stent can be fashioned into a specific shape; then when heated to a higher temperature (austenitic state) the stent alters its shape, only to regain its original shape when recooled to the lower temperature. The stent, connected to a small electric power supply, was introduced into 20 young rabbits with the use of a 2.5 cm rigid bronchoscope. After implantation in the martensitic state the stent was warmed to 40 degrees C, the austenitic state, by an electric current of 1.5 to 3 ampere for 1 to 2 seconds. After a period of 8 to 10 weeks the stent was removed (in its martensitic state) through the same-sized bronchoscope after being cooled with 3 to 4 ml of 80% alcohol solution at 6 degrees C. No signs of airway obstruction developed in any of the animals after implantation or extraction of the stent. The biomechanical properties of the trachea, as shown by strain measurements with the use of incremental forces, showed significant differences between the stented and unstented segments (p stent adequately fulfilled the requirements of a temporary intraluminal airway splint, and because of its unique feature of shape memory effect the stent could be inserted, fixed, and removed easily, even in very small airways.

  17. Marxism as permanent revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, E.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that the 'permanent revolution' represented the dominant element in Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels' political discourse, and that it tended to overrule considerations encapsulated in 'historical materialism'. In Marx and Engels's understanding, permanent revolution did not

  18. Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-eluting stents - discharge; PCI - discharge; Percutaneous coronary intervention - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - discharge; Coronary angioplasty - discharge; Coronary artery angioplasty - discharge; Cardiac ...

  19. Indications for stenting during thrombolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Broholm, R; Just, Sven Richardt Lundgren

    2013-01-01

    of a stent in this position is the treatment of choice facilitating the venous flow into an unobstructed outflow tract either from the femoral vein or the deep femoral vein or both. The stent, made of stainless steel or nitinol, has to be self-expandable and flexible with radial force to overcome...... the challenges in this low-pressure system. The characteristics of the anatomy with external compression and often a curved vein segment with diameter difference make stent placement necessary. Ballooning alone has no place in this area. The proportion of inserted stents varies in the published materials...

  20. The stenting strategy of drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease in patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports regarding the relationship between the length and diameter of implanted drug-eluting stents and clinical and angiographic outcomes in dialysis patients are limited. Aim: We investigated the efficiency of drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease in patients on dialysis from the viewpoint of stent sizing. Methods: Sirolimus-eluting stents were implanted in 88 lesions and bare metal stents were implanted in 43 lesions. We compared stenting strategy, major adverse cardiac events, and angiographic results between sirolimus-eluting stent and bare metal stent groups. Results: Stent diameter was smaller and stent length was longer in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare metal stent group in our routine practices. There was no significant between-group difference in late diameter loss. Rates of angiographic restenosis and target lesion revascularization were significantly higher in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare metal stent group. Although stent length was significantly longer and stent diameter was smaller in the sirolimus-eluting stent group, sirolimus-eluting stents did not improve the subsequent clinical and angiographic results compared with bare metal stents in dialysis patients. Conclusion: In dialysis patients, a longer length and/or smaller diameter sirolimus-eluting stent implantation was associated with high rates of restenosis and target lesion revascularization compared with bare metal stents.

  1. Efficiency and safety of the intraluminal stent as a treatment malignant obstruction of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xixiang; Si Tongguo; Pan Xiaohui; Yang Hui; Nan Yi; Huang Linfen; Feng Xiaofeng; Mao Aiwu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency and safety of intraluminal stent as a treatment of malignant obstruction of digestive tract and esophago-bronchial fistula. Methods: In total 71 patients suffered with malignant obstruction or esophago-bronchial fistula were treated with permanent nickel-titanium alloy, partially covered stents. All the procedures were performed under DSA guidance. Inserted via the oral anal access, the stents were placed at the sites of obstructions or the fistulas. Esophagogram or colonogram were done before and post the intervention. The clinical efficiency was assessed by function of swallowing or defecation in follow-up. Results: In 62 patients (96.9%), function of swallowing was restored after the stent was placed in upper digestive tract without drinking triggered coughing. Symptoms were immediately relieved after the stent was placed in sigmoid colon or rectum. Displacement of stents was seen in 2 cases (2.8%); restenosis in 2 (2.8%); hoarse voice was noted in 1 case (1.4%); intense thoracic pain was complained in 2 cases (2.8%); mild pain was noted in 12 cases (16.9%); and massive hemorrhage was complicated in 1 case (1.4%). All complications were successfully controlled after proper treatment. Conclusion: It is an effective, easy and safe method to treat malignant obstruction of digestive tract or esophago-bronchial fistula using partially covered nickel-titanium alloy stent. (authors)

  2. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Ananthakrishna Pillai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging.

  3. Primary care management of sexually transmitted urethritis in adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Claire E

    2003-04-01

    To describe current knowledge about diagnosis, screening, and treatment of sexually transmitted urethritis among adolescent and young adult males. Current research, systematic reviews, consensus guidelines and the author's clinical experience. Urethritis, the most common sexually transmitted syndrome in young males, is most frequently caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and/or Neisseria gonorrhea. Symptoms include dysuria and penile discharge, although up to 50% of males are asymptomatic. Risky sexual behaviors and lack of access to healthcare increase incidence of this infection. Transmission to female partners can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and neonatal infection. Young males with urethritis must be treated as soon as diagnosis is established. Consensus guidelines exist for diagnosis and treatment of gonococcal and non-gonococcal urethritis. Careful patient education is necessary to ensure successful treatment. Prevention of repeat infections requires partner treatment and detailed education about safer sexual practices. Improved access to preventive services for young males should be a healthcare priority.

  4. A novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaynar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To propose a novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization procedures. Technique: The sheath tip of an intravenous catheter is cut off, replaced to the needle tip and pushed through the distal drainage side hole to Foley catheter tip, and finally withdrawn for cannulation. In situations making urethral catheterization difficult, a guide wire is placed under direct vision. The modified Foley catheter is slid successfully over the guide wire from its distal end throughout the urethral passage into the bladder. Results: The modified Foley catheter was used successfully in our clinic in cases requiring difficult urethral catheterization. Conclusions: This easy and rapid modification of a Foley catheter may minimize the potential complications of blind catheter placement in standard catheterization.

  5. Patient knowledge of urethral stricture disease in a state sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. Barnard

    2018-02-16

    Feb 16, 2018 ... Introduction: The knowledge urethral stricture patients in a developing country Specialist Clinic have ... A systematic review done by DeWalt et al. confirms that low literacy ... The questionnaire was translated into Afrikaans and.

  6. Contralateral Fracture of the Penis with Concomitant Urethral Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ra

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... 2, 2009. 103. 103-106. Case Report. Contralateral Fracture of the Penis with Concomitant. Urethral ... Examination revealed ecchymosis and swelling of the proximal shaft and ... of impotence due to infection and cavernosal.

  7. Hinged Transpubic Approach to Delayed Repair of Posterior Urethral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the management of one of the most challenging injuries of the lower urinary tract. ... This patient underwent a successful re-operation with full recovery. ... delayed repair of urethral distraction defects complicating pelvic fracture is feasible.

  8. THE ROLE OF OPTICAL INTERNAL URETHROTOMY FOR MALE URETHRAL STRICTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Urethral stricture is characterized by decrease in urethral flow severe enough to cause acute urinary retention. Urethral strictures may develop after traumas to urethral epithelium and/or corpus spongiosum. Complication rates due to untreated urethral stricture are very high. Although various treatment methods have been described, the second most common method after urethral dilation in practice is cold-knife internal urethrotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate data of patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy in our clinic. Methods:This study included patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy due to internal stricture between January 2011 and May 2015. Demographic, clinical, radiological, uroflowmetric (maximum and mean urine flow rate and operative datas of the patients were retrospectively evaluated and recorded. Results:This study included 155 patients with a mean (±standard deviation age of 71.70 (±13.7. Etiologically the most common reason was urological surgical procedures (67% and the most common stricture was seen at bulbomembranous urethra region (85.2%. Mean length of stricture was 5.4±2.4mm. Mean duration to remove the catheter was 1.8±1.3 days. Regional anesthesia was used in 67.7% of the patients. Our success rate was 78,1%. Comparison of maximum and mean urine flow rates pre and postoperatively revealed significant increases postoperatively. Conclusion:Internal urethrotomy is a first line treatment method for urethral strictures because it is easily applied, has a low complication rate, and can be applied with local aenesthesia in high risk patients who are unable to take general anesthesia. Although recurrence rate is high, repeatability is its greatest advantage and it causes significant relief in patients with urethral strictures, but it must be kept in mind that definitive treatment is urethroplasty.

  9. Comparison of radiographic and sonographic urethrography for assessing urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babnik Peskar, Darja; Visnar Perovic, Alenka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiourethrography (RUG) and sonourethrography (SUG) for assessment of urethral strictures and to evaluate whether RUG underestimates stricture length, as has been reported. Fifty-one men with suspected urethral strictures were evaluated by both methods performed consecutively. Stricture lengths and diameters measured by RUG were significantly greater (mean 22%, 30%) than those measured by SUG because of radiographic magnification. Both methods, however, detected a similar percentage lumen reduction and similarly graded stricture severity. Equally significant non-correlation between both methods for length measurements in the bulbar and penile urethra (p 2 =0.33 and 0.34, respectively) supported radiographic magnification. Previous inaccuracies appear to relate to RUG measurements of the central tight stricture (mean 44% of the entire length in our series), not the full stricture length. Use of sonographic contrast medium intra-urethrally improved the definition of long narrow strictures. The SUG gave information about peri-urethral tissues not provided by RUG. Once radiographic magnification was taken into account, there were no major differences in the assessment of urethral strictures by both methods. With correct measurement methods, RUG does not underestimate stricture length. For full assessment, the combination of RUG and SUG, which gives information about peri-urethral disease, is optimal in many patients. (orig.)

  10. Dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Female urethral stricture is an underdiagnosed and overlooked cause of female bladder outlet obstruction. The possible etiologies may be infection, prior dilation, difficult catheterization with subsequent fibrosis, urethral surgery, trauma, or idiopathic. We present our technique and results of dorsal onlay full thickness vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 16 female patients with mid-urethral stricture who underwent dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty from January 2007 to June 2011.Of these, 13 patients had previously undergone multiple Hegar dilatations, three had previous internal urethrotomies. The preoperative work up included detailed voiding history, local examination, uroflowmetry, calibration, and micturating cystourethrogram. Results: All patients had mid-urethral stricture. Mean age was 47.5 years. Mean Q max improved from 6.2 to 27.6 ml/s. Mean residual volume decreased from 160 to 20 ml. Mean duration of follow-up was 24.5 months (6 months to 3 years. Only one patient required self-calibration for 6 months after which her stricture stabilized. None of the patient was incontinent. Conclusion: Dorsal vaginal onlay graft urethroplasty could be considered as an effective way to treat female urethral stricture.

  11. Urethral obstruction from dislodged bladder Diverticulum stones: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeke Linus I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary urethral stone although rare, commonly arises from the kidneys, bladder or are seen in patients with urethral stricture. These stones are either found in the posterior or anterior urethra and do result in acute urinary retention. We report urethral obstruction from dislodged bladder diverticulum stones. This to our knowledge is the first report from Nigeria and in English literature. Case presentation A 69 year old, male, Nigerian with clinical and radiological features of acute urinary retention, benign prostate enlargement and bladder diverticulum. He had a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP and was lost to follow up. He re-presented with retained urethral catheter of 4months duration. The catheter was removed but attempt at re-passing the catheter failed and a suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Clinical examination and plain radiograph of the penis confirmed anterior and posterior urethral stones. He had meatotomy and antegrade manual stone extraction with no urethra injury. Conclusions Urethral obstruction can result from inadequate treatment of patient with benign prostate enlargement and bladder diverticulum stones. Surgeons in resource limited environment should be conversant with transurethral resection of the prostate and cystolithotripsy or open prostatectomy and diverticulectomy.

  12. Effect of fesoterodine on urethral closure function in women with stress urinary incontinence assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Darekar, Amanda; Scholfield, David

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aim was to evaluate, using urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR), the effect of fesoterodine on urethral function in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: Women aged 18 to 65 years were eligible for this randomised, double-blind, placebo...... significant differences were seen between fesoterodine 4 mg or fesoterodine 8 mg and placebo in opening urethral pressure (primary endpoint) or other UPR endpoints. No statistically significant differences were seen between either fesoterodine dose and placebo in the change from baseline in the bladder diary...... variables (total urinary incontinence, SUI, or urgency urinary incontinence episodes per 24 h). Adverse events were reported by 8 participants taking fesoterodine 4 mg, 17 taking fesoterodine 8 mg, and 8 taking placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Fesoterodine did not affect urethral pressure or significantly decrease...

  13. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed when he was 5 years. After excision of the scarred portions of the urethra, the defect of the urethra was 20 mm. Transperineal bulbar urethral mobilization was performed, and a single-stage end-to-end anterior urethroplasty without tension could be performed simultaneously.

  14. A misleading urethral smear with polymorphonuclear leucocytes and intracellular diplococci; case report of urethritis caused by Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genders, R E; Spitaels, D; Jansen, C L; van den Akker, Th W; Quint, K D

    2013-12-01

    The primary pathogens found in men with urethritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Rapid diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infection can be made based on a Gram- or methylene blue-stained urethral smear. We describe a case of a man with purulent penile discharge, in which microscopic examination led to the presumptive diagnosis of gonorrhoea. A nucleic acid amplification test was negative for N. gonorrhoeae but positive for C. trachomatis. Culture showed Gram-negative diplococci which were identified as Neisseria meningitidis. N. meningitidis can be sporadically pathogenic in the genito-urinary tract and mimicks gonococcal urethritis, and appears identical by microscopy. When a gonococcal urethritis is suspected based on clinical signs and microscopic examination, but investigatory tests cannot confirm the diagnosis, a N. meningitidis infection should be considered.

  15. Intravascular stent graft with polyurethane and metallic stent: experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Young Soo; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Boo Kyung Han; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Hak Jong; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jong Won; Ha, Jongwon

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a new model of the stent graft, and of tissue response related to placement of the stent graft. The stent graft was constructed from polyurethane (Pellethane) graft and Hanaro stent(12mm in diameter, 45mm in length, 10 bends). A stent grafts was inserted into the lower thoracic aorta in each of six adult mongrel dogs(body weight, 12-16kg). At one, two, four, and six months, follow-up studies of angiography and spiral CT angiography were preformed to evaluate wascular patency, vascular stenosis, and thrombus formation. Two dogs were sacrificed at 1month, 2months, and 6months after insertion of the stent graft and macroscopic, light microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic examinations of the aortic segment including the stent graft were performed to evaluate intimal hyperplasia, endothelial growth to the graft, and thrombus formation. During follow-up at one, two, four, and six months, angiography or spiral CT angiography showed 20-100% luminal stenosis or occlusion of the lower thoracic aorta by the thrombus and perigraft leaks in three dogs(50%), and collateral vessels caused by occlusion of the aorta in two (33.3%). On gross examination, there were thrombi of 1-5mm thickness at the graft portions in all dogs, and this thickness gradually increased. The mean thickness of intimal hyperplasia at the stent portion gradually increased from 120μm to 227μm and the mean thickness of intimal hyperplasia at the graft portion from 93μm to 914μm. This thickness was greater at the graft portion than at the stent portion. Scanning electron microscopy showed elliptical endothelial lining on the neointimal surfaces at each end of the graft. Thrombi caused stenosis or occlusion of the stent graft. In order for such a graft to be ideal, further study is needed

  16. Stent fabric fatigue of grafts supported by Z-stents versus ringed stents: an in vitro buckling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Lu; Guidoin, Robert; Nutley, Mark; Song, Ge; Zhang, Ze; Du, Jia; Douville, Yvan

    2014-03-01

    Stent-grafts externally fitted with a Z-shaped stents were compared to devices fitted with ringed stents in an in vitro oscillating fatigue machine at 200 cycles per minute and a pressure of 360 mmHg for scheduled durations of up to 1 week. The devices fitted with Z-stents showed a considerably lower endurance limit to buckling compared to the controls. The contact between the apexes of adjacent Z-stents resulted in significant damage to the textile scaffolds and polyester fibers due to the sharp angle of the Z-stents. The ringed stents did not cause any fraying in the textile scaffolds.

  17. Percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totev, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) is an X-ray or US guided procedure that involves the injection of a contrast material directly into the bile ducts inside the liver to produce pictures of them. If a blockage or narrowing is found, additional procedures may be performed: 1. insertion of a catheter to drain excess bile out of the body or both - internal and external; 2. plastic endoprothesis placement; 3. self-expandable metal stents placement to help open bile ducts or to bypass an obstruction and allow fluids to drain. Current percutaneous biliary interventions include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage to manage benign and malignant obstructions. Internal biliary stents are either plastic or metallic, and various types of each kind are available. Internal biliary stents have several advantages. An external tube can be uncomfortable and have a psychological disadvantage. An internal stent prevents the problems related to external catheters, for example, pericatheter leakage of bile and the need for daily flushing. The disadvantages include having to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or new PTC procedures to obtain access in case of stent obstruction. Better patency rates are reported with metallic than with plastic stents in cases of malignant obstruction, though no effect on survival is noted. Plastic internal stents are the cheapest but reportedly prone to migration. Metallic stents are generally not used in the treatment of benign disease because studies have shown poor long-term patency rates. Limited applications may include the treatment of patients who are poor surgical candidates or of those in whom surgical treatment fails. Most postoperative strictures are treated surgically, though endoscopic and (less commonly) percutaneous placement of nonmetallic stents has increasingly been used in the past few years. Now there are some reports about use of biodegradable biliary

  18. Endotracheal expandable metallic stent placement in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, S; Tanabe, Y; Fujiwara, Y; Koyama, T; Tanigawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Katsube, Y; Nakamura, H [Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan). Dept. of Radiology Research Inst. for Microbial Diseases, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-01-01

    Various types of Gianturco zig-zag wire stent were implanted into the tracheas of 4 dogs to define the suitable characteristics of the endotracheal wire stent in these animals. These stents were constructed of 0.45, and 0.33 mm stainless steel wire. The diameter of the fully expanded stents was 3 cm and their lengths were 2, 3, and 4 cm. The 2 cm stent constructed of 0.33 mm wire showed minimum pathologic changes of the trachea of the dog compared to the other stents, and at the same time had a complete covering of ciliated columnar epithelium over the stent surface. (orig.).

  19. Trends in the prevalence of pathogens causing urethritis in Asturias, Spain, 1989-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, José A; Otero, Luis; García, María José; Palacio, Virgilo; Carreño, Francisco; Cuesta, Mar; Sánchez, Carmen; Vázquez, Fernando

    2003-04-01

    There are few studies of recent trends in the etiology and epidemiologic characteristics of specific microorganisms causing urethritis in men. The objective of the current study was to show the clinical experience in our country and to evaluate the trends in the prevalence of the pathogens in male urethritis, as well as the epidemiologic patterns in a series of 2101 patients. This was a descriptive study of the etiological agents causing urethritis in our sexually transmitted disease clinics in a period of 12 years (1989-2000), with a comparison of two periods of time. There were 97 cases of gonococcal urethritis (4.6%), 2004 of nongonococcal urethritis (95.4%), and 82 of mixed urethritis (3.9%). An association was found between gonococcal urethritis and heterosexual men; between chlamydial urethritis and homosexual/bisexual men; Ureaplasma urealyticum urethritis and heterosexual men and patients younger than 30 years of age; and between trichomonal urethritis and patients more than 30 years of age and the presence of HIV antibodies. During the period of research there was a significant decrease in cases of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis urethritis and an increase in those of U urealyticum urethritis. In conclusion, this report describes changes in the etiology and epidemiologic patterns of urethritis in our country in recent years.

  20. Chemico-physical characterisation and in vivo biocompatibility assessment of DLC-coated coronary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Micaela; Stolojan, Vlad; Virga, Alessandro; Rovere, Massimo; Cabiale, Karine; Galloni, Marco R; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of stent thrombosis occurs in the acute and sub-acute phases and is more common in patients with acute coronary syndromes, due to the thrombotic milieu where stent struts are positioned. Stent thrombosis is likely due to incomplete tissue coverage of metallic stents as the contact between metallic stents and blood elements may lead to platelet adhesion and trigger vessel thrombosis. If a stent is covered after 7 days, the risk that it will be found uncovered at later stages is very low (DLC) coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition, promote rapid endothelisation of coronary stent devices, with very low platelets activation, reducing thrombotic clots. We relate these behaviours to the surface and bulk material properties of the DLC films, subjected to a comprehensive chemico-physical characterisation using several techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, Raman and dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). In vivo studies, conducted on 24 pigs, have shown complete endothelisation after 7 days, with no fibrin mesh and with only rare monocytes scattered on the endothelial layer while 30 and 180 days tests have shown reduced inflammatory activation and a complete stabilisation of the vessel healing, with a minimal neointimal proliferation. The integral and permanent DLC film coating improves haemo- and bio-compatibility and leads to an excellent early vessel healing of the stent whilst the extremely thin strut thickness reduces the amount of late neointima and consequently the risk of late restenosis. These data should translate into a reduced acute and sub-acute stent thrombosis.

  1. Feasibility study for the investigation of Nitinol self-expanding stents by neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogante, M.; Pasquini, U.; Rosta, L.; Lebedev, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, neutron techniques - in particular, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron diffraction (ND) - are considered for the non-destructive characterization of Nitinol artery stents. This roughly equiatomic (50Ni-50Ti at%) shape memory alloy (SMA) exhibits significant properties of superelasticity and biocompatibility that make it suitable to be typically used as smart material for medical implants and devices. Nitinol self-expanding artery stents, as permanent vascular support structures, supply an ideal option to bypass surgery, but they are submitted for the whole of patient's life to the dynamical stress of the artery pulsation and the aggression from the biological environment. These stents, consequently, can suffer from wear and fracture occurrence likely due to a variety of cyclic fatigue, overload conditions and residual stresses. Neutrons have recently become a progressively more important probe for various materials and components and they allow achieving information complementary to those obtained from the traditional microstructural analyses. The outputs from the preliminary works already carried out in this field consent to consider neutron techniques capable to contribute to the development of these crucial medical implants. The achievable results can yield trends adoptable in monitoring of the stent features. -- Research Highlights: → Neutron techniques can contribute to develop Nitinol self-expanding artery stents. → Neutrons investigations can help avoiding wear and fracture events in Nitinol stents. → Neutron techniques can yield trends adoptable in monitoring of Nitinol stent features. → SANS is able to perform a micro- and nano-scale characterization of Nitinol stents. → Neutron Diffraction helps assessing stresses due to the exercise in Nitinol stents.

  2. Short-term safety and efficacy of the biodegradable iron stent in mini-swine coronary arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chao; QIU Hong; HU Xiao-ying; RUAN Ying-mao; TIAN Yi; CHU Yan; XU Xin-lin

    2013-01-01

    Background To overcome the drawbacks of permanent stents,biodegradable stents have been studied in recent years.The bioabsorbable polymer vascular scaffold (BVS) was the first bioabsorbable stent to undergo clinical trials,demonstrating safety and feasibility in the ABSORB studies.Iron can potentially serve as the biomaterial for biodegradable stents.This study aimed to assess the short-term safety and efficacy of a biodegradable iron stent in mini-swine coronary arteries.Methods Eight iron stents and eight cobalt chromium alloy (VISION) control stents were randomly implanted into the LAD and RCA of eight healthy mini-swine,respectively.Two stents of the same metal base were implanted into one animal.At 28 days the animals were sacrificed after coronary angiography,and histopathological examinations were performed.Results Histomorphometric measurements showed that mean neointimal thickness ((0.46±0.17) mm vs.(0.45±0.18)mm,P=0.878),neointimal area ((2.55±0.91) mm2 vs.(3.04±1.15) mm2,P=0.360) and percentage of area stenosis ((44.50±11.40)% vs.(46.00±17.95)%,P=0.845) were not significantly different between the iron stents and VISION stents.There was no inflammation,thrombosis or necrosis in either group.The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) intimal injury scores (0.75±1.04 vs.0.88±0.99,P=0.809) and number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive staining cells were not significantly different between the two groups.The percentage of neointimal coverage by SEM examination was numerically higher in iron stents than in VISION stents ((84.38±14.50)% vs.(65.00±22.04)%,P=0.057),but the difference was not statistically significant.Iron staining in the tissue surrounding the iron stents at 28 days was positive and the vascular wall adjacent to the iron stent had a brownish tinge,consistent with iron degradation.No abnormal histopathological changes were detected in coronary arteries or major organs.Conclusions The biodegradable iron stent has

  3. Preliminary Report of Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Tapered Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Seung; Jeong; Kim, Young Suk; Byun, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Hwan [Dept. of Neurology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To analyze the results of carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent and to evaluate the effectiveness of the tapered stent compared to previously reported studies using non-tapered stents. From October 2008 to August 2010, elective carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent was attempted in 39 lesions from 36 consecutive patients. Post-procedural complications were evaluated by neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Restenosis or occlusion was evaluated by carotid Doppler ultrasound and computerized tomography with angiography. Newly developed neurologic symptoms were evaluated clinically. The self-expandable tapered stent was placed across the carotid artery stenosis. A total stroke was noted in 3 patients, while a major stroke was noted in 1 patient. On diffusion weighted imaging, new lesions were observed in 15 patients, but 13 patients were clinically silent. Follow-up imaging studies were performed in the 13 clinically silent lesions, and no evidence of restenosis or occlusion was found any of the 13 lesions. During clinical follow-up in 34 lesions from 31 patients, there were newly developed neurological symptoms in only 1 patient.

  4. Radial force measurement of endovascular stents: Influence of stent design and diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsubara, Yutaka; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Matsuda, Daisuke; Okadome, Jun; Morisaki, Koichi; Inoue, Kentarou; Tanaka, Shinichi; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Angioplasty and endovascular stent placement is used in case to rescue the coverage of main branches to supply blood to brain from aortic arch in thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This study assessed mechanical properties, especially differences in radial force, of different endovascular and thoracic stents. We analyzed the radial force of three stent models (Epic, E-Luminexx and SMART) stents using radial force-tester method in single or overlapping conditions. We also analyzed radial force in three thoracic stents using Mylar film testing method: conformable Gore-TAG, Relay, and Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft. Overlapping SMART stents had greater radial force than overlapping Epic or Luminexx stents (P stents was greater than that of all three endovascular stents (P stents, site of deployment, and layer characteristics. In clinical settings, an understanding of the mechanical characteristics, including radial force, is important in choosing a stent for each patient. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Mycoplasma genitalium in male urethritis: diagnosis and treatment in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasuna, Ryoichi

    2013-07-01

    Male urethritis is a common disease for urologists, with the most common pathogens being, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. When the tests fail to detect these pathogens, the presented urethritis is called non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis. Mycoplasma genitalium is one of the pathogens for non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis. The test for detecting M. genitalium, which is commercially available in Japan, is not accepted by the Japanese insurance system now. The detection rate of M. genitalium from patients with non-gonococcal urethritis is 10-20% in Japan. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for M. genitalium showed that macrolide has the strongest activity and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of tetracyclines were not substantially lower. Some kinds of fluoroquinolones, such as sitafloxacin and moxifloxacin, have stronger activities against M. genitalium. For non-gonococcal urethritis, macrolides and tetracycline are recommended in some guidelines. In clinical studies, tetracyclines are less effective against M. genitalium than azithromycin, and azithromycin regimens including 1 g stat or 2 g stat are now recommended for urethritis with M. genitalium. However, macrolide-resistant M. genitalium strains have recently emerged and are spreading worldwide. This macrolide-resistance is closely related to mutations on the 23S rRNA gene. Sitafloxacin and moxifloxacin have shown good efficacies for M. genitalium in some clinical studies. If the azithromycin regimens fail, we must consider the use of fluoroquinolones, such as sitafloxacin, in Japan. The most important issues include the acceptance of M. genitalium examinations by the national insurance system and the individual treatment of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium in the not-too-distant future. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. The permanent process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; McCullagh, Peter

    We extend the boson process first to a large class of Cox processes and second an even larger class of infinitely divisible point processes. Density and moment results are studied in detail. These results are obtained in closed form as weighted permanents, so the extension is called a permanent...... process. Temporal extensions and a particularly tractable case of the permanent process are also studied. Extensions of the ferminon process along similar lines, leading to so-called determinant processes, are discussed at the end. While the permanent process is attractive, the determinant process...

  7. Long anterior urethral stricture: Reconstruction by dorsally quilted penile skin flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sayed Abdel-Kader

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Free penile skin flaps offer good results (functional and cosmetic in long anterior urethral stricture. Meticulously fashioned longitudinal, circular or spiral penile skin flaps could bridge urethral defects up to 15 cm long.

  8. Tissue Engineering for Human Urethral Reconstruction : Systematic Review of Recent Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kemp, Vincent; de Graaf, Petra; Fledderus, Joost O.; Bosch, JLHR; de Kort, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    Background Techniques to treat urethral stricture and hypospadias are restricted, as substitution of the unhealthy urethra with tissue from other origins (skin, bladder or buccal mucosa) has some limitations. Therefore, alternative sources of tissue for use in urethral reconstructions are

  9. Similarities and differences in coatings for magnesium-based stents and orthopaedic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg-based biodegradable materials are promising candidates for the new generation of implantable medical devices, particularly cardiovascular stents and orthopaedic implants. Mg-based cardiovascular stents represent the most innovative stent technology to date. However, these products still do not fully meet clinical requirements with regards to fast degradation rates, late restenosis, and thrombosis. Thus various surface coatings have been introduced to protect Mg-based stents from rapid corrosion and to improve biocompatibility. Similarly, different coatings have been used for orthopaedic implants, e.g., plates and pins for bone fracture fixation or as an interference screw for tendon-bone or ligament-bone insertion, to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Metal coatings, nanoporous inorganic coatings and permanent polymers have been proved to enhance corrosion resistance; however, inflammation and foreign body reactions have also been reported. By contrast, biodegradable polymers are more biocompatible in general and are favoured over permanent materials. Drugs are also loaded with biodegradable polymers to improve their performance. The key similarities and differences in coatings for Mg-based stents and orthopaedic implants are summarized.

  10. Angiographic CT: in vitro comparison of different carotid artery stents-does stent orientation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettau, Michael; Bendszus, Martin; Hähnel, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the in vitro visualization of different carotid artery stents on angiographic CT (ACT). Of particular interest was the influence of stent orientation to the angiography system by measurement of artificial lumen narrowing (ALN) caused by the stent material within the stented vessel segment to determine whether ACT can be used to detect restenosis within the stent. ACT appearances of 17 carotid artery stents of different designs and sizes (4.0 to 11.0 mm) were investigated in vitro. Stents were placed in different orientations to the angiography system. Standard algorithm image reconstruction and stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction was performed. For each stent, ALN was calculated. With standard algorithm image reconstruction, ALN ranged from 19.0 to 43.6 %. With stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction, ALN was significantly lower and ranged from 8.2 to 18.7 %. Stent struts could be visualized in all stents. Differences in ALN between the different stent orientations to the angiography system were not significant. ACT evaluation of vessel patency after stent placement is possible but is impaired by ALN. Stent orientation of the stents to the angiography system did not significantly influence ALN. Stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction decreases ALN but further research is required to define the visibility of in-stent stenosis depending on image reconstruction.

  11. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman A. Babaeer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC was 29.5 × 103/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 103/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy.

  12. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 10(3)/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 10(3)/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy.

  13. Adult posterior urethral valve: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilciler, Mete; Basal, Seref; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Zor, Murat; Istanbulluoglu, Mustafa Okan; Dayanc, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior urethral valve (PUV) is a congenital obstructive defect of the male urethra with an incidence of 1/8,000 to 1/25,000 live births. PUV is the most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in neonates. The diagnosis of PUV is usually made early, and PUV cases have rarely been detected in adults. Case presentation: Here we report the case of a 35 years old man presented with obstructive urinary symptoms. In spite of bladder neck rejection uroflowmetry pointed out infravesical obstruction with max. flow rate 9 ml/s and average flow rate 6 ml/s in uroflowmetry. During cystoscopy mild bladder trabeculation and resected bladder neck were seen. While the cystoscope was taken off, PUV were obtained. Conclusion: Since PUV is a rare condition in adults and the diagnosis of PUVs is also difficult in these groups we must consider this situation during evaluation of adult patients with obstructive symptoms especially during cystourethroscopy. PMID:20379394

  14. Adult posterior urethral valve: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanc, Murat

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior urethral valve (PUV is a congenital obstructive defect of the male urethra with an incidence of 1/8,000 to 1/25,000 live births. PUV is the most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in neonates. The diagnosis of PUV is usually made early, and PUV cases have rarely been detected in adults. Case presentation: Here we report the case of a 35 years old man presented with obstructive urinary symptoms. In spite of bladder neck rejection uroflowmetry pointed out infravesical obstruction with max. flow rate 9 ml/s and average flow rate 6 ml/s in uroflowmetry. During cystoscopy mild bladder trabeculation and resected bladder neck were seen. While the cystoscope was taken off, PUV were obtained. Conclusion: Since PUV is a rare condition in adults and the diagnosis of PUVs is also difficult in these groups we must consider this situation during evaluation of adult patients with obstructive symptoms especially during cystourethroscopy.

  15. Enterovesical Fistula: A Rare Complication of Urethral Catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Hawary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the case of an eighty-two-year old lady with an indwelling urethral catheter inserted eight years prior to her presentation to manage her urinary incontinence. She underwent radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (stage T2b in 1991 and had a laparotomy and drainage of an appendicular abscess in her early twenties. She presented with a short history of fecaluria, pneumaturia, and passage of urine per rectum. On laparotomy she was found to have an inflated catheter balloon that has eroded through the bladder wall into the lumen of a terminal ileal segment. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in literature of a patient developing an enterovesical fistula as a result of a urethral catheter eroding through the bladder wall into the bowel lumen. There are numerous known complications of long-term urethral catheterization. They include recurrent urinary tract infections, recurrent pyelonephritis, sepsis, urethral stricture, blocked and retained catheters, among many other reported complications. This case describes an unusual presentation secondary to an even more unusual complication. This should be considered when handling patients with indwelling urethral catheters inserted in unhealthy bladders.

  16. [Urethral pain syndrome: fact or fiction--an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, N M; Degener, S; Roth, S; Brandt, A S; Lazica, D A

    2015-09-01

    Urethral pain syndrome is a symptom complex including dysuria, urinary urgency and frequency, nocturia and persistent or intermittent urethral and/or pelvic pain in the absence of proven infection. These symptoms overlap with several other conditions, such as interstitial cystitis bladder pain syndrome and overactive bladder. Urethral pain syndrome may occur in men but is more frequent in women. The exact etiology is unknown but infectious and psychogenic factors, urethral spasms, early interstitial cystitis, hypoestrogenism, squamous metaplasia as well as gynecological risk factors are discussed. These aspects should be ruled out or confirmed in the diagnostic approach. Despite the assumption of a multifactorial etiology, pathophysiologically there is a common pathway: dysfunctional epithelium of the urethra becomes leaky which leads to bacterial and abacterial inflammation and ends in fibrosis due to the chronic impairment. The therapeutic approach should be multimodal using a trial and error concept: general treatment includes analgesia, antibiotics, alpha receptor blockers and muscle relaxants, antimuscarinic therapy, topical vaginal estrogen, psychological support and physical therapy. In cases of nonresponding patients intravesical and/or surgical therapy should be considered. The aim of this review is to summarize the preliminary findings on urethral pain syndrome and to elucidate the diagnostic and therapeutic options.

  17. Urethral triplication with meatuses terminating on the penis: a rare case presenting with bifid urinary stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirselj, Daniel A.; Jayanthi, Venkata R.; Lowe, Gregory K.

    2009-01-01

    Urethral duplication is an uncommon clinical finding, and classification systems have been described to explain the clinical findings. Urethral triplication is an extremely uncommon diagnosis, with few published case reports. We present the rare case of an infant noted to have a bifid urinary stream and found to have urethral triplication on voiding cystourethrography. (orig.)

  18. Neisseria meningitidis ST11 Complex Isolates Associated with Nongonococcal Urethritis, Indiana, USA, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Evelyn; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Batteiger, Byron E; Williams, James A; Arno, Janet N; Tai, Albert; Batteiger, Teresa A; Nelson, David E

    2017-02-01

    At a clinic in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, we observed an increase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-negative men with suspected gonococcal urethritis who had urethral cultures positive for N. meningitidis. We describe genomes of 2 of these N. meningitidis sequence type 11 complex urethritis isolates. Clinical evidence suggests these isolates may represent an emerging urethrotropic clade.

  19. Soap induced urethral pain in boys | Okeke | West African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The symptoms started suddenly while bathing with soap. Penile erections at onset occurred in 14(78%). Two (11%) had purulent urethral discharge and 1(5.5%) had meatal stenosis. Application of bland petroleum jelly to the external urethral meatus before each soap bath satisfactorily controlled the urethral pains.

  20. Urethral triplication with meatuses terminating on the penis: a rare case presenting with bifid urinary stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirselj, Daniel A.; Jayanthi, Venkata R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, Columbus, OH (United States); Lowe, Gregory K. [The Ohio State University Medical Center, Department of Urology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Urethral duplication is an uncommon clinical finding, and classification systems have been described to explain the clinical findings. Urethral triplication is an extremely uncommon diagnosis, with few published case reports. We present the rare case of an infant noted to have a bifid urinary stream and found to have urethral triplication on voiding cystourethrography. (orig.)

  1. Neisseria meningitidis ST11 Complex Isolates Associated with Nongonococcal Urethritis, Indiana, USA, 2015–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Evelyn; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Batteiger, Byron E.; Williams, James A.; Arno, Janet N.; Tai, Albert; Batteiger, Teresa A.

    2017-01-01

    At a clinic in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, we observed an increase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae–negative men with suspected gonococcal urethritis who had urethral cultures positive for N. meningitidis. We describe genomes of 2 of these N. meningitidis sequence type 11 complex urethritis isolates. Clinical evidence suggests these isolates may represent an emerging urethrotropic clade. PMID:28098538

  2. [Coronary stents: 30 years of medical progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvain, Johanne; Cayla, Guillaume; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Fargeot, Catherine; Montalescot, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    The history of interventional cardiology has been marked by several technologic revolutions since the late 1970s. The first key step was the use of inflatable balloon angioplasty as an alternative to CABG surgery for coronary revascularization, followed by intracoronary delivery of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug eluting stents (DES) to drastically reduce intracoronary restenosis observed with BMS. Improved stents platforms and polymers (absorbable or biocompatible) led to a dramatic reduction in the rate of late stent thrombosis. Self-expanding stents are now available to improve stent a position especially in acute myocardial infarction. The emergence of new fully bioabsorbable stents that can be combined with antiproliferative drugs is the ongoing revolution. A new generation of stents is continuously improving and likely to become the ideal stent for coronary revascularization in the near future. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  3. Genomic Characterization of Urethritis-Associated Neisseria meningitidis Shows that a Wide Range of N. meningitidis Strains Can Cause Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kevin C; Unemo, Magnus; Jeverica, Samo; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohnishi, Makoto; Grad, Yonatan H

    2017-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis , typically a resident of the oro- or nasopharynx and the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis and meningococcemia, is capable of invading and colonizing the urogenital tract. This can result in urethritis, akin to the syndrome caused by its sister species, N. gonorrhoeae , the etiologic agent of gonorrhea. Recently, meningococcal strains associated with outbreaks of urethritis were reported to share genetic characteristics with the gonococcus, raising the question of the extent to which these strains contain features that promote adaptation to the genitourinary niche, making them gonococcus-like and distinguishing them from other N. meningitidis strains. Here, we analyzed the genomes of 39 diverse N. meningitidis isolates associated with urethritis, collected independently over a decade and across three continents. In particular, we characterized the diversity of the nitrite reductase gene ( aniA ), the factor H-binding protein gene ( fHbp ), and the capsule biosynthetic locus, all of which are loci previously suggested to be associated with urogenital colonization. We observed notable diversity, including frameshift variants, in aniA and fHbp and the presence of intact, disrupted, and absent capsule biosynthetic genes, indicating that urogenital colonization and urethritis caused by N. meningitidis are possible across a range of meningococcal genotypes. Previously identified allelic patterns in urethritis-associated N. meningitidis strains may reflect genetic diversity in the underlying meningococcal population rather than novel adaptation to the urogenital tract. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Correlation between prostate brachytherapy-related urethral stricture and peri-apical urethral dosimetry: A matched case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earley, James J.; Abdelbaky, Ather M.; Cunningham, Melanie J.; Chadwick, Eliot; Langley, Stephen E.M.; Laing, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation dose to the bulbomembranous urethra has been shown to correlate with urethral stricture formation. This retrospective case–control study was designed to explore the relationship between dose to the apical/peri-apical regions of the urethra and development of brachytherapy (BXT)-related urethral stricture. Materials and methods: Cases were patients who developed urethral stricture after treatment with BXT as monotherapy and who had urethral dosimetry post-implant. Each case was matched with a control that had not developed urethral stricture. Dosimetry was compared between cases and controls. Results: Twenty-three cases were pair matched with 23 controls. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, presenting Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) or Gleason score. The dose delivered to the peri-apical and apical urethra was significantly higher for cases when compared with controls (peri-apical urethra: mean V 150 1.1 Vs 0.8 cc [p = 0.02]; apical urethra: mean dose 200 Vs 174 Gy [p = 0.01]). The distance from the prostate apex to isodose lines was also found to be significant in predicting stricture formation. Conclusion: There was evidence to suggest that the development of BXT-related stricture was associated with radiation dose at the apical and peri-apical urethra. Attention to the dose delivered to those areas may minimise the risk of developing such morbidity.

  5. Vaginal Swab Test Compared With the Urethral Q-tip Test for Urethral Mobility Measurement: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Isuzu; Szychowski, Jeff M; Illston, Jana D; Parden, Alison M; Richter, Holly E

    2016-02-01

    To assess whether use of a vaginal cotton-tipped swab is equivalent to the standard Q-tip test regarding urethral mobility. Secondarily, to examine whether both tests agree in hypermobility diagnosis, discomfort level, and patients' preference. In this randomized crossover trial, women with stress urinary incontinence without prolapse beyond the hymen were randomized to undergo either a vaginal or urethral mobility test first followed by the alternate approach. The primary outcome was the difference in rotation angle, from resting to maximum strain, between tests. The equivalence margin was ±10°. The secondary outcome was agreement in hypermobility diagnosis using two definitions: 1) maximum straining angle of 30° or greater from the horizontal plane; and 2) rotation angle 30° or greater. Discomfort was assessed using a 0-10 visual analog scale. Using 90% power assuming a standard deviation of 20°, 36 and 139 patients were needed for 10° and 5° equivalence margins, respectively. From January 2014 to March 2015, 140 women were randomized. The mean difference between the two tests was 5.1° (95% confidence interval 3.2-6.9°), meeting the predefined equivalence criteria. In the hypermobility diagnosis, the urethral and vaginal tests had no disagreement using definition 1 (P=.23), whereas the two tests disagreed using definition 2 (P=.03). The urethral approach had a higher discomfort level (Pstandard Q-tip test in measuring urethral mobility with less discomfort and is preferred by patients.

  6. [Non-gonococcal infectious urethritis : pathogen spectrum and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, S

    2015-01-01

    For many years an increase in cases of urethritis has been observed in western Europe. In order to be able to combat this continuous rise, the perception of sexually transmitted diseases must be promoted, the clarification and screening must be intensified and therapy must be rapidly and correctly carried out. In addition to the commonest pathogens causing urethritis, namely chlamydia and gonococci, many other pathogenic microbes must be taken into consideration in the diagnostics. With respect to therapy, apart from the increasing resistance formation of Mycoplasma genitalium, the decreasing effectiveness of standard forms of treatment of other microbes must be emphasized. For chronic and recurrent urethritis in particular a broad clarification of the pathogen should be carried out to enable targeted treatment and also partner treatment. Priority must again be given to primary prevention.

  7. Sonourethrography in the evaluation of anterior urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kwag, Jin Geun

    1994-01-01

    To determine the reliability of sonourethrography (SUG) in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures. Both SUG with retrograde saline infusion and retrograde urethrography (RUG) were performed in 5 young normal volunteers and 20 patients with symptoms of impaired urine flow. Those findings were compared with urethroscopic and operative findings in all patients. SUG was more accurate in the evaluation of the stricture length and degree than RUG in 7 patients with anterior urethral strictures, when compared with their subsequent open urethroplasty findings. Only SUG could classify the degree of spongiofibrosis surrounding the strictures in 15 patients. So, SUG was diagnostically as efficacious as or, superior to, RUG in all 20 patients. SUG can be used as one of complementary and reliable tools for diagnosis, evaluation and follow-up of anterior urethral strictures

  8. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  9. Where do patients go for treatment of urethritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoscan, Mustafa Burak; Tunckiran, Ahmet; Oksay, Taylan; Ozorak, Alper; Ozkardes, Hakan

    2014-05-01

    Urethritis is characterized by urethral inflammation, and it can result from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. Physicians and other health care providers play a critical role in preventing and treating urethritis. The aim of this study was to describe and identify predictors of health care seeking behavior among men with urethritis. In total, 98 male patients aged between 16 to 52 years-of-age (mean 30.9 ± 8.0 years), who attended our clinic with symptoms of urethritis, were included in the study. We conducted face-to-face interviews with the patients using a 9-item survey questionnaire. Patients were divided into three groups according to their level of education as follows: group I (n = 44), elementary school; group II (n = 38), high school; and group III (n = 16), university. Among the 98 patients evaluated, the source of treatment was physicians in 44 patients (44.9%), drugstores in 38 cases (38.77%), and friends in 16 patients (16.32%). There was a statistically significant difference found between the groups according to the source of treatment (P < 0.001). The most common factors associated with seeking care from other sources, rather than physicians, were economic reasons in 19 patients (35.18%), confidentiality concerns in 24 (44.4%), and ease of access in 11 patients (20.37%). A substantial proportion of patients with urethritis sought help from other sources, rather than physicians. The results of our study show that the patients with higher levels of education were more likely to seek help from health care services. It is important to promote the public's knowledge through informative studies and educational materials in order to encourage patients to seek rapid and effective treatment from proper sources.

  10. Anterior urethral valves: not such a benign condition…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar eCruz-Diaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anterior urethral valves (AUV is an unusual cause of congenital obstruction of the male urethra, being 15 to 30 times less common than posterior urethral valves (PUV. It has been suggested that patients with congenital anterior urethral obstruction have a better prognosis than those with PUV.The long term prognosis of anterior urethral valves is not clear in the literature. In this report we describe our experience and long-term follow up of patients with AUV.Materials and methods: We retrospectively identified 13 patients who presented with the diagnosis of AUV in our institutions between 1994 and 2012. From the 11 patients included, we evaluated the gestational age, ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram findings, age upon valve ablation, micturition pattern, creatinine and clinical follow up.Results: Between 1994 and 2012 we evaluated 150 patients with the diagnosis of urethral valves, where 11 patients (7.3% had AUV and an adequate follow up. Mean follow up is 6.3 years. 5 patients (45.4% had pre-natal diagnosis of AUV. The most common prenatal ultrasonographic finding was bilateral hydronephrosis and distended bladder.The mean gestational age was 37.6 weeks. Postnatally, 90% had trabeculated bladder, 80% hydronephrosis and 40% renal dysplasia. The most common clinical presentation was urinary tract infection in 5 patients (45.4%.7 patients (63.6% had primary transurethral valve resection or laser ablation and 3 patients (27.2% had primary vesicostomies. One boy (9.1% had urethrostomy with urethral diverticulum excision. 2 patients (18.2% developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Conclusions: Early urinary tract obstruction resulted in ESRD in 18% of our patient population. In our series, the complication rate and the evolution to renal failure are high and similar to patients with PUV. In patients with AUV we recommend long-term follow up and close evaluation of patient’s bladder and renal function.

  11. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  12. Male non-gonococcal urethritis: From microbiological etiologies to demographic and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Shimuta, Ken; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohnishi, Makoto; Deguchi, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To detect microorganisms responsible for male acute urethritis and to define the microbiology of non-gonococcal urethritis. The present study comprised 424 men with symptoms and signs compatible with acute urethritis. Their urethral swabs and first-voided urine underwent detection of the microorganisms. Demographic characteristics and clinical features of Mycoplasma genitalium-, Ureaplasma urealyticum-, Haemophilus influenza-, adenovirus- or Herpes simplex virus-positive monomicrobial non-gonococcal urethritis, or all-examined microorganism-negative urethritis in heterosexual men were compared with urethritis positive only for Chlamydia trachomatis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae was detected in 127 men (30.0%). In 297 men with non-gonococcal urethritis, C. trachomatis was detected in 143 (48.1%). In 154 men with non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis, M. genitalium (22.7%), M. hominis (5.8%), Ureaplasma parvum (9.1%), U. urealyticum (19.5%), H. influenzae (14.3%), Neisseria meningitidis (3.9%), Trichomonas vaginalis (1.3%), human adenovirus (16.2%), and Herpes simplex virus types 1 (7.1%) and 2 (2.6%) were detected. Although some features of monomicrobial non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis or all-examined microorganism-negative urethritis were significantly different from those of monomicrobial chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis, most features were superimposed. Predicting causative microorganisms in men with non-gonococcal urethritis based on demographic and clinical features is difficult. However, the present study provides useful information to better understand the microbiological diversity in non-gonococcal urethritis, and to manage patients with non-gonococcal urethritis appropriately. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Urethral Lymphogranuloma Venereum Infections in Men With Anorectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum and Their Partners: The Missing Link in the Current Epidemic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Speksnijder, Arjen Gerard Cornelis Lambertus; de Vries, Henry John C.

    2013-01-01

    Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is not screened routinely. We found that in 341 men having sex with men with anorectal LGV, 7 (2.1%) had concurrent urethral LGV. Among 59 partners, 4 (6.8%) had urethral LGV infections. Urethral LGV is common, probably key in transmission, and missed in

  14. Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum infections in men with anorectal lymphogranuloma venereum and their partners: the missing link in the current epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Speksnijder, Arjen Gerard Cornelis Lambertus; de Vries, Henry John C

    2013-08-01

    Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is not screened routinely. We found that in 341 men having sex with men with anorectal LGV, 7 (2.1%) had concurrent urethral LGV. Among 59 partners, 4 (6.8%) had urethral LGV infections. Urethral LGV is common, probably key in transmission, and missed in current routine LGV screening algorithms.

  15. Bleomycin induced urethral stricture in Hodgkin′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Tapkire

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a glycoprotein that is extensively used in combination with other anti-cancer agents because of its relative lack of hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity. However, pulmonary toxicity is common with bleomycin and limits its therapeutic utility. Urethral stricture as a result of bleomycin toxicity has not been reported in literature. In this case report, a young male patient who developed urethral stricture after bleomycin-based chemotherapy is described and the possible effects of bleomycin on the urethra are discussed.

  16. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding.

  17. Urethral Triplication Without Bladder Duplication: Endourologic Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ruben; Burgos, Laura; Angulo, Jose Maria

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Urethral triplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the lower urinary system, with urethra ending in glans. At the beginning of toilet training, urine output was observed along the rectum. Rigid cystoscopy shows a perineal urethra starting in the posterior urethra. Subsequently, flexible cystoscopy showed entry of epispadic urethra in the bladder immediately superior to the bladder neck. It was running parallel to primary urethra. Then, we observed two most frequent types of urethral duplication in the sagittal plane in a single patient. PMID:29675475

  18. Incomplete urethral duplication with cyst formation in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, M.H.; Barnhart, M.D.; Barthez, P.Y.; Smeak, D.D.

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete urethral duplication with cyst formation was diagnosed in a dog that had soft, fluctuant, subcutaneous swellings in the ventral perineal and penile areas and a history of nocturia and incontinence during recumbency that were unresponsive to treatment with antibiotics. Retrograde urethrocystography, voiding urethrography, double-contrast cystography, radiography after direct administration of contrast medium into cystic structures, and excretory urography were performed to evaluate the urinary tract. Communication between the cysts and the urethra was demonstrated radiographically only after intralesional injection of contrast medium. Nocturia and incontinence resolved after surgical removal of the urethral duplication and cysts. The dog was clinically normal 1 year after surgery

  19. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding. PMID:28163815

  20. A novel ureteral stent material with antibacterial and reducing encrustation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jing [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Cao, Zhiqiang [General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Shenyang 110840 (China); Ren, Ling; Chen, Shanshan; Zhang, Bingchun; Liu, Rui [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Ureteral stents have been used to relieve ureterostenosis. Complications such as infection and encrustation occur in the long time of stent implantation, which is a clinical problem needs to be resolved. Indwelling ureteral stents have shown to develop microbial biofilm that may lead to recurrent infection and encrustation. This study was aiming to reduce those complications by using a novel material, Cu-bearing antibacterial stainless steel. The antibacterial performance, encrustation property, and biocompatibility were examined by SEM, image analysis, MTT and would healing. The in vitro immersion test showed that 316LCu-bearing stainless steel (316LCu-SS) not only inhibited proliferation of bacteria and formation of biofilm, but also had less encrustation deposition. Its antibacterial effectiveness against Escherichia coli reached to 92.7% in the artificial urine for 24 h and 90.3% in the human urine for 6 h. The encrustation surface coverage percentage was 30.2% by 12 weeks, which was nearly one half of NiTi alloy. The in vitro tests showed that 316LCu-SS had no toxicity, and promoted the migration of urethral epithelial cells. - Highlights: • 316LCu-SS exhibited strong antibacterial performance against E.coli in the urine. • 316LCu-SS had less crystals deposition on its surface compared to NiTi. • 316LCu-SS showed no toxicity and promoted migration of epithelial cells. • 316LCu-SS is prospective to be a new candidate material to relieve UTIs.

  1. A novel ureteral stent material with antibacterial and reducing encrustation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ren, Ling; Chen, Shanshan; Zhang, Bingchun; Liu, Rui; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral stents have been used to relieve ureterostenosis. Complications such as infection and encrustation occur in the long time of stent implantation, which is a clinical problem needs to be resolved. Indwelling ureteral stents have shown to develop microbial biofilm that may lead to recurrent infection and encrustation. This study was aiming to reduce those complications by using a novel material, Cu-bearing antibacterial stainless steel. The antibacterial performance, encrustation property, and biocompatibility were examined by SEM, image analysis, MTT and would healing. The in vitro immersion test showed that 316LCu-bearing stainless steel (316LCu-SS) not only inhibited proliferation of bacteria and formation of biofilm, but also had less encrustation deposition. Its antibacterial effectiveness against Escherichia coli reached to 92.7% in the artificial urine for 24 h and 90.3% in the human urine for 6 h. The encrustation surface coverage percentage was 30.2% by 12 weeks, which was nearly one half of NiTi alloy. The in vitro tests showed that 316LCu-SS had no toxicity, and promoted the migration of urethral epithelial cells. - Highlights: • 316LCu-SS exhibited strong antibacterial performance against E.coli in the urine. • 316LCu-SS had less crystals deposition on its surface compared to NiTi. • 316LCu-SS showed no toxicity and promoted migration of epithelial cells. • 316LCu-SS is prospective to be a new candidate material to relieve UTIs.

  2. Usefulness of a balloon-expandable, covered stent for the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rössle M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE covered, self-expandable nitinol stents in 2001 considerably improved the patency, response rates and survival of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS. Side effects of portosystemic shunting such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE and worsening of hepatic function, however, remained a problem. To reduce HE, underdilatation of nitinol stents has been practiced for many years. However, as shown recently, underdilatation was a flop since, due to their intrinsic memory, nitinol stents always expanded to reach their nominal diameter of 8 or 10 mm. To overcome this problem and to be able to perform permanent shunts with a smaller diameter of < 8 mm, we studied the usefulness of a balloon-expandable, covered, metallic stent which allowed adjustment to any diameter between 5 and 12 mm. Methods: 30 patients with cirrhosis and symptomatic portal hypertension were included. The mean Child-Pugh score was 8 ± 2.17 patients had refractory ascites, 9 patients variceal bleeding and four patients other indications for the TIPS. Results: The TIPS was successfully implanted in all patients within 69.6 ± 21.8 min. The shunt reduced the portosystemic pressure gradient by 57.5 ± 14.2% with a mean stent diameter of 7.4 ± 1.0 mm (5 -10.3 mm. During a mean follow-up of 330 ± 249 days, shunt revision was necessary in 5 patients (17%, four of them had insufficient response and received stent dilatation and one patient had stent misplacement requiring a parallel shunt. Three patients (10% developed HE. Conclusions: The covered, balloon-expandable stent could be placed accurately and allowed creation of adapted shunts with smaller diameters as usual. This resulted in a comparatively low rate of HE.

  3. Is the Routine Check Nephrostogram Following Percutaneous Antegrade Ureteric Stent Placement Necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, Keng Chuan; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo; MM Htoo, Austin; HG Lo, Richard; Lin, Shueh En

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technical success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients

  4. Measurement of urethral closure function in women with stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, N; Scholfield, D; Soma, K

    2009-01-01

    , double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover study 17 women with stress urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence received 4 mg esreboxetine or placebo for 7 to 9 days followed by a washout period before crossing over treatments. Urethral pressure reflectometry and urethral pressure profilometry......, and had a positive and clinically relevant effect on urethral closure function and symptoms of stress urinary incontinence....... esreboxetine patients had significantly fewer incontinence episodes and reported a treatment benefit (global impression of change) compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: The opening pressure measured with urethral pressure reflectometry was less variable compared to the parameters measured with urethral pressure...

  5. Prevention of Intracranial In-stent Restenoses: Predilatation with a Drug Eluting Balloon, Followed by the Deployment of a Self-Expanding Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajda, Zsolt, E-mail: Z.Vajda@klinikum-stuttgart.de; Guethe, Thomas, E-mail: T.Guethe@klinikum-stuttgart.de; Perez, Marta Aguilar, E-mail: M.Aguilar@klinikum-stuttgart.de; Kurre, Wiebke, E-mail: w.kurre@klinikum-stuttgart.de [Klinikum Stuttgart, Katharinenhospital, Klinik fuer Neuroradiologie, Neurozentrum (Germany); Schmid, Elisabeth, E-mail: ESchmid@klinikum-stuttgart.de; Baezner, Hansjoerg, E-mail: H.Baezner@klinikum-stuttgart.de [Klinikum Stuttgart, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Neurozentrum (Germany); Henkes, Hans, E-mail: hhhenkes@aol.com [Klinikum Stuttgart, Katharinenhospital, Klinik fuer Neuroradiologie, Neurozentrum (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is increasingly debated, due to issues of procedural safety, technical efficacy, and in-stent recurrent stenoses (ISR). In the present study, feasibility, safety, and efficacy of angioplasty using a drug-eluting balloon (DEB) followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise) were evaluated for the treatment of ICAD lesions. Fifty-two patients (median age: 71 years; range: 54-86 years; male/female ratio 37:15) underwent stenting of high-grade ICAD lesions between February 2010 and November 2011 in a single center. Angioplasty using a paclitaxel coated SeQuent Please (B. Braun, Germany) or DIOR (Eurocor, Germany) coronary PTCA balloon, followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise, Codman, USA) was performed in 54 lesions. Angiographic and clinical follow-up was performed at 6 and 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months, and yearly thereafter. Technical success rate, periprocedural complications, occurrence of recurrent ischemic symptoms, and the development of an ISR were analyzed. Angioplasty using a DEB followed by stent implantation was successfully performed in 44 (81 %) cases. DEB insertion failed in 19 % of the cases and angioplasty was finally performed using a conventional PTCA balloon. The combined procedure related permanent neurologic morbidity and mortality rate (stroke, ICH, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) at 30 days and beyond was 5 %. Angiographic and clinical follow-up were obtained in 33 (61 %) lesions in 32 patients. Recurrent stenosis was seen in one (3 %) lesion. Angioplasty and stenting using a DEB is safe and yields encouragingly low ISR rates. Further technical developments to improve lesion accessibility are, nevertheless, mandatory.

  6. Prevention of Intracranial In-stent Restenoses: Predilatation with a Drug Eluting Balloon, Followed by the Deployment of a Self-Expanding Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Zsolt; Güthe, Thomas; Perez, Marta Aguilar; Kurre, Wiebke; Schmid, Elisabeth; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Henkes, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is increasingly debated, due to issues of procedural safety, technical efficacy, and in-stent recurrent stenoses (ISR). In the present study, feasibility, safety, and efficacy of angioplasty using a drug-eluting balloon (DEB) followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise) were evaluated for the treatment of ICAD lesions. Fifty-two patients (median age: 71 years; range: 54–86 years; male/female ratio 37:15) underwent stenting of high-grade ICAD lesions between February 2010 and November 2011 in a single center. Angioplasty using a paclitaxel coated SeQuent Please (B. Braun, Germany) or DIOR (Eurocor, Germany) coronary PTCA balloon, followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise, Codman, USA) was performed in 54 lesions. Angiographic and clinical follow-up was performed at 6 and 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months, and yearly thereafter. Technical success rate, periprocedural complications, occurrence of recurrent ischemic symptoms, and the development of an ISR were analyzed. Angioplasty using a DEB followed by stent implantation was successfully performed in 44 (81 %) cases. DEB insertion failed in 19 % of the cases and angioplasty was finally performed using a conventional PTCA balloon. The combined procedure related permanent neurologic morbidity and mortality rate (stroke, ICH, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) at 30 days and beyond was 5 %. Angiographic and clinical follow-up were obtained in 33 (61 %) lesions in 32 patients. Recurrent stenosis was seen in one (3 %) lesion. Angioplasty and stenting using a DEB is safe and yields encouragingly low ISR rates. Further technical developments to improve lesion accessibility are, nevertheless, mandatory.

  7. The dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Tollenaar, Bryan G.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is a paucity of data regarding the incidence of urethral strictures after prostate brachytherapy. In this study, we evaluate multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters to identify factors associated with the development of brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures. Methods and Materials: 425 patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy using either 103 Pd or 125 I for clinical T1b/T3a NxM0 (1997, American Joint Committee on Cancer) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland from April 1995 to October 1999. No patient was lost to follow-up. 221 patients were implanted with 103 Pd and 204 patients with 125 I. The median patient age was 68 years (range 48-81 years). The median follow-up was 35.2 months (range 15-72 months). Follow-up was calculated from the day of implantation. Thirteen patients developed brachytherapy-induced strictures, and all strictures involved the membranous urethra. A control group of 35 patients was rigorously matched to the stricture patients in terms of treatment approach; i.e., choice of isotope, plus or minus radiation therapy, and plus or minus hormonal manipulation. Nine of the 13 stricture patients had detailed Day 0 urethral dosimetry available for review. The apex of the prostate gland and the membranous urethra were defined by CT evaluation. Urethral dosimetry was reported for the prostatic urethra, the apical slice of the prostate gland, and the membranous urethra which was defined as extending 20 mm in length. Results: The 5-year actuarial risk of a urethral stricture was 5.3%, with a median time to development of 26.6 months (range 7.8-44.1 months). Of multiple clinical and treatment parameters evaluated, only the duration of hormonal manipulation (>4 months, p=0.011) was predictive for the development of a urethral stricture. The radiation dose to the membranous urethra was significantly greater in patients with strictures than those without: 97.6%±20.8% vs. 81.0%±19.8% of

  8. Dorsolateral onlay urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures by a unilateral urethral mobilization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra P Singh

    2009-01-01

    Settings and Design: A prospective study from September 2005 to March 2008 in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with long or multiple strictures of the anterior urethra were treated by a dorsolateral free buccal mucosa graft. The pendulous urethra was accessed by penile eversion through the perineal wound. The urethra was not separated from the corporal bodies on one side and was only mobilized from the midline on the ventral aspect to beyond the midline on the dorsal aspect. The urethra was opened in the dorsal midline over the stricture. The buccal mucosa graft was secured on the ventral tunica of the corporal bodies. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and median. Results: After a follow-up of 12-30 months, one recurrence developed and 1 patient needed an internal urethrotomy. Conclusions: A unilateral urethral mobilization approach for dorsolateral free graft urethroplasty is feasible for panurethral strictures of any length with good short-term success.

  9. Permanences GAG-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 5 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 2 juin, 1er septembre, 6 octobre, 3 novembre et 1er décembre 2015. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires.

  10. Permanent quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A family of quadrupole magnets using a soft iron return yoke and circular cross-section permanent magnet poles were fabricated to investigate the feasibility for use in ion or electron beam focusing applications in accelerators and transport lines. Magnetic field measurements yielded promising results. In fixed-field applications, permanent magnets with sufficient gradients would be a low cost substitute for conventional electromagnets, eliminating the need for power supplies, associated wiring, and cooling. Based on preliminary tests, it was seen that permanent quadrupole magnets can offer a low cost, reliable solution in applications requiring small, fixed-field focusing devices for use in ion or electron-beam transport systems. Permanent magnets do require special considerations in design, fabrication, handling, and service that are different than encountered in conventional quadrupole magnets. If these basic conditions are satisfied, the resulting beam-focusing device would be stable, maintenance free, with virtually an indefinite lifetime

  11. Stent migration after right ventricular outflow tract stenting in the severe cyanotic Tetralogy of Fallot case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Hayashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report our experience with a stent migration after right ventricle outflow tract stenting and converted to patent ductus arteriosus stenting in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF with severe infundibular stenosis. Finally, the patient achieved to TOF repair, and the migrated stent was removed without any complication.

  12. Permanent quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A family of quadrupole magnets using a soft iron return yoke and circular cross-section permanent magnet poles were fabricated to investigate the feasibility for use in ion or electron beam focusing applications in accelerators and transport lines. Magnetic field measurements yielded promising results. In fixed-field applications, permanent magnets with sufficient gradients would be a low cost substitute for conventional electromagnets, eliminating the need for power supplies, associated wiring, and cooling. (author)

  13. Marxism as permanent revolution

    OpenAIRE

    van Ree, E.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that the 'permanent revolution' represented the dominant element in Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels' political discourse, and that it tended to overrule considerations encapsulated in 'historical materialism'. In Marx and Engels's understanding, permanent revolution did not represent a historical shortcut under exceptional circumstances, but the course revolutions in the modern era would normally take. Marx and Engels traced back the pattern to the sixteenth century. It is ...

  14. Implantation of a new enteral stent in obstructive colorectal cancer using interventional radiology in patients over 70 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłek, Tomasz; Ciostek, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in Poland. The traditional approach to treat patients included a surgical procedure. Irrespective of the surgical method being used, surgical treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction is associated with prolonged hospitalisation, and the postoperative mortality rate is approximately 5-11%. Due to these problems, more interest has been shown in less invasive methods. Prosthesis implantation is a leading endoscopic method used currently in palliative or preoperative treatment. To compare the results of implantation of traditional stents with the results of implantation of an own stent using minimally invasive methods. Left-sided colon obstruction due to cancer was an indication for transplantation. All patients were aged over 70 years and had serious concomitant diseases. The control group included 50 patients with colorectal cancer who received traditional stents in the period 2009-2011. Our stent covers only the internal length of a tumour. It is not equipped with anti-migration flares. To minimize the risk of migration it has a system of hooks that are responsible for permanent anchorage of the stent within the tumour mass. Implantation technical and clinical success defined as effective decompression of intestinal obstruction was 100% in both groups. There were 2 cases of stent migration in the control group. It is possible to achieve a secure surgical anastomosis after intestinal decompression. Stent implantation is fast and safe thanks to the positioning system that was used. The use of labelled hooks is a secure anti-migration solution.

  15. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Il Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs] have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations.

  16. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000235.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge To use the sharing ... the hospital. You may have also had a stent (a tiny wire mesh tube) placed in the ...

  17. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000234.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge To use the sharing ... peripheral artery). You may have also had a stent placed. To perform the procedure: Your doctor inserted ...

  18. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007393.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries To use the sharing features ... inside the arteries and block blood flow. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that keeps ...

  19. Deviating colostomy construction versus stent placement as bridge to surgery for malignant left-sided colonic obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelung, F.J.; Borg, F. ter; Consten, E.C.; Siersema, P.D.; Draaisma, W.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute colonic decompression using a deviating colostomy (DC) or a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has been shown to lead to fewer complications and permanent stomas compared to acute resection in elderly patients with malignant left-sided colonic obstruction (LSCO). However, no

  20. Rosoxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated acute gonococcal urethritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagaskar S

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 112 male patients presenting with acute gonococcal urethritis were admitted to the hospital. The diagnosis was confirmed by smear, culture, oxidase reaction and sugar fermentation tests. The patients were treated with a single 300 mg capsule of rosoxacin. All patients except one showed adequate response to rosoxacin.

  1. Oral mucosa grafts for urethral reconstruction | Mungadi | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urethral reconstruction has continued to present formidable and enormous challenges for urologic, paediatric and plastic surgeons as diverse opinions have been expressed on the quality and type of ideal substitution material. This literature review is aimed at drawing attention of surgeons to the versatile ...

  2. Outcome of urethral strictures treated by endoscopic urethrotomy and urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinaut-Ranera, Javier; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Nogueras-Ocaña, Mercedes; López-León, Víctor Manuel; Palao-Yago, Francisco; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Lahoz-García, Clara; Alaminos, Miguel; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the outcomes of patients with urethral stricture who underwent surgical treatment within the past 5 years. This is a retrospective study of male patients who underwent surgery for urethral stricture at our service from January 2008 to June 2012. We analyzed the comorbidities, type, length and location of the stricture and the surgical treatment outcome after endoscopic urethrotomy, urethroplasty or both. In total, 45 patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.7 years underwent surgical treatment for urethral stricture. Six months after surgery, 46.7% of the patients had a maximum urinary flow greater than 15 mL/s, whereas 87.3% of the patients exhibited no stricture by urethrography after the treatment. The success rate in the patients undergoing urethrotomy was 47.8% versus 86.4% in those undergoing urethroplasty (p = 0.01). Twenty percent of the patients in whom the initial urethrotomy had failed subsequently underwent urethroplasty, thereby increasing the treatment success. In most cases, the treatment of choice for urethral stricture should be urethroplasty. Previous treatment with urethrotomy does not appear to produce adverse effects that affect the outcome of a urethroplasty if urethrotomy failed, so urethrotomy may be indicated in patients with short strictures or in patients at high surgical risk.

  3. Treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation: A forgotten tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization and dilation, urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy as well. Although treatment option depends on the type, length and aetiology of stricture, the choice can be influenced to varying degrees by the simplicity of the method, the preferences of the patient the available accoutrements and the patient health condition. Both urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy require anaesthesia and thus are not suitable for many elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients. On the other hand, dilations are easy to perform in every day clinical practice however they have been associated with iatrogenic urethral trauma. In contrast, balloon dilation under vision dilates by radial application of forces against the stricture, avoiding the potentially shearing forces associated with sequential rigid dilation. Since it reduces the possibility of an iatrogenic urethral trauma and the subsequent spongiofibrosis may lead into improved therapeutic outcomes. In this report we describe a technique for the treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation in elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients.

  4. Urethroplasty for male urethral strictures: Experience from a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Fall

    The success of urethroplasty was more frequent for urethral strictures between 1 and 5 cm (46/69) than in ... advent, endoscopic internal urethrotomy (EIU) raised great hopes because it is a .... The comparative analysis of the variables was performed with .... thral stricture are neither clinically effective nor cost-effective.

  5. Congenital anterior urethral valves and diverticula: Diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: We propose that, the patients of AUVs, if not excessively delayed for treatment are otherwise well in terms of general condition as opposed to patients of posterior urethral valves. The diagnosis is easily established by VCUG and the severity is revealed by a sonogram. Open surgical excision is the method of ...

  6. Pelvic fracture urethral injuries revisited: A systematic review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In children, the urethra and bladder neck may be directly torn by the sharp edge of bone fragments. Retrograde urethrography remains the cornerstone for the diagnostic appraisal of posterior urethral injury. Of the three conventional treatment methods primary suturing has the greatest complication rates of incontinence and ...

  7. Review: Management of anterior urethral strictures with buccal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture management is a challenging surgery. Multiplicity of techniques means that none of them is ideal. No single technique is appropriate for all situations and the successful surgeon should have a store of operations to choose from according to each specific case. This review aims to provide an update on the ...

  8. The Treatment of Complex Urethral Strictures Using Ventral Onlay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the outcome of free onlay Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG) with onlay penile Skin Island Flap (SIF) urethroplasty in the treatment of complex urethral strictures. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative study was conducted at the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

  9. Prostatic urethral lift vs transurethral resection of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gratzke, Christian; Barber, Neil; Speakman, Mark J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare prostatic urethral lift (PUL) with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with regard to symptoms, recovery experience, sexual function, continence, safety, quality of life, sleep and overall patient perception. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 80 patients with lower...

  10. Posterior Urethral Valves in Children: Pattern of Presentation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of congenital lower urinary tract outflow obstruction in male infants with an ... Talabi, et al.: Surgical treatment and initial outcome of posterior urethral valve in children. 152 ... stabilizing the patients by controlling infection, correction of fluid, electrolyte ..... have predictive value or be responsible for the long term development ...

  11. Posterior urethral valves and Down syndrome | Lazarus | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The broad range of renal and urinary tract abnormalities associated with Down syndrome are not well known. We present two cases from a single institution of posterior urethral valves associated with Down syndrome. The cases illustrate the potential for delayed diagnosis and the management challenges. The literature is ...

  12. Semen-like urethral discharge during the use of mazindol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Meyboom, R H

    Two case reports are described of male patients experiencing a semen-like urethral discharge during micturition, suspected to be induced by mazindol. Mazindol has an indirect sympathomimetic action and is known to cause urogenital side effects such as urinary retention and testicular pain. It is

  13. Management of stent dislodgment in coarctoplasty of aorta with three overlapping self-expandable nitinol stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Payam; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of native coarctation of aorta managed with three self-expandable nitinol stents. After balloon pre-dilation, the first and second stents were dislodged. The coarcted area was successfully treated with the third stent overlapped with the previous stents. During follow up (30 months), the patient was free of complications. It seems that implantation of multiple overlapping self-expandable stents in aortic coarctation patients, if needed, is safe and possible.

  14. A Method for Recording Urethral Pressure Profiles in Female Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengfei Xu

    Full Text Available Urethral pressure profile (UPP and leak-point pressure (LPP measurements as well as external urethral sphincter (EUS electromyography (EMG and videourodynamic analyses are the primary methods for evaluating urethral function in humans. However, UPP recording in female rats, a widely used animal model, is challenging due to their small body sizes. This study reports a novel method for recording UPP in female rats.Seventeen anesthetized female rats were studied. LPP data for 14 rats were included. The other 3 rats were excluded because of death or abnormal urogenital organs. UPP curves were recorded using a modified water-perfusion catheter system, with the lateral hole facing the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o'clock positions in a randomized sequence. LPP, functional urethral length (FUL and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP were analyzed.The mean LPP was 64.39 ± 20.29 cm H2O. The mean FUL and MUCP values at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o'clock positions were 12.90 ± 1.20, 16.70 ± 1.95, 13.90 ± 2.42, and 11.60 ± 0.97 mm, respectively, and 38.70 ± 11.85, 33.90 ± 11.82, 37.40 ± 11.95, and 71.90 ± 23.01 cm H2O, respectively. The FUL at the 6-o'clock position and MUCP at the 12-o'clock position were significantly greater than those at the other 3 positions. The FUL and MUCP of repeated UPP recordings were not significantly different than those of the first recordings.UPP recording using a modified method based on a water-perfusion catheter system is feasible and replicable in female rats. It produces UPP curves that sensitively and appreciably reflect detailed pressure changes at different points within the urethra and thus provides opportunity to evaluate urethral structures, especially the urethral sphincter, in detail. These results may enhance the utility of female rat models in research of urinary sphincter mechanisms.

  15. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but

  16. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further.

  17. Incidence and predictors of coronary stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Bollati, Mario; Clementi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis remains among the most feared complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. However, data on its incidence and predictors are sparse and conflicting. We thus aimed to perform a collaborative systematic review on incidence and predictors of stent...

  18. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent...

  19. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to...

  20. Metallic ureteral stents in malignant ureteral obstruction: clinical factors predicting stent failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Po-Ming; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lee, Yuan-Ju; Huang, Kuo-How; Yu, Hong-Jheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liang, Po-Chin

    2014-06-01

    To provide clinical outcomes of the Resonance metallic ureteral stent in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction, as well as clinical factors predicting stent failure. Cancer patients who have received Resonance stents from July 2009 to March 2012 for ureteral obstruction were included for chart review. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms, image studies, and renal function tests. Survival analysis for stent duration was used to estimate patency rate and factors predicting stent failure. A total of 117 stents were inserted successfully into 94 ureteral units in 79 patients. There were no major complications. These stents underwent survival analysis and proportional hazard regression. The median duration for the stents was 5.77 months. In multivariate analysis, age (P=0.043), preoperative serum creatinine level (P=0.0174), and cancer type (P=0.0494) were significant factors associated with stent failure. Cancer treatment before and after stent insertion had no effect on stent duration. Resonance stents are effective and safe in relieving malignant ureteral obstructions. Old age and high serum creatinine level are predictors for stent failure. Stents in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancers have longer functional duration.

  1. Thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhui; Wang, Zhixiang; Yang, Bo; Yang, Qing; Sun, Yinghao

    2010-09-01

    The outcome of thulium laser urethrotomy for patients with urethral stricture had not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome of endourethrotomy with the thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. Twenty-one consecutive patients with urethral stricture were evaluated by retrograde uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life preoperatively at a single academic center. All patients were treated with thulium laser urethrotomy. All patients were followed up for 12-24 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram every 3 months. And all patients were followed up by mailed questionnaire, including IPSS and quality of life. Retrograde endoscopic thulium laser urethrotomy was performed in all 21 patients. Most patients (N = 16; 76.2%) did not need any reintervention. Five patients developed recurrent strictures, of them two patients were treated by another laser urethrotomy, one patient was treated by open urethroplasty with buccal mucosa and the other two patients' reintervention were treated by urethral dilation. No intraoperative complications were encountered, although in 9.5% (N = 2) of patients, a urinary tract infection was diagnosed postoperatively. No gross hematuria occurred. Including two patients treated with repeat laser urethrotomy, 17(81.0%) showed good flow of urine (Q(ave)>16.0 ml/second) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU) 12 months after operation. Three (14.3%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Q(ave)urethrotomy. The thulium laser urethrotomy was a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral stricture. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. [Oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for complicated urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Akio; Sumitomo, Makoto; Kanbara, Taiki; Tsujita, Yujiro; Yoshii, Takahiko; Yoshii, Hidehiko; Satoh, Akinori; Asakuma, Junichi; Ito, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Masamichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and outcome of one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty, which is currently the procedure of choice for treating lengthy and complicated urethral strictures not amenable to excision and primary end-to-end anastomosis. Seven patients 33 to 74 years old (mean age = 53.7) underwent one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for a stricture in either the bulbar urethra (four patients), penile urethra (two patients), or pan-anterior urethra (one patient). Three of the strictures were due to trauma, one was due to inflammation, and one was due to a failed hypospadia repair. The other two were iatrogenic. All patients had previously undergone either internal urethrotomy or repeated urethral dilation. Three patients received a tube graft, three received a ventral onlay, and one received a dorsal onlay. A free graft of oral mucosa was harvested from the inside of each patient's left cheek, and if necessary to obtain a sufficient length, the harvest was extended to include mucosa from the lower lip and the right cheek. The graft lengths ranged from 2.5 to 12 cm (mean = 4.6 cm). A urethral catheter was left in place for 3 weeks postoperatively. While no severe complications at the donor site were observed during follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 55 months (mean = 14 months), two patients who had received a tube graft developed distal anastomotic ring strictures that were managed by internal urethrotomy. The other five required no postoperative urological procedure even though one who had received a ventral onlay developed a penoscrotal fistula. Oral mucosa is an ideal urethral graft, and oral mucosa graft urethroplasty is an effective procedure for repairing complicated urethral strictures involving long portions of the urethra.

  3. Coronary and peripheral stenting in aorto-ostial protruding stents: The balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Tarek A; Sanchez, Carlos E; Bailey, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of aorto-ostial in-stent restenosis lesions represents a challenge for interventional cardiologists. Excessive protrusion of the stent into the aorta may lead to multiple technical problems, such as difficult catheter reengagement of the vessel ostium or inability to re-wire through the stent lumen in repeat interventions. We describe a balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique in cases where conventional coaxial engagement of an aorto-ostial protruding stent with the guide catheter or passage of the guide wire through the true lumen is not feasible. This technique is applicable both in coronary and peripheral arteries. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Three-dimensional translabial ultrasound assessment of urethral supports and the urethral sphincter complex in stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassadó Garriga, Jordi; Pessarrodona Isern, Antoni; Rodríguez Carballeira, Monica; Pallarols Badia, Mar; Moya Del Corral, Manuela; Valls Esteve, Marta; Huguet Galofré, Eva

    2017-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of incontinence is multifactorial. We evaluated the role of 3D-4D ultrasound in the assessment of the fascial supports of the urethra and the urethral sphincter complex (USC) for diagnosing stress urinary incontinence. Observational case-control study in women with and without stress urinary incontinence attending a urogynecology service and a general gynecology service. All women were interviewed, examined, and classified according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) and underwent a 3D-4D translabial ultrasound. Fascial supports of the urethra were assessed by tomographic ultrasound and were considered to be intact or absent if it was possible to identify them at eight levels on each side, urethral mobility was assessed on maximal Valsalva in sagittal section and the length and volume of the USC at rest and on maximal Valsalva were determined using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided Analysis (VOCAL) program. Variables were compared between continent and incontinent women. A total of 173 women were examined, 78 continent and 95 incontinent. There was a significant difference in urethral mobility between continent and incontinent women (12.82 mm vs. 21.85 mm, P rest was significantly shorter (P continent and incontinent women. However, the length of the USC at rest was shorter and urethral mobility was higher in incontinent women. Neurourol. Urodynam. 9999:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Experimental absorbable stent permits airway remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Liu, Yun-Hen; Peng, Yi-Jie; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2011-02-01

    Despite metallic and silicone stents being effective in treating various airway lesions, many concerns still remain. A bioresorbable stent that scaffolds the airway lumen and dissolves after the remodeling process is completed has advantages over metallic and silicone stents. We designed and fabricated a new mesh-type bioresorbable stent with a backbone of polycaprolactone (PCL), and evaluated its safety and biocompatibility in a rabbit trachea model. The PCL stent was fabricated by a laboratory-made microinjection molding machine. In vitro mechanical strength of the PCL stents was tested and compared to that of commercial silicone stents. The bioresorbable stents were surgically implanted into the cervical trachea of New Zealand white rabbits (n=6). Animals received bronchoscopic examination at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was completed to evaluate the biocompatibility of the stents. No animals died during the period of study. Distal stent migration was noted in 1 rabbit. In-stent secretion accumulation was found in 2 rabbits. Histological examination showed intact ciliated epithelium and marked leukocyte infiltration in the submucosa of the stented area at 10 and 28 weeks. Stent degradation was minimal, and the mechanical strength was well preserved at the end of 33 weeks. These preliminary findings showed good safety and biocompatibility of the new PCL stent when used in the airway remodeling. PCL could be a promising bioresorbable material for stent design if prolonged degradation time is required. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous Retrieval of Permanent Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamrazi, Anobel; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Holly, Brian; Bhagat, Nikhil; Marx, Jonathan K.; Streiff, Michael; Lessne, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility, risks, and techniques of percutaneous removal of permanent TrapEase and Simon Nitinol IVC filters.Materials and MethodsBetween August 2011 and August 2015, 12 patients (5 women, 7 men; age range, 26–75 years) underwent an attempt at percutaneous removal of permanent TrapEase (10) and Simon Nitinol (2) IVC filters due to a history of IVC filter complications or need for lifelong anticoagulation due to the filter. Medical records were reviewed for filter dwell time, presence of iliocaval deep venous thrombosis, procedural technique, and complications.ResultsFilter dwell times ranged from 7 days to 15 years (mean 5.1 years). Successful removal of permanent IVC filters was possible in 11 of 12 patients (91.6 %). In 1 patient, a chronically thrombosed IVC filter could not be removed despite laser sheath assistance, but was successfully recanalized with the PowerWire RF guidewire. In the failed retrieval attempt, a stent was placed through the chronically thrombosed IVC filter with restoration of in-line flow. One major complication of large venous groin hematoma was encountered.ConclusionsIn carefully selected patients, percutaneous removal of permanent IVC filters can be performed safely despite prolonged filter dwell times. Extraction of chronically embedded permanent IVC filters may be facilitated by jugular and femoral approaches, often with laser sheath assistance. Chronic filter thrombosis and caval scarring may increase the risk of retrieval failure.

  7. Percutaneous Retrieval of Permanent Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamrazi, Anobel, E-mail: atamraz1@jhmi.edu; Wadhwa, Vibhor, E-mail: vwadhwa1@jhmi.edu; Holly, Brian, E-mail: bholly3@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Vascular & Interventional Radiology (United States); Bhagat, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhibhagat@gmail.com [Kaiser Permanente, Division of Vascular & Interventional Radiology (United States); Marx, Jonathan K., E-mail: jmarx9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Vascular & Interventional Radiology (United States); Streiff, Michael, E-mail: mstreif@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Hematology (United States); Lessne, Mark L., E-mail: mlessne@gmail.com [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Vascular & Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility, risks, and techniques of percutaneous removal of permanent TrapEase and Simon Nitinol IVC filters.Materials and MethodsBetween August 2011 and August 2015, 12 patients (5 women, 7 men; age range, 26–75 years) underwent an attempt at percutaneous removal of permanent TrapEase (10) and Simon Nitinol (2) IVC filters due to a history of IVC filter complications or need for lifelong anticoagulation due to the filter. Medical records were reviewed for filter dwell time, presence of iliocaval deep venous thrombosis, procedural technique, and complications.ResultsFilter dwell times ranged from 7 days to 15 years (mean 5.1 years). Successful removal of permanent IVC filters was possible in 11 of 12 patients (91.6 %). In 1 patient, a chronically thrombosed IVC filter could not be removed despite laser sheath assistance, but was successfully recanalized with the PowerWire RF guidewire. In the failed retrieval attempt, a stent was placed through the chronically thrombosed IVC filter with restoration of in-line flow. One major complication of large venous groin hematoma was encountered.ConclusionsIn carefully selected patients, percutaneous removal of permanent IVC filters can be performed safely despite prolonged filter dwell times. Extraction of chronically embedded permanent IVC filters may be facilitated by jugular and femoral approaches, often with laser sheath assistance. Chronic filter thrombosis and caval scarring may increase the risk of retrieval failure.

  8. Symptoms of non-gonococcal urethritis in heterosexual men: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, P; Read, Tr H; Tabrizi, S; Bradshaw, C; Lee, D; Horvarth, L; Garland, S; Denham, I; Fairley, C K

    2005-04-01

    To determine microbial and behavioural factors contributing to non-gonococcal urethral symptoms in men. Case-control study of heterosexual men with non-gonococcal urethral symptoms (cases) and without urethral symptoms (controls) attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. Sexual behaviour and condom use were measured by questionnaire. First stream urine was tested for potential pathogens: Chlamydia trachomatis (ligase chain reaction), Mycoplasma genitalium (polymerase chain reaction, PCR), Ureaplasma urealyticum (culture and PCR), and Streptococcus spp, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Haemophilus species (culture). Urethral smears from cases were examined for polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 80 cases and 79 controls were recruited over 4 months in 2002-3. 49 cases (61%) had urethritis by microscopic criteria, 17 (21%) had Chlamydia trachomatis (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4 to 222)), five (6%) had Mycoplasma genitalium (OR 6.1 (95% CI: 0.6 to 61)), and 11 (14%) had Gardnerella vaginalis (OR 9.0 (95% CI: 1.6 to 52)). Other organisms were not significantly associated with urethral symptoms. The presence of urethritis on urethral smear did not predict the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis (OR 1.7 (95% CI: 0.5 to 5.4)). Urethral symptoms were significantly associated with unprotected vaginal sex with more than one casual partner (OR 9.3 (95% CI: 1.3 to 65)) and unprotected anal sex with a regular partner in the past month (OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.0 to 13)). Gardnerella vaginalis and unprotected anal sex may cause symptoms of non-gonococcal urethritis. Microscopy of the urethral smear to diagnose urethritis in this population does not help to identify which men with urethral symptoms require treatment for chlamydia.

  9. Urethral diverticulum after laparoscopically-assisted anorectal pull-through (LAARP) for anorectal malformation: is resection of the diverticulum always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pedro José; Guelfand, Miguel; Angel, Lorena; Paulos, Angélica; Cadena, Yair; Escala, José M; Letelier, Nelly; Zubieta, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    With the increased use of minimally invasive surgery, the urethral diverticulum after anorectal surgery has become an issue. The few cases reported have been managed by surgical excision. We hereby report a case of urethral diverticulum after a laparoscopically-assisted anorectal pull-through (LAARP)procedure with a successful outcome after a period of active surveillance. A full-term boy who displayed a high anorectal malformation (ARM) and a rectoprostatic fistula underwent colostomy on the first day. He also showed associated malformations: bilateral low-grade reflux, horseshoe kidney and thoracic hemivertebrae; however, there were no signs of spinal cord tethering. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was started. At the age of 3 months, he underwent a LAARP with a 3 abdominal-port approach. After complete dissection of the distal bowel, the recto-prostatic fistula was identified and tied with metallic clips. A 10 mm trocar was inserted through the centre of the sphincteric complex, which had been previously identified under laparoscopic view during perineal electrical stimulation. The anorectal pull-through was accomplished without tension. The bladder remained stented for 14 days. On the 18th postoperative day, a voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) showed a 15 X 5 mm image of the diverticulum at the level of the membranous urethra. After 6 months, a new VCUG showed a normal urethra with neither signs of the diverticulum nor strictures; persistence of grade 2 reflux on the right side and resolution of the reflux on the left. When the boy was one year old his colostomy was closed uneventfully. Six months later he had not come into the emergency since the operation and voided with a normal flow. This report suggests that LAARP is a feasible approach for ARM, although urethral diverticulum is a major concern. It may evolve without complications, and eventually resolve spontaneously. Active surveillance might be an option in selected asymptomatic patients; however a longer

  10. Introduction to permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijlstra, H.

    1985-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning the application of permanent magnets are developed. The relevant magnet properties are discussed, with particular reference to Nd-Fe-B alloy. The author comes to the following conclusions; the air gap field B should be high, for high electrical efficiency; the magnet should face the air gap, for efficient use of the magnet material; the magnet material should therefore have a high remanence; and the new Nd-Fe-B magnet fits in nicely, having (potentially) the highest remanence ever reported in permanent magnets, combined with sufficient coercivity to sustain it

  11. Microvascular stent anastomosis using N-fibroin stents: feasibility, ischemia time, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Vorwig, Oliver; Wöltje, Michael; Gaudin, Robert; Luebke, Andreas M; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Rheinnecker, Michael; Heiland, Max; Grupp, Katharina; Gröbe, Alexander; Hanken, Henning

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a novel microvascular anastomosis technique using N-fibroin stents. Cylinder stents of 1 mm diameter and 5 mm length were fabricated using N-fibroin from silkworms. In 22 rats, aortas were dissected, and the stent was inserted into the two ends of the aorta and fixed using methylmethacrylate. Stent anastomosis was successful in 21 (96%) rats. The mean ischemia time was 7.4 minutes, significantly shorter than the 15.9 minutes in the control group with conventional sutures (P stent anastomosis cases, and marked host rejection was evident at the stent anastomosis sites. Around the stents, thrombi were frequent (52%). Our study demonstrated the basic feasibility of stent anastomosis using N-fibroin stents and reduced ischemia time. However, thrombus formation, frequent and severe abdominal infections, and heavy host rejection remain critical issues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endoscopic stent suture fixation for prevention of esophageal stent migration during prolonged dilatation for achalasia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, E; Asari, R; Paireder, M; Lenglinger, J; Schoppmann, S F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare endoscopic stent suture fixation with endoscopic clip attachment or the use of partially covered stents (PCS) regarding their capability to prevent stent migration during prolonged dilatation in achalasia. Large-diameter self-expanding metal stents (30 mm × 80 mm) were placed across the gastroesophageal junction in 11 patients with achalasia. Stent removal was scheduled after 4 to 7 days. To prevent stent dislocation, endoscopic clip attachment, endoscopic stent suture fixation, or PCS were used. The Eckardt score was evaluated before and 6 months after prolonged dilatation. After endoscopic stent suture fixation, no (0/4) sutured stent migrated. When endoscopic clips were used, 80% (4/5) clipped stents migrated (p = 0.02). Of two PCS (n = 2), one migrated and one became embedded leading to difficult stent removal. Technical adverse events were not seen in endoscopic stent suture fixation but were significantly correlated with the use of clips or PCS (r = 0.828, p = 0.02). Overall, 72% of patients were in remission regarding their achalasia symptoms 6 months after prolonged dilatation. Endoscopic suture fixation of esophageal stents but not clip attachment appears to be the best method of preventing early migration of esophageal stents placed at difficult locations such as at the naive gastroesophageal junction. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Angulated Stents-A Novel Stent Improvisation to Manage Difficult Post-tuberculosis Bronchial Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chee Kiang; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Kim, Hojoong

    2017-10-18

    Post-tuberculosis bronchostenosis (PTBS), a complication of endobronchial tuberculosis is currently treated by bronchial stenting. However, in cases of angulated bronchial stenoses, difficulty is often encountered in stent insertion and maintenance, resulting in stent migration, granulation tissue overgrowth, and restenosis. To accommodate the angulated alignment of the stenosis, we devised an "angulated stent"-a novel improvisation of the conventional stent via splicing and suturing to achieve a resultant angulated shape. A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this stent. Among 283 PTBS patients who underwent interventional bronchoscopy at our center from 2004 to 2014, 21 were treated with at least one angulated stent. Clinical outcomes, including the stenting duration were investigated. After a median follow-up of 26 months, stent removal was successful in 7 (33.3%) out of 21 patients. In patients managed with angulated stents, the median duration to stent change or eventual removal was longer than those treated with straight tube stents (392 days vs. 86 days; p < 0.05). Angulated stents are a feasible treatment option in patients with angulated PTBS by reducing complications and prolonging the stent-changing interval.

  14. Primary and revision efficacy of cross-wired metallic stents for endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement in malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Moon, J H; Kim, J H; Park, D H; Lee, S S; Choi, H J; Cho, Y D; Park, S H; Kim, S J

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic bilateral drainage for inoperable malignant hilar biliary strictures (HBS) using metal stents is considered to be technically difficult. Furthermore, endoscopic revision of bilateral stenting after occlusion can be challenging. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents in high-grade malignant HBS and planned endoscopic bilateral revision. A total of 84 patients with inoperable high-grade malignant HBS were enrolled from three academic tertiary referral centers. Two cross-wired metal stents were inserted using a bilateral stent-in-stent placement method. Bilateral endoscopic revision was also performed during follow-up using either identical metal stents or plastic stents. The main outcome measurements were technical and functional success, complications, stent patency, and endoscopic revision efficacy. The technical and clinical success rates of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents were 95.2% (80/84) and 92.9% (78/84), respectively. Median patency (range) and survival were 238 days (10-429) and 256 days (10-1130), respectively. Obstruction of primary bilateral stents occurred in 30.8% (24/78) of patients with functionally successful stent placement. The technical and clinical success rates of planned bilateral endoscopic revision for occluded stents were 83.3% (20/24) and 79.2% (19/24), respectively. For revision, bilateral metallic stents were placed in 11 patients (55.0%); the remaining patients received plastic stents. Palliative endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents was effective in patients with inoperable HBS. Revision endoscopic bilateral stenting may be feasible and successful in cases where the primary deployed metal stents are occluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Endobronchial Occlusion Stent: A Preliminary Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yo Won; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Heo, Jeong Nam; Jeon, Seok Chol [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and the technical feasibility of the use of an endobronchial occlusion stent and to get preliminary data for the development of the optimal material required for endobronchial occlusions. A commercialized, self-expandable tracheobronchial stent was modified; one half had a polyurethane cover with an occluded end and the other half was uncovered with a flaring configuration. The occluded end was placed such that it would face the distal lung. Under fluoroscopic guidance, seven stents were placed at the lower lobar bronchus in 6 mini-pigs. The bronchial obstruction was examined immediately after stent placement. Chest radiographs were taken at days 1, 7, 14, and 28 after stent placement and the removed airways from two, two, one, and one mini-pigs sacrificed on corresponding days were examined for the maintenance of bronchial obstruction. Stents were successfully placed and induced the immediate bronchial obstruction in all mini-pigs. Five of seven airways with occlusion stents maintained an obstruction until the mini-pigs were sacrificed. Proximal stent migration occurred in two mini-pigs (29%), and pulmonary consolidations were observed distal to four of the stents (57%). The placement of an endobronchial occlusion stent and the obstruction of targeted bronchi seem to be feasible, but an add-on check valve should be considered to prevent stent migration and obstructive pneumonia

  16. The effect of single oral doses of duloxetine, reboxetine, and midodrine on the urethral pressure in healthy female subjects, using urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Cerneus, Dirk; Sawyer, William

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect on urethral pressure of reference drugs known to reduce stress urinary incontinence symptoms by different effect size and mechanisms of action on urethral musculature under four test conditions in healthy female subjects using urethral pressure reflectometry. METHODS......: Healthy females aged 18-55 years were recruited by advertising for this phase 1, single site, placebo-controlled, randomized, four-period, crossover study. The interventions were single oral doses of 10 mg Midodrine, 80 mg Duloxetine, 12 mg Reboxetine, and placebo. The endpoints were the opening urethral...... pressure measured in each period at four time points (predose and 2, 5.5, and 9 h after dosing). RESULTS: Twenty-nine females were enrolled; 25 randomized and 24 completed the study. The opening urethral pressure was higher in all measurements with filled bladder compared with empty bladder, and during...

  17. A comparative evaluation of early stent occlusion among biliary conventional versus wing stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Hutfless, Susan; Kim, Katherine; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Jagannath, Sanjay B; Okolo, Patrick I; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-06-01

    Conventional plastic stents with a lumen typically have limited patency. The lumenless wing stent was engineered to overcome this problem. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of early stent occlusion (symptomatic occlusion/cholangitis necessitating re-insertion within 90 days) for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Patients with biliary pathology treated with plastic biliary stenting during the period 2003-2009 comprised the study cohort. Patients who had at least one biliary wing stent placed comprised the wing stent group, whereas patients who underwent only conventional stent plastic placement comprised the conventional stent group. Patients were stratified by indication: benign biliary strictures (group 1), malignant biliary strictures (group 2), or benign biliary non-stricture pathology (group 3). The association of stent type with the occurrence of primary outcome by indication was analyzed by use of multivariable logistic regression. Three-hundred and forty-six patients underwent 612 ERCP procedures with placement of plastic biliary stent(s). On multivariate analysis, early stent occlusion did not differ between the wing and conventional groups in groups 1, 2, and 3. Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 2, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (6.7% vs. 39.1%, P = 0.03). Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 3, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (10% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). Early stent occlusion was similar for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Wing stents, however, were associated with a lower incidence of cholangitis in patients with malignant biliary obstruction and benign non-stricturing biliary pathology.

  18. Recurrence of Subacute Stent Thrombosis and In-Stent Restenosis during Five Months after Stent Implantation in the LAD. A Case Report.

    OpenAIRE

    島田, 弘英; 大和, 眞史; 櫻井, 俊平; 疋田, 博之; 池田, 修一

    2001-01-01

    A coronary stent was deployed in the left anterior descending artery of an 82-year-old woman with unstable angina.Recurrence of subacute stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis occurred frequently during the five months after initial stent implantation.Balloon angioplasty and cutting balloon angioplasty failed to prevent these complications,but they ceased after re-stenting in the initial stent.In this case,tissue protrusion through the stent strut, deformation of the coil stent and inadequa...

  19. Object permanence in lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Anja M; Wright, Patricia C; Szelistowski, William A

    2009-03-01

    Object permanence, the ability to mentally represent objects that have disappeared from view, should be advantageous to animals in their interaction with the natural world. The objective of this study was to examine whether lemurs possess object permanence. Thirteen adult subjects representing four species of diurnal lemur (Eulemur fulvus rufus, Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta and Hapalemur griseus) were presented with seven standard Piagetian visible and invisible object displacement tests, plus one single visible test where the subject had to wait predetermined times before allowed to search, and two invisible tests where each hiding place was made visually unique. In all visible tests lemurs were able to find an object that had been in clear view before being hidden. However, when lemurs were not allowed to search for up to 25-s, performance declined with increasing time-delay. Subjects did not outperform chance on any invisible displacements regardless of whether hiding places were visually uniform or unique, therefore the upper limit of object permanence observed was Stage 5b. Lemur species in this study eat stationary foods and are not subject to stalking predators, thus Stage 5 object permanence is probably sufficient to solve most problems encountered in the wild.

  20. Predictors of stent dysfunction after self-expandable metal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: tumor ingrowth in uncovered stents and migration of covered stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Ban, Tesshin; Natsume, Makoto; Okumura, Fumihiro; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Takada, Hiroki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Jinno, Naruomi; Togawa, Shozo; Ando, Tomoaki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Joh, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopic metallic stenting is widely accepted as a palliation therapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, the predictors of stent dysfunction have not been clarified. We aimed to evaluate the predictors, especially tumor ingrowth in uncovered self-expandable metallic stents (U-SEMS) and migration of covered self-expandable metallic stents (C-SEMS), which are the main causes related to the stent characteristics. In this multicenter retrospective study, we compared patients with U-SEMS and C-SEMS in terms of clinical outcomes, and predictors of stent dysfunction. In total, 252 patients (126 with U-SEMS and 126 with C-SEMS) were enrolled. There were no significant differences in technical success, clinical success, GOO score, or time to stent dysfunction. Tumor ingrowth was significantly more frequent in U-SEMS (U-SEMS, 11.90% vs. C-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.002), and stent migration was significantly more frequent for C-SEMS (C-SEMS, 8.73% vs. U-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.005). Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.04), no presence of ascites (p = 0.02), and insufficient (stent expansion (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with tumor ingrowth in U-SEMS. Meanwhile, a shorter stent length (p = 0.05) and chemotherapy (p = 0.03) were predictors of C-SEMS migration. Both U-SEMS and C-SEMS are effective with comparable patencies. Tumor ingrowth and stent migration are the main causes of stent dysfunction for U-SEMS and C-SEMS, respectively. With regard to stent dysfunction, U-SEMS might be a good option for patients receiving chemotherapy, while C-SEMS with longer stents for patients in good condition. (Clinical trial registration number: UMIN000024059).

  1. Acquired urethral diverticulum in a man with paraplegia presenting with a scrotal mass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ammari Jalal Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Male urethral diverticula are rare. Patients with paraplegia may present with acquired diverticula as a result of prolonged catheterization. Diverticula may be asymptomatic or lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rarely, the diverticulum may initially present as a scrotal mass. Case presentation We report the case of a male 45-year-old Arab with paraplegia who presented with a mass in the peno-scrotal junction. He had in his medical history iterative prolonged urethral catheterizations associated with urine leakage through the urethral meatus upon applying compression. Diagnosis confirmation of urethral diverticula is obtained by retrograde urethrography. The patient underwent a diverticulectomy with urethroplasty. Conclusion Male acquired urethral diverticula can be found in patients who have a spinal cord injury because of prolonged urethral catheterization. Clinical presentations are different and sometimes can be misleading. Retrograde urethrography is the key to diagnosis and open surgery is the treatment of reference.

  2. Clinical experience in coronary stenting with the Vivant Z Stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K H; Siaw, F S; Chan, C G; Chong, W P; Imran, Z A; Haizal, H K; Azman, W; Tan, K H

    2005-06-01

    This single centre study was designed to demonstrate feasibility, safety and efficacy of the Vivant Z stent (PFM AG, Cologne, Germany). Patients with de novo lesion were recruited. Coronary angioplasty was performed with either direct stenting or after balloon predilatation. Repeated angiogram was performed 6 months later or earlier if clinically indicated. Between January to June 2003, a total of 50 patients were recruited (mean age 55.8 +/- 9 years). A total of 52 lesions were stented successfully. Mean reference diameter was 2.77 mm (+/-0.59 SD, range 2.05-4.39 mm) with mean target lesion stenosis of 65.5% (+/-11.6 SD, range 50.1-93.3%). Forty-six lesions (88.5%) were American College of Cardiologist/American Heart Association class B/C types. Direct stenting was performed in 18 (34.6%) lesions. Mean stent diameter was 3.18 mm (+/-0.41 SD, range 2.5-4 mm), and mean stent length was 14.86 mm (+/-2.72 SD, range 9-18 mm). The procedure was complicated in only one case which involved the loss of side branch with no clinical sequelae. All treated lesions achieved Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 3 flow. Mean residual diameter stenosis was 12.2% (+/-7.55 SD, range 0-22.6%) with acute gain of 1.72 mm (+/-0.50 SD, range 0.5-2.8). At 6 months, there was no major adverse cardiovascular event. Repeated angiography after 6 months showed a restenosis rate of 17% (defined as >50% diameter restenosis). Mean late loss was 0.96 mm (+/-0.48 SD) with loss index of 0.61 (+/-0.38 SD). The restenosis rate of those lesions less than 3.0 mm in diameter was 22.2% compared with 6.25% in those lesions more than 3.0 mm in diameter. The Vivant Z stent was shown to be safe and efficacious with low restenosis rate in de novo coronary artery lesion.

  3. A method to determine the kink resistance of stents and stent delivery systems according to international standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt-Wunderlich Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The kink behavior of vascular stents is of particular interest for clinicians, stent manufacturers and regulatory as a kinked stent generates a lumen loss in the stented vessel and can lead to in-stent restenosis. In this study methods to determine the kink resistance of stents and stent delivery systems according to the ISO 25539-2 and FDA guidance no. 1545 were presented. The methods are applicable for balloon expandable stents as well as for self-expanding stents and determine the lumen loss and residual diameter change dependent on the specific bending radius.

  4. An in Vitro Twist Fatigue Test of Fabric Stent-Grafts Supported by Z-Stents vs. Ringed Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Whereas buckling can cause type III endoleaks, long-term twisting of a stent-graft was investigated here as a mechanism leading to type V endoleak or endotension. Two experimental device designs supported with Z-stents having strut angles of 35° or 45° were compared to a ringed control under accelerated twisting. Damage to each device was assessed and compared after different durations of twisting, with focus on damage that may allow leakage. Stent-grafts with 35° Z-stents had the most severe distortion and damage to the graft fabric. The 45° Z-stents caused less fabric damage. However, consistent stretching was still seen around the holes for sutures, which attach the stents to the graft fabric. Larger holes may become channels for fluid percolation through the wall. The ringed stent-graft had the least damage observed. Stent apexes with sharp angles appear to be responsible for major damage to the fabrics. Device manufacturers should consider stent apex angle when designing stent-grafts, and ensure their devices are resistant to twisting.

  5. Stent malapposition, as a potential mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after bare-metal stent implantation: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuma, Takumi, E-mail: higuma@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp; Abe, Naoki; Hanada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2014-04-15

    A 90-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. He had a history of post-infarction angina pectoris 79 months ago and had a bare-metal stent (BMS) implanted in the proximal left anterior descending artery at our hospital. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated thrombotic occlusion in the previously stented segment. After catheter thrombectomy, antegrade flow was restored, but 90% stenosis with haziness persisted in the proximal and distal portions of the previously stented segment. Intravascular ultrasound imaging showed interstrut cavities or stent malapposition at the proximal and distal sites of stented segment. In close proximity to the sites, residual thrombi were also observed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated neither lipid-laden neointimal tissue nor rupture but clearly demonstrated residual thrombus adjacent to the malapposed region in addition to the stent malapposition. PCI with balloon was successfully performed and stent apposition was confirmed by OCT. Stent malapposition is an unusual mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after BMS implantation. OCT can clearly reveal the etiology of stent thrombosis.

  6. An in Vitro Twist Fatigue Test of Fabric Stent-Grafts Supported by Z-Stents vs. Ringed Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Guidoin, Robert; Du, Jia; Wang, Lu; Douglas, Graeham; Zhu, Danjie; Nutley, Mark; Perron, Lygia; Zhang, Ze; Douville, Yvan

    2016-02-16

    Whereas buckling can cause type III endoleaks, long-term twisting of a stent-graft was investigated here as a mechanism leading to type V endoleak or endotension. Two experimental device designs supported with Z-stents having strut angles of 35° or 45° were compared to a ringed control under accelerated twisting. Damage to each device was assessed and compared after different durations of twisting, with focus on damage that may allow leakage. Stent-grafts with 35° Z-stents had the most severe distortion and damage to the graft fabric. The 45° Z-stents caused less fabric damage. However, consistent stretching was still seen around the holes for sutures, which attach the stents to the graft fabric. Larger holes may become channels for fluid percolation through the wall. The ringed stent-graft had the least damage observed. Stent apexes with sharp angles appear to be responsible for major damage to the fabrics. Device manufacturers should consider stent apex angle when designing stent-grafts, and ensure their devices are resistant to twisting.

  7. Long-term results after carotid artery stenting. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting using self-expandable stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yasushi; Furui, Eisuke; Tsuboi, Ken; Takahashi, Akira; Ezura, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting has emerged as an acceptable treatment alternative in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Although early clinical results of carotid artery stenting have shown promise, long, term clinical results remain less certain. We report the frequency, management, and clinical results of in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting using a self-expandable stent. Between August 1998 and September 2004, 80 carotid artery stenting procedures in 78 patients were performed. We evaluated 76 of the 80 procedures in 75 of the 78 patients treated during this period who had a minimum 6-month clinical and imaging (ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance angiography) follow-up. Recurrent stenosis (≥50%) after carotid artery stenting occurred in 3 (3.9%) patients. The recurrent stenosis occurred within one year after the procedure in all cases. The low rate of in-stent restenosis using self-expandable stent suggested that carotid artery stenting may be an effective alternative treatment for carotid artery stenosis, but more data of long-term follow-up are required. (author)

  8. Radiological findings of male urethral duplication associated with bladder duplication: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae

    2004-01-01

    Urethral duplication or accessory urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. Even rarer, is its association with bladder duplication. We report a case of urethral duplication associated with bladder duplication in a seven-year-old boy who underwent retrograde urethrography, sonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. WhiIe retrograde urethrography can demonstrate the extent of the duplicated urethra, MR imaging and sonography can provide detailed information on the anatomy of the adjacent tissues as well as urethral duplication

  9. [Current approaches to the treatment of non-gonococcal urethritis in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'eva, Iu S; Neĭmark, A I

    2011-01-01

    The study was made of 50 men suffering from non-gonococcal urethritis caused by mixed pathogenic and opportunistic urogenital infection. Clinical characteristics of urethritis in relation to infection pathogen are shown. The results of clinical and laboratory examinations were considered in choice of antibacterial therapy. Safocid, a combined antibacterial medicine, demonstrated its clinical and microbiological efficacy in the treatment of patients with non-gonococcal urethritis of mixed etiology.

  10. Comparative Efficacy of Penicillin and Doxycycline in Gonococcal Urethritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K Sharma

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety two episodes of gonococcal urethritis treated with one of the following regimens viz: (A 3 m. u. of fortified procaine penicillin made by adding 1 m.u. of crystalline penicillin to 2 m.u. of fortified procaine penicillin intramuscularly with one gram of probenecid orally, (B 3 m.u. of above fortified procaine penicillin intramuscularly alone, and (C 400 mg single oral dose of doxycycline produced success rates of 95,76.2 and 66.7% respectively. Post gonococcal urethritis was detected in 37% patients. Thirty four (45.94% of the 74 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were relatively resistant (MIC 0. 12 units ml to penicillin. None of the 74 Neisseria gonorrhoeac strains was beta lactamase producing.

  11. The Structure of Urethral Epithelium in Merinos Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile RUS

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate by histological techniques the structure of urethral epithelium in lambs. In this study, we harvested several fragments (prostatic, membranous and cavernous from urethra from 5 merino’s lambs of 3 months old. The first anatomical segment, the prostatic urethra, is lined by a urinary epithelium. The intermediary layer of this epithelium is formed of 5-6 rows of oval cells. The second segment of urethra has the same type of epithelium but the intermediary layer is formed of 6-7 rows of oval cells. In the last anatomical segment, the penile urethra, the epithelium is the same, but the intermediary layer has 3-4 rows of oval cells. In lambs, the urethra is lined by urinary epithelium. The urethral epithelium does not have the same thickness in all segments. The thinner epithelium it is in the cavernous urethra, the ticker is the membranous urethra.

  12. Urethral pressure reflectometry in women with pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Lose, Gunnar; Klarskov, Niels

    2017-01-01

    at an abdominal pressure of 50 cmH2O (PO-Abd 50). UPR can help identify women with POP at risk of postoperative de novo SUI. The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of UPR in women with POP. METHODS: Women with anterior or posterior vaginal wall prolapse were recruited for this prospective......INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The mechanism of continence in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) before and after surgery remains unknown. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) separates women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from continent women by measuring urethral opening pressure...... studies to help reveal urodynamic features predictive of postoperative de novo SUI in women with POP....

  13. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted

  14. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C. Burg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13 mm filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results. Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy. 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L. Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique.

  15. Idiopathic urethritis in children: Classification and treatment with steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Sivasankar; Pringle, Kirsty; Ninan, George K

    2014-07-01

    Idiopathic urethritis [IU] in children is of unknown etiology and treatment options are limited. We propose a classification for IU based on cystourethroscopy findings and symptoms (Grade 1 - 4) and report our experience with use of topical and oral steroids in IU. Retrospective data collection of all male children (0-16 years) diagnosed with IU over a period of 8 years between 2005 and 2012 at our institution. Data was collected on patient demographics, laboratory and radiological investigations, cystourethroscopy findings, management and outcomes. A total of 19 male children were diagnosed with IU. The median age of the patients was 13(7-16) years. Presenting symptoms included dysuria in 12; hematuria in 9; loin pain in 6; and scrotal pain in 2 patients. Both patients with scrotal pain had previous left scrotal exploration that revealed epididymitis. Serum C-reactive protein and Full blood count was tested in 15 patients and was within normal limits in all of them. Cystourethroscopy revealed urethritis of grade-I in 2; grade-II in 11; and grade-III in 3 patients. There were 3 patients with systemic symptoms from extra-urethral extension of inflammation (grade-IV). Mean follow up was 18.9(1-74) months. All patients had steroid instillation at the time of cystourethroscopy. Three patients with IU grade IV required oral steroids (prednisolone) in view of exacerbation of symptoms and signs despite steroid instillation. Complete resolution of symptoms and signs occurred in 18(94.7%) patients. Significant improvement in symptoms and signs was noted in 1(5.3%) patient who is still undergoing treatment. IU in male children can be successfully managed with steroid instillation, especially in grade I and II. Grade III, will need steroid instillation but treatment of scarring and stricture will necessitate longer duration of treatment. In children with IU and extra-urethral symptoms (grade IV), oral steroids may be required.

  16. A young man with oligoarthritis preceded by urethritis and diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Zedan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is a form of seronegative spondyloarthritis temporally triggered by an apparent infection, usually gastroenteritis or urethritis. This arthritis typically starts within a few weeks of the inciting infection. It commonly affects young adults and is strongly associated with the MHC class I antigen HLA-B27. Here we present an interesting case of young man with HLA-B27 positive reactive arthritis in whom the presumptive diagnosis was reached early in the course of his illness.

  17. [Results of anastomotic urethroplasty for male urethral stricture disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, B; Zeondo, C; Sow, Y; Sarr, A; Sine, B; Thiam, A; Faye, S T; Sow, O; Traoré, A; Diao, B; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A K; Ba, M

    2018-04-04

    To report our experience with anastomotic uretroplasty (AU) due to male urethral stricture disease (USD) and to identify factors affecting the results. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 4 years and 6 months (July 2012 to December 2016). Any subsequent use of endoscopic urethrotomy or new urethroplasty was considered a failure. Forty-eight cases were included. The mean age of patients was 53.5±17.3 years (23-87 years). Urinary retention was the reason for consultation in 42 cases (87.5%). The most common localization of USD was the bulbar urethra (n=45). The mean length of USD was 1.23±0.62cm (0.5-3cm) with a median length of 1cm. The etiology was post-infectious in 56.3% of cases. More than half (58.3%) of patients had already undergone at least one urethral manipulation. After an average follow-up of 21.1±12.6 months (1 to 52 months), the overall success rate was 77.1%. In univariate analysis, length, cause and location of the stricture, age of patient, the presenting symptoms of the stricture, previous urethral manipulation and surgeon experience did not significantly impact on the success rate of anastomotic urethroplasty at one and two years follow-up. The AU had provided good results in our practice. The infectious origin of the stricture and previous urethral manipulation did not significantly impact the result of this surgical technique. 4. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Idiopathic urethritis in children: Classification and treatment with steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivasankar Jayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic urethritis [IU] in children is of unknown etiology and treatment options are limited. We propose a classification for IU based on cystourethroscopy findings and symptoms (Grade 1 - 4 and report our experience with use of topical and oral steroids in IU. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data collection of all male children (0-16 years diagnosed with IU over a period of 8 years between 2005 and 2012 at our institution. Data was collected on patient demographics, laboratory and radiological investigations, cystourethroscopy findings, management and outcomes. Results: A total of 19 male children were diagnosed with IU. The median age of the patients was 13(7-16 years. Presenting symptoms included dysuria in 12; hematuria in 9; loin pain in 6; and scrotal pain in 2 patients. Both patients with scrotal pain had previous left scrotal exploration that revealed epididymitis. Serum C-reactive protein and Full blood count was tested in 15 patients and was within normal limits in all of them. Cystourethroscopy revealed urethritis of grade-I in 2; grade-II in 11; and grade-III in 3 patients. There were 3 patients with systemic symptoms from extra-urethral extension of inflammation (grade-IV. Mean follow up was 18.9(1-74 months. All patients had steroid instillation at the time of cystourethroscopy. Three patients with IU grade IV required oral steroids (prednisolone in view of exacerbation of symptoms and signs despite steroid instillation. Complete resolution of symptoms and signs occurred in 18(94.7% patients. Significant improvement in symptoms and signs was noted in 1(5.3% patient who is still undergoing treatment. Conclusions: IU in male children can be successfully managed with steroid instillation, especially in grade I and II. Grade III, will need steroid instillation but treatment of scarring and stricture will necessitate longer duration of treatment. In children with IU and extra-urethral symptoms (grade IV, oral

  19. Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA bacterial load in men with symptomatic and asymptomatic gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, David; Ong, Jason J; Chow, Eric P F; Tabrizi, Sepehr; Phillips, Sam; Bissessor, Melanie; Fairley, Christopher K; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Read, Tim R H; Garland, Suzanne; Chen, Marcus

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have quantified bacterial loads of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the pharynx and rectum of men but not the urethra. We quantified the bacterial load of N. gonorrhoeae in men with symptomatic and asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea infections. Consecutive men diagnosed with urethral gonorrhoea by Aptima Combo 2 testing of urine at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between March and July 2016 were eligible for the study: symptomatic men with purulent urethral discharge and asymptomatic men with no urethral symptoms. The gonococcal bacterial load in both groups was measured by urethral swab using a standardised collection method and real-time quantitative PCR targeting the opa gene. Twenty men were recruited into the study: 16 had purulent urethral discharge and 4 had asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea. The median gonococcal bacterial load was significantly higher among symptomatic men (3.7×10 6 copies per swab, IQR 2.5×10 6 -4.7×10 6 ) compared with asymptomatic men (2.0×10 5 copies per swab, IQR 2.7×10 4 -4.5×10 5 ) (p=0.002). Gonococcal loads in men with urethral discharge were higher than loads seen with asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea and loads seen in asymptomatic pharyngeal and rectal gonorrhoea infections in previous studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Female urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention: Reporting the largest diverticulum with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Ranjan Pradhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Female urethral diverticulum is a rare entity with diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations. It is a very rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in females presenting with acute urinary retention associated with a vaginal mass. Strong clinical suspicion combined with thorough physical examination and focused radiological investigations are vital for its diagnosis. Herein we report a case of giant urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention in a young female. It was managed by excision and urethral closure, and is the largest urethral diverticulum reported till date in the literature.

  1. Suprapubic cystostomy for the management of urethral injuries during penile prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anele, Uzoma A; Le, Brian V; Burnett, Arthur L

    2014-12-01

    Urethral injury is an uncommon surgical complication of penile prosthesis (PP) surgery. Conventional dogma requires abortion of the procedure if the adjacent corporal body is involved or delayed implantation to avert device infection associated with urinary extravasation. Besides the setback of the aborted surgery, this management approach also presents the possible difficulty of encountering corporal fibrosis at the time of reoperation. We report an approach using primary urethral repair and temporary suprapubic cystostomy for the management of incidental urethral injuries in a cohort of patients allowing for successful completion of unaborted PP implantation. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients receiving PPs from 1990 to 2014 in which incidental urethral injuries were repaired and PP implantation was completed with suprapubic cystostomy (suprapubic tube [SPT] insertion). After allowing for urethral healing and urinary diversion via SPT for 4-8 weeks, the PP was activated. Successful management was determined by the absence of perioperative complications within 6 months of implantation. We identified four cases, all receiving inflatable PPs, managed with temporary suprapubic cystostomy. These patients sustained urethral injuries during corporal dissection (one patient), corporal dilation (one patient), and penile straightening (two patients). All patients were managed safely and successfully. Primary urethral repair followed by temporary suprapubic cystostomy offers a surgical approach to complete PP implantation successfully in patients who sustain urethral injury complications, particularly for complex PP surgeries. Anele UA, Le BV, and Burnett AL. Suprapubic cystostomy for the management of urethral injuries during penile prosthesis implantation.

  2. The Question of Decalage Between Object Permanence and Person Permanence

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Jackson, Elaine

    1978-01-01

    Presents a study of decalage between object permanence and person permanence. Decalage was influenced by environmental as well as stimulus factors with infants tested between 6- and 81/4-months/of-age. (BD)

  3. Treatment of extensive urethral hemangioma with KTP/532 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvetz, R W; Malek, R S; Husmann, D A

    1996-01-01

    Urethral hemangiomas are rare. They vary in size from pinpoint masses to extensive honeycomb-shape deformities leading to significant hematuria. For extensive lesions, therapeutic options have included extensive surgical resection and reconstruction or multistaged neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser photocoagulation. We report our experience with the use of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP/532) laser for treatment of the extensive form. A 7-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of urethral bleeding. He had extensive hemangiomas of the genital and perineal regions. Cystourethroscopy disclosed diffusely scattered honeycomb-shape hemangiomatous malformation of the anterior urethra. KTP/532 laser energy was delivered transurethrally to the hemangiomatous areas until they blanched. The Foley catheter was removed 24 hours postoperatively, and the patient voided clear urine without difficulty. He has remained trouble-free for more than 2 years. Judicious endoscopic single-stage therapy with KTP/532 laser may obviate open surgical intervention in most cases of extensive and symptomatic urethral hemangiomas. In view of our observation and the literature, KTP/532 laser therapy should be considered the first line of treatment.

  4. Surgical treatment of anterior urethral stricture diseases: brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Barbagli

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed an up-to-date review of the surgical techniques suggested for the treatment of anterior urethral strictures. References for this review were identified by searching PubMed and MEDLINE using the search terms "urethral stricture" or "urethroplasty" from 1995 to 2006. Descriptive statistics of the articles were provided. Meta-analyses or other multivariate designs were not employed. Out of 327 articles, 50 (15% were determined to be germane to this review. Eight abstracts were referenced as the authors of this review attended the meetings where the abstract results were presented, thus it was possible to collect additional information on such abstracts. Urethrotomy continues to be the most commonly used technique, but it does have a high failure rate and many patients progress to surgical repair. Buccal mucosa has become the most popular substitute material in urethroplasty; however, the skin appears to have a longer follow-up. Free grafts have been making a comeback, with fewer surgeons using genital flaps. Short bulbar strictures are amenable using primary anastomosis, with a high success rate. Longer strictures are repaired using ventral or dorsal graft urethroplasty, with the same success rate. New tools such as fibrin glue or engineered material will become a standard in future treatment. In reconstructive urethral surgery, the superiority of one approach over another is not yet clearly defined. The surgeon must be competent in the use of various techniques to deal with any condition of the urethra presented at the time of surgery.

  5. Adenocarcinoma uretral em uma cadela Urethral adenocarcinoma in a bitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina da Silva

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumores primários de uretra são raros em animais e há poucos relatos em cães. A ocorrência é maior em cadelas idosas, não havendo predileção por raça. Disúria, estrangúria e hematúria são sinais clínicos associados a esses tumores. É relatado um caso de adenocarcinoma primário de uretra em um cadela Poodle de 12 anos de idade que apresentava aumento de volume no membro pélvico esquerdo. Na necropsia, foram encontradas metástases na articulação femorotibial esquerda, na glândula adrenal e no rim.Urethral primary tumors are rare in animals and there are only few reports in dogs. They are more frequent in old bitches and have no breed predilection. Clinical signs associated with urethral primary tumors include dysuria, strangury and hematuria. We report a case of primary urethral adenocarcinoma in a 12-year-old female Poodle that was presented with localized volume enlargement in the left pelvic limb. At necropsy metastasis were found at the left femorotibial joint, adrenal gland and kidney.

  6. Dynamic MRI evaluation of urethral hypermobility post-radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M; DeLancey, John O L; Hussain, Hero K; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Latini, Jerilyn M; Cameron, Anne P

    2014-03-01

    One postulated cause of post-prostatectomy incontinence is urethral and bladder neck hypermobility. The objective of this study was to determine the magnitude of anatomical differences of urethral and bladder neck position at rest and with valsalva in continent and incontinent men post-prostatectomy based on dynamic MRI. All subjects underwent a dynamic MRI protocol with valsalva and non-valsalva images and a standard urodynamic evaluation. MRI measurements were taken at rest and with valsalva, including (1) bladder neck to sacrococcygeal inferior pubic point line (SCIPP), (2) urethra to pubis, and (3) bulbar urethra to SCIPP. Data were analyzed in SAS using two-tailed t tests. A total of 21 subjects (13 incontinent and 8 continent) had complete data and were included in the final analysis. The two groups had similar demographic characteristics. On MRI, there were no statistically significant differences in anatomic position of the bladder neck or urethra either at rest or with valsalva. The amount of hypermobility ranged from 0.8 to 2 mm in all measures. There were also no differences in the amount of hypermobility (position at rest minus position at valsalva) between groups. We found no statistically significant differences in bladder neck and urethral position or mobility on dynamic MRI evaluation between continent and incontinent men status post-radical prostatectomy. A more complex mechanism for post-prostatectomy incontinence needs to be modeled in order to better understand the continence mechanism in this select group of men. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Urethral diverticulum. Our casuistic and the literatura review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Backhaus, M; Trassierra Villa, M; Broseta Rico, E; Gimeno Argente, V; Arlandis Guzmán, S; Alonso Gorrea, M; Jiménez Cruz, J F

    2007-09-01

    The possible etiopathogenic factors, symptoms, diagnostic methods, surgical management and complications of the urethral diverticula are reviewed. A retrospective study of the clinical charts with urethral diverticula diagnosis during the period 1986-2006 was carried out. In the last 20 years a total of 19 patients have been treated for this pathology: 15 females and 4 males. Five of the females started with a sensation of vaginal mass; the rest were diagnosed of micturitional (irritative) syndrome, urinary incontinence or urinary infection. In the case of males, 3 of them had a palpable tumour in the penis. The most used diagnostic method was retrograde and voiding cystourethrography; urethrography with double-occlusion balloon catheter was used in 5 cases and urethroscopy in 4 patients; other techniques of image diagnosis like magnetic resonance imaging were necessary for the most complex cases. The treatment was the excision of the diverticulum, except for one of the females who rejected the treatment. The evolution in all treated women was successful, according to follow up 2 years after the treatment. In males, two of them had complex recurrent diverticula. Urethral diverticula are nosologic entities of difficult diagnosis, due to their low prevalence and their unspecific clinic, therefore diagnosis is sometimes incidental. The etiopathogenity is acquired in most cases and its surgical treatment is more challenging in males than in females probably linked to the fact that diverticula appear in urethras with previous surgery, endourologic manipulation or associated injuries.

  8. Stent Design Affects Femoropopliteal Artery Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacTaggart, Jason; Poulson, William; Seas, Andreas; Deegan, Paul; Lomneth, Carol; Desyatova, Anastasia; Maleckis, Kaspars; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2018-03-23

    Poor durability of femoropopliteal artery (FPA) stenting is multifactorial, and severe FPA deformations occurring with limb flexion are likely involved. Different stent designs result in dissimilar stent-artery interactions, but the degree of these effects in the FPA is insufficiently understood. To determine how different stent designs affect limb flexion-induced FPA deformations. Retrievable markers were deployed into n = 28 FPAs of lightly embalmed human cadavers. Bodies were perfused and CT images were acquired with limbs in the standing, walking, sitting, and gardening postures. Image analysis allowed measurement of baseline FPA foreshortening, bending, and twisting associated with each posture. Markers were retrieved and 7 different stents were deployed across the adductor hiatus in the same limbs. Markers were then redeployed in the stented FPAs, and limbs were reimaged. Baseline and stented FPA deformations were compared to determine the influence of each stent design. Proximal to the stent, Innova, Supera, and SmartFlex exacerbated foreshortening, SmartFlex exacerbated twisting, and SmartControl restricted bending of the FPA. Within the stent, all devices except Viabahn restricted foreshortening; Supera, SmartControl, and AbsolutePro restricted twisting; SmartFlex and Innova exacerbated twisting; and Supera and Viabahn restricted bending. Distal to the stents, all devices except AbsolutePro and Innova exacerbated foreshortening, and Viabahn, Supera, Zilver, and SmartControl exacerbated twisting. All stents except Supera were pinched in flexed limb postures. Peripheral self-expanding stents significantly affect limb flexion-induced FPA deformations, but in different ways. Although certain designs seem to accommodate some deformation modes, no device was able to match all FPA deformations.

  9. Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction after Coronary Stent Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafighdust, Abbasali; Eshraghi, Ali

    2015-10-27

    The invention of the drug-eluting stent (DES) has brought about revolutionary changes in the field of interventional cardiology. In the DES era, in-stent restenosis has declined but new issues such as stent thrombosis have emerged. One of the emerging paradigms in the DES era is stent fracture. There are reports about stent fracture leading to in-stent restenosis or stent thrombosis. Most of these reports concern the Sirolimus-eluting stent. The present case is a representation of a Biolimus-eluting stent fracture. We introduce a 64-year-old male patient, for whom the BioMatrix stent was deployed in the right coronary artery. Five months after the implantation, he experienced acute myocardial infarction, with stent fracture leading to stent thrombosis being the causative mechanism. Another DES (Cypher) was used to manage this situation, and the final result was good.

  10. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kyoto U.; Kumada, M.; NIRS, Chiba; Spencer, C.M.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments

  11. Causes and prevention of in-stent restenosis of vertebral artery origin after stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Huipin; Li Shenmao; Zhang Guangping

    2010-01-01

    Vertebral artery stenosis is an important cause of posterior circulation stroke. Vertebral artery stenosis most commonly occurs at its origin site. In recent years, balloon angioplasty and stent implantation have been widely employed in the treatment of vertebral artery origin stenosis. However, the long term outcome of stent implantation is affected by in-stent restenosis. Multiple contributory factors have been identified, but clear understanding of the overall underlying mechanism remains an enigma. With the development of pathophysiology, prevention and treatment methods of in-stent restenosis have been improved. In recent years, drug-eluting stents, radioactive stents and magnetic stents have been widely applied. To some extent, these stents and drug therapy can solve the problem of restenosis. This article aims to review the clinical application and the up-to-date research progresses in preventing and managing vertebral artery origin restenosis. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of a novel stent technology: the Genous EPC capturing stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, M.

    2012-01-01

    Tegenwoordig gebruiken ziekenhuizen een nieuwe stent bij dotterbehandelingen van kransslagadervernauwingen. Deze Genous-stent heeft een laag met antistoffen waardoor het behandelde bloedvat snel bedekt raakt met lichaamseigen cellen. Zo wordt tegengegaan dat er opnieuw een vernauwing optreedt of dat

  13. Superconducting permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipf, S.L.; Laquer, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of superconducting permanent magnets with fields trapped in shells or cylinders of Type II superconductors is an old one. Unfortunately, the low values of 0.5 to 1T for the first flux jump field, which is independent of the actual current density, have frustrated its implementation with classical Type II superconductors. The fact that the flux jump fields for high temperature superconductors should be an order of magnitude larger at liquid nitrogen temperatures allows us to reconsider these options. Analysis of the hysteresis patterns, based on the critical state model, shows that, if the dimensions are chosen so that the sample is penetrated at a field B/sub p/, which is equal to or just less than the first flux jump field, B/sub fj/, a temporarily applied field of 2B/sub fj/ will trap 0.5 B/sub fj/. Thus for a 90 K superconductor with a B/sub fj/ of 6T, a permanent field of 3 T should be trapped, with an energy product of 1.8 MJ/m/sup 3/ (225 MG . Oe). This is five times as large as for the best permanent magnet materials. The authors discuss means to verify the analysis and the limitations imposed by the low critical current densities in presently available high temperature superconductors

  14. Comparison of self-expandable and balloon-expanding stents for hybrid ductal stenting in hypoplastic left heart complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreczny, Sebastian; Qureshi, Shakeel A; Rosenthal, Eric; Krasemann, Thomas; Nassar, Mohamed S; Anderson, David R; Morgan, Gareth J

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare the procedural and mid-term performance of a specifically designed self-expanding stent with balloon-expandable stents in patients undergoing hybrid palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome and its variants. The lack of specifically designed stents has led to off-label use of coronary, biliary, or peripheral stents in the neonatal ductus arteriosus. Recently, a self-expanding stent, specifically designed for use in hypoplastic left heart syndrome, has become available. We carried out a retrospective cohort comparison of 69 neonates who underwent hybrid ductal stenting with balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents from December, 2005 to July, 2014. In total, 43 balloon-expandable stents were implanted in 41 neonates and more recently 47 self-expanding stents in 28 neonates. In the balloon-expandable stents group, stent-related complications occurred in nine patients (22%), compared with one patient in the self-expanding stent group (4%). During follow-up, percutaneous re-intervention related to the ductal stent was performed in five patients (17%) in the balloon-expandable stent group and seven patients (28%) in self-expanding stents group. Hybrid ductal stenting with self-expanding stents produced favourable results when compared with the results obtained with balloon-expandable stents. Immediate additional interventions and follow-up re-interventions were similar in both groups with complications more common in those with balloon-expandable stents.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of microscopy of urethral smears for asymptomatic Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis in men in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Andrew J; Roberts, Tracy E; Jackson, Louise; Saunders, John; White, Peter J; Birger, Ruthie; Estcourt, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to determine whether or not the limited use of urethral microscopy to diagnose asymptomatic and symptomatic non-chlamydial, non-gonococcal urethritis (NCNGU) in men is a cost-effective strategy to avert pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy or infertility in female partners. Outputs from a transmission dynamic model of NCNGU in a population of 16-30 year olds in England simulating the number of consultations, PID cases and patients treated over time amongst others, were used along with secondary data to undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis carried out from a health care provider perspective. The main outcome measure was cost per case of PID averted. A secondary outcome measure was cost per major outcome averted, where a major outcome is a case of symptomatic PID, ectopic pregnancy, or infertility. Offering a limited number of asymptomatic men urethral microscopy was more effective than the current practice of no microscopy in terms of reducing the number of cases of PID with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £15,700, meaning that an investment of £15,800 is required to avert one case of PID. For major outcomes averted, offering some asymptomatic men urethral microscopy was again found to be more effective than no microscopy, but here an investment of £49,900 is required to avert one major outcome. Testing asymptomatic men for NCNGU in a small number of genitourinary medicine settings in England is not cost-effective, and thus by maintaining the current practice of not offering this patient group microscopy, this continues to make savings for the health care provider.

  16. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  17. Signal processing in urodynamics: towards high definition urethral pressure profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klünder, Mario; Sawodny, Oliver; Amend, Bastian; Ederer, Michael; Kelp, Alexandra; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Feuer, Ronny

    2016-03-22

    Urethral pressure profilometry (UPP) is used in the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) which is a significant medical, social, and economic problem. Low spatial pressure resolution, common occurrence of artifacts, and uncertainties in data location limit the diagnostic value of UPP. To overcome these limitations, high definition urethral pressure profilometry (HD-UPP) combining enhanced UPP hardware and signal processing algorithms has been developed. In this work, we present the different signal processing steps in HD-UPP and show experimental results from female minipigs. We use a special microtip catheter with high angular pressure resolution and an integrated inclination sensor. Signals from the catheter are filtered and time-correlated artifacts removed. A signal reconstruction algorithm processes pressure data into a detailed pressure image on the urethra's inside. Finally, the pressure distribution on the urethra's outside is calculated through deconvolution. A mathematical model of the urethra is contained in a point-spread-function (PSF) which is identified depending on geometric and material properties of the urethra. We additionally investigate the PSF's frequency response to determine the relevant frequency band for pressure information on the urinary sphincter. Experimental pressure data are spatially located and processed into high resolution pressure images. Artifacts are successfully removed from data without blurring other details. The pressure distribution on the urethra's outside is reconstructed and compared to the one on the inside. Finally, the pressure images are mapped onto the urethral geometry calculated from inclination and position data to provide an integrated image of pressure distribution, anatomical shape, and location. With its advanced sensing capabilities, the novel microtip catheter collects an unprecedented amount of urethral pressure data. Through sequential signal processing steps, physicians are provided with

  18. Self-Expandable Metal Stents and Trans-stent Light Delivery: Are Metal Stents and Photodynamic Therapy Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luo-Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Li, Zhao-Shen; Chen, Yang K; Hetzel, Fred W.; Huang, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Obstructive non-small cell lung cancer and obstructive esophageal cancer are US FDA approved indications of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The usefulness of PDT for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma is currently under clinical investigation. Endoscopic stenting for lumen restoration is a common palliative intervention for those indications. It is important to assess whether self-expandable metal stents are compatible with trans-stent PDT light delivery. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Direct effects of various components of metal biliary (n = 2), esophageal (n = 2), and bronchial (n = 1) stents on PDT light transmittance and distribution were examined using a point or linear light source (630 or 652 nm diode laser). Resected pig biliary duct and esophageal wall tissues were used to examine the feasibility of PDT light delivery through the fully expanded metal stents. Results: While using a point light source, the metal components (thread and joint) of the stent could cause a significant shadow effect. The liner material (polytetrafluoroethylene or polyurethane) could cause various degrees of light absorption. When the stent was covered with a thin layer of biliary duct and esophageal tissues containing all wall layers, the shadow effect could be mitigated due to tissue scattering. Conclusions: This study clearly demonstrates that it is feasible to combine stenting and PDT for the treatment of luminal lesions. PDT light dose should be adjusted to counteract the reduction of light transmittance caused by the metal and liner materials of stent. PMID:18951422

  19. Prevention of stent thrombosis: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reejhsinghani, Risheen; Lotfi, Amir S

    2015-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is an uncommon but serious complication which carries with it significant mortality and morbidity. This review analyzes the entity of stent thrombosis from a historical and clinical perspective, and chronicles the evolution of this condition through the various generations of stent development, from bare metal to first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation drug-eluting stents. It also delineates the specific risk factors associated with stent thrombosis and comprehensively examines the literature related to each of these risks. Finally, it highlights the preventative strategies that can be garnered from the existing data, and concludes that a multifactorial approach is necessary to combat the occurrence of stent thrombosis, with higher risk groups, such as patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, meriting further research. PMID:25657588

  20. Genous endothelial progenitor cell-capturing stent system: a novel stent technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Margo; Beijk, Marcel A. M.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2009-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents have been demonstrated to significantly reduce clinical and angiographic restenosis in patients with coronary artery disease compared with bare-metal stents. Intuitively, however, a prohealing approach for the prevention of in-stent restenosis by promoting accelerated

  1. Mechanical behavior of peripheral stents and stent-vessel interaction: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Serena; Flamini, Vittoria; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper stents employed to treat peripheral artery disease are analyzed through a three-dimensional finite-element approach, based on a large-strain and large-displacement formulation. Aiming to evaluate the influence of some stent design parameters on stent mechanics and on the biomechanical interaction between stent and arterial wall, quasi-static and dynamic numerical analyses are carried out by referring to computational models of commercially and noncommercially available versions of both braided self-expandable stents and balloon-expandable stents. Addressing isolated device models, opening mechanisms and flexibility of both opened and closed stent configurations are numerically experienced. Moreover, stent deployment into a stenotic peripheral artery and possible postdilatation angioplasty (the latter for the self-expandable device only) are simulated by considering different idealized vessel geometries and accounting for the presence of a stenotic plaque. Proposed results highlight important differences in the mechanical response of the two types of stents, as well as a significant influence of the vessel shape on the stress distributions arising upon the artery-plaque system. Finally, computational results are used to assess both the stent mechanical performance and the effectiveness of the stenting treatment, allowing also to identify possible critical conditions affecting the risk of stent fracture, tissue damage, and/or pathological tissue response.

  2. PulmoStent : In Vitro to In Vivo Evaluation of a Tissue Engineered Endobronchial Stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiebes, Anja Lena; Kelly, Nicola; Sweeney, Caoimhe A.; McGrath, Donnacha J.; Clauser, Johanna; Kurtenbach, Kathrin; Gesche, Valentine N.; Chen, Weiluan; Kok, Robbert Jan; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Bruzzi, Mark; O’Brien, Barry J.; McHugh, Peter E.; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Cornelissen, Christian G.

    Currently, there is no optimal treatment available for end stage tumour patients with airway stenosis. The PulmoStent concept aims on overcoming current hurdles in airway stenting by combining a nitinol stent with a nutrient-permeable membrane, which prevents tumour ingrowth. Respiratory epithelial

  3. Complication after self expandable metallic stent for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Takeshi; Maruyama, Michio; Kato, Kiyomi; Shinoura, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kumi; Takashima, Itaru; Ebuchi, Masakazu

    2003-01-01

    Major complications after placement of esophageal stent and airway stent were reviewed and evaluated. Four patients, including two patients with perforations and two patients with fistula formation, developed major complications after placement of a self expandable metallic stent. Two patients underwent additional radiation to improve stricture after stent placement. In one patient, stent placement was selected to improve esophageal stricture that occurred after radical radiation therapy. In one patient, migration of stent into the lesion caused a perforation. It can be concluded that additional radiation after stent placement increases the risk of complication. Stent migration also can lead to the risk of perforation. (author)

  4. The current role of vascular stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, J

    1993-09-01

    The limitations of percutaneous balloon angioplasty have favoured the development and the use of vascular endoprostheses or stents. These thin-walled metal devices maintain after expansion, an optimal and constant diameter for the vascular lumen. Restenosis, dissection, abrupt closure, residual stenosis or re-opened total occlusion represent appropriate indications for stenting. A large experience with non-coronary application of stents is currently available in iliac, femoro-popliteal and renal arteries, aorta, large veins.

  5. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  6. Does the urethral angle change with leg position? Implications for urethral-based CT-planned transperineal prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarz, Greg; Ning, Yue; Waterman, Frank M.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dicker, Adam P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: CT based treatment planning for transperineal prostate implants allows for angulation of transperineal needles to avoid the pubic bones by changing the template angle. It requires fluoroscopic guidance and utilizes identification of the urethra by radiopaque markers inside the Foley catheter at the time of the implant. The needle trajectory is relative to the urethral angle as visualized by lateral fluoroscopic views. Patients who have a treatment planning CT in preparation for a transperineal prostate implant are typically scanned in the leg-down/straight position. However, the implant is done in the lithotomy position and changes in the template angle to adapt to the new urethral angle are often required. We have evaluated the relationship between leg position and the position of the prostatic urethra to predict the change in the planned template angle. Material and Methods: To duplicate the lithotomy position a custom designed foot holder was constructed that attached to a flatbed CT scanner. A Foley catheter was inserted with radio-opaque contrast placed in the balloon. Bladder contrast was also utilized. A catheter with 1 cm spaced dummy seeds was placed inside the Foley catheter. A radio-opaque catheter was inserted into the rectum. Fifteen patients had pre-implant scans performed in the leg-down/straight and lithotomy position. The prostate, urethra, bladder and rectum were contoured utilizing a 3D-brachytherapy software system and analyzed. Results: Fourteen of the patients (93%) had changes in urethral angle when evaluated in the lithotomy relative to the led-down/straight position. The mean angle change was - 9.8 degrees (Std. Error 1.47 degrees; p < 0.0001) when in the lithotomy position. The changes were not correlated with prostatic volume or clinical stage. All patients who had urethral angle changes would have required adjustments in the template angle. Conclusions: 1) The objective of treatment planning for prostate implants is to

  7. Management of JJ stent-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatsoris, Athanasios; Dellis, Athanasios; Daglas, George; Sanguedolce, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Ureteric JJ stents are inserted in numerous pa- tients as a routine procedure. Nevertheless, the ideal JJ stent that does not cause any lower urinary tract symptoms has not been developed yet. Even special validated ques- tionnaires have been used for the assessment of JJ stent-related symtoms. For the management of such symtoms usually alpha-blockers are admin- istered. Also, studies have examined the efficacy and safety of anticholinergics and calcium channel blo- ckers. In this article we review the literature upon the management of JJ stent-related symptoms.

  8. Configuration affects parallel stent grafting results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanious, Adam; Wooster, Mathew; Armstrong, Paul A; Zwiebel, Bruce; Grundy, Shane; Back, Martin R; Shames, Murray L

    2018-05-01

    A number of adjunctive "off-the-shelf" procedures have been described to treat complex aortic diseases. Our goal was to evaluate parallel stent graft configurations and to determine an optimal formula for these procedures. This is a retrospective review of all patients at a single medical center treated with parallel stent grafts from January 2010 to September 2015. Outcomes were evaluated on the basis of parallel graft orientation, type, and main body device. Primary end points included parallel stent graft compromise and overall endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compromise. There were 78 patients treated with a total of 144 parallel stents for a variety of pathologic processes. There was a significant correlation between main body oversizing and snorkel compromise (P = .0195) and overall procedural complication (P = .0019) but not with endoleak rates. Patients were organized into the following oversizing groups for further analysis: 0% to 10%, 10% to 20%, and >20%. Those oversized into the 0% to 10% group had the highest rate of overall EVAR complication (73%; P = .0003). There were no significant correlations between any one particular configuration and overall procedural complication. There was also no significant correlation between total number of parallel stents employed and overall complication. Composite EVAR configuration had no significant correlation with individual snorkel compromise, endoleak, or overall EVAR or procedural complication. The configuration most prone to individual snorkel compromise and overall EVAR complication was a four-stent configuration with two stents in an antegrade position and two stents in a retrograde position (60% complication rate). The configuration most prone to endoleak was one or two stents in retrograde position (33% endoleak rate), followed by three stents in an all-antegrade position (25%). There was a significant correlation between individual stent configuration and stent compromise (P = .0385), with 31

  9. Endovascular AAA exclusion: will stents with hooks and barbs prevent stent-graft migration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, M; Lindblad, B; Ivancev, K; Lindh, M; Malina, J; Brunkwall, J

    1998-11-01

    To investigate if stents with hooks and barbs will improve stent-graft fixation in the abdominal aorta. Sixteen- to 24-mm-diameter Dacron grafts were deployed inside cadaveric aortas. The grafts were anchored by stents as in endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. One hundred thirty-seven stent-graft deployments were carried out with modified self-expanding Z-stents with (A) no hooks and barbs (n = 75), (B) 4 5-mm-long hooks and barbs (n = 39), (C) 8 10-mm-long, strengthened hooks and barbs (n = 19), or (D) hooks only (n = 4). Increasing longitudinal traction was applied to determine the displacement force needed to extract the stent-grafts. The radial force of the stents was measured and correlated to the displacement force. The median (interquartile range) displacement force needed to extract grafts anchored by stent A was 2.5 N (2.0 to 3.4), stent B 7.8 N (7.4 to 10.8), and stent C 22.5 N (17.1 to 27.9), p barbs added anchoring strength. During traction, the weaker barbs were distorted or caused intimal tears. The stronger barbs engaged the entire aortic wall. The radial force of the stents had no impact on fixation, while aortic calcification and graft oversizing had marginal effects. Stent barbs and hooks increased the fixation of stent-grafts tenfold, while the radial force of stents had no impact. These data may prove important in future endograft development to prevent stent-graft migration after aneurysm exclusion.

  10. Predictive Factors of In-Stent Restenosis in Renal Artery Stenting: A Retrospective Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignali, Claudio; Bargellini, Irene; Lazzereschi, Michele; Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Caramella, Davide; Pinto, Stefania; Napoli, Vinicio; Zampa, Virna; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the role of clinical and procedural factors in predicting in-stent restenosis in patients with renovascular disease treated by renal artery stenting. Methods. From 1995 to 2002, 147 patients underwent renal artery stenting for the treatment of significant ostial atherosclerotic stenosis. Patients underwent strict clinical and color-coded duplex ultrasound follow-up. Ninety-nine patients (111 stents), with over 6 months of continuous follow-up (mean 22±12 months, range 6-60 months), were selected and classified according to the presence (group A, 30 patients, 32 lesions) or absence (group B, 69 patients, 79 lesions) of significant in-stent restenosis. A statistical analysis was performed to identify possible preprocedural and procedural predictors of restenosis considering the following data: sex, age, smoking habit, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, serum creatinine, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, renal artery stenosis grade, and stent type, length and diameter. Results. Comparing group A and B patients (χ 2 test), a statistically significant relation was demonstrated between stent diameter and length and restenosis: the risk of in-stent restenosis decreased when the stent was ≥6 mm in diameter and between 15 and 20 mm in length. This finding was confirmed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Stent diameter and length were proved to be significantly related to in-stent restenosis also when evaluating only patients treated by Palmaz stent (71 stents). Conclusion. Although it is based on a retrospective analysis, the present study confirms the importance of correct stent selection in increasing long-term patency, using stents of at least 6 mm in diameter and with a length of approximately 15-20 mm

  11. Urethritis bij de man in de huisartsenpraktijk. Soa's vooral op jongere leeftijd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, H. J. Rianne; Donker, Gé A.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; van den Broek, Ingrid V. F.

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of urethritis in men in Dutch general practice, the applied diagnostic procedures in relation to existing guidelines, and the underlying causes. Descriptive. The incidence of urethritis in the period 1998-2007 was calculated from data received from 45 GP sentinel stations.

  12. A faster urethral pressure reflectometry technique for evaluating the squeezing function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Saaby, Marie-Louise; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) has shown to be superior in evaluating the squeeze function compared to urethral pressure profilometry. The conventional UPR measurement (step method) required up to 15 squeezes to provide one measure of the squeezing opening pressure...

  13. Urethritis bij de man in de huisartsenpraktijk: soa's vooral op jongere leeftijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, H.J.; Donker, G.A.; Bergen, J.E.A.M. van; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Broek, I.V.F. van den

    2009-01-01

    Doel: Inzicht verschaffen in de incidentie van urethritis bij de man in de Nederlandse huisartsenpraktijk, de toegepaste diagnostiek in relatie tot de bestaande richtlijnen, en de onderliggende oorzaken. Opzet: Beschrijvend. Methode: De incidentie van urethritis over de periode 1998-2007 werd

  14. Technical note: Dynamic MRI in a complicated giant posterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundum, Prasad R; Gupta, Arun K; Thottom, Prasad V; Jana, Manisha

    2010-01-01

    Congenital posterior urethral diverticulum is an uncommon anomaly, sometimes complicated by infection or calculi formation. A conventional voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is the most commonly used diagnostic modality. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been frequently described in this entity. We describe a case of posterior urethral diverticulum complicated with secondary calculi, where the patient was evaluated using dynamic MRI and conventional VCUG

  15. Persistent Urethritis and Prostatitis Due to Trichomonas vaginalis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abdolrasouli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case of persistent urethritis accompanied by prostatitis due to Trichomonas vaginalis in a young male patient. The importance of the laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis in persistent or recurrent urethritis (ie, testing samples from multiple sites is highlighted, with the aim of improving the clinical recognition of this pathogen.

  16. The impact of tension-free vaginal tape on the urethral closure function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) works by increasing the abdominal to urethral pressure impact ratio (APIR). METHODS: Twenty one women with urodynamically proven stress urinary incontinence (SUI) were assessed by ICIQ-SF, pad-weighing test, incontinence diary and Urethral...

  17. Outcomes of urethral calculi patients in an endemic region and an undiagnosed primary fossa navicularis calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verit, Ayhan; Savas, Murat; Ciftci, Halil; Unal, Dogan; Yeni, Ercan; Kaya, Mete

    2006-02-01

    Urethral calculus is a rare form of urolithiasis with an incidence lower than 0.3%. We determined the outcomes of 15 patients with urethral stone, of which 8 were pediatric, including an undiagnosed primary fossa navicularis calculus. Fifteen consecutive male patients, of whom eight were children, with urethral calculi were assessed between 2000 and 2005 with a mean of 19 months' follow-up. All stones were fusiform in shape and solitary. Acute urinary retention, interrupted or weak stream, pain (penile, urethral, perineal) and gross hematuria were the main presenting symptoms in 7 (46.7%), 4 (26.7%), 3 (20%) and 1 (6.6%) patient, respectively. Six of them had accompanying urethral pathologies such as stenosis (primary or with hypospadias) and diverticulum. Two patients were associated with upper urinary tract calculi but none of them secondary to bladder calculi. A 50-year-old patient with a primary urethral stone disease had urethral meatal stenosis accompanied by lifelong lower urinary tract symptoms. Unlike the past reports, urethral stones secondary to bladder calculi were decreasing, especially in the pediatric population. However, the pediatric patients in their first decade are still under risk secondary to the upper urinary tract calculi or the primary ones.

  18. Congenital posterior urethral diverticula causing bladder outlet obstruction in a young male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Agrawal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 26-year-old male presenting with mild renal failure. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of posterior urethral valve, but micturating cystourethrogram and endoscopic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of posterior urethral diverticulae. Transurethral resection of diverticulae was performed. Patient is voiding well and his renal function has stabilized.

  19. Blood spotting on underpants: Case report of urethral prolapse in a pre-pubertal Chinese girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei Yi Wong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Urethral prolapse is a rare urological condition with non-specific clinical manifestations which is mostly seen in pre-pubertal black girls and postmenopausal woman. The exact etiology still remains unknown. We herein present a case report of urethral mucosa prolapse in a 5 year-old Chinese pre-pubertal girl.

  20. Delayed cerebral infarction due to stent folding deformation following carotid artery stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kwon Duk; Lee, Kyung Yul; Suh, Sang Hyun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We report a case of delayed cerebral infarction due to stent longitudinal folding deformation following carotid artery stenting using a self-expandable stent with an open-cell design. The stented segment of the left common carotid artery was divided into two different lumens by this folding deformation, and the separated lumens became restricted with in-stent thrombosis. Although no established method of managing this rare complication exists, a conservative approach was taken with administration of anticoagulant and dual antiplatelet therapy. No neurological symptoms were observed during several months of clinical follow-up after discharge.

  1. Post-TURP obliterative urethral stricture: Unusual treatment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shanker

    considered as the gold standard surgery for the treatment of benign hyperplasia of the prostate ... through a 22Fr cystoscopy sheath after placing a stent pusher. A central hole was created in ... Meatal stenosis may occur when instruments are ...

  2. Prevention of urethral stricture recurrence using clean intermittent self-catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, B; Walter, S; Bartholin, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on prevention of urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of 55 men who were randomly selected, 43 completed the investigation. Of these, 21 patients performed CIC weekly for 1...... year following Sachse's operation for urethral stricture and 22 patients formed the control group after the same operation. All had an objective examination for urethral stricture every 2 months after surgery. RESULTS: Significantly fewer (P urethral stricture...... within the first postoperative year in the CIC group (n = 4) compared with the control group (n = 15). No CIC complications were seen, and patients who completed the CIC programme considered the method fully acceptable. CONCLUSION: Weekly CIC is a simple method of reducing the frequency of urethral...

  3. New permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.-H.; Krabbes, G.; Fink, J.; Gruß, S.; Kirchner, A.; Fuchs, G.; Schultz, L.

    2001-05-01

    Permanent magnets play an important role and are widely spread in daily-life applications. Due to their very low costs, large availability of the row materials and their high chemical stability, hard ferrites are still dominant in the permanent magnet market although their relatively poor magnetic properties are a distinct disadvantage. Today's high-performance magnets are mostly made from Nd 2Fe 14B. The aim of research is to combine the large spontaneous magnetization of 3d metals with strong anisotropy fields known from rare-earth transition-metal compounds and, at the same time, to maintain a high value of the Curie temperature. However, the number of iron-rich rare-earth intermetallics is very limited and, consequently, not much success can be noted in this field for the last 10 years. One alternative concept is to use magnetic fields trapped in type II superconductors where much higher fields can be achieved compared to conventional rare-earth magnets. Very recently, we obtained a trapped field as high as 14.4 T in a melt-textured YBCO bulk sample of a few centimeters in diameter. This is the highest value ever achieved in a bulk superconductor. The trapped field of a superconductor is not governed by the Laplace equation and, therefore, levitation works without any additional (active) stabilization. The disadvantage of these magnets is their low working temperature (of liquid nitrogen and below).

  4. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  5. Do JJ Stents Increase the Effectiveness of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Pediatric Renal Stones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Metin; Sekmenli, Tamer; Ciftci, İlhan; Elmacı, Ahmet Midhat

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of preoperative urinary catheterization in nephrolithiasis treatment with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Patients admitted to the Department of Pediatric Surgery for renal stones between June 2012 and June 2014 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on JJ stent placements. Group 1 did not receive JJ stents, while group 2 did. The recorded demographic data for each group included age, gender, stone size, location, sessions, and complications. The Elmed Complit ESWL system was used with 11-13 kV, and 1,000-1,200 shots in patients 2-4 years of age, and 11-14 kV, and 1,000-1,500 shots for patients over 4 years. In group 1, 18 sessions of SWL were performed on 8 female and 2 male children with a mean age of 4.5 (range 2-12) years and stone diameter of 9 (range 7-15) mm. The locations of the renal stones were in the upper pole in 1 patient, 7 in the lower pole, and 2 in the pelvis renalis. Postoperatively, 1 patient had hematuria, 2 had dysuria, and one had a stone in the external urethral meatus. Eighty percent of patients were stone free; there were no fragmentations in 2 patients, and 1 patient discontinued treatment. In group 2, 15 SWL sessions were performed on 5 female and 5 male children aged 4 (range 3-5) and the stone diameter was 9 (range 7-16) mm. The locations of the renal stones were in the upper pole in 6 patients, in the lower pole in 3 patients, and in the ureteropelvic junction in one patient. JJ stents were placed in all patients preoperatively. Postoperatively, 3 patients had hematuria and one had dysuria. At the end of the study, all of the patients were stone free. Statistically, there were no differences in age, gender, stone size, location, and the number of sessions. Our results indicate that SWL without preoperative ureteral stenting is an effective and safe procedure that can be carried out in the pediatric population. Preoperative JJ stenting is unnecessary in

  6. The effect of stent coating on stent deliverability: direct randomised comparison of drug eluting and bare metal stents using the same stent platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminiak, Tomasz; Link, Rafał; Wołoszyn, Maciej; Kałmucki, Piotr; Baszko, Artur

    2012-01-01

    There is certain experimental and clinical evidence indicating that the covering of bare metal stents (BMS) with drug eluting polymers to produce drug eluting stents (DES) results in increased stent stiffness and modifies the mechanical properties of the stent platform. In addition, it has been speculated that the mechanical performance of DES, compared to BMS, may be related to the type of polymer used to cover stents. We aimed at evaluating the deliverability of DES with a lactate based biodegradable polymer and BMS in patients with stable coronary artery disease in a prospective randomised study. One hundred eleven consecutive patients (age: 36-77, mean 58.8 years) scheduled for routine angioplasty due to stable coronary disease were randomised to receive BMS (Chopin II(TM), Balton, Poland) or paclitaxel eluting stent (Chopin Luc(TM), Balton, Poland) using the same metal platform. Only patients scheduled for angioplasty using the direct implantation technique of a single stent were randomised. The exclusion criteria included patients 〉 80 years, multivessel disease and reference diameter of the target vessel 〉 3.5 mm. In the BMS group (n = 55; 35 males and 20 females), the mean diameter of implanted stents was 3.09 ± 0.40 and the mean length was 11.37 ± 2.80, whereas in the DES group (n = 56; 34 males and 22 females) the mean stent sizes were 3.02 ± 0.34 and 17.90 ± 7.38 mm, respectively (p 〉 0.05 for length). The groups did not significantly differ regarding the frequency of stent implantation to particular coronary vessels. The direct stenting technique was attempted and failed, leading to the stents' implantation after predilatation in five patients in the BMS group and six patients in the DES group. Failure of stent implantation and subsequent implantation of another stent type was observed in no BMS patients and in one DES patient (NS). Although stent covering with lactate based drug eluting polymer may increase its stiffness, it does not affect

  7. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Wolf, Mark de, E-mail: markthewolf@gmail.com [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Laanen, Jorinde van, E-mail: jorinde.van.laanen@mumc.nl; Wittens, Cees, E-mail: c.wittens@me.com [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Jalaie, Houman, E-mail: hjalaie@ukaachen.de [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Surgery (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  8. Metallic Zinc Exhibits Optimal Biocompatibility for Bioabsorbable Endovascular Stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Patrick K.; Guillory, Roger J.; Shearier, Emily R.; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Drelich, Jaroslaw; Bocks, Martin; Zhao, Feng; Goldman, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Although corrosion resistant bare metal stents are considered generally effective, their permanent presence in a diseased artery is an increasingly recognized limitation due to the potential for long-term complications. We previously reported that metallic zinc exhibited an ideal biocorrosion rate within murine aortas, thus raising the possibility of zinc as a candidate base material for endovascular stenting applications. This study was undertaken to further assess the arterial biocompatibility of metallic zinc. Metallic zinc wires were punctured and advanced into the rat abdominal aorta lumen for up to 6.5 months. This study demonstrated that metallic zinc did not provoke responses that often contribute to restenosis. Low cell densities and neointimal tissue thickness, along with tissue regeneration within the corroding implant, point to optimal biocompatibility of corroding zinc. Furthermore, the lack of progression in neointimal tissue thickness over 6.5 months or the presence of smooth muscle cells near the zinc implant suggest that the products of zinc corrosion may suppress the activities of inflammatory and smooth muscle cells. PMID:26249616

  9. The forgotten ureteric JJ stent and its prevention: a prospective audit of the value of a ureteric stent logbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A Z; Casey, R G; Grainger, R; McDermott, T; Flynn, R; Thornhill, J A

    2007-01-01

    Temporary ureteric stent insertion is an integral part of modern endo-urological practice. Delayed stent removal or forgotten stents are associated with increased patient morbidity and complications which are often difficult to manage. We prospectively audited our ureteric stent insertion and removal logbook system to determine the value and effectiveness of our stent follow-up. Over a 1-year period, 210 ureteric stents were inserted in our urological unit. Of these, 47 (22.4%) patients were unaccounted as having their stents removed within the stent logbooks. One patient was lost to follow-up and re-presented with stent encrustation 10 months later. Our results in this audit suggest that our system of ureteric stent follow-up is not effective. We have now introduced a new system that we feel is a safer and a satisfactory alternative to the stent logbooks. This includes a patient education leaflet and removal date scheduling prior to discharge from hospital.

  10. [The Predictive Factors of Stent Failure in the Treatment of Malignant Extrinsc Ureteral Obstruction Using Internal Ureteral Stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Hiroshi; Arase, Shigeki; Hori, Yasuhide; Tochigi, Hiromi

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the experiences at our single institute in the treatment of malignant extrinsic ureteral obstruction (MUO) using ureteral stents to investigate the clinical outcomes and the predictive factors of stent failure. In 52 ureters of 38 patients who had radiologically significant hydronephrosis due to MUO, internal ureteral stents (The BARD(R) INLAY(TM) ureteral stent set) were inserted. The median follow-up interval after the initial stent insertion was 124.5 days (4-1,120). Stent failure occurred in 8 ureters (15.4%) of the 7 patients. The median interval from the first stent insertion to stent failure was 88 days (1-468). A Cox regression multivariate analysis showed that the significant predictors of stent failure were bladder invasion. Based on the possibility of stent failure, the adaptation of the internal ureteral stent placement should be considered especially in a patient with MUO combined with bladder invasion.

  11. Management for the anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture: a 9-year single centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Liao, Banghua; Luo, Deyi; Liu, Bing; Wang, Kunjie; Liu, Jiaming; Jin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Therapy for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture is difficult and controversial. This study aims to introduce a standard process for managing anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture. Patients and methods: 19 patients with anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture were treated following our standard process. Average (range) age was 52 (21-72) years old. In this standard process, anterior urethral stricture should be treated first. Endoscopic surgery is applied for anterior urethra stricture as a priority as long as obliteration does not occur, and operation for posterior urethral stricture can be conducted in the same stage. Otherwise, an open reconstructive urethroplasty for anterior urethral is needed; while in this condition, the unobliterated posterior urethra can also be treated with endoscopic surgery in the same stage; however, if posterior urethra obliteration exists, then open reconstructive urethroplasty for posterior urethral stricture should be applied 2-3 months later. Results: The median (range) follow-up time was 25.8 (3-56) months. All 19 patients were normal in urethrography after 1 month of the surgery. 4 patients (21.1%) recurred urethral stricture during follow-up, and the locations of recurred stricture were bulbomembranous urethra (2 cases), bulbar urethra (1 case) and bladder neck (1 case). 3 of them restored to health through urethral dilation, yet 1 underwent a second operation. 2 patients (10.5%) complaint of dripping urination. No one had painful erection, stress urinary incontinence or other complications. Conclusions: The management for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture following our standard process is effective and safe. PMID:26064293

  12. Predictors of urethral stricture recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redón-Gálvez, L; Molina-Escudero, R; Álvarez-Ardura, M; Otaola-Arca, H; Alarcón Parra, R O; Páez-Borda, Á

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the clinical-demographic variables of the series and the predictors of urethral stricture recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy. We retrospectively analysed 67 patients who underwent Sachse endoscopic urethrotomy between June 2006 and September 2014. Those patients who had previously undergone endoscopic urethrotomy or urethroplasty were excluded. The other patients who presented urethral stricture were included. We analysed age, weight, smoking habit, and cardiovascular risk factors, as well as the number, location, length and aetiology of the strictures, previous urethrotomies, vesical catheter duration and postsurgical dilatations. A univariate and multivariate analysis was conducted using the chi-squared test or Fisher's test and logistic regression to identify the variables related to recurrence. Thirty-seven percent of the patients had a relapse. The majority of the patients were older than 60 years (56.7%), obese (74.6%), nonsmokers (88%) and had no cardiovascular factors (56.7%). The majority of the strictures were single (94%), urethrotomy (89.6%). The majority of the patients carried a vesical catheter for urethrotomy, a stricture length >1cm is the only factor that predicts an increase in the risk of recurrence. We found no clinical or demographic factors that caused an increase in the incidence of recurrence. Similarly, technical factors such as increasing the bladder catheterisation time and urethral dilatations did not change the course of the disease. Their routine use is therefore unnecessary. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. MRT of carotid stents: influence of stent properties and sequence parameters on visualization of the carotid artery lumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straube, T.; Wolf, S.; Alfke, K.; Jansen, O.; Flesser, A.; Deli, M.; Nabavi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate MR artifacts of carotid artery stents and to optimize stent properties and sequence parameters. Material and Methods: Four carotid artery stents - Wallstent (mediloy), Precise (nitinol), ACCULINK (nitinol) and a stent prototype (nitinol) - were investigated in a flow model of the cervical vessels. The model was made of silicon tubing and a flow pump that produces realistic flow curves of the carotid artery. To investigate the effects of magnetic susceptibility and radiofrequency induced shielding artifacts, turbo spin echo and gradient echo sequences as well as CE-MRAs were measured. To improve the visualization of the stent lumen in a CE-MRA, flip angle as well as geometry and covering of the stent prototype were altered. Results: Susceptibility artifacts in stents of the carotid artery only influence the lumen visualization at the proximal and distal end of the braided mediloy stent. A change of stent coverings has no significant influence on radiofrequency artifacts, whereas a reduction in linking elements between stent segments and a change in diameter of stent struts improves visualization of the stent lumen. By increasing the flip angle in a CE-MRA, visualization of the stent lumen is possible in both mediloy and nitinol stents. Conclusion: The choice of stent material and changes in stent geometry as well as the optimization of the flip angle of the CE-MRA may reduce susceptibility and radiofrequency artifacts, rendering feasible the CE-MRA of a stented carotid artery. (orig.)

  14. Compliance Study of Endovascular Stent Grafts Incorporated with Polyester and Polyurethane Graft Materials in both Stented and Unstented Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Guan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Compliance mismatch between stent graft and host artery may induce complications and blood flow disorders. However, few studies have been reported on stent graft compliance. This study aims to explore the deformation and compliance of stent graft in stented and unstented zones under three pressure ranges. Compliance of two stent grafts incorporated with polyurethane graft (nitinol-PU and polyester graft (nitinol-PET materials respectively were tested; the stents used in the two stent grafts were identical. For the circumferential deformation of the stent grafts under each pressure range, the nitinol-PET stent graft was uniform in both zones. The nitinol-PU stent graft was circumferentially uniform in the stented zone, however, it was nonuniform in the unstented zone. The compliance of the PU graft material was 15 times higher than that of the PET graft. No significant difference in compliance was observed between stented and unstented zones of the nitinol-PET stent graft regardless of the applied pressure range. However, for the nitinol-PU stent graft, compliance of the unstented PU region was approximately twice that of the stented region; thus, compliance along the length of the nitinol-PU stent graft was not constant and different from that of the nitinol-PET stent graft.

  15. Is circumferential urethral mobilisation an overdo? A prospective outcome analysis of dorsal onlay and dorso - lateral onlay BMGU for anterior urethral strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Gaurav; Singh, Bhupendra Pal; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Jhanwar, Ankur; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2018-01-01

    For dorsal onlay graft placement, unilateral urethral mobilization is less invasive than standard circumferential urethral mobilization. Apart from success in terms of patency of urethra, other issues like sexual function, overall quality of life and patient satisfaction remain important issues while comparing outcomes of urethroplasty. To prospectively compare the objective as well as subjective outcomes of two approaches. Between July 2011 and January 2015, 136 adult males having anterior urethral stricture with urethral lumen ≥ 6 Fr. were prospectively assigned between two groups by alternate randomization. Operative time, complications, success rate (no obstructive symptoms, no need of any postoperative intervention, Q max > 15mL/sec), sexual functions (using Brief Male Sexual Function Inventory) were compared. Baseline parameters were similar in both groups (68 in each group). Overall success rate was similar in both groups (89 % and 91 % respectively). Improvement in total LUTS scores was similar in groups. Changes in overall health status (VAS and EQ 5D) was equal in both groups. Erectile function score was significantly decreased in DO than DL group while ejaculatory function and sexual desire remained stable after urethroplasty in both groups. In anterior urethral stricture buccal mucosa graft provides satisfactory results as onlay technique. No technique whether dorsolateral and dorsal techniques is superior to other. Dorsolateral technique needs minimal urethral mobilization and should be preferred whenever feasible. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus saprophyticus and urethral staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, T J; Kwan, C

    1982-01-01

    The activity of eight antimicrobial agents was determined against 115 isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus. All were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalexin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and resistant to nalidixic acid and novobiocin. A bimodal pattern of susceptibility to erythromycin was observed: 80% were inhibited by 0.25 microgram/ml, whereas 13% required greater than or equal to 128 micrograms/ml. The following urethral staphylococci were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalexin, and nitrofurantoin but resistant to nalidixic acid: S. epidermidis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. warneri, S. simulans, and S. cohnii. PMID:6982679

  17. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Venkatramani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  18. Late presentation of posterior urethral valve: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Márcio Nóbrega de Jesus

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Posterior urethral valve (PUV is a widely known condition affecting males that generally presents prenatally or at birth. PUVs have also been occasionally described in literature in cases diagnosed during adolescence or adulthood. CASE REPORT: This report presents two late PUV cases, one in a teenager and the other in an adult. Both cases had had clinical signs of urinary tract infection and obstructive urinary symptoms. The diagnoses were made by means of voiding cystourethrography and urethrocystoscopy. Endoscopic valve fulguration was the treatment chosen for both. Their follow-up was uneventful.

  19. Válvula de uretra anterior Anterior urethral valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tucci Jr.

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: apresentar os aspectos clínicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos de pacientes portadores de válvula da uretra anterior. Descrição: em dois neonatos, o diagnóstico presuntivo de patologia obstrutiva do trato urinário foi sugerido pela ultra-sonografia realizada no período pré-natal, confirmando-se o diagnóstico de válvula de uretra anterior pela avaliação pós-natal. Os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico paliativo, com vesicostomia temporária e, posteriormente, definitivo, pela fulguração endoscópica das válvulas. Ambos evoluíram com função renal normal. Comentários: a válvula da uretra anterior é anomalia rara que deve ser considerada em meninos com quadro radiológico pré-natal sugestivo de obstrução infravesical, secundariamente à hipótese mais comum de válvula da uretra posterior. Ressaltamos a utilização da vesicostomia como derivação urinária temporária nestes casos, prevenindo potenciais complicações pela manipulação da uretra do recém-nascido.Objective: to discuss clinical signs, diagnostic tools and therapeutics of anterior urethral valves, an obstructive anomaly of the urinary system in males. Description: signs of urinary tract obstruction were identified on pre-natal ultrasound in two male fetuses and the diagnosis of anterior urethral valves was made through post-natal evaluation. As an initial treatment, vesicostomy was performed in both patients. Later, the valves were fulgurated using an endoscopic procedure. During the follow-up period both patients presented normal renal function. Comments: anterior urethral valves are a rare form of urethral anomaly that must be ruled out in boys with pre-natal ultrasound indicating infravesical obstruction. Vesicostomy used as an initial treatment rather than transurethral fulguration may prevent potential complications that can occur due to the small size of the neonatal urethra.

  20. Risk Factors and Clinical Evaluation of Superficial Femoral Artery Stent Fracture: Prote'ge'GPS Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Da Un; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hye Doo; Huh, Tae Wook; Yim, Nam Yeol; Oh, Hyun jun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chang, Nam Kyu

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of superficial femoral artery stent fractures, the risk factors of stent fracture, and the relationship between fractures and clinical findings. Of the 38 patients who underwent treatment with Prote'ge'GPS stenting due to arterial occlusions on the superficial femoral artery, 17 also underwent a clinical analysis. Forty-three stents were inserted in the 17 superficial femoral arteries, ranging between 15 and 50 cm in length, with a mean treated length of 26.4 cm (15-50 cm). A fracture was evaluated by taking a PA and lateral simple radiography, as well as a follow-up evaluation accompanied with a CT angiography, DSA, and a color Doppler sonography. The examination involved the assessment of the difference between bone fractures due to length, placement, and frequency. Fractures occurred in 13 of 43 stents (30.2%). A total of 10 (71.4%) occurred in the upper third, compared to 4 (28.6%) in the lower third of the superficial femoral artery. In addition, 10 stents (71.4%) had a single strut fracture, whereas 4 (28.6%) had multiple strut fractures. A stent fracture occurred more frequently when the stents and lesions were longer (p=0.021, 0.012) and the stents were inserted near the joint. However, there was no significant relationship between stent numbers and the fractures (p=0.126). When the stents were inserted along the popliteal artery, a stent fracture occurred more frequently in the lower third of the artery. The stent fractures did not significantly influence the patency rate of the stented artery (p=0.44) Prote'ge'GPS stents in the superficial femoral artery revealed a considerable number of fractures and the fracture frequency showed a significant relationship with the length of stents and lesions. The closer stent insertion was to the joints, the more frequently fractures occurred. There were no evident significant relationships between the presence of stent fractures and the patency of the stented arteries

  1. Viral and bacterial aetiologies of male urethritis: findings of a high prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, M; Löwhagen, G-B; Bergström, T; Dubicanac, L; Welinder-Olsson, C; Alvengren, G; Tunbäck, P

    2010-03-01

    Male urethritis is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, the aetiology is still unclear in many cases. In this study the prevalences of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma urealyticum (including subtyping) were investigated. Samples from 112 male STI attendants with microscopically verified urethritis and from a control group of 103 men without clinical or microscopic signs of urethritis were analysed. Prevalences in the urethritis group compared with the controls were as follows: EBV 21%, 6% (P urethritis and may play a role in its pathogenesis.

  2. Stent placement for esophageal strictures : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief

  3. Role of tissue engineered buccal mucosa for treatment of urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaddi S

    2013-10-01

    next challenge awaiting researchers in the urogenital tissue engineering field. Genitalia reconstruction is also possible with cell therapy. Engineered penile prosthesis can be reconstructed by culturing autologous chondrocytes which are seeded onto a Poly-glycolic acid scaffold and then implanting the scaffold into the corporal space of penis [6]. Microencapsulated Leydig cells in animal studies have been used to replace or supplement testosterone in testicular failure [7]. Cell therapy techniques are also used for treatment of urinary incontinence, vesicoureteric reflux by injecting cultured myoblasts or adipocytes [5]. The major limitation in engineering solid organs is the vascularisation of the regenerated tissue. Recent developments in angiogenesis research [8] may provide answer to this complex problem and accomplish the goal. Most of the research to date in urological tissue engineering is done in animals. Before these engineering techniques can be applied to humans, further studies need to be performed. Buccal Mucosal Epithelium for repair of the short segment urethral stricture: Urethral stricture is the narrowing of the lumen of the urethra which occurs as a terminal event secondary to many etiologies. Patients present with difficulty in voiding urine. There are endoscopic and open surgical reconstructive procedures to treat this disorder. Endoscopic treatment is often temporary and eventually results in recurrence of the disease. Many open surgical procedures have been described but none of the procedures offer permanent cure. The use of buccal mucosal grafts for stricture repair is in practice [9,10] with considerable success. However the donor site morbidity and complications like stricture recurrence with the present techniques [11,12] warrant the advent of novel techniques. The use of buccal mucosal cells which can be obtained by harvesting a 2mm x 2mm tissue bit compared to that of 5-6cm tissue usually harvested in conventional techniques for a graft

  4. Colonic stenting as bridge to surgery versus emergency surgery for management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction: a multicenter randomized trial (Stent-in 2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Pieter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute left-sided colonic obstruction is most often caused by malignancy and the surgical treatment is associated with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Moreover, these operated patients end up with a temporary or permanent stoma. Initial insertion of an enteral stent to decompress the obstructed colon, allowing for surgery to be performed electively, is gaining popularity. In uncontrolled studies stent placement before elective surgery has been suggested to decrease mortality, morbidity and number of colostomies. However stent perforation can lead to peritoneal tumor spill, changing a potentially curable disease in an incurable one. Therefore it is of paramount importance to compare the outcomes of colonic stenting followed by elective surgery with emergency surgery for the management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction in a randomized multicenter fashion. Methods/design Patients with acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction eligible for this study will be randomized to either emergency surgery (current standard treatment or colonic stenting as bridge to elective surgery. Outcome measurements are effectiveness and costs of both strategies. Effectiveness will be evaluated in terms of quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Quality of life will be measured with standardized questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR38, EQ-5D and EQ-VAS. Morbidity is defined as every event leading to hospital admission or prolonging hospital stay. Mortality will be analyzed as total mortality as well as procedure-related mortality. The total costs of treatment will be evaluated by counting volumes and calculating unit prices. Including 120 patients on a 1:1 basis will have 80% power to detect an effect size of 0.5 on the EORTC QLQ-C30 global health scale, using a two group t-test with a 0.05 two-sided significance level. Differences in quality of life and morbidity will be analyzed using mixed-models repeated measures

  5. Incidence of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation for treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis. From western denmark heart registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data on the optimal management of in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare metal stent (BMS) or drug-eluting stent (DES) implantations. We assessed the clinical presentation, the incidence, and prognosis of definite stent thrombosis...

  6. Direct coronary stenting in reducing radiation and radiocontrast consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caluk, Jasmin; Osmanovic, Enes; Barakovic, Fahir; Kusljugic, Zumreta; Terzic, Ibrahim; Caluk, Selma; Sofic, Amela

    2010-01-01

    Coronary stenting is the primary means of coronary revascularization. There are two basic techniques of stent implantation: stenting with balloon predilatation of stenosis and stenting without predilatation (direct stenting). Limiting the time that a fluoroscope is activated and by appropriately managing the intensity of the applied radiation, the operator limits radiation in the environment, and this saves the exposure to the patient and all personnel in the room. Nephrotoxicity is one of the most important properties of radiocontrast. The smaller amount of radiocontrast used also provides multiple positive effects, primarily regarding the periprocedural risk for the patients with the reduced renal function. The goal of the study was to compare fluoroscopy time, the amount of radiocontrast, and expenses of material used in direct stenting and in stenting with predilatation. In a prospective study, 70 patients with coronary disease were randomized to direct stenting, or stenting with predilatation. Fluoroscopy time and radiocontrast use were significantly reduced in the directly stented patients in comparison to the patients stented with balloon-predilatation. The study showed a significant reduction of expenses when using a direct stenting method in comparison to stenting with predilatation. If the operator predicts that the procedure can be performed using direct stenting, he is encouraged to do so. Direct stenting is recommended for all percutaneous coronary interventions when appropriate conditions have been met. If direct stenting has been unsuccessful, the procedure can be converted to predilatation

  7. Stent Graft in Managing Juxta-Renal Aortoiliac Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhudesai, V.; Mitra, K.; West, D. J.; Dean, M. R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Endovascular procedures are frequently used as an alternative to surgical bypass in aortic and iliac occlusion. Stents have revolutionized the scope of such endovascular procedures, but there are few reports of stents or stent grafts in occlusive juxta-renal aortic occlusion. We present a case where such occlusion was managed by use of a stent graft with successful outcome

  8. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Jeong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS, a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS.

  9. Stent graft placement for dysfunctional arteriovenous grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Gyeong Sik [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, College of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok; Ohm, Joon Young; Ahn, Moon Sang [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and outcomes of stent graft use in dysfunctional arteriovenous grafts. Eleven patients who underwent stent graft placement for a dysfunctional hemodialysis graft were included in this retrospective study. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene covered stent grafts were placed at the venous anastomosis site in case of pseudoaneurysm, venous laceration, elastic recoil or residual restenosis despite the repeated angioplasty. The patency of the arteriovenous graft was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Primary and secondary mean patency was 363 days and 741 days. Primary patency at 3, 6, and 12 months was 82%, 73%, and 32%, respectively. Secondary patency at the 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months was improved to 91%, 82%, 82%, 50%, and 25%, respectively. Fractures of the stent graft were observed in 2 patients, but had no effect on the patency. Stent graft placement in dysfunctional arteriovenous graft is useful and effective in prolonging graft patency.

  10. External stent for repair of secondary tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M R; Loeber, N; Hillyer, P; Stephenson, L W; Edmunds, L H

    1980-09-01

    Tracheomalacia was created in anesthetized piglets by submucosal resection of 3 to 5 tracheal cartilages. Measurements of airway pressure and flow showed that expiratory airway resistance is maximal at low lung volumes and is significantly increased by creation of the malacic segment. Cervical flexion increases expiratory airway resistance, whereas hyperextension of the neck reduces resistance toward normal. External stenting of the malacic segment reduces expiratory airway resistance, and the combination of external stenting and hyperextension restores airway resistance to normal except at low lung volume. Two patients with secondary tracheomalacia required tracheostomy and could not be decannulated after the indication for the tracheostomy was corrected. Both were successfully decannulated after external stenting of the malacic segment with rib grafts. Postoperative measurements of expiratory pulmonary resistance show a marked decrease from preoperative measurements. External stenting of symptomatic tracheomalacia reduces expiratory airway resistance by supporting and stretching the malacic segment and is preferable to prolonged internal stenting or tracheal resection.

  11. Atrial septal stenting - How I do it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothandam Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide atrial communication is important to maintain hemodynamics in certain forms of congenital and acquired heart defects. In comparison to balloon septostomy or blade septostomy, atrial septal stenting provides a controlled, predictable, and long-lasting atrial communication. It often needs a prior Brockenbrough needle septal puncture to obtain a stable stent position. A stent deployed across a previously dilated and stretched oval foramen or tunnel form of oval foramen carries higher risk of embolization. This review provides technical tips to achieve a safe atrial septal stenting. Even though this is a "How to do it article," an initial discussion about the indications for atrial septal stenting is vital as the resultant size of the atrial septal communication should be tailored for each indication.

  12. Classic crush and DK crush stenting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Chen, Shao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data have supported the advantages of the double kissing (DK) crush technique, which consists of stenting the side branch (SB), balloon crush, first kissing, stenting the main vessel (MV) and final kissing balloon inflation, for complex coronary bifurcation lesions compared to other stenting techniques. Careful rewiring from the proximal cell of the MV stent to make sure the wire is in the true lumen of the SB stent is key to acquiring optimal angiographic results. Balloon anchoring from the MV, alternative inflation and each kissing inflation using large enough non-compliant balloons at high pressure, and the proximal optimisation technique are mandatory to improve both angiographic and clinical outcomes. Stratification of a given bifurcation lesion is recommended before decision making.

  13. Plastic Biliary Stent Migration During Multiple Stents Placement and Successful Endoscopic Removal Using Intra-Stent Balloon Inflation Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcara, Calcedonio; Broglia, Laura; Comi, Giovanni; Balzarini, Marco

    2016-02-05

    Late migration of a plastic biliary stent after endoscopic placement is a well known complication, but there is little information regarding migration of a plastic stent during multiple stents placement. A white man was hospitalized for severe jaundice due to neoplastic hilar stenosis. Surgical eligibility appeared unclear on admission and endoscopy was carried out, but the first stent migrated proximally at the time of second stent insertion. After failed attempts with various devices, the migrated stent was removed successfully through cannulation with a dilation balloon. The migration of a plastic biliary stent during multiple stents placement is a possible complication. In this context, extraction can be very complicated. In our patient, cannulation of a stent with a dilation balloon was the only effective method.

  14. Upper Gastrointestinal Stent Insertion in Malignant and Benign Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) stents are increasingly being used to manage upper GI obstructions. Initially developed for palliative treatment of esophageal cancer, upper GI stents now play an emerging role in benign strictures of the upper GI tract. Because recurrent obstruction and stent-related complications are common, new modifications of stents have been implemented. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) have replaced older plastic stents. In addition, newly designed SEMS have been developed to prevent complications. This review provides an overview of the various types, indications, methods, complications, and clinical outcomes of upper GI stents in a number of malignant and benign disorders dividing the esophagus and gastroduodenum. PMID:26064817

  15. An ovine in vivo framework for tracheobronchial stent analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Donnacha J; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Cornelissen, Christian G; O'Shea, Mary B; O'Brien, Barry; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Bruzzi, Mark; McHugh, Peter E

    2017-10-01

    Tracheobronchial stents are most commonly used to restore patency to airways stenosed by tumour growth. Currently all tracheobronchial stents are associated with complications such as stent migration, granulation tissue formation, mucous plugging and stent strut fracture. The present work develops a computational framework to evaluate tracheobronchial stent designs in vivo. Pressurised computed tomography is used to create a biomechanical lung model which takes into account the in vivo stress state, global lung deformation and local loading from pressure variation. Stent interaction with the airway is then evaluated for a number of loading conditions including normal breathing, coughing and ventilation. Results of the analysis indicate that three of the major complications associated with tracheobronchial stents can potentially be analysed with this framework, which can be readily applied to the human case. Airway deformation caused by lung motion is shown to have a significant effect on stent mechanical performance, including implications for stent migration, granulation formation and stent fracture.

  16. Urethroscopy and urethral cytology in men with external genital condyloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, R A; Malek, R S; Goellner, J R; Hyland, K M

    1994-03-01

    To develop guidelines as to which asymptomatic male patients with genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection need further evaluation of the urethra, we studied two screening methods: urethroscopy and voided urethral cytology. In a four-year period, 135 asymptomatic men underwent complete screening for HPV infection. They were evaluated because of HPV-related genital disease in their female sex partners or visible genital lesions, or both. Of the 135 patients, 21 (16%) had no clinical, subclinical, cytologic, or urethroscopic evidence of disease, and 114 (84%) had biopsy-proven HPV infection. Of these 114 patients, only 14 (12.3%) had intraurethral condyloma. All of these 14 patients had current or historical evidence of meatal or perimeatal "sentinel" lesions. They constituted 29.8 percent of 47 such patients with sentinel lesions. In 5 patients (4%), results of voided urine cytology were positive for condyloma cells, but only 1 of these had visible intraurethral disease. Of the 14 patients with urethral disease, only 1 (7%) had positive results of urine cytology. These observations suggest that any asymptomatic male patient undergoing screening for condyloma acuminatum who has a history of or demonstrable subclinical or grossly visible perimeatal or meatal HPV infection should undergo urethroscopy and that voided urine cytology is not a reliable or cost-effective test for the detection of visible intraurethral disease.

  17. Sonourethrography of anterior urethral strictures: assessment of length and degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Jeong, Youn Sin

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed out experience of sonourethrography(SUG) in male anterior urethral strictures to correlate the stricture length and degree seen on SUG with those on urethroscopy, surgery or biopsy. During the recent 6 years,both the retrograde urethrography (RUG) and SUG were preformed in 50 occasions for 47 patients with anteriorurethral stricture, that were subsequently evaluated urethroscopically or at surgery. As a whole, the length of the stricture seen on SUG did not correlate very well with that seen on RGU (r2=0.71, p<0.005). Considering the data from the operation as the gold standard, SUG was more accurate than RUG in depicting the exact stricturelength (r2=0.97 and 0.75 respectively,p<0.005). The shorter the lesion, the more accurate the data obtained.Although SUG certainly identified periurethral tissue, it was not adequate in predicting the depth of spongiofibrosis compared with full-depth biopsies in 20 patients. In conclusion, SUG, a dynamic study, accurately defined the stricture site, number and calibre. When compared with RUG, SUG was more accurate in the measurement of stricture length and in the demonstration of periurethral tissue, making it a valuable method in the evaluation of patients with suspected anterior urethral strictures

  18. Urethral dysfunction in female mice with estrogen receptor β deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsiang Chen

    Full Text Available Estrogen has various regulatory functions in the growth, development, and differentiation of the female urogenital system. This study investigated the roles of ERβ in stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Wild-type (ERβ(+/+ and knockout (ERβ(-/- female mice were generated (aged 6-8 weeks, n = 6 and urethral function and protein expression were measured. Leak point pressures (LPP and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP were assessed in mice under urethane anesthesia. After the measurements, the urethras were removed for proteomic analysis using label-free quantitative proteomics by nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis. The interaction between these proteins was further analysed using MetaCore. Lastly, Western blot was used to confirm the candidate proteins. Compared with the ERβ(+/+ group, the LPP and MUCP values of the ERβ(-/- group were significantly decreased. Additionally, we identified 85 differentially expressed proteins in the urethra of ERβ(-/- female mice; 57 proteins were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated. The majority of the ERβ knockout-modified proteins were involved in cell-matrix adhesion, metabolism, immune response, signal transduction, nuclear receptor translational regelation, and muscle contraction and development. Western blot confirmed the up-regulation of myosin and collagen in urethra. By contrast, elastin was down-regulated in the ERβ(-/- mice. This study is the first study to estimate protein expression changes in urethras from ERβ(-/- female mice. These changes could be related to the molecular mechanism of ERβ in SUI.

  19. Stent insertion in patients with malignant biliary obstruction: problems of the Hanaro stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Seong, Chang Kyu; Shin, Tae Beom; Kim, Yong Joo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gyoo Sik [School of Medicine, Kosin National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byeung Ho [School of Medicine, Donga National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To investigate the problems of the Hanaro stent (Solco Intermed, Seoul, Korea) when used in the palliative treatment of patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Between January 2000 and May 2001, the treatment of 46 patients with malignant biliary obstruction involved percutaneous placement of the Hanaro stent. Five patients encountered problems during removal of the stent's introduction system. The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma (n=2), cholangiocarcinoma (n=2), and gastric carcinoma with biliary invasion (n=1). In one patient, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and stent insertion were performed as a one-step procedure, while the others underwent conventional percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for at least two days prior to stent insertion. A self-expandable Hanaro stent, 8-10 mm in deameter and 50-100 mm in lengh, and made from a strand of nitinol wire, was used in all cases. Among the five patients who encountered problems, breakage of the olive tip occourred in three, upward displacement of the stent in two, and improper expansion of the distal portion of the stent, unrelated with the obstruction site, in one. The broken olive tip was pushed to the duodenum in two cases and to the peripheral intrahepatic duct in one. Where the stent migrated during withdrawal of its introduction system, an additional stent was inserted. In one case, the migrated stent was positioned near the liver capsule and the drainage catheter could not be removed. Although the number of patients in this study was limited, some difficulties were encountered in withdrawing the stent's introduction system. To prevent the occurrence of this unusual complication, the stent should be appropriately expansile, and shape in the olive tip should be considered.

  20. Self-expandable metallic stents vs. plastic stents for endoscopic biliary drainage in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwang Hyun; Lee, Sang Hyub; Park, Jin Myung; Lee, Jae Min; Ahn, Dong-Won; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-06-01

    The patency of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is known to be better than plastic stents in the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction. However, data are scarce for obstructive jaundice caused by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to compare SEMSs and plastic stents for the palliation of obstructive jaundice in unresectable HCC. A total of 96 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage with SEMSs or plastic stents were included in this retrospective analysis. The rate of successful biliary drainage, adverse events, stent patency duration, and patient survival were compared between the SEMS (n = 36) and plastic stent (n = 60) groups. The rate of successful biliary drainage was similar between the SEMS and plastic stent groups (25/36 [69.4 %] vs. 39/60 [65.0 %]; P = 0.655). Adverse events occurred in 6 patients (16.7 %) in the SEMS group and 13 patients (21.7 %) in the plastic stent group (P = 0.552). The median patency duration was also similar between the two groups (60 vs. 68 days; P = 0.396). The median patient survival was longer in the plastic stent group than in the SEMS group (123 vs. 48 days; P = 0.005). SEMSs were not superior to plastic stents for the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction in HCC with regard to successful drainage, stent patency, and adverse events. Patient survival was better in the plastic stent group. Given the lower cost, plastic stents could be a favorable option for malignant biliary obstruction caused by HCC. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Ureaplasma urealyticum is significantly associated with non-gonococcal urethritis in heterosexual Sydney men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldwell, D L; Gidding, H F; Freedman, E V; McKechnie, M L; Biggs, K; Sintchenko, V; Gilbert, G L

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the prevalence of various genital organisms in 268 men with (cases) and 237 men without (controls) urethral symptoms/signs (urethral discharge, dysuria and/or urethral irritation) from two sexual health clinics in Sydney between April 2006 and November 2007. The presence of urethral symptoms/signs was defined as non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) for this study. Specific aims were to investigate the role of Ureaplasma urealyticum in NGU and the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in our population. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) assay was performed to detect 14 recognized or putative genital pathogens, including Chlamydia trachomatis, M. genitalium, U. urealyticum and U. parvum. U. urealyticum was associated with NGU in men without another urethral pathogen (odds ratio [OR] 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.8; P = 0.04); this association remained after controlling for potential confounding by age and history of unprotected vaginal sex in the last four weeks (OR 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1-3.9; P = 0.03). C. trachomatis (OR 7.5, P urethral pathogens. Further research should investigate the role of U. urealyticum subtypes among heterosexual men with NGU.

  2. Substitution urethroplasty of complex and long-segment urethral strictures: a rationale for procedure selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue-Min; Qiao, Yong; Sa, Ying-Long; Wu, Den-Long; Zhang, Xin-Ru; Zhang, Jion; Gu, Bao-Jun; Jin, San-Bao

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated the applications and outcomes of substitution urethroplasty, using a variety of techniques, in 65 patients with complex, long-segment urethral strictures. From January 1995 to December 2005, 65 patients with complex urethral strictures >8cm in length underwent substitution urethroplasty. Of the 65 patients, 43 underwent one-stage urethral reconstruction using mucosal grafts (28 colonic mucosal graft, 12 buccal mucosal graft, and 3 bladder mucosal graft), 17 patients underwent one-stage urethroplasty using pedicle flaps, and 5 patients underwent staged Johanson's urethroplasty. The mean follow-up time was 4.8 yr (range; 0.8-10 yr), with an overall success rate of 76.92% (50 of 65 cases). Complications developed in 15 patients (23.08%) and included recurrent stricture in 7 (10.77%), urethrocutaneous fistula in 3 (4.62%), coloabdominal fistula in 1 (1.54%), penile chordee in 2 (3.08%), and urethral pseudodiverticulum in 2 (3.08%). Recurrent strictures and urethral pseudodiverticulum were treated successfully with a subsequent procedure, including repeat urethroplasty in six cases and urethrotomy or dilation in three. Coloabdominal fistula was corrected only by dressing change; five patients await further reconstruction. Penile skin, colonic mucosal, and buccal mucosal grafts are excellent materials for substitution urethroplasty. Colonic mucosal graft urethroplasty is a feasible procedure for complicated urethral strictures involving the entire or multiple portions of the urethra and the technique may also be considered for urethral reconstruction in patients in whom other conventional procedures failed.

  3. Evrim Bougie: A new instrument in the management of urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soylu Ahmet

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study a new instrument and technique is described for the endoscopic treatment of complete posterior urethral strictures, which may result in serious complications and sometimes require troublesome treatments. Methods Three patients with complete posterior urethral obstruction were treated endoscopically with the guidance of a new instrument: Evrim Bougie. Evrim Bougie looks like a Guyon Bougie, has a curved end, which facilitates getting into the bladder through the cystostomy tract and with a built in channel of 1.5 mm in diameter for a sliding needle exiting at its tip. Having confirmed fluoroscopically and endoscopically that the sliding needle had passed across the strictured segment, the strictured segment was incised with internal urethrotomy, distal to the strictured segment, and urethral continuity was accomplished. At the end of the operation a Foley urethral catheter was easily placed into the bladder per urethra. Patients were instructed in self-catheterization after removal of the urethral catheter. All patients achieved normal voiding at postoperative 7th month follow-up evaluation. Conclusion Internal urethrotomy could be performed under the guidance of the sliding needle of Evrim Bougie advanced from above the posterior urethral strictures, which to our knowledge was described for the first time in the English literature. We also believe that there may be other possible indications of Evrim Bougie for different procedures in urethral surgery.

  4. Measurement of Dynamic Urethral Pressures with a High Resolution Manometry System in Continent and Incontinent Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Anna C; Tan-Kim, Jasmine; Nager, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is caused by urethral dysfunction during dynamic conditions, but current technology has limitations in measuring urethral pressures under dynamic conditions. An 8-French high resolution manometry catheter (HRM) currently in clinical use in gastroenterology may accurately measure urethral pressures under dynamic conditions because it has a 25ms response rate and circumferential pressure sensors along the length of the catheter (ManoScan® ESO, Given Imaging). We evaluated the concordance, repeatability, and tolerability of this catheter. Methods We measured resting, cough, and strain maximum urethral closure pressures (MUCPs) using HRM and measured resting MUCPs with water perfusion side-hole catheter urethral pressure profilometry (UPP) in 37 continent and 28 stress incontinent subjects. Maneuvers were repeated after moving the HRM catheter along the urethral length to evaluate whether results depend on catheter positioning. Visual analog pain scores evaluated the comfort of HRM compared to UPP. Results The correlation coefficient for resting MUCPs measured by HRM vs. UPP was high (r = 0.79, prest, cough, and strain with HRM: r= 0.92, 0.89, and 0.89. Mean MUCPs (rest, cough, strain) were higher in continent than incontinent subjects (all p continent subjects during cough and strain maneuvers compared to rest. Conclusions This preliminary study shows that HRM is concordant with standard technology, repeatable, and well tolerated in the urethra. Incontinent women have more impairment of their urethral closure pressures during cough and strain than continent women. PMID:25185595

  5. Transient coronary aneurysm formation after Nevo™ stent implantation versus persistent coronary aneurysm after Cypher Select™ stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Evald Høj; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2011-01-01

    We implanted a Cypher Select™ coronary stent and two months later a Nevo™ sirolimus-eluting coronary stent in another vessel. At a prescheduled angiographic follow-up, coronary aneurysms were seen in the two stented segments, 6 and 8 months after stent implantation, respectively. Six months later......, the aneurysm had healed in the Nevo, but was still present in the Cypher stented segment. We hypothesize that aneurysm formation was induced by sirolimus and the polymer of the implanted stents, and that subsequent healing was possible in the Nevo stent after degradation of the polymer....

  6. When should adenoviral non-gonococcal urethritis be suspected? Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Manuela; De Rosa, Rita; Modolo, Maria Luisa; Stano, Paola; Camporese, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The impact of Adenovirus as agent of non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is still poorly documented in the literature. We describe two cases showing that adenoviral infection should be reasonably hypothesized in men with dysuria and scant urethral discharge in addition to meatus inflammation and/or edema (meatitis) or conjunctivitis. Case 1: a 55-year-old man came to our observation in July 2012 referring a 5-day-history of intense dysuria and scant mucoid urethral discharge. Physical examination revealed the urethral discharge referred, but also modest meatitis and an intense conjunctival hyperemia on his right eye. Adenoviral infection was investigated and Adenovirus DNA (type 37) was detected in both the urethral and conjunctival swabs. Case 2: a 43-year-old man with intense dysuria, started 4-5 days earlier, came to our attention with his wife in August 2012. Scant urethral mucoid secretions, severe meatal inflammation of the male patient were revealed during physical examination. His wife instead complained of a 2-day history of intense burning eyes. Adenoviral infection was investigated and Adenovirus DNA (type 37) was positive both in the male urethral swab and in his wife's conjunctival swab. Adenovirus seems to cause a distinct and recognisable clinical syndrome in men presenting with urethritis. Studies on the prevalence and role of Adenovirus as a causative agent of urethritis are limited. Moreover, as rapid advanced molecular microbiology is now available, we believe that extending the search to Adenovirus in sexually active men with dysuria, scant discharge in addition to meatitis or conjunctivitis, should be a useful approach improving our understanding about adenoviral NGU, and especially avoiding or stopping unnecessary empirical antibiotic therapy.

  7. Mycoplasma genitalium: prevalence in men presenting with urethritis to a South Australian public sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzini, T M; Waddell, R G; Douglas, R J; Sadlon, T A

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium infection among male patients with dysuria and/or urethral discharge. An analysis of the clinical, demographic and microbiological factors associated with M. genitalium infection was also conducted. From May 2007 to June 2011, men presenting to the clinic with self-reported symptoms of dysuria and/or urethral discharge were identified and underwent urethral swab, which was microscopically assessed for objective non-gonococcal urethritis. A first-void urine sample was tested for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae using the Aptima Combo-2 assay. A portion of the urine sample was sent for polymerase chain reaction analysis for M. genitalium. One thousand, one hundred and eighty-two men with dysuria and/or urethral discharge were tested for M. genitalium. Of those, 96 men (8.1%) were positive for M. genitalium. Men identifying as solely MSM (men who have sex with men) constituted 16.3% (n = 193) of the sample. Their infection rate was 3.1% (n = 6). The infection rate for heterosexual and bisexual men was 9.1%. For all men, the M. genitalium co-infection rate was 14.6% (n = 14) with C. trachomatis and 3.1% (n = 3) with N. gonorrhoeae. Factors associated with M. genitalium infection were analysed by univariate analysis. We determined that five investigated predictors were significantly associated with M. genitalium infection, urethral discharge, non-gonococcal urethritis on Gram stain of urethral smears, identification as heterosexual or bisexual, and absence of co-infection with C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae. In Adelaide, M. genitalium is an important sexually transmitted infection among men with dysuria and/or urethral discharge, and is primarily an infection of heterosexual and bisexual men. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement for malignant hilar obstruction using a large cell type stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Myung; Lee, Sang Hyub; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Jang, Dong Kee; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Jae Min; Paik, Woo Hyun

    2016-12-01

    Bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) self-expandable metal stent placement is technically challenging for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar obstruction. In the SIS technique, the uniform large cell type biliary stent facilitates contralateral stent deployment through the mesh of the first metallic stent. This study aimed to assess the technical success and clinical effectiveness of this technique with a uniform large cell type biliary stent. Thirty-one patients who underwent bilateral SIS placement using a large cell type stent were reviewed retrospectively. All patients showed malignant hilar obstruction (Bismuth types II, III, IV) with different etiologies. Sixteen (51.6%) patients were male. The mean age of the patients was 67.0+/-14.0 years. Most patients were diagnosed as having hilar cholangiocarcinoma (58.1%) and gallbladder cancer (29.0%). Technical success rate was 83.9%. Success was achieved more frequently in patients without masses obstructing the biliary confluence (MOC) than those with MOC (95.2% vs 60.0%, P=0.03). Functional success rate was 77.4%. Complications occurred in 29.0% of the patients. These tended to occur more frequently in patients with MOC (50.0% vs 19.0%, P=0.11). Median time to recurrent biliary obstruction was 188 days and median survival was 175 days. The large cell type stent can be used efficiently for bilateral SIS placement in malignant hilar obstruction. However, the risk of technical failure increases in patients with MOC, and caution is needed to prevent complications for these patients.

  9. Partially Covered Metal Stents May Not Prolong Stent Patency Compared to Uncovered Stents in Unresectable Malignant Distal Biliary Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Yun; Ko, Gyu Bong; Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Yun Nah; Cho, Young Sin; Jung, Yunho; Chung, Il-Kwun; Choi, Hyun Jong; Cha, Sang-Woo; Moon, Jong Ho; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Controversy still exists regarding the benefits of covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) compared to uncovered SEMSs. We aimed to compare the patency and stent-related adverse events of partially covered SEMSs (PC-SEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs in unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction. Methods A total of 134 patients who received a PC-SEMS or uncovered SEMS for palliation of unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction were reviewed retrospectively. The main outcome measures were stent patency, stent-related adverse events, and overall survival. Results The median stent patency was 118 days (range, 3 to 802 days) with PC-SEMSs and 105 days (range, 2 to 485 days) with uncovered SEMSs (p=0.718). The overall endoscopic revision rate due to stent dysfunction was 36.6% (26/71) with PC-SEMSs and 36.5% (23/63) with uncovered SEMSs (p=0.589). Tumor ingrowth was more frequent with uncovered SEMSs (4.2% vs 19.1%, p=0.013), but migration was more frequent with PC-SEMSs (11.2% vs 1.5%, p=0.04). The incidence of stent-related adverse events was 2.8% (2/71) with PC-SEMSs and 9.5% (6/63) with uncovered SEMSs (p=0.224). The median overall survival was 166 days with PC-SEMSs and 168 days with uncovered SEMSs (p=0.189). Conclusions Compared to uncovered SEMSs, PC-SEMSs did not prolong stent patency in unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction. Stent migration was more frequent with PC-SEMSs. However, tumor ingrowth was less frequent with PC-SEMSs compared to uncovered SEMSs. PMID:28208003

  10. Isolation of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae in urethral exudates from men with acute urethritis: a descriptive study of 52 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deza, Gustavo; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Gómez, Julià; Villar-García, Judit; Supervia, August; Pujol, Ramon M

    2016-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes from male patients diagnosed of Haemophilus spp urethritis. A chart review of patients who presented to our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 with symptoms of acute urethritis in which Haemophilus spp was isolated in their urethral samples was performed. Haemophilus spp was isolated in 52 out of 413 urethral samples (12.6%) received in our laboratory from patients with symptoms of acute urethritis during the study period. Seven cases corresponded to Haemophilus influenzae and 45 cases to Haemophilus parainfluenzae. The most common clinical presentation was mucopurulent urethral discharge (71%). Eight per cent were HIV-infected patients, and 60% were men who have sex with men. Haemophilus spp was isolated as a single pathogen in 6.8% (28 of 413) of cases. Seventeen per cent of Haemophilus spp were β-lactamase producers. All patients reported having practiced unprotected insertive oral sex the month before consultation, and five of them denied having had another sexual contact apart from this exposure. In all cases in which follow-up was available, empirical treatment achieved a complete clinical resolution. Haemophilus spp was considered a pathogen in at least 6.8% of the patients from the evaluated area. It affected men regardless their sexual orientation or HIV status. Unprotected oral sex could play a role in its transmission. The limitations of the study (small sample size and lack of a representative control group) do not allow to prove the true pathogenic role of Haemophilus spp in acute urethritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Flexibility and trackability of laser cut coronary stent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadíts, Péter; Puskás, Zsolt; Dobránszky, János

    2009-01-01

    Coronary stents are the most important supports in present day cardiology. Flexibility and trackability are two basic features of stents. In this paper, four different balloon-expandable coronary stent systems were investigated mechanically in order to compare their suitability. The coronary stent systems were assessed by measurements of stent flexibility as well as by comparison of forces during simulated stenting in a self-investigated coronary vessel model. The stents were cut by laser from a single tube of 316L stainless steel or L-605 (CoCr) cobalt chromium alloy. The one-and four-point bending tests were carried out to evaluate the stent flexibility E x I (Nmm(2)), under displacement control in crimped and expanded configurations. The flexibility of stents would be rather dependent on the design than on raw material. In general a more flexible stent needs lower tracking force during the implantation. The L-605 raw material stents need lower track force to pass through in the vessel model than the 316L raw material stents. The sort and long stents passed through the curved vessel model in different ways. The long stents nestled to the vessel wall at the outer arc and bent, while the short stents did not bend in the curve, only the delivery systems bent.

  12. Complications Following the Insertion of Two Synthetic Mid-urethral Slings and Subsequent Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic; Bacsu, Chasta; Dillon, Benjamin; Zimmern, Philippe E

    2017-06-28

    To determine outcomes after removal of two synthetic mid-urethral slings (MUS) at a tertiary care center. Following IRB approval, a retrospective chart review of non-neurogenic, symptomatic women requiring re-operation after ≥2 MUS was performed. Data reviewed by a third party included: demographics, prior anti-incontinence surgery, complications, pelvic/urinary symptoms, subsequent investigations, surgical repair and outcomes (including UDI-6/IIQ-7 questionnaires) at a minimum 6 months follow-up. Cure was defined as being continent, no dyspareunia, and no additional surgical therapy. Between 2007 and 2014, 21 women met the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 57 years (range: 40-82) and mean follow-up was 30.2 months (range: 6-78). The majority of patients presented with one or more symptoms of voiding dysfunction (95%), urinary incontinence (86%), irritative voiding symptoms (62%), dyspareunia (57%), recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) (29%), vaginal extrusion (20%) and erosion involving the urinary tract (5%). Patients had a mean of 2 prior anti-incontinence procedures (range 2-3). Over two-thirds had a combination of retropubic and transobturator MUS. Mean number of pre-operative investigations was 3.5 (1-6) including voiding cystourethrogram, cystoscopy and urodynamics. Two patients had complete remission, 14 partial remission, and five failed. Mean postoperative total UDI-6 and IIQ-7 scores at last clinic visit were 10 (range: 0-16/SD 4.1) and 11 (range: 0-28/SD 10.3), respectively. The management of women with suboptimal outcomes following two synthetic MUS from transvaginal excision results in modest symptomatic improvement but low permanent complete remission and frequent need for additional therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Use of Cutting Balloon in the Treatment of Urethral Stricture: A Novel Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Erkan; Cicek, Tufan; Istanbulluoglu, Okan; Ozturk, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral cutting balloon has been used to treat various nonvascular strictures as well as vascular stenosis. In this article, we describe for the first time the use of the cutting balloon in the treatment of patients with urethral stricture. Four patients with bulbar urethral stricture were included in the study. All strictures were successfully dilated with the cutting balloon, and patients were free of symptoms at 6-month follow-up. Cutting-balloon dilatation is a safe, easy-to-perform, and effective treatment for patients with tight urethral strictures.

  14. A simple technique to facilitate treatment of urethral strictures with optical internal urethrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Papadatou, Aggeliki; Moschouris, Hippocrates; Kornezos, Ioannis; Pavlis, Anargiros; Christopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the urethral lumen may increase procedural time and substantially increase the failure rates of internal urethrotomy. In this report we describe a technique for urethral catheterization via a suprapubic, percutaneous approach through the urinary bladder in order to facilitate endoscopic internal urethrotomy.

  15. A Simple Technique to Facilitate Treatment of Urethral Strictures with Optical Internal Urethrotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the urethral lumen may increase procedural time and substantially increase the failure rates of internal urethrotomy. In this report we describe a technique for urethral catheterization via a suprapubic, percutaneous approach through the urinary bladder in order to facilitate endoscopic internal urethrotomy.

  16. Parameatal urethral cyst of glans penis in children – a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Parameatal urethral cysts are a rare benign condition usually seen in males. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce symptoms like difficulty in micturition, pain during intercourse, urinary retention and distortion of the urinary stream. We report three cases of parameatal urethral cyst in young males presenting as a spherical clear fluid filled cystic lesions over the external urethral meatus, causing distortion of the urinary stream and poor cosmesis. Histological examination of the excised cyst showed a monolocular cyst lined with pseudo-stratified epithelium with no evidence of inflammation. Complete surgical excision of the cysts was done and no recurrence was observed at follow-up.

  17. Tracheal obstruction caused by an expandable metallic stent: a case of successful removal of the stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroomi; Kubota, Akio; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Oue, Takaharu; Nose, Satoko; Ihara, Toshiyuki

    2005-07-01

    We report a case of tracheal obstruction caused by an expandable metallic stent. A 3-month-old girl with severe tracheomalacia had a placement of a Palmaz stent. At 3 years of age, she developed progressive dyspnea. The CT scan showed tracheal obstruction caused by granulation tissue over the stent. At operation, the stent was found to have penetrated the posterior tracheal wall. Under partial cardiopulmonary bypass, the stent was removed along with the membranous wall of the trachea, and the trachea was reconstructed using slide tracheoplasty. Tracheal obstruction is one of the serious complications caused by an expandable metallic stent. Direct open approach to the trachea under cardiopulmonary bypass is thought to be a safe way to manage this problem.

  18. [The Object Permanence Fallacy.] Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Ben S.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that Greenberg's challenge to the centrality of object permanence in developmental thinking reveals that developmentalists' theories about childhood speak about their own self-images. Notes that developmentalists have been guilty of not only the object permanence fallacy but also the genetic fallacy, or the mistaken belief that describing…

  19. TOKYO criteria 2014 for transpapillary biliary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Ichiro; Itoi, Takao; Ryozawa, Shomei; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to carry out meta-analyses or to compare the results of different studies of biliary stents because there is no uniform evaluation method. Therefore, a standardized reporting system is required. We propose a new standardized system for reporting on biliary stents, the 'TOKYO criteria 2014', based on a consensus among Japanese pancreatobiliary endoscopists. Instead of stent occlusion, we use recurrent biliary obstruction, which includes occlusion and migration. The time to recurrent biliary obstruction was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. We can evaluate both plastic and self-expandable metallic stents (uncovered and covered). We also propose specification of the cause of recurrent biliary obstruction, identification of complications other than recurrent biliary obstruction, indication of severity, measures of technical and clinical success, and a standard for clinical care. Most importantly, the TOKYO criteria 2014 allow comparison of biliary stent quality across studies. Because blocked stents can be drained not only using transpapillary techniques but also by an endoscopic ultrasonography-guided transmural procedure, we should devise an evaluation method that includes transmural stenting in the near future. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  20. Experimental use of new absorbable tracheal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, Luciano F; Fraga, José Carlos; Porto, Rodrigo; Santos, Luis A; Marques, Douglas R; Sanchez, Paulo R; Meyer, Fabíola S; Ulbrich, Jane M

    2017-11-16

    Silicone and metallic stents are not effective in children with tracheobronchial stenosis or tracheomalacia. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the clinical manifestations and histological reaction of rabbit trachea to the presence of a new poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with polyisoprene (PLGA/PI) polymer absorbable stent. Fourteen adult white rabbits (weight, 3.0-3.5kg) were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (n=6): PLGA/PI spiral stent; Group II (n=6): PLGA/PI fragment; and Group III (n=2): controls. After a longitudinal incision on three cervical tracheal rings, the stents and fragments were inserted into the trachea and fixed onto the lateral wall with nonabsorbable sutures. The stented group showed significantly more stridor at rest (p=0.0041), agitation (p=0.014), and use of accessory muscles (p=0.0002) and required more emergency endoscopies than the fragment group. Further, it showed significantly more remarkable histological inflammatory damage than the fragment and control groups (p=0.002). The new PLGA/PI polymeric stent implanted into the trachea of rabbits caused more clinical manifestations and histologically verified inflammatory reaction than the PLGA/PI polymeric fragment. Future studies should be aimed at reducing the stent-wall thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.